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Sample records for repair protein xrcc1

  1. Purification of mammalian DNA repair protein XRCC1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I.

    1995-11-01

    Malfunctioning DNA repair systems lead to cancer mutations, and cell death. XRCC1 (X-ray Repair Cross Complementing) is a human DNA repair gene that has been found to fully correct the x-ray repair defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutant EM9. The corresponding protein (XRCC1) encoded by this gene has been linked to a DNA repair pathway known as base excision repair, and affects the activity of DNA ligase III. Previously, an XRCC1 cDNA minigene (consisting of the uninterrupted coding sequence for XRCC1 protein followed by a decahistidine tag) was constructed and cloned into vector pET-16b for the purpose of: (1) overproduction of XRCC1 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and (2) to facilitate rapid purification of XRCC1 from these systems. A vector is basically a DNA carrier that allows recombinant protein to be cloned and overexpressed in host cells. In this study, XRCC1 protein was overexpressed in E. coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Currently, the XRCC1 minigene is being inserted into a new vector [pET-26b(+)] in hopes to increase overexpression and improve purification. Once purified XRCC1 can be crystallized for structural studies, or studied in vitro for its biological function.

  2. The interaction between polynucleotide kinase phosphatase and the DNA repair protein XRCC1 is critical for repair of DNA alkylation damage and stable association at DNA damage sites.

    PubMed

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L; McNeill, Daniel R; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-11-09

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair.

  3. The Interaction between Polynucleotide Kinase Phosphatase and the DNA Repair Protein XRCC1 Is Critical for Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage and Stable Association at DNA Damage Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; McNeill, Daniel R.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M.; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair. PMID:22992732

  4. Partial loss of the DNA repair scaffolding protein, Xrcc1, results in increased brain damage and reduced recovery from ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Canugovi, Chandrika; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Wilson, David M; Croteau, Deborah L; Mattson, Mark P; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is mainly repaired by base excision repair (BER). Previously, our laboratory showed that mice lacking the BER glycosylases 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) or nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (Neil1) recover more poorly from focal ischemic stroke than wild-type mice. Here, a mouse model was used to investigate whether loss of 1 of the 2 alleles of X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (Xrcc1), which encodes a nonenzymatic scaffold protein required for BER, alters recovery from stroke. Ischemia and reperfusion caused higher brain damage and lower functional recovery in Xrcc1(+/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Additionally, a greater percentage of Xrcc1(+/-) mice died as a result of the stroke. Brain samples from human individuals who died of stroke and individuals who died of non-neurological causes were assayed for various steps of BER. Significant losses of thymine glycol incision, abasic endonuclease incision, and single nucleotide incorporation activities were identified, as well as lower expression of XRCC1 and NEIL1 proteins in stroke brains compared with controls. Together, these results suggest that impaired BER is a risk factor in ischemic brain injury and contributes to its recovery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Down-regulation of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 protein (XRCC1) expression by Hsp90 inhibition enhances the gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-05-15

    Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and AKT signaling activation. It has been shown that inhibition of Hsp90 function can enhance antitumor activity of EGFR-TKI. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein in base excision repair, which could be regulated by ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. However, the role of ERK1/2 and AKT-mediated XRCC1 expression in gefitinib alone or combination with an Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. In this study, gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through ERK1/2 and AKT inactivation in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Knocking down XRCC1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of XRCC1 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of gefitinib. Combining treatment of gefitinib with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in enhancing the reduction of XRCC1 protein and mRNA levels in gefitinib-exposed A549 and H1975 cells. Compared to a single agent alone, gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK1 or AKT vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level as well as the cell survival suppressed by an Hsp90 inhibitor and gefitinib. These findings suggested that down-regulation of XRCC1 can enhance the sensitivity of gefitinib for NSCLC cells. - Highlights: • Gefitinib treatment decreased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression in NSCLC cells. • Knocking down XRCC1 expression enhanced the cytotoxic effect of gefitinib. • Gefitinib combined with an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in synergistically cytotoxicity.

  6. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  7. HSP90 regulates DNA repair via the interaction between XRCC1 and DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qingming; Inanc, Burcu; Schamus, Sandy; Wang, Xiao-hong; Wei, Leizhen; Brown, Ashley R.; Svilar, David; Sugrue, Kelsey F.; Goellner, Eva M.; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A.; Lan, Li; Vens, Conchita; Sobol, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular DNA repair processes are crucial to maintain genome stability and integrity. In DNA base excision repair, a tight heterodimer complex formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ) and XRCC1 is thought to facilitate repair by recruiting Polβ to DNA damage sites. Here we show that disruption of the complex does not impact DNA damage response or DNA repair. Instead, the heterodimer formation is required to prevent ubiquitylation and degradation of Polβ. In contrast, the stability of the XRCC1 monomer is protected from CHIP-mediated ubiquitylation by interaction with the binding partner HSP90. In response to cellular proliferation and DNA damage, proteasome and HSP90-mediated regulation of Polβ and XRCC1 alters the DNA repair complex architecture. We propose that protein stability, mediated by DNA repair protein complex formation, functions as a regulatory mechanism for DNA repair pathway choice in the context of cell cycle progression and genome surveillance. PMID:25423885

  8. SNF2H interacts with XRCC1 and is involved in repair of H2O2-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimizu, Shinji; Yasuhira, Shinji; Horiuchi, Saburo

    2016-07-01

    The protein XRCC1 has no inherent enzymatic activity, and is believed to function in base excision repair as a dedicated scaffold component that coordinates other DNA repair factors. Repair foci clearly represent the recruitment and accumulation of DNA repair factors at sites of damage; however, uncertainties remain regarding their organization in the context of nuclear architecture and their biological significance. Here we identified the chromatin remodeling factor SNF2H/SMARCA5 as a novel binding partner of XRCC1, with their interaction dependent on the casein kinase 2-mediated constitutive phosphorylation of XRCC1. The proficiency of repairing H2O2-induced damage was strongly impaired by SNF2H knock-down, and similar impairment was observed with knock-down of both XRCC1 and SNF2H simultaneously, suggesting their role in a common repair pathway. Most SNF2H exists in the nuclear matrix fraction, forming salt extraction-resistant foci-like structures in unchallenged nuclei. Remarkably, damage-induced formation of both PAR and XRCC1 foci depended on SNF2H, and the PAR and XRCC1 foci co-localized with the SNF2H foci. We propose a model in which a base excision repair complex containing damaged chromatin is recruited to specific locations in the nuclear matrix for repair, with this recruitment mediated by XRCC1-SNF2H interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. XRCC1 interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain suggests a role in post replication repair.

    PubMed

    Gabel, Scott A; DeRose, Eugene F; London, Robert E

    2013-12-01

    The function of X-ray cross complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1), a scaffold that binds to DNA repair enzymes involved in single-strand break and base excision repair, requires that it be recruited to sites of damaged DNA. However, structural insights into this recruitment are currently limited. Sequence analysis of the first unstructured linker domain of XRCC1 identifies a segment consistent with a possible REV1 interacting region (X1RIR) motif. The X1RIR motif is present in translesion polymerases that can be recruited to the pol /REV1 DNA repair complex via a specific interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain. NMR and fluorescence titration studies were performed on XRCC1-derived peptides containing this putative RIR motif in order to evaluate the binding affinity for the REV1 C-terminal domain. These studies demonstrate an interaction of the XRCC1-derived peptide with the human REV1 C-terminal domain characterized by dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. Ligand competition studies comparing the XRCC1 RIR peptide with previously studied RIR peptides were found to be inconsistent with the NMR based Kd values. These discrepancies were resolved using a fluorescence assay for which the RIR–REV1 system is particularly well suited. The structure of a REV1-XRCC1 peptide complex was determined by using NOE restraints to dock the unlabeled XRCC1 peptide with a labeled REV1 C-terminal domain. The structure is generally homologous with previously determined complexes with the pol κ and pol η RIR peptides, although the helical segment in XRCC1 is shorter than was observed in these cases. These studies suggest the possible involvement of XRCC1 and its associated repair factors in post replication repair.

  10. Distinct spatiotemporal patterns and PARP dependence of XRCC1 recruitment to single-strand break and base excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Campalans, Anna; Kortulewski, Thierry; Amouroux, Rachel; Menoni, Hervé; Vermeulen, Wim; Radicella, J. Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Single-strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER) of modified bases and abasic sites share several players. Among them is XRCC1, an essential scaffold protein with no enzymatic activity, required for the coordination of both pathways. XRCC1 is recruited to SSBR by PARP-1, responsible for the initial recognition of the break. The recruitment of XRCC1 to BER is still poorly understood. Here we show by using both local and global induction of oxidative DNA base damage that XRCC1 participation in BER complexes can be distinguished from that in SSBR by several criteria. We show first that XRCC1 recruitment to BER is independent of PARP. Second, unlike SSBR complexes that are assembled within minutes after global damage induction, XRCC1 is detected later in BER patches, with kinetics consistent with the repair of oxidized bases. Third, while XRCC1-containing foci associated with SSBR are formed both in eu- and heterochromatin domains, BER complexes are assembled in patches that are essentially excluded from heterochromatin and where the oxidized bases are detected. PMID:23355608

  11. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  12. XRCC1 interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain suggests a role in post replication repair

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Scott A.; DeRose, Eugene F.; London, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The function of X-ray cross complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1), a scaffold that binds to DNA repair enzymes involved in single-strand break and base excision repair, requires that it be recruited to sites of damaged DNA. However, structural insights into this recruitment are currently limited. Sequence analysis of the first unstructured linker domain of XRCC1 identifies a segment consistent with a possible REV1 interacting region (RIR) motif. The RIR motif is present in translesion polymerases that can be recruited to the pol ζ/REV1 DNA repair complex via a specific interaction with the REV1 C-terminal domain. NMR and fluorescence titration studies were performed on XRCC1-derived peptides containing this putative RIR motif in order to evaluate the binding affinity for the REV1 C-terminal domain. These studies demonstrate an interaction of the XRCC1-derived peptide with the human REV1 C-terminal domain characterized by dissociation constants in the low micromolar range. Ligand competition studies comparing the X1 RIR peptide with previously studied RIR peptides were found to be inconsistent with the NMR based Kd values. These discrepancies were resolved using a fluorescence assay for which the RIR – REV1 system is particularly well suited. The structure of a REV1-XRCC1 peptide complex was determined by using NOE restraints to dock the unlabeled XRCC1 peptide with a labeled REV1 C-terminal domain. The structure is generally homologous with previously determined complexes with the pol κ and pol η RIR peptides, although the helical segment in XRCC1 is shorter than was observed in these cases. These studies suggest the possible involvement of XRCC1 and its associated repair factors in post replication repair. PMID:24409475

  13. APE1 overexpression in XRCC1-deficient cells complements the defective repair of oxidative single strand breaks but increases genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Sossou, Marguerite; Flohr-Beckhaus, Claudia; Schulz, Ina; Daboussi, Fayza; Epe, Bernd; Radicella, J. Pablo

    2005-01-01

    XRCC1 protein is essential for mammalian viability and is required for the efficient repair of single strand breaks (SSBs) and damaged bases in DNA. XRCC1-deficient cells are genetically unstable and sensitive to DNA damaging agents. XRCC1 has no known enzymatic activity and is thought to act as a scaffold protein for both SSB and base excision repair activities. To further define the defects leading to genetic instability in XRCC1-deficient cells, we overexpressed the AP endonuclease APE1, shown previously to interact with and be stimulated by XRCC1. Here, we report that the overexpression of APE1 can compensate for the impaired capability of XRCC1-deficient cells to repair SSBs induced by oxidative DNA damage, both in vivo and in whole-cell extracts. We show that, for this kind of damage, the repair of blocked DNA ends is rate limiting and can be performed by APE1. Conversely, APE1 overproduction resulted in a 3-fold increase in the sensitivity of XRCC1-deficient cells to an alkylating agent, most probably due to the accumulation of SSBs. Finally, the overproduction of APE1 results in increases of 40% in the frequency of micronuclei and 33% in sister chromatid exchanges of XRCC1− cells. These data suggest that the spontaneous generation of AP sites could be at the origin of the SSBs responsible for the spontaneous genetic instability characteristic of XRCC1-deficient cells. PMID:15647512

  14. Decreased DNA repair gene XRCC1 expression is associated with radiotherapy-induced acute side effects in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Batar, Bahadir; Guven, Gulgun; Eroz, Seda; Bese, Nuran Senel; Guven, Mehmet

    2016-05-10

    DNA repair plays a critical role in response to ionizing radiation (IR) and developing of radiotherapy induced normal tissue reactions. In our study, we investigated the association of radiotherapy related acute side effects, with X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) DNA repair gene expression levels, their changes in protein expression and DNA damage levels in breast cancer patients. The study included 40 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer; an experimental case group (n=20) with acute side effects and the control group (n=20) without side effects. For gene and protein expression analysis, lymphocytes were cultured for 72 h and followed by in vitro 2 Gray (Gy) gamma-irradiation. For detection of DNA damage levels, lymphocytes were irradiated with in vitro 2 Gy gamma-rays and followed by incubation for 72 h. XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in controls than in experimental cases (P=0.020). In terms of DNA damage levels, an increased frequency of micronucleus (MN) was observed in experimental cases versus controls, but this association was not significant (P=0.206). We also observed a significant negative correlation between MN frequency and XRCC1 protein levels in experimental (r=-0.469, P=0.037) vs control (r=-0.734, P<0.001). Our results suggested that decreased XRCC1 expression levels might be associated with the increased risk of therapeutic IR-related acute side effects in patients with breast cancer.

  15. Polymorphisms of base-excision repair genes hOGG1 326cys and XRCC1 280His increase hepatocellular carcinoma risk.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tao; Wei, Jingyu; Luo, Jie; Liu, Menggang; Deng, Shaoli; Chen, Ping

    2012-09-01

    DNA base-excision repair genes hOGG1 and XRCC1 play an important role in preserving genetic stability in mammalian cells against any damage caused by different factors. However, it is unclear whether altered expression and function of these DNA repair genes could lead to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) susceptibility. This study determined the association between polymorphisms of the genes encoding two key proteins of DNA base excision repair (hOGG1 ser326Cys and XRCC1 Arg 280His) and HCC risk. A total of 350 HCC patients (mean age of 51.1 years) and 400 healthy controls (mean age of 51.4 years) were recruited for analysis of XRCC1 and hOGG1 gene polymorphisms using PCR plus restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The data showed that the hOGG1 Cys326Cys and Ser326Cys genotypes were associated with increase in HCC risk. In contrast, there was no association between HCC susceptibility and the distribution of XRCC1 His 280 His and Arg280His. However, combination of these two gene polymorphisms (XRCC1-280 Arg and hOGG1-326Cys) is associated with significant induction of HCC risk. In addition, the data also showed that XRCC1 280His polymorphism was associated with HBV infection and HCC family history to increase HCC risk. The hOGG1 326cys genotype was associated with alcohol consumption, tobacco smoke, and HBV infection to increase HCC risk. The data from the current study demonstrated the association of these two DNA repair gene polymorphisms with HCC risk. Future studies will confirm these data before they can be used as a biomarker for assessing HCC risk.

  16. XRCC1 deficiency increased the DNA damage induced by γ-ray in HepG2 cell: Involvement of DSB repair and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yujie; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Yuxin; Zhang, Rong

    2013-09-01

    γ-ray irradiation can induce DNA damages which include base damages, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks in various type cells. The DNA repair protein XRCC1, as a part of the BER pathway, forms complexes with DNA polymerase beta, DNA ligase III and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in the repair of DNA single strand breaks and also affects the repair of double strand breaks. However, it is still not known well whether XRCC1 contributes to affect the irradiation sensitivity and DNA damage in HepG2 cell and the potential mechanism. Hence, the purpose of this study was to explore whether abrogation of XRCC1 gene expression by shRNA could reduce DNA repair and thus sensitize HepG2 cells to γ-ray. Cell viability was measured by Trypan blue staining and cloning efficiency assay. The DNA damage was detected by Comet assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by flow cytometry. The DNA-PKcs and gadd153 mRNA expression were determined by Real-time PCR. Our results showed that abrogation of XRCC 1 could sensitize HepG2 cells to γ-ray. This enhanced sensitivity could be attributed to the increased DNA damage and increased cell cycle arrest, which might be related with the increasing of DNA-PKcs and gadd153 mRNA expression. Therefore, our results suggested that the γ-ray irradiation sensitivity could be increased by targeting inhibition of XRCC1 in HepG2 cell.

  17. Curcumin downregulates p38 MAPK-dependent X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 (XRCC1) expression to enhance cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chen, Wen-Ching; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chang, Po-Yuan; Liao, Kai-Sheng; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a well-studied and widely used chemotherapeutic agent and is effective in the treatment of the advanced human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Curcumin is a yellow pigment derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and has been proved to have antioxidant and antitumor properties. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein involved in base excision repair and plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. In this study, we characterize the role of curcumin in the cytotoxicity, p38 MAPK activation, and XRCC1 expression affected by cisplatin in NSCLC cells. We show that curcumin enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Treatment with cisplatin alone increased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through p38 MAPK activation. Moreover, SB2023580 (p38 inhibitor) decreased the XRCC1 mRNA and protein stability upon cisplatin treatment. Knockdown of XRCC1 in NSCLC cells by transfection of XRCC1 siRNA or inactivation of p38 MAPK resulted in enhancing the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition induced by cisplatin. Curcumin inhibited the expression of XRCC1 in cisplatin-exposed NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK6 or HA-p38 MAPK vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level and also the cell survival suppressed by cisplatin and curcumin combination in A549 and H1703 cells. These findings suggested that the downregulation of XRCC1 expression by curcumin can enhance the chemosensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells.

  18. DNA Ligase III is critical for mtDNA integrity but not Xrcc1-mediated nuclear DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yankun; Katyal, Sachin; Lee, Youngsoo; Zhao, Jingfeng; Rehg, Jerold E.; Russell, Helen R.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication and repair in mammalian cells involves three distinct DNA ligases; ligase I (Lig1), ligase III (Lig3) and ligase IV (Lig4)1. Lig3 is considered a key ligase during base excision repair because its stability depends upon its nuclear binding partner Xrcc1, a critical factor for this DNA repair pathway2,3. Lig3 is also present in the mitochondria where its role in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance is independent of Xrcc14. However, the biological role of Lig3 is unclear as inactivation of murine Lig3 results in early embryonic lethality5. Here we report that Lig3 is essential for mtDNA integrity but dispensable for nuclear DNA repair. Inactivation of Lig3 in the mouse nervous system resulted in mtDNA loss leading to profound mitochondrial dysfunction, disruption of cellular homeostasis and incapacitating ataxia. Similarly, inactivation of Lig3 in cardiac muscle resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and defective heart pump function leading to heart failure. However, Lig3 inactivation did not result in nuclear DNA repair deficiency, indicating essential DNA repair functions of Xrcc1 can occur in the absence of Lig3. Instead, we found that Lig1 was critical for DNA repair, but in a cooperative manner with Lig3. Additionally, Lig3 deficiency did not recapitulate the hallmark features of neural Xrcc1 inactivation such as DNA damage-induced cerebellar interneuron loss6, further underscoring functional separation of these DNA repair factors. Therefore, our data reveal that the critical biological role of Lig3 is to maintain mtDNA integrity and not Xrcc1-dependent DNA repair. PMID:21390131

  19. Association of XRCC1 and OGG1 DNA repair gene polymorphisms with rheumatoid arthritis in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Randa H; El-Shal, Amal S; El-Shahawy, Eman E; Abdel Galil, Sahar M

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease and can lead to deformities and severe disabilities, due to irreversible damage of tendons, joints, and bones. Previous studies indicated that the DNA repair system was involved in the pathology of RA. In this study, we investigated the association of two XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1) (rs25487 and rs25489) gene polymorphisms and two OGG1 (8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1) gene polymorphisms (rs159153 and rs3219008) with the susceptibility to RA in 320 Egyptians individuals (160 RA patients and 160 controls). Genotyping was performed using restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction. We found an association between variant XRCC1 (rs25487 and rs25489) genotype polymorphisms, OGG1 (rs3219008) genotype polymorphism, and RA disease susceptibility. Moreover, the presence of the Gln/Gln, Arg/His, and His/His genotypes of XRCC1 was significantly more likely to have bone erosion and extra-articular features in RA patients. Further, patient's carrying the OGG1 A/G and G/G genotypes more likely to have bone erosion. However, the AA genotype and A allele were significantly more likely to have extra-articular features. Also, there were no significant associations between C/T OGG1 gene polymorphism and RA susceptibility, bone erosion, and extra-articular features occurrence in RA patients. We concluded that the XRCC1-Arg/Gln, XRCC1-Arg/His, and OGG1 A/G polymorphism have a role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis disease. Also, these variant are associated with the severity of RA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. XRCC1 Arg399Gln was associated with repair capacity for DNA damage induced by occupational chromium exposure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational chromium exposure may induce DNA damage and lead to lung cancer and other work-related diseases. DNA repair gene polymorphisms, which may alter the efficiency of DNA repair, thus may contribute to genetic susceptibility of DNA damage. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the genetic variations of 9 major DNA repair genes could modulate the hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI))-induced DNA damage. Findings The median (P25-P75) of Olive tail moment was 0.93 (0.58–1.79) for individuals carrying GG genotype of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (G/A), 0.73 (0.46–1.35) for GA heterozygote and 0.50 (0.43–0.93) for AA genotype. Significant difference was found among the subjects with three different genotypes (P = 0.048) after adjusting the confounding factors. The median of Olive tail moment of the subjects carrying A allele (the genotypes of AA and GA) was 0.66 (0.44–1.31), which was significantly lower than that of subjects with GG genotype (P = 0.043). The A allele conferred a significantly reduced risk of DNA damage with the OR of 0.39 (95% CI: 0.15–0.99, P = 0.048). No significant association was found between the XRCC1Arg194Trp, ERCC1 C8092A, ERCC5 His1104Asp, ERCC6 Gly399Asp, GSTP1 Ile105Val, OGG1 Ser326Cys, XPC Lys939Gln, XPD Lys751Gln and DNA damage. Conclusion The polymorphism of Arg399Gln in XRCC1 was associated with the Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. XRCC1 Arg399Gln may serve as a genetic biomarker of susceptibility for Cr (VI)- induced DNA damage. PMID:22642904

  1. Association between polymorphisms in DNA repair gene XRCC1 and non-melanoma skin cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Xu, Jia; Duan, Baoxue

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy with annually rising incidence. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between three coding polymorphisms (Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp, and Arg280His) of the DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and NMSC susceptibility. Online databases were searched to retrieve case-control studies published between January 2000 and November 2016. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were employed to assess the strength of association. Overall, 10 relevant studies were finally included for analysis, including 3,143 NMSC patients and 3,540 controls. For each polymorphism of XRCC1 gene, there were 3,050 cases and 3,463 controls for Arg399Gln, 914 cases and 1,182 controls for Arg194Trp, and 279 cases and 413 controls for Arg280His. Our results showed that these three polymorphisms in the XRCC1 coding region were not associated with increased risk of NMSC in the total studied population. However, subgroup analysis by ethnicities demonstrated that Gln/Arg genotype of Arg399Gln polymorphism was associated with increased risk of NMSC under the heterogeneous model in Asian populations (Gln/Arg vs Arg/Arg: OR =1.39, 95% CI =1.04-1.87, P=0.03); subgroup analysis by tumor types showed that Trp/Trp genotype of Arg194Trp was positively associated with decreased cancer risk in squamous-cell skin cancer (SCC) type under the homogeneous model (Trp/Trp vs Arg/Arg: OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.16-0.92, P=0.03). Our results suggested that Arg399Gln variant of XRCC1 gene might be a risk factor for NMSC in Asian populations, and Arg194Trp variant of XRCC1 gene might be a protective factor for patients with SCC. In addition, future case-control studies are still needed to further evaluate the effect of XRCC1 polymorphisms in NMSC risk.

  2. Rescue of Xrcc1 knockout mouse embryo lethality by transgene-complementation.

    PubMed

    Tebbs, Robert S; Thompson, Larry H; Cleaver, James E

    2003-12-09

    Xrcc1 knockout embryos show increased DNA breakage and apoptosis in tissues of the embryo proper prior to death at embryonic day E6.5. An additional deficiency in Trp53 allows Xrcc1(-/-) embryos to enlarge slightly and initiate gastrulation although ultimately death is delayed by less than 24h. Death presumably results from DNA damage that reaches toxic levels in the post-implantation mouse embryo. To investigate the level of XRCC1 protein needed for successful mouse development, we derived Xrcc1 transgene-complemented Xrcc1(-/-) mice that express Xrcc1 within the normal range or at a greatly reduced level (<10% normal). The greatly reduced XRCC1 protein level destabilized the XRCC1 partner protein DNA ligase III (LIG3) but still allowed for successful mouse development and healthy, fertile adults. Fibroblasts from these animals exhibited almost normal alkylation sensitivity measured by differential cytotoxicity. Thus, a large reduction of both XRCC1 and DNA ligase III has no observable effect on mouse embryogenesis and post-natal development, and no significant effect on cellular sensitivity to DNA alkylation. The presence of XRCC1, even at reduced levels of expression, is therefore capable of supporting mouse development and DNA repair.

  3. DNA Repair Gene (XRCC1) Polymorphism (Arg399Gln) Associated with Schizophrenia in South Indian Population: A Genotypic and Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sujitha, S. P.; Kumar, D. Thirumal; Doss, C. George Priya; Aavula, K.; Ramesh, R.; Lakshmanan, S.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anilkumar, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper depicts the first report from an Indian population on the association between the variant Arg399Gln of XRCC1 locus in the DNA repair system and schizophrenia, the debilitating disease that affects 1% of the world population. Genotypic analysis of a total of 523 subjects (260 patients and 263 controls) revealed an overwhelming presence of Gln399Gln in the case subjects against the controls (P < 0.0068), indicating significant level of association of this nsSNP with schizophrenia; the Gln399 allele frequency was also perceptibly more in cases than in controls (p < 0.003; OR = 1.448). The results of the genotypic studies were further validated using pathogenicity and stability prediction analysis employing computational tools [I-Mutant Suite, iStable, PolyPhen2, SNAP, and PROVEAN], with a view toassess the magnitude of deleteriousness of the mutation. The pathogenicity analysis reveals that the nsSNP could be deleterious inasmuch as it could affect the functionality of the gene, and interfere with protein function. Molecular dynamics simulation of 60ns was performed using GROMACS to analyse structural change due to a mutation (Arg399Gln) that was never examined before. RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, radius of gyration and SASA analysis showedthe existence of asignificant difference between the native and the mutant protein. The present study gives astrong indication that the XRCC1 locus deserves serious attention, as it could be a potential candidatecontributing to the etio-pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26824244

  4. DNA Repair Genes XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, and OGG1 Polymorphisms among the Central Region Population of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Mohammad; Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan; Ajaj, Sana Abdulla; Khan, Wajahatullah; Shaik, Jilani P; Al Tassan, Nada; Parine, Narasimha Reddy

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair is one of the central defense mechanisms against mutagenic exposures. Inherited SNPs of DNA repair genes may contribute to variations in DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to cancer. Due to the presence of these variants, inter-individual and ethnic differences in DNA repair capacity have been established in various populations. Saudi Arabia harbors enormous genetic and cultural diversity. In the present study we aimed to determine the genotype and allele frequencies of XRCC1 Arg399Gln (rs25487), XRCC3 Thr241Met (rs861539), XPD Lys751Gln (rs13181), and OGG1 Ser326Cys (rs1052133) gene polymorphisms in 386 healthy individuals residing in the central region of Saudi Arabia and compare them with HapMap and other populations. The genotype and allele frequencies of the four DNA repair gene loci in central Saudi population showed a distinctive pattern. Furthermore, comparison of polymorphisms in these genes with other populations also showed a unique pattern for the central Saudi population. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that deals with these DNA repair gene polymorphisms among the central Saudi population.

  5. Repair of radiation-induced heat-labile sites is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 or PARP

    SciTech Connect

    Stenerlöw, Bo; Karlsson, Karin H.; Radulescu, Irina; Rydberg, Bjorn; Stenerlow, Bo

    2008-04-29

    Ionizing radiation induces a variety of different DNA lesions: in addition to the most critical DNA damage, the DSB, numerous base alterations, SSBs and other modifications of the DNA double-helix are formed. When several non-DSB lesions are clustered within a short distance along DNA, or close to a DSB, they may interfere with the repair of DSBs and affect the measurement of DSB induction and repair. We have previously shown that a substantial fraction of DSBs measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) are in fact due to heat-labile sites (HLS) within clustered lesions, thus reflecting an artifact of preparation of genomic DNA at elevated temperature. To further characterize the influence of HLS on DSB induction and repair, four human cell lines (GM5758, GM7166, M059K, U-1810) with apparently normal DSB rejoining were tested for bi-phasic rejoining after gamma irradiation. When heat-released DSBs were excluded from the measurements the fraction of fast rejoining decreased to less than 50% of the total. However, neither the half-times of the fast (t{sub 1/2} = 7-8 min) or slow (t{sub 1/2} = 2.5 h) DSB rejoining were changed significantly. At t=0 the heat-released DSBs accounted for almost 40% of the DSBs, corresponding to 10 extra DSB/cell/Gy in the initial DSB yield. These heat-released DSBs were repaired within 60-90 min in all tested cells, including M059K cells treated with wortmannin or DNA-PKcs defect M059J cells. Furthermore, cells lacking XRCC1 or Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) rejoined both total DSBs and heat-released DSBs similar to normal cells. In summary, the presence of heat-labile sites have a substantial impact on DSB induction yields and DSB rejoining rates measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and HLS repair is independent of DNA-PKcs, XRCC1 and PARP.

  6. Inhibition of Gli1 results in altered c-Jun activation, inhibition of cisplatin-induced upregulation of ERCC1, XPD and XRCC1, and inhibition of platinum-DNA adduct repair.

    PubMed

    Kudo, K; Gavin, E; Das, S; Amable, L; Shevde, L A; Reed, E

    2012-11-01

    The transcription of ERCC1 and other nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes is strongly influenced by c-jun. C-jun is transcriptionally regulated by Gli proteins of the Hedgehog pathway. We therefore studied the possible relationships between Gli1, c-jun, and the upregulation of ERCC1, XPD and XRCC1 in cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells. We studied the paired human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and A2780-CP70. We used a shRNA construct that specifically degrades Gli1 message. Genes we assessed for mRNA and/or protein levels included: c-jun, ERCC1, XPD, XRCC1, Gli1, Gli2, SHH, IHH, GAPDH and α-tubulin. Platinum-DNA adduct repair was assessed by atomic absorbance spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. Use of the anti-Gli1 shRNA in cisplatin-resistant cells resulted in a block of the cell's ability to upregulate genes in response to cisplatin treatment, including: c-jun, ERCC1, XPD and XRCC1. This block in upregulation of c-jun was concurrent with a change in the phosphorylation pattern of the c-jun protein, shifting that pattern from a Ser63/73 dominant pattern, to a Thr91/93 dominant pattern. A2780-CP70 cells were treated at their cisplatin IC50, and DNA repair was assessed after pretreatment with anti-Gli1 shRNA or scrambled shRNA control. Control cells repaired 78% of platinum-DNA adducts at 12 h, compared with 33% repair in cells pretreated with anti-Gli1 shRNA resulting in a 2.4-fold difference. Pretreatment of A2780-CP70 cells with anti-Gli1 shRNA resulted in supra-additive cell killing with cisplatin; shifting the cisplatin IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) from 30 μM to 5 μM. Pretreatment of these cells with cyclopamine did not shift the cisplatin IC50. We conclude that the transcriptional protein Gli1 is important in the upregulation of these three DNA repair genes in human ovarian cancer cells, and that Gli1 strongly influences platinum-DNA adduct repair, and cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. This Gli1 role has c

  7. Microhomology-mediated end joining is activated in irradiated human cells due to phosphorylation-dependent formation of the XRCC1 repair complex.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arijit; Eckelmann, Bradley; Adhikari, Sanjay; Ahmed, Kazi Mokim; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Pandey, Arvind; Hegde, Pavana M; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Tainer, John A; Weinfeld, Michael; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Mitra, Sankar

    2017-03-17

    Microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ), an error-prone pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is implicated in genomic rearrangement and oncogenic transformation; however, its contribution to repair of radiation-induced DSBs has not been characterized. We used recircularization of a linearized plasmid with 3΄-P-blocked termini, mimicking those at X-ray-induced strand breaks, to recapitulate DSB repair via MMEJ or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Sequence analysis of the circularized plasmids allowed measurement of relative activity of MMEJ versus NHEJ. While we predictably observed NHEJ to be the predominant pathway for DSB repair in our assay, MMEJ was significantly enhanced in preirradiated cells, independent of their radiation-induced arrest in the G2/M phase. MMEJ activation was dependent on XRCC1 phosphorylation by casein kinase 2 (CK2), enhancing XRCC1's interaction with the end resection enzymes MRE11 and CtIP. Both endonuclease and exonuclease activities of MRE11 were required for MMEJ, as has been observed for homology-directed DSB repair (HDR). Furthermore, the XRCC1 co-immunoprecipitate complex (IP) displayed MMEJ activity in vitro, which was significantly elevated after irradiation. Our studies thus suggest that radiation-mediated enhancement of MMEJ in cells surviving radiation therapy may contribute to their radioresistance and could be therapeutically targeted. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Association of DNA Damage Repair Gene Polymorphisms hOGG1, XRCC1and p53 with Sickle Cell Disease Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Nishank, Sudhansu Sekhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress constitutes one of the significant cause of vaso-occlusive clinical episodes in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. It brings about the generation of reactive oxygen species and consequent damage to DNA. DNA damage repair genes such as hOGG1, XRCC1 and p53 play an important role in the repair of DNA damage during oxidative stress. However, it is not known as to the role of these genes in oxidative stress mediated vaso-occlusive clinical complications of SCD patients. Objective To see the possible association of DNA repair gene polymorphisms with clinical manifestation of SCD patients. Methods: Genotyping of DNA damage repair genes by PCR-RFLP, measurement of oxidant and anti-oxidant status, along with a clinical evaluation of 250 SCD patients and their comparison with normal individuals. Result The level of oxidants were high, and that of antioxidants were low in SCD patients compared to normal individuals. The prevalence of mutant alleles of hOGG1 gene, XRCC1 gene (codon 280 Arg>His) were found to be significantly higher among SCD patients as compared to controls. However, SCD patients did not show clinical association with any of these DNA repair gene polymorphisms. Conclusion This indicates that hOGG1, p53and XRCC1 gene polymorphisms have no clinical association with SCD patients in India. PMID:26185611

  9. Association between polymorphisms of XRCC1, p53 and MDR1 genes, the expression of their protein products and prognostic significance in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rybárová, Silvia; Vecanová, Janka; Hodorová, Ingrid; Mihalik, Jozef; Čižmáriková, Martina; Mojžiš, Ján; Solár, Peter; Benický, Marián; Adamkov, Marian; Mirossay, Ladislav

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background This study aimed to examine the relationship between XRCC1, p53 and MDR1 protein, along with polymorphisms of their genes and their prognostic values in breast cancer. The following clinical and pathological parameters were evaluated: histopathological type of tumor, grade, stage, Her2/neu expression, ER, PR positivity and involvement of regional lymph nodes. Material/Methods Expression of proteins was determined in 39 samples of breast cancer by immunohistochemistry. Nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. For statistical analysis, chi-square test (Yates), Fisher’s exact test, and correlation test were used to analyze the data. Results The highest protein expression was immunohistochemically found in MDR1 protein, with 54% of samples testing positive. In addition, the evaluation of MDR1 expression revealed higher positive immunoreactivity in lobular (LIC) and other types of tumor in comparison to ductal (DIC) type. The expression of p53 and XRCC1 protein was equal, but lower compared to MDR1, both testing positive in 36% of all tissue samples. Comparison of XRCC1 protein and histopathological type of tumor revealed that DIC and LIC types were mostly XRCC1-negative, while other types, papillary and mucinous were more likely to be XRCC1-positive. Interestingly, when evaluating LIC samples separately, a negative correlation between the Her2/neu and expression of XRCC1 was detected. Apparently, all Her2/neu-positive samples were XRCC1-negative (6/86%). The correlation test indicated a negative correlation between Her2/neu-positive samples and XRCC1-negative specimens (r=1, p<0.05). Statistical analysis did not reveal a correlation of p53 expression with clinical and pathological parameters. Similarly, no statistically significant difference was found between the tested polymorphisms and protein expression. Conclusions We did not find statistically significant correlation between tested polymorphisms and their protein expression. PMID

  10. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J

    2011-07-15

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease.

  11. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin

    2011-01-01

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease. PMID:21636980

  12. XRCC1 mutation is associated with PARP1 hyperactivation and cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Nicolas C; Hanzlikova, Hana; Rulten, Stuart L; Tétreault, Martine; Komulainen, Emilia; Ju, Limei; Hornyak, Peter; Zeng, Zhihong; Gittens, William; Rey, Stephanie A; Staras, Kevin; Mancini, Grazia M S; McKinnon, Peter J; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Wagner, Justin D; Yoon, Grace; Caldecott, Keith W

    2017-01-05

    XRCC1 is a molecular scaffold protein that assembles multi-protein complexes involved in DNA single-strand break repair. Here we show that biallelic mutations in the human XRCC1 gene are associated with ocular motor apraxia, axonal neuropathy, and progressive cerebellar ataxia. Cells from a patient with mutations in XRCC1 exhibited not only reduced rates of single-strand break repair but also elevated levels of protein ADP-ribosylation. This latter phenotype is recapitulated in a related syndrome caused by mutations in the XRCC1 partner protein PNKP and implicates hyperactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase/s as a cause of cerebellar ataxia. Indeed, remarkably, genetic deletion of Parp1 rescued normal cerebellar ADP-ribose levels and reduced the loss of cerebellar neurons and ataxia in Xrcc1-defective mice, identifying a molecular mechanism by which endogenous single-strand breaks trigger neuropathology. Collectively, these data establish the importance of XRCC1 protein complexes for normal neurological function and identify PARP1 as a therapeutic target in DNA strand break repair-defective disease.

  13. A systematic gene-gene and gene-environment interaction analysis of DNA repair genes XRCC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, XRCC4, and oral cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Lin, Yu-Da; Yen, Ching-Yui; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2015-04-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide with a high mortality rate. Biomarkers that anticipate susceptibility, prognosis, or response to treatments are much needed. Oral cancer is a polygenic disease involving complex interactions among genetic and environmental factors, which require multifaceted analyses. Here, we examined in a dataset of 103 oral cancer cases and 98 controls from Taiwan the association between oral cancer risk and the DNA repair genes X-ray repair cross-complementing group (XRCCs) 1-4, and the environmental factors of smoking, alcohol drinking, and betel quid (BQ) chewing. We employed logistic regression, multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), and hierarchical interaction graphs for analyzing gene-gene (G×G) and gene-environment (G×E) interactions. We identified a significantly elevated risk of the XRCC2 rs2040639 heterozygous variant among smokers [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.7, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.1-12.1] and alcohol drinkers [adjusted OR=5.7, 95% CI=1.4-23.2]. The best two-factor based G×G interaction of oral cancer included the XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 [OR=3.13, 95% CI=1.66-6.13]. For the G×E interaction, the estimated OR of oral cancer for two (drinking-BQ chewing), three (XRCC1-XRCC2-BQ chewing), four (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-BQ chewing), and five factors (XRCC1-XRCC2-age-drinking-BQ chewing) were 32.9 [95% CI=14.1-76.9], 31.0 [95% CI=14.0-64.7], 49.8 [95% CI=21.0-117.7] and 82.9 [95% CI=31.0-221.5], respectively. Taken together, the genotypes of XRCC1 rs1799782 and XRCC2 rs2040639 DNA repair genes appear to be significantly associated with oral cancer. These were enhanced by exposure to certain environmental factors. The observations presented here warrant further research in larger study samples to examine their relevance for routine clinical care in oncology.

  14. The region of XRCC1 which harbours the three most common nonsynonymous polymorphic variants, is essential for the scaffolding function of XRCC1

    PubMed Central

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Gilljam, Karin Margaretha; Torseth, Kathrin; Wilson, David M.; Akbari, Mansour; Otterlei, Marit

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 functions as a non-enzymatic, scaffold protein in single strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER). Here, we examine different regions of XRCC1 for their contribution to the scaffolding functions of the protein. We found that the central BRCT1 domain is essential for recruitment of XRCC1 to sites of DNA damage and DNA replication. Also, we found that ectopic expression of the region from residue 166 to 436 partially rescued the methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) hypersensitivity of XRCC1-deficient EM9 cells, suggesting a key role for this region in mediating DNA repair. The three most common amino acid variants of XRCC1, Arg194Trp, Arg280His and Arg399Gln, are located within the region comprising the NLS and BRCT1 domains, and these variants may be associated with increased incidence of specific types of cancer. While we could not detect differences in the intra-nuclear localization or the ability to support recruitment of POLβ or PNKP to micro-irradiated sites for these variants relative to the conservative protein, we did observe lower foci intensity after micro-irradiation and a reduced stability of the foci with the Arg280His and Arg399Gln variants, respectively. Furthermore, when challenged with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, we detected small but consistent differences in the repair profiles of cells expressing these two variants in comparison to the conservative protein. PMID:22281126

  15. Modulation of DNA repair capacity and mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC genes in styrene-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanova, Monika; Stetina, Rudolf; Vodickova, Ludmila; Vaclavikova, Radka; Hlavac, Pavel; Smerhovsky, Zdenek; Naccarati, Alessio; Polakova, Veronika; Soucek, Pavel; Kuricova, Miroslava; Manini, Paola; Kumar, Rajiv; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel

    2010-11-01

    Decreased levels of single-strand breaks in DNA (SSBs), reflecting DNA damage, have previously been observed with increased styrene exposure in contrast to a dose-dependent increase in the base-excision repair capacity. To clarify further the above aspects, we have investigated the associations between SSBs, micronuclei, DNA repair capacity and mRNA expression in XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC genes on 71 styrene-exposed and 51 control individuals. Styrene concentrations at workplace and in blood characterized occupational exposure. The workers were divided into low (below 50 mg/m{sup 3}) and high (above 50 mg/m{sup 3}) styrene exposure groups. DNA damage and DNA repair capacity were analyzed in peripheral blood lymphocytes by Comet assay. The mRNA expression levels were determined by qPCR. A significant negative correlation was observed between SSBs and styrene concentration at workplace (R = - 0.38, p = 0.001); SSBs were also significantly higher in men (p = 0.001). The capacity to repair irradiation-induced DNA damage was the highest in the low exposure group (1.34 {+-} 1.00 SSB/10{sup 9} Da), followed by high exposure group (0.72 {+-} 0.81 SSB/10{sup 9} Da) and controls (0.65 {+-} 0.82 SSB/10{sup 9} Da). The mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC negatively correlated with styrene concentrations in blood and at workplace (p < 0.001) and positively with SSBs (p < 0.001). Micronuclei were not affected by styrene exposure, but were higher in older persons and in women (p < 0.001). In this study, we did not confirm previous findings on an increased DNA repair response to styrene-induced genotoxicity. However, negative correlations of SSBs and mRNA expression levels of XRCC1, hOGG1 and XPC with styrene exposure warrant further highly-targeted study.

  16. Recent developments with the human repair genes ERCC2, ERCC4, and XRCC1

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Caldecott, K.W.; Brookman, K.W.; Weber, C.A.; Salazar, E.S.; Takayama, K.; Fornace, A.J.

    1992-11-06

    ERCC2 was first identified as a gene on human chromosome 19 that complemented the UV sensitivity of CHO UV5 cells in somatic cell hybrids. Subsequent studies localized ERCC2 to the same chromosomal region (19q13.2--13.3) as the ERCC1 gene and showed that the two genes were less than 250 kb apart. Cloning of ERCC2 was accomplished by transfection of genomic DNA into UV5 cells and rescue of the gene from a secondary transformant. Recovery of the gene was aided by the presence of repetitive sequences that were detected on Southern blots with a probe for Alu-family repeats. ERCC2, which is 19 kb in size, quantitatively corrected the UV sensitivity and incision defect in UV5 cells upon transfection. An ERCC2 CDNA clone was recovered from the pcD2 expression library. Although this clone was truncated at the 5 in. end, it conferred transient, but not stable, correction to UV5 cells upon transfection. Based on genomic sequence, this clone was extended by oligonucleotide addition to obtain minigene constructs in which the complete open reading frame (ORF) was present. Translation of the ERCC2 ORF gives an amino acid sequence that has 72% similarity with the S. cerevisiae RAD3 protein, which encodes a DNA helicase.

  17. DNA repair genes XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 are associated with risk and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Farnebo, Lovisa; Stjernström, Annika; Fredrikson, Mats; Ansell, Anna; Garvin, Stina; Thunell, Lena K

    2015-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are a heterogenous group of tumors with a high rate of early recurrences, second primary tumors, and mortality. Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment over the past decades, the overall 5-year survival rate remains around 50%. Since the head-and neck-region is continuously exposed to potentially DNA-damaging exogenous and endogenous factors, it is reasonable to expect that the DNA repair genes play a part in the development, progression, and outcome of HNSCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the SNPs XPC A499V, XPD K751Q, XRCC1 R399Q, and XRCC3 T241M as potential risk factors and indicators of survival among Caucasian patients. One-hundred-sixty-nine patients as well as 344 healthy controls were included and genotyped with PCR-RFLP. We showed that XPC A499V was associated with increased risk of HNSCC, especially laryngeal carcinoma. Among women, XPD K751Q was associated with increased risk of oral SCC. Furthermore, XPD homozygous mutant individuals had the shortest survival time, a survival time that increased however after full dose radiotherapy. Wild-type individuals of XRCC3 T241M demonstrated an earlier age of onset. HPV-positive never smokers had lower frequencies of p53 mutation. Among HNSCC patients, HPV-positivity was significantly associated with XRCC1 R399Q homozygous mutant genotype. Moreover, combinations of putative risk alleles seemed to act synergistically, increasing the risk of HNSCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that SNPs of the DNA repair genes XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 may affect risk and survival of HNSCC.

  18. XRCC1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    XRCC1, or X-ray repair complementing defective repair in Chinese hamster cells 1, corrects defective DNA strand-break repair and sister chromatid exchange following treatment with ionizing radiation and alkylating agents. XRCC1 interacts with polynucleotide kinase (PNK), DNA polymerase-beta (POLB) and DNA ligase III (LIG3) to participate in the base excision repair pathway. It may be involved in DNA processing during meiogenesis and recombination in germ cells. A rare microsatellite polymorphism in this gene is associated with cancer in patients of varying radiosensitivity.

  19. X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) genetic polymorphisms and cervical cancer risk: a huge systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Liu, Fei; Tan, Shi-Qiao; Wang, Yan; Li, Shang-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies investigating the association between X-ray repair cross-complementation group 1(XRCC1) polymorphisms and cervical cancer (CC) risk has provided inconsistent results. The aim of our study was to assess the association between the XRCC1 gene Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp, Arg280His polymorphisms and risk of CC. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI, and Chinese Biomedicine Databases for studies published before March 2011.Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for XRCC1 polymorphisms and CC were calculated in a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model when appropriate. Ultimately, 9, 5 and 2 studies were found to be eligible for meta-analyses of Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp and Arg280His, respectively. Our analysis suggested that the variant genotypes of Arg194Trp were associated with a significantly increased CC risk (Trp/Trp vs Arg/Arg, OR = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.60-3.06; Arg/Trp vs Arg/Arg, OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02-1.49; dominant model, OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.14-1.63; recessive model, OR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.51-2.82). For Arg280His polymorphism, no obvious associations were found for all genetic models. For Arg399Gln polymorphism, also no obvious associations were found for all genetic models. In the subgroup analyses by ethnicity/country, a significantly increased risk was observed among Asian, especially among Chinese. To get more precise evidences, adjusted ORs (95%CI) by potential confounders (such as age, ethnicity or smoking, etc) were also calculated for XRCC1 Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp, however, the estimated pooled adjusted OR still did not change at all. This meta-analysis suggests that Arg194Trp polymorphism may be associated with CC risk, Arg399Gln polymorphism might be a low-penetrent risk factor for CC only in Asians, and there may be no association between Arg280His polymorphism and CC risk.

  20. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  1. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    DOE PAGES

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; ...

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs ofmore » the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.« less

  2. Nuclear Localization of the DNA Repair Scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the Functional Role of a Bipartite NLS.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Thomas W; Gassman, Natalie R; Smith, Cassandra E; Pedersen, Lars C; Gabel, Scott A; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H; London, Robert E

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior provides a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  3. Association of XRCC1 variants with acute skin reaction after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liqing; Xia, Jianhong; Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jianrong; Hu, Yimin

    2010-12-01

    After irradiation results in cytotoxic effects by DNA damage, base excision repair (BER) pathway is involved in the repair of single-strand breaks and nonhomologous end joining and homologous repair of double-strand breaks caused by radiotherapy. Alterations in the function of BER DNA repair genes may affect DNA repair proficiency and influence the response of patients with cancer to radiotherapy. The association of single nucleotide polymorphisms of BER DNA repair X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1) and risk of radiotherapy-induced ≥grade 2 acute skin reaction in patients with breast cancer was examined. It was found that the risk of ≥grade 2 acute skin toxicity after radiotherapy could be increased by 2.86-fold in patients carrying the XRCC1 -77TC and CC genotypes (p = 0.016). However, the other three coding XRCC1 variants did not influence the risk of ≥grade 2 acute skin toxicity for patients with breast cancer after radiotherapy. Our results suggested that the XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with increased risk of radiation-induced acute skin reaction in a Chinese population.

  4. Recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogous genes in X-ray sensitive and resistant CHO cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubnitchaya-Labudová, O.; Portele, A.; Vaçata, V.; Lubec, G.; Rink, H.; Höfer, M.

    1997-10-01

    The XRCC1 gene (X-ray repair cross complementing) complements the DNA repair deficiency of the radiation sensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant cell line EM9 but the mechanism of the correction is not elucidated yet. XRCC1 shows substantial homology to the RAG2 gene (recombination activating gene) and we therefore tried to answer question, whether structural similarities (sequence of a putative recombination activating domain, aa 332-362 for XRCC1 and aa 286-316 in RAG2) would reflect similar functions of the homologous, putative recombination activating domain. PCR experiments revealed that no sequence homologous to the structural part of human XRCC1 was present in cDNA of CHO. Differential display demonstrated two putative recombination activating domains in the parental CHO line AA8 and one in the radiosensitive mutant EM9. Southern blot experiments showed the presence of several genes with partial homology to human XRCC1. Recombination studies consisted of expressing amplified target domains within chimeric proteins in recA - bacteria and subsequent detection of recombination events by sequencing the recombinant plasmids. Recombination experiments demonstrated recombination activating activity of all putative recombination activating domains amplified from AA8 and EM9 genomes as reflected by deletions within the insert of the recombinant plasmids. The recombination activating activity of XRCC1 analogues could explain a mechanism responsible for the correction of the DNA repair defect in EM9.

  5. Polymorphisms in XPC, XPD, XRCC1, and XRCC3 DNA repair genes and lung cancer risk in a population of Northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Felicitas López-Cima, M; González-Arriaga, Patricia; García-Castro, Laura; Pascual, Teresa; Marrón, Manuel G; Puente, Xose S; Tardón, Adonina

    2007-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes have been associated to repair DNA lesions, and might contribute to the individual susceptibility to develop different types of cancer. Nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), and double-strand break repair (DSBR) are the main DNA repair pathways. We investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in two NER genes, XPC (poly (AT) insertion/deletion: PAT-/+) and XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln), the BER gene XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), and the DSBR gene XRCC3 (Thr241Met) and the risk of developing lung cancer. Methods A hospital-based case-control study was designed with 516 lung cancer patients and 533 control subjects, matched on ethnicity, age, and gender. Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP and the results were analysed using multivariate unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender and pack-years. Results Borderline association was found for XPC and XPD NER genes polymorphisms, while no association was observed for polymorphisms in BER and DSBR genes. XPC PAT+/+ genotype was associated with no statistically significant increased risk among ever smokers (OR = 1.40; 95%CI = 0.94–2.08), squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 1.44; 95%CI = 0.85–2.44), and adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.72; 95%CI = 0.97–3.04). XPD variant genotypes (312Asn/Asn and 751Gln/Gln) presented a not statistically significant risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 1.52; 95%CI = 0.91–2.51; OR = 1.38; 95%CI = 0.85–2.25, respectively), especially among ever smokers (OR = 1.58; 95%CI = 0.96–2.60), heavy smokers (OR = 2.07; 95%CI = 0.74–5.75), and adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.88; 95%CI = 0.97–3.63). On the other hand, individuals homozygous for the XRCC1 399Gln allele presented no risk of developing lung cancer (OR = 0.87; 95%CI = 0.57–1.31) except for individuals carriers of 399Gln/Gln genotype and without family history of cancer (OR = 0.57; 95%CI = 0.33–0.98) and no association was found between XRCC3 Thr241Met

  6. Human Mre11/human Rad50/Nbs1 and DNA ligase IIIalpha/XRCC1 protein complexes act together in an alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway.

    PubMed

    Della-Maria, Julie; Zhou, Yi; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Kuhnlein, Jeff; Carney, James P; Paull, Tanya T; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2011-09-30

    Recent studies have implicated a poorly defined alternative pathway of nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) in the generation of large deletions and chromosomal translocations that are frequently observed in cancer cells. Here, we describe an interaction between two factors, hMre11/hRad50/Nbs1 (MRN) and DNA ligase IIIα/XRCC1, that have been linked with alt-NHEJ. Expression of DNA ligase IIIα and the association between MRN and DNA ligase IIIα/XRCC1 are altered in cell lines defective in the major NHEJ pathway. Most notably, DNA damage induced the association of these factors in DNA ligase IV-deficient cells. MRN interacts with DNA ligase IIIα/XRCC1, stimulating intermolecular ligation, and together these proteins join incompatible DNA ends in a reaction that mimics alt-NHEJ. Thus, our results provide novel mechanistic insights into the alt-NHEJ pathway that not only contributes to genome instability in cancer cells but may also be a therapeutic target.

  7. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Qingyi

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade {>=}2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.

  8. Functional polymorphisms of base excision repair genes XRCC1 and APEX1 predict risk of radiation pneumonitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei, Qingyi

    2011-11-01

    To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade ≥2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. XRCC1 genotype and breast cancer: functional studies and epidemiologic data show interactions between XRCC1 codon 280 His and smoking.

    PubMed

    Pachkowski, Brian F; Winkel, Scott; Kubota, Yoshiko; Swenberg, James A; Millikan, Robert C; Nakamura, Jun

    2006-03-01

    Tobacco smoke produces oxidative and alkylative DNA damage that necessitates repair by base excision repair coordinated by X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 (XRCC1). We investigated whether polymorphisms in XRCC1 alter DNA repair capacity and modify breast cancer risk associated with smoking. To show the functionality of the 280His variant, we evaluated single-strand break (SSB) repair capacity of isogenic Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human forms of XRCC1 after exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), or camptothecin by monitoring NAD(P)H. We used data from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based, case-control study that included 2,077 cases (786 African Americans and 1,281 Whites) and 1,818 controls (681 African Americans and 1,137 Whites), to examine associations among XRCC1 codon 194, 280, and 399 genotypes, breast cancer, and smoking. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated by unconditional logistic regression. Only cells expressing the 280His protein accumulated SSB, indicated by NAD(P)H depletion, from both H(2)O(2) and MMS exposures. In the CBCS, positive associations were observed between breast cancer and smoking dose for participants with XRCC1 codon 194 Arg/Arg (P(trend) = 0.046), 399 Arg/Arg (P(trend) = 0.012), and 280 His/His or His/Arg (P(trend) = 0.047) genotypes. The 280His allele was in strong linkage disequilibrium with 194Arg (Lewontin's D' = 1.0) and 399Arg (D' = 1.0). These data suggest that less common, functional polymorphisms may lie within common haplotypes and drive gene-environment interactions.

  10. XRCC1 and DNA polymerase β in cellular protection against cytotoxic DNA single-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K; Watson, Mary; Stefanick, Donna F; Shaughnessy, Daniel T; Taylor, Jack A; Wilson, Samuel H

    2008-01-01

    Single-strand breaks (SSBs) can occur in cells either directly, or indirectly following initiation of base excision repair (BER). SSBs generally have blocked termini lacking the conventional 5′Œ-phosphate and 3′Œ-hydroxyl groups and require further processing prior to DNA synthesis and ligation. XRCC1 is devoid of any known enzymatic activity, but it can physically interact with other proteins involved in all stages of the overlapping SSB repair and BER pathways, including those that conduct the rate-limiting end-tailoring, and in many cases can stimulate their enzymatic activities. XRCC1−/− mouse fibroblasts are most hypersensitive to agents that produce DNA lesions repaired by monofunctional glycosylase-initiated BER and that result in formation of indirect SSBs. A requirement for the deoxyribose phosphate lyase activity of DNA polymerase β (pol β) is specific to this pathway, whereas pol β is implicated in gap-filling during repair of many types of SSBs. Elevated levels of strand breaks, and diminished repair, have been demonstrated in MMStreated XRCC1−/−, and to a lesser extent in pol β−/−cell lines, compared with wild-type cells. Thus a strong correlation is observed between cellular sensitivity to MMS and the ability of cells to repair MMS-induced damage. Exposure of wild-type and pol β −/−cells to an inhibitor of PARP activity dramatically potentiates MMS-induced cytotoxicity. XRCC1−/− cells are also sensitized by PARP inhibition demonstrating that PARP-mediated poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays a role in modulation of cytotoxicity beyond recruitment of XRCC1 to sites of DNA damage. PMID:18166976

  11. SNPs of GSTM1, T1, P1, epoxide hydrolase and DNA repair enzyme XRCC1 and risk of urinary transitional cell carcinoma in southwestern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.-I; Chiu, Allen W.; Huan, Steven K.; Chen, C.-L.; Wang, Y.-H.; Hsieh, F.-I; Chou, W.-L.; Wang, L.-H.; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-04-15

    A hospital-based case-control study was conducted near a former black-foot disease (BFD)-endemic area in southwestern Taiwan to examine the possible risk factors and genetic susceptibility for urinary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). A total of 221 patients with pathologically confirmed TCC and 223 age-sex-matched control subjects from urology outpatient clinics were recruited between 1998 and 2002. The results showed that residency in the BFD area and consumption of well water for more than 10 years was a strong factor on urinary cancer risk (odds ratio [OR],8.16, 95% confidence interval [CI],3.34-19.90, p < 0.0001). Dose response relationship between average arsenic concentration in well water and TCC risk was also observed. Cigarette smoking played a relatively minor role in urinary carcinogenesis in this study. The GSTP1 Ile105Val A {yields} G polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk (A/G + G/G: OR = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.39-0.94, p = 0.02), and the effect of Val105 allele was largely confined to the subjects diagnosed earlier than 55 years old (A/G + G/G: OR,0.29; 95% CI, 0.09-0.87, p = 0.03). The results suggest that GSTP1 is a candidate for susceptibility locus and Ile105 allele may predispose individuals to early-onset urinary TCC. The GSTM1 null genotype was associated with tumors of high-invasiveness (OR,2.21; 95% CI, 1.34-4.73) as well as with early-onset TCC risk (OR,2.53; 95% CI, 0.97-6.59). Our preliminary results showed the XRCC1 Arg194Trp were associated with arsenic-related urinary TCC and the interaction between the genotype and the exposure was statistically significant. The modulating effect of the GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val, EPHX Tyr113His and XRCC1 Arg280His on arsenic-related TCC risk was also suggestive. These observations implied that impaired metabolism of carcinogenic exposure as well as impaired DNA repair function play an important role in arsenic-related urinary transitional cell carcinogenesis.

  12. Relationship between glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (5,10-MTHFR) gene polymorphisms and response to chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mei; Xu, Bin; Jiang, Jing-Ting; Wu, Jun; Li, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, Wei-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Jie; Wu, Chang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the relationship between glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (5,10-MTHFR) and X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms and the response to chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. 59 cases of advanced gastric cancer were enrolled. All patients were treated with the DCF regimen comprising docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil. All patients' genotypes regarding GSTP1, XRCC1, and 5,10-MTHFR were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction/ligase detection reaction (PCR-LDR). There were 15 (25.42%) cases of G/G genotype, 21 (35.59%) of G/A genotype, and 23 (38.98%) of A/A genotype for GSTP1, 16 (27.12%) cases of A/A genotype, 18 (30.51%) of G/A genotype, and 25 (42.37%) of G/G genotype for XRCC1, and 21 (35.59%) cases of C/C genotype, 22 (37.29%) of C/T genotype, and 16 (27.12%) of T/T genotype for 5,10-MTHFR. After 2 cycles of chemotherapy, there were 4 cases of complete remission, 14 of partial remission, 19 of stable disease, and 22 of advanced disease, with a total effective rate of 30.51%. Better survival was shown for GSTP1 G/G genotype, XRCC1 A/A genotype, and 5,10-MTHFR T/T genotype (p < 0.05). The gene polymorphisms of GSTP1 G/G, XRCC1 A/A, and 5,10-MTHFR T/T have clinical value for predicting the response to the DCF regimen for advanced gastric cancer. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  13. Two stages of XRCC1 recruitment and two classes of XRCC1 foci formed in response to low level DNA damage induced by visible light, or stress triggered by heat shock.

    PubMed

    Solarczyk, Kamil J; Kordon, Magdalena; Berniak, Krzysztof; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2016-01-01

    Induction of local photosensitised DNA damage has been used to study recruitment of repair factors, spatial organisation and subsequent stages of the repair processes. However, the damage induced by a focused laser beam interacting with a photosensitiser may not fully reflect the types of damage and repair encountered in cells of an animal under typical conditions in vivo. We report on two characteristic stages of recruitment of XRCC1 (a protein engaged in BER and SSB repair pathways), in response to low level DNA damage induced by visible light. We demonstrate that, when just a few DNA breaks are induced in a small region of the nucleus, the recruited XRCC1 is initially distributed uniformly throughout this region, and rearranges into several small stationary foci within minutes. In contrast, when heavy damage of various types (including oxidative damage) is induced in cells pre-sensitized with a DNA-binding drug ethidium bromide, XRCC1 is also recruited but fails to rearrange from the stage of the uniform distribution to the stage of several small foci, indicating that this heavy damage interferes with the progress and completion of the repair processes. We hypothesize that that first stage may reflect recruitment of XRCC1 to poly(ADP-ribose) moieties in the region surrounding the single-strand break, while the second-binding directly to the DNA lesions. We also show that moderate damage or stress induces formation of two types of XRCC1-containing foci differing in their mobility. A large subset of DNA damage-induced XRCC1 foci is associated with a major component of PML nuclear bodies--the Sp100 protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of the XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism with lung cancer risk in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lin, Yong; Qi, Cong-Cong; Sheng, Bao-Wei; Fu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 protein (XRCC1) plays important roles in the DNA base excision repair pathway which may influence the development of lung cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the potential association of the XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism with lung cancer risk. The created restriction site-polymerase chain reaction (CRS-PCR) and DNA sequencing methods were utilized to evaluate the XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism among 376 lung cancer patients and 379 controls. Associations between the genetic polymorphism and lung cancer risk were determined with an unconditional logistic regression model. Our data suggested that the distribution of allele and genotype in lung cancer patients was significantly different from that of controls. The XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of lung cancer (AA vs GG: OR=2.91, 95%CI 1.70-4.98, p<0.001; A vs G: OR=1.52, 95%CI 1.22-1.90, p<0.001). The allele A and genotype AA may contribute to risk of lung cancer. These preliminary results suggested that the XRCC1 c.1178G>A genetic polymorphism is statistically associated with lung cancer risk in the Chinese population.

  15. A prospective study of XRCC1 haplotypes and their interaction with plasma carotenoids on breast cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H W; Han, J; Hankinson, S E; De Vivo, I; Spiegelman, D; Tamimi, R M; Colditz, G A; Hunter, D J

    2004-01-15

    The XRCC1 protein is involved in the base excision repair pathway through interactions with other proteins. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene may lead to variation in repair proficiency and confer inherited predisposition to cancer. We prospectively assessed the associations between polymorphisms and haplotypes in XRCC1 and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study within the Nurses' Health Study (incident cases, n 1004; controls, n 1385). We further investigated gene-environment interactions between the XRCC1 variations and plasma carotenoids on breast cancer risk. We genotyped four haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms Arg {sup 194}Trp, C26602T, Arg{sup 399}Gln, and Gln{sup 632}Gln in the XRCC1 gene. Five common haplotypes accounted for 99% of the chromosomes in the present study population of mostly Caucasian women. We observed a marginally significant reduction in the risk of breast cancer among {sup 194}Trp carriers. As compared with no-carriers, women with at least one {sup 194}Trp allele had a multivariate odds ratio of 0.79 (95% of the confidence interval, 0.60 -1.04). The inferred haplotype harboring the {sup 194}Trp allele was more common in controls than in cases (6.6 versus 5.3%, P 0.07). We observed that the Arg {sup 194}Trp modified the inverse associations of plasma -carotene level (P, ordinal test for interaction 0.02) and plasma -carotene level (P, ordinal test for interaction 0.003) with breast cancer risk. No suggestion of an interaction was observed between the Arg {sup 194}Trp and cigarette smoking. Our results suggest an inverse association between XRCC1 {sup 194}Trp allele and breast cancer risk. The findings of the effect modification of the Arg {sup 194}Trp on the relations of plasma -and -carotene levels with breast cancer risk suggest a potential protective effect of carotenoids in breast carcinogenesis by preventing oxidative DNA damage.

  16. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Dunigan, Brittany B.; Stefanick, Donna F.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1+/+ and Xrcc1−/− mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β- dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  17. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes XRCC1 and XRCC3, occupational exposure to arsenic and sunlight, and the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in a European case-control study.

    PubMed

    Surdu, Simona; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Bloom, Michael S; Boscoe, Francis P; Carpenter, David O; Haase, Richard F; Gurzau, Eugen; Rudnai, Peter; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Vahter, Marie; Leonardi, Giovanni; Goessler, Walter; Kumar, Rajiv; Fletcher, Tony

    2014-10-01

    X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) and group 3 (XRCC3) polymorphisms are relatively frequent in Caucasian populations and may have implications in skin cancer modulation. A few studies have evaluated their association with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), but the results are inconsistent. In the current study, we aim to assess the impact of XRCC1 R399Q and XRCC3 T241M polymorphisms on the risk of NMSC associated with sunlight and arsenic exposure. Study participants consist of 618 new cases of NMSC and 527 hospital-based controls frequency matched on age, sex, and county of residence from Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia. Adjusted effects are estimated using multivariable logistic regression. The results indicate an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) for the homozygous variant genotype of XRCC1 R399Q (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.14-5.65) and a protective effect against basal cell carcinoma (BCC) for the homozygous variant genotype of XRCC3 T241M (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.41-0.92), compared with the respective homozygous common genotypes. Significant interactions are detected between XRCC3 T241M and sunlight exposure at work, and between XRCC3 T241M and exposure to arsenic in drinking water (p-value for interaction <0.10). In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that polymorphisms in XRCC genes may modify the associations between skin cancer risk and exposure to sunlight or arsenic. Given the high prevalence of genetic polymorphisms modifying the association between exposure to environmental carcinogens and NMSC, these results are of substantial relevance to public health.

  18. The XRCC1 Arg280His polymorphism contributes to cancer susceptibility: an update by meta-analysis of 53 individual studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kui; Zhou, Bin; Wang, Yanyun; Rao, Li; Zhang, Lin

    2012-12-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) protein plays a central role in DNA repair pathways. Epidemiological studies have revealed the association between XRCC1 Arg280His polymorphism and cancer risk, but the results were inconsistent. We conducted this meta-analysis to assess the effect of XRCC1 Arg280His polymorphism on cancer susceptibility with accumulated data. Up to January 2012, 53 case-control studies with 21,349 cases and 23,649 controls were available for our study. Summary odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for XRCC1 Arg280His polymorphism and cancer were estimated using fixed- or random-effects models when appropriate. Our meta-analysis identified that elevated cancer risk was statistically associated with the minor variant His allele and Arg-His/His-His genotypes both in the overall population (allele comparison, His versus Arg: OR=1.16; 95% CI: 1.08-1.25; dominant comparison, Arg-His/His-His versus Arg-Arg: OR=1.17; 95% CI: 1.08-1.27) and in terms of subgroup analyses by ethnicity for both Caucasians and non-Caucasians. However, no significant result was observed in the stratified analysis by cancer type. Moreover, significantly increased cancer risk was observed in smokers. These findings indicated that XRCC1 Arg280His polymorphism may play a role in cancer development.

  19. XRCC1 Gene Polymorphism, Clinicopathological Characteristics and Stomach Cancer Survival in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Putthanachote, Nuntiput; Promthet, Supannee; Suwanrungruan, Krittika; Chopjitt, Peechanika; Wiangnon, Surapon; Chen, Li-Sheng; Yen, Ming-Fang; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    Stomach cancer is one of leading causes of death worldwide. In Thailand, the incidence and mortality of stomach cancer are in the top ten for cancers. Effects of DNA repair gene X-ray repair cross complementary protein 1 (XRCC1) polymorphisms and clinicopathological characteristics on survival of stomach cancer in Thailand have not been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of XRCC1 gene and clinicopathological characteristics on survival of stomach cancer patients in Thailand. Data and blood samples were collected from 101 newly diagnosed stomach cancer cases pathologically confirmed and recruited during 2002 to 2006 and followed-up for vital status until 31 October 2012. Genotype analysis was performed using real-time PCR-HRM. The data were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method to yield cumulative survival curve, log-rank test to assess statistical difference of survival and Cox proportional hazard models to estimate adjusted hazard ratio. The total followed-up times were 2,070 person-months, and the mortality rate was 4.3 per 100 person-months. The median survival time after diagnosis was 8.07 months. The cumulative 1-, 3-, 5-years survival rates were 40.4%, 15.2 % and 10.1 % respectively. After adjustment, tumour stage were associated with an increased risk of death (p= 0.036). The XRCC1 Gln339Arg, Arg/Arg homozygote was also associated with increased risk but statistically this was non-significant. In addition to tumour stage, which is an important prognostic factor affecting to the survival of stomach cancer patients, the genetic variant Gln339Arg in XRCC1 may non-significantly contribute to risk of stomach cancer death among Thai people. Larger studies with different populations are need to verify ours findings.

  20. Association between polymorphisms in XRCC1 gene and clinical outcomes of patients with lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhigang; Yin, Zhihua; Li, Xuelian; Wu, Wei; Guan, Peng; Zhou, Baosen

    2012-02-17

    X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA damage and adducts. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1 are suspected to have some relationship with response to chemotherapy and overall survival of lung cancer. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize published data on the association between the commonest SNPs of XRCC1 (Arg194Trp, C > T, rs1799782 and Arg399Gln, G > A, rs25487) and clinical outcome of lung cancer patients. We retrieved the relevant articles from PubMed, EMBASE and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. Studies were selected using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. Primary outcomes included objective response (i.e., complete response + partial response vs. progressive disease + stable disease) and overall survival (OS). Odds ratio (OR) or hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated. All analyses were performed using the Stata software. Twenty-two articles were included in the present analysis. XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms were significantly associated with response to treatment in lung cancer patients. Patients with C/T genotype, T/T genotype and minor variant T allele at Arg194Trp were more likely to respond to platinum-based chemotherapy compared with those with C/C genotype (C/T vs. C/C: OR, 2.54; 95%CI, 1.95-3.31; T/T vs. C/C: OR, 2.06; 95%CI, 1.39-3.06; C/T+T/T vs. C/C: OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.88-3.10). For XRCC1 Arg399Gln, G/A genotype, A/A genotype and minor variant A allele were associated with objective response in all patients (G/A vs. G/G: OR, 0.67; 95%CI, 0.50-0.90; A/A vs. G/G: OR, 0.43; 95%CI, 0.25-0.73; A/A+G/A vs. G/G: OR, 0.63; 95%CI, 0.49-0.83). Both G/A and A/A genotypes of XRCC1 Arg399Gln could influence overall survival of lung cancer patients (G/A vs. G/G: HR, 1.23; 95%CI, 1.06-1.44; A/A vs. G/G: HR, 2.03; 95%CI, 1.20-3.45). Interaction analysis suggested that compared with the patients carrying C

  1. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA BASE EXCISION REPAIR GENES APEX1 AND XRCC1 AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a key role in revers...

  2. POLYMORPHISMS IN THE DNA BASE EXCISION REPAIR GENES APEX1 AND XRCC1 AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN XUAN WEI, CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lung cancer mortality rate in Xuan Wei County is among the highest in China and has been attributed to exposure to indoor smoky coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a key role in revers...

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ERCC2, hOGG1, and XRCC1 DNA repair genes and the risk of triple-negative breast cancer in Polish women.

    PubMed

    Smolarz, Beata; Makowska, Marianna; Samulak, Dariusz; Michalska, Magdalena M; Mojs, Ewa; Wilczak, Maciej; Romanowicz, Hanna

    2014-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) refers to about 15-20% of all breast cancer cases. It is characterized by worse clinical outcome, poor prognosis, and absence of prognostic indicators. Several polymorphisms in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER) gene have been extensively studied in association with various human cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the hOGG1-Ser326Cys (rs13181), XRCC1-Arg194Trp (rs1799782), and ERCC2-Lys751Gln (rs13181) gene polymorphisms with clinical parameters and the risk for development of triple-negative breast cancer. Our research included 70 patients with TNBC and 70 healthy controls. Gene polymorphisms were genotyped by the PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) method. The genotype distributions were contrasted by the chi-square test, and the significance of the polymorphism was assessed by multiple logistic regression producing odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In the present work, a relationship was identified between ERCC2-Lys751Gln polymorphism and the incidence of triple-negative breast cancer. An association was observed between triple-negative breast carcinoma occurrence and the presence of Gln/Gln genotype (OR = 5.71 (2.12-5.43), p = 0.0007). A tendency for an increased risk of TNBC was detected with the occurrence of 751Gln allele of ERCC2 polymorphism. No significant associations between Ser326Cys and Arg194Trp genotype and TNBC were observed. We suggest that the Lys751Gln polymorphism of the ERCC2 gene may be risk factors for triple-negative breast cancer development in Polish women.

  4. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes (APEX1, XPD, XRCC1 and XRCC3) and Risk of Preeclampsia in a Mexican Mestizo Population

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada; Méndez-Hernández, Edna M.; Vazquez-Alaniz, Fernando; Aguilar-Durán, Marisela; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo; Barraza-Salas, Marcelo; Castellanos-Juárez, Francisco X.; La Llave-León, Osmel; Salas-Pacheco, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Variations in genes involved in DNA repair systems have been proposed as risk factors for the development of preeclampsia (PE). We conducted a case-control study to investigate the association of Human apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease (APEX1) Asp148Glu (rs1130409), Xeroderma Pigmentosum group D (XPD) Lys751Gln (rs13181), X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC) Arg399Gln (rs25487) and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) Thr241Met (rs861539) polymorphisms with PE in a Mexican population. Samples of 202 cases and 350 controls were genotyped using RTPCR. Association analyses based on a χ2 test and binary logistic regression were performed to determine the odds ratio (OR) and a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for each polymorphism. The allelic frequencies of APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism showed statistical significant differences between preeclamptic and normal women (p = 0.036). Although neither of the polymorphisms proved to be a risk factor for the disease, the APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism showed a tendency of association (OR: 1.74, 95% CI = 0.96–3.14) and a significant trend (p for trend = 0.048). A subgroup analyses revealed differences in the allelic frequencies of APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism between women with mild preeclampsia and severe preeclampsia (p = 0.035). In conclusion, our results reveal no association between XPD Lys751Gln, XRCC Arg399Gln and XRCC3 Thr241Met polymorphisms and the risk of PE in a Mexican mestizo population; however, the results in the APEX1 Asp148Glu polymorphism suggest the need for future studies using a larger sample size. PMID:24619222

  5. XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms and arsenic methylation capacity are associated with urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Chien-I; Huang, Ya-Li; Chen, Wei-Jen; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Lin, Ying-Chin; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2014-09-15

    The association between DNA repair gene polymorphisms and bladder cancer has been widely studied. However, few studies have examined the correlation between urothelial carcinoma (UC) and arsenic or its metabolites. The aim of this study was to examine the association between polymorphisms of the DNA repair genes, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln, with urinary arsenic profiles and UC. To this end, we conducted a hospital-based case–control study with 324 UC patients and 647 age- and gender-matched non-cancer controls. Genomic DNA was used to examine the genotype of XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (PCR-RFLP). Urinary arsenic profiles were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) linked with hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. The XRCC1 399 Gln/Gln and 194 Arg/Trp and Trp/Trp genotypes were significantly related to UC, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were 1.68 (1.03–2.75) and 0.66 (0.48–0.90), respectively. Participants with higher total urinary arsenic levels, a higher percentage of inorganic arsenic (InAs%) and a lower percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA%) had a higher OR of UC. Participants carrying XRCC1 risk diplotypes G-C/G-C, A-C/A-C, and A-T/G-T, and who had higher total arsenic levels, higher InAs%, or lower DMA% compared to those with other XRCC1 diplotypes had a higher OR of UC. Our results suggest that the XRCC1 399 Gln/Gln and 194 Arg/Arg DNA repair genes play an important role in poor arsenic methylation capacity, thereby increasing the risk of UC in non-obvious arsenic exposure areas. - Highlights: • The XRCC1 399Gln/Gln genotype was significantly associated with increased OR of UC. • The XRCC1 194 Arg/Trp and Trp/Trp genotype had a significantly decreased OR of UC. • Combined effect of the XRCC1 genotypes and poor arsenic methylation capacity on

  6. Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene modify survival of bladder cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sacerdote, Carlotta; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Pardini, Barbara; Polidoro, Silvia; Allione, Alessandra; Critelli, Rossana; Russo, Alessia; Andrew, Angeline S; Ye, Yuanqing; Wu, Xifeng; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Bosio, Andrea; Casetta, Giovanni; Cucchiarale, Giuseppina; Destefanis, Paolo; Gontero, Paolo; Rolle, Luigi; Zitella, Andrea; Fontana, Dario; Vineis, Paolo; Matullo, Giuseppe

    2013-10-15

    Survival of bladder cancer patients depends on several factors including disease stage and grade at diagnosis, age, health status of the patient and the applied treatment. Several studies investigated the role of DNA repair genetic variants in cancer susceptibility, but only few studies investigated their role in survival and response to chemotherapy for bladder cancer. We genotyped 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in DNA repair genes in 456 bladder cancer patients, reconstructed haplotypes and calculated a score for combinations of the SNPs. We estimated Hazard Ratios (adjHR) for time to death. Among patients treated with chemotherapy, variant alleles of five SNPs in the XRCC1 gene conferred better survival (rs915927 adjHR 0.55 (95%CI 0.32-0.94); rs76507 adjHR 0.48 (95%CI 0.27-0.84); rs2854501 adjHR 0.25 (95%CI 0.12-0.52); rs2854509 adjHR 0.21 (95%CI 0.09-0.46); rs3213255 adjHR 0.46 (95%CI 0.26-0.80). In this group of patients, an increasing number of variant alleles in a XRCC1 gene score were associated with a better survival (26% decrease of risk of death for each additional variant allele in XRCC1). By functional analyses we demonstrated that the previous XRCC1 SNPs confer lower DNA repair capacity. This may support the hypothesis that survival in these patients may be modulated by the different DNA repair capacity determined by genetic variants. Chemotherapy treated cancer patients bearing an increasing number of "risky" alleles in XRCC1 gene had a better survival, suggesting that a proficient DNA repair may result in resistance to therapy and shorter survival. This finding may have clinical implications for the choice of therapy.

  7. XRCC1 and OGG1 Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sanjari Moghaddam, Ali; Nazarzadeh, Milad; Noroozi, Rezvan; Darvish, Hossein; Mosavi Jarrahi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Context: Known polymorphisms of DNA repair genes can be associated with the risk of many types of cancer. There is no consensus regarding association between XRCC1 and OGG1 with breast cancer (BC). Objectives: The aim of this study is to collect relevant published studies systematically. Data Sources: Sixty-two publications were identified through searching PubMed, PubMed Central, ISI web of knowledge, and reference list of related articles. Study Selection: We performed a systematic review according MOOSE guideline criteria. All longitudinal cohort and case-control studies investigating association of any type and grade of breast cancer with XRCC1 and OGG1 gene and their polymorphisms were eligible for initial inclusion. Data Extraction: Two authors screened titles and abstracts and extracted all needed information from eligible studies. Four research methodological components causing bias for the association between gene polymorphisms and breast cancer risk, including source of controls sampling, population ethnicity, sample size of studies and menopausal status of cases and controls was used for assessment of quality of studies Results: A total of 14,793 breast cancer cases and 15,409 controls were included in assessment of XRCC1 Arg194Trp. Four studies showed significant association and one study showed protective effect of XRCC1 Arg194Trp and BC. A total of 7,716 cases and 7,370 controls were included for XRCC1 Arg280His. Only one study showed significant association of XRCC1 Arg280His and breast cancer (OR = 1.82 (1.06 - 3.15). A total of 27,167 cases and 31,998 controls were included to estimate association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism and breast cancer. Seven studies showed significant association and one showed protective effect of XRCC1 Arg399Gln and BC. A total of 9,417 cases and 11,087 controls were included for OGG1 Ser326Cys. Among studies focused on OGG1 Ser326Cys, none showed significant association with breast cancer. Conclusions

  8. Association between genetic polymorphisms in XPD and XRCC1 genes and risks of non-small cell lung cancer in East Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Du, Yong; He, Yanchao; Mei, Zhoufang; Qian, Ling; Shi, Jindong; Jie, Zhijun

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is a multifactorial disease. Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) and X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1) genes are 2 important susceptibility genes related to lung cancer. In this study, we explored the correlation between genetic polymorphisms in XPD and XRCC1 and the risk of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the East Chinese Han population. We also investigated risk factors associated with non-small cell lung cancer in this population. We conducted a case control study in 120 NSCLC patients and 120 healthy controls. The NSCLC patients were further divided into three subgroups, squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and other type of cancer, according to tumor histology. No patients had undergone any treatment. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technologies were applied to detect the distribution of XPD-751, XRCC1-194 and XRCC1-399 genes in all patients. The results showed significant gene frequency differences for all three genes between patients with NSCLC and control patients. Significantly different frequencies of XPD-751-Gln, XRCC-194-Trp and XRCC1-399-Gln mutant alleles were observed between the two groups. XPD-751SNP and XRCC1-194SNP frequencies varied among the three lung cancer groups, while the frequency of XRCC1-399SNP did not differ significantly. The results suggested that genetic polymorphisms in XPD-751, XRCC1-194 and XRCC1-399 were related to the risk of NSCLC, among which XPD-751SNP was responsible for adenocarcinoma, while XRCC1-194SNP was closely linked to squamous carcinoma. Smoking and XRCC1-194SNP were risk factors of NSCLC. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Variant Alleles in XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln Polymorphisms Increase Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancer in Sabah, North Borneo.

    PubMed

    Halim, Noor Hanis Abu; Chong, Eric Tzyy Jiann; Goh, Lucky Poh Wah; Chuah, Jitt Aun; See, Edwin Un Hean; Chua, Kek Heng; Lee, Ping-Chin

    2016-01-01

    The XRCC1 protein facilitates various DNA repair pathways; single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in this gene are associated with a risk of gastrointestinal cancer (GIC) with inconsistent results, but no data have been previously reported for the Sabah, North Borneo, population. We accordingly investigated the XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln SNPs in terms of GIC risk in Sabah. We performed genotyping for both SNPs for 250 GIC patients and 572 healthy volunteers using a polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism approach. We validated heterozygosity and homozygosity for both SNPs using direct sequencing. The presence of a variant 194Trp allele in the Arg194Trp SNP was significantly associated with a higher risk of GIC, especially with gastric and colorectal cancers. We additionally found that the variant 399Gln allele in Arg399Gln SNP was associated with a greater risk of developing gastric cancer. Our combined analysis revealed that inheritance of variant alleles in both SNPs increased the GIC risk in Sabah population. Based on our etiological analysis, we found that subjects ≥50 years and males who carrying the variant 194Trp allele, and Bajau subjects carrying the 399Gln allele had a significantly increased risk of GIC. Our findings suggest that inheritance of variant alleles in XRCC1 Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln SNPs may act as biomarkers for the early detection of GIC, especially for gastric and colorectal cancers in the Sabah population.

  10. Association of XRCC1 and XRCC3 gene haplotypes with the development of radiation-induced fibrosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Isabella Wai Yin; Yip, Shea Ping; Kwong, Dora Lai Wan; Wu, Vincent Wing Cheung

    2014-07-01

    Radiation-induced fibrosis is one of the late complications of radiotherapy (RT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 and 3 (XRCC1 and XRCC3, respectively) gene haplotypes and radiation-induced fibrosis in NPC patients. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 120 NPC patients previously treated with RT. In total, 12 tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from the XRCC1 and XRCC3 genes and were genotyped using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis or unlabeled probe melting analysis. Single-marker and haplotype analyses were performed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The functional variant rs861539 of XRCC3 may be associated with radiation-induced fibrosis [asymptotic P-value (Pasym)<0.05]. No significant association was observed between radiation-induced fibrosis and any of the tag SNPs of XRCC1 and XRCC3 in either single-marker or haplotype analysis after 10,000 permutations [empirical P-value (Pemp)>0.05]. Our preliminary results indicated that the rs861539 variant of XRCC3 may be associated with an increased risk of radiation-induced fibrosis; however, a large-scale study is required to confirm this result.

  11. Quantitative characterization of protein–protein complexes involved in base excision DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Moor, Nina A.; Vasil'eva, Inna A.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Antson, Alfred A.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2015-01-01

    Base Excision Repair (BER) efficiently corrects the most common types of DNA damage in mammalian cells. Step-by-step coordination of BER is facilitated by multiple interactions between enzymes and accessory proteins involved. Here we characterize quantitatively a number of complexes formed by DNA polymerase β (Polβ), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), using fluorescence- and light scattering-based techniques. Direct physical interactions between the APE1-Polβ, APE1-TDP1, APE1-PARP1 and Polβ-TDP1 pairs have been detected and characterized for the first time. The combined results provide strong evidence that the most stable complex is formed between XRCC1 and Polβ. Model DNA intermediates of BER are shown to induce significant rearrangement of the Polβ complexes with XRCC1 and PARP1, while having no detectable influence on the protein–protein binding affinities. The strength of APE1 interaction with Polβ, XRCC1 and PARP1 is revealed to be modulated by BER intermediates to different extents, depending on the type of DNA damage. The affinity of APE1 for Polβ is higher in the complex with abasic site-containing DNA than after the APE1-catalyzed incision. Our findings advance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying coordination and regulation of the BER process. PMID:26013813

  12. The polymorphism XRCC1 Arg194Trp and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine increased susceptibility to arsenic-related renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Lin, Ying-Chin; Chen, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chen, Chi-Hung; Su, Chien-Tien

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to explore the relationship between X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene polymorphisms and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and to investigate whether individuals with an XRCC1 risk genotype, a high level of 8-OHdG or a high urinary total arsenic concentration have a modified odds ratio (OR) of RCC. We recruited 180 RCC patients and 360 age- and sex-matched controls from a hospital-based pool. Image-guided biopsy or surgical resection of renal tumors was performed on RCC patients for pathological verification. Genomic DNA was used to examine the genotype of XRCC1(Arg399Gln), XRCC1(Arg194Trp), XRCC3(Thr241Met) and XPD(Lys751Gln) by PCR-RFLP. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine urinary 8-OHdG levels. A HPLC-HG-AAS was used to determine the concentrations of urinary arsenic species. Participants with the genotype XRCC1(Arg194Trp) Arg/Trp+Trp/Trp had a significantly higher OR of RCC than those with the Arg/Arg genotype; the OR and 95% confidence interval was 0.66 (0.45-0.97) after multivariate adjustment. The OR of RCC for the combined effect of high urinary 8-OHdG levels and high urinary total arsenic concentration in individuals with a XRCC1(Arg194Trp) Arg/Trp+Trp/Trp genotype was higher than in patients with an Arg/Arg genotype, which was evident in a dose response manner. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the XRCC1 Arg194 allele is a predicting factor for RCC. The more risk factors (high urinary 8-OHdG levels, high urinary total arsenic concentrations, and XRCC1 Arg194 allele) that were present, the higher the OR of RCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The genesis of cerebellar interneurons and the prevention of neural DNA damage require XRCC1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngsoo; Katyal, Sachin; Li, Yang; El-Khamisy, Sherif F; Russell, Helen R; Caldecott, Keith W; McKinnon, Peter J

    2009-08-01

    Defective responses to DNA single strand breaks underlie various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the exact role of this repair pathway during the development and maintenance of the nervous system is unclear. Using murine neural-specific inactivation of Xrcc1, a factor that is critical for the repair of DNA single strand breaks, we found a profound neuropathology that is characterized by the loss of cerebellar interneurons. This cell loss was linked to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and occurred as interneuron progenitors commenced differentiation. Loss of Xrcc1 also led to the persistence of DNA strand breaks throughout the nervous system and abnormal hippocampal function. Collectively, these data detail the in vivo link between DNA single strand break repair and neurogenesis and highlight the diverse consequences of specific types of genotoxic stress in the nervous system.

  14. Genesis of cerebellar interneurons and the prevention of neural DNA damage require XRCC1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngsoo; Katyal, Sachin; Li, Yang; El-Khamisy, Sherif F.; Russell, Helen R.; Caldecott, Keith W.; McKinnon, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Defective responses to DNA single strand breaks underpin various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the exact role of this repair pathway during development and maintenance of the nervous system is unclear. Using murine neural-specific inactivation of Xrcc1, a factor critical for the repair of DNA single strand breaks, we identified a profound neuropathology characterized by the loss of cerebellar interneurons. This cell loss was linked to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and occurred as interneuron progenitors commenced differentiation. Loss of Xrcc1 also led to the persistence of DNA strand breaks throughout the nervous system and abnormal hippocampal function. Collectively, these data detail the first in vivo link between DNA single strand break repair and neurogenesis, and highlight the diverse consequences of specific types of genotoxic stress in the nervous system. PMID:19633665

  15. Polymorphism of XRCC1, XRCC3, and XPD Genes and Risk of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bănescu, Claudia; Trifa, Adrian P.; Demian, Smaranda; Benedek Lazar, Erzsebeth; Dima, Delia; Duicu, Carmen; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2014-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3), and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) repair genes may lead to genetic instability and leukemogenesis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His and Arg194Trp, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms and the risk of developing CML in Romanian patients. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with CML and 180 healthy controls were included in this study. We found no association between CML and XRCC1 or XRCC3 variant genotypes in any of the investigated cases. A significant difference was observed in the variant genotype frequencies of the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism between the patients with CML and control group (for variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.20–4.67; P value = 0.016 and for combined heterozygous and variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.10–2.69; P value = 0.019). This was also observed when analyzing the variant 751Gln allele (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.13–2.11; P value = 0.008). Our results suggest that the XPD Lys751Gln variant genotype increases the risk of CML. PMID:24955348

  16. Polymorphism of XRCC1, XRCC3, and XPD genes and risk of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bănescu, Claudia; Trifa, Adrian P; Demian, Smaranda; Benedek Lazar, Erzsebeth; Dima, Delia; Duicu, Carmen; Dobreanu, Minodora

    2014-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), X-ray repair cross complementing group 3 (XRCC3), and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) repair genes may lead to genetic instability and leukemogenesis. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His and Arg194Trp, XRCC3 Thr241Met, and XPD Lys751Gln polymorphisms and the risk of developing CML in Romanian patients. A total of 156 patients diagnosed with CML and 180 healthy controls were included in this study. We found no association between CML and XRCC1 or XRCC3 variant genotypes in any of the investigated cases. A significant difference was observed in the variant genotype frequencies of the XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism between the patients with CML and control group (for variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.20-4.67; P value = 0.016 and for combined heterozygous and variant homozygous genotypes, OR = 1.72; 95% CI = 1.10-2.69; P value = 0.019). This was also observed when analyzing the variant 751Gln allele (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.13-2.11; P value = 0.008). Our results suggest that the XPD Lys751Gln variant genotype increases the risk of CML.

  17. Associations between XRCC1 Gene Polymorphisms and Coronary Artery Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wen-Qi; Han, Xi-Qiong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Yi; Liu, Nai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations that influence DNA repair efficiency may contribute to coronary artery disease (CAD) susceptibility. Previous studies have investigated whether there was evidence of an association between polymorphisms at the X-ray repair cross complementing 1 (XRCC1) gene and susceptibility to CAD, but findings have been inconclusive. We identified eligible studies through a comprehensive literature search to determine whether an association exists between XRCC1 gene polymorphisms and CAD susceptibility. Findings were assessed using the odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI), which were calculated using a fixed- or random-effects model, based on the heterogeneity of the studies. Ten eligible studies were finally included in this meta-analysis. Our pooled analysis found that XRCC1 polymorphisms were significantly associated with CAD susceptibility under recessive (Arg194Trp: OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.13–1.93; Arg399Gln: OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.12–1.89), homozygous (Arg194Trp: OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.03–1.81; Arg399Gln: OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.19–2.05), and allele (Arg399Gln: OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.06–1.32) genetic models. Following subgroup analysis by ethnicity, in Asian populations, we found evidence of associations between the XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphism and CAD under recessive and homozygous genetic models, and between the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism and CAD under recessive, homozygous, and allele genetic models. Subgroup analysis stratified by control source revealed associations between the Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln polymorphisms and susceptibility to CAD under recessive and homozygous modes of inheritance, respectively. In addition, subgroup analysis stratified by sample size found that findings of the Arg194Trp polymorphism in large sample sizes were comparable to those found using pooled eligible studies. Based on our meta-analysis, we concluded that the XRCC1 gene polymorphisms, Arg194Trp and Arg399Gln, are associated with CAD

  18. The codon 399 Arg/Gln XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with lung cancer in Indians.

    PubMed

    Natukula, Kirmani; Jamil, Kaiser; Pingali, Usha Rani; Attili, Venkata Satya Suresh; Madireddy, Umamaheshwar Rao Naidu

    2013-01-01

    The XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross complimenting group-I) gene in BER (base excision repair) pathway is essential for DNA repair process. Polymorphisms in this gene are associated with variations in the repair efficiency which might predispose individuals to development of various cancers. Two variants of XRCC1gene (at codon 399), Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln, have been shown to be related to lowered DNA repair capacity and increased genomic instability in multiple studies. Hence our investigation focused on genotyping these variants to correlate with other multiple risk factors in lung cancer (NSCLC) patients since we hypothesized that these variants of the XRCC1 gene might influence disease susceptibility. We examined the frequency of the polymorphism in one hundred cases and an almost equal number of controls after recording their demographics with a structured questionnaire. Genomic DNA from blood samples was extracted for PCR studies, followed by RFLP to determine the variants. The significance of the data was statistically analyzed. The three genotypes in cases and controls were Arg/Arg (40% and 54.45%); Gln/Gln (19% and 9.90%), and Arg/Gln (41.0% and 35.64%) respectively. Among these 3 genotypes, we found Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln to show association with lung cancer. Correlating these genotypes with several parameters, we also found that these two variants were associated with risk in males (p<0.05) and with smoking habits (p<0.05). In females Arg/Gln genotype showed association with stage of the disease (p=0.04). This is the first report in South Indian scenario where Arg399Gln genotypes were found to be associated with stage of the disease in females. It is concluded that XRCC1 genotypes Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln may influence cancer susceptibility in patients with smoking habits and these functional SNPs in XRCC1 gene may act as attractive candidate biomarkers in lung cancer for diagnosis and prognosis.

  19. Association studies of OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2 and XRCC3 polymorphisms with differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    García-Quispes, Wilser-Andrés; Pérez-Machado, Giselle; Akdi, Abdelmounaim; Pastor, Susana; Galofré, Pere; Biarnés, Fina; Castell, Joan; Velázquez, Antonia; Marcos, Ricard

    2011-05-10

    The role of the DNA repair genes OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2 and XRCC3 on differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) susceptibility was examined in 881 individuals (402 DTC and 479 controls). DNA repair genes were proposed as candidate genes, since the current data indicate that exposure to ionizing radiation is the only established factor in the development of thyroid cancer, especially when it occurs in early stages of life. We have genotyped DNA repair genes involved in base excision repair (BER) (OGG1, Ser326Cys; XRCC1, Arg280His and Arg399Gln), and homologous recombination repair (HRR) (XRCC2, Arg188His and XRCC3, ISV-14G). Genotyping was carried out using the iPLEX (Sequenom) technique. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed in a case-control study design. From all the studied polymorphism, only a positive association (OR=1.58, 95% CI 1.05-2.46, P=0.027) was obtained for XRCC1 (Arg280His). No associations were observed for the other polymorphisms. No effects of the histopathological type of tumor were found when the DTC patients were stratified according to the type of tumor. It must be emphasized that this study include the greater patients group, among the few studies carried out until now determining the role of DNA repair genes in thyroid cancer susceptibility.

  20. The association between four SNPs of X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 and the sensitivity to radiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YAOHONG; LUO, ZHAOYUN; YANG, LIYE; CHEN, SENMING; CHEN, CHUZHI; LIN, ZHIXIONG

    2016-01-01

    Early stage diagnosis and therapeutic outcomes of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma remain poor. In order to evaluate the association between 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of X-ray repair cross complementing protein 1 (XRCC1) and the sensitivity to radiotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), the present study identified 4 SNPs of XRCC1 and evaluated the distribution of these genotypes among patients with ESCC. Venous blood samples from 175 patients with ESCC were collected and DNA was extracted. The 4 SNPs of the XRCC1 gene fragment were amplified using three primer pairs, which were sequenced. The mismatches were analyzed and identified using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool software. The sensitivity to radiotherapy was graded as effective and non-effective, according to the treatment results of the patients. The present study successfully amplified and sequenced 4 SNPs of XRCC1 in 112 out of the 175 patients with ESCC. The effective response rate of radiotherapy was 84.8% among the 112 patients. The effective response rate of patients with no mutation in the SNPs was 74.3%, and the rate increased to 89.6% in patients that had ≥1 mutation out of the 4 SNPs (χ2=4.389; P=0.036). For G28152A and G28152A mutations the effective response rate of patients was 91.2% (χ2=4.014; P=0.045) and 91.5% (χ2=4.451; P=0.035), respectively, which was significantly different compared to patients with no mutation (P=0.045 and P=0.035, respectively). The present results suggest that the 4 SNPs of XRCC1 are associated with the effective response rate of radiotherapy in patients with ESCC. The mutation of SNP G28152A was particularly important and may be a potential genomic predictor for radiotherapy sensitivity in patients with ESCC. PMID:27123143

  1. Genetic polymorphisms of XRCC1, alcohol consumption, and the risk of colorectal cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guang; Morita, Makiko; Ohnaka, Keizo; Toyomura, Kengo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Ueki, Takashi; Tanaka, Masao; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Okamura, Takeshi; Ikejiri, Koji; Futami, Kitaroh; Yasunami, Yohichi; Maekawa, Takefumi; Takenaka, Kenji; Ichimiya, Hitoshi; Terasaka, Reiji

    2012-01-01

    X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) polymorphisms affect DNA repair capacity and may therefore be of importance in colorectal carcinogenesis. Alcohol consumption, an important risk factor for colorectal cancer, may induce carcinogenesis through DNA damage caused by the toxic effects of alcohol or its metabolites. Therefore, we examined the associations of XRCC1 Arg399Gln, Arg280His, and Arg194Trp polymorphisms with colorectal cancer and the impact of the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk. This case-control study in Fukuoka, Japan including 685 cases and 778 controls. The cases were incident patients with histologically confirmed colorectal adenocarcinoma. The controls were randomly selected community subjects. The XRCC1 399Gln/Gln genotype was significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% CI 1.01-2.42; relative to 399Arg/Arg genotype). The association was strongest in individuals with high alcohol consumption. The Arg280His polymorphism modified the association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer risk (interaction P = 0.049). The OR of colorectal cancer in individuals with the 280His allele was 0.45 (95% CI 0.26-0.78) as compared with the 280Arg/Arg genotype limited to the 399Gln allele (interaction P = 0.001). The adjusted ORs for 399Gln/Gln-280Arg/Arg-194Arg/Arg and 399Arg/Gln-280Arg/Arg-194Arg/Trp were 1.71 (95% CI 1.02-2.87) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.05-2.33), respectively, with 399Arg/Arg-280Arg/Arg-194Arg/Arg as reference (interaction P = 0.418). The findings are additional evidence that individuals with the XRCC1 399Gln/Gln genotype have an increased risk of colorectal cancer, and that XRCC1 polymorphisms have an important role in colorectal cancer risk associated with alcohol consumption or gene-gene interaction.

  2. Hsp70 translocates to the nuclei and nucleoli, binds to XRCC1 and PARP-1, and protects HeLa cells from single-strand DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Kotoglou, Polychronis; Kalaitzakis, Alexandros; Vezyraki, Patra; Tzavaras, Theodore; Michalis, Lampros K; Dantzer, Francoise; Jung, Jae U; Angelidis, Charalampos

    2009-07-01

    For many years, there has been uncertainty concerning the reason for Hsp70 translocation to the nucleus and nucleolus. Herein, we propose that Hsp70 translocates to the nucleus and nucleoli in order to participate in pathways related to the protection of the nucleoplasmic DNA or ribosomal DNA from single-strand breaks. The absence of Hsp70 in HeLa cells, via Hsp70 gene silencing (knockdown), indicated the essential role of Hsp70 in DNA integrity. Therefore, HeLa Hsp70 depleted cells were very sensitive in heat treatment and their DNA breaks were multiple compared to that of control HeLa cells. The molecular mechanism with which Hsp70 performs its role at the level of nucleus and nucleolus during stress was examined. Hsp70 co-localizes with PARP1 in the nucleus/nucleoli as was observed in confocal studies and binds to the BCRT domain of PARP1 as was revealed with protein-protein interaction assays. It was also found that Hsp70 binds simultaneously to XRCC1 and PARP-1, indicating that Hsp70 function takes place at the level of DNA repair and possibly at the base excision repair system. Making a hypothetical model, we have suggested that Hsp70 is the molecule that binds and interrelates with PARP1 creating the repair proteins simultaneously, such as XRCC1, at the single-strand DNA breaks. Our data partially clarify a previously unrecognized cellular response to heat stress. Finally, we can speculate that Hsp70 plays a role in the quality and integrity of DNA.

  3. Hsp70 translocates to the nuclei and nucleoli, binds to XRCC1 and PARP-1, and protects HeLa cells from single-strand DNA breaks

    PubMed Central

    Kotoglou, Polychronis; Kalaitzakis, Alexandros; Vezyraki, Patra; Tzavaras, Theodore; Michalis, Lampros K.; Dantzer, Francoise; Jung, Jae U.

    2008-01-01

    For many years, there has been uncertainty concerning the reason for Hsp70 translocation to the nucleus and nucleolus. Herein, we propose that Hsp70 translocates to the nucleus and nucleoli in order to participate in pathways related to the protection of the nucleoplasmic DNA or ribosomal DNA from single-strand breaks. The absence of Hsp70 in HeLa cells, via Hsp70 gene silencing (knockdown), indicated the essential role of Hsp70 in DNA integrity. Therefore, HeLa Hsp70 depleted cells were very sensitive in heat treatment and their DNA breaks were multiple compared to that of control HeLa cells. The molecular mechanism with which Hsp70 performs its role at the level of nucleus and nucleolus during stress was examined. Hsp70 co-localizes with PARP1 in the nucleus/nucleoli as was observed in confocal studies and binds to the BCRT domain of PARP1 as was revealed with protein–protein interaction assays. It was also found that Hsp70 binds simultaneously to XRCC1 and PARP-1, indicating that Hsp70 function takes place at the level of DNA repair and possibly at the base excision repair system. Making a hypothetical model, we have suggested that Hsp70 is the molecule that binds and interrelates with PARP1 creating the repair proteins simultaneously, such as XRCC1, at the single-strand DNA breaks. Our data partially clarify a previously unrecognized cellular response to heat stress. Finally, we can speculate that Hsp70 plays a role in the quality and integrity of DNA. PMID:19089598

  4. Polymorphism in XRCC1 gene modulates survival and clinical outcomes of advanced North Indian lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrita; Singh, Navneet; Behera, Digambar; Sharma, Siddharth

    2017-04-01

    Survival in lung cancer patients is genetically determined. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes are observed to play a critical role in survival as DNA repair itself can behave as double-edged sword. We aim to explore the association of DNA repair gene XRCC1 in survival and clinical outcomes for North Indian population. Blood sample from patients diagnosed with lung cancer was taken. DNA isolation and genotyping were performed for the SNPs of XRCC1 gene. Further, patients were followed up through telephonic conversation after every 2 months for 3 years. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kaplan-Meier to determine the median survival time (MST) and Cox proportional regression model to determine the hazards ratio. Further, logistic regression was used to calculate to calculate the objective response. The mutant genotype for XRCC1 399 is observed to have a better survival (MST = 9.6). Histological stratification did not reveal any association for any SNP except for SCLC subtype in XRCC1 632 with an increased death rate (HR 3.08, p = 0.02). On stratification according to chemotherapy regimen administered; cisplatin/carboplatin + docetaxel was observed to increase survival for XRCC1 399 mutant genotype (AA) (HR 0.26, p = 0.05). Cisplatin/carboplatin + irinotecan increased survival in both heterozygotes (GA) and combined variants (GA + AA) (HR 0.22, p = 0.014; HR 0.23, p = 0.012). The polymorphic variants within the XRCC1 gene have found to play an important role in overall survival of lung cancer patients undergoing specific chemotherapy regimen.

  5. Impact of CYP1A1, GSTP1 and XRCC1 genes polymorphisms on toxicity and response to chemotherapy in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abo-Bakr, Asmaa; Mossallam, Ghada; El Azhary, Nevin; Hafez, Hanafy; Badawy, Ragia

    2017-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. The interindividual genetic variations in drug metabolizing enzymes and DNA repair genes influence the efficacy and toxicity of numerous chemotherapeutic drugs affecting the treatment outcome. The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of drug metabolizing CYP1, GSTP1 and DNA repair (XRCC1) genes polymorphisms on the toxicity and response to chemotherapy in childhood ALL. Ninety seven ALL pediatric patients were genotyped for CYP1A1, GSTP1 ILe105Val and XRCC1 Arg194Tryp single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using PCR-RFLP. No statistically significant differences were observed between the wild and variant (homozygous and heterozygous) genotypes of the polymorphisms studied in CYP1A1, GSTP1 or XRCC1 genes regarding age, total leukocyte count, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic or risk group. The SNPs in CYP1A1, GSTP1 and XRCC1 genes did not show significant association with complete remission (CR) rate, overall survival (OS) or event free survival (EFS). However, XRCC1 Arg194Trp SNP was associated with higher drug toxicity; carriers of variant genotypes (CT and TT) had a significantly higher frequency of myelosuppression compared to those with the wild CC genotype (21/43[48.8%]) compared to (14/54[25.9%]) (p=0.020). The analysis of the combined effect of studied SNPs did not show any significant association with patient outcome. Our study reported a significant association between the DNA repair gene polymorphism and myelosuppression in childhood ALL patients. Adjustment of the dose of chemotherapeutic agents according to XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphism may improve outcome in cases with risk of toxicity. Copyright © 2017 National Cancer Institute, Cairo University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic Polymorphisms in XRCC1, CD3EAP, PPP1R13L, XPB, XPC, and XPF and the Risk of Chronic Benzene Poisoning in a Chinese Occupational Population

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Sha; Zhang, Guopei; Xiao, Mingyang; Zhang, Qianye; Zheng, Xiao; Cai, Yuan; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Wu, Shengwen; Lu, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Individual variations in the capacity of DNA repair machinery to relieve benzene-induced DNA damage may be the key to developing chronic benzene poisoning (CBP), an increasingly prevalent occupational disease in China. ERCC1 (Excision repair cross complementation group 1) is located on chromosome 19q13.2–3 and participates in the crucial steps of Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER); moreover, we determined that one of its polymorphisms, ERCC1 rs11615, is a biomarker for CBP susceptibility in our previous report. Our aim is to further explore the deeper association between some genetic variations related to ERCC1 polymorphisms and CBP risk. Methods Nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1 (X-ray repair cross-complementing 1), CD3EAP (CD3e molecule, epsilon associated protein), PPP1R13L (protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 13 like), XPB (Xeroderma pigmentosum group B), XPC (Xeroderma pigmentosum group C) and XPF (Xeroderma pigmentosum group F) were genotyped by the Snapshot and TaqMan-MGB® probe techniques, in a study involving 102 CBP patients and 204 controls. The potential interactions between these SNPs and lifestyle factors, such as smoking and drinking, were assessed using a stratified analysis. Results An XRCC1 allele, rs25487, was related to a higher risk of CBP (P<0.001) even after stratifying for potential confounders. Carriers of the TT genotype of XRCC1 rs1799782 who were alcohol drinkers (OR = 8.000; 95% CI: 1.316–48.645; P = 0.022), male (OR = 9.333; 95% CI: 1.593–54.672; P = 0.019), and had an exposure of ≤12 years (OR = 2.612; 95% CI: 1.048–6.510; P = 0.035) had an increased risk of CBP. However, the T allele in PPP1R13L rs1005165 (P<0.05) and the GA allele in CD3EAP rs967591 (OR = 0.162; 95% CI: 0039~0.666; P = 0.037) decreased the risk of CBP in men. The haplotype analysis of XRCC1 indicated that XRCC1 rs25487A, rs25489G and rs1799782T (OR = 15.469; 95% CI: 5.536–43.225; P<0.001) were associated with a high

  7. XRCC-1 Gene Polymorphism (Arg399Gln) and Susceptibility to Development of Lung Cancer in Cohort of North Indian Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, Mohit; Mohapatra, Debabratta; Grover, Rajesh K; Puri, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Smoking has been considered to be the major cause of lung cancer. However, only a fraction of cigarette smokers develop this disease. This suggests the importance of genetic constitution in predicting the individual’s susceptibility towards lung cancer. This genetic susceptibility may result from inherited polymorphisms in genes controlling carcinogen metabolism and repair of damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). These repair systems are fundamental to the maintenance of genomic integrity. X-ray repair cross complimenting group I (XRCC1), a major DNA repair gene in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. It is involved in repair by interacting with components of DNA at the site of damage. Inconsistent results have been reported regarding the associations between the Arg399Gln polymorphism of XRCC1. This study demonstrates the importance of recognition of this relationship of lung carcinoma and genetic constitution of the person which will help guide clinicians on the optimal screening of this disease. Aim: To assess the role of XRCC1 gene polymorphism (Arg399Gln) directly on the variation in susceptibility to development of lung cancer in North Indian subjects. Materials and Methods: One hundred males with diagnosed cases of lung cancer were recruited from Delhi State Cancer Institute (DSCI). Hundred healthy volunteers were taken as controls. DNA isolation was done and Polymerase chain reaction–Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) procedure undertaken to amplify the region containing Arg/Gln substitution at codon 399 (in exon 10). Results: XRCC1 gene polymorphism is associated with increased risk of lung cancer when the Arg/Arg genotype was used as the reference group. The Arg/Gln and Gln/Gln was associated with statistically increased risk for cancer. Conclusion: Arg399Gln polymorphism in XRCC1 gene polymorphism is associated with lung cancer in North Indian subjects and screening for this polymorphism will help in targeting

  8. Polymorphism of the XRCC1 Gene Is Associated with Susceptibility and Short-Term Recovery of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Huang, Peng; Liu, Dinghua; Zhong, Lingling; Yu, Rongbin; Li, Jianan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Base excision repair (BER) is the primary DNA repair system with the ability to fix base lesions caused by oxidative damage. Genetic variants influencing the BER pathway may affect the susceptibility and the outcomes of ischemic stroke. Here, we examined how single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BER impact susceptibility and short-term recovery of ischemic stroke. Methods: We selected 320 ischemic stroke patients and 303 controls. Then we genotyped SNPs of NEIL1 rs4462560, NEIL3 rs12645561 and XRCC1 rs25487 in both groups. Results: Polymorphism in XRCC1 rs25487 was significantly associated with reduced ischemic stroke (IS) risk (dominant model: OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.36–0.79, p = 0.002), a milder initial stroke (dominant model: OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.33–0.98, p = 0.043), and also a better short-term recovery (dominant model: OR = 0.57, 95% CI = 0.35–0.92, p = 0.022). No association was observed in the other two SNPs. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the genetic variant of XRCC1 rs25487 may contribute to the etiology of ischemic stroke. PMID:27763529

  9. XRCC1, but not APE1 and hOGG1 gene polymorphisms is a risk factor for pterygium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Liang; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Tsai, Yi-Yu; Koeh, Hank; Liu, Yu-Ling; Lee, Huei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Epidemiological evidence suggests that UV irradiation plays an important role in pterygium pathogenesis. UV irradiation can produce a wide range of DNA damage. The base excision repair (BER) pathway is considered the most important pathway involved in the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. Based on previous studies, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-1 (OGG1), X-ray repair cross-complementing-1 (XRCC1), and AP-endonuclease-1 (APE1) genes in the BER pathway have been found to affect the individual sensitivity to radiation exposure and induction of DNA damage. Therefore, we hypothesize that the genetic polymorphisms of these repair genes increase the risk of pterygium. Methods XRCC1, APE1, and hOGG1 polymorphisms were studied using fluorescence-labeled Taq Man probes on 83 pterygial specimens and 206 normal controls. Results There was a significant difference between the case and control groups in the XRCC1 genotype (p=0.038) but not in hOGG1 (p=0.383) and APE1 (p=0.898). The odds ratio of the XRCC1 A/G polymorphism was 2.592 (95% CI=1.225–5.484, p=0.013) and the G/G polymorphism was 1.212 (95% CI=0.914–1.607), compared to the A/A wild-type genotype. Moreover, individuals who carried at least one C-allele (A/G and G/G) had a 1.710 fold increased risk of developing pterygium compared to those who carried the A/A wild type genotype (OR=1.710; 95% CI: 1.015–2.882, p=0.044). The hOGG1 and APE1 polymorphisms did not have an increased odds ratio compared with the wild type. Conclusions XRCC1 (Arg399 Glu) is correlated with pterygium and might become a potential marker for the prediction of pterygium susceptibility. PMID:20577654

  10. Senile cataract and genetic polymorphisms of APE1, XRCC1 and OGG1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Lai, Qiaohong; Zhang, Shu; Hu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms of DNA repair enzymes which may influence their repair efficiency lead to diseases, for example, senile cataract. In this study, we aimed to analyze the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in AP endonuclease-1 (APE1), 8-oxoguanine glycosylase-1 (OGG1) and X-ray repair cross-complementing-1 (XRCC1) genes with the risk of age-related cataract in a Chinese population. Genotyping was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing on 402 cataract patients and 813 controls in this study. Differences in the frequencies were estimated by the chi-square test, and risk was estimated using unconditional logistic regression after adjusting for age and gender. Our results demonstrated there was a significant difference between the case and control groups in the APE1-141 G/G genotype (P=0.002). This difference still existed after adjusting for age and gender (P*=0.003). The APE1-141 T/T genotype and T allele frequencies were significantly higher in cataract patients, while the G/G genotype and G allele frequencies in patients were significantly lower than in controls (P < 0.05). The APE1-141 G/G genotype (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31-0.77) seems to have a protective role against cataract, and the T allele seems to have a deleterious role in the development of cataract. In OGG1 Ser326Cys and XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphisms, there were no significant differences in frequencies of the variant homozygous in patients compared with controls.

  11. Associations between XRCC1 and ERCC2 polymorphisms and DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocyte among coke oven workers.

    PubMed

    Leng, Shuguang; Cheng, Juan; Pan, Zufei; Huang, Chuanfeng; Niu, Yong; Dai, Yufei; Li, Bin; He, Fengsheng; Zheng, Yuxin

    2004-01-01

    A wide variety of base damages and single-strand breaks formed by reactive oxygen species during metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been recognized to be involved in PAH carcinogenesis. In this study, alkaline comet assay was used to detect the DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes among 143 coke-oven workers and 50 non-coke-oven workers, and the effects of genetic polymorphisms of XRCC1 and ERCC2 genes on DNA damage were evaluated. The olive tail moment was significantly higher in coke-oven workers than in non-coke-oven workers (2.6, 95% CI=2.1-3.3 versus 1.0, 95% CI=0.8-1.2, p<0.01), and significant correlation between ln-transformed urinary 1-OHP and ln-transformed olive tail moment was found in total population (n=193, Pearson's r=0.393, p<0.001) and in coke-oven workers (n=143, Pearson's r=0.224, p=0.007). The olive tail moment was significantly higher in coke-oven workers with GA genotype of G27466A polymorphism of XRCC1 than those with GG genotype (4.6, 95% CI=2.5-8.7 versus 2.4, 95% CI=1.9-2.9, p<0.01 with adjustment for covariates). No significant associations between C26304T, G28152A and G36189A polymorphisms of XRCC1 and G23591A and A35931C polymorphisms of ERCC2 and olive tail moment were found in both groups. The study showed that the alkaline comet assay is a suitable biomarker in the detection of DNA damage among coke-oven workers and it suggested that the A allele of G27466A polymorphism of XRCC1 may be associated with decreased DNA repair capacity toward PAH-induced base damage and strand breaks.

  12. Association Between XRCC1 and WRN as Genetic Markers of Stability and Susceptibility to Cancer in Patients with HIV/AIDS and Cancer: a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Gabriel de Carvalho; Terra, Orlando Nascimento; Arnóbio, Adriano; Alfradique, Guilherme Rohem; Ornellas, Maria Helena; da Silva, Roberto Irineu; de Lima, Dirce Bonfim

    2017-01-01

    Background: HIV-induced immunodeficiency has been implicated as a key factor for risk of cancer. Neoplasia is considered to result from accumulation of damage to the genome. Polymorphisms in repair genes, such as the XRCC1 and WRN, have been associated with susceptibility to development of cancer in patients with HIV/AIDS. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) and WRN (Cys1367Arg) in patients with HIV/AIDS with or without cancer. Materials and Methods: Genotyping for analysis of polymorphisms was carried out by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) and RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism). Results: In the genotypic and allelic analysis, no increased risk of cancer was observed with any genotype or allele of XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) singly (prevalence ratio 2.82; p-value= 0.24). However, with the WRN (Cys1367Arg) gene, the heterozygous genotype and arginine allele were associated with increased risk (prevalence ratio= 25.62; p-value= 0.0001). Correlation analysis showed no association between gender and the risk (male p-value= 0.639 and women p-value> 1); however, a positive association for the increased risk of cancer was shown with XRCC1 (Arg399Arg) wild-type homozygous and WRN (Cys1367Arg) heterozygous (p-value< 0.001), with heterozygous XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) and WRN (Cys1367Arg) (p-value< 0.001), and with variant homozygous XRCC1 (Gln399Gln) and heterozygous WRN (Cys1367Arg) (p-value< 0.001). Conclusions: There is no increased risk of cancer in patients who are HIV/AIDS carriers of the XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) gene singly. However, there is a high risk in patients with HIV/AIDS who have the heterozygous genotype and the arginine allele in the WRN (Cys1367Arg) gene singly. Those with WRN (Cys1367Arg) heterozygote genotype showed a high risk of cancer with all genotypes of the XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) gene. PMID:28440612

  13. XRCC1 Polymorphism Associated With Late Toxicity After Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Seibold, Petra; Behrens, Sabine; Schmezer, Peter; Helmbold, Irmgard; Barnett, Gillian; Coles, Charlotte; Yarnold, John; Talbot, Christopher J.; Imai, Takashi; Azria, David; Koch, C. Anne; Dunning, Alison M.; Burnet, Neil; Bliss, Judith M.; Symonds, R. Paul; Rattay, Tim; Suga, Tomo; Kerns, Sarah L.; and others

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in oxidative stress–related genes associated with risk of late toxicities in breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Using a 2-stage design, 305 SNPs in 59 candidate genes were investigated in the discovery phase in 753 breast cancer patients from 2 prospective cohorts from Germany. The 10 most promising SNPs in 4 genes were evaluated in the replication phase in up to 1883 breast cancer patients from 6 cohorts identified through the Radiogenomics Consortium. Outcomes of interest were late skin toxicity and fibrosis of the breast, as well as an overall toxicity score (Standardized Total Average Toxicity). Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to assess associations between SNPs and late toxicity. A meta-analysis approach was used to summarize evidence. Results: The association of a genetic variant in the base excision repair gene XRCC1, rs2682585, with normal tissue late radiation toxicity was replicated in all tested studies. In the combined analysis of discovery and replication cohorts, carrying the rare allele was associated with a significantly lower risk of skin toxicities (multivariate odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.96, P=.02) and a decrease in Standardized Total Average Toxicity scores (−0.08, 95% confidence interval −0.15 to −0.02, P=.016). Conclusions: Using a stage design with replication, we identified a variant allele in the base excision repair gene XRCC1 that could be used in combination with additional variants for developing a test to predict late toxicities after radiation therapy in breast cancer patients.

  14. XRCC1 Polymorphism Associated With Late Toxicity After Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Petra; Behrens, Sabine; Schmezer, Peter; Helmbold, Irmgard; Barnett, Gillian; Coles, Charlotte; Yarnold, John; Talbot, Christopher J; Imai, Takashi; Azria, David; Koch, C Anne; Dunning, Alison M; Burnet, Neil; Bliss, Judith M; Symonds, R Paul; Rattay, Tim; Suga, Tomo; Kerns, Sarah L; Bourgier, Celine; Vallis, Katherine A; Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise; Claßen, Johannes; Debus, Juergen; Schnabel, Thomas; Rosenstein, Barry S; Wenz, Frederik; West, Catharine M; Popanda, Odilia; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2015-08-01

    To identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in oxidative stress-related genes associated with risk of late toxicities in breast cancer patients receiving radiation therapy. Using a 2-stage design, 305 SNPs in 59 candidate genes were investigated in the discovery phase in 753 breast cancer patients from 2 prospective cohorts from Germany. The 10 most promising SNPs in 4 genes were evaluated in the replication phase in up to 1883 breast cancer patients from 6 cohorts identified through the Radiogenomics Consortium. Outcomes of interest were late skin toxicity and fibrosis of the breast, as well as an overall toxicity score (Standardized Total Average Toxicity). Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were used to assess associations between SNPs and late toxicity. A meta-analysis approach was used to summarize evidence. The association of a genetic variant in the base excision repair gene XRCC1, rs2682585, with normal tissue late radiation toxicity was replicated in all tested studies. In the combined analysis of discovery and replication cohorts, carrying the rare allele was associated with a significantly lower risk of skin toxicities (multivariate odds ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.96, P=.02) and a decrease in Standardized Total Average Toxicity scores (-0.08, 95% confidence interval -0.15 to -0.02, P=.016). Using a stage design with replication, we identified a variant allele in the base excision repair gene XRCC1 that could be used in combination with additional variants for developing a test to predict late toxicities after radiation therapy in breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. XRCC1 genetic polymorphism Arg399Gln and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Li, Bo; Wei, Yonggang; Yan, Lvnan; Wen, Tianfu; Zhao, Jichun; Xu, Mingqing

    2011-07-01

    Studies investigating the association between X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) genetic polymorphism Arg399Gln and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk report conflicting results. The aim of this study was to quantitatively summarize the evidence for such a relationship. Two investigators independently searched the Medline, Embase, CNKI and Chinese Biomedicine Database. Summary odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for XRCC1 polymorphism and HCC were calculated in a fixed-effects model (the Mantel-Haenszel method) and a random-effects model (the DerSimonian and Laird method) when appropriate. The pooled ORs were performed for a codominant model (Gln/Gln vs. Arg/Arg, Arg/Gln vs. Arg/Arg), a dominant model (Gln/Gln+Arg/Gln vs. Arg/Arg) and a recessive model (Gln/Gln vs. Arg/Gln+Arg/Arg). This meta-analysis included 11 case-control studies, which included 2208 HCC cases and 3265 controls. Overall, the variant genotypes (Gln/Gln and Arg/Gln) of Arg399Gln were not associated with HCC risk when compared with the wild-type Arg/Arg homozygote (Gln/Gln vs. Arg/Arg, OR=1.01, 95% CI=0.79-1.28; Arg/Gln vs. Arg/Arg, OR=1.09, 95% CI=0.81-1.45). Similarly, no associations were found in the dominant and recessive models (dominant model, OR=1.12, 95% CI=0.85-1.47; recessive model, OR=0.99, 95% CI=0.79-1.25). Limiting the analysis to the studies within Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, the results were persistent and robust. When stratifying for ethnicity, country/region and source of controls, no evidence of a significant association was observed in any subgroup. No publication bias was found in the present study. No association is found between the XRCC1 polymorphism Arg399Gln and the risk of HCC. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. XRCC1 gene polymorphisms and risk of ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee; Boonsuwan, Titiporn; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Kitkumthorn, Nakarin

    2013-06-01

    Ameloblastoma is a common benign odontogenic tumour with inherently aggressive behaviour. Genetic susceptibility of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) can likely predict ameloblastoma at risk patients but this data remains limited. Here, we studied XRCC1 polymorphism as a risk factor for ameloblastoma. Eighty-two ameloblastoma samples and blood from 140 healthy controls were used to perform polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for XRCC1 at codons 194, 280 and 399, and confirmed by sequence analysis. Compare to healthy control, a significant increase was noted in the occurrence of polymorphism at codon 194 and 399 in ameloblastoma patients. At codon 194, tryptophan encoded by T, was the susceptibility allele showed an ODD ratio of (95% CI)=1.62 (1.05-2.48), p=0.027. At codon 399, glycine encoded by A was the susceptibility allele showing ODD ratio of (95% CI)=1.83 (1.19-2.84), p=0.005. Moreover at codon 399, we found AG as the susceptibility genotype (2.06 (1.14-3.72), p=0.015). However, we did not find any significant increase in polymorphic occurrence in ameloblastoma patients at codon 280. For haplotype analysis of 3 codons, we found GGC as protective haplotype, and AGT as the risk haplotype. Our data suggest that polymorphism at codons 194 and 399, likely contributes to the risk of developing ameloblastoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ERCC1, XRCC1 and GSTP1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Survival of Patients with Colon Cancer Receiving Oxaliplatin-Based Adjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zaanan, Aziz; Dalban, Cécile; Emile, Jean-François; Blons, Hélène; Fléjou, Jean-François; Goumard, Claire; Istanbullu, Melek; Calmel, Claire; Alhazmi, Khalid; Validire, Pierre; Louvet, Christophe; de Gramont, Aimery; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Taïeb, Julien; Praz, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Background: While single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in genes involved in DNA repair or drug metabolism have been shown to influence survival of metastatic colon cancer patients treated with FOLFOX, data on adjuvant setting are scarce. Methods: This study evaluated the correlation between disease-free survival (DFS) of 210 unselected stage III colon cancer patients receiving FOLFOX chemotherapy, and ERCC1-118 (rs11615, c.354T>C), XRCC1-399 (rs25487, c.1196G>A) and GSTP1-105 (rs1695, c.313A>G) polymorphisms. SNP were determined on tumor DNA using a PCR-based RFLP technique. Results: In univariate analysis, a trend towards longer DFS was observed for ERCC1 (C/T + T/T) versus (C/C) (HR=2.29; p=0.06), and XRCC1 (A/A) versus (G/G + G/A) (HR=1.61; p=0.16), but not for GSTP1 genotypes; a statistically significant p value was obtained when combining ERCC1 and XRCC1 favorable genotypes (0 versus ≥ 1 favorable genotypes, HR=2.42; p=0.02). After adjustment on tumor stage, lymph node ratio and differentiation grade, multivariate analysis showed that combining ERCC1 and XRCC1 genotypes gave a p value slightly above the threshold for statistical significance (HR=2.03; p=0.06), which was lower than for tumor stage, lymph node ratio or differentiation grade. Conclusion: The association of ERCC1 and XRCC1 polymorphisms may influence the prognosis of stage III colon cancer patients treated with FOLFOX adjuvant chemotherapy. Yet, these findings need to be confirmed in independent prospective studies. PMID:24847383

  18. XRCC1 codon 280 and ERCC2 codon 751 polymorphisms and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xian-Dun; Mo, Yao-Nan; Xue, Xiao-Qi; Zhao, Gui-Sen; Gao, Lin-Bo; Ai, Hong-Wei; Ye, Yi

    2009-10-01

    Numerous candidate genes have been proposed as susceptibility factors for the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). XRCC1 (X-ray cross-complementing group 1) codon 280 and ERCC2 (excision repair cross complementing group 2) codon 751 polymorphisms were studied in ESCC in a Chinese population. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of XRCC1 codon 280 His and ERCC2 codon 751 Gln polymorphisms and ESCC. Peripheral blood samples of 200 cases and 200 age-and-gender matching controls were collected from a Chinese population and the two polymorphisms were studied by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. Our results showed that XRCC1 codon 280 His allele had no significant difference between ESCC patients and normal controls (P > 0.05), while ERCC2 codon 751Gln allele was associated with a borderline decrease of ESCC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.628, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.400-0.986).

  19. Gene-environment interactions between ERCC2, ERCC3, XRCC1 and cadmium exposure in nasal polyposis disease.

    PubMed

    Khlifi, Rim; Olmedo, Pablo; Gil, Fernando; Hammami, Boutheina; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel; Rebai, Ahmed

    2016-11-12

    Gene-environment interactions have long been known to play an important role in complex disease aetiology, such as nasal polyposis (NP). The present study supports the concept that DNA repair gene polymorphisms play critical roles in modifying individual susceptibility to environmental diseases. In fact, we investigated the role of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and cadmium as risk factors for Tunisian patients with NP. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the impact of combined effects of cadmium and ERCC3 7122 A>G (rs4150407), ERCC2 Lys751Gln (rs13181) and XRCC1 Arg399Gln (rs25487) genes in the susceptibility to NP disease. Significant associations between the risk of developing NP disease and ERCC2 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.0, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-3.7, p = 0.023] and ERCC3 (OR = 2.2, 95 % CI = 1.2-4.1, p = 0.013) genotypes polymorphisms were observed. Blood concentrations of Cd in NP patients (2.2 μg/L) were significantly higher than those of controls (0.5 μg/L). A significant interaction between ERCC3 (7122 A>G) polymorphism and blood-Cd levels (for the median of blood-Cd levels: OR = 3.8, 95 % CI = 1.3-10.8, p = 0.014 and for the 75th percentiles of blood-Cd levels: OR = 2.7, 95 % CI = 1.1-7.2, p = 0.041) was found in association with the risk of NP disease. In addition, when we stratified ERCC2, ERCC3 and XRCC1 polymorphism genotypes by the median and 75th percentiles of blood-Cd levels, we found also significant interactions between ERCC2 (Lys751Gln) and ERCC3 (7122 A>G) genotypes polymorphism and this metal in association with NP disease. However, no interaction was found between XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) polymorphism genotypes and Cd in association with NP disease.

  20. X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 and 3 polymorphisms and susceptibility of breast cancer in a Jordanian population

    PubMed Central

    Zoubi, Mazhar S. Al

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the contribution of x-ray repair cross-complementing (XRCC) protein 1 399Gln, XRCC3 241M, and XRCC3-5’-UTR polymorphisms to the susceptibility of breast cancer (BC) in a Jordanian population. Methods: Forty-six formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples from BC diagnosed female patients, and 31 samples from the control group were subjected to DNA sequencing. Samples were collected between September 2013 and December 2014. Results: The XRCC1 Arg399Gln genotype did not exhibit any significant correlation with the susceptibility of BC (odds ratio [OR]=1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.60-3.51) (p=0.47). Likewise, XRCC3 M241T genotype did not show significant correlation with BC (OR=2.02, 95% CI: 0.50-8.21) (p=0.40). However, distribution of XRCC3-5’UTR (rs1799794 A/G) genotype showed a significant difference between the patient and control group (OR=0.73, 95% CI: 0.06-8.46) (p=0.02). Conclusion: The XRCC3-5’UTR (rs1799794) G allele frequency was higher in cancer patients while XRCC1 (rs25487) and XRCC3 (rs861539) did not show any significant correlation with susceptibility of BC in the selected Jordanian population. Contribution of other environmental factors should be studied in future works, as well as the response of cancer therapy. PMID:26446325

  1. Association between XRCC1 and XRCC3 gene polymorphisms and risk of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xufu; Zhang, Kunpeng; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhenguang

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to examine the role of genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1 at codons 194 (Arg>Trp), 280 (Arg>His) and 399 (Arg>Gln) and XRCC3 at codon 241 (Thr>Met) in the risk of TC. This study included 276 consecutive primary TC patients and 552 control subjects. The genotypes of XRCC1 at codons 194 (Arg>Trp), 280 (Arg>His) and 399 (Arg>Gln) and XRCC3 at codon 241 (Thr>Met) were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. TT and CT+TT genotypes of XRCC1 194 (Arg>Trp) were significantly associated with increased risk of TC, and CC and TC+CC genotypes of XRCC3 241 (Thr>Met) revealed a significant associated with the TC risk. We only found that XRCC1 194 (Arg>Trp) and XRCC3 241 (Thr>Met) polymorphisms had interaction with smoking and drinking habits. In conclusion, the current study suggests that XRCC1 194 (Arg>Trp) and XRCC3 241 (Thr>Met) polymorphisms may be associated with TC risk in a Chinese population, especially in smokers and drinkers.

  2. Association between XRCC1 and ERCC1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and the efficacy of concurrent radiochemotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xue; Liu, Changmin; Cui, Yayun; Zhang, Heping; Liu, Yongping; Zhou, Xifa; Luo, Judong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in X-ray repair cross-complementing 1–399 (XRCC1-399) or excision repair cross-complementation group 1–118 (ERCC1-118) and the short-term efficacy of radiochemotherapy, tumor metastasis and relapse, as well as the survival time in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). TaqMan probe-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was conducted to examine the levels of XRCC1-399 and ERCC1-118 SNPs in the peripheral blood of 50 patients with pathologically confirmed ESCC. In addition, the associations between different genotypes and short-term therapeutic efficacy [the complete remission (CR) rate], tumor metastasis and relapse, as well as the survival time following concurrent radiochemotherapy, were determined. A total of 50 ESCC patients who received concurrent radiochemotherapy were enrolled. It was found that the short-term therapeutic efficacy (CR rate) was higher in the group of patients carrying the homozygous mutation of XRCC1-399 (A/A genotype) than in the group of patients without the XRCC1-399 mutation (G/G genotype). In addition, the CR rate was significantly increased in patients carrying one or two ERCC1-118 C alleles (C/C or C/T genotype) compared with patients lacking the C allele (T/T genotype). The differences were statistically significant (A/A vs. G/G, P=0.014; TT vs. C/T+C/C, P=0.040). During the follow-up period, the group of patients carrying the homozygous mutation of XRCC1-399 (A/A genotype) exhibited a markedly reduced risk of metastasis and relapse compared with the group of patients carrying non-mutated XRCC1-399 (G/G genotype; P=0.031). By contrast, ERCC1-118 SNP was not associated with the risk of metastasis and recurrence (P>0.05). The combined results of univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the SNP in ERCC1-118 was closely associated with survival time. The mean survival

  3. Association between XRCC1 and ERCC1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and the efficacy of concurrent radiochemotherapy in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xue; Liu, Changmin; Cui, Yayun; Zhang, Heping; Liu, Yongping; Zhou, Xifa; Luo, Judong

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in X-ray repair cross-complementing 1-399 (XRCC1-399) or excision repair cross-complementation group 1-118 (ERCC1-118) and the short-term efficacy of radiochemotherapy, tumor metastasis and relapse, as well as the survival time in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). TaqMan probe-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was conducted to examine the levels of XRCC1-399 and ERCC1-118 SNPs in the peripheral blood of 50 patients with pathologically confirmed ESCC. In addition, the associations between different genotypes and short-term therapeutic efficacy [the complete remission (CR) rate], tumor metastasis and relapse, as well as the survival time following concurrent radiochemotherapy, were determined. A total of 50 ESCC patients who received concurrent radiochemotherapy were enrolled. It was found that the short-term therapeutic efficacy (CR rate) was higher in the group of patients carrying the homozygous mutation of XRCC1-399 (A/A genotype) than in the group of patients without the XRCC1-399 mutation (G/G genotype). In addition, the CR rate was significantly increased in patients carrying one or two ERCC1-118 C alleles (C/C or C/T genotype) compared with patients lacking the C allele (T/T genotype). The differences were statistically significant (A/A vs. G/G, P=0.014; TT vs. C/T+C/C, P=0.040). During the follow-up period, the group of patients carrying the homozygous mutation of XRCC1-399 (A/A genotype) exhibited a markedly reduced risk of metastasis and relapse compared with the group of patients carrying non-mutated XRCC1-399 (G/G genotype; P=0.031). By contrast, ERCC1-118 SNP was not associated with the risk of metastasis and recurrence (P>0.05). The combined results of univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that the SNP in ERCC1-118 was closely associated with survival time. The mean survival time

  4. Potential Role of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of XRCC1, XRCC3, and RAD51 in Predicting Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Preoperative Radiochemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Osti, Mattia F; Nicosia, Luca; Agolli, Linda; Gentile, Giovanna; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; Di Nardo, Francesco; Minniti, Giuseppe; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Valeriani, Maurizio; Maglio, Marianna; Borro, Marina; Simmaco, Maurizio; Enrici, Riccardo M

    2015-03-24

    To investigate the association between polymorphisms of DNA repair genes and xenobiotic with acute adverse effects in locally advanced rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. Sixty-seven patients were analyzed for the current study. Genotypes in DNA repair genes XRCC1 (G28152A), XRCC3 (A4541G), XRCC3 (C18067T), RAD51 (G315C), and GSTP1 (A313G) were determined by pyrosequencing technology. The observed grade ≥3 acute toxicity rates were 23.8%. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were interrupted for 46 and 14 days, respectively, due to critical complications. Four patients were hospitalized, 6 patients had been admitted to the ER, and 5 patients received invasive procedures (2 bladder catheters, 2 blood transfusions, and 1 growth factor therapy).RAD51 correlated with acute severe gastrointestinal toxicity in heterozygosity (Aa) and homozygosity (AA) (P=0.036). Grade ≥3 abdominal/pelvis pain toxicity was higher in the Aa group (P=0.017) and in the Aa+AA group (P=0.027) compared with homozygous (aa) patients. Acute skin toxicity of any grade occurred in 55.6% of the mutated patients versus 22.8% in the wild-type group (P=0.04) for RAD51. XRCC1 correlated with skin toxicity of any grade in the Aa+AA group (P=0.03) and in the Aa group alone (P=0.044). Grade ≥3 urinary frequency/urgency was significantly higher in patients with AA (P=0.01), Aa (P=0.022), and Aa+AA (P=0.031) for XRCC3 compared with aa group. Our study suggested that RAD51, XRCC1, and XRCC3 polymorphisms may be predictive factors for radiation-induced acute toxicity in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative combined therapy.

  5. XRCC1 gene polymorphism, diet and risk of colorectal cancer in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Poomphakwaen, Kirati; Promthet, Supannee; Suwanrungruang, Krittika; Chopjitt, Peechanika; Songserm, Nopparat; Wiangnon, Surapon

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the interaction between the presence of a polymorphism of the XRCC1 gene and known risk factors for colorectal cancer in Thailand. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in Thailand. The participants were 230 histologically confirmed new cases and 230 controls matched by sex and age and recruited from the same hospital. Information about demographic characteristics, life style, and dietary habits was collected using structured interviews, and blood samples were taken which were used for the detection of a homozygous and heterozygous polymorphisms of XRCC1. Associations were assessed using multiple conditional logistic regression. In the univariate analysis, factors found to be significantly associated with an increased risk for CRC were the presence of the XRCC1 AA homozygote (OR= 4.95; 95% CI: 1.99-12.3), a first degree family history of cancer (OR= 1.74; 95% CI: 1.18-2.58), and a high frequency of pork consumption (OR= 1.49; 95% CI: 1.00-2.21). Intakes of fish fruit and vegetables appeared to be protective factors, but the associations were not statistically significant. In the multivariate analysis only the XRCC1 AA homozygote polymorphism and a family history of cancer emerged as risk factors (OR= 4.96; 95% CI: 1.90- 12.95 and OR=1.80; 95% CI: 1.18-2.72, respectively). While the XRCC1 AA homozygote and a family history of cancer were found to be associated with an increased risk of CRC, none of the dietary intake variables were clearly identified as risk or protective factors. There is a need for further research to determine the reasons for this.

  6. XRCC1 Arg399Gln Polymorphism Confers Risk of Breast Cancer in American Population: A Meta-Analysis of 10846 Cases and 11723 Controls

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Zhao, Li; Peng, Yang; Zhou, Shudong; Li, Lixia; Chen, Sidong; Gao, Yanhui

    2014-01-01

    Background In the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene, a polymorphism, Arg399Gln (rs25487), has been shown to change neoconservative amino acid and thus result in alternation of DNA repair capacity. Numerous studies have investigated the association between Arg399Gln and breast cancer risk in the American population, but yielding inconsistent results. This study aimed to clarify the role of this polymorphism in susceptibility to breast cancer. Methods Literatures were searched in multiple databases including PubMed, Springer Link, Ovid, EBSCO and ScienceDirect databases up to April 2013. A comprehensive meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the overall odds ratio (OR), by integrating data from 18 case control studies of 10846 cases and 11723 controls in the American population. Results Overall, significant association was observed between the Arg399Gln polymorphism and breast cancer risk under the random-effects model (OR for dominant model = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.02–1.24, Pheterogeneity = 0.003; OR for additive model = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01–1.14, Pheterogeneity = 0.017). Further sensitivity analysis supported the robust stability of this current result by showing similar ORs before and after removal of a single study. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism may significantly contribute to susceptibility of breast cancer in the American population. PMID:24489692

  7. Common variants of eNOS and XRCC1 genes may predict acute skin toxicity in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Terrazzino, Salvatore; La Mattina, Pierdaniele; Masini, Laura; Caltavuturo, Tina; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Genazzani, Armando A; Krengli, Marco

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of functional polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair mechanisms (XRCC1, TP53, MSH2, MSH3, XPD), oxidative stress response (GSTP1, GSTA1, eNOS, SOD2) and fibroblast proliferation (TGFβ1) on the risk of acute skin toxicity in breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Skin toxicity was scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria in 286 breast cancer patients who received radiotherapy after breast conserving surgery. Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP analysis and real-time PCR allelic discrimination assay on genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood. In the multivariate analysis, nominally significant associations, before multiple testing corrections, were found between XRCC1 T-77C (T carriers vs. CC, OR: 2.240, 95% CI: 1.015-4.941, P=0.046), eNOS G894T polymorphisms (TT vs. G carriers, OR: 2.473, 95% CI: 1.220-5.012, P=0.012), breast diameter (OR: 1.138, 95% CI: 1.001-1.293, P=0.048), boost dose-fractionation (3 Gy vs. no boost, OR: 4.902, 95% CI: 1.458-16.483, P=0.010) and ≥ grade 2 acute radiation skin toxicity in breast cancer patients. As our exploratory study suggests that XRCC1 T-77C and eNOS G874T may confer an increased risk of acute skin reactions to radiotherapy in breast cancer patients, further confirmatory studies are warranted to determine the clinical significance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA-Protein Crosslink Proteolysis Repair.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Bruno; Popovic, Marta; Ramadan, Kristijan

    2017-06-01

    Proteins that are covalently bound to DNA constitute a specific type of DNA lesion known as DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs). DPCs represent physical obstacles to the progression of DNA replication. If not repaired, DPCs cause stalling of DNA replication forks that consequently leads to DNA double-strand breaks, the most cytotoxic DNA lesion. Although DPCs are common DNA lesions, the mechanism of DPC repair was unclear until now. Recent work unveiled that DPC repair is orchestrated by proteolysis performed by two distinct metalloproteases, SPARTAN in metazoans and Wss1 in yeast. This review summarizes recent discoveries on two proteases in DNA replication-coupled DPC repair and establishes DPC proteolysis repair as a separate DNA repair pathway for genome stability and protection from accelerated aging and cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms of DNA-protein crosslink repair.

    PubMed

    Stingele, Julian; Bellelli, Roberto; Boulton, Simon J

    2017-09-01

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs, also known as protein adducts) of topoisomerases and other proteins with DNA are highly toxic DNA lesions. Of note, chemical agents that induce DPCs include widely used classes of chemotherapeutics. Their bulkiness blocks virtually every chromatin-based process and makes them intractable for repair by canonical repair pathways. Distinct DPC repair pathways employ unique points of attack and are crucial for the maintenance of genome stability. Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterases (TDPs) directly hydrolyse the covalent linkage between protein and DNA. The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) nuclease complex targets the DNA component of DPCs, excising the fragment affected by the lesion, whereas proteases of the spartan (SPRTN)/weak suppressor of SMT3 protein 1 (Wss1) family target the protein component. Loss of these pathways renders cells sensitive to DPC-inducing chemotherapeutics, and DPC repair pathways are thus attractive targets for combination cancer therapy.

  10. Requirement for Parp-1 and DNA ligases 1 or 3 but not of Xrcc1 in chromosomal translocation formation by backup end joining.

    PubMed

    Soni, Aashish; Siemann, Maria; Grabos, Martha; Murmann, Tamara; Pantelias, Gabriel E; Iliakis, George

    2014-06-01

    In mammalian cells, ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired in all phases of the cell cycle predominantly by classical, DNA-PK-dependent nonhomologous end joining (D-NHEJ). Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is functional during the S- and G2-phases, when a sister chromatid becomes available. An error-prone, alternative form of end joining, operating as backup (B-NHEJ) functions robustly throughout the cell cycle and particularly in the G2-phase and is thought to backup predominantly D-NHEJ. Parp-1, DNA-ligases 1 (Lig1) and 3 (Lig3), and Xrcc1 are implicated in B-NHEJ. Chromosome and chromatid translocations are manifestations of erroneous DSB repair and are crucial culprits in malignant transformation and IR-induced cell lethality. We analyzed shifts in translocation formation deriving from defects in D-NHEJ or HRR in cells irradiated in the G2-phase and identify B-NHEJ as the main DSB repair pathway backing up both of these defects at the cost of a large increase in translocation formation. Our results identify Parp-1 and Lig1 and 3 as factors involved in translocation formation and show that Xrcc1 reinforces the function of Lig3 in the process without being required for it. Finally, we demonstrate intriguing connections between B-NHEJ and DNA end resection in translocation formation and show that, as for D-NHEJ and HRR, the function of B-NHEJ facilitates the recovery from the G2-checkpoint. These observations advance our understanding of chromosome aberration formation and have implications for the mechanism of action of Parp inhibitors. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Requirement for Parp-1 and DNA ligases 1 or 3 but not of Xrcc1 in chromosomal translocation formation by backup end joining

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Aashish; Siemann, Maria; Grabos, Martha; Murmann, Tamara; Pantelias, Gabriel E.; Iliakis, George

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian cells, ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired in all phases of the cell cycle predominantly by classical, DNA-PK-dependent nonhomologous end joining (D-NHEJ). Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is functional during the S- and G2-phases, when a sister chromatid becomes available. An error-prone, alternative form of end joining, operating as backup (B-NHEJ) functions robustly throughout the cell cycle and particularly in the G2-phase and is thought to backup predominantly D-NHEJ. Parp-1, DNA-ligases 1 (Lig1) and 3 (Lig3), and Xrcc1 are implicated in B-NHEJ. Chromosome and chromatid translocations are manifestations of erroneous DSB repair and are crucial culprits in malignant transformation and IR-induced cell lethality. We analyzed shifts in translocation formation deriving from defects in D-NHEJ or HRR in cells irradiated in the G2-phase and identify B-NHEJ as the main DSB repair pathway backing up both of these defects at the cost of a large increase in translocation formation. Our results identify Parp-1 and Lig1 and 3 as factors involved in translocation formation and show that Xrcc1 reinforces the function of Lig3 in the process without being required for it. Finally, we demonstrate intriguing connections between B-NHEJ and DNA end resection in translocation formation and show that, as for D-NHEJ and HRR, the function of B-NHEJ facilitates the recovery from the G2-checkpoint. These observations advance our understanding of chromosome aberration formation and have implications for the mechanism of action of Parp inhibitors. PMID:24748665

  12. [Association of XRCC1 polymorphisms and chromosomal damage levels in coke-oven workers].

    PubMed

    Leng, Shu-Guang; Cheng, Juan; Zhang, Lin-Yuan; Pan, Zu-Fei; Dai, Yu-Fei; Niu, Yong; Sun, Yao-Feng; Li, Bin; He, Feng-Sheng; Zheng, Yu-Xin

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the association of XRCC1 polymorphisms and chromosomal damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocyte in coke-oven workers. The study included 141 coke-oven workers who exposed to a high level of polycyclic aromahaplotpetic hydrocarbon and 66 non-exposed controls. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene and chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocyte were measured. Four -tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1 gene, including C26304T, G27466A, G28152A and G36189A, were detected and the XRCC1 haplotypes were estimated by using an extension of Clark algorithm. The associations between haplotype pairs and micronuclei data were assessed by analysis of covariance in the exposed and non-exposed groups. The geometric means of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels in coke-oven workers and the controls were 12.0 and 0.7 micromol/mol Cr respectively (P < 0.01). The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytokinesis-block micronucleus frequencies (number of micronucleus per 1 000 binucleated lymphocytes) was significantly higher in coke-oven workers (0.95 +/- 0.66)% than in the controls (0.40 +/- 0.36)%, P < 0.01. The haplotype CGGG was associated with the decreased frequencies of total micronucleus, and the haplotypes TGGG (P = 0.01) and CGAG (P < 0.05) were associated with the increased frequencies of total micronucleus in the multivariate analysis with adjustment for covariates among coke-oven workers. The genetic polymorphisms of XRCC1 gene could influence the chromosome damage levels in coke-oven workers.

  13. Arg399Gln polymorphism of XRCC1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer in Kashmir: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Nissar, Saniya; Lone, Tufail Ahmad; Banday, Mujeeb Zafar; Rasool, Roohi; Chowdri, Nissar A; Parray, Fazl Q; Abdullah, Safiya; Sameer, Aga Syed

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism in the susceptibility of a Kashmiri population to colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the genotype distribution of the XRCC1 gene in 130 CRC cases in comparison with that of 150 healthy subjects. There was no direct significant association between the XRCC1 genotypes and CRC; however, the Arg/Gln genotype was associated with an elevated risk of CRC (OR>1.47) and the Gln/Gln variant genotype was associated with an increased risk of CRC in various clinicopathological parameters. This study suggests that the XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of CRC.

  14. Arg399Gln polymorphism of XRCC1 gene and risk of colorectal cancer in Kashmir: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    NISSAR, SANIYA; LONE, TUFAIL AHMAD; BANDAY, MUJEEB ZAFAR; RASOOL, ROOHI; CHOWDRI, NISSAR A.; PARRAY, FAZL Q.; ABDULLAH, SAFIYA; SAMEER, AGA SYED

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism in the susceptibility of a Kashmiri population to colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the genotype distribution of the XRCC1 gene in 130 CRC cases in comparison with that of 150 healthy subjects. There was no direct significant association between the XRCC1 genotypes and CRC; however, the Arg/Gln genotype was associated with an elevated risk of CRC (OR>1.47) and the Gln/Gln variant genotype was associated with an increased risk of CRC in various clinicopathological parameters. This study suggests that the XRCC1 polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of CRC. PMID:23426866

  15. ERCC1 and XRCC1 but not XPA single nucleotide polymorphisms correlate with response to chemotherapy in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Liu, Mei-Mei; Liu, Hui; Lu, Dan; Zhao, Xiao-Dan; Yang, Xue-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the correlation between single nucleotide polymorphisms of ERCC1/XRCC1/XPA genes and postoperative chemotherapy efficacy and prognosis of endometrial carcinoma. Our study included 108 patients with endometrial carcinoma and 100 healthy participants. ERCC1 rs11615/XRCC1 rs25487/XPA rs1800975 gene polymorphisms were detected by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. Then the chemotherapy efficacy and toxic effects of the patients were assessed. The genotype and allele frequency of ERCC1 rs11615/XRCC1 rs25487 in the case group were significantly different from that in the control group (all P<0.05). The patients with AA + GA in ERCC1 rs11615 had an increased risk of endometrial carcinoma than those with GG, and the risk of endometrial carcinoma for patients with AA + GA was also higher in comparison with patients with GG genotype in XRCC1 rs25487 (all P<0.05). GG on both ERCC1 rs11615/XRCC1 rs25487 had a higher effective rate of chemotherapy than GA + AA (all P<0.05). ERCC1 rs11615/XRCC1 rs25487 gene polymorphisms were linked with toxic effects in liver, kidney, and nervous system. ERCC1 rs11615/XRCC1 rs25487, muscular invasion, and tumor stage were independent risk factors for the prognosis of endometrial carcinoma (all P<0.05). However, no significant associations were observed between XPA rs1800975 polymorphism and chemotherapy efficacy and prognosis of endometrial carcinoma (all P>0.05). These results indicated that ERCC1 and XRCC1 but not XPA polymorphisms correlate with response to chemotherapy in endometrial carcinoma. PMID:27895494

  16. Incorporation of gemcitabine and cytarabine into DNA by DNA polymerase beta and ligase III/XRCC1.

    PubMed

    Prakasha Gowda, A S; Polizzi, Joanna M; Eckert, Kristin A; Spratt, Thomas E

    2010-06-15

    1-Beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (cytarabine, araC) and 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (gemcitabine, dFdC), are effective cancer chemotherapeutic agents due to their ability to become incorporated into DNA and then subsequently inhibit DNA synthesis by replicative DNA polymerases. However, the impact of these 3'-modified nucleotides on the activity of specialized DNA polymerases has not been investigated. The role of polymerase beta and base excision repair may be of particular importance due to the increased oxidative stress in tumors, increased oxidative stress caused by chemotherapy treatment, and the variable amounts of polymerase beta in tumors. Here we directly investigate the incorporation of the 5'-triphosphorylated form of araC, dFdC, 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (FdC), and cytidine into two nicked DNA substrates and the subsequent ligation. Opposite template dG, the relative k(pol)/K(d) for incorporation was dCTP > araCTP, dFdCTP > rCTP. The relative k(pol)/K(d) for FdCTP depended on sequence. The effect on k(pol)/K(d) was due largely to changes in k(pol) with no differences in the affinity of the nucleoside triphosphates to the polymerase. Ligation efficiency by T4 ligase and ligase III/XRCC1 was largely unaffected by the nucleotide analogues. Our results show that BER is capable of incorporating araC and dFdC into the genome.

  17. Polymorphisms in base excision repair genes: Breast cancer risk and individual radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Patrono, Clarice; Sterpone, Silvia; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer among women worldwide. The aetiology and carcinogenesis of BC are not clearly defined, although genetic, hormonal, lifestyle and environmental risk factors have been established. The most common treatment for BC includes breast-conserving surgery followed by a standard radiotherapy (RT) regimen. However, radiation hypersensitivity and the occurrence of RT-induced toxicity in normal tissue may affect patients’ treatment. The role of DNA repair in cancer has been extensively investigated, and an impaired DNA damage response may increase the risk of BC and individual radiosensitivity. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes may alter protein function and modulate DNA repair efficiency, influencing the development of various cancers, including BC. SNPs in DNA repair genes have also been studied as potential predictive factors for the risk of RT-induced side effects. Here, we review the literature on the association between SNPs in base excision repair (BER) genes and BC risk. We focused on X-ray repair cross complementing group 1 (XRCC1), which plays a key role in BER, and on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, which encode three important BER enzymes that interact with XRCC1. Although no association between SNPs and radiation toxicity has been validated thus far, we also report published studies on XRCC1 SNPs and variants in other BER genes and RT-induced side effects in BC patients, emphasising that large well-designed studies are needed to determine the genetic components of individual radiosensitivity. PMID:25493225

  18. XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism is not associated with breast cancer in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuren; Mao, Xiaohuan; Ming, Liang

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted to explore the association of XRCC1 polymorphisms with Breast cancer (BC) risk in Asians, but the results have been inconsistent. We therefore performed the present meta-analysis to explore the relationship in detail. Reported studies were searched from 1990 to October 15, 2014 in PubMed and Wan fang Med Online. We performed a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies fitting our eligibility criteria. These studies involved XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphisms in 4984 BC cases and 5744 controls in dominant (ArgArg vs. GlnGln+ArgGln), recessive (ArgGln+ArgArg vs. GlnGln), and co-dominant (ArgArg vs. GlnGln) inheritance models. The total odds Ratio (OR) and 95% CI were calculated and analyzed by Review Manager 5.2 and STATE 12. Overall, significantly increased BC risk was observed in any genetic model (dominant model: odds ration [OR] = 1.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.08, 1.58]; recessive model: OR = 0.63, 95% CI = [0.50, 0.81]; codominant model: OR = 2.52, 95% CI: [1.38, 4.60]) when all eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. In further stratified analyses, no association was found between Arg399Gln polymorphism and BC risk in Chinese fewer than three hereditary models. Our results suggest that the XRCC1 Arg399Gln polymorphism may be associated with increased Breast cancer risk among Asians, except Chinese population.

  19. Overexpression of PCNA Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Caused Delay of Gap-Filling during Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    UVC irradiation-caused DNA lesions are repaired in mammalian cells solely by nucleotide excision repair (NER), which consists of sequential events including initial damage recognition, dual incision of damage site, gap-filling, and ligation. We have previously shown that gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions may be delayed by a subsequent treatment of oxidants or prooxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, flavonoids, and colcemid. We considered the delay as a result of competition for limiting protein/enzyme factor(s) during repair synthesis between NER and base excision repair (BER) induced by the oxidative chemicals. In this report, using colcemid as oxidative stress inducer, we showed that colcemid-caused delay of gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions was attenuated by overexpression of PCNA but not ligase-I. PCNA knockdown, as expected, delayed the gap-filling of NER but also impaired the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Fen-1 knockdown, however, did not affect the repair of oxidative DNA damage, suggesting repair of oxidative DNA damage is not of long patch BER. Furthermore, overexpression of XRCC1 delayed the gap-filling, and presumably increase of XRCC1 pulls PCNA away from gap-filling of NER for BER, consistent with our hypothesis that delay of gap-filling of NER attributes the competition between NER and BER. PMID:28116145

  20. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  1. Antibody specific for a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-07-11

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  2. DNA single-strand break repair is impaired in aprataxin-related ataxia.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Makito; Yamamoto, Aya; Mori, Toshio; Lan, Li; Iwamoto, Taka-aki; Aoki, Masashi; Shimada, Keiji; Furiya, Yoshiko; Kariya, Shingo; Asai, Hirohide; Yasui, Akira; Nishiwaki, Tomohisa; Imoto, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Kiriyama, Takao; Nagata, Tetsuya; Konishi, Noboru; Itoyama, Yasuto; Ueno, Satoshi

    2007-02-01

    Early-onset ataxia with ocular motor apraxia and hypoalbuminemia (EAOH)/ataxia with oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is an autosomal recessive form of cerebellar ataxia. The causative protein for EAOH/AOA1, aprataxin (APTX), interacts with X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1), a scaffold DNA repair protein for single-strand breaks (SSBs). The goal of this study was to prove the functional involvement of APTX in SSB repair (SSBR). We visualized the SSBR process with a recently developed laser irradiation system that allows real-time observation of SSBR proteins and with a local ultraviolet-irradiation system using a XPA-UVDE cell line that repairs DNA lesions exclusively via SSBR. APTX was knocked down using small interference RNA in the cells. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage and cell death were assessed in EAOH fibroblasts and cerebellum. Our systems showed the XRCC1-dependent recruitment of APTX to SSBs. SSBR was impaired in APTX-knocked-down cells. Oxidative stress in EAOH fibroblasts readily induced SSBs and cell death, which were blocked by antioxidants. Accumulated oxidative DNA damage was confirmed in EAOH cerebellum. This study provides the first direct evidence for the functional involvement of APTX in SSBR and in vivo DNA damage in EAOH/AOA1, and suggests a benefit of antioxidant treatment.

  3. [Relationship of XRCC1 polymorphism with the risks and clinicopathological factors of cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiao-mei; Li, Kui-xiu; Niu, Shu-huai; Fang, Zhao-hui; Liu, Hong

    2013-11-19

    To explore the correlation of XRCC1 Arg194Trp Arg399Gln SNPs with the risks and clinicopathological factors of cervical cancer. Polymorphisms Arg194Trp, Arg399Gln of XRCC1 gene in 253 cervical cancer patients and 350 healthy controls were analyzed by mismatch amplification polymerase chain reaction (MAMA-PCR). Compared with the Arg/Arg genotypes, the Trp/Trp genotypes could increase the risk of cervical cancer (P = 0.000) . Arg/Arg was a protection factor with an odds ratio of 0.116 (95%CI = 0.043-0.316) . The frequency of Arg and Gln allele among cervical cancer and healthy controls were 56.81%, 43.19% and 64.86%, 35.14%. Compared with the Arg genotypes, the Gln genotypes could increase the risk of cervical cancer (P < 0.05) . Compared with the Arg/Arg genotypes, the Gln/Gln genotypes could increase the risk of cervical cancer (P < 0.01) . Arg/Arg was a protection factor with an odds ratio of 0.188 (95%CI = 0.089-0.398) . Using haplotypes 194Trp-399Gln as a reference, women carrying 194Arg-399Gln and 194Arg-399Arg halpotypes had a significantly decreased risk for cervical carcinoma. The adjusted OR and 95%CI were 0.613 [0.446, 0.842] and 0.635 [0.449, 0.899]. The frequencies of Arg/Arg, Arg/Gln, Gln/Gln genotype had significant relationship with clinical stage and histological grade. Tumor diameter, patient age and neoplastic form had no relationship. Compared with the Arg/Arg genotypes, the Trp/Trp and Gln/ Gln genotypes could increase the risk of cervical cancer. The Trp or Gln genotypes risk increases. Arg may be a protection factor. The frequencies of Arg399Gln SNP have a correlation with stage and histological grade.

  4. Mismatch repair proteins: key regulators of genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Surtees, J A; Argueso, J L; Alani, E

    2004-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) systems are central to maintaining genome stability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. MMR proteins play a fundamental role in avoiding mutations, primarily by removing misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. MMR proteins also act during genetic recombination in steps that include repairing mismatches in heteroduplex DNA, modulating meiotic crossover control, removing 3' non-homologous tails during double-strand break repair, and preventing recombination between divergent sequences. In this review we will, first, discuss roles for MMR proteins in repairing mismatches that occur during recombination, particularly during meiosis. We will also explore how studying this process has helped to refine models of double-strand break repair, and particularly to our understanding of gene conversion gradients. Second, we will examine the role of MMR proteins in repressing homeologous recombination, i.e. recombination between divergent sequences. We will also compare the requirements for MMR proteins in preventing homeologous recombination to the requirements for these proteins in mismatch repair.

  5. Association between XRCC1 and XRCC3 polymorphisms with lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis from case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guohua; Cai, Shaoxi; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Aihua

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported the association of X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) Arg399Gln, Arg194Trp, Arg280His, -77T>C, and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) T241M polymorphisms with lung cancer risk, but the results remained controversial. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the association between lung cancer risk and XRCC1 Arg399Gln (14,156 cases and 16,667 controls from 41 studies), Arg194Trp (7,426 cases and 9,603 controls from 23 studies), Arg280His (6,211 cases and 6,763 controls from 16 studies), -77T>C (2,487 cases and 2,576 controls from 5 studies), and XRCC3 T241M (8,560 cases and 11,557 controls from 19 studies) in different inheritance models. We found that -77T>C polymorphism was associated with increased lung cancer risk (dominant model: odds ration [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27-1.66, recessive model: OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.14-2.62, additive model: OR = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.24-1.94) when all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis. In the stratified and sensitive analyses, significantly decreased lung cancer risk was observed in overall analysis (dominant model: OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.78-0.89; recessive model: OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.81-1.00; additive model: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.74-0.92), Caucasians (dominant model: OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76-0.87; recessive model: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.80-0.99; additive model: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.73-0.91), and hospital-based controls (dominant model: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.76-0.88; recessive model: OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79-1.00; additive model: OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.71-0.90) for XRCC3 T241M. In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicates that XRCC1 -77T>C shows an increased lung cancer risk and XRCC3 T241M polymorphism is associated with decreased lung cancer risk, especially in Caucasians.

  6. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and associations with cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Goode, Ellen L; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Potter, John D

    2002-12-01

    Common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may alter protein function and an individual's capacity to repair damaged DNA; deficits in repair capacity may lead to genetic instability and carcinogenesis. To establish our overall understanding of possible in vivo relationships between DNA repair polymorphisms and the development of cancer, we performed a literature review of epidemiological studies that assessed associations between such polymorphisms and risk of cancer. Thirty studies of polymorphisms in OGG1, XRCC1, ERCC1, XPC, XPD, XPF, BRCA2, and XRCC3 were identified in the April 30, 2002 MEDLINE database (National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubMed Database: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez). These studies focused on adult glioma, bladder cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, skin cancer (melanoma and nonmelanoma), squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, and stomach cancer. We found that a small proportion of the published studies were large and population-based. Nonetheless, published data were consistent with associations between: (a) the OGG1 S326C variant and increased risk of various types of cancer; (b) the XRCC1 R194W variant and reduced risk of various types of cancer; and (c) the BRCA2 N372H variant and increased risk of breast cancer. Suggestive results were seen for polymorphisms in other genes; however, small sample sizes may have contributed to false-positive or false-negative findings. We conclude that large, well-designed studies of common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes are needed. Such studies may benefit from analysis of multiple genes or polymorphisms and from the consideration of relevant exposures that may influence the likelihood of cancer in the presence of reduced DNA repair capacity.

  7. Correlation between XRCC1 Arg399Gln genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to bladder cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nannan; Fei, Xiawei; Shen, Yi; Shi, Weifeng; Ma, Jinhong

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between XRCC1 polymorphisms and bladder cancer has been widely studied. Here, our meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlations between common genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1 and susceptibility to bladder cancer. In order to derive a more precise estimation of the association, 27 clinical case-control studies (which met all the inclusion criteria) were included in this meta-analysis. A total of 8,539 cancer cases and 10,750 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. Overall, no significant association was detected in allelic model (A allele vs T allele odds ratio [OR] =0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71–1.06), homozygote comparison (AA vs GG OR =1.12, 95% CI, 0.68–1.85), heterozygote comparison (AT vs TT OR =1.01, 95% CI, 0.81–1.26), dominant model (AA + AG vs GG OR =0.93, 95% CI, 0.85–1.02), and recessive model (AA vs AG + GG OR =1.01, 95% CI, 0.88–1.15), but a moderately significant association was found for AG vs GG (OR =0.241, 95% CI =0.17–0.35). Subgroup analysis based on ethnicity. Ethnicity analysis suggested that genetic polymorphisms in XRCC1 were not correlated with increased bladder cancer risk among Asians (all P>0.05). Therefore, we concluded that XRCC1 genetic polymorphism may not contribute to bladder cancer susceptibility in the present meta-analysis, and further well-designed studies with a large sample size are warranted to validate our conclusion. PMID:26869802

  8. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Base excision repair imbalance in colorectal cancer has prognostic value and modulates response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Leguisamo, Natalia M.; Gloria, Helena C.; Kalil, Antonio N.; Martins, Talita V.; Azambuja, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is prevalent worldwide, and treatment often involves surgery and genotoxic chemotherapy. DNA repair mechanisms, such as base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR), may not only influence tumour characteristics and prognosis but also dictate chemotherapy response. Defective MMR contributes to chemoresistance in colorectal cancer. Moreover, BER affects cellular survival by repairing genotoxic base damage in a process that itself can disrupt metabolism. In this study, we characterized BER and MMR gene expression in colorectal tumours and the association between this repair profile with patients’ clinical and pathological features. In addition, we exploited the possible mechanisms underlying the association between altered DNA repair, metabolism and response to chemotherapy. Seventy pairs of sporadic colorectal tumour samples and adjacent non-tumour mucosal specimens were assessed for BER and MMR gene and protein expression and their association with pathological and clinical features. MMR-deficient colon cancer cells (HCT116) transiently overexpressing MPG or XRCC1 were treated with 5-FU or TMZ and evaluated for viability and metabolic intermediate levels. Increase in BER gene and protein expression is associated with more aggressive tumour features and poor pathological outcomes in CRC. However, tumours with reduced MMR gene expression also displayed low MPG, OGG1 and PARP1 expression. Imbalancing BER by overexpression of MPG, but not XRCC1, sensitises MMR-deficient colon cancer cells to 5-FU and TMZ and leads to ATP depletion and lactate accumulation. MPG overexpression alters DNA repair and metabolism and is a potential strategy to overcome 5-FU chemotherapeutic resistance in MMR-deficient CRC. PMID:28903334

  10. Double strand break (DSB) repair in heterochromatin and heterochromatin proteins in DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Charlène; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-07-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer cells and they represent a major cause of tumorigenesis. To avoid chromosomal translocations, faithful repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) has to be ensured in the context of high ordered chromatin structure. However, chromatin compaction is proposed to represent a barrier for DSB repair. Here we review the different mechanisms cells use to alleviate the heterochromatic barrier for DNA repair. At the same time, we discuss the activating role of heterochromatin-associated proteins in this process, therefore proposing that chromatin structure, more than being a simple barrier, is a key modulator of DNA repair.

  11. Heat shock proteins and DNA repair mechanisms: an updated overview.

    PubMed

    Sottile, Mayra L; Nadin, Silvina B

    2017-09-26

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), also known as molecular chaperones, participate in important cellular processes, such as protein aggregation, disaggregation, folding, and unfolding. HSPs have cytoprotective functions that are commonly explained by their antiapoptotic role. Their involvement in anticancer drug resistance has been the focus of intense research efforts, and the relationship between HSP induction and DNA repair mechanisms has been in the spotlight during the past decades. Because DNA is permanently subject to damage, many DNA repair pathways are involved in the recognition and removal of a diverse array of DNA lesions. Hence, DNA repair mechanisms are key to maintain genome stability. In addition, the interactome network of HSPs with DNA repair proteins has become an exciting research field and so their use as emerging targets for cancer therapy. This article provides a historical overview of the participation of HSPs in DNA repair mechanisms as part of their molecular chaperone capabilities.

  12. Association Between Genetic Polymorphisms in the XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, GSTM1, GSTT1, MSH2, MLH1, MSH3, and MGMT Genes and Radiosensitivity in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mangoni, Monica; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carozzi, Francesca; Sani, Cristina; Biti, Giampaolo; Livi, Lorenzo; Barletta, Emanuela; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Clinical radiosensitivity varies considerably among patients, and radiation-induced side effects developing in normal tissue can be therapy limiting. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to correlate with hypersensitivity to radiotherapy. We conducted a prospective study of 87 female patients with breast cancer who received radiotherapy after breast surgery. We evaluated the association between acute skin reaction following radiotherapy and 11 genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes: XRCC1 (Arg399Gln and Arg194Trp), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), XPD (Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln), MSH2 (gIVS12-6T>C), MLH1 (Ile219Val), MSH3 (Ala1045Thr), MGMT (Leu84Phe), and in damage-detoxification GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes (allele deletion). Methods and Materials: Individual genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and single nucleotide primer extension for single nucleotide polymorphisms or by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for deletion polymorphisms. The development of severe acute skin reaction (moist desquamation or interruption of radiotherapy due to toxicity) associated with genetic polymorphisms was modeled using Cox proportional hazards, accounting for cumulative biologically effective radiation dose. Results: Radiosensitivity developed in eight patients and was increased in carriers of variants XRCC3-241Met allele (hazard ratio [HR] unquantifiably high), MSH2 gIVS12-6nt-C allele (HR = 53.36; 95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 3.56-798.98), and MSH3-1045Ala allele (HR unquantifiably high). Carriers of XRCC1-Arg194Trp variant allele in combination with XRCC1-Arg399Gln wild-type allele had a significant risk of radiosensitivity (HR = 38.26; 95% CI, 1.19-1232.52). Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report to find an association between MSH2 and MSH3 genetic variants and the development of radiosensitivity in breast cancer patients. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that mismatch repair mechanisms may be

  13. Mismatch repair proteins collaborate with methyltransferases in the repair of O6-methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Rye, Peter T.; Delaney, James C.; Netirojjanakul, Chawita; Sun, Dana X.; Liu, Jenny Z.; Essigmann, John M.

    2010-01-01

    DNA repair is essential for combatting the adverse effects of damage to the genome. One example of base damage is O6-methylguanine (O6mG), which stably pairs with thymine during replication and thereby creates a promutagenic O6mG:T mismatch. This mismatch has also been linked with cellular toxicity. Therefore, in the absence of repair, O6mG:T mismatches can lead to cell death or result in G:C→A:T transition mutations upon the next round of replication. Cysteine thiolate residues on the Ada and Ogt methyltransferase (MTase) proteins directly reverse the O6mG base damage to yield guanine. When a cytosine is opposite the lesion, MTase repair restores a normal G:C pairing. However, if replication past the lesion has produced an O6mG:T mismatch, MTase conversion to a G:T mispair must still undergo correction to avoid mutation. Two mismatch repair pathways in E. coli that convert G:T mispairs to native G:C pairings are methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) and very short patch repair (VSPR). This work examined the possible roles that proteins in these pathways play in coordination with the canonical MTase repair of O6mG:T mismatches. The possibility of this repair network was analyzed by probing the efficiency of MTase repair of a single O6mG residue in cells deficient in individual mismatch repair proteins (Dam, MutH, MutS, MutL, or Vsr). We found that MTase repair in cells deficient in Dam or MutH showed wild-type levels of MTase repair. In contrast, cells lacking any of the VSPR proteins MutS, MutL, or Vsr showed a decrease in repair of O6mG by the Ada and Ogt MTases. Evidence is presented that the VSPR pathway positively influences MTase repair of O6mG:T mismatches, and assists the efficiency of restoring these mismatches to native G:C base pairs. PMID:17951114

  14. The association of XRCC1 haplotypes and chromosomal damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocyte among coke-oven workers

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Leng; Juan Cheng; Linyuan Zhang; Yong Niu; Yufei Dai; Zufei Pan; Bin Li; Fengsheng He; Yuxin Zheng

    2005-05-15

    Theoretically, a haplotype has a higher level of heterozygosity than individual single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the association study based on the haplotype may have an increased power for detecting disease associations compared with SNP-based analysis. In this study, we investigated the effects of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) and the inferred haplotype pairs of the X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene on chromosome damage detected by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. The study included 141 coke-oven workers with exposure to a high level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 66 nonexposed controls. The frequencies of total MN and MNed cells were borderline associated with the Arg{sup 194}Trp polymorphism (P = 0.053 and P = 0.050, respectively) but not associated with the Arg{sup 280}His, Arg{sup 399}Gln and Gln{sup 632}Gln polymorphisms among coke-oven workers. Five haplotypes, including CGGG, TGGG, CAGG, CGAG, and CGGA, were inferred based on the four htSNPs of XRCC1 gene. The haplotype CGGG was associated with the decreased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells, and the haplotypes TGGG and CGAG were associated with the increased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells with adjustment for covariates among coke-oven workers. This study showed that the haplotypes derived from htSNPs in the XRCC1 gene were more likely than single SNPs to correlate with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced chromosome damage among coke-oven workers.

  15. Radiation-induced damage to normal tissues after radiotherapy in patients treated for gynecologic tumors: Association with single nucleotide polymorphisms in XRCC1, XRCC3, and OGG1 genes and in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity in lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruyck, Kim de . E-mail: kim.deruyck@UGent.be; Eijkeren, Marc van; Claes, Kathleen; Morthier, Rudy; Paepe, Anne de; Vral, Anne; Ridder, Leo de; Thierens, Hubert

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To examine the association of polymorphisms in XRCC1 (194Arg/Trp, 280Arg/His, 399Arg/Gln, 632Gln/Gln), XRCC3 (5' UTR 4.541A>G, IVS5-14 17.893A>G, 241Thr/Met), and OGG1 (326Ser/Cys) with the development of late radiotherapy (RT) reactions and to assess the correlation between in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity and clinical radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Sixty-two women with cervical or endometrial cancer treated with RT were included in the study. According to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, scale, 22 patients showed late adverse RT reactions. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assays were performed to examine polymorphic sites, the G2 assay was used to measure chromosomal radiosensitivity, and patient groups were compared using actuarial methods. Results: The XRCC3 IVS5-14 polymorphic allele was significantly associated with the risk of developing late RT reactions (odds ratio 3.98, p = 0.025), and the XRCC1 codon 194 variant showed a significant protective effect (p = 0.028). Patients with three or more risk alleles in XRCC1 and XRCC3 had a significantly increased risk of developing normal tissue reactions (odds ratio 10.10, p = 0.001). The mean number of chromatid breaks per cell was significantly greater in patients with normal tissue reactions than in patients with no reactions (1.16 and 1.34, respectively; p = 0.002). Patients with high chromosomal radiosensitivity showed a 9.2-fold greater annual risk of complications than patients with intermediate chromosomal radiosensitivity. Combining the G2 analysis with the risk allele model allowed us to identify 23% of the patients with late normal tissue reactions, without false-positive results. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that clinical radiosensitivity is associated with an enhanced G2 chromosomal radiosensitivity and is significantly associated with a combination of different polymorphisms in

  16. Role of XPC, XPD, XRCC1, GSTP genetic polymorphisms and Barrett's esophagus in a cohort of Italian subjects. A neural network analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarlarini, Claudia; Penco, Silvana; Conio, Massimo; Grossi, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus (BE), a metaplastic premalignant disorder, represents the primary risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease and central obesity have been associated with BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma, but relatively little is known about the specific genes that confer susceptibility to BE carcinogenesis. A total of 74 patients with BE and 67 controls coming from six gastrointestinal Italian units were evaluated for six polymorphisms in four genes: XPC, XPD nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes, XRCC1 (BER gene), and glutathione S-transferase P1. Smoking status was analyzed together with the genetic data. Statistical analysis was performed through Artificial Neural Networks. Distributions of sex, smoking history, and polymorphisms among BE cases and controls did not show statistically significant differences. The r-value from linear correlation allowed us to identify possible protective factors as well as possible risk factors. The application of advanced intelligent systems allowed for the selection of a subgroup of nine variables. Artificial Neural Networks applied on the final data set reached mean global accuracy of 60%, reaching as high as 65.88%. We report here results from an exploratory study. Results from this study failed to find an association among the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms and BE phenotype through classical statistical methods. On the contrary, advanced intelligent systems are really able to handle the disease complexity, not treating the data with reductionist approaches unable to detect multiple genes of smaller effect in predisposing to the disease. To detect multiple genes of smaller effects in predisposing individuals to Barrett's esophagus.

  17. Alkyltransferase-like proteins: Molecular switches between DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tubbs, Julie L.; Tainer, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Alkyltransferase-like proteins (ATLs) play a role in the protection of cells from the biological effects of DNA alkylation damage. Although ATLs share functional motifs with the DNA repair protein and cancer chemotherapy target O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase, they lack the reactive cysteine residue required for alkyltransferase activity, so its mechanism for cell protection was previously unknown. Here, we review recent advances in unravelling the enigmatic cellular protection provided by ATLs against the deleterious effects of DNA alkylation damage. We discuss exciting new evidence that ATLs aid in the repair of DNA O6-alkylguanine lesions through a novel repair cross-talk between DNA-alkylation base damage responses and the DNA nucleotide excision repair pathway. PMID:20502938

  18. Protein damage and repair controlling seed vigor and longevity.

    PubMed

    Ogé, Laurent; Broyart, Caroline; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Jallet, Denis; Bourdais, Gildas; Job, Dominique; Grappin, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The formation of abnormal isoaspartyl residues derived from aspartyl or asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous protein misfolding in cells. The repair enzyme protein L: -isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) counteracts such damage by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal isoaspartyl residues to their normal aspartyl forms. Thus, this enzyme contributes to the survival of many organisms, including plants. Analysis of the accumulation of isoaspartyl-containing proteins and its modulation by the PIMT repair pathway, using germination tests, immunodetection, enzymatic assays, and HPLC analysis, gives new insights in understanding controlling mechanisms of seed longevity and vigor.

  19. Purification of PCNA as a nucleotide excision repair protein

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Anne F.; Sancar, Aziz

    1992-01-01

    Human cell free extracts carry out nucleotide excision repair in vitro. The extract is readily separated into two fractions by chromatography on a DEAE column. Neither the low salt (0.1 M KCl) nor the high salt (0.8 M KCl) fractions are capable of repair synthesis but the combination of the two restore the repair synthesis activity. Using the repair synthesis assay we purified a protein of 37 kDa from the high salt fraction which upon addition to the low salt fraction restores repair synthesis activity. Amino acid sequence analysis, amino acid composition and immunobloting with PCNA antibodies revealed that the 37 kDa protein is the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) known to stimulate DNA Polymerases δ and ε. By using an assay which specifically measures the excision of thymine dimers we found that PCNA is not required for the actual excision reaction per se but increases the extent of excision by enabling the excision repair enzyme to turn over catalytically. Images PMID:1352873

  20. Polymorphisms in XRCC1 gene, alcohol drinking, and risk of colorectal cancer: a case-control study in Jiangsu Province of China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chang-Ming; Ding, Jian-Hua; Li, Su-Ping; Liu, Yan-Ting; Cao, Hai-Xia; Wu, Jian-Zhong; Tang, Jin-Hai; Tajima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between alcohol drinking, XRCC1 codon 194 and 399 polymorphisms and risk of colorectal cancer, we conducted a case-control study with 315 colorectal cancer cases (105 colon, 210 rectal) and 439 population-based controls in Jiangsu Province of China. The XRCC1 codon 194 and 399 genotypes were identified using polymerase chain reaction and restrictrion fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). A structured questionnaire was used to elicit detailed information. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with an unconditional logistic model. In this study no significant differences were observed among the studied groups with regard to the genotype distribution of the XRCC1 codons 194 and 399 and the risk of colorectal cancer did not appear to be significantly influenced by genotype alone, whereas alcohol consumption showed a positive association (P for trend <0.01). When combined effects of XRCC1 polymorphisms and alcohol consumption were analyzed, we found that the 194Trp or 399Gln alleles further increased the colorectal cancer risk due to high alcohol intake. These findings support the conclusion that colorectal cancer susceptibility may be altered by gene-environment interactions.

  1. Polymorphisms in three base excision repair genes and breast cancer risk in Thai women.

    PubMed

    Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Schmezer, Peter; Burkholder, Iris; Waas, Peter; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Bartsch, Helmut; Wiangnon, Surapon; Popanda, Odilia

    2008-09-01

    DNA repair plays an important role in tumor development. The base excision repair (BER) pathway mainly removes DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation and reactive oxidative species. Here, we examined possible associations between polymorphisms in three important BER genes (OGG1 Ser326Cys, APEX1 Asp148Glu, XRCC1 Arg194Trp, XRCC1 Arg280His, XRCC1 Arg399Gln) and breast cancer incidence in Thai women. The study population consisted of 507 breast cancer cases and 425 controls. Odds ratios (OR) were adjusted by multivariate logistic regression analysis for age, body mass index, age at menarche, family history of breast cancer, menopausal status, reproduction parameters, use of contraceptives, tobacco smoking, involuntary tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, and education. For homozygous carriers of the Glu allele in APEX1, a significant protective effect was found when compared to Asp/Asp carriers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38-0.94). Subgroup analysis based on menopausal status revealed increased breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women and OGG1 (OR = 2.05, 95% CI 1.14-3.69). Reconstructed diplotypes for XRCC1 showed that CGA/CGA carriers had an increased risk of breast cancer compared with carriers of the wild type diplotype CGG/CGG (OR = 2.56, 95% CI 1.28-5.15). When the joint effects of XRCC1, APEX1 and OGG1 polymorphisms were evaluated, individuals homozygous for two or three risk alleles were at increased risk (OR = 1.88, 95% CI 1.26-2.82). In conclusion, our data suggest that Thai women with a certain XRCC1 diplotype or homozygous for two or three variant alleles of XRCC1, OGG1, and APEX1 are likely to have an increased susceptibility to breast cancer.

  2. Putative functional variants of XRCC1 identified by RegulomeDB were not associated with lung cancer risk in a Korean population.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung Soo; Jin, Chengcheng; Jung, Deuk Kju; Choi, Yi Young; Choi, Jin Eun; Lee, Won Kee; Lee, Shin Yup; Lee, Jaehee; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Seok, Yangki; Lee, Eungbae; Park, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) project revealed that nearby or distantly located non-coding DNA regulates the expression of coding genes. RegulomeDB (http://regulome.stanford.edu) is a new database that can be used to predict whether a variant affects transcription factor binding and gene expression. We investigated the association between lung cancer risk and potentially functional polymorphisms of XRCC1 that were selected using RegulomeDB in a Korean population. A total of 185 polymorphisms of XRCC1 were evaluated using RegulomeDB. Strong evidence suggested that 10 polymorphisms, from among the 185, affected XRCC1 expression with scores of 1a-1f that were based on the RegulomeDB scoring system. The rs2854510 polymorphism was rare in Asians (minor allele frequency < 0.05). Eight polymorphisms were in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD). The rs2854509 polymorphism, which was one of the 8 polymorphisms in LD, and rs7248167, which was not in the LD block, were genotyped in 610 lung cancer patients and 607 age- and sex-matched controls. Additionally, four polymorphisms of XRCC1 (rs25487, rs25489, rs1799782, and rs3213245), which were investigated with regard to their association with lung cancer risk in previous studies, were also genotyped. Two polymorphisms (rs2854509 and rs7248167) that were predicted to affect XRCC1 expression based on their RegulomeDB scores were not associated with lung cancer risk (P = 0.31 and 0.93, respectively). When stratified according to age, gender, smoking status, and tumor histology, the two polymorphisms of XRCC1 were not associated with lung cancer risk. Among the four polymorphisms that were previously studied, only rs25489 of XRCC1 was significantly associated with lung cancer risk (dominant model, adjusted odds ratio = 0.61, 95% confidence interval = 0.46-0.83, P = 0.002). Although RegulomeDB is an attractive tool for predicting the regulatory potential of variants, the two polymorphisms that were selected using Regulome

  3. HYDROGEL-BASED NANOCOMPOSITES OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS FOR TISSUE REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The ability to design artificial extracellular matrices as cell instructive scaffolds has opened the door to technologies capable of studying cell fates in vitro and to guide tissue repair in vivo. One main component of the design of artificial extracellular matrices is the incorporation of protein-based biochemical cues to guide cell phenotypes and multicellular organizations. However, promoting the long-term bioactivity, controlling the bioavailability and understanding how the physical presentations of these proteins impacts cellular fates are among the challenges of the field. Nanotechnolgy has advanced to meet the challenges of protein therapeutics. For example, the approaches to incorporating proteins into tissue repairing scaffolds have ranged from bulk encapsulations to smart nanodepots that protect proteins from degradations and allow opportunities for controlled release. PMID:24778979

  4. HYDROGEL-BASED NANOCOMPOSITES OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS FOR TISSUE REPAIR.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suwei; Segura, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    The ability to design artificial extracellular matrices as cell instructive scaffolds has opened the door to technologies capable of studying cell fates in vitro and to guide tissue repair in vivo. One main component of the design of artificial extracellular matrices is the incorporation of protein-based biochemical cues to guide cell phenotypes and multicellular organizations. However, promoting the long-term bioactivity, controlling the bioavailability and understanding how the physical presentations of these proteins impacts cellular fates are among the challenges of the field. Nanotechnolgy has advanced to meet the challenges of protein therapeutics. For example, the approaches to incorporating proteins into tissue repairing scaffolds have ranged from bulk encapsulations to smart nanodepots that protect proteins from degradations and allow opportunities for controlled release.

  5. DNA ligase III acts as a DNA strand break sensor in the cellular orchestration of DNA strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Abdou, Ismail; Poirier, Guy G.; Hendzel, Michael J.; Weinfeld, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the current model of DNA SSBR, PARP1 is regarded as the sensor of single-strand breaks (SSBs). However, biochemical studies have implicated LIG3 as another possible SSB sensor. Using a laser micro-irradiation protocol that predominantly generates SSBs, we were able to demonstrate that PARP1 is dispensable for the accumulation of different single-strand break repair (SSBR) proteins at sites of DNA damage in live cells. Furthermore, we show in live cells for the first time that LIG3 plays a role in mediating the accumulation of the SSBR proteins XRCC1 and PNKP at sites of DNA damage. Importantly, the accumulation of LIG3 at sites of DNA damage did not require the BRCT domain-mediated interaction with XRCC1. We were able to show that the N-terminal ZnF domain of LIG3 plays a key role in the enzyme's SSB sensing function. Finally, we provide cellular evidence that LIG3 and not PARP1 acts as the sensor for DNA damage caused by the topoisomerase I inhibitor, irinotecan. Our results support the existence of a second damage-sensing mechanism in SSBR involving the detection of nicks in the genome by LIG3. PMID:25539916

  6. DNA Repair-Protein Relocalization After Heavy Ion Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metting, N. F.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is good at making DNA double strand breaks, and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as heavy ion particles are particularly efficient. For this reason, the proteins belonging to repair systems that deal with double strand breaks are of particular interest. One such protein is Ku, a component in the non-homologous recombination repair system. The Ku protein is an abundant, heterodimeric DNA end-binding complex, composed of one 70 and one 86 kDa subunit. Ku protein binds to DNA ends, nicks, gaps, and regions of transition between single and double-stranded structure. These binding properties suggest an important role in DNA repair. The Ku antigen is important in this study because it is present in relatively large copy numbers and it is part of a double-strand-break repair system. More importantly, we consistently measure an apparent upregulation in situ that is not verified by whole-cell-lysate immunoblot measurements. This apparent upregulation is triggered by very low doses of radiation, thus showing a potentially useful high sensitivity. However, elucidation of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still to be done.

  7. DNA Repair-Protein Relocalization After Heavy Ion Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metting, N. F.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is good at making DNA double strand breaks, and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations such as heavy ion particles are particularly efficient. For this reason, the proteins belonging to repair systems that deal with double strand breaks are of particular interest. One such protein is Ku, a component in the non-homologous recombination repair system. The Ku protein is an abundant, heterodimeric DNA end-binding complex, composed of one 70 and one 86 kDa subunit. Ku protein binds to DNA ends, nicks, gaps, and regions of transition between single and double-stranded structure. These binding properties suggest an important role in DNA repair. The Ku antigen is important in this study because it is present in relatively large copy numbers and it is part of a double-strand-break repair system. More importantly, we consistently measure an apparent upregulation in situ that is not verified by whole-cell-lysate immunoblot measurements. This apparent upregulation is triggered by very low doses of radiation, thus showing a potentially useful high sensitivity. However, elucidation of the mechanism underlying this phenomenon is still to be done.

  8. Methods to alter levels of a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-10-17

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  9. Selected Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in Japanese

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Makoto; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Sato, Shigeki; Yatabe, Yasushi; Yamao, Kenji; Ueda, Ryuzo; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Hideo; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2012-01-01

    Background Although several reports have described a possible association between DNA repair genes and pancreatic cancer (PC) in smokers, this association has not been fully evaluated in an Asian population. We assessed the impact of genetic polymorphisms in the base excision repair (BER) pathway on PC risk among Japanese. Methods This case-control study compared the frequency of 5 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of BER genes, namely rs1052133 in OGG1, rs1799782 and rs25487 in XRCC1, rs1130409 in APE1, and rs1136410 in PARP1. SNPs were investigated using the TaqMan assay in 185 PC cases and 1465 controls. Associations of PC risk with genetic polymorphisms and gene–environment interaction were examined with an unconditional logistic regression model. Exposure to risk factors was assessed from the results of a self-administered questionnaire. We also performed haplotype-based analysis. Results We observed that the minor allele of rs25487 in XRCC1 was significantly associated with PC risk in the per-allele model (odds ratio = 1.29, CI = 1.01–1.65; trend P = 0.043). Haplotype analysis of XRCC1 also showed a statistically significant association with PC risk. No statistically significant interaction between XRCC1 polymorphisms and smoking status was seen. Conclusions Our findings suggest that XRCC1 polymorphisms affect PC risk in Japanese. PMID:22850545

  10. Influence of Morinda citrifolia (Noni) on Expression of DNA Repair Genes in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Bajpai, Deepti; Singh, Neeta

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Morinda citrifolia (Noni) has potential to reduce cancer risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Noni, cisplatin, and their combination on DNA repair genes in the SiHa cervical cancer cell line. SiHa cells were cultured and treated with 10% Noni, 10 μg/dl cisplatin or their combination for 24 hours. Post culturing, the cells were pelleted, RNA extracted, and processed for investigating DNA repair genes by real time PCR. The expression of nucleotide excision repair genes ERCC1, ERCC2, and ERCC4 and base excision repair gene XRCC1 was increased 4 fold, 8.9 fold, 4 fold, and 5.5 fold, respectively, on treatment with Noni as compared to untreated controls (p<0.05). In contrast, expression was found to be decreased 22 fold, 13 fold, 16 fold, and 23 fold on treatment with cisplatin (p<0.05). However, the combination of Noni and cisplatin led to an increase of 2 fold, 1.6 fold, 3 fold, 1.2 fold, respectively (p<0.05). Noni enhanced the expression of DNA repair genes by itself and in combination with cisplatin. However, high expression of DNA repair genes at mRNA level only signifies efficient DNA transcription of the above mentioned genes; further investigations are needed to evaluate the DNA repair protein expression.

  11. TRIM proteins in therapeutic membrane repair of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Alloush, Jenna; Weisleder, Noah

    2013-07-01

    Muscular dystrophy represents a major unmet medical need; only palliative treatments exist for this group of debilitating diseases. Because multiple forms of muscular dystrophy arise from compromised sarcolemmal membrane integrity, a therapeutic approach that can target this loss of membrane function could be applicable to a number of these distinct diseases.One promising therapeutic approach involves the process the cell uses to repair injuries to the plasma membrane. Recent discoveries of genes associated with the membrane repair process provide an opportunity to promote this process as a way to treat muscular dystrophy. One such gene is mitsugumin 53 (MG53), a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins (TRIM72), which is an essential component of the membrane repair pathway in muscle. Recent results indicate that MG53/TRIM72 protein can be directly applied as a therapeutic agent to increase membrane repair capacity of many cell types and treat some aspects of the disease in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. There is great potential for the use of recombinant human MG53 in treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases in which compromised membrane integrity contributes to the disease. Other TRIM family proteins may provide additional targets for therapeutic intervention in similar disease states.

  12. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.

    1994-12-31

    Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.

  13. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  14. A combined analysis of XRCC1, XRCC3, GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms and centromere content of micronuclei in welders.

    PubMed

    Iarmarcovai, G; Sari-Minodier, I; Orsière, T; De Méo, M; Gallice, P; Bideau, C; Iniesta, D; Pompili, J; Bergé-Lefranc, J L; Botta, A

    2006-03-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess clastogenic and aneugenic properties of welding fumes using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a human pancentromeric DNA probe. The involvement of genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes (p.Arg399Gln of XRCC1 and p.Thr241Met of XRCC3) and in detoxification genes (GSTM1 and GSTT1) on the centromere content of micronuclei (MN) was also evaluated. This study included 27 male welders working without any collective protection device and a control group (n = 30). The welders showed significantly higher levels of chromosome/genome damage compared to the controls. The frequencies of MN and centromere-positive MN (C+MN) per 1,000 binucleated cells were significantly higher in the exposed group than in the control group (7.1 per thousand +/- 3.7 versus 4.9 per thousand +/- 1.8; P = 0.012 and 3.5 per thousand +/- 1.8 versus 2.4 per thousand +/- 1.2; P = 0.018, respectively, Mann-Whitney U-test). The centromere-negative MN (C-MN) frequency was higher in the exposed subjects than in the controls (3.6 per thousand +/- 3.4 versus 2.5 per thousand +/- 1.4), but the Mann-Whitney U-test did not yield a significant result. In the total population, the GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms significantly affected the frequencies of C-MN and C+MN defined by FISH. GSTM1 positive subjects showed an increased C-MN frequency and GSTT1 null subjects showed an elevated C+MN frequency. When GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes were included in multiple regression analysis, the effect of the occupational exposure could better be demonstrated; both C+MN and C-MN were significantly increased in the welders. Our results suggest that the combined analysis of genetic polymorphisms and centromeres in MN may improve the sensitivity of the micronucleus assay in detecting genotoxic effects.

  15. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required.

  16. Genetic Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Genes as Modulators of Hodgkin Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    El-Zein, Randa; Monroy, Claudia M.; Etzel, Carol J.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Xing, Yun; Collier, Amanda L.; Strom, Sara S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although the pathogenesis of Hodgkin disease (HD) remains unknown, the results of epidemiologic studies suggest that heritable factors are important in terms of susceptibility. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may contribute to individual susceptibility for development of different cancers. However, to the authors’ knowledge, few studies to date have investigated the role of such polymorphisms as risk factors for development of HD. METHODS The authors evaluated the relation between polymorphisms in 3 nucleotide excision repair pathway genes (XPD [Lys751Gln], XPC [Lys939Gln], and XPG [Asp1104His]), the base excision repair XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), and double-strand break repair XRCC3 (Thr241Met) in a population of 200 HD cases and 220 matched controls. Variants were investigated independently and in combination; odd ratios (OR) were calculated. RESULTS A positive association was found for XRCC1 gene polymorphism Arg399Gln (OR, 1.77; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.16−2.71) and risk of HD. The combined analysis demonstrated that XRCC1/XRCC3 and XRCC1/XPC polymorphisms were associated with a significant increase in HD risk. XRCC1 Arg/Arg and XRCC3 Thr/Met genotypes combined were associated with an OR of 2.38 (95% CI, 1.24−4.55). The XRCC1 Arg/Gln and XRCC3 Thr/Thr, Thr/Met, and Met/Met genotypes had ORs of 1.88 (95% CI, 1.02−4.10), 1.97 (95% CI, 1.05−3.73), and 4.13 (95% CI, 1.50−11.33), respectively. XRCC1 Gln/Gln and XRCC3 Thr/Thr variant led to a significant increase in risk, with ORs of 3.00 (95% CI, 1.15−7.80). Similarly, XRCC1 Arg/Gln together with XPC Lys/Lys was found to significantly increase the risk of HD (OR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.09−4.23). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may modify the risk of HD, especially when interactions between the pathways are considered. PMID:19280628

  17. Studies of Bone Morphogenetic Protein based Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Ulery, Bret D.; Ashe, Keshia M.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several decades, recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) have been the most extensively studied and widely used osteoinductive agents for clinical bone repair. Since rhBMP-2 and rhBMP-7 were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for certain clinical uses, millions of patients worldwide have been treated with rhBMPs for various musculoskeletal disorders. Current clinical applications include treatment of long bone fracture non-unions, spinal surgeries, and oral maxillofacial surgeries. Considering the growing number of recent publications related to clincal research of rhBMPs, there exists enormous promise for these proteins to be used in bone regenerative medicine. The authors take this opportunity to review the rhBMP literature paying specific attention to the current applications of rhBMPs in bone repair and spine surgery. The prospective future of rhBMPs delivered in combination with tissue engineered scaffolds is also reviewed. PMID:22512928

  18. Nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination systems commit differentially to the repair of DNA-protein crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Morishita, Soh; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Matsubara, Mayumi; Horikawa, Yusuke; Terato, Hiroaki; Salem, Amir M H; Izumi, Shunsuke; Pack, Seung Pil; Makino, Keisuke; Ide, Hiroshi

    2007-10-12

    DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs)-where proteins are covalently trapped on the DNA strand-block the progression of replication and transcription machineries and hence hamper the faithful transfer of genetic information. However, the repair mechanism of DPCs remains largely elusive. Here we have analyzed the roles of nucleotide excision repair (NER) and homologous recombination (HR) in the repair of DPCs both in vitro and in vivo using a bacterial system. Several lines of biochemical and genetic evidence show that both NER and HR commit to the repair or tolerance of DPCs, but differentially. NER repairs DPCs with crosslinked proteins of sizes less than 12-14 kDa, whereas oversized DPCs are processed exclusively by RecBCD-dependent HR. These results highlight how NER and HR are coordinated when cells need to deal with unusually bulky DNA lesions such as DPCs.

  19. DNA repair prognostic index modelling reveals an essential role for base excision repair in influencing clinical outcomes in ER negative and triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Arora, Arvind; Moseley, Paul M; Perry, Christina; Rakha, Emad A; Green, Andrew R; Chan, Stephen Y T; Ellis, Ian O; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-09-08

    Stratification of oestrogen receptor (ER) negative and triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs) is urgently needed. In the current study, a cohort of 880 ER- (including 635 TNBCs) was immuno-profiled for a panel of DNA repair proteins including: Pol β, FEN1, APE1, XRCC1, SMUG1, PARP1, BRCA1, ATR, ATM, DNA-PKcs, Chk1, Chk2, p53, and TOPO2. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models (with backward stepwise exclusion of these factors, using a criterion of p < 0.05 for retention of factors in the model) were used to identify factors that were independently associated with clinical outcomes. XRCC1 (p = 0.002), pol β (p = 0.032) FEN1 (p = 0.001) and BRCA1 (p = 0.040) levels were independently associated with poor BCSS. Subsequently, DNA repair index prognostic (DRPI) scores for breast cancer specific survival (BCSS) were calculated and two prognostic groups (DRPI-PGs) were identified. Patients in prognostic group 2 (DRPI-PG2) have higher risk of death (p < 0.001). Furthermore, in DRPI-PG2 patients, exposure to anthracycline reduced the risk of death [(HR (95% CI) = 0.79 (0.64-0.98), p = 0.032) by 21-26%. In addition, DRPI-PG2 patients have adverse clinicopathological features including higher grade, lympho-vascular invasion, Her-2 positive phenotype, compared to those in DRPI-PG1 (p < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated that the DRPI outperformed the currently used prognostic factors and adding DRPI to lymph node stage significantly improved their performance as a predictor for BCSS [p < 0.00001, area under curve (AUC) = 0.70]. BER strongly influences pathogenesis of ER- and TNBCs. The DRPI accurately predicts BCSS and can also serve as a valuable prognostic and predictive tool for TNBCs.

  20. Association between codon 399 polymorphism in the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 gene and risk of prostate cancer in Asians: A study of 4,479 cases and 4,281 controls

    PubMed Central

    Yuanyuan, Mi; Xiaoming, You; Lijie, Zhu; Ninghan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The polymorphism in codon 399 of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene may subtly alter structure of DNA repair enzymes and modulate the repair capacity. Impaired DNA repair can lead to the development of cancers such as prostate cancer (PCA). Although the association between the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk has been extensively reported, the results have been ambiguous. Methods: We conducted an updated analysis of 18 case–control studies to determine the association between the XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk. We performed a literature search of the PubMed database to identify all eligible articles that reported this association. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were evaluated to assess the association. Results: Significant associations between PCA risk and XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism were found (such as A-allele vs. G-allele: OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01–1.23). Moreover, subgroup analysis based on ethnicity revealed similar significant associations in Asians (such as AA vs. GG: OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.19–1.97). Egger’s test did not reveal the presence of a publication bias. Conclusions: Our updated analysis provides evidence for significant association between XRCC1 codon 399 polymorphism and PCA risk. Further carefully designed studies should be performed. PMID:26649000

  1. Mismatch repair system proteins in oral benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Silva, Gleyson Kleber do; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2017-04-01

    Different environmental agents may cause DNA mutations by disrupting its double-strand structure; however, even normal DNA polymerase function may synthesize mismatch nucleotide bases, occasionally demonstrating failure in its proofreading activity. To overcome this issue, mismatch repair (MMR) system, a group of proteins specialized in finding mispairing bases and small loops of insertion or deletion, works to avoid the occurrence of mutations that could ultimately lead to innumerous human diseases. In the last decades, the role of MMR proteins in oral carcinogenesis and in the development of other oral cavity neoplasms has grown, but their importance in the pathogenesis and their prognostic potential for patients affected by oral malignancies, especially oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), remain unclear. Therefore, in this manuscript we aimed to review and critically discuss the currently available data on MMR proteins expression in oral potentially malignant lesions, in OSCC, and in other oral neoplasms to better understand their relevance in these lesions.

  2. Isoaspartyl Protein Damage and Repair in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zhenxia; Yang, Jing; Klassen, Henry J.; Aswad, Dana W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the propensity of retinal proteins for spontaneous damage via formation of isoaspartyl sites, a common type of protein damage that could contribute to retinal disease. Methods. Tissue extracts were obtained from retinas and brains of control mice and from mice in which the gene for protein L-isoaspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT; an enzyme that repairs isoaspartyl protein damage) was knocked out. PIMT expression in these extracts was measured by Western blot, and its specific activity was assayed by monitoring the rate of [3H]methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-[methyl-3H]L-methionine to γ-globulin. Isoaspartate levels in extracts were measured by their capacity to accept [3H]methyl groups via the PIMT-catalyzed methylation reaction. To compare molecular weight distributions of isoaspartyl-rich proteins in retina versus brain, proteins from PIMT knockout (KO) and control mice were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF). Isoaspartyl proteins were 3H-labeled on-blot using a PIMT overlay and imaged by autoradiography. Results. When normalized to the β-actin content of each tissue, retina was found to be nearly identical to brain with regard to expression and activity of PIMT and its propensity to accumulate isoaspartyl sites when PIMT is absent. The two tissues show distinct differences in the molecular weight distribution of isoaspartyl proteins. Conclusions. The retina is rich in PIMT activity and contains a wide range of proteins that are highly susceptible to this type of protein damage. Recoverin may be one such protein. Isoaspartate formation, along with oxidation, should be considered as a potential source of protein dysfunction and autoimmunity in retinal disease. PMID:24550364

  3. Tumor-selective use of DNA base excision repair inhibition in pancreatic cancer using the NQO1 bioactivatable drug, β-lapachone

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Gaurab; Silvers, Molly A.; Ilcheva, Mariya; Liu, Yuliang; Moore, Zachary R.; Luo, Xiuquan; Gao, Jinming; Anderson, Glenda; Liu, Lili; Sarode, Venetia; Gerber, David E.; Burma, Sandeep; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Gerson, Stanton L.; Boothman, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is an essential pathway for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) survival. Attempts to target this repair pathway have failed due to lack of tumor-selectivity and very limited efficacy. The NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) bioactivatable drug, ß-lapachone (ARQ761 in clinical form), can provide tumor-selective and enhanced synergy with BER inhibition. ß-Lapachone undergoes NQO1-dependent futile redox cycling, generating massive intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels and oxidative DNA lesions that stimulate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) hyperactivation. Rapid NAD+/ATP depletion and programmed necrosis results. To identify BER modulators essential for repair of ß-lapachone-induced DNA base damage, a focused synthetic lethal RNAi screen demonstrated that silencing the BER scaffolding protein, XRCC1, sensitized PDA cells. In contrast, depleting OGG1 N-glycosylase spared cells from ß-lap-induced lethality and blunted PARP1 hyperactivation. Combining ß-lapachone with XRCC1 knockdown or methoxyamine (MeOX), an apyrimidinic/apurinic (AP)-modifying agent, led to NQO1-dependent synergistic killing in PDA, NSCLC, breast and head and neck cancers. OGG1 knockdown, dicoumarol-treatment or NQO1- cancer cells were spared. MeOX + ß-lapachone exposure resulted in elevated DNA double-strand breaks, PARP1 hyperactivation and TUNEL+ programmed necrosis. Combination treatment caused dramatic antitumor activity, enhanced PARP1-hyperactivation in tumor tissue, and improved survival of mice bearing MiaPaca2-derived xenografts, with 33% apparent cures. Significance: Targeting base excision repair (BER) alone has limited therapeutic potential for pancreatic or other cancers due to a general lack of tumor-selectivity. Here, we present a treatment strategy that makes BER inhibition tumor-selective and NQO1-dependent for therapy of most solid neoplasms, particularly for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26602448

  4. Polymorphisms in MGMT and DNA repair genes and the risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doecke, James; Zhao, Zhen Zhen; Pandeya, Nirmala; Sadeghi, Shahram; Stark, Mitchell; Green, Adèle C; Hayward, Nicholas K; Webb, Penelope M; Whiteman, David C

    2008-07-01

    Rates of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus (EAC) and esophago-gastric junction (EGJAC) have increased rapidly in recent decades. The primary risk factors, gastro-esophageal acid reflux and smoking, are potentially genotoxic through the generation of N-nitroso compounds. The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is the major cellular defense against alkylating DNA damage. We compared patients with EAC (n = 263) or EGJAC (n = 303) with matched population controls (n = 1,337) for the frequency of 5 MGMT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs12269324, rs12268840, L84F, I143V, K178R), as well as SNPs in DNA repair genes ERCC1 (N118N), XRCC1 (Q399R) and XPD (K751Q). Relative risks were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Potential biological interaction was assessed through the synergy index S. Each MGMT SNP conferred increased risks of EAC but not EGJAC; strongest associations were found for the 2 variant MGMT alleles rs12268840 and I143V (p = 0.005 and p < 0.001, respectively). Homozygous carriers of MGMT rs12268840 with frequent acid reflux had significantly higher risks of EAC (OR 15.5, 95% CI 5.8-42) than expected under an additive model, consistent with biological interaction (S = 3.3, 95% CI 1.1-10). Modest, nonsignificant interactions with smoking were also observed. Homozygous variant ERCC1 genotype was associated with reduced risks of EAC (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-1.1), while the homozygous variant XRCC1 genotype conferred higher risks of EGJAC (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4). No associations with EAC or EGJAC were observed with XPD (rs13181). In summary, MGMT SNPs are associated with increased risks of EAC. Exposure to acid reflux, and possibly smoking, confer markedly higher risks among homozygous variant genotype carriers.

  5. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology.

    PubMed

    Brown, J B; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2009-01-20

    DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM). We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several functionally unconfirmed proteins that are highly

  6. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, JB; Akutsu, Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Background DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM). Results We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several functionally unconfirmed

  7. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  8. Predictive assessment in pharmacogenetics of XRCC1 gene on clinical outcomes of advanced lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhengrong; Li, Jiao; Hu, Ruiqi; Jiao, Yang; Han, Yingying; Weng, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Published data have shown inconsistent results about the pharmacogenetics of XRCC1 gene on clinical outcomes of advanced lung cancer patients treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize published findings and provide more reliable association. A total of 53 eligible studies including 7433 patients were included. Patients bearing the favorable TrpTrp and TrpArg genotypes of Arg194Trp were more likely to better response rates to platinum-based chemotherapy compared to those with the unfavorable ArgArg genotype (TrpTrp+TrpArg vs. ArgArg: odds ratio (OR) = 2.02, 95% CI, 1.66–2.45). The GlnGln and GlnArg genotypes of Arg399Gln were significantly associated with the poorer response rates compared to those with the ArgArg genotype (GlnGln +GlnArg vs. ArgArg: OR = 0.68, 95% CI, 0.54–0.86). The GlnGln genotype might be more closely associated with shorter survival time and higher risks of death for patients (GlnGln vs. ArgArg: hazard ratio (HR) = 1.14, 95% CI, 0.75–1.75). Our cumulative meta-analyses indicated a distinct apparent trend toward a better response rate for Arg194Trp, but a poorer response rate in Arg399Gln. These findings indicate a predictive role of XRCC1 polymorphisms in clinical outcomes. The use of XRCC1 polymorphisms as predictive factor of clinical outcomes in personalized chemotherapy treatment requires further verification from large well-designed pharmacogenetics studies. PMID:26585370

  9. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in SOD2, XRCC1 and XRCC3 with susceptibility for the development of adverse effects resulting from radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Burri, Ryan J; Stock, Richard G; Cesaretti, Jamie A; Atencio, David P; Peters, Sheila; Peters, Christopher A; Fan, Grace; Stone, Nelson N; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether an association exists between certain single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which have previously been linked with adverse normal tissue effects resulting from radiotherapy, and the development of radiation injury resulting from radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A total of 135 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer and a minimum of 1 year of follow-up who had been treated with radiation therapy, either brachytherapy alone or in combination with external-beam radiotherapy, with or without hormone therapy, were genotyped for SNPs in SOD2, XRCC1 and XRCC3. Three common late tissue toxicities were investigated: late rectal bleeding, urinary morbidity, and erectile dysfunction. Patients with the XRCC1 rs25489 G/A (Arg280His) genotype were more likely to develop erectile dysfunction after irradiation than patients who had the G/G genotype (67% compared to 24%; P=0.048). In addition, patients who had the SOD2 rs4880 T/C (Val16Ala) genotype exhibited a significant increase in grade 2 late rectal bleeding compared to patients who had either the C/C or T/T genotype for this SNP (8% compared to 0%; P=0.02). Finally, patients with the combination of the SOD2 rs4880 C/T genotype and XRCC3 rs861539 T/C (Thr241Met) genotype experienced a significant increase in grade 2 late rectal bleeding compared to patients without this particular genotypic arrangement (14% compared to 1%; P=0.002). These results suggest that SNPs in the SOD2, XRCC1 and XRCC3 genes are associated with the development of late radiation injury in patients treated with radiation therapy for prostate adenocarcinoma.

  10. XAB2, a novel tetratricopeptide repeat protein involved in transcription-coupled DNA repair and transcription.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Y; Asahina, H; Citterio, E; Rademakers, S; Vermeulen, W; Kamiuchi, S; Yeo, J P; Khaw, M C; Saijo, M; Kodo, N; Matsuda, T; Hoeijmakers, J H; Tanaka, K

    2000-11-10

    Nucleotide excision repair is a highly versatile DNA repair system responsible for elimination of a wide variety of lesions from the genome. It is comprised of two subpathways: transcription-coupled repair that accomplishes efficient removal of damage blocking transcription and global genome repair. Recently, the basic mechanism of global genome repair has emerged from biochemical studies. However, little is known about transcription-coupled repair in eukaryotes. Here we report the identification of a novel protein designated XAB2 (XPA-binding protein 2) that was identified by virtue of its ability to interact with XPA, a factor central to both nucleotide excision repair subpathways. The XAB2 protein of 855 amino acids consists mainly of 15 tetratricopeptide repeats. In addition to interacting with XPA, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that a fraction of XAB2 is able to interact with the transcription-coupled repair-specific proteins CSA and CSB as well as RNA polymerase II. Furthermore, antibodies against XAB2 inhibited both transcription-coupled repair and transcription in vivo but not global genome repair when microinjected into living fibroblasts. These results indicate that XAB2 is a novel component involved in transcription-coupled repair and transcription.

  11. The Intertwined Roles of Transcription and Repair Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Yick W.; Cattoglio, Claudia; Tjian, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Transcription is apparently risky business. Its intrinsic mutagenic potential must be kept in check by networks of DNA repair factors that monitor the transcription process to repair DNA lesions that could otherwise compromise transcriptional fidelity and genome integrity. Intriguingly, recent studies point to an even more direct function of DNA repair complexes as co-activators of transcription and the unexpected role of “scheduled” DNA damage/repair at gene promoters. Paradoxically, spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks also induce ectopic transcription that is essential for repair. Thus, transcription, DNA damage and repair may be more physically and functionally intertwined than previously appreciated. PMID:24207023

  12. Defective DNA strand break repair after DNA damage in prostate cancer cells: implications for genetic instability and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Kumaravel, Tirukalikundram S; Jalali, Farid; Marrano, Paula; Squire, Jeremy A; Bristow, Robert G

    2004-12-01

    Together with cell cycle checkpoint control, DNA repair plays a pivotal role in protecting the genome from endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. Although increased genetic instability has been associated with prostate cancer progression, the relative role of DNA double-strand break repair in malignant versus normal prostate epithelial cells is not known. In this study, we determined the RNA and protein expression of a series of DNA double-strand break repair genes in both normal (PrEC-epithelial and PrSC-stromal) and malignant (LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3) prostate cultures. Expression of genes downstream of ATM after ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage reflected the p53 status of the cell lines. In the malignant prostate cell lines, mRNA and protein levels of the Rad51, Xrcc3, Rad52, and Rad54 genes involved in homologous recombination were elevated approximately 2- to 5-fold in comparison to normal PrEC cells. The XRCC1, DNA polymerase-beta and -delta proteins were also elevated. There were no consistent differences in gene expression relating to the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Despite increased expression of DNA repair genes, malignant prostate cancer cells had defective repair of DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative base damage. Furthermore, after ionizing radiation and mitomycin C treatment, chromosomal aberration assays confirmed that malignant prostate cells had defective DNA repair. This discordance between expression and function of DNA repair genes in malignant prostate cancer cells supports the hypothesis that prostate tumor progression may reflect aberrant DNA repair. Our findings support the development of novel treatment strategies designed to reinstate normal DNA repair in prostate cancer cells.

  13. Thyroid nodules, polymorphic variants in DNA repair and RET-related genes, and interaction with ionizing radiation exposure from nuclear tests in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Alice J; Land, Charles E; Bhatti, Parveen; Pineda, Marbin; Brenner, Alina; Carr, Zhanat; Gusev, Boris I; Zhumadilov, Zhaxibay; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, Andre; Rutter, Joni L; Ron, Elaine; Struewing, Jeffery P

    2009-01-01

    Risk factors for thyroid cancer remain largely unknown except for ionizing radiation exposure during childhood and a history of benign thyroid nodules. Because thyroid nodules are more common than thyroid cancers and are associated with thyroid cancer risk, we evaluated several polymorphisms potentially relevant to thyroid tumors and assessed interaction with ionizing radiation exposure to the thyroid gland. Thyroid nodules were detected in 1998 by ultrasound screening of 2997 persons who lived near the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan when they were children (1949-1962). Cases with thyroid nodules (n = 907) were frequency matched (1:1) to those without nodules by ethnicity (Kazakh or Russian), gender and age at screening. Thyroid gland radiation doses were estimated from fallout deposition patterns, residence history and diet. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in 13 genes and assessed interaction with ionizing radiation exposure using likelihood ratio tests (LRT). Elevated thyroid nodule risks were associated with the minor alleles of RET S836S (rs1800862, P = 0.03) and GFRA1 -193C>G (rs not assigned, P = 0.05) and decreased risk with XRCC1 R194W (rs1799782, P trend = 0.03) and TGFB1 T263I (rs1800472, P = 0.009). Similar patterns of association were observed for a small number of papillary thyroid cancers (n = 25). Ionizing radiation exposure to the thyroid gland was associated with significantly increased risk of thyroid nodules (age and gender adjusted excess odds ratio/Gy = 0.30, 95% CI 0.05-0.56), with evidence for interaction by genotype found for XRCC1 R194W (LRT P value = 0.02). Polymorphisms in RET signaling, DNA repair and proliferation genes may be related to risk of thyroid nodules, consistent with some previous reports on thyroid cancer. Borderline support for gene-radiation interaction was found for a variant in XRCC1, a key base excision repair protein. Other pathways such as genes in double-strand break repair, apoptosis and genes related to

  14. Single-nucleotide patch base excision repair of uracil in DNA by mitochondrial protein extracts.

    PubMed

    Stierum, R H; Dianov, G L; Bohr, V A

    1999-09-15

    Mammalian mitochondria contain several 16.5 kb circular DNAs (mtDNA) encoding electron transport chain proteins. Reactive oxygen species formed as byproducts from oxidative phosphorylation in these organelles can cause oxidative deamination of cytosine and lead to uracil in mtDNA. Upon mtDNA replication, these lesions, if unrepaired, can lead to mutations. Until recently, it was thought that there was no DNA repair in mitochondria, but lately there is evidence that some lesions are efficiently repaired in these organelles. In the study of nuclear DNA repair, the in vitro repair measurements in cell extracts have provided major insights into the mechanisms. The use of whole-cell extract based DNA repair methods has revealed that mammalian nuclear base excision repair (BER) diverges into two pathways: the single-nucleotide replacement and long patch repair mechanisms. Similar in vitro methods have not been available for the study of mitochondrial BER. We have established an in vitro DNA repair system supported by rat liver mitochondrial protein extract and DNA substrates containing a single uracil opposite to a guanine. Using this approach, we examined the repair pathways and the identity of the DNA polymerase involved in mitochondrial BER (mtBER). Employing restriction analysis of in vitro repaired DNA to map the repair patch size, we demonstrate that only one nucleotide is incorporated during the repair process. Thus, in contrast to BER in the nucleus, mtBER of uracil in DNA is solely accomplished by single-nucleotide replacement.

  15. Misregulation of DNA damage repair pathways in HPV-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma contributes to cellular radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nickson, Catherine M.; Moori, Parisa; Carter, Rachel J.; Rubbi, Carlos P.; Parsons, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) display increased sensitivity to radiotherapy and improved survival rates in comparison to HPV-negative forms of the disease. However the cellular mechanisms responsible for this characteristic difference are unclear. Here, we have investigated the contribution of DNA damage repair pathways to the in vitro radiosensitivity of OPSCC cell lines. We demonstrate that two HPV-positive OPSCC cells are indeed more radiosensitive than two HPV-negative OPSCC cells, which correlates with reduced efficiency for the repair of ionising radiation (IR)-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB). Interestingly, we show that HPV-positive OPSCC cells consequently have upregulated levels of the proteins XRCC1, DNA polymerase β, PNKP and PARP-1 which are involved in base excision repair (BER) and single strand break (SSB) repair. This translates to an increased capacity and efficiency for the repair of DNA base damage and SSBs in these cells. In addition, we demonstrate that HPV-positive but interestingly more so HPV-negative OPSCC display increased radiosensitivity in combination with the PARP inhibitor olaparib. This suggests that PARP inhibition in combination with radiotherapy may be an effective treatment for both forms of OPSCC, particularly for HPV-negative OPSCC which is relatively radioresistant. PMID:28415784

  16. Reversible protein phosphorylation modulates nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA by human cell extracts.

    PubMed

    Ariza, R R; Keyse, S M; Moggs, J G; Wood, R D

    1996-02-01

    Nucleotide excision repair of DNA in mammalian cells uses more than 20 polypeptides to remove DNA lesions caused by UV light and other mutagens. To investigate whether reversible protein phosphorylation can significantly modulate this repair mechanism we studied the effect of specific inhibitors of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases. The ability of HeLa cell extracts to carry out nucleotide excision repair in vitro was highly sensitive to three toxins (okadaic acid, microcystin-LR and tautomycin), which block PP1- and PP2A-type phosphatases. Repair was more sensitive to okadaic acid than to tautomycin, suggesting the involvement of a PP2A-type enzyme, and was insensitive to inhibitor-2, which exclusively inhibits PP1-type enzymes. In a repair synthesis assay the toxins gave 70% inhibition of activity. Full activity could be restored to toxin-inhibited extracts by addition of purified PP2A, but not PP1. The p34 subunit of replication protein A was hyperphosphorylated in cell extracts in the presence of phosphatase inhibitors, but we found no evidence that this affected repair. In a coupled incision/synthesis repair assay okadaic acid decreased the production of incision intermediates in the repair reaction. The formation of 25-30mer oligonucleotides by dual incision during repair was also inhibited by okadaic acid and inhibition could be reversed with PP2A. Thus Ser/Thr- specific protein phosphorylation plays an important role in the modulation of nucleotide excision repair in vitro.

  17. Structural constraints for protein repair in plant photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    The thylakoid membrane system inside plants chloroplasts defines the structural framework for photosynthetic conversion of sunlight into metabolic energy forms (ATP, NADPH + H(+)). An architectural hallmark of these thylakoid membranes is the tight stacking of part of the membrane into cylindrical flat grana thylakoids, with a diameter of about 500 nm, that are interconnected by unstacked stroma lamellae forming a complex 3D network of alternating grana piles and stroma lamellae. The structural differentiation in the stacked and unstacked thylakoid regions is the basis for a pronounced spatial separation of multisubunit pigment-protein complexes that catalyze energy transformation. The main part of photosystem II (PSII) associated with light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) is concentrated in the grana thylakoids whereas PSI-LHCI and the ATPase complex are excluded from the stacked grana and accumulate in the unstacked thylakoid regions. The fifth protein complex, the cytochrome b 6f complex, is assumed to be homogenously distributed. It is important to recognize that this structural arrangement is not static but highly dynamic and responsive to environmental factors like light intensity and quality or temperature. Knowledge about the interplay between dynamic structural features of the intricate thylakoid architecture, and the functionality, regulation, repair and biogenesis of the photosynthetic machinery is essential for understanding the plasticity of energy conversion in plants living in a fluctuating multi-factorial environment.

  18. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  19. Host DNA repair proteins in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in lung epitehlial cells and in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host DNA damage and DNA repair response to bacterial infections and its significance are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that infection by Gram-negative bacterium P. aeruginosa significantly altered the expression and enzymatic activity of base excision DNA repair protein OGG1 in lung epi...

  20. DNA repair genes polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in a Portuguese population: The role of base excision repair genes polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Ana P; Silva, Susana N; De Lima, João P; Reichert, Alice; Lima, Fernando; Júnior, Esmeraldina; Rueff, José

    2017-06-01

    The role of base excision repair (BER) genes in Philadelphia-negative (PN)-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) susceptibility was evaluated by genotyping eight polymorphisms [apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1, mutY DNA glycosylase, earlier mutY homolog (E. coli) (MUTYH), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, PARP4 and X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1)] in a case-control study involving 133 Caucasian Portuguese patients. The results did not reveal a correlation between individual BER polymorphisms and PN-MPNs when considered as a whole. However, stratification for essential thrombocythaemia revealed i) borderline effect/tendency to increased risk when carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP); ii) decreased risk for Janus kinase 2-positive patients carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 SNP; and iii) decreased risk in females carrying at least one variant allele for MUTYH SNP. Combination of alleles demonstrated an increased risk to PN-MPNs for one specific haplogroup. These findings may provide evidence for gene variants in susceptibility to MPNs. Indeed, common variants in DNA repair genes may hamper the capacity to repair DNA, thus increasing cancer susceptibility.

  1. DNA repair genes polymorphisms and genetic susceptibility to Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms in a Portuguese population: The role of base excision repair genes polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Ana P.; Silva, Susana N.; De Lima, João P.; Reichert, Alice; Lima, Fernando; Júnior, Esmeraldina; Rueff, José

    2017-01-01

    The role of base excision repair (BER) genes in Philadelphia-negative (PN)-myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) susceptibility was evaluated by genotyping eight polymorphisms [apurinic/apyrimidinic endodeoxyribonuclease 1, mutY DNA glycosylase, earlier mutY homolog (E. coli) (MUTYH), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1, PARP4 and X-ray repair cross-complementing 1 (XRCC1)] in a case-control study involving 133 Caucasian Portuguese patients. The results did not reveal a correlation between individual BER polymorphisms and PN-MPNs when considered as a whole. However, stratification for essential thrombocythaemia revealed i) borderline effect/tendency to increased risk when carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP); ii) decreased risk for Janus kinase 2-positive patients carrying at least one variant allele for XRCC1_399 SNP; and iii) decreased risk in females carrying at least one variant allele for MUTYH SNP. Combination of alleles demonstrated an increased risk to PN-MPNs for one specific haplogroup. These findings may provide evidence for gene variants in susceptibility to MPNs. Indeed, common variants in DNA repair genes may hamper the capacity to repair DNA, thus increasing cancer susceptibility. PMID:28599464

  2. Antagonistic role of tea against sodium arsenite-induced oxidative DNA damage and inhibition of DNA repair in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dona; Roy, Madhumita

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in groundwater is of increasing health concern in West Bengal, India. Arsenic has been associated with various human cancers, but the precise mechanism of its co-carcinogenic action is not clearly elucidated. Oxidative stress and defective repair mechanisms may promote accumulation of mutations and may be a stepping stone for carcinogenesis. Prevention of arsenic-induced oxidative stress and repair inhibition may reduce the chances of initiation of cancer. Tea polyphenols are reported to have excellent chemopreventive properties against cancer. This study aimed to elucidate the role of tea against arsenic-induced formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG) and arsenic-suppressed DNA repair in Swiss albino mice. Both green and black tea gave fruitful results in the reduction of 8OHdG and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) in Swiss albino mice administered sodium arsenite (As III). DNA repair enzymes--such as PARP1, DNA β-polymerase, XRCC1, DNA ligase III, DNA protein kinase (catalytic subunit), XRCC 4, DNA ligase IV, and DNA topoisomerase IIβ--were induced by the phytochemicals at both the protein and genetic levels. Thus, tea polyphenols may prove effective in treating arsenic-induced carcinogenesis.

  3. A role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein in direct alkylation repair.

    PubMed

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-12-26

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity.

  4. A Role for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 Protein in Direct Alkylation Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Shivange, Gururaj; Kodipelli, Naveena; Monisha, Mohan; Anindya, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Alkylating agents induce cytotoxic DNA base adducts. In this work, we provide evidence to suggest, for the first time, that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tpa1 protein is involved in DNA alkylation repair. Little is known about Tpa1 as a repair protein beyond the initial observation from a high-throughput analysis indicating that deletion of TPA1 causes methyl methane sulfonate sensitivity in S. cerevisiae. Using purified Tpa1, we demonstrate that Tpa1 repairs both single- and double-stranded methylated DNA. Tpa1 is a member of the Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase family, and we show that mutation of the amino acid residues involved in cofactor binding abolishes the Tpa1 DNA repair activity. Deletion of TPA1 along with the base excision repair pathway DNA glycosylase MAG1 renders the tpa1Δmag1Δ double mutant highly susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. We further demonstrate that the trans-lesion synthesis DNA polymerase Polζ (REV3) plays a key role in tolerating DNA methyl-base lesions and that tpa1Δmag1revΔ3 triple mutant is extremely susceptible to methylation-induced toxicity. Our results indicate a synergism between the base excision repair pathway and direct alkylation repair by Tpa1 in S. cerevisiae. We conclude that Tpa1 is a hitherto unidentified DNA repair protein in yeast and that it plays a crucial role in reverting alkylated DNA base lesions and cytotoxicity. PMID:25381260

  5. Effect of DNA Repair Protein Rad18 on Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Aliza G; Tateishi, Satoshi; Bieniasz, Paul D; Muesing, Mark A; Yamaizumi, Masaru; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F

    2006-01-01

    Host factors belonging to the DNA repair machineries are assumed to aid retroviruses in the obligatory step of integration. Here we describe the effect of DNA repair molecule Rad18, a component of the post-replication repair pathway, on viral infection. Contrary to our expectations, cells lacking Rad18 were consistently more permissive to viral transduction as compared to Rad18+/+ controls. Remarkably, such susceptibility was integration independent, since retroviruses devoid of integration activity also showed enhancement of the initial steps of infection. Moreover, the elevated sensitivity of the Rad18−/− cells was also observed with adenovirus. These data indicate that Rad18 suppresses viral infection in a non-specific fashion, probably by targeting incoming DNA. Furthermore, considering data published recently, it appears that the interactions between DNA repair components with incoming viruses, often result in inhibition of the infection rather than cooperation toward its establishment. PMID:16710452

  6. Quantification of DNA repair protein kinetics after γ-irradiation using number and brightness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Poudel, Milan; Chen, David J.; Alexandrakis, George

    2011-03-01

    The kinetics of most proteins involved in DNA damage sensing, signaling and repair following ionizing radiation exposure cannot be quantified by current live cell fluorescence microscopy methods. This is because most of these proteins, with only few notable exceptions, do not attach in large numbers at DNA damage sites to form easily detectable foci in microscopy images. As a result a high fluorescence background from freely moving and immobile fluorescent proteins in the nucleus masks the aggregation of proteins at sparse DNA damage sites. Currently, the kinetics of these repair proteins are studied by laser-induced damage and Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching that rely on the detectability of high fluorescence intensity spots of clustered DNA damage. We report on the use of Number and Brightness (N&B) analysis methods as a means to monitor kinetics of DNA repair proteins during sparse DNA damage created by γ-irradiation, which is more relevant to cancer treatment than laser-induced clustered damage. We use two key double strand break repair proteins, namely Ku 70/80 and the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKCS), as specific examples to showcase the feasibility of the proposed methods to quantify dose-dependent kinetics for DNA repair proteins after exposure to γ-rays.

  7. Proteomic identification of hair cell repair proteins in the model sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Watson, Glen M

    2015-09-01

    Sea anemones have an extraordinary capability to repair damaged hair bundles, even after severe trauma. A group of secreted proteins, named repair proteins (RPs), found in mucus covering sea anemones significantly assists the repair of damaged hair bundle mechanoreceptors both in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae and the blind cavefish Astyanax hubbsi. The polypeptide constituents of RPs must be identified in order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which repair of hair bundles is accomplished. In this study, several polypeptides of RPs were isolated from mucus using blue native PAGE and then sequenced using LC-MS/MS. Thirty-seven known polypeptides were identified, including Hsp70s, as well as many polypeptide subunits of the 20S proteasome. Other identified polypeptides included those involved in cellular stress responses, protein folding, and protein degradation. Specific inhibitors of Hsp70s and the 20S proteasome were employed in experiments to test their involvement in hair bundle repair. The results of those experiments suggested that repair requires biologically active Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes. A model is proposed that considers the function of extracellular Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes in the repair of damaged hair cells.

  8. Cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins interact with Lynch-Syndrome associated mismatch repair protein MLH1.

    PubMed

    Brieger, Angela; Adryan, Boris; Wolpert, Fabian; Passmann, Sandra; Zeuzem, Stefan; Trojan, Jörg

    2010-09-01

    The involvement of MLH1 in several mismatch repair-independent cellular processes has been reported. In an attempt to gain further insight into the protein's cellular functions, we screened for novel interacting partners of MLH1 utilizing a bacterial two-hybrid system. Numerous unknown interacting proteins were identified, suggesting novel biological roles of MLH1. The network of MLH1 and its partner proteins involves a multitude of cellular processes. Integration of our data with the "General Repository for Interaction Datasets" highlighted that MLH1 exhibits relationships to three interacting pairs of proteins involved in cytoskeletal and filament organization: Thymosin beta 4 and Actin gamma, Cathepsin B and Annexin A2 as well as Spectrin alpha and Desmin. Coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization experiments validated the interaction of MLH1 with these proteins. Differential mRNA levels of many of the identified proteins, detected by microarray analysis comparing MLH1-deficient and -proficient cell lines, support the assumed interplay of MLH1 and the identified candidate proteins. By siRNA knock down of MLH1, we demonstrated the functional impact of MLH1-Actin interaction on filament organization and propose that dysregulation of MLH1 plays an essential role in cytoskeleton dynamics. Our data suggest novel roles of MLH1 in cellular organization and colorectal cancerogenesis.

  9. DNA repair genes polymorphism and lung cancer risk with the emphasis to sex differences.

    PubMed

    Letkova, L; Matakova, T; Musak, L; Sarlinova, M; Krutakova, M; Slovakova, P; Kavcova, E; Jakusova, V; Janickova, M; Drgova, A; Berzinec, P; Halasova, E

    2013-09-01

    Polymorphisms in nucleotide and base excision repair genes are associated with the variability in the risk of developing lung cancer. In the present study, we investigated the polymorphisms of following selected DNA repair genes: XPC (Lys939Gln), XPD (Lys751Gln), hOGG1 (Ser326Cys) and XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), and the risks they present towards the development of lung cancer with the emphasis to gender differences within the Slovak population. We analyzed 761 individuals comprising 382 patients with diagnosed lung cancer and 379 healthy controls. Genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism method. We found out statistically significant increased risk for lung cancer development between genders. Female carrying XPC Gln/Gln, XPC Lys/Gln+Gln/Gln and XRCC1 Arg/Gln, XRCC1 Arg/Gln+Gln/Gln genotypes had significantly increased risk of lung cancer corresponding to OR = 2.06; p = 0.04, OR = 1.66; p = 0.04 and OR = 1.62; p = 0.04, OR = 1.69; p = 0.02 respectively. In total, significantly increased risk of developing lung cancer was found in the following combinations of genotypes: XPD Lys/Gln+XPC Lys/Lys (OR = 1.62; p = 0.04), XRCC1 Gln/Gln+hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR = 2.14; p = 0.02). After stratification for genders, the following combinations of genotype were found to be significant in male: XPD Lys/Gln+XPC Lys/Lys (OR = 1.87; p = 0.03), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Lys/Lys (OR = 4.52; p = 0.0007), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Lys/Gln (OR = 5.44; p < 0.0001). In female, different combinations of the following genotypes were found to be significant: XRCC1 Arg/Gln+hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR = 1.98; p = 0.04), XRCC1 Gln/Gln+hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR = 3.75; p = 0.02), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Lys/Gln (OR = 2.40; p = 0.04), XRCC1 Arg/Gln+XPC Gln/Gln (OR = 3.03; p = 0.04). We found out decreased cancer risk in genotype combinations between female patients and healthy controls: XPD Lys/Lys+XPC Lys/Gln (OR = 0.45; p = 0.02), XPD Lys

  10. Heat shock protein 70 stimulation of the deoxyribonucleic acid base excision repair enzyme polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Frances; Kozin, Elliott; Bases, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) of damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is a multistep process during which potentially lethal abasic sites temporarily exist. Repair of these lesions is greatly stimulated by heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), which enhances strand incision and removal of the abasic sites by human apurinic-apyrimidinic endonuclease (HAP1). The resulting single-strand gaps must then be filled in. Here, we show that Hsp70 and its 48- and 43-kDa N-terminal domains greatly stimulated filling in the single-strand gaps by DNA polymerase β, a novel finding that extends the role of Hsps in DNA repair. Incorporation of deoxyguanosine monophosphate (dGMP) to fill in single-strand gaps in DNA phagemid pBKS by DNA polymerase β was stimulated by Hsp70. Truncated proteins derived from the C-terminus of Hsp70 as well as unrelated proteins were less effective, but proteins derived from the N-terminus of Hsp70 remained efficient stimulators of DNA polymerase β repair of DNA single-strand gaps. In agreement with these results, repair of a gap in a 30-bp oligonucleotide by polymerase β also was strongly stimulated by Hsp70 although not by a truncated protein from the C-terminus of Hsp70. Sealing of the repaired site in the oligonucleotide by human DNA ligase 1 was not specifically stimulated by Hsp-related proteins. Results presented here now implicate and extend the role of Hsp70 as a partner in the enzymatic repair of damaged DNA. The participation of Hsp70 jointly with base excision enzymes improves repair efficiency by mechanisms that are not yet understood. PMID:14627201

  11. An Achilles' Heel in an Amyloidogenic Protein and Its Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanwu; Petkova, Aneta; Huang, Kun; Xu, Bin; Hua, Qing-xin; Ye, I-Ju; Chu, Ying-Chi; Hu, Shi-Quan; Phillips, Nelson B.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Mackin, Robert B.; Katsoyannis, Panayotis G.; Tycko, Robert; Weiss, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin fibrillation provides a model for a broad class of amyloidogenic diseases. Conformational distortion of the native monomer leads to aggregation-coupled misfolding. Whereas β-cells are protected from proteotoxicity by hexamer assembly, fibrillation limits the storage and use of insulin at elevated temperatures. Here, we have investigated conformational distortions of an engineered insulin monomer in relation to the structure of an insulin fibril. Anomalous 13C NMR chemical shifts and rapid 15N-detected 1H-2H amide-proton exchange were observed in one of the three classical α-helices (residues A1–A8) of the hormone, suggesting a conformational equilibrium between locally folded and unfolded A-chain segments. Whereas hexamer assembly resolves these anomalies in accordance with its protective role, solid-state 13C NMR studies suggest that the A-chain segment participates in a fibril-specific β-sheet. Accordingly, we investigated whether helicogenic substitutions in the A1–A8 segment might delay fibrillation. Simultaneous substitution of three β-branched residues (IleA2 → Leu, ValA3 → Leu, and ThrA8 → His) yielded an analog with reduced thermodynamic stability but marked resistance to fibrillation. Whereas amide-proton exchange in the A1–A8 segment remained rapid, 13Cα chemical shifts exhibited a more helical pattern. This analog is essentially without activity, however, as IleA2 and ValA3 define conserved receptor contacts. To obtain active analogs, substitutions were restricted to A8. These analogs exhibit high receptor-binding affinity; representative potency in a rodent model of diabetes mellitus was similar to wild-type insulin. Although 13Cα chemical shifts remain anomalous, significant protection from fibrillation is retained. Together, our studies define an “Achilles' heel” in a globular protein whose repair may enhance the stability of pharmaceutical formulations and broaden their therapeutic deployment in the developing world

  12. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  13. DNA damage repair and genetic polymorphisms: Assessment of individual sensitivity and repair capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Cornetta, Tommaso; Festa, Fabiola; Testa, Antonella; Cozzi, Renata Prof. . E-mail: cozzi@uniroma3.it

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To study the repair capacity after X-ray irradiation in human peripheral blood cells of healthy subjects, in relation to their genotypes. Methods and Materials: The peripheral blood of 50 healthy subjects was irradiated in vitro with 2 Gy of X rays and the induced DNA damage was measured by Comet assay immediately after irradiation. DNA repair was detected by analyzing the cells at defined time intervals after the exposure. Furthermore, all subjects were genotyped for XRCC1, OGG1, and XPC genes. Results: After X-ray irradiation, persons bearing XRCC1 homozygous variant (codon 399) genotype exhibited significantly lower Tail DNA values than those bearing wild-type and heterozygous genotypes. These results are also confirmed at 30 and 60 min after irradiation. Furthermore, XPC heterozygous subjects (variant codon 939) showed lower residual DNA damage 60 min after irradiation compared with wild-type and homozygous genotypes. Conclusion: The results of the present study show that polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could influence individual DNA repair capacity.

  14. Polymorphisms in selected DNA repair genes and cell cycle regulating genes involved in the risk of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Halkova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Sarka; Sykorova, Vlasta; Vaclavikova, Eliska; Vcelak, Josef; Vlcek, Petr; Sykorova, Pavla; Kodetova, Daniela; Betka, Jan; Lastuvka, Petr; Bavor, Petr; Hoch, Jiri; Katra, Rami; Bendlova, Bela

    2016-06-07

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. In addition to causal somatic mutations in the BRAF gene and RET/PTC rearrangements, the contribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in low-penetrance genes in the development of PTC has been proposed. Four SNPs in the XRCC1 (Arg399Gln, Arg280His, Arg194Trp and T-77C) and one SNP from each of three other genes participating in DNA repair pathways and/or cell cycle regulation (ATM Asp1853Asn, TP53 Arg72Pro, CDKN1B Val109Gly) were selected. The allelic and genotypic distributions of these variants as well as haplotypes of the XRCC1 were examined in 583 individuals comprising well-characterized cohorts of 209 PTC patients and 374 healthy volunteers. Correlations of polymorphism with clinical-pathological data and mutation status were performed. XRCC1 T-77C polymorphism affects the genetic susceptibility for PTC development in men, the specific combination of XRCC1 haplotypes correlates with RET/PTC incidence, CDKN1B Val109Gly significantly influences the risk of developing PTC regardless of gender and in PTC cases, selected genotypes of TP53 Arg72Pro and ATM Asp1853Asn were significantly associated with monitored tumour characteristics. It seems that SNPs in studied regulating genes contribute to the development of PTC and modify the tumour behaviour or characteristics.

  15. Zinc Binding to MG53 Protein Facilitates Repair of Injury to Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chuanxi; Lin, Peihui; Zhu, Hua; Ko, Jae-Kyun; Hwang, Moonsun; Tan, Tao; Pan, Zui; Korichneva, Irina; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-05-29

    Zinc is an essential trace element that participates in a wide range of biological functions, including wound healing. Although Zn(2+) deficiency has been linked to compromised wound healing and tissue repair in human diseases, the molecular mechanisms underlying Zn(2+)-mediated tissue repair remain unknown. Our previous studies established that MG53, a TRIM (tripartite motif) family protein, is an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Domain homology analysis revealed that MG53 contains two Zn(2+)-binding motifs. Here, we show that Zn(2+) binding to MG53 is indispensable to assembly of the cell membrane repair machinery. Live cell imaging illustrated that Zn(2+) entry from extracellular space is essential for translocation of MG53-containing vesicles to the acute membrane injury sites for formation of a repair patch. The effect of Zn(2+) on membrane repair is abolished in mg53(-/-) muscle fibers, suggesting that MG53 functions as a potential target for Zn(2+) during membrane repair. Mutagenesis studies suggested that both RING and B-box motifs of MG53 constitute Zn(2+)-binding domains that contribute to MG53-mediated membrane repair. Overall, this study establishes a base for Zn(2+) interaction with MG53 in protection against injury to the cell membrane. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno (ε)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ε-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ε-adducts, 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), 3,N4-ethenocytosine (εC) and 1,N2-ethenoguanine (1,N2-εG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ε-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed εA and εC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N2-εG. SC-1A repaired only εA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ε-adducts in dsDNA, while only εA and εC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only εC in ssDNA Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N2-εG and that ALKBH3 removes only εC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. PMID:25797601

  17. Replication protein A binds to regulatory elements in yeast DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K K; Samson, L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to DNA damage by arresting cell cycle progression (thereby preventing the replication and segregation of damaged chromosomes) and by inducing the expression of numerous genes, some of which are involved in DNA repair, DNA replication, and DNA metabolism. Induction of the S. cerevisiae 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase repair gene (MAG) by DNA-damaging agents requires one upstream activating sequence (UAS) and two upstream repressing sequences (URS1 and URS2) in the MAG promoter. Sequences similar to the MAG URS elements are present in at least 11 other S. cerevisiae DNA repair and metabolism genes. Replication protein A (Rpa) is known as a single-stranded-DNA-binding protein that is involved in the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination. We now show that the MAG URS1 and URS2 elements form similar double-stranded, sequence-specific, DNA-protein complexes and that both complexes contain Rpa. Moreover, Rpa appears to bind the MAG URS1-like elements found upstream of 11 other DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. These results lead us to hypothesize that Rpa may be involved in the regulation of a number of DNA repair and DNA metabolism genes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7761422

  18. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 suppresses DNA repair response triggered by DNA-targeted anticancer drugs and augments efficacy: mechanistic rationale for drug combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui-Jain, Adam; Bliesath, Joshua; Macalino, Diwata; Omori, Mayuko; Huser, Nanni; Streiner, Nicole; Ho, Caroline B; Anderes, Kenna; Proffitt, Chris; O'Brien, Sean E; Lim, John K C; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Ryckman, David M; Rice, William G; Drygin, Denis

    2012-04-01

    Drug combination therapies are commonly used for the treatment of cancers to increase therapeutic efficacy, reduce toxicity, and decrease the incidence of drug resistance. Although drug combination therapies were originally devised primarily by empirical methods, the increased understanding of drug mechanisms and the pathways they modulate provides a unique opportunity to design combinations that are based on mechanistic rationale. We have identified protein kinase CK2 as a promising therapeutic target for combination therapy, because CK2 regulates not just one but many oncogenic pathways and processes that play important roles in drug resistance, including DNA repair, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling, Hsp90 machinery activity, hypoxia, and interleukin-6 expression. In this article, we show that CX-4945, a clinical stage selective small molecule inhibitor of CK2, blocks the DNA repair response induced by gemcitabine and cisplatin and synergizes with these agents in models of ovarian cancer. Mechanistic studies show that the enhanced activity is a result of inactivation of XRCC1 and MDC1, two mediator/adaptor proteins that are essential for DNA repair and that require phosphorylation by CK2 for their function. These data position CK2 as a valid pharmacologic target for intelligent drug combinations and support the evaluation of CX-4945 in combination with gemcitabine and platinum-based chemotherapeutics in the clinical setting. ©2012 AACR.

  20. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human. Progress report, November 1, 1991--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  1. HIV-1 and HIV-2 exhibit divergent interactions with HLTF and UNG2 DNA repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hrecka, Kasia; Hao, Caili; Shun, Ming-Chieh; Kaur, Sarabpreet; Swanson, Selene K.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Skowronski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication in nondividing host cells occurs in the presence of high concentrations of noncanonical dUTP, apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing, enzyme-catalytic, polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) cytidine deaminases, and SAMHD1 (a cell cycle-regulated dNTP triphosphohydrolase) dNTPase, which maintains low concentrations of canonical dNTPs in these cells. These conditions favor the introduction of marks of DNA damage into viral cDNA, and thereby prime it for processing by DNA repair enzymes. Accessory protein Vpr, found in all primate lentiviruses, and its HIV-2/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) SIVsm paralogue Vpx, hijack the CRL4DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase to alleviate some of these conditions, but the extent of their interactions with DNA repair proteins has not been thoroughly characterized. Here, we identify HLTF, a postreplication DNA repair helicase, as a common target of HIV-1/SIVcpz Vpr proteins. We show that HIV-1 Vpr reprograms CRL4DCAF1 E3 to direct HLTF for proteasome-dependent degradation independent from previously reported Vpr interactions with base excision repair enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG2) and crossover junction endonuclease MUS81, which Vpr also directs for degradation via CRL4DCAF1 E3. Thus, separate functions of HIV-1 Vpr usurp CRL4DCAF1 E3 to remove key enzymes in three DNA repair pathways. In contrast, we find that HIV-2 Vpr is unable to efficiently program HLTF or UNG2 for degradation. Our findings reveal complex interactions between HIV-1 and the DNA repair machinery, suggesting that DNA repair plays important roles in the HIV-1 life cycle. The divergent interactions of HIV-1 and HIV-2 with DNA repair enzymes and SAMHD1 imply that these viruses use different strategies to guard their genomes and facilitate their replication in the host. PMID:27335459

  2. Monitoring of the spatial and temporal dynamics of BER/SSBR pathway proteins, including MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1 and NEIL1-3, during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Bj Rås, Karine Ø; Sousa, Mirta M L; Sharma, Animesh; Fonseca, Davi M; S Gaard, Caroline K; Bj Rås, Magnar; Otterlei, Marit

    2017-08-21

    Base lesions in DNA can stall the replication machinery or induce mutations if bypassed. Consequently, lesions must be repaired before replication or in a post-replicative process to maintain genomic stability. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway for repair of base lesions and is known to be associated with DNA replication, but how BER is organized during replication is unclear. Here we coupled the iPOND (isolation of proteins on nascent DNA) technique with targeted mass-spectrometry analysis, which enabled us to detect all proteins required for BER on nascent DNA and to monitor their spatiotemporal orchestration at replication forks. We demonstrate that XRCC1 and other BER/single-strand break repair (SSBR) proteins are enriched in replisomes in unstressed cells, supporting a cellular capacity of post-replicative BER/SSBR. Importantly, we identify for the first time the DNA glycosylases MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1, NEIL1, 2 and 3 on nascent DNA. Our findings suggest that a broad spectrum of DNA base lesions are recognized and repaired by BER in a post-replicative process. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Studies of protein-protein interactions in Fanconi anemia pathway to unravel the DNA interstrand crosslink repair mechanism.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohd Quadir; Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Thapa, Pankaj S; Maurya, Ganesh Kumar; Banerjee, Kuheli; Khan, Mudassar Ali; Panda, Pragnya; Hasan, Syed K; Gadewal, Nikhil; Misra, Hari S; Varma, Ashok K

    2017-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA), a cancer predisposition syndrome exhibits hallmark feature of radial chromosome formation, and hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. A set of FA pathway proteins mainly FANCI, FANCD2 and BRCA2 are expressed to repair the covalent crosslink between the dsDNA. However, FA, BRCA pathways play an important role in DNA ICL repair as well as in homologous recombination repair, but the presumptive role of FA-BRCA proteins has not clearly explored particularly in context to function associated protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Here, in-vivo, in-vitro and in-silico studies have been performed for functionally relevant domains of FANCI, FANCD2 and BRCA2. To our conclusion, FANCI ARM repeat interacts with FANCD2 CUE domain and BRCA2 C-terminal region. Interestingly, FANCD2 CUE domain also interacts strongly with BRCA2 C-terminal region. Interactions between BRCA2 CTR and functionally relevant mutations Ser222Ala (cell cycle checkpoint mutant) and Leu231Arg (DNA ICL repair mutant) present in FANCD2 CUE domain have been analysed. To our finding, these mutations abrogate the binding between FANCD2 CUE domain and BRCA2 CTR. Furthermore, (1) different domain of FANCI, FANCD2 and BRCA2 are playing important role in PPIs, (2) mutations cause the impairment in the PPIs which in turn may disrupt the DNA ICL repair mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α regulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair proteins in keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mahfouf, Walid; Ali, Nsrein; Chemin, Cecile; Ged, Cecile; Kim, Arianna L.; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Bickers, David R.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair enzymes is crucial for cancer prevention, initiation, and therapy. We have studied the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the expression of the two nucleotide excision repair factors (XPC and XPD) in human keratinocytes. We show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is involved in the regulation of XPC and XPD. Early UVB-induced downregulation of HIF-1α increased XPC mRNA expression due to competition between HIF-1α and Sp1 for their overlapping binding sites. Late UVB-induced enhanced phosphorylation of HIF-1α protein upregulated XPC mRNA expression by direct binding to a separate hypoxia response element (HRE) in the XPC promoter region. HIF-1α also regulated XPD expression by binding to a region of seven overlapping HREs in its promoter. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed putative HREs in the genes encoding other DNA repair proteins (XPB, XPG, CSA and CSB), suggesting that HIF-1α is a key regulator of the DNA repair machinery. Analysis of the repair kinetics of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers also revealed that HIF-1α downregulation led to an increased rate of immediate removal of both photolesions but attenuated their late removal following UVB irradiation, indicating the functional effects of HIF-1α in the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage. PMID:19934262

  5. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha regulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair proteins in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Mahfouf, Walid; Ali, Nsrein; Chemin, Cecile; Ged, Cecile; Kim, Arianna L; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Bickers, David R; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of DNA repair enzymes is crucial for cancer prevention, initiation, and therapy. We have studied the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation on the expression of the two nucleotide excision repair factors (XPC and XPD) in human keratinocytes. We show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is involved in the regulation of XPC and XPD. Early UVB-induced downregulation of HIF-1alpha increased XPC mRNA expression due to competition between HIF-1alpha and Sp1 for their overlapping binding sites. Late UVB-induced enhanced phosphorylation of HIF-1alpha protein upregulated XPC mRNA expression by direct binding to a separate hypoxia response element (HRE) in the XPC promoter region. HIF-1alpha also regulated XPD expression by binding to a region of seven overlapping HREs in its promoter. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed putative HREs in the genes encoding other DNA repair proteins (XPB, XPG, CSA and CSB), suggesting that HIF-1alpha is a key regulator of the DNA repair machinery. Analysis of the repair kinetics of 6-4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers also revealed that HIF-1alpha downregulation led to an increased rate of immediate removal of both photolesions but attenuated their late removal following UVB irradiation, indicating the functional effects of HIF-1alpha in the repair of UVB-induced DNA damage.

  6. Mismatch repair proteins recruit DNA methyltransferase 1 to sites of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Bonham, Emily M; Hannon, Brooke E; Amick, Thomas R; Baylin, Stephen B; O'Hagan, Heather M

    2016-06-01

    At sites of chronic inflammation, epithelial cells are exposed to high levels of reactive oxygen species and undergo cancer-associated DNA methylation changes, suggesting that inflammation may initiate epigenetic alterations. Previously, we demonstrated that oxidative damage causes epigenetic silencing proteins to become part of a large complex that is localized to GC-rich regions of the genome, including promoter CpG islands that are epigenetically silenced in cancer. However, whether these proteins were recruited directly to damaged DNA or during the DNA repair process was unknown. Here we demonstrate that the mismatch repair protein heterodimer MSH2-MSH6 participates in the oxidative damage-induced recruitment of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) to chromatin. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induces the interaction of MSH2-MSH6 with DNMT1, suggesting that the recruitment is through a protein-protein interaction. Importantly, the reduction in transcription for genes with CpG island-containing promoters caused by oxidative damage is abrogated by knockdown of MSH6 and/or DNMT1. Our findings provide evidence that the role of DNMT1 at sites of oxidative damage is to reduce transcription, potentially preventing transcription from interfering with the repair process. This study uniquely brings together several factors that are known to contribute to colon cancer, namely inflammation, mismatch repair proteins, and epigenetic changes. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of β-catenin-regulated CCN matricellular proteins in epithelial repair after inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    McClendon, Jazalle; Aschner, Yael; Briones, Natalie; Young, Scott K.; Lau, Lester F.; Kahn, Michael; Downey, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of the lung epithelium after injury is integral to the pathogenesis and outcomes of diverse inflammatory lung diseases. We previously reported that β-catenin signaling promotes epithelial repair after inflammatory injury, but the β-catenin target genes that mediate this effect are unknown. Herein, we examined which β-catenin transcriptional coactivators and target genes promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. Transmigration of human neutrophils across cultured monolayers of human lung epithelial cells resulted in a fall in transepithelial resistance and the formation of discrete areas of epithelial denudation (“microinjury”), which repaired via cell spreading by 96 h. In mice treated with intratracheal (i.t.) LPS or keratinocyte chemokine, neutrophil emigration was associated with increased permeability of the lung epithelium, as determined by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid albumin concentration, which decreased over 3–6 days. Activation of β-catenin/p300-dependent gene expression using the compound ICG-001 accelerated epithelial repair in vitro and in murine models. Neutrophil transmigration induced epithelial expression of the β-catenin/p300 target genes Wnt-induced secreted protein (WISP) 1 and cysteine-rich (Cyr) 61, as determined by real-time PCR (qPCR) and immunostaining. Purified neutrophil elastase induced WISP1 upregulation in lung epithelial cells, as determined by qPCR. WISP1 expression increased in murine lungs after i.t. LPS, as determined by ELISA of the BAL fluid and qPCR of whole lung extracts. Finally, recombinant WISP1 and Cyr61 accelerated repair, and Cyr61-neutralizing antibodies delayed repair of the injured epithelium in vitro. We conclude that β-catenin/p300-dependent expression of WISP1 and Cyr61 is critical for epithelial repair and represents a potential therapeutic target to promote epithelial repair after inflammatory injury. PMID:23316072

  8. Functional characterization of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes using cytogenetic challenge assays.

    PubMed Central

    Au, William W; Salama, Salama A; Sierra-Torres, Carlos H

    2003-01-01

    A major barrier to understanding the role of polymorphic DNA repair genes for environmental cancer is that the functions of variant genotypes are largely unknown. Using our cytogenetic challenge assays, we conducted an investigation to address the deficiency. Using X-rays or ultraviolet (UV) light, we irradiated blood lymphocytes from 80 nonsmoking donors to challenge the cells to repair the induced DNA damage, and we analyzed expression of chromosome aberrations (CA) specific to the inducing agents. We have genotyped polymorphic DNA repair genes preferentially involved with base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) activities (XRCC1, XRCC3, APE1, XPD) corresponding to the repair of X-ray- and UV light-induced DNA damage, respectively. We expected that defects in specific DNA repair pathways due to polymorphisms would cause corresponding increases of specific CA. From our data, XRCC1 399Gln and XRCC3 241Met were associated with significant increases in chromosome deletions compared with the corresponding homozygous wild types (18.27 1.1 vs 14.79 1.2 and 18.22 0.99 vs 14.20 1.39, respectively); XPD 312Asn and XPD 751Gln were associated with significant increases in chromatid breaks compared with wild types (16.09 1.36 vs 11.41 0.98 and 16.87 1.27 vs 10.54 0.87, respectively), p < 0.05. The data indicate that XRCC1 399Gln and XRCC3 241Met are significantly defective in BER, and the XPD 312Asn and XPD 751Gln are significantly defective in NER. In addition, the variant genotypes interact significantly, with limited overlap of the two different repair pathways. PMID:14630517

  9. The Rad9 protein enhances survival and promotes DNA repair following exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Patrick D.; Helt, Christopher E.; Keng, Peter C.; Bambara, Robert A. . E-mail: robert_bambara@urmc.rochester.edu

    2006-08-18

    Following DNA damage cells initiate cell cycle checkpoints to allow time to repair sustained lesions. Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 proteins form a toroidal complex, termed the 9-1-1 complex, that is involved in checkpoint signaling. 9-1-1 shares high structural similarity to the DNA replication protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and 9-1-1 has been shown in vitro to stimulate steps of the repair process known as long patch base excision repair. Using a system that allows conditional repression of the Rad9 protein in human cell culture, we show that Rad9, and by extension, the 9-1-1 complex, enhances cell survival, is required for efficient exit from G2-phase arrest, and stimulates the repair of damaged DNA following ionizing radiation. These data provide in vivo evidence that the human 9-1-1 complex participates in DNA repair in addition to its previously described role in DNA damage sensing.

  10. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Song, Peter I.; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yong; Jun, Jae Yeoul; You, Ho Jin

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  11. Identify in Breast Cancer Stem Cell-Like Cells the Proteins Involved in Non-Homologous End Joining DNA Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Cells the Proteins Involved in Non - Homologous End Joining DNA Repair PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hong Yin, M.D., PH.D...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identify in Breast Cancer Stem Cell-Like Cells the Proteins Involved in Non - Homologous End Joining DNA Repair 5b. GRANT NUMBER...subpopulations. 15. SUBJECT TERMS CD44/CD24, Cancer stem-like cells, radiation sensitivity, non - homologous end joining DNA repair, response to DNA

  12. New Paradigms in the Repair of Oxidative Damage in Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mis-pairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydoxyuracil (5-OHU), produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication in order to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1’s role in replicating template-strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the ‘cow-catcher’ mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1’s non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in re-annealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U) and Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as well as high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1

  13. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  14. The PTEN phosphatase functions cooperatively with the Fanconi anemia proteins in DNA crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Vuono, Elizabeth A.; Mukherjee, Ananda; Vierra, David A.; Adroved, Morganne M.; Hodson, Charlotte; Deans, Andrew J.; Howlett, Niall G.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure and increased cancer risk. The FA proteins function primarily in DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Here, we have examined the role of the PTEN phosphatase in this process. We have established that PTEN-deficient cells, like FA cells, exhibit increased cytotoxicity, chromosome structural aberrations, and error-prone mutagenic DNA repair following exposure to ICL-inducing agents. The increased ICL sensitivity of PTEN-deficient cells is caused, in part, by elevated PLK1 kinase-mediated phosphorylation of FANCM, constitutive FANCM polyubiquitination and degradation, and the consequent inefficient assembly of the FA core complex, FANCD2, and FANCI into DNA repair foci. We also establish that PTEN function in ICL repair is dependent on its protein phosphatase activity and ability to be SUMOylated, yet is independent of its lipid phosphatase activity. Finally, via epistasis analysis, we demonstrate that PTEN and FANCD2 function cooperatively in ICL repair. PMID:27819275

  15. Bone morphogenetic proteins: Signaling periodontal bone regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Anusuya, G Sai; Kandasamy, M; Jacob Raja, S A; Sabarinathan, S; Ravishankar, P; Kandhasamy, Balu

    2016-10-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors also known as cytokines and as metabologens. Originally discovered by their ability to induce the formation of bone and cartilage, BMPs are now considered to constitute a group of pivotal morphogenetic signals, orchestrating tissue architecture throughout the body. The important functioning of BMP signals in physiology is emphasized by the multitude of roles for dysregulated BMP signaling in pathological processes. A study done wherein it was found that protein extracts from bone implanted into the animals at nonbone sites induced the formation of new cartilage and bone tissue. This protein extract contained multiple factors that stimulated bone formation and was termed as "BMP." There are at least 15 different BMPs identified to date and are a part of the transforming growth factor-β super family. The most widely studied BMPs are BMP-2, BMP-3 (osteogenin), BMP-4, and BMP-7 (osteogenic protein-1). Now, any recombination type of morphogenic proteins have been synthesized, for example - recombinant human BMPs.

  16. Bone morphogenetic proteins: Signaling periodontal bone regeneration and repair

    PubMed Central

    Anusuya, G. Sai; Kandasamy, M.; Jacob Raja, S. A.; Sabarinathan, S.; Ravishankar, P.; Kandhasamy, Balu

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors also known as cytokines and as metabologens. Originally discovered by their ability to induce the formation of bone and cartilage, BMPs are now considered to constitute a group of pivotal morphogenetic signals, orchestrating tissue architecture throughout the body. The important functioning of BMP signals in physiology is emphasized by the multitude of roles for dysregulated BMP signaling in pathological processes. A study done wherein it was found that protein extracts from bone implanted into the animals at nonbone sites induced the formation of new cartilage and bone tissue. This protein extract contained multiple factors that stimulated bone formation and was termed as “BMP.” There are at least 15 different BMPs identified to date and are a part of the transforming growth factor-β super family. The most widely studied BMPs are BMP-2, BMP-3 (osteogenin), BMP-4, and BMP-7 (osteogenic protein-1). Now, any recombination type of morphogenic proteins have been synthesized, for example - recombinant human BMPs. PMID:27829744

  17. Retinoblastoma family proteins: New players in DNA repair by non-homologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Huang, Paul H; Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2016-03-01

    Loss of retinoblastoma protein (RB1) function is a major driver in cancer development. We have recently reported that, in addition to its well-documented functions in cell cycle and fate control, RB1 and its paralogs have a novel role in regulating DNA repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Here we summarize our findings and present mechanistic hypotheses on how RB1 may support the DNA repair process and the therapeutic implications for patients who harbor RB1-negative cancers.

  18. Conserved ram seminal plasma proteins bind to the sperm membrane and repair cryopreservation damage.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, A; Hozbor, F; Sanchez, E; Fornés, M W; Alberio, R H; Cesari, A

    2011-08-01

    Whole seminal plasma (SP) enhances the function and fertility of frozen/thawed ram sperm. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether SP proteins capable of binding to molecules from the sperm plasma membrane were conserved among ram breeds, and whether these proteins were sufficient to overcome cryopreservation-induced reductions in sperm quality. Whole ram SP, obtained from rams of various breeds, improved progressive motility of frozen/thawed sperm at all times evaluated (P < 0.05); however, it did not improve total motility (15 min, P = 0.480; 30 min, P = 0.764; and 45 min, P = 0.795). To identify SP proteins responsible for this effect, a new method was developed to retain SP proteins that bound specifically to the sperm membrane by immobilization of sperm membrane proteins. These proteins specifically bound to the sperm surface, especially the acrosomal region. Lactotransferrin, epididymal secretory protein E1, Synaptosomal-associated protein 29, and RSVP-20 were identified (mass spectrometry) in this fraction. The retained SP proteins fraction repaired ultrastructural damage of frozen/thawed sperm and, with the addition of fructose, significantly improved motility of frozen/thawed sperm. We concluded that SP proteins that bound to the sperm membrane were conserved among ram breeds, and that when added to frozen/thawed semen (along with an energy source), they repaired ram sperm damage and enhanced sperm motility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Viral interference with DNA repair by targeting of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pubali; DeJesus, Rowena; Gjoerup, Ole; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2013-10-01

    Correct repair of damaged DNA is critical for genomic integrity. Deficiencies in DNA repair are linked with human cancer. Here we report a novel mechanism by which a virus manipulates DNA damage responses. Infection with murine polyomavirus sensitizes cells to DNA damage by UV and etoposide. Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) alone is sufficient to sensitize cells 100 fold to UV and other kinds of DNA damage. This results in activated stress responses and apoptosis. Genetic analysis shows that LT sensitizes via the binding of its origin-binding domain (OBD) to the single-stranded DNA binding protein replication protein A (RPA). Overexpression of RPA protects cells expressing OBD from damage, and knockdown of RPA mimics the LT phenotype. LT prevents recruitment of RPA to nuclear foci after DNA damage. This leads to failure to recruit repair proteins such as Rad51 or Rad9, explaining why LT prevents repair of double strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. A targeted intervention directed at RPA based on this viral mechanism could be useful in circumventing the resistance of cancer cells to therapy.

  20. Quantifying kinetics and dynamics of DNA repair proteins using Raster-scan Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdisalaam, Salim; Poudel, Milan; Chen, David; Alexandrakis, George

    2011-03-01

    DNA double strand breaks are potentially dangerous lesions as their incomplete repair may lead to carcinogenesis. In this study the confocal Raster scan Image Correlation Spectroscopy technique is used to study kinetics and dynamics of double stand break repair proteins after γ -irradiation of mammalian cells. Diffusion and binding constants were obtained by fitting with different physical models. Results were compared to ones obtained by creating high density DNA damage with a laser and subsequently performing Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching over the damage area. This work presents similarities and differences in double strand break repair response between γ -irradiation versus laser damage. This is of importance to answering the question of whether the popular use of laser induced DNA damage is a sufficient surrogate for predicting the radiation treatment response of cancer cells.

  1. Protein expression of DNA damage repair proteins dictates response to topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Boerner, Julie L; Nechiporchik, Nicole; Mueller, Kelly L; Polin, Lisa; Heilbrun, Lance; Boerner, Scott A; Zoratti, Gina L; Stark, Karri; LoRusso, Patricia M; Burger, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) have a poor prognosis. New approaches for the treatment of TNBC are needed to improve patient survival. The concept of synthetic lethality, brought about by inactivating complementary DNA repair pathways, has been proposed as a promising therapeutic option for these tumors. The TNBC tumor type has been associated with BRCA mutations, and inhibitors of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a family of proteins that facilitates DNA repair, have been shown to effectively kill BRCA defective tumors by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to a loss of cell viability and clonogenic survival. Here we present preclinical efficacy results of combining the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888, with CPT-11, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. CPT-11 binds to topoisomerase I at the replication fork, creating a bulky adduct that is recognized as damaged DNA. When DNA damage was stimulated with CPT-11, protein expression of the nucleotide excision repair enzyme ERCC1 inversely correlated with cell viability, but not clonogenic survival. However, 4 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by cell viability and 5 out of the 6 TNBC cells were synergistically responsive by clonogenic survival to the combination of ABT-888 and CPT-11. In vivo, the BRCA mutant cell line MX-1 treated with CPT-11 alone demonstrated significant decreased tumor growth; this decrease was enhanced further with the addition of ABT-888. Decrease in tumor growth correlated with an increase in double strand DNA breaks as measured by γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In summary, inhibiting two arms of the DNA repair pathway simultaneously in TNBC cell lines, independent of BRCA mutation status, resulted in un-repairable DNA damage and subsequent cell death.

  2. A role for the HOXB7 homeodomain protein in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Ethel; Wu, Xinyan; Zhu, Tao; Cheung, Joyce C Y; Chen, Hexin; Lorincz, Annaka; Pandita, Raj K; Sharma, Girdhar G; Ha, Hyo Chol; Gasson, Judith; Hanakahi, Les A; Pandita, Tej K; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2007-02-15

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors which function in body axis patterning in the developing embryo. Recent evidence suggests that the maintenance of specific HOX expression patterns is necessary for regulating the homeostasis of adult tissues as well. In this study, HOXB7 transformed human mammary epithelial cells, MCF10A, to grow in minimally supplemented medium, to form colonies in Matrigel, and display resistance to ionizing radiation. Searching for protein partners of HOXB7 that might contribute to resistance to ionizing radiation, we identified four HOXB7-binding proteins by GST pull-down/affinity chromatography and confirmed their interactions by coimmunoprecipitation in vivo. Interestingly, all four HOXB7-binding proteins shared functions as genomic caretakers and included members of the DNA-dependent protein kinase holoenzyme (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PK(cs)) responsible for DNA double-strand break repair by nonhomologous end joining pathway and poly(ADP) ribose polymerase. Exogenous and endogenous expression of HOXB7 enhanced nonhomologous end joining and DNA repair functions in vitro and in vivo, which were reversed by silencing HOXB7. This is the first mechanistic study providing definitive evidence for the involvement of any HOX protein in DNA double-strand break repair.

  3. Choreography of the DNA damage response: spatiotemporal relationships among checkpoint and repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Lisby, Michael; Barlow, Jacqueline H; Burgess, Rebecca C; Rothstein, Rodney

    2004-09-17

    DNA repair is an essential process for preserving genome integrity in all organisms. In eukaryotes, recombinational repair is choreographed by multiprotein complexes that are organized into centers (foci). Here, we analyze the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mre11 nuclease and the ATM-related Tel1 kinase are the first proteins detected at DSBs. Next, the Rfa1 single-strand DNA binding protein relocalizes to the break and recruits other key checkpoint proteins. Later and only in S and G2 phase, the homologous recombination machinery assembles at the site. Unlike the response to DSBs, Mre11 and recombination proteins are not recruited to hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks unless the forks collapse. The cellular response to DSBs and DNA replication stress is likely directed by the Mre11 complex detecting and processing DNA ends in conjunction with Sae2 and by RP-A recognizing single-stranded DNA and recruiting additional checkpoint and repair proteins.

  4. CUX2 protein functions as an accessory factor in the repair of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Pal, Ranjana; Ramdzan, Zubaidah M; Kaur, Simran; Duquette, Philippe M; Marcotte, Richard; Leduy, Lam; Davoudi, Sayeh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Iulianella, Angelo; Nepveu, Alain

    2015-09-11

    CUX1 and CUX2 proteins are characterized by the presence of three highly similar regions called Cut repeats 1, 2, and 3. Although CUX1 is ubiquitously expressed, CUX2 plays an important role in the specification of neuronal cells and continues to be expressed in postmitotic neurons. Cut repeats from the CUX1 protein were recently shown to stimulate 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1), an enzyme that removes oxidized purines from DNA and introduces a single strand break through its apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activity to initiate base excision repair. Here, we investigated whether CUX2 plays a similar role in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Cux2 knockdown in embryonic cortical neurons increased levels of oxidative DNA damage. In vitro, Cut repeats from CUX2 increased the binding of OGG1 to 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine-containing DNA and stimulated both the glycosylase and apurinic/apyrimidinic lyase activities of OGG1. Genetic inactivation in mouse embryo fibroblasts or CUX2 knockdown in HCC38 cells delayed DNA repair and increased DNA damage. Conversely, ectopic expression of Cut repeats from CUX2 accelerated DNA repair and reduced levels of oxidative DNA damage. These results demonstrate that CUX2 functions as an accessory factor that stimulates the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Neurons produce a high level of reactive oxygen species because of their dependence on aerobic oxidation of glucose as their source of energy. Our results suggest that the persistent expression of CUX2 in postmitotic neurons contributes to the maintenance of genome integrity through its stimulation of oxidative DNA damage repair. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Correction of the DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum group E by injection of a DNA damage-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Keeney, S.; Brody, T.; Linn, S.; Eker, A.P.M.; Vermeulen, W.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.

    1994-04-26

    Cells from a subset of patients with the DNA-repair-defective disease xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group E (XP-E) are known to lack a DNA damage-binding (DDB) activity. Purified human DDB protein was injected into XP-E cells to test whether the DNA-repair defect in these cells is caused by a defect in DDB activity. Injected DDB protein stimulated DNA repair to normal levels in those strains that lack the DDB activity but did not stimulate repair in cells from other xeroderma pigmentosum groups or in XP-E cells that contain the activity. These results provide direct evidence that defective DDB activity causes the repair defect in a subset of XP-E patients, which in turn establishes a role for this activity in nucleotide-excision repair in vivo.

  6. High-strength silk protein scaffolds for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Biman B; Grinberg, Ariela; Gil, Eun Seok; Panilaitis, Bruce; Kaplan, David L

    2012-05-15

    Biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration represent a major focus of orthopedic research. However, only a handful of polymeric biomaterials are utilized today because of their failure to address critical issues like compressive strength for load-bearing bone grafts. In this study development of a high compressive strength (~13 MPa hydrated state) polymeric bone composite materials is reported, based on silk protein-protein interfacial bonding. Micron-sized silk fibers (10-600 µm) obtained utilizing alkali hydrolysis were used as reinforcement in a compact fiber composite with tunable compressive strength, surface roughness, and porosity based on the fiber length included. A combination of surface roughness, porosity, and scaffold stiffness favored human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation toward bone-like tissue in vitro based on biochemical and gene expression for bone markers. Further, minimal in vivo immunomodulatory responses suggested compatibility of the fabricated silk-fiber-reinforced composite matrices for bone engineering applications.

  7. Rad5-dependent DNA repair functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FANCM protein homolog Mph1.

    PubMed

    Daee, Danielle L; Ferrari, Elisa; Longerich, Simonne; Zheng, Xiao-feng; Xue, Xiaoyu; Branzei, Dana; Sung, Patrick; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-08-03

    Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) covalently link complementary DNA strands, block DNA replication, and transcription and must be removed to allow cell survival. Several pathways, including the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, can faithfully repair ICLs and maintain genomic integrity; however, the precise mechanisms of most ICL repair processes remain enigmatic. In this study we genetically characterized a conserved yeast ICL repair pathway composed of the yeast homologs (Mph1, Chl1, Mhf1, Mhf2) of four FA proteins (FANCM, FANCJ, MHF1, MHF2). This pathway is epistatic with Rad5-mediated DNA damage bypass and distinct from the ICL repair pathways mediated by Rad18 and Pso2. In addition, consistent with the FANCM role in stabilizing ICL-stalled replication forks, we present evidence that Mph1 prevents ICL-stalled replication forks from collapsing into double-strand breaks. This unique repair function of Mph1 is specific for ICL damage and does not extend to other types of damage. These studies reveal the functional conservation of the FA pathway and validate the yeast model for future studies to further elucidate the mechanism of the FA pathway.

  8. Mismatch Repair Proteins Are Activators of Toxic Responses to Chromium-DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Mindy; Quievryn, George; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal that causes the formation of DNA phosphate-based adducts. Cr-DNA adducts are genotoxic in human cells, although they do not block replication in vitro. Here, we report that induction of cytotoxicity in Cr(VI)-treated human colon cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts requires the presence of all major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Cr-DNA adducts lost their ability to block replication of Cr-modified plasmids in human colon cells lacking MLH1 protein. The presence of functional mismatch repair caused induction of p53-independent apoptosis associated with activation of caspases 2 and 7. Processing of Cr-DNA damage by mismatch repair resulted in the extensive formation of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase, indicating generation of double-stranded breaks as secondary toxic lesions. Induction of γ-H2AX foci was observed at 6 to 12 h postexposure, which was followed by activation of apoptosis in the absence of significant G2 arrest. Our results demonstrate that mismatch repair system triggers toxic responses to Cr-DNA backbone modifications through stress mechanisms that are significantly different from those for other forms of DNA damage. Selection for Cr(VI) resistant, MMR-deficient cells may explain the very high frequency of lung cancers with microsatellite instability among chromate workers. PMID:15831465

  9. Rapid recovery of sensory function in blind cave fish treated with anemone repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Berg, Astrid; Watson, Glen M

    2002-12-01

    Blind cave fish employ superficial neuromasts to detect currents [Baker, C.F. and J.C. Montgomery, J. Comp. Physiol. A 184 (1999) 519-527]. Briefly exposing fish to calcium-free water significantly reduces the ability of the fish to perform rheotaxis (i.e., to orient properly in currents). Spontaneous recovery to control levels of rheotaxis requires 9 days. However, if the fish are treated with fraction beta immediately after exposure to calcium-free water, recovery to control levels of rheotaxis occurs within 1.3 h, the first time point tested. Fraction beta is a chromatographic fraction of 'repair proteins' isolated from sea anemones. The benefits of fraction beta on restoring rheotaxis exhibit dose dependency with the minimum effective dose estimated at 1 ng/ml. Exogenously supplied ATP augments the efficacy of fraction beta. Such augmentation is abolished by PPADS, an inhibitor of purinoceptors. Immunocytochemistry confirms the presence of purinoceptors in superficial neuromasts. The present results suggest that 'repair proteins' obtained from anemones significantly augment intrinsic repair mechanisms in fish. Furthermore, the data obtained in the fish system strongly parallel our previously published findings on sea anemones, raising the possibility that mechanisms of hair bundle repair may be evolutionarily conserved.

  10. Hepatitis B virus X protein impedes the DNA repair via its association with transcription factor, TFIIH

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections play an important role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV X protein (HBx) is a multifunctional protein that can modulate various cellular processes and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HCC. HBx is known to interact with DNA helicase components of TFIIH, a basal transcriptional factor and an integral component of DNA excision repair. Results In this study, the functional relevance of this association was further investigated in the context to DNA repair. By site-directed mutagenesis HBx's critical residues for interaction with TFIIH were identified. Similarly, TFIIH mutants lacking ATPase domain and the conserved carboxyl-terminal domain failed to interact with HBx. Yeast and mammalian cells expressing HBxwt conferred hypersensitivity to UV irradiation, which is interpreted as a basic deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. HBxmut120 (Glu to Val) was defective in binding to TFIIH and failed to respond to UV. Conclusions We conclude that HBx may act as the promoting factor by inhibiting DNA repair causing DNA damage and accumulation of errors, thereby contributing to HCC development. PMID:21375739

  11. High-strength silk protein scaffolds for bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Biman B.; Grinberg, Ariela; Seok Gil, Eun; Panilaitis, Bruce; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials for bone tissue regeneration represent a major focus of orthopedic research. However, only a handful of polymeric biomaterials are utilized today because of their failure to address critical issues like compressive strength for load-bearing bone grafts. In this study development of a high compressive strength (~13 MPa hydrated state) polymeric bone composite materials is reported, based on silk protein-protein interfacial bonding. Micron-sized silk fibers (10–600 µm) obtained utilizing alkali hydrolysis were used as reinforcement in a compact fiber composite with tunable compressive strength, surface roughness, and porosity based on the fiber length included. A combination of surface roughness, porosity, and scaffold stiffness favored human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation toward bone-like tissue in vitro based on biochemical and gene expression for bone markers. Further, minimal in vivo immunomodulatory responses suggested compatibility of the fabricated silk-fiber-reinforced composite matrices for bone engineering applications. PMID:22552231

  12. Differential contribution of HP1 proteins to DNA end resection and homology-directed repair.

    PubMed

    Soria, Gaston; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-02-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 paralogs (HP1α, β and γ in mammals) are not only central in heterochromatin organization, but have also been linked to transcriptional activation at euchromatic regions, maintenance of telomere stability and, most recently, to the DNA damage response (DDR). However, how HP1 proteins contribute to the DDR at a molecular level, and whether HP1 paralogs within the same organism, as well as their respective orthologs, have overlapping or unique roles in the DDR, remain to be elucidated. Herein, we have combined the analysis of the efficiency and kinetics of recruitment of key repair proteins to sites of DNA damage with specific DNA repair assays to demonstrate that human HP1 paralogs differentially modulate homology-directed repair (HDR) pathways, including homologous recombination (HR) and single-strand annealing (SSA). We find that while HP1α and β stimulate HR and SSA, HP1γ has an inhibitory role. In addition, we show that the stimulatory role of HP1α and β in HDR is linked to the DNA-end resection step of DNA breaks, through the promotion of RPA loading and phosphorylation at damage sites. Altogether, our findings provide mechanistic insight into how human HP1 proteins participate in the recombination process, emerging as important chromatin regulators during HDR.

  13. Homology-directed repair in rodent zygotes using Cas9 and TALEN engineered proteins.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, Séverine; De Cian, Anne; Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Boulé, Jean-Baptiste; Boix, Charlotte; Fontanière, Sandra; Crénéguy, Alison; Nguyen, Tuan H; Brusselle, Lucas; Thinard, Reynald; Gauguier, Dominique; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Cherifi, Yacine; Fraichard, Alexandre; Giovannangeli, Carine; Anegon, Ignacio

    2015-10-07

    The generation of genetically-modified organisms has been revolutionized by the development of new genome editing technologies based on the use of gene-specific nucleases, such as meganucleases, ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPRs-Cas9 systems. The most rapid and cost-effective way to generate genetically-modified animals is by microinjection of the nucleic acids encoding gene-specific nucleases into zygotes. However, the efficiency of the procedure can still be improved. In this work we aim to increase the efficiency of CRISPRs-Cas9 and TALENs homology-directed repair by using TALENs and Cas9 proteins, instead of mRNA, microinjected into rat and mouse zygotes along with long or short donor DNAs. We observed that Cas9 protein was more efficient at homology-directed repair than mRNA, while TALEN protein was less efficient than mRNA at inducing homology-directed repair. Our results indicate that the use of Cas9 protein could represent a simple and practical methodological alternative to Cas9 mRNA in the generation of genetically-modified rats and mice as well as probably some other mammals.

  14. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  15. Two familial ALS proteins function in prevention/repair of transcription-associated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sarah J; Mordes, Daniel A; Cameron, Lisa A; Neuberg, Donna S; Landini, Serena; Eggan, Kevin; Livingston, David M

    2016-11-29

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron dysfunction disease that leads to paralysis and death. There is currently no established molecular pathogenesis pathway. Multiple proteins involved in RNA processing are linked to ALS, including FUS and TDP43, and we propose a disease mechanism in which loss of function of at least one of these proteins leads to an accumulation of transcription-associated DNA damage contributing to motor neuron cell death and progressive neurological symptoms. In support of this hypothesis, we find that FUS or TDP43 depletion leads to increased sensitivity to a transcription-arresting agent due to increased DNA damage. Thus, these proteins normally contribute to the prevention or repair of transcription-associated DNA damage. In addition, both FUS and TDP43 colocalize with active RNA polymerase II at sites of DNA damage along with the DNA damage repair protein, BRCA1, and FUS and TDP43 participate in the prevention or repair of R loop-associated DNA damage, a manifestation of aberrant transcription and/or RNA processing. Gaining a better understanding of the role(s) that FUS and TDP43 play in transcription-associated DNA damage could shed light on the mechanisms underlying ALS pathogenesis.

  16. Enhanced protein repair and recycling are not correlated with longevity in 15 vertebrate endotherm species.

    PubMed

    Salway, Kurtis D; Page, Melissa M; Faure, Paul A; Burness, Gary; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that longevity is associated with enhanced cellular stress resistance. This observation supports the disposable soma theory of aging, which suggests that the investment made in cellular maintenance will be proportional to selective pressures to extend lifespan. Maintenance of protein homeostasis is a critical component of cellular maintenance and stress resistance. To test the hypothesis that enhanced protein repair and recycling activities underlie longevity, we measured the activities of the 20S/26S proteasome and two protein repair enzymes in liver, heart and brain tissues of 15 different mammalian and avian species with maximum lifespans (MLSP) ranging from 3 to 30 years. The data set included Snell dwarf mice, in which lifespan is increased by ∼50% compared to their normal littermates. None of these activities in any of the three tissues correlated positively with MLSP. In liver, 20S/26S proteasome and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activities correlated negatively with body mass. In brain tissue, TrxR was also negatively correlated with body mass. Glutaredoxin (Grx) activity in brain was negatively correlated with MLSP and this correlation remained after residual analysis to remove the effects of body mass, but was lost when the data were analysed using Felsenstein's independent contrasts. Snell dwarf mice had marginally lower 20S proteasome, TrxR and Grx activities than normal controls in brain, but not heart tissue. Thus, increased longevity is not associated with increased protein repair or proteasomal degradation capacities in vertebrate endotherms.

  17. Human DNA repair and recombination genes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Jones, N.J.

    1988-09-01

    Several genes involved in mammalian DNA repair pathways were identified by complementation analysis and chromosomal mapping based on hybrid cells. Eight complementation groups of rodent mutants defective in the repair of uv radiation damage are now identified. At least seven of these genes are probably essential for repair and at least six of them control the incision step. The many genes required for repair of DNA cross-linking damage show overlap with those involved in the repair of uv damage, but some of these genes appear to be unique for cross-link repair. Two genes residing on human chromosome 19 were cloned from genomic transformants using a cosmid vector, and near full-length cDNA clones of each gene were isolated and sequenced. Gene ERCC2 efficiently corrects the defect in CHO UV5, a nucleotide excision repair mutant. Gene XRCC1 normalizes repair of strand breaks and the excessive sister chromatid exchange in CHO mutant EM9. ERCC2 shows a remarkable /approximately/52% overall homology at both the amino acid and nucleotide levels with the yeast RAD3 gene. Evidence based on mutation induction frequencies suggests that ERCC2, like RAD3, might also be an essential gene for viability. 100 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes ATM, GSTP1, SOD2, TGFB1, XPD and XRCC1 with risk of severe erythema after breast conserving radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To examine the association of polymorphisms in ATM (codon 158), GSTP1 (codon 105), SOD2 (codon 16), TGFB1 (position −509), XPD (codon 751), and XRCC1 (codon 399) with the risk of severe erythema after breast conserving radiotherapy. Methods and materials Retrospective analysis of 83 breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving radiotherapy. A total dose of 50.4 Gy was administered, applying 1.8 Gy/fraction within 42 days. Erythema was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score. DNA was extracted from blood samples and polymorphisms were determined using either the Polymerase Chain Reaction based Restriction-Fragment-Length-Polymorphism (PCR-RFL) technique or Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption/Ionization –Time-Of-Flight-Mass-Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). Relative excess heterozygosity (REH) was investigated to check compatibility of genotype frequencies with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). In addition, p-values from the standard exact HWE lack of fit test were calculated using 100,000 permutations. HWE analyses were performed using R. Results Fifty-six percent (46/83) of all patients developed erythema of grade 2 or 3, with this risk being higher for patients with large breast volume (odds ratio, OR = 2.55, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.03–6.31, p = 0.041). No significant association between SNPs and risk of erythema was found when all patients were considered. However, in patients with small breast volume the TGFB1 SNP was associated with erythema (p = 0.028), whereas the SNP in XPD showed an association in patients with large breast volume (p = 0.046). A risk score based on all risk alleles was neither significant in all patients nor in patients with small or large breast volume. Risk alleles of most SNPs were different compared to a previously identified risk profile for fibrosis. Conclusions The genetic risk profile for erythema appears to be different for patients with small and larger

  19. Repair of DNA-protein cross-links in an excision repair-deficient human cell line and its simian virus 40-transformed derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, R.; Taylor, W.G.; Camalier, R.F.; Stephens, E.V.

    1984-05-01

    DNA-protein cross-links are induced in mammalian cells by X-rays, ultraviolet light, fluorescent light, and numerous chemical carcinogens. Others have shown that these cross-links are repaired by normal cells but that excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) Group A cells, XP12BE, are deficient in repair of these bulky adducts. This paper compares the DNA-protein cross-link repair competency of another XP Group A strain, XP20S, with its more rapidly proliferating simian virus 40-transformed derivative line and with normal human skin fibroblasts. DNA-protein cross-links were induced with 20 microM transplatinum(II)diamminedichloride and assayed by the membrane alkaline elution procedure of Kohn. Treated and untreated cells are lysed on a polycarbonate membrane filter, and the coelution rates of the DNA at pH 12.2 are compared; DNA-protein cross-links retard elution of DNA. The repair competency of XP20S cells for trans-platinum(II)diamminedichloride-induced DNA-protein cross-links was similar to that of XP12BE cells, but the competency of the simian virus 40-transformed XP20S cells was nearly equal to that of normal human skin fibroblasts. These results suggest that either cell cycling compensates for the genetic deficiency present in the nucleotide excision process of XP Group A cells or that a process other than nucleotide excision can repair these lesions; this process requires cell cycling or activation by the virus.

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia fusion proteins deregulate genes involved in stem cell maintenance and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcalay, Myriam; Meani, Natalia; Gelmetti, Vania; Fantozzi, Anna; Fagioli, Marta; Orleth, Annette; Riganelli, Daniela; Sebastiani, Carla; Cappelli, Enrico; Casciari, Cristina; Sciurpi, Maria Teresa; Mariano, Angela Rosa; Minardi, Simone Paolo; Luzi, Lucilla; Muller, Heiko; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Frosina, Guido; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemias (AMLs) are genetically heterogeneous and characterized by chromosomal rearrangements that produce fusion proteins with aberrant transcriptional regulatory activities. Expression of AML fusion proteins in transgenic mice increases the risk of myeloid leukemias, suggesting that they induce a preleukemic state. The underlying molecular and biological mechanisms are, however, unknown. To address this issue, we performed a systematic analysis of fusion protein transcriptional targets. We expressed AML1/ETO, PML/RAR, and PLZF/RAR in U937 hemopoietic precursor cells and measured global gene expression using oligonucleotide chips. We identified 1,555 genes regulated concordantly by at least two fusion proteins that were further validated in patient samples and finally classified according to available functional information. Strikingly, we found that AML fusion proteins induce genes involved in the maintenance of the stem cell phenotype and repress DNA repair genes, mainly of the base excision repair pathway. Functional studies confirmed that ectopic expression of fusion proteins constitutively activates pathways leading to increased stem cell renewal (e.g., the Jagged1/Notch pathway) and provokes accumulation of DNA damage. We propose that expansion of the stem cell compartment and induction of a mutator phenotype are relevant features underlying the leukemic potential of AML-associated fusion proteins. PMID:14660751

  1. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: A multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-03-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes.

  2. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  3. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80-95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure which is uncoupled from its essential function in DSB repair. This could have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to radiosensitize tumors by affecting the DNA-PKcs function.

  4. Protection from heat-induced protein migration and DNA repair inhibition by cycloheximide.

    PubMed

    Armour, E P; Lee, Y J; Corry, P M; Borrelli, M J

    1988-12-15

    The mechanism by which Cycloheximide (CHM) protects cells from heat induced killing has been investigated. Cycloheximide (10 micrograms/ml) added for 2 hr before and during a 3 hour heating at 43 degrees C prevented a 40% increase of heat-induced protein accumulation in the nucleus and protected cells (0.0001 vs. 0.15 surviving fraction) from heat-induced killing. Heat-induced DNA repair inhibition was also suppressed when cells were treated with CHM in the above manner. This combination of results suggests that protein accumulation in the nucleus and inhibition of DNA repair are related and these events are associated with CHM protection from heat induced cell killing.

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Vahid; Molaei, Mahsa; Shalmani, Hamid Mohaghegh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of DNA (MMR) proteins, including hMLH1 and hMSH2, in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-infected gastritis. METHODS: Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study. During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain) and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2. RESULTS: The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14 ± 7.32% in H pylori-negative patients, while it was 73.34 ± 10.10% in H pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16 ± 8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24 ± 8.71% in H pylori-positive patients; P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system. PMID:19034977

  6. Chimeric protein repair of laminin polymerization ameliorates muscular dystrophy phenotype.

    PubMed

    McKee, Karen K; Crosson, Stephanie C; Meinen, Sarina; Reinhard, Judith R; Rüegg, Markus A; Yurchenco, Peter D

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in laminin α2-subunit (Lmα2, encoded by LAMA2) are linked to approximately 30% of congenital muscular dystrophy cases. Mice with a homozygous mutation in Lama2 (dy2J mice) express a nonpolymerizing form of laminin-211 (Lm211) and are a model for ambulatory-type Lmα2-deficient muscular dystrophy. Here, we developed transgenic dy2J mice with muscle-specific expression of αLNNd, a laminin/nidogen chimeric protein that provides a missing polymerization domain. Muscle-specific expression of αLNNd in dy2J mice resulted in strong amelioration of the dystrophic phenotype, manifested by the prevention of fibrosis and restoration of forelimb grip strength. αLNNd also restored myofiber shape, size, and numbers to control levels in dy2J mice. Laminin immunostaining and quantitation of tissue extractions revealed increased Lm211 expression in αLNNd-transgenic dy2J mice. In cultured myotubes, we determined that αLNNd expression increased myotube surface accumulation of polymerization-deficient recombinant laminins, with retention of collagen IV, reiterating the basement membrane (BM) changes observed in vivo. Laminin LN domain mutations linked to several of the Lmα2-deficient muscular dystrophies are predicted to compromise polymerization. The data herein support the hypothesis that engineered expression of αLNNd can overcome polymerization deficits to increase laminin, stabilize BM structure, and substantially ameliorate muscular dystrophy.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi modulates gene expression of plasma membrane repair-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Brígido, Rebecca Tavares E Silva; Tavares, Paula Cristina Brígido; Santos, Marlus Alves Dos; Santos, Júlia de Gouveia; Souza, Maria Aparecida de; Goulart, Isabela Maria Bernardes; Silva, Claudio Vieira da

    2017-10-01

    Plasma membrane injury and repair is particularly prevalent in muscle cells. Here, we aimed to verify dysferlin, acid sphingomyelinase and transcriptional factor EB gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi infection in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that the parasite modulates gene expression of these proteins in a way dependent on the number of plasma membrane interacting parasites and in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  9. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, traffic-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure and breast cancer incidence.

    PubMed

    Mordukhovich, Irina; Beyea, Jan; Herring, Amy H; Hatch, Maureen; Stellman, Steven D; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Richardson, David B; Millikan, Robert C; Engel, Lawrence S; Shantakumar, Sumitra; Steck, Susan E; Neugut, Alfred I; Rossner, Pavel; Santella, Regina M; Gammon, Marilie D

    2016-07-15

    Vehicular traffic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been associated with breast cancer incidence in epidemiologic studies, including our own. Because PAHs damage DNA by forming adducts and oxidative lesions, genetic polymorphisms that alter DNA repair capacity may modify associations between PAH-related exposures and breast cancer risk. Our goal was to examine the association between vehicular traffic exposure and breast cancer incidence within strata of a panel of nine biologically plausible nucleotide excision repair (NER) and base excision repair (BER) genotypes. Residential histories of 1,508 cases and 1,556 controls were assessed in the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project between 1996 and 1997 and used to reconstruct residential traffic exposures to benzo[a]pyrene, as a proxy for traffic-related PAHs. Likelihood ratio tests from adjusted unconditional logistic regression models were used to assess multiplicative interactions. A gene-traffic interaction was evident (p = 0.04) for ERCC2 (Lys751); when comparing the upper and lower tertiles of 1995 traffic exposure estimates, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 2.09 (1.13, 3.90) among women with homozygous variant alleles. Corresponding odds ratios for 1960-1990 traffic were also elevated nearly 2-3-fold for XRCC1(Arg194Trp), XRCC1(Arg399Gln) and OGG1(Ser326Cys), but formal multiplicative interaction was not evident. When DNA repair variants for ERCC2, XRCC1 and OGG1 were combined, among women with 4-6 variants, the odds ratios were 2.32 (1.22, 4.49) for 1995 traffic and 2.96 (1.06, 8.21) for 1960-1990 traffic. Our study is first to report positive associations between traffic-related PAH exposure and breast cancer incidence among women with select biologically plausible DNA repair genotypes.

  10. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins.

  11. Differential regulation of intracellular factors mediating cell cycle, DNA repair and inflammation following exposure to silver nanoparticles in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Investigating the cellular and molecular signatures in eukaryotic cells following exposure to nanoparticles will further our understanding on the mechanisms mediating nanoparticle induced effects. This study illustrates the molecular effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) in normal human lung cells, IMR-90 and human brain cancer cells, U251 with emphasis on gene expression, induction of inflammatory mediators and the interaction of Ag-np with cytosolic proteins. Results We report that silver nanoparticles are capable of adsorbing cytosolic proteins on their surface that may influence the function of intracellular factors. Gene and protein expression profiles of Ag-np exposed cells revealed up regulation of many DNA damage response genes such as Gadd 45 in both the cell types and ATR in cancer cells. Moreover, down regulation of genes necessary for cell cycle progression (cyclin B and cyclin E) and DNA damage response/repair (XRCC1 and 3, FEN1, RAD51C, RPA1) was observed in both the cell lines. Double strand DNA damage was observed in a dose dependant manner as evidenced in γH2AX foci assay. There was a down regulation of p53 and PCNA in treated cells. Cancer cells in particular showed a concentration dependant increase in phosphorylated p53 accompanied by the cleavage of caspase 3 and PARP. Our results demonstrate the involvement of NFκB and MAP kinase pathway in response to Ag-np exposure. Up regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukins (IL-8, IL-6), macrophage colony stimulating factor, macrophage inflammatory protein in fibroblasts following Ag-np exposure were also observed. Conclusion In summary, Ag-np can modulate gene expression and protein functions in IMR-90 cells and U251 cells, leading to defective DNA repair, proliferation arrest and inflammatory response. The observed changes could also be due to its capability to adsorb cytosolic proteins on its surface. PMID:22321936

  12. Identification of the FANCI protein, a monoubiquitinated FANCD2 paralog required for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Agata; Matsuoka, Shuhei; Vinciguerra, Patrizia; McDonald, E Robert; Hurov, Kristen E; Luo, Ji; Ballif, Bryan A; Gygi, Steven P; Hofmann, Kay; D'Andrea, Alan D; Elledge, Stephen J

    2007-04-20

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a developmental and cancer-predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in genes controlling DNA interstrand crosslink repair. Several FA proteins form a ubiquitin ligase that controls monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 protein in an ATR-dependent manner. Here we describe the FA protein FANCI, identified as an ATM/ATR kinase substrate required for resistance to mitomycin C. FANCI shares sequence similarity with FANCD2, likely evolving from a common ancestral gene. The FANCI protein associates with FANCD2 and, together, as the FANCI-FANCD2 (ID) complex, localize to chromatin in response to DNA damage. Like FANCD2, FANCI is monoubiquitinated and unexpectedly, ubiquitination of each protein is important for the maintenance of ubiquitin on the other, indicating the existence of a dual ubiquitin-locking mechanism required for ID complex function. Mutation in FANCI is responsible for loss of a functional FA pathway in a patient with Fanconi anemia complementation group I.

  13. Sumoylation Influences DNA Break Repair Partly by Increasing the Solubility of a Conserved End Resection Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Steinacher, Roland; Altmannova, Veronika; Fu, Qiong; Paull, Tanya T.; Krejci, Lumir; Whitby, Matthew C.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Protein modifications regulate both DNA repair levels and pathway choice. How each modification achieves regulatory effects and how different modifications collaborate with each other are important questions to be answered. Here, we show that sumoylation regulates double-strand break repair partly by modifying the end resection factor Sae2. This modification is conserved from yeast to humans, and is induced by DNA damage. We mapped the sumoylation site of Sae2 to a single lysine in its self-association domain. Abolishing Sae2 sumoylation by mutating this lysine to arginine impaired Sae2 function in the processing and repair of multiple types of DNA breaks. We found that Sae2 sumoylation occurs independently of its phosphorylation, and the two modifications act in synergy to increase soluble forms of Sae2. We also provide evidence that sumoylation of the Sae2-binding nuclease, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, further increases end resection. These findings reveal a novel role for sumoylation in DNA repair by regulating the solubility of an end resection factor. They also show that collaboration between different modifications and among multiple substrates leads to a stronger biological effect. PMID:25569253

  14. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Genes Involved in Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and the Risk of Recurrent Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Toma, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Bobińska, Kinga; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Berk, Michael; Anderson, George; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder, including recurrent type (rDD), is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and activation of inflammatory pathways, which may induce DNA damage. This thesis is supported by the presence of increased levels of DNA damage in depressed patients. Such DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER efficiency may be influenced by polymorphisms in BER-related genes. Therefore, we genotyped nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes encoding BER proteins. Material/Methods Using TaqMan, we selected and genotyped the following SNPs: c.-441G>A (rs174538) of FEN1, c.2285T>C (rs1136410) of PARP1, c.580C>T (rs1799782) and c.1196A>G (rs25487) of XRCC1, c.*83A>C (rs4796030) and c.*50C>T (rs1052536) of LIG3, c.-7C>T (rs20579) of LIG1, and c.-468T>G (rs1760944) and c.444T>G (rs1130409) of APEX1 in 599 samples (288 rDD patients and 311 controls). Results We found a strong correlation between rDD and both SNPs of LIG3, their haplotypes, as well as a weaker association with the c.-468T>G of APEXI which diminished after Nyholt correction. Polymorphisms of LIG3 were also associated with early onset versus late onset depression, whereas the c.-468T>G polymorphism showed the opposite association. Conclusions The SNPs of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage may modulate rDD risk. Since this is an exploratory study, the results should to be treated with caution and further work needs to be done to elucidate the exact involvement of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in the development of this disease. PMID:27866211

  15. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Genes Involved in Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage and the Risk of Recurrent Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Toma, Monika; Gałecki, Piotr; Orzechowska, Agata; Bobińska, Kinga; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Berk, Michael; Anderson, George; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-11-20

    BACKGROUND Depressive disorder, including recurrent type (rDD), is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and activation of inflammatory pathways, which may induce DNA damage. This thesis is supported by the presence of increased levels of DNA damage in depressed patients. Such DNA damage is repaired by the base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER efficiency may be influenced by polymorphisms in BER-related genes. Therefore, we genotyped nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six genes encoding BER proteins. MATERIAL AND METHODS Using TaqMan, we selected and genotyped the following SNPs: c.-441G>A (rs174538) of FEN1, c.2285T>C (rs1136410) of PARP1, c.580C>T (rs1799782) and c.1196A>G (rs25487) of XRCC1, c.*83A>C (rs4796030) and c.*50C>T (rs1052536) of LIG3, c.-7C>T (rs20579) of LIG1, and c.-468T>G (rs1760944) and c.444T>G (rs1130409) of APEX1 in 599 samples (288 rDD patients and 311 controls). RESULTS We found a strong correlation between rDD and both SNPs of LIG3, their haplotypes, as well as a weaker association with the c.-468T>G of APEXI which diminished after Nyholt correction. Polymorphisms of LIG3 were also associated with early onset versus late onset depression, whereas the c.-468T>G polymorphism showed the opposite association. CONCLUSIONS The SNPs of genes involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage may modulate rDD risk. Since this is an exploratory study, the results should to be treated with caution and further work needs to be done to elucidate the exact involvement of DNA damage and repair mechanisms in the development of this disease.

  16. Expression of domains for protein-protein interaction of nucleotide excision repair proteins modifies cancer cell sensitivity to platinum derivatives and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Jordheim, Lars Petter; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Matera, Eva-Laure; Bouledrak, Karima; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is involved in the repair of DNA damage caused by platinum derivatives and has been shown to decrease the cytotoxic activity of these drugs. Because protein-protein interactions are essential for NER activity, we transfected human cancer cell lines (A549 and HCT116) with plasmids coding the amino acid sequences corresponding to the interacting domains between excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA), as well as ERCC1 and xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group F (XPF), all NER proteins. Using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and annexin V staining, we showed that transfected A549 cells were sensitized 1.2-2.2-fold to carboplatin and that transfected HCT116 cells were sensitized 1.4-5.4-fold to oxaliplatin in vitro. In addition, transfected cells exhibited modified in vivo sensitivity to the same drugs. Finally, in particular cell models of the interaction between ERCC1 and XPF, DNA repair was decreased, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of the histone 2AX after exposure to mitomycin C, and genomic instability was increased, as determined by comparative genomic hybridization studies. The results indicate that the interacting peptides act as dominant negatives and decrease NER activity through inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  17. DNA mismatch repair proteins are required for efficient herpes simplex virus 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Mohni, Kareem N; Mastrocola, Adam S; Bai, Ping; Weller, Sandra K; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that replicates in the nucleus of its human host cell and is known to interact with many cellular DNA repair proteins. In this study, we examined the role of cellular mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in the virus life cycle. Both MSH2 and MLH1 are required for efficient replication of HSV-1 in normal human cells and are localized to viral replication compartments. In addition, a previously reported interaction between MSH6 and ICP8 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and extended to show that UL12 is also present in this complex. We also report for the first time that MLH1 associates with ND10 nuclear bodies and that like other ND10 proteins, MLH1 is recruited to the incoming genome. Knockdown of MLH1 inhibits immediate-early viral gene expression. MSH2, on the other hand, which is generally thought to play a role in mismatch repair at a step prior to that of MLH1, is not recruited to incoming genomes and appears to act at a later step in the viral life cycle. Silencing of MSH2 appears to inhibit early gene expression. Thus, both MLH1 and MSH2 are required but appear to participate in distinct events in the virus life cycle. The observation that MLH1 plays an earlier role in HSV-1 infection than does MSH2 is surprising and may indicate a novel function for MLH1 distinct from its known MSH2-dependent role in mismatch repair.

  18. Measurement of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Using Flow Cytometry Provides a Reliable Estimate of DNA Repair Capacity.

    PubMed

    Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2017-09-27

    Uncontrolled generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cells is regarded as a highly toxic event that threatens cell survival. Radiation-induced DNA DSBs are commonly measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, microscopic evaluation of accumulating DNA damage response proteins (e.g., 53BP1 or γ-H2AX) or flow cytometric analysis of γ-H2AX. The advantage of flow cytometric analysis is that DSB formation and repair can be studied in relationship to cell cycle phase or expression of other proteins. However, γ-H2AX is not able to monitor repair kinetics within the first 60 min postirradiation, a period when most DSBs undergo repair. A key protein in non-homologous end joining repair is the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Among several phosphorylation sites of DNA-dependent protein kinase, the threonine at position 2609 (T2609), which is phosphorylated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) or DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit itself, activates the end processing of DSB. Using flow cytometry, we show here that phosphorylation at T2609 is faster in response to DSBs than γ-H2AX. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis of T2609 resulted in a better representation of fast repair kinetics than analysis of γ-H2AX. In cells with reduced ligase IV activity, and wild-type cells where DNA-dependent protein kinase activity was inhibited, the reduced DSB repair capacity was observed by T2609 evaluation using flow cytometry. In conclusion, flow cytometric evaluation of DNA-dependent protein kinase T2609 can be used as a marker for early DSB repair and gives a better representation of early repair events than analysis of γ-H2AX.

  19. Decreased UV light resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair and small, acid-soluble spore proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, B.; Setlow, P.

    1988-05-01

    Loss of small, acid-soluble spore protein alpha reduced spore UV resistance 30- to 50-fold in Bacillus subtilis strains deficient in pyrimidine dimer repair, but gave only a 5- to 8-fold reduction in UV resistance in repair-proficient strains. However, both repair-proficient and -deficient spores lacking this protein had identical heat and gamma-radiation resistance.

  20. Prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Tongshan; Xu, Jun; Chen, WenJiao; Shi, Wei; Cheng, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to identify the prognostic significance of X-ray cross-complementing gene 1 (XRCC1) in patients with gastric cancer undergoing surgery and platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to evaluate XRCC1 protein expression profiles on surgical specimens of 612 gastric cancer patients. The relationship between XRCC1 expression and existing prognostic factors, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results Among 612 patients staged Ⅱ/Ⅲ in our study, 182 (29.74%) were evaluated as XRCC1 IHC positive. XRCC1 expression was not significantly related to OS (P = 0.347) or DFS (P = 0.297). Compared with surgery only, platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the OS (P = 0.031). And the patients with negative XRCC1 expression benefited more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.049). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that tumor size, T category, N category, vascular or nerve invasion and platinum-based chemotherapy were good prognostic factors for OS (P < 0.05). Though XRCC1 plays an important role in DNA repair pathways, no significant relationship is found in XRCC1 expression and OS among gastric cancer in our study. Conclusions XRCC1 might be an alternative prognostic marker for the patients of gastric cancer after radical resection. The patients with negative XRCC1 expression can benefit more from platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27478321

  1. Chromodomain protein Tcd1 is required for macronuclear genome rearrangement and repair in Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Yuan, Yajing; Liang, Aihua; Wang, Wei

    2015-05-19

    The survival of an organism's progeny depends on the maintenance of its genome. Programmed DNA rearrangement and repair in Tetrahymena occur during the differentiation of the developing somatic macronuclear genome from the germ line micronuclear genome. Tetrahymena chromodomain protein (Tcd1) exhibited dynamic localization from the parental to the developing macronuclei. In the developing macronuclei, Tcd1 colocalized with Pdd1 and H3K9me3. Furthermore, Tcd1 colocalized with Pdd1 in the conjusome and "donut structure" of DNA elimination heterochromatin region. During the growth and conjugation stages, TCD1 knockout cells appeared normal and similar to wild-type strains. In addition, these knockout cells proceeded to the 2MAC-1MIC stage. However, the progeny of the TCD1 knockout cells did not grow upon return to SPP medium and eventually died. The deletion of the internal elimination sequence R element was partially disrupted in the developing new macronuclei. Gamma H2A staining showed that Tcd1 loss induced the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks and the failure of genome repair. These results suggest that the chromodomain protein Tcd1 is required for the rearrangement and repair of new macronuclear genome in Tetrahymena.

  2. Chromodomain protein Tcd1 is required for macronuclear genome rearrangement and repair in Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Yuan, Yajing; Liang, Aihua; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The survival of an organism’s progeny depends on the maintenance of its genome. Programmed DNA rearrangement and repair in Tetrahymena occur during the differentiation of the developing somatic macronuclear genome from the germ line micronuclear genome. Tetrahymena chromodomain protein (Tcd1) exhibited dynamic localization from the parental to the developing macronuclei. In the developing macronuclei, Tcd1 colocalized with Pdd1 and H3K9me3. Furthermore, Tcd1 colocalized with Pdd1 in the conjusome and “donut structure” of DNA elimination heterochromatin region. During the growth and conjugation stages, TCD1 knockout cells appeared normal and similar to wild-type strains. In addition, these knockout cells proceeded to the 2MAC-1MIC stage. However, the progeny of the TCD1 knockout cells did not grow upon return to SPP medium and eventually died. The deletion of the internal elimination sequence R element was partially disrupted in the developing new macronuclei. Gamma H2A staining showed that Tcd1 loss induced the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks and the failure of genome repair. These results suggest that the chromodomain protein Tcd1 is required for the rearrangement and repair of new macronuclear genome in Tetrahymena. PMID:25989344

  3. Functions of disordered regions in mammalian early base excision repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species, generated endogenously and induced as a toxic response, produce several dozen oxidized or modified bases and/or single-strand breaks in mammalian and other genomes. These lesions are predominantly repaired via the conserved base excision repair (BER) pathway. BER is initiated with excision of oxidized or modified bases by DNA glycosylases leading to formation of abasic (AP) site or strand break at the lesion site. Structural analysis by experimental and modeling approaches shows the presence of a disordered segment commonly localized at the N- or C-terminus as a characteristic signature of mammalian DNA glycosylases which is absent in their bacterial prototypes. Recent studies on unstructured regions in DNA metabolizing proteins have indicated their essential role in interaction with other proteins and target DNA recognition. In this review, we have discussed the unique presence of disordered segments in human DNA glycosylases, and AP endonuclease involved in the processing of glycosylase products, and their critical role in regulating repair functions. These disordered segments also include sites for posttranslational modifications and nuclear localization signal. The teleological basis for their structural flexibility is discussed. PMID:20714778

  4. Emerging roles for centromere-associated proteins in DNA repair and genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2013-12-01

    Centromere proteins CENP-S and CENP-X are members of the constitutive centromere-associated network, which is a conserved group of proteins that are needed for the assembly and function of kinetochores at centromeres. Intriguingly CENP-S and CENP-X have alter egos going by the names of MHF1 (FANCM-associated histone-fold protein 1) and MHF2 respectively. In this guise they function with a DNA translocase called FANCM (Fanconi's anemia complementation group M) to promote DNA repair and homologous recombination. In the present review we discuss current knowledge of the biological roles of CENP-S and CENP-X and how their dual existence may be a common feature of CCAN (constitutive centromere-associated network) proteins.

  5. Replication Checkpoint Kinase Cds1 Regulates Recombinational Repair Protein Rad60

    PubMed Central

    Boddy, Michael N.; Shanahan, Paul; Hayes McDonald, W.; Lopez-Girona, Antonia; Noguchi, Eishi; Yates III, John R.; Russell, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Genome integrity is protected by Cds1 (Chk2), a checkpoint kinase that stabilizes arrested replication forks. How Cds1 accomplishes this task is unknown. We report that Cds1 interacts with Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair in fission yeast. Cds1 activation triggers Rad60 phosphorylation and nuclear delocalization. A Rad60 mutant that inhibits regulation by Cds1 renders cells specifically sensitive to replication fork arrest. Genetic and biochemical studies indicate that Rad60 functions codependently with Smc5 and Smc6, subunits of an SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) complex required for recombinational repair. These studies indicate that regulation of Rad60 is an important part of the replication checkpoint response controlled by Cds1. We propose that control of Rad60 regulates recombination events at stalled forks. PMID:12897162

  6. Protein–DNA charge transport: Redox activation of a DNA repair protein by guanine radical

    PubMed Central

    Yavin, Eylon; Boal, Amie K.; Stemp, Eric D. A.; Boon, Elizabeth M.; Livingston, Alison L.; O'Shea, Valerie L.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2005-01-01

    DNA charge transport (CT) chemistry provides a route to carry out oxidative DNA damage from a distance in a reaction that is sensitive to DNA mismatches and lesions. Here, DNA-mediated CT also leads to oxidation of a DNA-bound base excision repair enzyme, MutY. DNA-bound Ru(III), generated through a flash/quench technique, is found to promote oxidation of the [4Fe-4S]2+ cluster of MutY to [4Fe-4S]3+ and its decomposition product [3Fe-4S]1+. Flash/quench experiments monitored by EPR spectroscopy reveal spectra with g = 2.08, 2.06, and 2.02, characteristic of the oxidized clusters. Transient absorption spectra of poly(dGC) and [Ru(phen)2dppz]3+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine), generated in situ, show an absorption characteristic of the guanine radical that is depleted in the presence of MutY with formation instead of a long-lived species with an absorption at 405 nm; we attribute this absorption also to formation of the oxidized [4Fe-4S]3+ and [3Fe-4S]1+ clusters. In ruthenium-tethered DNA assemblies, oxidative damage to the 5′-G of a 5′-GG-3′ doublet is generated from a distance but this irreversible damage is inhibited by MutY and instead EPR experiments reveal cluster oxidation. With ruthenium-tethered assemblies containing duplex versus single-stranded regions, MutY oxidation is found to be mediated by the DNA duplex, with guanine radical as an intermediate oxidant; guanine radical formation facilitates MutY oxidation. A model is proposed for the redox activation of DNA repair proteins through DNA CT, with guanine radicals, the first product under oxidative stress, in oxidizing the DNA-bound repair proteins, providing the signal to stimulate DNA repair. PMID:15738421

  7. Localization of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein and replication protein A on damaged DNA in nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) and replication protein A (RPA) with damaged DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) was studied using model dsDNA and bubble-DNA structure with 5-{3-[6-(carboxyamido-fluoresceinyl)amidocapromoyl]allyl}-dUMP lesions in one strand and containing photoreactive 5-iodo-dUMP residues in defined positions. Interactions of XPA and RPA with damaged and undamaged DNA strands were investigated by DNA–protein photocrosslinking and gel shift analysis. XPA showed two maximums of crosslinking intensities located on the 5′-side from a lesion. RPA mainly localized on undamaged strand of damaged DNA duplex and damaged bubble-DNA structure. These results presented for the first time the direct evidence for the localization of XPA in the 5′-side of the lesion and suggested the key role of XPA orientation in conjunction with RPA binding to undamaged strand for the positioning of the NER preincision complex. The findings supported the mechanism of loading of the heterodimer consisting of excision repair cross-complementing group 1 and xeroderma pigmentosum group F proteins by XPA on the 5′-side from the lesion before damaged strand incision. Importantly, the proper orientation of XPA and RPA in the stage of preincision was achieved in the absence of TFIIH and XPG. PMID:20693538

  8. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1 protein impairs DNA repair mediated through the inhibition of DNA-dependent protein kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanaga, Kentaro; Sueoka, Naoko; Sato, Akemi; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo . E-mail: sueokae@post.saga-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-05

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein B1, an RNA binding protein, is overexpressed from the early stage of lung cancers; it is evident even in bronchial dysplasia, a premalignant lesion. We evaluated the proteins bound with hnRNP B1 and found that hnRNP B1 interacted with DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) complex, and recombinant hnRNP B1 protein dose-dependently inhibited DNA-PK activity in vitro. To test the effect of hnRNP B1 on DNA repair, we performed comet assay after irradiation, using normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1: reduction of hnRNP B1 treated with siRNA for hnRNP A2/B1 induced faster DNA repair in normal HBE cells. Considering these results, we assume that overexpression of hnRNP B1 occurring in the early stage of carcinogenesis inhibits DNA-PK activity, resulting in subsequent accumulation of erroneous rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks, causing tumor progression.

  9. Non-repair Pathways for Minimizing Protein Isoaspartyl Damage in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Patananan, Alexander N.; Capri, Joseph; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The spontaneous degradation of asparaginyl and aspartyl residues to isoaspartyl residues is a common type of protein damage in aging organisms. Although the protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the repair of l-isoaspartyl residues to l-aspartyl residues in most organisms, no gene homolog or enzymatic activity is present in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we used biochemical approaches to elucidate how proteins containing isoaspartyl residues are metabolized in this organism. Surprisingly, the level of isoaspartyl residues in yeast proteins (50–300 pmol of isoaspartyl residues/mg of protein extract) is comparable with organisms with protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase, suggesting a novel regulatory pathway. Interfering with common protein quality control mechanisms by mutating and inhibiting the proteasomal and autophagic pathways in vivo did not increase isoaspartyl residue levels compared with wild type or uninhibited cells. However, the inhibition of metalloproteases in in vitro aging experiments by EDTA resulted in an ∼3-fold increase in the level of isoaspartyl-containing peptides. Characterization by mass spectrometry of these peptides identified several proteins involved in metabolism as targets of isoaspartyl damage. Further analysis of these peptides revealed that many have an N-terminal isoaspartyl site and originate from proteins with short half-lives. These results suggest that one or more metalloproteases participate in limiting isoaspartyl formation by robust proteolysis. PMID:24764295

  10. Non-repair pathways for minimizing protein isoaspartyl damage in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Patananan, Alexander N; Capri, Joseph; Whitelegge, Julian P; Clarke, Steven G

    2014-06-13

    The spontaneous degradation of asparaginyl and aspartyl residues to isoaspartyl residues is a common type of protein damage in aging organisms. Although the protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the repair of l-isoaspartyl residues to l-aspartyl residues in most organisms, no gene homolog or enzymatic activity is present in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we used biochemical approaches to elucidate how proteins containing isoaspartyl residues are metabolized in this organism. Surprisingly, the level of isoaspartyl residues in yeast proteins (50-300 pmol of isoaspartyl residues/mg of protein extract) is comparable with organisms with protein-l-isoaspartyl (d-aspartyl) O-methyltransferase, suggesting a novel regulatory pathway. Interfering with common protein quality control mechanisms by mutating and inhibiting the proteasomal and autophagic pathways in vivo did not increase isoaspartyl residue levels compared with wild type or uninhibited cells. However, the inhibition of metalloproteases in in vitro aging experiments by EDTA resulted in an ∼3-fold increase in the level of isoaspartyl-containing peptides. Characterization by mass spectrometry of these peptides identified several proteins involved in metabolism as targets of isoaspartyl damage. Further analysis of these peptides revealed that many have an N-terminal isoaspartyl site and originate from proteins with short half-lives. These results suggest that one or more metalloproteases participate in limiting isoaspartyl formation by robust proteolysis.

  11. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  12. Deficiency of a protein-repair enzyme results in the accumulation of altered proteins, retardation of growth, and fatal seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Lowenson, J D; MacLaren, D C; Clarke, S; Young, S G

    1997-06-10

    L-Asparaginyl and L-aspartyl residues in proteins are subject to spontaneous degradation reactions that generate isomerized and racemized aspartyl derivatives. Proteins containing L-isoaspartyl and D-aspartyl residues can have altered structures and diminished biological activity. These residues are recognized by a highly conserved cytosolic enzyme, the protein L-isoaspartate(D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.77). The enzymatic methyl esterification of these abnormal residues in vitro can lead to their conversion (i.e., repair) to normal L-aspartyl residues and should therefore prevent the accumulation of potentially dysfunctional proteins in vivo as cells and tissues age. Particularly high levels of the repair methyltransferase are present in the brain, although enyzme activity is present in all vertebrate tissues. To define the physiological relevance of this protein-repair pathway and to determine whether deficient protein repair would cause central nervous system dysfunction, we used gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells to generate protein L-isoaspartate(D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase-deficient mice. Analyses of tissues from methyltransferase knockout mice revealed a striking accumulation of protein substrates for this enzyme in the cytosolic fraction of brain, heart, liver, and erythrocytes. The knockout mice showed significant growth retardation and succumbed to fatal seizures at an average of 42 days after birth. These results suggest that the ability of mice to repair L-isoaspartyl- and D-aspartyl-containing proteins is essential for normal growth and for normal central nervous system function.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr protein binds to the uracil DNA glycosylase DNA repair enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhamdan, M; Benichou, S; Rey, F; Navarro, J M; Agostini, I; Spire, B; Camonis, J; Slupphaug, G; Vigne, R; Benarous, R; Sire, J

    1996-01-01

    The role of the accessory gene product Vpr during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection remains unclear. We have used the yeast two-hybrid system to identify cellular proteins that interact with Vpr and could be involved in its function. A cDNA clone which encodes the human uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), a DNA repair enzyme involved in removal of uracil in DNA, has been isolated. Interaction between Vpr and UNG has been demonstrated by in vitro protein-protein binding assays using translated, radiolabeled Vpr and UNG recombinant proteins expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Conversely, purified UNG has been demonstrated to interact with Vpr recombinant protein expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed that Vpr and UNG are associated within cells expressing Vpr. By using a panel of C- and N-terminally deleted Vpr mutants, we have determined that the core protein of Vpr, spanning amino acids 15 to 77, is involved in the interaction with UNG. We also demonstrate by in vitro experiments that the enzymatic activity of UNG is retained upon interaction with Vpr. PMID:8551605

  14. Delayed skin wound repair in proline-rich protein tyrosine kinase 2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Aaron C; Kiss, Alexi; Hindes, Anna; Burns, Carole J; Marmer, Barry L; Goldberg, Gregory; Blumenberg, Miroslav; Efimova, Tatiana

    2014-05-15

    Proline-rich protein tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) is a member of the focal adhesion kinase family. We used Pyk2 knockout (Pyk2-KO) mice to study the role of Pyk2 in cutaneous wound repair. We report that the rate of wound closure was delayed in Pyk2-KO compared with control mice. To examine whether impaired wound healing of Pyk2-KO mice was caused by a keratinocyte cell-autonomous defect, the capacities of primary keratinocytes from Pyk2-KO and wild-type (WT) littermates to heal scratch wounds in vitro were compared. The rate of scratch wound repair was decreased in Pyk2-KO keratinocytes compared with WT cells. Moreover, cultured human epidermal keratinocytes overexpressing the dominant-negative mutant of Pyk2 failed to heal scratch wounds. Conversely, stimulation of Pyk2-dependent signaling via WT Pyk2 overexpression induced accelerated scratch wound closure and was associated with increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-9, and MMP-10. The Pyk2-stimulated increase in the rate of scratch wound repair was abolished by coexpression of the dominant-negative mutant of PKCδ and by GM-6001, a broad-spectrum inhibitor of MMP activity. These results suggest that Pyk2 is essential for skin wound reepithelialization in vivo and in vitro and that it regulates epidermal keratinocyte migration via a pathway that requires PKCδ and MMP functions.

  15. Modulation of wound healing and scar formation by MG53 protein-mediated cell membrane repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-10-02

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53(-/-) mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against the Escherichia coli DNA repair protein RadA/Sms.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Nastassia C; Sargentini, Neil J; Singh, Vineet K; Stuart, Melissa K

    2012-02-01

    The RadA/Sms protein facilitates DNA repair in Escherichia coli cells damaged by UV radiation, X-rays, and chemical agents. However, the precise mechanism by which RadA/Sms aids DNA repair is unknown. Here we report the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for RadA/Sms for use in biochemical and physiological investigations. Histidine-tagged RadA/Sms (RadA-6xHis) was overproduced in E. coli BL21 cells transformed with the radA/sms coding region in plasmid pRSET A and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Splenocytes from female BALB/c mice hyperimmunized with the purified protein were fused to SP2/0-Ag14 myeloma cells, and the resultant hybridomas were selected in HAT medium. MAbs were detected in hybridoma culture supernatants by indirect ELISA and Western blot analysis against purified RadA-6xHis. MAbs from four cell lines were further evaluated by Western blotting against peptide maps generated by endoproteinase Glu-C digestion of RadA-6xHis. Each of the four MAbs recognized a unique epitope on the fusion protein. Two of the MAbs (6F5 and 2A2) also detected wild-type (tagless) RadA/Sms produced from the pJS003 plasmid in E. coli K-12 cells. We anticipate that these antibodies will prove useful for the detection, isolation, and functional analysis of RadA/Sms.

  18. Parkinsonism-associated Protein DJ-1/Park7 Is a Major Protein Deglycase That Repairs Methylglyoxal- and Glyoxal-glycated Cysteine, Arginine, and Lysine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Richarme, Gilbert; Mihoub, Mouadh; Dairou, Julien; Bui, Linh Chi; Leger, Thibaut; Lamouri, Aazdine

    2015-01-01

    Glycation is an inevitable nonenzymatic covalent reaction between proteins and endogenous reducing sugars or dicarbonyls (methylglyoxal, glyoxal) that results in protein inactivation. DJ-1 was reported to be a multifunctional oxidative stress response protein with poorly defined function. Here, we show that human DJ-1 is a protein deglycase that repairs methylglyoxal- and glyoxal-glycated amino acids and proteins by acting on early glycation intermediates and releases repaired proteins and lactate or glycolate, respectively. DJ-1 deglycates cysteines, arginines, and lysines (the three major glycated amino acids) of serum albumin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and aspartate aminotransferase and thus reactivates these proteins. DJ-1 prevented protein glycation in an Escherichia coli mutant deficient in the DJ-1 homolog YajL and restored cell viability in glucose-containing media. These results suggest that DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism results from excessive protein glycation and establishes DJ-1 as a major anti-glycation and anti-aging protein. PMID:25416785

  19. Nucleotide Excision Repair Proteins Rapidly Accumulate but Fail to Persist in Human XP-E (DDB2 Mutant) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kyu-Seon; Imoto, Kyoko; Emmert, Steffen; Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth. H.

    2011-01-01

    The XP-E DNA damage binding protein (DDB2) is involved in early recognition of global genome DNA damage during DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER). We found that skin fibroblasts from 4 newly reported XP-E patients with numerous skin cancers and DDB2 mutations had slow repair of 6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP) and markedly reduced repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD). NER proteins (XPC, XPB, XPG, XPA, and XPF) co-localized to CPD and 6-4PP positive regions immediately (< 0.1h) after localized UV irradiation in cells from the XP-E patients and normal controls. While these proteins persist in normal cells, surprisingly, within 0.5h these repair proteins were no longer detectable at the sites of DNA damage in XP-E cells. Our results indicate that DDB2 is not required for the rapid recruitment of NER proteins to sites of UV photoproducts or for partial repair of 6-4PP but is essential for normal persistence of these proteins for CPD photoproduct removal. PMID:21388382

  20. Polymorphisms in base excision DNA repair genes and association with melanoma risk in a pilot study on Central-South Italian population.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Concetta; Scapaticci, Margherita; Penitente, Romina; Paradisi, Andrea; Capizzi, Rodolfo; Lanza-Silveri, Sara; Ficarra, Silvana; Landi, Francesco; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-10-09

    Base excision repair plays a key role in the removing of DNA damage from exposure to endogenous and exogenous carcinogens. The BER pathway removes alterations of a single oxidized, reduced or methylated base. Recently some studies have explored the association between risk for cutaneous melanoma and non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in DNA-repair genes, although with contradictory results. We hypothesized that common nsSNPs of BER genes, specifically ADPRT rs1136410, XRCC1 rs25487, rs25489, rs1799782, APEX1 rs1130409, OGG1 rs1052133, LIG3 rs3136025 and MUTYH rs3219466, may contribute to risk of melanoma. The aim of this study is to investigate whether or not a correlation between these nsSNPs and melanoma risk and/or aggressiveness is present. 167 melanoma patients and 186 healthy control subjects were analysed. By multivariate statistical analysis no association was found between nsSNP and melanoma aggressiveness, while only the two XRCC1 (rs25487 and rs25489) nsSNPs showed a strong correlation (p<0.001) with melanoma risk. To our knowledge this is the first study reporting an association between BER nsSNPs and melanoma risk in Central-South Italian individuals. Our findings, if confirmed in larger population studies, will allow the inclusion of these XRCC1 nsSNPs in a screening panel for those individuals at higher risk for melanoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Endothelial repair in stented arteries is accelerated by inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Sarah T.; Spencer, Tim; Boldock, Luke; Prosseda, Svenja Dannewitz; Xanthis, Ioannis; Tovar-Lopez, Francesco J.; Van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Khamis, Ramzi Y; Foin, Nicolas; Bowden, Neil; Hussain, Adil; Rothman, Alex; Ridger, Victoria; Halliday, Ian; Perrault, Cecile; Gunn, Julian; Evans, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Stent deployment causes endothelial cells (EC) denudation, which promotes in-stent restenosis and thrombosis. Thus endothelial regrowth in stented arteries is an important therapeutic goal. Stent struts modify local hemodynamics, however the effects of flow perturbation on EC injury and repair are incompletely understood. By studying the effects of stent struts on flow and EC migration, we identified an intervention that promotes endothelial repair in stented arteries. Methods and Results In vitro and in vivo models were developed to monitor endothelialization under flow and the influence of stent struts. A 2D parallel-plate flow chamber with 100 μm ridges arranged perpendicular to the flow was used. Live cell imaging coupled to computational fluid dynamic simulations revealed that EC migrate in the direction of flow upstream from the ridges but subsequently accumulate downstream from ridges at sites of bidirectional flow. The mechanism of EC trapping by bidirectional flow involved reduced migratory polarity associated with altered actin dynamics. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) enhanced endothelialization of ridged surfaces by promoting migratory polarity under bidirectional flow (P < 0.01). To more closely mimic the in vivo situation, we cultured EC on the inner surface of polydimethylsiloxane tubing containing Coroflex Blue stents (65 μm struts) and monitored migration. ROCK inhibition significantly enhanced EC accumulation downstream from struts under flow (P < 0.05). We investigated the effects of ROCK inhibition on re-endothelialization in vivo using a porcine model of EC denudation and stent placement. En face staining and confocal microscopy revealed that inhibition of ROCK using fasudil (30 mg/day via osmotic minipump) significantly increased re-endothelialization of stented carotid arteries (P < 0.05). Conclusions Stent struts delay endothelial repair by generating localized bidirectional flow which traps migrating EC. ROCK

  2. Endothelial repair in stented arteries is accelerated by inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sarah T; Spencer, Tim; Boldock, Luke; Prosseda, Svenja Dannewitz; Xanthis, Ioannis; Tovar-Lopez, Francesco J; Van Beusekom, Heleen M M; Khamis, Ramzi Y; Foin, Nicolas; Bowden, Neil; Hussain, Adil; Rothman, Alex; Ridger, Victoria; Halliday, Ian; Perrault, Cecile; Gunn, Julian; Evans, Paul C

    2016-12-01

    Stent deployment causes endothelial cells (EC) denudation, which promotes in-stent restenosis and thrombosis. Thus endothelial regrowth in stented arteries is an important therapeutic goal. Stent struts modify local hemodynamics, however the effects of flow perturbation on EC injury and repair are incompletely understood. By studying the effects of stent struts on flow and EC migration, we identified an intervention that promotes endothelial repair in stented arteries. In vitro and in vivo models were developed to monitor endothelialization under flow and the influence of stent struts. A 2D parallel-plate flow chamber with 100 μm ridges arranged perpendicular to the flow was used. Live cell imaging coupled to computational fluid dynamic simulations revealed that EC migrate in the direction of flow upstream from the ridges but subsequently accumulate downstream from ridges at sites of bidirectional flow. The mechanism of EC trapping by bidirectional flow involved reduced migratory polarity associated with altered actin dynamics. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) enhanced endothelialization of ridged surfaces by promoting migratory polarity under bidirectional flow (P < 0.01). To more closely mimic the in vivo situation, we cultured EC on the inner surface of polydimethylsiloxane tubing containing Coroflex Blue stents (65 μm struts) and monitored migration. ROCK inhibition significantly enhanced EC accumulation downstream from struts under flow (P < 0.05). We investigated the effects of ROCK inhibition on re-endothelialization in vivo using a porcine model of EC denudation and stent placement. En face staining and confocal microscopy revealed that inhibition of ROCK using fasudil (30 mg/day via osmotic minipump) significantly increased re-endothelialization of stented carotid arteries (P < 0.05). Stent struts delay endothelial repair by generating localized bidirectional flow which traps migrating EC. ROCK inhibitors accelerate endothelial repair

  3. A novel small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair protein Ku70/80.

    PubMed

    Weterings, Eric; Gallegos, Alfred C; Dominick, Lauren N; Cooke, Laurence S; Bartels, Trace N; Vagner, Josef; Matsunaga, Terry O; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2016-07-01

    Non-Homologous End-Joining (NHEJ) is the predominant pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. The NHEJ pathway is frequently upregulated in several solid cancers as a compensatory mechanism for a separate DSB repair defect or for innate genomic instability, making this pathway a powerful target for synthetic lethality approaches. In addition, NHEJ reduces the efficacy of cancer treatment modalities which rely on the introduction of DSBs, like radiation therapy or genotoxic chemotherapy. Consequently, inhibition of the NHEJ pathway can modulate a radiation- or chemo-refractory disease presentation. The Ku70/80 heterodimer protein plays a pivotal role in the NHEJ process. It possesses a ring-shaped structure with high affinity for DSBs and serves as the first responder and central scaffold around which the rest of the repair complex is assembled. Because of this central position, the Ku70/80 dimer is a logical target for the disruption of the entire NHEJ pathway. Surprisingly, specific inhibitors of the Ku70/80 heterodimer are currently not available. We here describe an in silico, pocket-based drug discovery methodology utilizing the crystal structure of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. We identified a novel putative small molecule binding pocket and selected several potential inhibitors by computational screening. Subsequent biological screening resulted in the first identification of a compound with confirmed Ku-inhibitory activity in the low micro-molar range, capable of disrupting the binding of Ku70/80 to DNA substrates and impairing Ku-dependent activation of another NHEJ factor, the DNA-PKCS kinase. Importantly, this compound synergistically sensitized human cell lines to radiation treatment, indicating a clear potential to diminish DSB repair. The chemical scaffold we here describe can be utilized as a lead-generating platform for the design and development of a novel class of anti-cancer agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  4. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein is required for efficient processing and repair of trapped Topoisomerase II-DNA cleavable complexes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai; Goodrich, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Type II topoisomerases (TOP2) introduce transient double-stranded DNA breaks through a covalent TOP2-DNA intermediate. Anticancer agents like etoposide kill cells by trapping covalent TOP2-DNA cleavable complexes. Pathways influencing the repair of cleavable complexes are expected to be major determinants of therapeutic response to etoposide. Rb1 is required to enforce cell cycle checkpoints in response to DNA damage, but evidence for a direct role in the processing and repair of DNA lesions is lacking. We observe that degradation of trapped TOP2 cleavable complexes, liberation of DNA strand breaks, and repair of those breaks occurs more efficiently in cells expressing Rb1 protein (pRb). Cells lacking pRb are more sensitive to etoposide induced cytotoxicity. Rb1 mediated processing and repair of TOP2 cleavable complexes is genetically separable from its ability to bind E2F and enforce DNA damage induced cell cycle checkpoints. Rb1 protein binds both TOP2 and BRCA1 in intact cells, and pRb is required for association between TOP2 and BRCA1. These results suggest that pRb facilitates processing and repair of TOP2 cleavable complexes by recruiting proteins like BRCA1 to the damaged site. The functional status of pRb, therefore, may influence sensitivity to etoposide by facilitating the repair of trapped TOP2-DNA complexes as well as by enforcing cell cycle checkpoints. PMID:16091739

  5. Human HMGB1 directly facilitates interactions between nucleotide excision repair proteins on triplex-directed psoralen interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Lange, Sabine S; Reddy, Madhava C; Vasquez, Karen M

    2009-07-04

    Psoralen is a chemotherapeutic agent that acts by producing DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), which are especially cytotoxic and mutagenic because their complex chemical nature makes them difficult to repair. Proteins from multiple repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair (NER), are involved in their removal in mammalian cells, but the exact nature of their repair is poorly understood. We have shown previously that HMGB1, a protein involved in chromatin structure, transcriptional regulation, and inflammation, can bind cooperatively to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with RPA, and that mammalian cells lacking HMGB1 are hypersensitive to psoralen ICLs. However, whether this effect is mediated by a role for HMGB1 in DNA damage recognition is still unknown. Given HMGB1's ability to bind to damaged DNA and its interaction with the RPA protein, we hypothesized that HMGB1 works together with the NER damage recognition proteins to aid in the removal of ICLs. We show here that HMGB1 is capable of binding to triplex-directed psoralen ICLs with the dedicated NER damage recognition complex XPC-RAD23B, as well as XPA-RPA, and that they form a higher-order complex on these lesions. In addition, we demonstrate that HMGB1 interacts with XPC-RAD23B and XPA in the absence of DNA. These findings directly demonstrate interactions between HMGB1 and the NER damage recognition proteins, and suggest that HMGB1 may affect ICL repair by enhancing the interactions between NER damage recognition factors.

  6. MOF and H4 K16 Acetylation Play Important Roles in DNA Damage Repair by Modulating Recruitment of DNA Damage Repair Protein Mdc1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangzhi; Corsa, Callie Ann Sprunger; Pan, Patricia W.; Wu, Lipeng; Ferguson, David; Yu, Xiaochun; Min, Jinrong; Dou, Yali

    2010-01-01

    MOF (MYST1) is the major enzyme to catalyze acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (K16) and is highly conserved through evolution. Using a conditional knockout mouse model and the derived mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines, we showed that loss of Mof led to a global reduction of H4 K16 acetylation, severe G2/M cell cycle arrest, massive chromosome aberration, and defects in ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage repair. We further showed that although early DNA damage sensing and signaling by ATM were normal in Mof-null cells, the recruitment of repair mediator protein Mdc1 and its downstream signaling proteins 53bp1 and Brca1 to DNA damage foci was completely abolished. Mechanistic studies suggested that Mof-mediated H4 K16 acetylation and an intact acidic pocket on H2A.X were essential for the recruitment of Mdc1. Removal of Mof and its associated proteins phenocopied a charge-neutralizing mutant of H2A.X. Given the well-characterized H4-H2A trans interactions in regulating higher-order chromatin structure, our study revealed a novel chromatin-based mechanism that regulates the DNA damage repair process. PMID:20837706

  7. MOF and H4 K16 acetylation play important roles in DNA damage repair by modulating recruitment of DNA damage repair protein Mdc1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangzhi; Corsa, Callie Ann Sprunger; Pan, Patricia W; Wu, Lipeng; Ferguson, David; Yu, Xiaochun; Min, Jinrong; Dou, Yali

    2010-11-01

    MOF (MYST1) is the major enzyme to catalyze acetylation of histone H4 lysine 16 (K16) and is highly conserved through evolution. Using a conditional knockout mouse model and the derived mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines, we showed that loss of Mof led to a global reduction of H4 K16 acetylation, severe G(2)/M cell cycle arrest, massive chromosome aberration, and defects in ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage repair. We further showed that although early DNA damage sensing and signaling by ATM were normal in Mof-null cells, the recruitment of repair mediator protein Mdc1 and its downstream signaling proteins 53bp1 and Brca1 to DNA damage foci was completely abolished. Mechanistic studies suggested that Mof-mediated H4 K16 acetylation and an intact acidic pocket on H2A.X were essential for the recruitment of Mdc1. Removal of Mof and its associated proteins phenocopied a charge-neutralizing mutant of H2A.X. Given the well-characterized H4-H2A trans interactions in regulating higher-order chromatin structure, our study revealed a novel chromatin-based mechanism that regulates the DNA damage repair process.

  8. A heat-shock protein axis regulates VEGFR2 proteolysis, blood vessel development and repair.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Alexander F; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Latham, Antony M; Bao, Leyuan; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Frankel, Paul; Stephen, Sam L; Howell, Gareth J; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binds to the VEGFR2 receptor tyrosine kinase, regulating endothelial function, vascular physiology and angiogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying VEGFR2 turnover and degradation in this response is unclear. Here, we tested a role for heat-shock proteins in regulating the presentation of VEGFR2 to a degradative pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of HSP90 stimulated VEGFR2 degradation in primary endothelial cells and blocked VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling via VEGFR2. HSP90 inhibition stimulated the formation of a VEGFR2-HSP70 complex. Clathrin-mediated VEGFR2 endocytosis is required for this HSP-linked degradative pathway for targeting VEGFR2 to the endosome-lysosome system. HSP90 perturbation selectively inhibited VEGF-A-stimulated human endothelial cell migration in vitro. A mouse femoral artery model showed that HSP90 inhibition also blocked blood vessel repair in vivo consistent with decreased endothelial regeneration. Depletion of either HSP70 or HSP90 caused defects in blood vessel formation in a transgenic zebrafish model. We conclude that perturbation of the HSP70-HSP90 heat-shock protein axis stimulates degradation of endothelial VEGFR2 and modulates VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling, endothelial cell migration, blood vessel development and repair.

  9. The Slx5-Slx8 complex affects sumoylation of DNA repair proteins and negatively regulates recombination.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Rahman, Sadia; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2007-09-01

    Recombination is important for repairing DNA lesions, yet it can also lead to genomic rearrangements. This process must be regulated, and recently, sumoylation-mediated mechanisms were found to inhibit Rad51-dependent recombination. Here, we report that the absence of the Slx5-Slx8 complex, a newly identified player in the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) pathway, led to increased Rad51-dependent and Rad51-independent recombination. The increases were most striking during S phase, suggesting an accumulation of DNA lesions during replication. Consistent with this view, Slx8 protein localized to replication centers. In addition, like SUMO E2 mutants, slx8Delta mutants exhibited clonal lethality, which was due to the overamplification of 2 microm, an extrachromosomal plasmid. Interestingly, in both SUMO E2 and slx8Delta mutants, clonal lethality was rescued by deleting genes required for Rad51-independent recombination but not those involved in Rad51-dependent events. These results suggest that sumoylation negatively regulates Rad51-independent recombination, and indeed, the Slx5-Slx8 complex affected the sumoylation of several enzymes involved in early steps of Rad51-independent recombination. We propose that, during replication, the Slx5-Slx8 complex helps prevent DNA lesions that are acted upon by recombination. In addition, the complex inhibits Rad51-independent recombination via modulating the sumoylation of DNA repair proteins.

  10. Replication Protein A (RPA) deficiency activates the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seok-Won; Jung, Jin Ki; Kim, Jung Min

    2016-09-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway regulates DNA inter-strand crosslink (ICL) repair. Despite our greater understanding of the role of FA in ICL repair, its function in the preventing spontaneous genome instability is not well understood. Here, we show that depletion of replication protein A (RPA) activates the FA pathway. RPA1 deficiency increases chromatin recruitment of FA core complex, leading to FANCD2 monoubiquitination (FANCD2-Ub) and foci formation in the absence of DNA damaging agents. Importantly, ATR depletion, but not ATM, abolished RPA1 depletion-induced FANCD2-Ub, suggesting that ATR activation mediated FANCD2-Ub. Interestingly, we found that depletion of hSSB1/2-INTS3, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein complex, induces FANCD2-Ub, like RPA1 depletion. More interestingly, depletion of either RPA1 or INTS3 caused increased accumulation of DNA damage in FA pathway deficient cell lines. Taken together, these results indicate that RPA deficiency induces activation of the FA pathway in an ATR-dependent manner, which may play a role in the genome maintenance.

  11. APE1, the DNA base excision repair protein, regulates the removal of platinum adducts in sensory neuronal cultures by NER

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L.; Jiang, Yanlin; Kelley, Mark R.; Vasko, Michael R.; Lee, Suk-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the major side effects of treatment with the anticancer drug, cisplatin. One proposed mechanism for this neurotoxicity is the formation of platinum adducts in sensory neurons that could contribute to DNA damage. Although this damage is largely repaired by nuclear excision repair (NER), our previous findings suggest that augmenting the base excision repair pathway (BER) by overexpressing the repair protein APE1 protects sensory neurons from cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity. The question remains whether APE1 contributes to the ability of the NER pathway to repair platinum-damage in neuronal cells. To examine this, we manipulated APE1 expression in sensory neuronal cultures and measured Pt-removal after exposure to cisplatin. When neuronal cultures were treated with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for two or three hours, there was a concentration-dependent increase in Pt-damage that peaked at four hours and returned to near baseline levels after 24 hours. In cultures where APE1 expression was reduced by ~80% using siRNA directed at APE1, there was a significant inhibition of Pt-removal over eight hours which was reversed by overexpressing APE1 using a lentiviral construct for human wtAPE1. Reduction in APE1 expression also altered the expression of the NER proteins RPA70 and XPA in sensory neuronal cultures. Overexpressing a mutant APE1 (C65 APE1), which only has DNA repair activity, but not its other significant redox-signaling function, mimicked the effects of wtAPE1. Overexpressing DNA repair activity mutant APE1 (226+177APE1), with only redox activity was ineffective suggesting it is the DNA repair function of APE1 and not its redox-signaling, that restores the Pt-damage removal. Together, these data provide the first evidence that a critical BER enzyme, APE1, helps regulate the NER pathway in the repair of cisplatin damage in sensory neurons. PMID:26164266

  12. The repair function of the multifunctional DNA repair/redox protein APE1 is neuroprotective after ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Vasko, Michael R; Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L; Kelley, Mark R

    2011-09-05

    Although exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) can produce significant neurotoxicity, the mechanisms mediating this toxicity remain to be determined. Previous studies using neurons isolated from the central nervous system show that IR produces reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage in those cells. Because the base excision DNA repair pathway repairs single-base modifications caused by ROS, we asked whether manipulating this pathway by altering APE1 expression would affect radiation-induced neurotoxicity. In cultures of adult hippocampal and sensory neurons, IR produces DNA damage as measured by phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and results in dose-dependent cell death. In isolated sensory neurons, we demonstrate for the first time that radiation decreases the capsaicin-evoked release of the neuropeptide CGRP. Reducing APE1 expression in cultured cells augments IR-induced neurotoxicity, whereas overexpressing APE1 is neuroprotective. Using lentiviral constructs with a neuronal specific promoter that selectively expresses APE1s different functions in neurons, we show that selective expression of the DNA repair competent (redox inactive) APE1 constructs in sensory neurons resurrects cell survival and neuronal function, whereas use of DNA-repair deficient (redox active) constructs is not protective. Use of an APE1 redox-specific inhibitor, APX3330, also facilitates neuronal protection against IR-induced toxicity. These results demonstrate for the first time that the repair function of APE1 is required to protect both hippocampal and DRG neuronal cultures--specifically neuronal cells--from IR-induced damage, while the redox activity of APE1 does not appear to be involved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The repair function of the multifunctional DNA repair/redox protein APE1 is neuroprotective after ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Vasko, Michael R.; Guo, Chunlu; Thompson, Eric L.; Kelley, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Although exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) can produce significant neurotoxicity, the mechanisms mediating this toxicity remain to be determined. Previous studies using neurons isolated from the central nervous system show that IR produces reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage in those cells. Because the base excision DNA repair pathway repairs single-base modifications caused by ROS, we asked whether manipulating this pathway by altering APE1 expression would affect radiation-induced neurotoxicity. In cultures of adult hippocampal and sensory neurons, IR produces DNA damage as measured by phosphorylation of histone H2A.X and results in dose-dependent cell death. In isolated sensory neurons, we demonstrate for the first time that radiation decreases the capsaicin-evoked release of the neuropeptide CGRP. Reducing APE1 expression in cultured cells augments IR-induced neurotoxicity, whereas overexpressing APE1 is neuroprotective. Using lentiviral constructs with a neuronal specific promoter that selectively expresses APE1’s different functions in neurons, we show that selective expression of the DNA repair competent (redox inactive) APE1 constructs in sensory neurons resurrects cell survival and neuronal function, whereas use of DNA-repair deficient (redox active) constructs is not protective. Use of an APE1 redox-specific inhibitor, APX3330, also facilitates neuronal protection against IR-induced toxicity. These results demonstrate for the first time that the repair function of APE1 is required to protect both hippocampal and DRG neuronal cultures—specifically neuronal cells—from IR-induced damage, while the redox activity of APE1 does not appear to be involved. PMID:21741887

  14. Induction of a novel damage-specific DNA binding protein correlates with enhanced DNA repair in primate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Protic, M.; Hirschfeld, S.; Tsang, A.P.; Wagner, M.; Dixon, K.; Levine, A.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Pretreatment of mammalian cell with DNA-damaging agents, such as UV light or mitomycin C, but not the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), results in the enhanced repair of subsequently transfected UV-damaged expression vectors. To determine the cellular factors that are responsible for this enhancement, the authors have used a modified gel retardation assay to detect the proteins that interact with damaged DNA. They have identified a constitutive DNA binding protein in extracts from primate cells that has a high affinity for UV-irradiated double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin, but not TPA or serum starvation, have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA binding (DDB) protein. These results suggest that the signal for induction of DDB protein can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. The induction of DDB protein varies among primate cells with different phenotypes: (1) virus-transformed repair-proficient cells have partially or fully lost the ability to induce DDB protein above constitutive levels; (2) primary cells from repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) group C, and transformed XP groups A and D, show constitutive DDB protein, but do not show induced levels of this protein 48 h after UV; and (3) primary and transformed repair-deficient cells from one XP E patient are lacking both the constitutive and the induced DDB activity. The correlation between the induction of the DDB protein and the enhanced repair of UV-damaged expression vectors implies the involvement of the DDB protein in this inducible cellular response.

  15. ERCC4 (XPF) encodes a human nucleotide excision repair protein with eukaryotic recombination homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Brookman, K W; Lamerdin, J E; Thelen, M P; Hwang, M; Reardon, J T; Sancar, A; Zhou, Z Q; Walter, C A; Parris, C N; Thompson, L H

    1996-01-01

    ERCC4 is an essential human gene in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is responsible for removing UV-C photoproducts and bulky adducts from DNA. Among the NER genes, ERCC4 and ERCC1 are also uniquely involved in removing DNA interstrand cross-linking damage. The ERCC1-ERCC4 heterodimer, like the homologous Rad10-Rad1 complex, was recently found to possess an endonucleolytic activity that incises on the 5' side of damage. The ERCC4 gene, assigned to chromosome 16p13.1-p13.2, was previously isolated by using a chromosome 16 cosmid library. It corrects the defect in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutants of NER complementation group 4 and is implicated in complementation group F of the human disorder xeroderma pigmentosum. We describe the ERCC4 gene structure and functional cDNA sequence encoding a 916-amino-acid protein (104 kDa), which has substantial homology with the eukaryotic DNA repair and recombination proteins MEI-9 (Drosophila melanogaster), Rad16 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and Rad1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). ERCC4 cDNA efficiently corrected mutants in rodent NER complementation groups 4 and 11, showing the equivalence of these groups, and ERCC4 protein levels were reduced in mutants of both groups. In cells of an XP-F patient, the ERCC4 protein level was reduced to less than 5%, consistent with XPF being the ERCC4 gene. The considerable identity (40%) between ERCC4 and MEI-9 suggests a possible involvement of ERCC4 in meiosis. In baboon tissues, ERCC4 was expressed weakly and was not significantly higher in testis than in nonmeiotic tissues. PMID:8887684

  16. Contribution of polyunsaturated fatty acids to intestinal repair in protein-energy malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Natalia; Mesa, María Dolores; López-Pedrosa, José María; Torres, M Isabel; Ríos, Antonio; Suárez, María Dolores; Gil, Angel

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids supplied in the diet on intestinal mucosa repair in a rat model of protein-energy malnutrition. Rats were fed either a standard semipurified diet or the same diet containing lactose as the only source of carbohydrate to cause protein-energy malnutrition. Diarrhea was induced within 24 h and was maintained for 2 weeks, after which both groups of rats were fed for 1 week either the standard diet or the standard diet supplemented with different sources of fatty acids, such as olive oil (OO), fish oil (FO), and purified phospholipids from pig brain (BPL). The lactose-enriched diet caused loss of enterocyte microvilli, lymphocyte infiltration, supranuclear cytoplasmic vesiculation, decreased number of goblet cells, low-density enlarged mitochondria, and less cristae. The FO diet improved the pathology score according to the histological and ultrastructural analysis, with an increased number of goblet cells, ratio of microvilli length to crypt depth, and percentage of intraepithelial lymphocytes compared to those found in rats with protein-energy malnutrition. We previously reported that chronic diarrhea depletes the antioxidant defense in rat intestine; we now show that both, the FO and the BPL diets, increase GSH levels in colon and that some antioxidant enzyme activities vary according to the source of fatty acids, with higher catalase and superoxide dismutase by the FO diet in jejunum, increased catalase by the BPL diet in jejunum, and elevated glutathione peroxidase by the OO diet in colon. The fatty acid profile of intestinal mucosa reflects the source of fat in the diet, with the lowest ratio of n-6/n-3 for rats fed the FO diet. These results suggest that dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly those in the n-3 series, may play an important role in intestinal repair in chronic diarrhea due to protein-energy malnutrition.

  17. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase in plants. Phylogenetic distribution and the accumulation of substrate proteins in aged barley seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Mudgett, M B; Lowenson, J D; Clarke, S

    1997-01-01

    Protein L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferases (MTs; EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the conversion of detrimental L-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal L-aspartyl residues. We detected this enzyme in 45 species from 23 families representing most of the divisions of the plant kingdom. MT activity is often localized in seeds, suggesting that it has a role in their maturation, quiescence, and germination. The relationship among MT activity, the accumulation of abnormal protein L-isoaspartyl residues, and seed viability was explored in barley (Hordeum vulgare cultivar Himalaya) seeds, which contain high levels of MT. Natural aging of barley seeds for 17 years resulted in a significant reduction in MT activity and in seed viability, coupled with increased levels of "unrepaired" L-isoaspartyl residues. In seeds heated to accelerate aging, we found no reduction of MT activity, but we did observe decreased seed viability and the accumulation of isoaspartyl residues. Among populations of accelerated aged seed, those possessing the highest levels of L-isoaspartyl-containing proteins had the lowest germination percentages. These results suggest that the MT present in seeds cannot efficiently repair all spontaneously damaged proteins containing altered aspartyl residues, and their accumulation during aging may contribute to the loss of seed viability. PMID:9414558

  18. Towards Comprehensive Cardiac Repair and Regeneration after Myocardial Infarction: Aspects to Consider and Proteins to Deliver

    PubMed Central

    Awada, Hassan K.; Hwang, Mintai P.; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. After the onset of myocardial infarction, many pathological changes take place and progress the disease towards heart failure. Pathologies such as ischemia, inflammation, cardiomyocyte death, ventricular remodeling and dilation, and interstitial fibrosis, develop and involve the signaling of many proteins. Proteins can play important roles in limiting or countering pathological changes after infarction. However, they typically have short half-lives in vivo in their free form and can benefit from the advantages offered by controlled release systems to overcome their challenges. The controlled delivery of an optimal combination of proteins per their physiologic spatiotemporal cues to the infarcted myocardium holds great potential to repair and regenerate the heart. The effectiveness of therapeutic interventions depends on the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cargo proteins and the spatiotemporal control of their release. It is likely that multiple proteins will provide a more comprehensive and functional recovery of the heart in a controlled release strategy. PMID:26757257

  19. Cell and protein compatible 3D bioprinting of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Sawkins, M J; Mistry, P; Brown, B N; Shakesheff, K M; Bonassar, L J; Yang, J

    2015-07-02

    Rapid prototyping of bone tissue engineering constructs often utilizes elevated temperatures, organic solvents and/or UV light for materials processing. These harsh conditions may prevent the incorporation of cells and therapeutic proteins in the fabrication processes. Here we developed a method for using bioprinting to produce constructs from a thermoresponsive microparticulate material based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) at ambient conditions. These constructs could be engineered with yield stresses of up to 1.22 MPa and Young's moduli of up to 57.3 MPa which are within the range of properties of human cancellous bone. Further study showed that protein-releasing microspheres could be incorporated into the bioprinted constructs. The release of the model protein lysozyme from bioprinted constructs was sustainted for a period of 15 days and a high degree of protein activity could be measured up to day 9. This work suggests that bioprinting is a viable route to the production of mechanically strong constructs for bone repair under mild conditions which allow the inclusion of viable cells and active proteins.

  20. Frequent Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency in Mixed Endometrioid and Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Endometrium.

    PubMed

    Köbel, Martin; Tessier-Cloutier, Basile; Leo, Joyce; Hoang, Lien N; Gilks, C Blake; Soslow, Robert A; Delair, Deborah; Stewart, Colin J R; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2017-01-20

    Mixed endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma of the endometrium refers to a scenario in which the tumor exhibits histologic features of both endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma. We observed a tendency for these tumors to occur in a mismatch repair (MMR) protein-deficient molecular background in a prior study that examined a small cohort of mixed-type endometrial carcinomas. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of MMR protein deficiency in a larger series of endometrial mixed endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas, through a retrospective survey of MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 expression in such tumors at 5 tertiary centers. A total of 41 cases were identified and 27 (66%) tumors demonstrated MMR protein deficiency with a comparable frequency across the contributing centers (ranging from 56% to 83%). Among the MMR protein-deficient cases, 59% showed concurrent MLH1 and PMS2 loss, 33% showed concurrent MSH2 and MSH6 loss, and 4% showed isolated PMS2 or MSH6 loss. Compared with a previously published series of 15 pure endometrial clear cell carcinomas, mixed endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas are associated with significantly better disease-specific survival (P=0.02). In summary, endometrial carcinomas with mixed endometrioid and clear cell histology are frequently MMR protein deficient. This finding has implications both for our understanding of its tumor biology and for the identification of patients with potential Lynch syndrome.

  1. Retraction RETRACTION of "Association between polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene and the risk of non-small cell lung cancer", by Han JC, Zhang YJ and Li XD - Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4): 12888-12893 (2015).

    PubMed

    Han, J C; Zhang, Y J; Li, X D

    2016-10-07

    The retracted article is: Han JC, Zhang YJ and Li XD (2015). Association between polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene and the risk of non-small cell lung cancer. Genet. Mol. Res. 14: 12888-12893. The GMR editorial staff was alerted about this article (received on May 3, 2015; accepted on August 18, 2015) published on October 21, 2015 (DOI: 10.4238/2015.October.21.9) that was found to be substantially similar to the publication of "Association of XRCC1 gene polymorphisms with risk of non-small cell lung cancer" (received on January 25, 2015; accepted on March 23, 2015; e-published on April 1, 2015) by Kang et al., published in the International Journal of Clinical Experimental Pathology 8 (4): 4171-4176. The authors were aware of the Kang et al.'s paper, since they cite it several times in the manuscript published in GMR. Some of the language is similar between the two manuscripts, but what is the most concerning is that several of the tables in the papers are nearly identical. Tables 2 and 3 are exactly identical between the two articles, suggesting that the publication in GMR was plagiarized from the publication in the International Journal of Clinical Experimental Pathology. The Publisher and Editor decided to retract these articles in accordance with the recommendations of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). After a thorough investigation, we have strong reason to believe that the peer review process was failure and, after review and contacting the authors, the editors of Genetics and Molecular Research decided to retract the article. The authors and their institutions were advised of this serious breach of ethics.

  2. The Molecular Mechanisms and the Role of hnRNP K Protein Post- Translational Modification in DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage repair is a kind of cellular self-protection mechanism in which some relevant proteins are activated when DNA damage response occurs in order to maintain the intracellular function stability and structure integrity. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins can rapidly confer to them more complicated structure and sophisticated function by covalently combining different small molecules with target proteins, which in turn plays an important regulatory role in DNA damage repair. It was reported that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) could be involved in DNA damage repair process under the regulation of its many post-translational modifications, including methylation, ubiquitination, sumoylation and phosphorylation. Here, we reviewed molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K protein post-translational modifications and their role in DNA damage repair, which will promote our understanding of how hnRNP K participating in the repair process to maintain the normal operation of biological activities in the cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA repair proteins following laser microbeam induced DNA damage - when is a DSB not a DSB?

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Pamela; Botchway, Stanley W; Parker, Anthony W; O'Neill, Peter

    2013-08-30

    The formation of DNA lesions poses a constant threat to cellular stability. Repair of endogenously and exogenously produced lesions has therefore been extensively studied, although the spatiotemporal dynamics of the repair processes has yet to be fully understood. One of the most recent advances to study the kinetics of DNA repair has been the development of laser microbeams to induce and visualize recruitment and loss of repair proteins to base damage in live mammalian cells. However, a number of studies have produced contradictory results that are likely caused by the different laser systems used reflecting in part the wavelength dependence of the damage induced. Additionally, the repair kinetics of laser microbeam induced DNA lesions have generally lacked consideration of the structural and chemical complexity of the DNA damage sites, which are known to greatly influence their reparability. In this review, we highlight the key considerations when embarking on laser microbeam experiments and interpreting the real time data from laser microbeam irradiations. We compare the repair kinetics from live cell imaging with biochemical and direct quantitative cellular measurements for DNA repair.

  4. Hydrogel Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cell–Expressing Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Enhances Bone Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hui-Yi; Yang, Shu-Rui; Brey, Eric M.; Chu, I-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The application of bone tissue engineering for repairing bone defects has gradually shown some satisfactory progress. One of the concerns raising scientific attention is the poor supply of growth factors. A number of growth factor delivery approaches have been developed for promoting bone formation. However, there is no systematic comparison of those approaches on efficiency of neobone formation. In this study, the approaches using periosteum, direct supply of growth factors, or gene transfection of growth factors were evaluated to determine the osteogenic capacity on the repair of bone defect. Methods: In total, 42 male 21-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250 to 400 g were used as the bone defect model to evaluate the bone repair efficiency. Various tissue engineered constructs of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactic acid) (PEG-PLLA) copolymer hydrogel with periosteum, with external supply of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), or with BMP2-transfected bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) were filled in a 7-mm bone defect region. Animals were euthanized at 3 months, and the hydrogel constructs were harvested. The evaluation with histological staining and radiography analysis were performed for the volume of new bone formation. Results: The PEG-PLLA scaffold with BMMSCs promotes bone regeneration with the addition of periosteum. The group with BMP2-transfected BMMSCs demonstrated the largest volume of new bone among all the testing groups. Conclusions: Altogether, the results of this study provide the evidence that the combination of PEG-PLLA hydrogels with BMMSCs and sustained delivery of BMP2 resulted in the maximal bone regeneration. PMID:27622106

  5. Altered expression of the DNA repair protein, N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG) in human gonads.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Keun; An, Hee Jung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Sohn, Tae Jong; Roy, Rabindra; Oh, Doyeun; Ahn, Jung Yong; Hwang, Tae Sun; Cha, Kwang Yul

    2002-01-01

    The multifunctional mammalian MPG is responsible for a damaged DNA base in the nucleus. The DNA repair enzyme is transported from the cytoplasm to nucleus to repair the DNA base when it is damaged. If the enzyme does not work properly, the damaged DNA may lead to carcinogenesis, cell death, aging or infertility. This study was performed to determine mRNA expression and intracellular localization of the DNA repair protein, N-methylpurine-DNA glycosylase (MPG), in human ovary and testicular tissues, particularly in epithelial ovarian tumor and spermatogenic (maturation) arrest infertile patients, by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining using human MPG monoclonal antibody. MPG mRNA expression in epithelial ovarian tumor and spermatogenic arrest testis tissues was slightly higher than in normal ovarian and testicular tissues, respectively. The present study demonstrated new and unexpected patterns of cellular and subcellular localization of this enzyme. In a normal ovary, immunostaining for MPG was observed in the nucleus of oocyte, granulosa and stromal cells. MPG was stained mostly in the nucleus and faintly-stained in the cytoplasm of normal coelomic epithelium as well as in benign epithelial ovarian tumors. However, the MPG expression of the nucleus in malignant epithelial tumors, both serous and mucinous type, disappeared. The spermatocyte and Leydig cells in normal testis were immunostained only in the cytoplasm. The spermatocyte and Leydig cells in spermatogenic arrest testis tissues showed up both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. The subcellular localization of MPG in the tissues tested was heterogeneous, while the altered MPG expression was found in ovarian tumor and spermatogenic arrest testis. These results suggest MPG's role in human gonadal tissues and raise the possibility that the altered mRNA level and intracellular localization could be associated with ovarian tumorigenesis and male infertility.

  6. RAD6 Promotes Homologous Recombination Repair by Activating the Autophagy-Mediated Degradation of Heterochromatin Protein HP1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su; Wang, Chen; Sun, Luxi; Wang, Da-Liang; Chen, Lu; Huang, Zhuan; Yang, Qi; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xi-Bin; Chang, Jian-Feng; Chen, Ping; Lan, Li

    2014-01-01

    Efficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is critical for the maintenance of genome stability. Unrepaired or misrepaired DSBs cause chromosomal rearrangements that can result in severe consequences, such as tumorigenesis. RAD6 is an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that plays a pivotal role in repairing UV-induced DNA damage. Here, we present evidence that RAD6 is also required for DNA DSB repair via homologous recombination (HR) by specifically regulating the degradation of heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α). Our study indicates that RAD6 physically interacts with HP1α and ubiquitinates HP1α at residue K154, thereby promoting HP1α degradation through the autophagy pathway and eventually leading to an open chromatin structure that facilitates efficient HR DSB repair. Furthermore, bioinformatics studies have indicated that the expression of RAD6 and HP1α exhibits an inverse relationship and correlates with the survival rate of patients. PMID:25384975

  7. Expression of Mismatch Repair Proteins in Early and Advanced Gastric Cancer in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, Katarzyna; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Białek, Andrzej; Urasińska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations in DNA of mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in failure to repair errors that occur during DNA replication in microsatellites, resulting in accumulation of frameshift mutations in these genes and leading to DNA mismatch replication errors and microsatellite instability. Gastric cancers (GCs) with high MSI (MSI-H) are a well-defined subset of carcinomas showing distinctive clinicopathological features. In this study we investigated the rate of MSI and the correlation between MSI status and clinicopathological features of GC. Material/Methods The study included 107 patients with GCs: 61 with advanced gastric cancers (AGC) and 46 with early gastric cancer (EGC). MSI deficiency in GCs was assessed by the immunohistochemical analysis of expression of MMR proteins – MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 – using formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. Results A total of 6 (5.6%) MSI-H were observed. The loss of MMR proteins expression was associated with the intestinal type of GC in Lauren classification, and tubular and papillary architecture in WHO classification. There was no statistically significant association between negative MMR expression and other selected clinical parameters: age, sex, tumor location, depth of invasion (EGC and AGC), lymph nodes status, presence of the ulceration, and lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusions In the present era of personalized medicine, the histological type of GC and MMR proteins status in cancer cells are very important for the proper surveillance of patients with familial GC and sporadic GCs, as well as for selecting the proper follow-up and treatment. Larger collaborative studies are needed to verify the features of MSI-H GCs in Poland. PMID:27527654

  8. Regulation of ATRIP protein abundance by RAD9 in the DNA damage repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Peng, X-J; Liu, S-J; Bao, C-M; Liu, Y-Z; Xie, H-W; Cai, Y-H; Li, B-M; Hang, H-Y; Ding, X

    2015-12-09

    Genotoxic stress activates checkpoint signaling pathways that activate the checkpoint kinases ATM and ATR, halt cell cycle progression, and promote DNA repair. A number of proteins act in concert with ATR to phosphorylate Chk1, including RAD17, the RAD9-RAD1-HUS1 complex, ATR/ATRIP and TopBp1. However, how these proteins involved act in concert with one another to propagate and maintain the checkpoint response is not well understood. Here, we reported that upregulation of RAD9 protein increased the quantity of ATRIP, suggesting that RAD9 activation will induce more efficient accumulation of ATRIP in vivo. Furthermore, the DNA damage-induced ATRIP foci formation was faster in the mRad9-/- ES cells. Also, ATRIP interacts specifically with RAD9, but not HUS1 and RAD1. Taken together, we suggested that RAD9 could affect both the ATRIP protein levels and DNA damage-induced ATRIP foci formation. Thus, we propose a role of RAD9 in the ATR-Chk1 pathway that is necessary for successful formation of the damage-sensing complex and DNA damage checkpoint signaling.

  9. [Direct bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene therapy for repairing segmental radial defect in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Bai, Lunhao; Sun, Hongbin; Han, Dong; Gu, Jiaxiang; Wang, Huan; Duan, Jingzhu; Xu, Xinxiang

    2005-09-01

    To study the effect of direct bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) gene therapy mediated by adenovirus on repairing bone defect. The radial defect models were made on 60 rabbits, which were evenly divided into 4 groups randomly. The 4 groups were treated with different materials: group A, adenovirus carrying BMP-2 gene (Ad-BMP-2) plus bovine cancellous bone (BCB); group B, reconstructed BMP-2 plus BCB; group C, Ad-Lacz plus BCB; and group D, only BCB scaffolds. The X-ray, histological examination, biomechanics analysis, and immunohistochemical staining were made 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the operation. Group A gained better effect in the volume of new bones, the anti-bending intensity of the healing bone, and the expression of BMP-2 than those of group B. The defect in group A was healed. No new bones were observed in group C and group D. Direct BMP-2 gene therapy is easy to perform and has very strong osteo-induction ability. It is a good method to repair segmental bone defects.

  10. The reaction of the dura to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in repair of skull defects.

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, K; Urist, M R

    1982-01-01

    Trephine defects in the adult rat skull 0.8 cm in diameter, which do not spontaneously heal, were filled with a bovine bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) fraction. The defects healed not only by bony ingrowth from the trephine rim, but also by proliferation of pervascular mesenchymal-type cells (pericytes) of the dura mater. Under the influence of BMP, dural pericytes differentiated into chondroid and woven bone. Between three and four weeks postimplantation, sinusoids formed and the woven bone remodelled into lamellar bone. Concurrently, blood-borne bone marrow cells colonized the bone deposits, and the diploe were restored. Demonstrating that it is soluble in interstitial fluid, and diffusible across a nucleopore membrane (which isolated the bony margins of the skull), BMP induced new bone formation in the underlying dura and complete repair of the defect. The response of the dura to the BMP fraction produced more new bone than the response to allogeneic bone matrix. The BMP-induced repair was dose dependent; the quantity of new bone was proportional to the dose of the implanted BMP. Images Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b. Fig. 1c. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:7092346

  11. Direct involvement of retinoblastoma family proteins in DNA repair by non-homologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Cook, Rebecca; Zoumpoulidou, Georgia; Luczynski, Maciej T; Rieger, Simone; Moquet, Jayne; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hartley, John A; Rothkamm, Kai; Huang, Paul H; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2015-03-31

    Deficiencies in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair lead to genetic instability, a recognized cause of cancer initiation and evolution. We report that the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB1) is required for DNA DSB repair by canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ). Support of cNHEJ involves a mechanism independent of RB1's cell-cycle function and depends on its amino terminal domain with which it binds to NHEJ components XRCC5 and XRCC6. Cells with engineered loss of RB family function as well as cancer-derived cells with mutational RB1 loss show substantially reduced levels of cNHEJ. RB1 variants disabled for the interaction with XRCC5 and XRCC6, including a cancer-associated variant, are unable to support cNHEJ despite being able to confer cell-cycle control. Our data identify RB1 loss as a candidate driver of structural genomic instability and a causative factor for cancer somatic heterogeneity and evolution. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanism and Regulation of DNA-Protein Crosslink Repair by the DNA-Dependent Metalloprotease SPRTN

    DOE PAGES

    Stingele, Julian; Bellelli, Roberto; Alte, Ferdinand; ...

    2016-10-27

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are toxic DNA lesions that interfere with essential chromatin transactions, such as replication and transcription. Little was known about DPC-specific repair mechanisms until the recent identification of a DPC-processing protease in yeast. The existence of a DPC protease in higher eukaryotes is inferred from data in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, but its identity remains elusive. Here we identify the metalloprotease SPRTN as the DPC protease acting in metazoans. Loss of SPRTN results in failure to repair DPCs and hypersensitivity to DPC-inducing agents. SPRTN accomplishes DPC processing through a unique DNA-induced protease activity, which is controlled bymore » several sophisticated regulatory mechanisms. Cellular, biochemical, and structural studies define a DNA switch triggering its protease activity, a ubiquitin switch controlling SPRTN chromatin accessibility, and regulatory autocatalytic cleavage. Our data also provide a molecular explanation on how SPRTN deficiency causes the premature aging and cancer predisposition disorder Ruijs-Aalfs syndrome.« less

  13. Mechanism and Regulation of DNA-Protein Crosslink Repair by the DNA-Dependent Metalloprotease SPRTN

    SciTech Connect

    Stingele, Julian; Bellelli, Roberto; Alte, Ferdinand; Hewitt, Graeme; Sarek, Grzegorz; Maslen, Sarah L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Borg, Annabel; Kjær, Svend; Tainer, John A.; Skehel, J. Mark; Groll, Michael; Boulton, Simon J.

    2016-10-27

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are toxic DNA lesions that interfere with essential chromatin transactions, such as replication and transcription. Little was known about DPC-specific repair mechanisms until the recent identification of a DPC-processing protease in yeast. The existence of a DPC protease in higher eukaryotes is inferred from data in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, but its identity remains elusive. Here we identify the metalloprotease SPRTN as the DPC protease acting in metazoans. Loss of SPRTN results in failure to repair DPCs and hypersensitivity to DPC-inducing agents. SPRTN accomplishes DPC processing through a unique DNA-induced protease activity, which is controlled by several sophisticated regulatory mechanisms. Cellular, biochemical, and structural studies define a DNA switch triggering its protease activity, a ubiquitin switch controlling SPRTN chromatin accessibility, and regulatory autocatalytic cleavage. Our data also provide a molecular explanation on how SPRTN deficiency causes the premature aging and cancer predisposition disorder Ruijs-Aalfs syndrome.

  14. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  15. Involvement of a periplasmic protein kinase in DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Mangoli, Suhas H; Apte, Shree K; Misra, Hari S

    2007-07-01

    The involvement of signal transduction in the repair of radiation-induced damage to DNA has been known in eukaryotes but remains understudied in bacteria. This article for the first time demonstrates a role for the periplasmic lipoprotein (YfgL) with protein kinase activity transducing a signal for DNA strand break repair in Escherichia coli. Purified YfgL protein showed physical as well as functional interaction with pyrroloquinoline-quinone in solution and the protein kinase activity of YfgL was strongly stimulated in the presence of pyrroloquinoline-quinone. Transgenic E. coli cells producing Deinococcus radiodurans pyrroloquinoline-quinone synthase showed nearly four log cycle improvement in UVC dark survival and 10-fold increases in gamma radiation resistance as compared with untransformed cells. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone enhanced the UV resistance of E. coli through the YfgL protein and required the active recombination repair proteins. The yfgL mutant showed higher sensitivity to UVC, mitomycin C and gamma radiation as compared with wild-type cells and showed a strong impairment in homologous DNA recombination. The mutant expressing an active YfgL in trans recovered the lost phenotypes to nearly wild-type levels. The results strongly suggest that the periplasmic phosphoquinolipoprotein kinase YfgL plays an important role in radiation-induced DNA strand break repair and homologous recombination in E. coli.

  16. Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Characterize the Conformational Properties of Proteins and Protein-DNA Complexes That Carry Out DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Sharonda; Wilkins, Hunter; Li, Zimeng; Kaur, Parminder; Wang, Hong; Erie, Dorothy A

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a scanning probe technique that allows visualization of single biomolecules and complexes deposited on a surface with nanometer resolution. AFM is a powerful tool for characterizing protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. It can be used to capture snapshots of protein-DNA solution dynamics, which in turn, enables the characterization of the conformational properties of transient protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. With AFM, it is possible to determine the stoichiometries and binding affinities of protein-protein and protein-DNA associations, the specificity of proteins binding to specific sites on DNA, and the conformations of the complexes. We describe methods to prepare and deposit samples, including surface treatments for optimal depositions, and how to quantitatively analyze images. We also discuss a new electrostatic force imaging technique called DREEM, which allows the visualization of the path of DNA within proteins in protein-DNA complexes. Collectively, these methods facilitate the development of comprehensive models of DNA repair and provide a broader understanding of all protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. The structural details gleaned from analysis of AFM images coupled with biochemistry provide vital information toward establishing the structure-function relationships that govern DNA repair processes. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of DNA-repair gene variants on the micronucleus frequency in thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    García-Quispes, W A; Pastor, S; Galofré, P; Biarnés, F; Castell, J; Velázquez, A; Marcos, R

    2013-01-20

    The role of different DNA-repair genes (OGG1, XRCC1, XRCC2 and XRCC3) on both the spontaneous and the induced frequency of micronuclei (MN) has been studied in the lymphocytes of a group of 114 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Induction of MN was achieved by treatment of the lymphocytes with 0.5Gy of gamma-radiation. The selected genes are involved in base-excision repair (BER) (OGG1, Ser326Cys; XRCC1, Arg280His and Arg399Gln), and in homologous recombination repair (HRR) (XRCC2, Arg188His and XRCC3, IVS5-14G). Genotyping was carried out by use of the iPLEX (Sequenom) technique. Results indicate that only the OGG1-Ser326Cys polymorphism was able to modulate the MN frequency. This effect was only observed in the spontaneous MN frequency (P=0.016), but not in the MN frequency induced after irradiation. In addition, a strong correlation was observed between spontaneous and induced MN frequency, which would suggest an underlying genetic background.

  18. WSTF does it all: a multifunctional protein in transcription, repair and replication

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Chris; Krebs, Jocelyn E.

    2011-01-01

    Williams Syndrome Transcription Factor (WSTF) has emerged as an incredibly versatile nuclear protein. WSTF and the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in which it exists, WINAC, WICH and B-WICH have been studied in a variety of organisms. This research has revealed roles for WSTF in a number of diverse molecular events. WSTF function includes chromatin assembly, Pol I and III gene regulation, vitamin D metabolism and DNA repair. In addition to functioning as a subunit of several ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, WSTF binds specifically to acetylated histones and is itself a histone kinase, as well as a target of phosphorylation. This review will describe the three known WSTF-containing complexes and discuss their various roles as well as mechanisms of regulating WSTF activity. PMID:21326359

  19. WSTF does it all: a multifunctional protein in transcription, repair, and replication.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Chris; Krebs, Jocelyn E

    2011-02-01

    Williams syndrome transcription factor (WSTF) has emerged as an incredibly versatile nuclear protein. WSTF and the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes in which it exists, WINAC, WICH, and B-WICH, have been studied in a variety of organisms. This research has revealed roles for WSTF in a number of diverse molecular events. WSTF function includes chromatin assembly, RNA polymerase I and III gene regulation, vitamin D metabolism, and DNA repair. In addition to functioning as a subunit of several ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes, WSTF binds specifically to acetylated histones and is itself a histone kinase as well as a target of phosphorylation. This review will describe the three known WSTF-containing complexes and discuss their various roles as well as mechanisms of regulating WSTF activity.

  20. Bone morphogenetic protein-2-encapsulated grafted-poly-lactic acid-polycaprolactone nanoparticles promote bone repair.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jun; Ding, Lifeng; Li, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of a novel tissue-engineered bone in repairing bone defects, using poly-lactic-acid-polycaprolactone (PLA-PCL) scaffolding seeded with PEG-bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-transfected rBMSCs (rabbit bone marrow stromal cells). The rBMSCs were transfected with PEG/BMP-2 or liposome/BMP-2, and then implanted into a PLA-PCL tissue-engineered bone. The protein level of BMP-2 was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. ELISA was used to measure the amount of BMP-2 secreted in the culture media. The mRNA level of BMP-2 and osteocalcin was assayed quantitatively by real-time PCR. The middle portion of the bilateral radius in New Zealand rabbits was excised and implanted with tissue-engineered bone, and the modified areas were monitored by X-ray, hematoxylin-eosin staining, and immunohistochemistry staining of BMP-2. PEG-BMP-2 nanoparticles (NPs) and BMP-2-loaded PEG-PLA-PCL tissue-engineered bones were successfully constructed. The novel PEG-PLA-PCL NPs/DNA complex was a superior option for transfecting BMP-2 in rBMSCs compared to normal liposomes Moreover, the mRNA level of osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase activity was also elevated upon transfection of BMP-2-encapsulated NPs. In vivo implants with BMP-2-carried tissue-engineered bone exhibited dramatic augmentation of BMP-2 and effective bone formation in the rabbit ectopic model. The PEG-PLA-PCL NPs/BMP-2 complex had an advantageous effect on bone repair, which provided an important theoretic basis for potential clinical treatments.

  1. When DNA repair goes wrong: BER-generated DNA-protein crosslinks to oxidative lesions.

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Jason Luis; Demple, Bruce

    2016-08-01

    Free radicals generate an array of DNA lesions affecting all parts of the molecule. The damage to deoxyribose receives less attention than base damage, even though the former accounts for ∼20% of the total. Oxidative deoxyribose fragments (e.g., 3'-phosphoglycolate esters) are removed by the Ape1 AP endonuclease and other enzymes in mammalian cells to enable DNA repair synthesis. Oxidized abasic sites are initially incised by Ape1, thus recruiting these lesions into base excision repair (BER) pathways. Lesions such as 2-deoxypentos-4-ulose can be removed by conventional (single-nucleotide) BER, which proceeds through a covalent Schiff base intermediate with DNA polymerase β (Polβ) that is resolved by hydrolysis. In contrast, the lesion 2-deoxyribonolactone (dL) must be processed by multinucleotide ("long-patch") BER: attempted repair via the single-nucleotide pathway leads to a dead-end, covalent complex with Polβ cross- linked to the DNA by an amide bond. We recently detected these stable DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) between Polβ and dL in intact cells. The features of the DPC formation in vivo are exactly in keeping with the mechanistic properties seen in vitro: Polβ-DPC are formed by oxidative agents in line with their ability to form the dL lesion; they are not formed by non-oxidative agents; DPC formation absolutely requires the active-site lysine-72 that attacks the 5'-deoxyribose; and DPC formation depends on Ape1 to incise the dL lesion first. The Polβ-DPC are rapidly processed in vivo, the signal disappearing with a half-life of 15-30min in both mouse and human cells. This removal is blocked by inhibiting the proteasome, which leads to the accumulation of ubiquitin associated with the Polβ-DPC. While other proteins (e.g., topoisomerases) also form DPC under these conditions, 60-70% of the trapped ubiquitin depends on Polβ. The mechanism of ubiquitin targeting to Polβ-DPC, the subsequent processing of the expected 5'-peptidyl-dL, and the

  2. Focal Contact and Hemidesmosomal Proteins in Keratinocyte Migration and Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, Susan B.; Hamill, Kevin J.; Wu, Yvonne; Eisenberg, Jessica L.; Hiroyasu, Sho; Jones, Jonathan C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: During wound healing of the skin, keratinocytes should move over while still adhering to their underlying matrix. Thus, mechanistic insights into the wound-healing process require an understanding of the forms and functions of keratinocyte matrix adhesions, specifically focal contacts and hemidesmosomes, and their components. Recent Advances: Although the structure and composition of focal contacts and hemidesmosomes are relatively well defined, the functions of their components are only now being delineated using mouse genetic models and knockdown approaches in cell culture systems. Remarkably, both focal contact and hemidesmosomal proteins appear involved in determining the speed and directional migration of epidermal cells by modulating several signal transduction pathways. Critical Issues: Although many publications are centered on focal contacts, their existence in tissues such as the skin is controversial. Nonetheless, focal contact proteins are central to mechanisms that regulate skin cell motility. Conversely, hemidesmosomes have been identified in intact skin but whether hemidesmosomal components play a positive regulatory function in keratinocyte motility remains debated in the field. Future Directions: Defective wound healing is a developing problem in the aged, hospitalized and diabetic populations. Hence, deriving new insights into the molecular roles of matrix adhesion proteins in wound healing is a prerequisite to the development of novel therapeutics to enhance tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:24669360

  3. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-08-30

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  4. Multifaceted Roles of Alkyltransferase and Related Proteins In DNA Repair, DNA Damage, Resistance to Chemotherapy and Research Tools

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.

    2011-01-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is a widely distributed, unique DNA repair protein that acts as a single agent to directly remove alkyl groups located on the O6-position of guanine from DNA restoring the DNA in one step. The protein acts only once and its alkylated form is degraded rapidly. It is a major factor in counteracting the mutagenic, carcinogenic and cytotoxic effects of agents that form such adducts including N-nitroso-compounds and a number of cancer chemotherapeutics. This review describes the structure, function and mechanism of action of AGTs and of a family of related alkyltransferase-like proteins, which do not alone act to repair O6-alkylguanines in DNA but link repair to other pathways. The paradoxical ability of AGTs to stimulate the DNA-damaging ability of dihaloalkanes and other bis-electrophiles via the formation of AGT-DNA crosslinks is also described. Other important properties of AGTs include the ability to provide resistance to cancer therapeutic alkylating agents and the availability of AGT inhibitors such as O6-benzylguanine that might overcome this resistance is discussed. Finally, the properties of fusion proteins in which AGT sequences are linked to other proteins are outlined. Such proteins occur naturally and synthetic variants engineered to react specifically with derivatives of O6-benzylguanine are the basis of a valuable research technique for tagging proteins with specific reagents. PMID:21466232

  5. Photosensitized UVA-Induced Cross-Linking between Human DNA Repair and Replication Proteins and DNA Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320–400 nm) interacts with chromophores present in human cells to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage both DNA and proteins. ROS levels are amplified, and the damaging effects of UVA are exacerbated if the cells are irradiated in the presence of UVA photosensitizers such as 6-thioguanine (6-TG), a strong UVA chromophore that is extensively incorporated into the DNA of dividing cells, or the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Both DNA-embedded 6-TG and ciprofloxacin combine synergistically with UVA to generate high levels of ROS. Importantly, the extensive protein damage induced by these photosensitizer+UVA combinations inhibits DNA repair. DNA is maintained in intimate contact with the proteins that effect its replication, transcription, and repair, and DNA–protein cross-links (DPCs) are a recognized reaction product of ROS. Cross-linking of DNA metabolizing proteins would compromise these processes by introducing physical blocks and by depleting active proteins. We describe a sensitive and statistically rigorous method to analyze DPCs in cultured human cells. Application of this proteomics-based analysis to cells treated with 6-TG+UVA and ciprofloxacin+UVA identified proteins involved in DNA repair, replication, and gene expression among those most vulnerable to cross-linking under oxidative conditions. PMID:27654267

  6. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons.

    PubMed

    Gennaris, Alexandra; Ezraty, Benjamin; Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-12-17

    The reactive species of oxygen and chlorine damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine is converted to methionine sulfoxide, which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with methionine sulfoxide residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing proteins containing methionine sulfoxide in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the reactive species of oxygen and chlorine generated by the host defence mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a haem-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid, a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from methionine oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both rectus (R-) and sinister (S-) diastereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting methionine residues from oxidation should prompt a search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum.

  7. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The reactive species of oxygen (ROS) and chlorine (RCS) damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine (Met) is converted to methionine sulfoxide (Met-O), which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with Met-O residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts 1-3. Here, we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing Met-O containing proteins in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the ROS and RCS generated by the host defense mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a heme-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from Met oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both R- and S- diastereoisomers of Met-O, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting Met residues from oxidation should prompt search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PMID:26641313

  8. Multiple DNA Binding Domains Mediate the Function of the ERCC1-XPF Protein in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yan; Orelli, Barbara; Madireddy, Advaitha; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Schärer, Orlando D.

    2012-01-01

    ERCC1-XPF is a heterodimeric, structure-specific endonuclease that cleaves single-stranded/double-stranded DNA junctions and has roles in nucleotide excision repair (NER), interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair, homologous recombination, and possibly other pathways. In NER, ERCC1-XPF is recruited to DNA lesions by interaction with XPA and incises the DNA 5′ to the lesion. We studied the role of the four C-terminal DNA binding domains in mediating NER activity and cleavage of model substrates. We found that mutations in the helix-hairpin-helix domain of ERCC1 and the nuclease domain of XPF abolished cleavage activity on model substrates. Interestingly, mutations in multiple DNA binding domains were needed to significantly diminish NER activity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that interactions with proteins in the NER incision complex can compensate for some defects in DNA binding. Mutations in DNA binding domains of ERCC1-XPF render cells more sensitive to the crosslinking agent mitomycin C than to ultraviolet radiation, suggesting that the ICL repair function of ERCC1-XPF requires tighter substrate binding than NER. Our studies show that multiple domains of ERCC1-XPF contribute to substrate binding, and are consistent with models of NER suggesting that multiple weak protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions drive progression through the pathway. Our findings are discussed in the context of structural studies of individual domains of ERCC1-XPF and of its role in multiple DNA repair pathways. PMID:22547097

  9. Host DNA Repair Proteins in Response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Lung Epithelial Cells and in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Huang, Huang; Zhang, Weidong; Kannan, Shibichakravarthy; Weaver, Andrew; Mckibben, Molynda; Herington, Danielle; Zeng, Huawei; Gao, Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    Although DNA repair proteins in bacteria are critical for pathogens' genome stability and for subverting the host defense, the role of host DNA repair proteins in response to bacterial infection is poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, that infection with the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa significantly altered the expression and enzymatic activity of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) in lung epithelial cells. Downregulation of OGG1 by a small interfering RNA strategy resulted in severe DNA damage and cell death. In addition, acetylation of OGG1 is required for host responses to bacterial genotoxicity, as mutations of OGG1 acetylation sites increased Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) protein expression. These results also indicate that CSB may be involved in DNA repair activity during infection. Furthermore, OGG1 knockout mice exhibited increased lung injury after infection with P. aeruginosa, as demonstrated by higher myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. Together, our studies indicate that P. aeruginosa infection induces significant DNA damage in host cells and that DNA repair proteins play a critical role in the host response to P. aeruginosa infection, serving as promising targets for the treatment of this condition and perhaps more broadly Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:20956573

  10. DNA repair variants and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Grundy, Anne; Richardson, Harriet; Schuetz, Johanna M; Burstyn, Igor; Spinelli, John J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Aronson, Kristan J

    2016-05-01

    A functional DNA repair system has been identified as important in the prevention of tumour development. Previous studies have hypothesized that common polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play a role in breast cancer risk and also identified the potential for interactions between these polymorphisms and established breast cancer risk factors such as physical activity. Associations with breast cancer risk for 99 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from genes in ten DNA repair pathways were examined in a case-control study including both Europeans (644 cases, 809 controls) and East Asians (299 cases, 160 controls). Odds ratios in both additive and dominant genetic models were calculated separately for participants of European and East Asian ancestry using multivariate logistic regression. The impact of multiple comparisons was assessed by correcting for the false discovery rate within each DNA repair pathway. Interactions between several breast cancer risk factors and DNA repair SNPs were also evaluated. One SNP (rs3213282) in the gene XRCC1 was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in the dominant model of inheritance following adjustment for the false discovery rate (P < 0.05), although no associations were observed for other DNA repair SNPs. Interactions of six SNPs in multiple DNA repair pathways with physical activity were evident prior to correction for FDR, following which there was support for only one of the interaction terms (P < 0.05). No consistent associations between variants in DNA repair genes and breast cancer risk or their modification by breast cancer risk factors were observed.

  11. Kaempferol induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60

  12. The nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location, and protein stoichiometry influence the base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats.

    PubMed

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E; Wilson, David M; Merienne, Karine

    2012-05-08

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >14 genetic disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases, the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights into how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, the repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely because of the lower level of APE1, FEN1, and LIG1. Damage located toward the 5' end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired, with the accumulation of incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the center or at the 3' end of the repeats or within control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5' end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly at the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that the BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence, and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome and suggest that a suboptimal long-patch BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability.

  13. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    PubMed Central

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  14. Characterization of DNA binding and pairing activities associated with the native SFPQ·NONO DNA repair protein complex.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Dynan, William S

    2015-08-07

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks. We have previously shown that a complex of SFPQ (PSF) and NONO (p54(nrb)) cooperates with Ku protein at an early step of NHEJ, forming a committed preligation complex and stimulating end-joining activity by 10-fold or more. SFPQ and NONO show no resemblance to other repair factors, and their mechanism of action is uncertain. Here, we use an optimized microwell-based assay to characterize the in vitro DNA binding behavior of the native SFPQ·NONO complex purified from human (HeLa) cells. SFPQ·NONO and Ku protein bind independently to DNA, with little evidence of cooperativity and only slight mutual interference at high concentration. Whereas Ku protein requires free DNA ends for binding, SFPQ·NONO does not. Both Ku and SFPQ·NONO have pairing activity, as measured by the ability of DNA-bound protein to capture a second DNA fragment in a microwell-based assay. Additionally, SFPQ·NONO stimulates DNA-dependent protein kinase autophosphorylation, consistent with the ability to promote formation of a synaptic complex formation without occluding the DNA termini proper. These findings suggest that SFPQ·NONO promotes end joining by binding to internal DNA sequences and cooperating with other repair proteins to stabilize a synaptic pre-ligation complex.

  15. Dynamics of the DNA repair proteins WRN and BLM in the nucleoplasm and nucleoli.

    PubMed

    Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Jensen, Martin Borch; May, Alfred; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Trusina, Ala; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Jensen, Mogens H

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the mobility of two EGFP-tagged DNA repair proteins, WRN and BLM. In particular, we focused on the dynamics in two locations, the nucleoli and the nucleoplasm. We found that both WRN and BLM use a "DNA-scanning" mechanism, with rapid binding-unbinding to DNA resulting in effective diffusion. In the nucleoplasm WRN and BLM have effective diffusion coefficients of 1.62 and 1.34 μm(2)/s, respectively. Likewise, the dynamics in the nucleoli are also best described by effective diffusion, but with diffusion coefficients a factor of ten lower than in the nucleoplasm. From this large reduction in diffusion coefficient we were able to classify WRN and BLM as DNA damage scanners. In addition to WRN and BLM we also classified other DNA damage proteins and found they all fall into one of two categories. Either they are scanners, similar to WRN and BLM, with very low diffusion coefficients, suggesting a scanning mechanism, or they are almost freely diffusing, suggesting that they interact with DNA only after initiation of a DNA damage response.

  16. Dynamics of the DNA repair proteins WRN and BLM in the nucleoplasm and nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Martin Borch; May, Alfred; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Trusina, Ala; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the mobility of two EGFP-tagged DNA repair proteins, WRN and BLM. In particular, we focused on the dynamics in two locations, the nucleoli and the nucleoplasm. We found that both WRN and BLM use a “DNA-scanning” mechanism, with rapid binding–unbinding to DNA resulting in effective diffusion. In the nucleoplasm WRN and BLM have effective diffusion coefficients of 1.62 and 1.34 μm2/s, respectively. Like wise, the dynamics in the nucleoli are also best described by effective diffusion, but with diffusion coefficients a factor of ten lower than in the nucleoplasm. From this large reduction in diffusion coefficient we were able to classify WRN and BLM as DNA damage scanners. In addition to WRN and BLM we also classified other DNA damage proteins and found they all fall into one of two categories. Either they are scanners, similar to WRN and BLM, with very low diffusion coefficients, suggesting a scanning mechanism, or they are almost freely diffusing, suggesting that they interact with DNA only after initiation of a DNA damage response. PMID:25119658

  17. Identification of Pathways in Liver Repair Potentially Targeted by Secretory Proteins from Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Sandra; Hempel, Madlen; Brückner, Sandra; Tautenhahn, Hans-Michael; Kaufmann, Roland; Christ, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background: The beneficial impact of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on both acute and chronic liver diseases has been confirmed, although the molecular mechanisms behind it remain elusive. We aim to identify factors secreted by undifferentiated and hepatocytic differentiated MSC in vitro in order to delineate liver repair pathways potentially targeted by MSC. Methods: Secreted factors were determined by protein arrays and related pathways identified by biomathematical analyses. Results: MSC from adipose tissue and bone marrow expressed a similar pattern of surface markers. After hepatocytic differentiation, CD54 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1) increased and CD166 (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule, ALCAM) decreased. MSC secreted different factors before and after differentiation. These comprised cytokines involved in innate immunity and growth factors regulating liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, chemokine signalling pathways, the complement and coagulation cascades as well as the Januskinase-signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK-STAT) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NOD-like receptor) signalling pathways as relevant networks. Relationships to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF1-α) signalling seemed also relevant. Conclusion: MSC secreted proteins, which differed depending on cell source and degree of differentiation. The factors might address inflammatory and growth factor pathways as well as chemo-attraction and innate immunity. Since these are prone to dysregulation in most liver diseases, MSC release hepatotropic factors, potentially supporting liver regeneration. PMID:27409608

  18. Can a mixed damage interfere with DNA-protein cross-links repair?

    PubMed

    Marzano, C; Severin, E; Bordin, F

    2001-01-01

    Some photochemical and photobiological properties of 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) have been studied in comparison with 1,4,6,8-tetramethyl-2H-furo[2,3-h]quinolin-2 one (FQ) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP). TMP and FQ can photobind to mammalian cell DNA in vivo, by UVA irradiation, forming DNA-protein cross-links (DPC), but only TMP shows a strong capacity of inducing interstrand cross-links (ISC). The mechanism of DPC formation was studied using the double irradiation method in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and DPC were detected by alkaline elution. Both TMP and FQ induce covalent diadducts linking together DNA and proteins. Studying the formation of double strand breaks (DSB) in CHO cells we observed that TMP induced a low amount of DSB, similar to 8-MOP. TMP and 8-MOP induced chromosomal aberrations in CHO cells to the same extent, while FQ appeared to be more active. Our data suggest that the ISC induced by TMP could trap enzymes involved in DPC repair.

  19. The Protein Oxidation Repair Enzyme Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Modulates Aβ Aggregation and Toxicity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, Alicia N.; Arrazola, Macarena S.; Bravo-Zehnder, Marcela; Ramos, Francisca; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To examine the role of the enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase A-1 (MSRA-1) in amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-peptide aggregation and toxicity in vivo, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model of the human amyloidogenic disease inclusion body myositis. Results: MSRA-1 specifically reduces oxidized methionines in proteins. Therefore, a deletion of the msra-1 gene was introduced into transgenic C. elegans worms that express the Aβ-peptide in muscle cells to prevent the reduction of oxidized methionines in proteins. In a constitutive transgenic Aβ strain that lacks MSRA-1, the number of amyloid aggregates decreases while the number of oligomeric Aβ species increases. These results correlate with enhanced synaptic dysfunction and mislocalization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ACR-16 at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Innovation: This approach aims at modulating the oxidation of Aβ in vivo indirectly by dismantling the methionine sulfoxide repair system. The evidence presented here shows that the absence of MSRA-1 influences Aβ aggregation and aggravates locomotor behavior and NMJ dysfunction. The results suggest that therapies which boost the activity of the Msr system could have a beneficial effect in managing amyloidogenic pathologies. Conclusion: The absence of MSRA-1 modulates Aβ-peptide aggregation and increments its deleterious effects in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 48–62. PMID:24988428

  20. Mieap, a p53-Inducible Protein, Controls Mitochondrial Quality by Repairing or Eliminating Unhealthy Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Noriaki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Miyamoto, Yuji; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Kabu, Koki; Yoshida, Masaki; Futamura, Manabu; Ichinose, Shizuko; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of healthy mitochondria prevents aging, cancer, and a variety of degenerative diseases that are due to the result of defective mitochondrial quality control (MQC). Recently, we discovered a novel mechanism for MQC, in which Mieap induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in the elimination of oxidized mitochondrial proteins (designated MALM for Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria). However, a large part of the mechanisms for MQC remains unknown. Here, we report additional mechanisms for Mieap-regulated MQC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers completely inhibited MALM. A mitochondrial outer membrane protein NIX interacted with Mieap in a ROS-dependent manner via the BH3 domain of NIX and the coiled-coil domain of Mieap. Deficiency of NIX also completely impaired MALM. When MALM was inhibited, Mieap induced vacuole-like structures (designated as MIV for Mieap-induced vacuole), which engulfed and degraded the unhealthy mitochondria by accumulating lysosomes. The inactivation of p53 severely impaired both MALM and MIV generation, leading to accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria. These results suggest that (1) mitochondrial ROS and NIX are essential factors for MALM, (2) MIV is a novel mechanism for lysosomal degradation of mitochondria, and (3) the p53-Mieap pathway plays a pivotal role in MQC by repairing or eliminating unhealthy mitochondria via MALM or MIV generation, respectively. PMID:21264228

  1. The Ku70 DNA-repair protein is involved in centromere function in a grasshopper species.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Josefa; Bakkali, Mohammed; Navarro-Domínguez, Beatriz; Ruíz-Ruano, Francisco J; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; López-León, María Dolores; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2013-06-25

    The Ku70 protein is involved in numerous cell functions, the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway being the best known. Here, we report a novel function for this protein in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans. We observed the presence of large Ku70 foci on the centromeres of meiotic and mitotic chromosomes during the cell cycle stages showing the highest centromeric activity (i.e., metaphase and anaphase). The fact that colchicine treatment prevented centromeric location of Ku70, suggests a microtubule-dependent centromeric function for Ku70. Likewise, the absence of Ku70 at metaphase-anaphase centromeres from three males whose Ku70 gene had been knocked down using interference RNA, and the dramatic increase in the frequency of polyploid spermatids observed in these males, suggest that the centromeric presence of Ku70 is required for normal cytokinesis in this species. The centromeric function of Ku70 was not observed in 14 other grasshopper and locust species, or in the mouse, thus suggesting that it is an autapomorphy in E. plorans.

  2. Use of bone morphogenetic proteins in mesenchymal stem cell stimulation of cartilage and bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Scarfì, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix-associated bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) govern a plethora of biological processes. The BMPs are members of the transforming growth factor-β protein superfamily, and they actively participate to kidney development, digit and limb formation, angiogenesis, tissue fibrosis and tumor development. Since their discovery, they have attracted attention for their fascinating perspectives in the regenerative medicine and tissue engineering fields. BMPs have been employed in many preclinical and clinical studies exploring their chondrogenic or osteoinductive potential in several animal model defects and in human diseases. During years of research in particular two BMPs, BMP2 and BMP7 have gained the podium for their use in the treatment of various cartilage and bone defects. In particular they have been recently approved for employment in non-union fractures as adjunct therapies. On the other hand, thanks to their potentialities in biomedical applications, there is a growing interest in studying the biology of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC), the rules underneath their differentiation abilities, and to test their true abilities in tissue engineering. In fact, the specific differentiation of MSCs into targeted cell-type lineages for transplantation is a primary goal of the regenerative medicine. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge of BMP roles and signaling in MSC biology and differentiation capacities. In particular the article focuses on the potential clinical use of BMPs and MSCs concomitantly, in cartilage and bone tissue repair. PMID:26839636

  3. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein is driven to nucleotide excision repair sites by the electrostatic potential of distorted DNA.

    PubMed

    Camenisch, Ulrike; Dip, Ramiro; Vitanescu, Mirela; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2007-12-01

    The presumed DNA-binding cleft of xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein, a key regulatory subunit of the eukaryotic nucleotide excision repair complex, displays a distinctive array of 6 positively charged amino acid side chains. Here, the molecular function of these closely spaced electropositive residues has been tested by systematic site-directed mutagenesis. After the introduction of single amino acid substitutions, the mutants were probed for protein-DNA interactions in electrophoretic mobility shift and photochemical crosslinking assays. This analysis led to the identification of a critical hot-spot for DNA substrate recognition composed of two neighboring lysines at codons 141 and 179 of the human XPA sequence. The replacement of other basic side chains in the DNA interaction domain conferred more moderate defects of substrate binding. When the function of XPA was tested as a fusion product with either mCherry or green-fluorescent protein, a glutamate substitution of one of the positively charged residues at positions 141 and 179 was sufficient to decrease DNA repair activity in human fibroblasts. Thus, the removal of a single cationic side chain abolished DNA-binding activity and significant excision repair defects could be induced by single charge inversions on the XPA surface, indicating that this molecular sensor participates in substrate recognition by monitoring the electrostatic potential of distorted DNA repair sites.

  4. The Drosophila Meiotic Recombination Gene Mei-9 Encodes a Homologue of the Yeast Excision Repair Protein Rad1

    PubMed Central

    Sekelsky, J. J.; McKim, K. S.; Chin, G. M.; Hawley, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic recombination and DNA repair are mediated by overlapping sets of genes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, many genes required to repair DNA double-strand breaks are also required for meiotic recombination. In contrast, mutations in genes required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) have no detectable effects on meiotic recombination in S. cerevisiae. The Drosophila melanogaster mei-9 gene is unique among known recombination genes in that it is required for both meiotic recombination and NER. We have analyzed the mei-9 gene at the molecular level and found that it encodes a homologue of the S. cerevisiae excision repair protein Rad1, the probable homologue of mammalian XPF/ERCC4. Hence, the predominant process of meiotic recombination in Drosophila proceeds through a pathway that is at least partially distinct from that of S. cerevisiae, in that it requires an NER protein. The biochemical properties of the Rad1 protein allow us to explain the observation that mei-9 mutants suppress reciprocal exchange without suppressing the frequency of gene conversion. PMID:8647398

  5. Molecular ageing of alpha- and Beta-synucleins: protein damage and repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Cass, Simon; Wayne, Declan; Bolt, Edward L; Ray, David E; Carter, Wayne G

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal α-synuclein aggregates are hallmarks of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Alpha synuclein and β-synucleins are susceptible to post-translational modification as isoaspartate protein damage, which is regulated in vivo by the action of the repair enzyme protein L-isoaspartyl O-methyltransferase (PIMT). We aged in vitro native α-synuclein, the α-synuclein familial mutants A30P and A53T that give rise to Parkinsonian phenotypes, and β-synuclein, at physiological pH and temperature for a time course of up to 20 days. Resolution of native α-synuclein and β-synuclein by two dimensional techniques showed the accumulation of a number of post-translationally modified forms of both proteins. The levels of isoaspartate formed over the 20 day time course were quantified by exogenous methylation with PIMT using S-Adenosyl-L-[(3)H-methyl]methionine as a methyl donor, and liquid scintillation counting of liberated (3)H-methanol. All α-synuclein proteins accumulated isoaspartate at ∼1% of molecules/day, ∼20 times faster than for β-synuclein. This disparity between rates of isoaspartate was confirmed by exogenous methylation of synucleins by PIMT, protein resolution by one-dimensional denaturing gel electrophoresis, and visualisation of (3)H-methyl esters by autoradiography. Protein silver staining and autoradiography also revealed that α-synucleins accumulated stable oligomers that were resistant to denaturing conditions, and which also contained isoaspartate. Co-incubation of approximately equimolar β-synuclein with α-synuclein resulted in a significant reduction of isoaspartate formed in all α-synucleins after 20 days of ageing. Co-incubated α- and β-synucleins, or α, or β synucleins alone, were resolved by non-denaturing size exclusion chromatography and all formed oligomers of ∼57.5 kDa; consistent with tetramerization. Direct association of α-synuclein with β-synuclein in column fractions or from in vitro ageing co-incubations was

  6. Modulation of caveolins, integrins and plasma membrane repair proteins in anthracycline-induced heart failure in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice E; Zhang, Zheng; McKirnan, M Dan; Manso, Ana Maria; Ross, Robert S; Hammond, H Kirk; Patel, Hemal H; Roth, David M

    2017-01-01

    Anthracyclines are chemotherapeutic drugs known to induce heart failure in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanisms involved in anthracycline cardiotoxicity are an area of relevant investigation. Caveolins bind, organize and regulate receptors and signaling molecules within cell membranes. Caveolin-3 (Cav-3), integrins and related membrane repair proteins can function as cardioprotective proteins. Expression of these proteins in anthracycline-induced heart failure has not been evaluated. We tested the hypothesis that daunorubicin alters cardioprotective protein expression in the heart. Rabbits were administered daunorubicin (3 mg/kg, IV) weekly, for three weeks or nine weeks. Nine weeks but not three weeks of daunorubicin resulted in progressive reduced left ventricular function. Cav-3 expression in the heart was unchanged at three weeks of daunorubicin and increased in nine week treated rabbits when compared to control hearts. Electron microscopy showed caveolae in the heart were increased and mitochondrial number and size were decreased after nine weeks of daunorubicin. Activated beta-1 (β1) integrin and the membrane repair protein MG53 were increased after nine weeks of daunorubicin vs. controls with no change at the three week time point. The results suggest a potential pathophysiological role for Cav3, integrins and membrane repair in daunorubicin-induced heart failure.

  7. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  8. Origin and evolution of the protein-repairing enzymes methionine sulphoxide reductases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Weissbach, Herbert

    2008-08-01

    The majority of extant life forms thrive in an O2-rich environment, which unavoidably induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during cellular activities. ROS readily oxidize methionine (Met) residues in proteins/peptides to form methionine sulphoxide [Met(O)] that can lead to impaired protein function. Two methionine sulphoxide reductases, MsrA and MsrB, catalyse the reduction of the S and R epimers, respectively, of Met(O) in proteins to Met. The Msr system has two known functions in protecting cells against oxidative damage. The first is to repair proteins that have lost activity due to Met oxidation and the second is to function as part of a scavenger system to remove ROS through the reversible oxidation/reduction of Met residues in proteins. Bacterial, plant and animal cells lacking MsrA are known to be more sensitive to oxidative stress. The Msr system is considered an important cellular defence mechanism to protect against oxidative stress and may be involved in ageing/senescence. MsrA is present in all known eukaryotes and eubacteria and a majority of archaea, reflecting its essential role in cellular life. MsrB is found in all eukaryotes and the majority of eubacteria and archaea but is absent in some eubacteria and archaea, which may imply a less important role of MsrB compared to MsrA. MsrA and MsrB share no sequence or structure homology, and therefore probably emerged as a result of independent evolutionary events. The fact that some archaea lack msr genes raises the question of how these archaea cope with oxidative damage to proteins and consequently of the significance of msr evolution in oxic eukaryotes dealing with oxidative stress. Our best hypothesis is that the presence of ROS-destroying enzymes such as peroxiredoxins and a lower dissolved O2 concentration in those msr-lacking organisms grown at high temperatures might account for the successful survival of these organisms under oxidative stress.

  9. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent Protein Kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Ronald A.; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao; Berber, Elisabeth; Boxer, Lisa D.; Kusumoto, Rika; Guan, Shenheng; Shi, Xiaobing; Gozani, Or; Burlingame, Alma L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Chua, Katrin F.

    2009-01-01

    The Sir2 chromatin regulatory factor links maintenance of genomic stability to life span extension in yeast. The mammalian Sir2 family member SIRT6 has been proposed to have analogous functions, because SIRT6-deficiency leads to shortened life span and an aging-like degenerative phenotype in mice, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor with chromatin impacts on the efficiency of repair, and establish a link between chromatin regulation, DNA repair, and a mammalian Sir2 factor. PMID:20157594

  10. The human Werner syndrome protein stimulates repair of oxidative DNA base damage by the DNA glycosylase NEIL1.

    PubMed

    Das, Aditi; Boldogh, Istvan; Lee, Jae Wan; Harrigan, Jeanine A; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Piotrowski, Jason; de Souza Pinto, Nadja; Ramos, William; Greenberg, Marc M; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2007-09-07

    The mammalian DNA glycosylase, NEIL1, specific for repair of oxidatively damaged bases in the genome via the base excision repair pathway, is activated by reactive oxygen species and prevents toxicity due to radiation. We show here that the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, associates with NEIL1 in the early damage-sensing step of base excision repair. WRN stimulates NEIL1 in excision of oxidative lesions from bubble DNA substrates. The binary interaction between NEIL1 and WRN (K(D) = 60 nM) involves C-terminal residues 288-349 of NEIL1 and the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) region of WRN, and is independent of the helicase activity WRN. Exposure to oxidative stress enhances the NEIL-WRN association concomitant with their strong nuclear co-localization. WRN-depleted cells accumulate some prototypical oxidized bases (e.g. 8-oxoguanine, FapyG, and FapyA) indicating a physiological function of WRN in oxidative damage repair in mammalian genomes. Interestingly, WRN deficiency does not have an additive effect on in vivo damage accumulation in NEIL1 knockdown cells suggesting that WRN participates in the same repair pathway as NEIL1.

  11. Expression, purification, and characterization of the protein repair l-isoaspartyl methyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Thapar, N; Clarke, S

    2000-11-01

    Protein l-isoaspartate (d-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1. 77) is a repair enzyme that methylates abnormal l-isoaspartate residues in proteins which arise spontaneously as a result of aging. This enzyme initiates their conversion back into the normal l-aspartate form by a methyl esterification reaction. Previously, partial cDNAs of this enzyme were isolated from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we report the cloning and expression of a full-length cDNA of l-isoaspartyl methyltransferase from A. thaliana into Escherichia coli under the P(BAD) promoter, which offers a high level of expression under a tight regulatory control. The enzyme is found largely in the soluble fraction. We purified this recombinant enzyme to homogeneity using a series of steps involving DEAE-cellulose, gel filtration, and hydrophobic interaction chromatographies. The homogeneous enzyme was found to have maximum activity at 45 degrees C and a pH optimum from 7 to 8. The enzyme was found to have a wide range of affinities for l-isoaspartate-containing peptides and displayed relatively poor reactivity toward protein substrates. The best methyl-accepting substrates were KASA-l-isoAsp-LAKY (K(m) = 80 microM) and VYP-l-isoAsp-HA (K(m) = 310 microM). We also expressed the full-length form and a truncated version of this enzyme (lacking the N-terminal 26 amino acid residues) in E. coli under the T7 promoter. Both the full-length and the truncated forms were active, though overexpression of the truncated enzyme led to a complete loss of activity. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Sebaceous neoplasms with mismatch repair protein expressions and the frequency of co-existing visceral tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonnie A; Yu, Limin; Ma, Linglei; Lind, Anne C; Lu, Dongsi

    2012-12-01

    Visceral malignancy has been associated with sebaceous neoplasms in patients with Muir-Torre syndrome. However, no large studies have been done to evaluate the frequency of visceral tumors in patients with sebaceous neoplasms and mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression of the sebaceous tumors. We sought to determine the frequency of visceral tumors in patients with sebaceous neoplasms, MMR protein expression of the sebaceous tumors, and the related surveillance practices of physicians. We identified 85 patients with sebaceous neoplasms. Relevant clinical information was obtained via chart review and database searches. MMR protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. Nineteen of the 85 patients had a total of 22 visceral malignancies, of which 41% were genitourinary in origin. Ten of the 17 patients (59%) with visceral malignancy had loss of MMR expression in their sebaceous neoplasms or somatic MMR mutation. Thirty patients had other findings such as colonic adenomas and polyps. Of the 23 patients who had a family history of visceral malignancy, 9 had a personal history of visceral malignancy. Only one sebaceous tumor from each patient (except one) was tested for MMR, which might reduce the sensitivity. Our findings demonstrate an increased frequency of internal malignancy in patients with sebaceous neoplasms compared with the general population, and highlight the heterogeneous nature of the visceral tumors. A majority of the sebaceous tumors show loss of MMR expression. The study reminds us to strive toward a consistent and comprehensive approach to screening for internal malignancy when a patient is given a diagnosis of a sebaceous neoplasm. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Involvement of the Artemis Protein in the Relative Biological Efficiency Observed With the 76-MeV Proton Beam Used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay

    SciTech Connect

    Calugaru, Valentin; Nauraye, Catherine; Cordelières, Fabrice P.; Biard, Denis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Hall, Janet; Favaudon, Vincent; Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Previously we showed that the relative biological efficiency for induced cell killing by the 76-MeV beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay increased with depth throughout the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). To investigate the repair pathways underlying this increase, we used an isogenic human cell model in which individual DNA repair proteins have been depleted, and techniques dedicated to precise measurements of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). Methods and Materials: The 3-Gy surviving fractions of HeLa cells individually depleted of Ogg1, XRCC1, and PARP1 (the base excision repair/SSB repair pathway) or of ATM, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, and Artemis (nonhomologous end-joining pathway) were determined at the 3 positions previously defined in the SOBP. Quantification of incident SSBs and DSBs by the alkaline elution technique and 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence of γ-H2AX foci, respectively, was performed in SQ20 B cells. Results: We showed that the amount of SSBs and DSBs depends directly on the particle fluence and that the increase in relative biological efficiency observed in the distal part of the SOBP is due to a subset of lesions generated under these conditions, leading to cell death via a pathway in which the Artemis protein plays a central role. Conclusions: Because therapies like proton or carbon beams are now being used to treat cancer, it is even more important to dissect the mechanisms implicated in the repair of the lesions generated by these particles. Additionally, alteration of the expression or activity of the Artemis protein could be a novel therapeutic tool before high linear energy transfer irradiation treatment.

  14. Involvement of the Artemis protein in the relative biological efficiency observed with the 76-MeV proton beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay.

    PubMed

    Calugaru, Valentin; Nauraye, Catherine; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Biard, Denis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Hall, Janet; Favaudon, Vincent; Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique

    2014-09-01

    Previously we showed that the relative biological efficiency for induced cell killing by the 76-MeV beam used at the Institut Curie Proton Therapy Center in Orsay increased with depth throughout the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). To investigate the repair pathways underlying this increase, we used an isogenic human cell model in which individual DNA repair proteins have been depleted, and techniques dedicated to precise measurements of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs). The 3-Gy surviving fractions of HeLa cells individually depleted of Ogg1, XRCC1, and PARP1 (the base excision repair/SSB repair pathway) or of ATM, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4, and Artemis (nonhomologous end-joining pathway) were determined at the 3 positions previously defined in the SOBP. Quantification of incident SSBs and DSBs by the alkaline elution technique and 3-dimensional (3D) immunofluorescence of γ-H2AX foci, respectively, was performed in SQ20 B cells. We showed that the amount of SSBs and DSBs depends directly on the particle fluence and that the increase in relative biological efficiency observed in the distal part of the SOBP is due to a subset of lesions generated under these conditions, leading to cell death via a pathway in which the Artemis protein plays a central role. Because therapies like proton or carbon beams are now being used to treat cancer, it is even more important to dissect the mechanisms implicated in the repair of the lesions generated by these particles. Additionally, alteration of the expression or activity of the Artemis protein could be a novel therapeutic tool before high linear energy transfer irradiation treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Telomere binding of checkpoint sensor and DNA repair proteins contributes to maintenance of functional fission yeast telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Toru M; Moser, Bettina A; Russell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres, the ends of linear chromosomes, are DNA double-strand ends that do not trigger a cell cycle arrest and yet require checkpoint and DNA repair proteins for maintenance. Genetic and biochemical studies in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were undertaken to understand how checkpoint and DNA repair proteins contribute to telomere maintenance. On the basis of telomere lengths of mutant combinations of various checkpoint-related proteins (Rad1, Rad3, Rad9, Rad17, Rad26, Hus1, Crb2, Chk1, Cds1), Tel1, a telomere-binding protein (Taz1), and DNA repair proteins (Ku70, Rad32), we conclude that Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32 represent two pathways required to maintain telomeres and prevent chromosome circularization. Rad1/Rad9/Hus1/Rad17 and Ku70 are two additional epistasis groups, which act in the Rad3/Rad26 pathway. However, Rad3/Rad26 must have additional target(s), as cells lacking Tel1/Rad32, Rad1/Rad9/Hus1/Rad17, and Ku70 groups did not circularize chromosomes. Cells lacking Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32 senesced faster than a telomerase trt1Delta mutant, suggesting that these pathways may contribute to telomere protection. Deletion of taz1 did not suppress chromosome circularization in cells lacking Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32, also suggesting that two pathways protect telomeres. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses found that Rad3, Rad1, Rad9, Hus1, Rad17, Rad32, and Ku70 associate with telomeres. Thus, checkpoint sensor and DNA repair proteins contribute to telomere maintenance and protection through their association with telomeres. PMID:12196391

  16. Recovery of DNA Replication in UV-Irradiated Escherichia coli Requires both Excision Repair and RecF Protein Function†

    PubMed Central

    Courcelle, Justin; Crowley, David J.; Hanawalt, Philip C.

    1999-01-01

    After UV doses that disrupt DNA replication, the recovery of replication at replication forks in Escherichia coli requires a functional copy of the recF gene. In recF mutants, replication fails to recover and extensive degradation of the nascent DNA occurs, suggesting that recF function is needed to stabilize the disrupted replication forks and facilitate the process of recovery. We show here that the ability of recF to promote the recovery of replication requires that the disrupting lesions be removed. In the absence of excision repair, recF+ cells protect the nascent DNA at replication forks, but replication does not resume. The classical view is that recombination proteins operate in pathways that are independent from DNA repair, and therefore the functions of Rec proteins have been studied in repair-deficient cells. However, mutations in either uvr or recF result in failure to recover replication at UV doses from which wild-type cells recover efficiently, suggesting that recF and excision repair contribute to a common pathway in the recovery of replication. PMID:9922256

  17. Interdependence of DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in apoptosis in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Samar; Ali, Akhtar A; Kilaparty, Surya P; Al-Anbaky, Qudes A; Majeed, Waqar; Boman, Bruce M; Fields, Jeremy Z; Ali, Nawab

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system consists of a number of proteins that play important roles in repair of base pair mismatch mutations and in maintenance of genomic integrity. A defect in this system can cause genetic instability, which can lead to carcinogenesis. For instance, a germline mutation in one of the mismatch repair proteins, especially MLH1 or MSH2, is responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. These MMR proteins also play an important role in the induction of apoptosis. Accordingly, altered expression of or a defect in MLH1 or MSH2 may confer resistance to anti-cancer drugs used in chemotherapy. We hypothesized that the ability of these two MMR proteins to regulate apoptosis are interdependent. Moreover, a defect in either one may confer resistance to chemotherapy by an inability to trigger apoptosis. To this end, we studied three cell lines-SW480, LoVo, and HTC116. These cell lines were selected based on their differential expression of MLH1 and MSH2 proteins. SW480 expresses both MLH1 and MSH2; LoVo expresses only MLH1 but not MSH2; HCT116 expresses only MSH2 but not MLH1 protein. MTT assays, a measure of cytotoxicity, showed that there were different cytotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, etoposide, on these cell lines, effects that were correlated with the MMR status of the cells. Cells that are deficient in MLH1 protein (HCT116 cells) were resistant to the drug. Cells that express both MLH1 and MSH2 proteins (SW480 cells) showed caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptosis. Cells that lack MLH1 (HCT116 cells) did not show any caspase-3 cleavage. Expression of full-length MLH1 protein was decreased in MMR proficient (SW480) cells during apoptosis; it remained unchanged in cells that lack MSH2 (LoVo cells). The expression of MSH2 protein remained unchanged during apoptosis both in MMR proficient (SW480) and deficient (HCT116) cells. Studies on translocation of MLH1 protein from nucleus to cytosolic fraction, an

  18. Screening for Muir-Torre syndrome using mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry of sebaceous neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Maegan E; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Thomas, Brittany C; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Krishna, Murli; DiCaudo, David J; Bridges, Alina G; Hunt, Katherine S; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Cappel, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    Screening for the Muir-Torre variant of Lynch Syndrome (LS) using Mismatch Repair (MMR) gene immunohistochemistry (IHC) on sebaceous neoplasms (SNs) is technically feasible. To date, research into the clinical utility of MMR IHC for this indication is limited. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 90 patients with MMR IHC completed on at least one SN from January 2005 to May 2010. SNs included were adenomas, epitheliomas, carcinomas and basal and squamous cell carcinomas with sebaceous differentiation. Of the 90 patients, 13 (14 %) had genetically confirmed or fulfilled clinical criteria for a diagnosis of MTS and 51 patients (57 %) presented with an abnormal MMR IHC result (loss of one or more MMR proteins) on at least one SN. Abnormal IHC had a sensitivity of 85 %, specificity of 48 %, positive predictive value (PPV) of 22 % and negative predictive value (NPV) of 95 % when evaluating for MTS. When personal or family history of colorectal cancer (≥2 family members with a history of colorectal cancer) was taken into consideration, ignoring IHC results, sensitivity was 92 %, specificity was 99 %, PPV was 92 % and NPV was 99 %. MMR IHC on SNs when used to screen for MTS has poor diagnostic utility. We recommend that MMR IHC not be performed routinely on SNs when the patient does not have either personal or family history of colorectal cancer.

  19. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation. PMID:25820262

  20. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response

    PubMed Central

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  1. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-05-12

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation.

  2. The HhH domain of the human DNA repair protein XPF forms stable homodimers.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2008-03-01

    The human XPF-ERCC1 protein complex plays an essential role in nucleotide excision repair by catalysing positioned nicking of a DNA strand at the 5' side of the damage. We have recently solved the structure of the heterodimeric complex of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1 (Tripsianes et al., Structure 2005;13:1849-1858). We found that this complex comprises a pseudo twofold symmetry axis and that the helix-hairpin-helix motif of ERCC1 is required for DNA binding, whereas the corresponding domain of XPF is functioning as a scaffold for complex formation with ERCC1. Despite the functional importance of heterodimerization, the C-terminal domain of XPF can also form homodimers in vitro. We here compare the stabilities of homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes of the C-terminal domains of XPF and ERCC1. The higher stability of the XPF HhH complexes under various experimental conditions, determined using CD and NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, is well explained by the structural differences that exist between the HhH domains of the two complexes. The XPF HhH homodimer has a larger interaction interface, aromatic stacking interactions, and additional hydrogen bond contacts as compared to the XPF/ERCC1 HhH complex, which accounts for its higher stability.

  3. Mismatch repair protein immunohistochemistry: a useful population screening strategy for Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Musulén, Eva; Sanz, Carolina; Muñoz-Mármol, Ana María; Ariza, Aurelio

    2014-07-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most frequent form of hereditary colorectal cancer, shows a highly penetrant, autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Distinction of LS colorectal carcinoma instances from the much more common sporadic colorectal carcinoma cases is of paramount importance. Revised Bethesda Guidelines were developed to diagnose LS by evaluating a combination of clinical and pathologic data. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of the pathology items included in the Revised Bethesda Guidelines. We have prospectively studied a series of 1624 consecutive colorectal carcinomas with an algorithm including immunohistochemical analysis of mismatch repair proteins and molecular study of microsatellite instability and BRAF c.1799 T > A (p.V600E) gene mutations. Patients with tumors showing LS features were referred for germline mutation analysis. By applying our algorithmic approach, we were able to identify LS features in 89 colorectal cancer patients, of whom only 27 met Revised Bethesda Guidelines pathology criteria. Of the 89 patients, 47 were then studied at the Genetic Counseling Unit, and LS was confirmed in 18, of whom 7 had not been identified by the Revised Bethesda Guidelines. Our study shows that the Revised Bethesda Guidelines failed to detect 70% of patients at risk of LS. Our algorithmic approach is a realistic and effective tool for LS identification. We strongly recommend the implementation of universal population screening for LS among all patients with newly diagnosed colorectal carcinoma.

  4. Differential Expression of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Proteins in Breast Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    DNA-PK in human breast tissues by immuno-histochemistry and extended these studies to two other components of the NHEJ repair pathway, XRCC4 and DNA ... ligase IV, as well as other DNA repair components including NBS 1 and MRE11. In contrast to the original report, 90% of the epithelial cells in normal

  5. Differential Expression of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Proteins in Breast Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    DNA-PK in human breast tissues by immuno-histochemistry and extended these studies to two other components of the NHEJ repair pathway, XRCC4 and DNA ... ligase IV, as well as other DNA repair components including NBSl and MRE11. In contrast to the original report, 90% of the epithelial cells in normal

  6. (p)ppGpp-Dependent Persisters Increase the Fitness of Escherichia coli Bacteria Deficient in Isoaspartyl Protein Repair

    PubMed Central

    VandenBerg, Kelsey E.; Ahn, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The l-isoaspartyl protein carboxyl methyltransferase (PCM) repairs protein damage resulting from spontaneous conversion of aspartyl or asparaginyl residues to isoaspartate and increases long-term stationary-phase survival of Escherichia coli under stress. In the course of studies intended to examine PCM function in metabolically inactive cells, we identified pcm as a gene whose mutation influences the formation of ofloxacin-tolerant persisters. Specifically, a Δpcm mutant produced persisters for an extended period in stationary phase, and a ΔglpD mutation drastically increased persisters in a Δpcm background, reaching 23% of viable cells. The high-persister double mutant showed much higher competitive fitness than the pcm mutant in competition with wild type during long-term stationary phase, suggesting a link between persistence and the mitigation of unrepaired protein damage. We hypothesized that reduced metabolism in the high-persister strain might retard protein damage but observed no gross differences in metabolism relative to wild-type or single-mutant strains. However, methylglyoxal, which accumulates in glpD mutants, also increased fitness, suggesting a possible mechanism. High-level persister formation in the Δpcm ΔglpD mutant was dependent on guanosine pentaphosphate [(p)ppGpp] and polyphosphate. In contrast, persister formation in the Δpcm mutant was (p)ppGpp independent and thus may occur by a distinct pathway. We also observed an increase in conformationally unstable proteins in the high-persister strain and discuss this as a possible trigger for persistence as a response to unrepaired protein damage. IMPORTANCE Protein damage is an important factor in the survival and function of cells and organisms. One specific form of protein damage, the formation of the abnormal amino acid isoaspartate, can be repaired by a nearly universally conserved enzyme, PCM. PCM-directed repair is associated with stress survival and longevity in bacteria

  7. Interpretation of immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair proteins is only reliable in a specialized setting.

    PubMed

    Overbeek, Lucia I H; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Willems, Riki W; Hermens, Rosella P M G; Blokx, Willeke A M; Dubois, Stefan V; van der Linden, Hans; Meijer, Jos W R; Mlynek-Kersjes, Maria L; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Hebeda, Konnie M; van Krieken, Joannes H J M

    2008-08-01

    We examined the validity of immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in colorectal cancer specimens to identify patients at risk for Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) and patients with sporadic microsatellite instable colorectal cancer. This was assessed by observer agreement for and accuracy of interpretation of immunohistochemistry. Seven pathologists from 5 different pathology laboratories evaluated 100 molecularly defined colorectal cancers stained for MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6. Two of the pathologists were experienced in interpretation of immunohistochemistry for MMR proteins. After evaluation of a subset of 20 cases, a discussion meeting was organized, after which pathologists evaluated all 100 cases. Staining patterns were interpreted as aberrant, normal, or indefinite. In 82% of tumors, 5 or more pathologists reached the same interpretation, which was considered the consensus diagnosis. Consensus was reached slightly less frequently in microsatellite instable than in stable tumors, and interobserver variation was moderate to substantial (kappa: 0.49-0.79). More microsatellite instable tumors showed an indefinite staining pattern compared with microsatellite stable tumors. Three out of 7 pathologists, including the 2 experienced pathologists, did not miss a microsatellite instable tumor. Each pathologist found at least 1 tumor with an aberrant staining pattern, whereas consensus was a normal staining pattern and the tumor was microsatellite stable. We conclude that, if restricted to experienced pathologists, immunohistochemistry is a valid tool to identify patients at risk for Lynch syndrome and patients with sporadic microsatellite instable colorectal cancer. An indefinite or aberrant staining result has to be followed by molecular microsatellite instability analysis to confirm the presence of a defective DNA MMR system.

  8. Connecting Replication and Repair: YoaA, a Helicase-Related Protein, Promotes Azidothymidine Tolerance through Association with Chi, an Accessory Clamp Loader Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Laura T.; Sutera, Vincent A.; Zhou, Shen; Weitzel, Christopher S.; Cheng, Yisha; Lovett, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Elongating DNA polymerases frequently encounter lesions or structures that impede progress and require repair before DNA replication can be completed. Therefore, directing repair factors to a blocked fork, without interfering with normal replication, is important for proper cell function, and it is a process that is not well understood. To study this process, we have employed the chain-terminating nucleoside analog, 3’ azidothymidine (AZT) and the E. coli genetic system, for which replication and repair factors have been well-defined. By using high-expression suppressor screens, we identified yoaA, encoding a putative helicase, and holC, encoding the Chi component of the replication clamp loader, as genes that promoted tolerance to AZT. YoaA is a putative Fe-S helicase in the XPD/RAD3 family for which orthologs can be found in most bacterial genomes; E. coli has a paralog to YoaA, DinG, which possesses 5’ to 3’ helicase activity and an Fe-S cluster essential to its activity. Mutants in yoaA are sensitive to AZT exposure; dinG mutations cause mild sensitivity to AZT and exacerbate the sensitivity of yoaA mutant strains. Suppression of AZT sensitivity by holC or yoaA was mutually codependent and we provide evidence here that YoaA and Chi physically interact. Interactions of Chi with single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB) and with Psi were required to aid AZT tolerance, as was the proofreading 3’ exonuclease, DnaQ. Our studies suggest that repair is coupled to blocked replication through these interactions. We hypothesize that SSB, through Chi, recruits the YoaA helicase to replication gaps and that unwinding of the nascent strand promotes repair and AZT excision. This recruitment prevents the toxicity of helicase activity and aids the handoff of repair with replication factors, ensuring timely repair and resumption of replication. PMID:26544712

  9. Connecting Replication and Repair: YoaA, a Helicase-Related Protein, Promotes Azidothymidine Tolerance through Association with Chi, an Accessory Clamp Loader Protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura T; Sutera, Vincent A; Zhou, Shen; Weitzel, Christopher S; Cheng, Yisha; Lovett, Susan T

    2015-11-01

    Elongating DNA polymerases frequently encounter lesions or structures that impede progress and require repair before DNA replication can be completed. Therefore, directing repair factors to a blocked fork, without interfering with normal replication, is important for proper cell function, and it is a process that is not well understood. To study this process, we have employed the chain-terminating nucleoside analog, 3' azidothymidine (AZT) and the E. coli genetic system, for which replication and repair factors have been well-defined. By using high-expression suppressor screens, we identified yoaA, encoding a putative helicase, and holC, encoding the Chi component of the replication clamp loader, as genes that promoted tolerance to AZT. YoaA is a putative Fe-S helicase in the XPD/RAD3 family for which orthologs can be found in most bacterial genomes; E. coli has a paralog to YoaA, DinG, which possesses 5' to 3' helicase activity and an Fe-S cluster essential to its activity. Mutants in yoaA are sensitive to AZT exposure; dinG mutations cause mild sensitivity to AZT and exacerbate the sensitivity of yoaA mutant strains. Suppression of AZT sensitivity by holC or yoaA was mutually codependent and we provide evidence here that YoaA and Chi physically interact. Interactions of Chi with single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB) and with Psi were required to aid AZT tolerance, as was the proofreading 3' exonuclease, DnaQ. Our studies suggest that repair is coupled to blocked replication through these interactions. We hypothesize that SSB, through Chi, recruits the YoaA helicase to replication gaps and that unwinding of the nascent strand promotes repair and AZT excision. This recruitment prevents the toxicity of helicase activity and aids the handoff of repair with replication factors, ensuring timely repair and resumption of replication.

  10. Rad4 recognition-at-a-distance: Physical basis of conformation-specific anomalous diffusion of DNA repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Kong, Muwen; Van Houten, Bennett

    2016-12-07

    Since Robert Brown's first observations of random walks by pollen particles suspended in solution, the concept of diffusion has been subject to countless theoretical and experimental studies in diverse fields from finance and social sciences, to physics and biology. Diffusive transport of macromolecules in cells is intimately linked to essential cellular functions including nutrient uptake, signal transduction, gene expression, as well as DNA replication and repair. Advancement in experimental techniques has allowed precise measurements of these diffusion processes. Mathematical and physical descriptions and computer simulations have been applied to model complicated biological systems in which anomalous diffusion, in addition to simple Brownian motion, was observed. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the major physical models of anomalous diffusion and corresponding experimental evidence on the target search problem faced by DNA-binding proteins, with an emphasis on DNA repair proteins and the role of anomalous diffusion in DNA target recognition.

  11. Effect of the Space Environment on the Induction of DNA-repair Related Proteins and Recovery from Radiation Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Kikuchi, M.; Narumi, I.

    Recovery of bacterial cells from radiation damage and the effects of microgravity were examined in an STS-79 Shuttle/Mir Mission-4 experiment using the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The cells were irradiated with gamma rays before the space flight and incubated on board the Space-Shuttle. The survival of the wild type cells incubated in space increased compared with the ground controls, suggesting that the recovery of this bacterium from radiation damage was enhanced under microgravity. No difference was observed for the survival of radiosensitive mutant rec30 cells whether incubated in space or on the ground. The amount of DNA-repair related RecA protein induced under microgravity was similar to those of ground controls, however, induction of PprA protein, the product of a newly found gene related to the DNA repair mechanism of D. radiodurans, was enhanced under microgravity compared with ground controls

  12. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes as risk factors for asbestos-related malignant mesothelioma in a general population study.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, I; Gibello, L; Biava, A; Giordano, M; Bertolotti, M; Betti, M; Ferrante, D; Guarrera, S; Betta, G P; Mirabelli, D; Matullo, G; Magnani, C

    2006-07-25

    Differences in response to carcinogenic agents are due to the allelic variants of the genes that control it. Key genes are those involved in the repair of the DNA damage caused by such agents. This paper describes the results of a case-control epidemiological study designed to determine the genotypes of four of these genes in persons exposed to a single genotoxic factor, i.e. asbestos, who had or had not developed malignant mesothelioma (MM). Our working hypothesis was that an imperfect DNA repair, as revealed by subtle polymorphic variants, could reduce protection against the chronic DNA insult provoked by asbestos and eventually result in mutagenesis and cancer. Seven variants (i.e. XRCC1-R399Q-NCBI SNP, XRCC1-R194W, XRCC3-T241M, XRCC3-IVS6-14, XPD-K751Q, XPD-D312N, OGG1-S326C) were investigated in 81 patients and 110 age and sex-matched controls, all residents at Casale Monferrato, a Piedmontese town highly exposed to asbestos pollution. Unconditional multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). When considered as a categorical variable, XRCC1-399Q showed an increased OR both in heterozygotes (OR=2.08; 95% CI=1.00-4.33) and homozygotes (2.38; 95% CI=0.82-6.94), although individual ORs were not significant. When it was considered as a continuous variable OR was significant (OR=1.68; 95% CI: 1.02-2.75). When genotypes were divided into "non-risk" and "risk" genotypes, i.e. those thought to be associated with increased risk in the light of the functional significance of the variants, XRCC1-399Q (Q homozygotes+Q/R heterozygotes versus R homozygotes) had an OR=2.147 (95% CI: 1.08-4.28), whereas that of XRCC3-241T (T homozygotes+M/T heterozygotes versus M homozygotes) was 4.09 (95% CI: 1.26-13.21) and that of OGG1-326C was increased, though not significantly. None of the haplotypes showed a significantly different frequency between patients and controls. This is the first report of an association between

  13. Ganetespib overcomes resistance to PARP inhibitors in breast cancer by targeting core proteins in the DNA repair machinery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juhong; Lu, Yuanzhi; Li, Zhi; Li, Liping; Niu, Daoli; Xu, Wenwei; Liu, Jing; Fu, Lin; Zhou, Ziqing; Gu, Yingying; Xia, Fen

    2017-06-01

    DNA damage repair plays essential roles in drug resistance, especially resistance to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in the clinic. A subset of DNA repair proteins such as Breast cancer gene 1 (BRCA1), BRCA2 and RecA homolog (RAD51) are client proteins of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Clearance of these DNA repair proteins by inhibition of Hsp90 is a promising strategy for overcoming resistance to PARP inhibitors. Here we report the pharmacological analysis of the highly potent second-generation Hsp90 inhibitor, ganetespib. Methods Nuclear BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51 expression in breast cancer cells were detected by subcellular fractionation and western blot analysis. Formation of nuclear RAD51 and γ-H2AX foci was analyzed by immunofluorescent staining. The cytotoxicity of ganetespib and ABT-888 in breast cancer cells were evaluated by cell proliferation, colony survival, and apoptosis assay. To investigate the efficacy of this therapy in vivo, SCID mice bearing MCF7 xenografts were treated with ganetespib and ABT-888, both as single agents and in combination. Results Ganetespib significantly destabilized nuclear BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51, and efficiently disrupted homologous recombination-mediated DNA double-strand break repair in breast cancer cells. The synergistic antitumor effects of ganetespib and the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888 were observed, and concurrent treatment with both inhibitors synergistically inhibited xenograft tumor growth. Importantly, the combined treatment was well tolerated, without significant loss of body weight or major histological changes in the breast cancer xenograft model. Conclusion These data provide a novel strategy for the treatment of breast cancer with wild type BRCA1 using combination therapy targeting Hsp90 to overcome resistance to PARP inhibitors.

  14. Human XPA and RPA DNA repair proteins participate in specific recognition of triplex-induced helical distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Karen M.; Christensen, Jesper; Li, Lei; Finch, Rick A.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2002-04-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a central role in maintaining genomic integrity by detecting and repairing a wide variety of DNA lesions. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A protein (XPA) is an essential component of the repair machinery, and it is thought to be involved in the initial step as a DNA damage recognition and/or confirmation factor. Human replication protein A (RPA) and XPA have been reported to interact to form a DNA damage recognition complex with greater specificity for damaged DNA than XPA alone. The mechanism by which these two proteins recognize such a wide array of structures resulting from different types of DNA damage is not known. One possibility is that they recognize a common feature of the lesions, such as distortions of the helical backbone. We have tested this idea by determining whether human XPA and RPA proteins can recognize the helical distortions induced by a DNA triple helix, a noncanonical DNA structure that has been shown to induce DNA repair, mutagenesis, and recombination. We measured binding of XPA and RPA, together or separately, to substrates containing triplexes with three, two, or no strands covalently linked by psoralen conjugation and photoaddition. We found that RPA alone recognizes all covalent triplex structures, but also forms multivalent nonspecific DNA aggregates at higher concentrations. XPA by itself does not recognize the substrates, but it binds them in the presence of RPA. Addition of XPA decreases the nonspecific DNA aggregate formation. These results support the hypothesis that the NER machinery is targeted to helical distortions and demonstrate that RPA can recognize damaged DNA even without XPA.

  15. The involvement of FANCM, FANCI, and checkpoint proteins in the interstrand DNA crosslink repair pathway is conserved in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyong Yun; Chung, Kee Yang; Koo, Hyeon-Sook

    2010-04-04

    Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are specifically defective in the repair of interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs), a complex process involving at least 13 FA proteins and other repair/checkpoint proteins. Of the 13 FA proteins, FANCD1/BRCA2, FANCD2, and FANCJ were previously found to be functionally conserved in C. elegans. We have also identified C. elegans homologs of FANCM and FANCI, and determined their epistatic relationships with homologs of FANCD2, checkpoint proteins, and RAD51 upon DNA crosslinking. The counterparts of FANCM, FANCI, and three checkpoint proteins (RPA, ATR and CHK1) are required for focus formation and ubiquitination associated with FANCD2 in C. elegans. However, C. elegans FANCM affects neither RPA focus formation nor CHK1 phosphorylation induced by ICLs, unlike the reported role of human FANCM, which influences ATR-CHK1 signaling at stalled replication forks. Although focus formation by both FANCD2 and RAD51 requires ATR-CHK1 signaling, FANCD2 and RAD51 acted independently in the formation of their respective foci. Thus, the FANCD2 activation pathway involving FANCM, FANCI, and the checkpoint proteins is conserved in C. elegans but with distinct differences.

  16. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase 1 is involved in both seed longevity and germination vigor in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ogé, Laurent; Bourdais, Gildas; Bove, Jérôme; Collet, Boris; Godin, Béatrice; Granier, Fabienne; Boutin, Jean-Pierre; Job, Dominique; Jullien, Marc; Grappin, Philippe

    2008-11-01

    The formation of abnormal amino acid residues is a major source of spontaneous age-related protein damage in cells. The protein l-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) combats protein misfolding resulting from l-isoaspartyl formation by catalyzing the conversion of abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues to their normal l-aspartyl forms. In this way, the PIMT repair enzyme system contributes to longevity and survival in bacterial and animal kingdoms. Despite the discovery of PIMT activity in plants two decades ago, the role of this enzyme during plant stress adaptation and in seed longevity remains undefined. In this work, we have isolated Arabidopsis thaliana lines exhibiting altered expression of PIMT1, one of the two genes encoding the PIMT enzyme in Arabidopsis. PIMT1 overaccumulation reduced the accumulation of l-isoaspartyl residues in seed proteins and increased both seed longevity and germination vigor. Conversely, reduced PIMT1 accumulation was associated with an increase in the accumulation of l-isoaspartyl residues in the proteome of freshly harvested dry mature seeds, thus leading to heightened sensitivity to aging treatments and loss of seed vigor under stressful germination conditions. These data implicate PIMT1 as a major endogenous factor that limits abnormal l-isoaspartyl accumulation in seed proteins, thereby improving seed traits such as longevity and vigor. The PIMT repair pathway likely works in concert with other anti-aging pathways to actively eliminate deleterious protein products, thus enabling successful seedling establishment and strengthening plant proliferation in natural environments.

  17. [Correlation between mismatch repair proteins status and clinicopathological characteristics in sporadic colorectal cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z T; Zhang, R X; Zhao, Y; Peng, J H; Lu, S X; Zhang, H Z; Ding, P R; Wu, X J; Lu, Z H; Li, L R; Wan, D S; Pan, Z Z; Chen, G

    2017-04-25

    Objective: To explore the expression of mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in sporadic colorectal cancer (SCRC) patients, and its association with clinicopathological characteristics of SCRC. Methods: Patients with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer were consecutively recruited between December 2011 and June 2015 at Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center. The exclusion criteria included multiple primary colorectal tumors, hereditary colorectal cancer (including Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis), and the patients without the MMR proteins status tested. A total of 2 684 patients were included. Correlations of MMR proteins status and patients' demographics (including gender, age), tumor characteristics (site and differentiation) and TNM staging (excluding 315 SCRC patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy) were investigated. Results: The percentage of deficient MMR (dMMR) in these SCRC patients was 10.2%, and that of proficient MMR (pMMR) was 89.8%. The dMMR was more likely to be detected in younger (≤59 old years) SCRC patients compared to the elderly (>59 years) [12.7%(179/1 406)vs 7.5%(96/1 278), P<0.001]. The dMMR rate in right colon cancer was significantly higher than that in left colon cancer and rectal cancer [22.7%(151/664)vs 7.2%(69/956)vs 5.2%(55/1 064), P<0.001]. Among the various pathological types of SCRC, mucinous adenocarcinoma showed the highest rate of dMMR (24.4%), and neuroendocrine carcinoma the lowest rate of dMMR (0) (P<0.001). In addition, the proportions of dMMR in stage Ⅰ, stage Ⅱ, stage Ⅲ and stage Ⅳ SCRC were 9.7%, 16.5%, 8.5%, and 3.9%, respectively (P<0.001). There is no significant difference in the proportion of dMMR between male and female (11.0% vs 9.1%, P=0.114). Conclusion: dMMR status may be most likely to exist in younger (≤59 years) patients with stage Ⅱ right colon mucinous adenocarcinoma among SCRC.

  18. The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Sofia; Rassoolzadeh, Hanif; Hedström, Elisabeth; Coucoravas, Christos; Julner, Alexander; Goldstein, Michael; Imreh, Gabriela; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Kastan, Michael B.; Helleday, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WD40 domain-containing protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA antisense to p53; also referred to as WDR79/TCAB1) controls trafficking of splicing factors and the telomerase enzyme to Cajal bodies, and its functional loss has been linked to carcinogenesis, premature aging, and neurodegeneration. Here, we identify WRAP53β as an essential regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. WRAP53β rapidly localizes to DSBs in an ATM-, H2AX-, and MDC1-dependent manner. We show that WRAP53β targets the E3 ligase RNF8 to DNA lesions by facilitating the interaction between RNF8 and its upstream partner, MDC1, in response to DNA damage. Simultaneous binding of MDC1 and RNF8 to the highly conserved WD40 scaffold domain of WRAP53β facilitates their interaction and accumulation of RNF8 at DSBs. In this manner, WRAP53β controls proper ubiquitylation at DNA damage sites and the downstream assembly of 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAD51. Furthermore, we reveal that knockdown of WRAP53β impairs DSB repair by both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), causes accumulation of spontaneous DNA breaks, and delays recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a novel regulator of DSB repair by providing a scaffold for DNA repair factors. PMID:25512560

  19. Protein phosphatases pph3, ptc2, and ptc3 play redundant roles in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ae; Hicks, Wade M; Li, Jin; Tay, Sue Yen; Haber, James E

    2011-02-01

    In response to a DNA double-strand break (DSB), cells undergo a transient cell cycle arrest prior to mitosis until the break is repaired. In budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the DNA damage checkpoint is regulated by a signaling cascade of protein kinases, including Mec1 and Rad53. When DSB repair is complete, cells resume cell cycle progression (a process called "recovery") by turning off the checkpoint. Recovery involves two members of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family, Ptc2 and Ptc3, as well as the protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) enzyme, Pph3. Here, we demonstrate a new function of these three phosphatases in DSB repair. Cells lacking all three phosphatases Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 exhibit synergistic sensitivities to the DNA-damaging agents camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate, as well as hydroxyurea but not to UV light. Moreover, the simultaneous absence of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 results in defects in completing DSB repair, whereas neither single nor double deletion of the phosphatases causes a repair defect. Specifically, cells lacking all three phosphatases are defective in the repair-mediated DNA synthesis. Interestingly, the repair defect caused by the triple deletion of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 is most prominent when a DSB is slowly repaired and the DNA damage checkpoint is fully activated.

  20. Anemone repair proteins as a potential therapeutic agent for vertebrate hair cells: facilitated recovery of the lateral line of blind cave fish.

    PubMed

    Repass, J J; Watson, G M

    2001-04-01

    Blind cave fish use the lateral line sensory system to detect nearby objects. The fish responds to sudden perturbations in the water column by initiating startle responses in which they swim more rapidly. Normal startle responses disappear after trauma caused by a single 15 s immersion in calcium free water, but return within 5 days if the traumatized fish are treated with 'repair proteins' isolated from sea anemones. Polyclonal antibodies raised to fraction beta, a specific chromatographic fraction of repair proteins, bind to hair cells within superficial neuromasts. Likewise, biotinylated fraction beta binds to hair cells in neuromasts. Neuromast hair cells exposed to calcium free water followed by repair proteins have more compact hair bundles than do hair cells exposed only to calcium free water. We propose that anemone repair proteins replace linkages between stereocilia destroyed by exposure to calcium free water.

  1. Polymorphism of the DNA Base Excision Repair Genes in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Katarzyna A.; Synowiec, Ewelina; Sobierajczyk, Katarzyna; Izdebska, Justyna; Blasiak, Janusz; Szaflik, Jerzy; Szaflik, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is a degenerative corneal disorder for which the exact pathogenesis is not yet known. Oxidative stress is reported to be associated with this disease. The stress may damage corneal biomolecules, including DNA, and such damage is primarily removed by base excision repair (BER). Variation in genes encoding BER components may influence the effectiveness of corneal cells to cope with oxidative stress. In the present work we genotyped 5 polymorphisms of 4 BER genes in 284 patients and 353 controls. The A/A genotype of the c.–1370T>A polymorphism of the DNA polymerase γ (POLG) gene was associated with increased occurrence of KC, while the A/T genotype was associated with decreased occurrence of KC. The A/G genotype and the A allele of the c.1196A>G polymorphism of the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) were associated with increased, and the G/G genotype and the G allele, with decreased KC occurrence. Also, the C/T and T as well as C/C genotypes and alleles of the c.580C>T polymorphism of the same gene displayed relationship with KC occurrence. Neither the g.46438521G>C polymorphism of the Nei endonuclease VIII-like 1 (NEIL1) nor the c.2285T>C polymorphism of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was associated with KC. In conclusion, the variability of the XRCC1 and POLG genes may play a role in KC pathogenesis and determine the risk of this disease. PMID:25356504

  2. Overproduction, purification, and ATPase activity of the Escherichia coli RuvB protein involved in DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, H; Shiba, T; Makino, K; Nakata, A; Shinagawa, H

    1989-01-01

    The ruvA and ruvB genes of Escherichia coli constitute an operon which belongs to the SOS regulon. Genetic evidence suggests that the products of the ruv operon are involved in DNA repair and recombination. To begin biochemical characterization of these proteins, we developed a plasmid system that overproduced RuvB protein to 20% of total cell protein. Starting from the overproducing system, we purified RuvB protein. The purified RuvB protein behaved like a monomer in gel filtration chromatography and had an apparent relative molecular mass of 38 kilodaltons in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which agrees with the value predicted from the DNA sequence. The amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal region of the purified protein was analyzed, and the sequence agreed with the one deduced from the DNA sequence. Since the deduced sequence of RuvB protein contained the consensus sequence for ATP-binding proteins, we examined the ATP-binding and ATPase activities of the purified RuvB protein. RuvB protein had a stronger affinity to ADP than to ATP and weak ATPase activity. The results suggest that the weak ATPase activity of RuvB protein is at least partly due to end product inhibition by ADP. Images PMID:2529252

  3. How reliable is immunohistochemical staining for DNA mismatch repair proteins performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiation?

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Boltin, Doron; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Welinsky, Sara; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Levi, Zohar

    2014-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) is currently being used primarily in colorectal cancer resection specimens. We aimed to compare the results of IHC staining performed on biopsy specimens obtained at endoscopy with that performed on surgical specimens after neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty-two rectal cancer subjects had paired preneoadjuvant and postneoadjuvant tissue available for IHC staining (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2), whereas 39 rectosigmoid cancer patients who did not receive neoadjuvant treatment served as controls. Each slide received a qualitative (absent, focal, and strong) and quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]). The quantitative scores of MMRP from the operative material were significantly lower in the neoadjuvant group than in the control (P < .05 for all).The scores of all MMRP from endoscopic biopsies were not significantly different between the neoadjuvant and the control groups. Disagreement between the endoscopic biopsy and the operative material was evident in 23 of 128 stains (18.5%) in the neoadjuvant group and in 12 of 156 stains (7.7%) in the control group (P = .009). In the neoadjuvant group, a disagreement pattern of "endoscopic strong operative focal" was observed in 28.1% for PMS2, 12.5% for MSH6, 12.5% for MLH1, and 6.3% for MSH2, and in the control group, this same disagreement pattern was found in 12.8% for PMS2, 7.7% for MSH6, 7.7% for MLH1, and 0% for MSH2. Based on our findings, we suggest that for rectal cancer, the endoscopic material rather than the operative material should serve as the primary material for IHC staining.

  4. Immunohistochemistry staining for mismatch repair proteins: the endoscopic biopsy material provides useful and coherent results.

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Wasserberg, Nir; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Sneh-Arbib, Orly; Levi, Zohar

    2015-11-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) in patients with colorectal cancer can be performed on endoscopic biopsy material or the surgical resection material. Data are continuing to accumulate regarding the deleterious effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation on MMRP expression. However, despite continuing rise in the use of endoscopic biopsies for IHC, most pathology departments still use mainly the surgical materials for IHC testing. In this study we compared the quality of stains among 96 colon cancer subjects with paired endoscopic and surgical material available for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 stains (96 × 4, yielding 384 paired stains). Each slide received both a quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]) and a qualitative score (absent; weak and focal; strong). The quantitative scores of all MMRP were significantly higher among the endoscopic material (P<.001 for all). In 358 pairs (93.2%), both the endoscopic and operative material stained either strong (322, 83.9%) or absent (36, 9.4%). In 26 pairs (6.8%), the endoscopic material stained strong, whereas the operative material stained focal and weak. No endoscopic biopsy materials stained focal and weak. Our findings indicate that the biopsy material may provide more coherent results. Although these results may indicate that biopsy material provides coherent and useful results, it is yet to be determined if the demonstrated differences pose a real clinical problem in interpreting final results of IHC staining of such kind. Hence, we suggest that when available, the endoscopic material rather than the operative one should serve as the primary substrate for IHC staining.

  5. Protein energy-malnutrition: does the in vitro zinc sulfate supplementation improve chromosomal damage repair?

    PubMed

    Padula, Gisel; González, Horacio F; Varea, Ana; Seoane, Analía I

    2014-12-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is originated by a cellular imbalance between nutrient/energy supply and body's demand. Induction of genetic damage by PEM was reported. The purpose of this study was to determine the genetic effect of the in vitro zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) supplementation of cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from children with PEM. Twenty-four samples from 12 children were analyzed. Anthropometric and biochemical diagnosis was made. For the anthropometric assessment, height-for-age index, weight-for-age index, and weight-for-height index were calculated (WHO, 2005). Micronutrient status was evaluated. A survey for assessed previous exposure to potentially genotoxic agents was applied. Results were statistically evaluated using paired sample t test and χ (2) test. Each sample was fractionated and cultured in two separate flasks to performed two treatments. One was added with 180 μg/dl of ZnSO4 (PEMs/ZnSO4) and the other remains non-supplemented (PEMs). Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage were assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). All participants have at least one type of malnutrition and none have anemia, nor iron, folate, vitamin A, and zinc deficiency. All PEMs/ZnSO4 samples have a significant reduction in the micronucleus (MNi) frequency compared with PEMs (t = 6.25685; p < 0.001). Nuclear division index (NDI) increase in PEMs/ZnSO4 (t = -17.4226; p < 0.001). Nucleoplasmic bridge (NPBs) frequency was four times smaller in PEMs/ZnSO4 (χ (2) = 40.82; p < 0.001). No nuclear buds (NBuds) were observed. Cytotoxic effects and chromosomal damage observed in children suffering from PEM can be repaired in vitro with zinc sulfate supplementation.

  6. Differential Expression of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Proteins in Breast Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    resting breast tissues from 10 different patients express both components of DNA-PK, DNAPKcs and Ku. These tissues also expressed XRCC4, DNA Ligase IV...DNA-PK in human breast tissues by immuno-histochemistry and extended these studies to two other components of the NHEJ repair pathway, XRCC4 and DNA ... ligase IV, as well as three other DNA repair components NBS1, MRE11, and PCNA. In contrast to the original report, 90% of the epithelial cells in normal

  7. Clinical Impact of Mismatch Repair Protein Testing on Outcome of Early Staged Colorectal Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jatin Sundersham; Goswami, Malini; Sharma, Anila; Tanwar, Parul; Gupta, Gurudutt; Gupta, Nikhil; Pasricha, Sunil; Mehta, Anurag; Singh, Shivender; Agarwal, Mohit; Gupta, Nitin

    2017-06-05

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and second most common in women globally. In the present study, we aimed to analyse the proportion of patients with loss of immunostaining for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in all newly diagnosed stage II cases of colorectal cancer for the purpose of prognostication, for determination of further chemotherapeutic strategy and for familial screening. From January 2014 to December 2015, 62 consecutive newly diagnosed cases of stage II colorectal cancer were included in the study. Details of each patient related to their demographic profile and tumour profile were recorded. All the cases were grossed and staged according to College of American Pathologist (CAP) guidelines. The expression of MMR proteins (which was earlier validated on normal as well as tumour tissue) in FFPE tumour tissue using IHC for mut L homologue 1 (MLH1), mut S homologue 2 (MSH2), mut S homologue 6 (MSH6) and post-meiotic segregation increased 2 (PMS2) was studied. Information regarding stage, treatment, clinical outcome and overall survival was retrieved when available. Out of a total of 371 cases, 62 (16.7%) cases were of stage II CRC, out of which 43 (12%) were treatment naive. Among the selected 62 cases, 26 (41.9%) demonstrated loss of MMR proteins and 36 (58.0%) cases had intact nuclear expression. Out of the cases with MMR loss, 38.4% showed loss of MLH1 and PMS2, 30.7% showed loss of MSH2 and MSH6, 26.9% showed isolated loss of PMS2 and 3.8% showed isolated loss of MSH6. Right-sided location (57.6%) was more common than left-sided (19.2%) and transverse colon (23.0%). Majority of the cases were moderately differentiated (65.3%) in morphology. There was no intratumoural infiltrate in most of the cases (53.8%), and only 3.8% cases showed marked intratumoural infiltrate. Also, peritumoural lymphocytic infiltrate was mild to moderate in most of the cases (26.9%) and marked Crohn's-like infiltrate was seen in only 7.6% cases. Our study

  8. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase 1 (PIMT1) in rice improves seed longevity by preserving embryo vigor and viability.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yidong; Xu, Huibin; Diao, Lirong; Zhu, Yongsheng; Xie, Hongguang; Cai, Qiuhua; Wu, Fangxi; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Jianfu; Xie, Huaan

    2015-11-01

    Damaged proteins containing abnormal isoaspartyl (isoAsp) accumulate as seeds age and the abnormality is thought to undermine seed vigor. Protein-L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) is involved in isoAsp-containing protein repair. Two PIMT genes from rice (Oryza sativa L.), designated as OsPIMT1 and OsPIMT2, were isolated and investigated for their roles. The results indicated that OsPIMT2 was mainly present in green tissues, but OsPIMT1 largely accumulated in embryos. Confocal visualization of the transient expression of OsPIMTs showed that OsPIMT2 was localized in the chloroplast and nucleus, whereas OsPIMT1 was predominately found in the cytosol. Artificial aging results highlighted the sensitivity of the seeds of OsPIMT1 mutant line when subjected to accelerated aging. Overexpression of OsPIMT1 in transgenic seeds reduced the accumulation of isoAsp-containing protein in embryos, and increased embryo viability. The germination percentage of transgenic seeds overexpressing OsPIMT1 increased 9-15% compared to the WT seeds after 21-day of artificial aging, whereas seeds from the OsPIMT1 RNAi lines overaccumulated isoAsp in embryos and experienced rapid loss of seed germinability. Taken together, these data strongly indicated that OsPIMT1-related seed longevity improvement is probably due to the repair of detrimental isoAsp-containing proteins that over accumulate in embryos when subjected to accelerated aging.

  9. Non-covalent interactions between ATP and RecA DNA-repairing proteins: DFT and semiempirical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    The role of Bacterial RecA in the structural maintenance of genomes and the genetic information they carry has been established. In particular, the RecA DNA-repairing protein from D. Radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria, is crucial for the repair of double strand breaks (DSBs). We have performed semi-empirical free-energy calculations and QM/MM calculations to study their non-covalent interactions with ATP and ADP. Such studies provide insight into the mechanisms of ATP/ADP --> RecA energy transfer and, therefore, about specific functional uses of incoming energy for DNA repairing mechanisms. We present a detailed analysis of the non-covalent interactions which minimize the interaction Gibbs free energies leading to the most stable non-covalent binding sites. Van der Waal, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions has been quantified which provides a detailed insight into the mechanisms of ATP-RecA interaction. Further, possible chemical interactions and functional roles of RecA proteins are explored based on the previously mentioned studies. Acknowledgements: Funded, in part, by DTRA award 106339 (JHR). Dr. Mark C. Palenik and Mrs. Lora Beard are gratefully acknowledged Supported in part by DTRA Award 106339.

  10. A method for systematic mapping of protein lysine methylation identifies new functions for HP1β in DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huadong; Galka, Marek; Liu, Xuguang; Lin, Yu-fen; Pittock, Paula; Voss, Courtney; Dhami, Gurpreet; Li, Xing; Miyaji, Masaaki; Lajoie, Gilles; Chen, Benjamin; Li, Shawn S.-C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine methylation occurs on both histone and non-histone proteins. However, our knowledge on the prevalence and function of non-histone protein methylation is poor. We describe here an approach that combines peptide array, bioinformatic and mass spectrometric analyses to systematically identify lysine methylation sites in proteins and methyllysine-mediated protein-protein interactions. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by identifying a methyllysine-driven interactome of the heterochromatin protein (HP) 1β and uncovering, simultaneously, numerous methyllysine sites on non-histone proteins. The HP1β interactome is enriched with proteins involved in DNA damage repair and RNA splicing. We showed that lysine methylation played a pivotal role in the function of the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and its interaction with HP1β during DNA damage response. Moreover, by combining heavy methyl SILAC with Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry (MS), we showed that lysine methylation underwent widespread and large changes in response to DNA damage. Our work indicates that lysine methylation is a highly dynamic post-translational modification occurring frequently on non-histone proteins and that the approach presented herein may be extended to many methyllysine-binding modules to systematically uncover lysine methylation events in the cell. PMID:23707759

  11. ATM protein is indispensable to repair complex-type DNA double strand breaks induced by high LET heavy ion irradiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Emiko; Yu, Dong; Fujimori, Akira; Anzai, Kazunori; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated) protein responsible for a rare genetic disease with hyperradiosensitivity, is the one of the earliest repair proteins sensing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). ATM is known to phosphorylate DNA repair proteins such as MRN complex (Mre11, Rad50 and NBS1), 53BP1, Artemis, Brca1, gamma-H2AX, and MDC. We studied the interactions between ATM and DNA-PKcs, a crucial NHEJ repair protein, after cells exposure to high and low LET irradiation. Normal human (HFL III, MRC5VA) and AT homozygote (AT2KY, AT5BIVA, AT3BIVA) cells were irradiated with X-rays and high LET radiation (carbon ions: 290MeV/n initial energy at 70 keV/um, and iron ions: 500MeV/n initial energy at 200KeV/um), and several critical end points were examined. AT cells with high LET irradiation showed a significantly higher radiosensitivity when compared with normal cells. The behavior of DNA DSB repair was monitored by immuno-fluorescence techniques using DNA-PKcs (pThr2609, pSer2056) and ATM (pSer1981) antibodies. In normal cells, the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs was clearly detected after high LET irradiation, though the peak of phosphorylation was delayed when compared to X-irradiation. In contrast, almost no DNA-PKcs phosphorylation foci were detected in AT cells irradiated with high LET radiation. A similar result was also observed in normal cells treated with 10 uM ATM kinase specific inhibitor (KU55933) one hour before irradiation. These data suggest that the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with low LET X-rays is mostly ATM-independent, and the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs with high LET radiation seems to require ATM probably due to its complex nature of DSB induced. Our study indicates that high LET heavy ion irradiation which we can observe in the space environment would provide a useful tool to study the fundamental mechanism associated with DNA DSB repair.

  12. Histone chaperone activity of Fanconi anemia proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, is required for DNA crosslink repair.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koichi; Ishiai, Masamichi; Toda, Kazue; Furukoshi, Satoshi; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Kagawa, Wataru; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Obuse, Chikashi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2012-08-29

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by genomic instability and cancer susceptibility. A key FA protein, FANCD2, is targeted to chromatin with its partner, FANCI, and plays a critical role in DNA crosslink repair. However, the molecular function of chromatin-bound FANCD2-FANCI is still poorly understood. In the present study, we found that FANCD2 possesses nucleosome-assembly activity in vitro. The mobility of histone H3 was reduced in FANCD2-knockdown cells following treatment with an interstrand DNA crosslinker, mitomycin C. Furthermore, cells harbouring FANCD2 mutations that were defective in nucleosome assembly displayed impaired survival upon cisplatin treatment. Although FANCI by itself lacked nucleosome-assembly activity, it significantly stimulated FANCD2-mediated nucleosome assembly. These observations suggest that FANCD2-FANCI may regulate chromatin dynamics during DNA repair.

  13. Histone chaperone activity of Fanconi anemia proteins, FANCD2 and FANCI, is required for DNA crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koichi; Ishiai, Masamichi; Toda, Kazue; Furukoshi, Satoshi; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Kagawa, Wataru; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Obuse, Chikashi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by genomic instability and cancer susceptibility. A key FA protein, FANCD2, is targeted to chromatin with its partner, FANCI, and plays a critical role in DNA crosslink repair. However, the molecular function of chromatin-bound FANCD2-FANCI is still poorly understood. In the present study, we found that FANCD2 possesses nucleosome-assembly activity in vitro. The mobility of histone H3 was reduced in FANCD2-knockdown cells following treatment with an interstrand DNA crosslinker, mitomycin C. Furthermore, cells harbouring FANCD2 mutations that were defective in nucleosome assembly displayed impaired survival upon cisplatin treatment. Although FANCI by itself lacked nucleosome-assembly activity, it significantly stimulated FANCD2-mediated nucleosome assembly. These observations suggest that FANCD2-FANCI may regulate chromatin dynamics during DNA repair. PMID:22828868

  14. The Role of Slr0151, a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, during Photosystem II Assembly and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Anna; Rengstl, Birgit; Heinz, Steffen; Klingl, Andreas; Nickelsen, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and repair of photosystem II (PSII) is facilitated by a variety of assembly factors. Among those, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein Slr0151 from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (hereafter Synechocystis) has previously been assigned a repair function under high light conditions (Yang et al., 2014). Here, we show that inactivation of slr0151 affects thylakoid membrane ultrastructure even under normal light conditions. Moreover, the level and localization of Slr0151 are affected in a variety of PSII-related mutants. In particular, the data suggest a close functional relationship between Slr0151 and Sll0933, which interacts with Ycf48 during PSII assembly and is homologous to PAM68 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed a punctate distribution of Slr0151 within several different membrane types in Synechocystis cells. PMID:27200072

  15. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Decreases 53BP1 Protein Levels Leading to a Defective DNA Repair in Cultured Primary Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ana M; Palanca, Ana; Ruiz-Soto, Maria; Llorca, Javier; Marín, María P; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Berciano, Maria T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption may cause neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Alcohol neurotoxicity is associated with the production of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species that induce oxidative DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ethanol disturbs the DNA damage response (DDR), resulting in a defective DNA repair, remain unknown. Here, we have used cultured primary cortical neurons exposed to 50 or 100 mM ethanol for 7 days to analyze the ethanol-induced DDR. Ethanol exposure produced a dose-dependent generation of double strand breaks and the formation of DNA damage foci immunoreactive for the histone γH2AX, a DNA damage marker, and for the ubiquitylated H2A, which is involved in chromatin remodeling at DNA damage sites. Importantly, these DNA damage foci failed to recruit the protein 53BP1, a crucial DNA repair factor. This effect was associated with a drop in 53BP1 mRNA and protein levels and with an inhibition of global transcription. Moreover, ethanol-exposed neurons treated with ionizing radiation (2 Gy) also failed to recruit 53BP1 at DNA damage foci and exhibited a greater vulnerability to DNA lesions than irradiated control neurons. Our results support that defective DNA repair, mediated by the deficient expression and recruitment of 53BP1 to DNA damage sites, represents a novel mechanism involved in ethanol neurotoxicity. The design of therapeutic strategies that increase or stabilize 53BP1 levels might potentially promote DNA repair and partially compensate alcohol neurotoxicity.

  16. The virion of Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV) contains a complex suite of proteins for transcription and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias G; Kelly, Isabelle; Foster, Leonard J; Suttle, Curtis A

    2014-10-01

    Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV) is a giant virus of the Mimiviridae family that infects the marine phagotrophic flagellate C. roenbergensis. CroV possesses a DNA genome of ~730 kilobase pairs that is predicted to encode 544 proteins. We analyzed the protein composition of purified CroV particles by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and identified 141 virion-associated CroV proteins and 60 host proteins. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000993. Predicted functions could be assigned to 36% of the virion proteins, which include structural proteins as well as enzymes for transcription, DNA repair, redox reactions and protein modification. Homologs of 36 CroV virion proteins have previously been found in the virion of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus. The overlapping virion proteome of CroV and Mimivirus reveals a set of conserved virion protein functions that were presumably present in the last common ancestor of the Mimiviridae.

  17. A human ortholog of archaeal DNA repair protein Hef is defective in Fanconi anemia complementation group M.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Medhurst, Annette L; Ling, Chen; Xue, Yutong; Singh, Thiyam Ramsing; Bier, Patrick; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Stone, Stacie; Dokal, Inderjeet; Mathew, Christopher G; Hoatlin, Maureen; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Wang, Weidong

    2005-09-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genetic disease characterized by genomic instability and cancer predisposition. Nine genes involved in Fanconi anemia have been identified; their products participate in a DNA damage-response network involving BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 2,3). We previously purified a Fanconi anemia core complex containing the FANCL ubiquitin ligase and six other Fanconi anemia-associated proteins. Each protein in this complex is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2, a key reaction in the Fanconi anemia DNA damage-response pathway. Here we show that another component of this complex, FAAP250, is mutant in individuals with Fanconi anemia of a new complementation group (FA-M). FAAP250 or FANCM has sequence similarity to known DNA-repair proteins, including archaeal Hef, yeast MPH1 and human ERCC4 or XPF. FANCM can dissociate DNA triplex, possibly owing to its ability to translocate on duplex DNA. FANCM is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and becomes hyperphosphorylated in response to DNA damage. Our data suggest an evolutionary link between Fanconi anemia-associated proteins and DNA repair; FANCM may act as an engine that translocates the Fanconi anemia core complex along DNA.

  18. Effects of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein 1 (CDMP1) transgenic mesenchymal stem cell sheets in repairing rabbit cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Yao, M; Liu, Y; Mu, L; Zhang, B; Wu, G

    2016-06-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the abilities of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein 1 (CDMP1) transgenic cell sheets in repairing rabbit cartilage defects. Rabbit CDMP1 transgenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets (CDMP1-BMSCs) were cultured on temperature-sensitive culture dishes, and CDMP1 expression and type II collagen protein in the cell sheets were detected. Tissue-engineered cell sheets were constructed and transplanted into defect rabbit thyroid cartilage, to investigate the expression of engineered cartilage collagen protein and proteoglycan (GAG). The experiment was divided into three groups; A) BMSC sheet, B) Ad-CMV-eGFP-transfected cell sheet, and C) Ad-CMV-hCDMP1-IRES-eGFP-transfected cell sheet. The expression of CDMP1 was detected in the transgenic cell sheets. The engineered cartilage exhibited positive immunohistochemical and Alcian blue staining. The expression levels of type II collagen protein and GAG in group A were positive, whereas those in group B and group C were negative (P < 0.05). The CDMP1-BMSC sheets had a good cartilage differentiation activity, and could effectively repair rabbit laryngeal cartilage defects.

  19. The DNA-repair Ku70 protein is located in the nucleus and tail of elongating spermatids in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Josefa; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence immunostaining for the phosphorylated H2AX histone (gammaH2AX) in the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans has shown abundance of gammaH2AX in the nuclei of round and elongating spermatids, suggesting that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) occur regularly during spermiogenesis. Immunofluorescence patterns for Ku70, a DNA-repair protein participating in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, showed that this protein is present in round and elongating spermatids, implying that the NHEJ DNA-repair pathway operates during chromatin compaction in spermiogenesis. In addition, during the final stages of spermiogenesis, the Ku70 protein concentrates on the region forming the sperm tail. Since Ku70 was also abundant in spermatid tails, it is reasonable to assume that Ku70 might play a novel function in sperm-tail formation. The analysis of Ku70 immunofluorescence patterns in 13 other grasshopper species also showed the presence of this protein in the nucleus and tail of elongating spermatids, indicating that this is a general characteristic in grasshoppers.

  20. Meningocele repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myelodysplasia repair; Spinal dysraphism repair; Meningomyelocele repair; Neural tube defect repair; Spina bifida repair ... If your child has hydrocephalus, a shunt (plastic tube) will be put in the child's brain to ...

  1. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase α2 in Neutrophils Regulates Vascular Repair via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α and a Network of Proteins Affecting Metabolism and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Malik, Randa; Zippel, Nina; Frömel, Timo; Heidler, Juliana; Zukunft, Sven; Walzog, Barbara; Ansari, Nariman; Pampaloni, Francesco; Wingert, Susanne; Rieger, Michael A.; Wittig, Ilka; Fisslthaler, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by hypoxia, and although the AMPKα1 catalytic subunit has been implicated in angiogenesis, little is known about the role played by the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Objective: To determine the role of the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Methods and Results: Recovery of blood flow after femoral artery ligation was impaired (>80%) in AMPKα2−/− versus wild-type mice, a phenotype reproduced in mice lacking AMPKα2 in myeloid cells (AMPKα2ΔMC). Three days after ligation, neutrophil infiltration into ischemic limbs of AMPKα2ΔMC mice was lower than that in wild-type mice despite being higher after 24 hours. Neutrophil survival in ischemic tissue is required to attract monocytes that contribute to the angiogenic response. Indeed, apoptosis was increased in hypoxic neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice, fewer monocytes were recruited, and gene array analysis revealed attenuated expression of proangiogenic proteins in ischemic AMPKα2ΔMC hindlimbs. Many angiogenic growth factors are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induction was attenuated in AMPKα2-deficient cells and accompanied by its enhanced hydroxylation. Also, fewer proteins were regulated by hypoxia in neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Mechanistically, isocitrate dehydrogenase expression and the production of α-ketoglutarate, which negatively regulate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, were attenuated in neutrophils from wild-type mice but remained elevated in cells from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Conclusions: AMPKα2 regulates α-ketoglutarate generation, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, and neutrophil survival, which in turn determine further myeloid cell recruitment and repair potential. The activation of AMPKα2 in neutrophils is a decisive event in the initiation of vascular repair after ischemia. PMID:27777247

  2. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua; Liu, Wenjing; Guo, Jinlong; Wu, Ruqun; Chen, Hao; Wei, Junzhe

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10-3 s-1 and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10-2 s-1.

  3. Live cell imaging combined with high-energy single-ion microbeam

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Na; Du, Guanghua Liu, Wenjing; Wu, Ruqun; Wei, Junzhe; Guo, Jinlong; Chen, Hao

    2016-03-15

    DNA strand breaks can lead to cell carcinogenesis or cell death if not repaired rapidly and efficiently. An online live cell imaging system was established at the high energy microbeam facility at the Institute of Modern Physics to study early and fast cellular response to DNA damage after high linear energy transfer ion radiation. The HT1080 cells expressing XRCC1-RFP were irradiated with single high energy nickel ions, and time-lapse images of the irradiated cells were obtained online. The live cell imaging analysis shows that strand-break repair protein XRCC1 was recruited to the ion hit position within 20 s in the cells and formed bright foci in the cell nucleus. The fast recruitment of XRCC1 at the ion hits reached a maximum at about 200 s post-irradiation and then was followed by a slower release into the nucleoplasm. The measured dual-exponential kinetics of XRCC1 protein are consistent with the proposed consecutive reaction model, and the measurements obtained that the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 recruitment to DNA strand break is 1.2 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1} and the reaction rate constant of the XRCC1 release from the break-XRCC1 complex is 1.2 × 10{sup −2} s{sup −1}.

  4. Gallic acid induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair-associated protein expression in human oral cancer SCC-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shu-Wen; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Ji, Bin-Chuan; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Kuo-Ching; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Lin, Jing-Pin; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-04-01

    Gallic acid (GA), a phenolic compound naturally present in plants, used as an antioxidant additive in food and in the pharmaceutical industry, may have cancer chemopreventive properties. In the present study, we investigated whether GA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair-associated protein expression in human oral cancer SCC-4 cells. Flow cytometry assays were used to measure total viable cells and results indicated that GA decreased viable cells dose-dependently. The comet assay and 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining were used to measure DNA damage, as well as condensation and it was shown that GA induced DNA damage (comet tail) and DNA condensation in a dose-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine DNA fragmentation and we found that GA induced DNA ladder (fragmentation). Using western blotting it was shown that GA inhibited the protein expressions of MDC1, O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p-H2A.X, p53, DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK) and 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ) but increased p-p53, phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia (p-H2A.X) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (p-ATR), phosphate-ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM) and breast cancer susceptibility protein 1 (BRCA1) in a 24-h treatment. The protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy and results indicated that GA increased the levels of p-H2A.X, MDC1 and p-p53 in SCC-4 cells. In conclusion, we found that GA-induced cell death may proceed through the induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair-associated protein expression in SCC-4 cells. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. Roles for mismatch repair family proteins in promoting meiotic crossing over

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Carol M.; Alani, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The mismatch repair (MMR) family complexes Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 act with Exo1 and Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 in a meiotic double strand break repair pathway that results in the asymmetric cleavage of double Holliday junctions (dHJ) to form crossovers. This review discusses how meiotic roles for Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3 do not fit paradigms established for post-replicative MMR. We also outline models used to explain how these factors promote the formation of meiotic crossovers required for the accurate segregation of chromosome homologs during the Meiosis I division. PMID:26686657

  6. Variable continental distribution of polymorphisms in the coding regions of DNA-repair genes.

    PubMed

    Mathonnet, Géraldine; Labuda, Damian; Meloche, Caroline; Wambach, Tina; Krajinovic, Maja; Sinnett, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    DNA-repair pathways are critical for maintaining the integrity of the genetic material by protecting against mutations due to exposure-induced damages or replication errors. Polymorphisms in the corresponding genes may be relevant in genetic epidemiology by modifying individual cancer susceptibility or therapeutic response. We report data on the population distribution of potentially functional variants in XRCC1, APEX1, ERCC2, ERCC4, hMLH1, and hMSH3 genes among groups representing individuals of European, Middle Eastern, African, Southeast Asian and North American descent. The data indicate little interpopulation differentiation in some of these polymorphisms and typical FST values ranging from 10 to 17% at others. Low FST was observed in APEX1 and hMSH3 exon 23 in spite of their relatively high minor allele frequencies, which could suggest the effect of balancing selection. In XRCC1, hMSH3 exon 21 and hMLH1 Africa clusters either with Middle East and Europe or with Southeast Asia, which could be related to the demographic history of human populations, whereby human migrations and genetic drift rather than selection would account for the observed differences.

  7. Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Fahmideh, Maral Adel; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schüz, Joachim; Röösli, Martin; Tynes, Tore; Grotzer, Michael A.; Johansen, Christoffer; Kuehni, Claudia E; Lannering, Birgitta; Prochazka, Michaela; Schmidt, Lisbeth S; Feychting, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk. The study is based on the largest series of PBT cases to date. Saliva DNA from 245 cases and 489 controls, aged 7–19 years at diagnosis/reference date, was genotyped for 68 SNPs. Data were analyzed using unconditional logistic regression. The results showed EGFRrs730437 and EGFRrs11506105 may decrease susceptibility to PBTs, whereas ERCC1rs3212986 may increase risk of these tumors. Moreover, stratified analyses indicated CHAF1Ars243341, CHAF1Ars2992, and XRCC1rs25487 were associated with a decreased risk of astrocytoma subtype. Furthermore, an increased risk of non-astrocytoma subtype associated with EGFRrs9642393, EME1rs12450550, ATMrs170548, and GLTSCRrs1035938 as well as a decreased risk of this subtype associated with XRCC4rs7721416 and XRCC4rs2662242 were detected. This study indicates SNPs in EGFR, ERCC1, CHAF1A, XRCC1, EME1, ATM, GLTSCR1, and XRCC4 may be associated with the risk of PBTs. Therefore, cell cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways. PMID:27613841

  8. DNA binding properties of the actin-related protein Arp8 and its role in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, Akihisa; Takahashi, Yuichiro; Murakami, Hirokazu; Otawa, Kenji; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Oma, Yukako; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Shibahara, Kei-ich; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Harata, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Actin and actin-related proteins (Arps), which are members of the actin family, are essential components of many of these remodeling complexes. Actin, Arp4, Arp5, and Arp8 are found to be evolutionarily conserved components of the INO80 chromatin remodeling complex, which is involved in transcriptional regulation, DNA replication, and DNA repair. A recent report showed that Arp8 forms a module in the INO80 complex and this module can directly capture a nucleosome. In the present study, we showed that recombinant human Arp8 binds to DNAs, and preferentially binds to single-stranded DNA. Analysis of the binding of adenine nucleotides to Arp8 mutants suggested that the ATP-binding pocket, located in the evolutionarily conserved actin fold, plays a regulatory role in the binding of Arp8 to DNA. To determine the cellular function of Arp8, we derived tetracycline-inducible Arp8 knockout cells from a cultured human cell line. Analysis of results obtained after treating these cells with aphidicolin and camptothecin revealed that Arp8 is involved in DNA repair. Together with the previous observation that Arp8, but not γ-H2AX, is indispensable for recruiting INO80 complex to DSB in human, results of our study suggest an individual role for Arp8 in DNA repair.

  9. Identification of Polycomb Group Protein EZH2-Mediated DNA Mismatch Repair Gene MSH2 in Human Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Laknaur, Archana; Elam, Lelyand; Ismail, Nahed; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Lue, John; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-10-01

    Uterine fibroids (UFs) are benign smooth muscle neoplasms affecting up to 70% of reproductive age women. Treatment of symptomatic UFs places a significant economic burden on the US health-care system. Several specific genetic abnormalities have been described as etiologic factors of UFs, suggesting that a low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in the formation of UF. In this study, we used human fibroid and adjacent myometrial tissues, as well as an in vitro cell culture model, to evaluate the expression of MutS homolog 2 (MSH2), which encodes a protein belongs to the mismatch repair system. In addition, we deciphered the mechanism by which polycomb repressive complex 2 protein, EZH2, deregulates MSH2 in UFs. The RNA expression analysis demonstrated the deregulation of MSH2 expression in UF tissues in comparison to its adjacent myometrium. Notably, protein levels of MSH2 were upregulated in 90% of fibroid tissues (9 of 10) as compared to matched adjacent myometrial tissues. Human fibroid primary cells treated with 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep), chemical inhibitor of EZH2, exhibited a significant increase in MSH2 expression (P < .05). Overexpression of EZH2 using an adenoviral vector approach significantly downregulated the expression of MSH2 (P < .05). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that enrichment of H3K27me3 in promoter regions of MSH2 was significantly decreased in DZNep-treated fibroid cells as compared to vehicle control. These data suggest that EZH2-H3K27me3 regulatory mechanism dynamically changes the expression levels of DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, through epigenetic mark H3K27me3. MSH2 may be considered as a marker for early detection of UFs. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Distinct Roles of FANCO/RAD51C Protein in DNA Damage Signaling and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Somyajit, Kumar; Subramanya, Shreelakshmi; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    RAD51C, a RAD51 paralog, has been implicated in homologous recombination (HR), and germ line mutations in RAD51C are known to cause Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancers. The role of RAD51C in the FA pathway of DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair and as a tumor suppressor is obscure. Here, we report that RAD51C deficiency leads to ICL sensitivity, chromatid-type errors, and G2/M accumulation, which are hallmarks of the FA phenotype. We find that RAD51C is dispensable for ICL unhooking and FANCD2 monoubiquitination but is essential for HR, confirming the downstream role of RAD51C in ICL repair. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RAD51C plays a vital role in the HR-mediated repair of DNA lesions associated with replication. Finally, we show that RAD51C participates in ICL and double strand break-induced DNA damage signaling and controls intra-S-phase checkpoint through CHK2 activation. Our analyses with pathological mutants of RAD51C that were identified in FA and breast and ovarian cancers reveal that RAD51C regulates HR and DNA damage signaling distinctly. Together, these results unravel the critical role of RAD51C in the FA pathway of ICL repair and as a tumor suppressor. PMID:22167183

  11. Processing of a complex multiply damaged DNA site by human cell extracts and purified repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eot-Houllier, Grégory; Eon-Marchais, Séverine; Gasparutto, Didier; Sage, Evelyne

    2005-01-01

    Clustered DNA lesions, possibly induced by ionizing radiation, constitute a trial for repair processes. Indeed, recent studies suggest that repair of such lesions may be compromised, potentially leading to the formation of lethal double-strand breaks (DSBs). A complex multiply damaged site (MDS) composed of 8-oxoguanine and 8-oxoadenine on one strand, 5-hydroxyuracil, 5-formyluracil and a 1 nt gap on the other strand, within 17 bp was built and used to challenge several steps of base excision repair (BER) pathway with human whole-cell extracts and purified repair enzymes as well. We show a hierarchy in the processing of lesions within the MDS, in particular at the base excision step. In the present configuration, efficient excision of 5-hydroxyuracil and low cleavage at 8-oxoguanine prevent DSB formation and generate a short single-stranded region carrying the 8-oxoguanine. On the other hand, rejoining of the 1 nt gap occurs by the short-patch BER pathway, but is slightly retarded by the presence of the oxidized bases. Taken together, our results suggest a hierarchy in the processing of the lesions within the MDS, which prevents the formation of DSB, but would dramatically enhance mutagenesis. They also indicate that the mutagenic (or lethal) consequences of a complex MDS will largely depend on the first event in the processing of the MDS. PMID:15647508

  12. MET1 Is a Thylakoid-Associated TPR Protein Involved in Photosystem II Supercomplex Formation and Repair in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Nazmul H.; Friso, Giulia; Poliakov, Anton; Ponnala, Lalit

    2015-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) requires constant disassembly and reassembly to accommodate replacement of the D1 protein. Here, we characterize Arabidopsis thaliana MET1, a PSII assembly factor with PDZ and TPR domains. The maize (Zea mays) MET1 homolog is enriched in mesophyll chloroplasts compared with bundle sheath chloroplasts, and MET1 mRNA and protein levels increase during leaf development concomitant with the thylakoid machinery. MET1 is conserved in C3 and C4 plants and green algae but is not found in prokaryotes. Arabidopsis MET1 is a peripheral thylakoid protein enriched in stroma lamellae and is also present in grana. Split-ubiquitin assays and coimmunoprecipitations showed interaction of MET1 with stromal loops of PSII core components CP43 and CP47. From native gels, we inferred that MET1 associates with PSII subcomplexes formed during the PSII repair cycle. When grown under fluctuating light intensities, the Arabidopsis MET1 null mutant (met1) showed conditional reduced growth, near complete blockage in PSII supercomplex formation, and concomitant increase of unassembled CP43. Growth of met1 in high light resulted in loss of PSII supercomplexes and accelerated D1 degradation. We propose that MET1 functions as a CP43/CP47 chaperone on the stromal side of the membrane during PSII assembly and repair. This function is consistent with the observed differential MET1 accumulation across dimorphic maize chloroplasts. PMID:25587003

  13. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Abagyan, Ruben; An, Jianghong

    2005-08-12

    DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR&R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. We have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR&R process. The significant achievements of this project include: 1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR&R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR&R; 2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; and the development of a method to predict the effects of mutations. Large scale testing of technology to identify novel small binding pockets in protein structures leading to new DDRR inhibitor strategies 3) Improvements of macromolecular docking technology (see the CAPRI 1-3 and 4-5 results) 4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; 5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; 6) Producing 15 research papers (12 published and 3 in preparation).

  14. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  15. Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben A. Abagyan, PhD

    2004-04-15

    OAK-B135 DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR and R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. the authors have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR and R process. The significant achievements of this project include: (1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR and R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR and R; (2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; (3) Important improvement of macromolecular docking technology and its application to predict the DNA-Protein complex conformation; (4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; (5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; and (6) Producing 14 research papers (10 published and 4 in preparation).

  16. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  17. Ultraviolet-induced movement of the human DNA repair protein, xeroderma pigmentosum type G, in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.S.; Knauf, J.A.; Pendergrass, S.H.

    1996-08-06

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) is a human genetic disease exhibiting extreme sensitivity to sunlight. XPG patients are defective XPG endonuclease, which is an enzyme essential for DNA repair of the major kinds of solar ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damages. Here we describe a novel dynamics of this protein within the cell nucleus after UV irradiation of human cells. USing confocal microscopy, we have localized the immunofluorescent, antigenic signal of XPG protein to foci throughout the cell nucleus. Our biochemical studies also established that XPG protein forms a tight association with nuclear structure(s). In human skin fibroblast cells, the number of XPG foci decreased within 2 h after UV irradiation, whereas total nuclear XPG fluorescence intensity remained constant, suggesting redistribution of XPG from a limited number of nuclear foci to the nucleus overall. Within 8 h after UV, most XPG antigenic signal was found as foci. Using {beta}-galactosidase-XPG fusion constructs ({beta}-gal-XPG) transfected into HeLa cells, we have identified a single region of XPG that is evidently responsible both for foci formation and for the UV dynamic response. The fusion protein carrying the C terminus of XPG (amino acids 1146-1185) localized {beta}-gal specific antigenic signal to foci and to the nucleolus regions. After UV irradiation, antigenic {beta}-gal translocated reversibly from the subnuclear structures to the whole nucleus with kinetics very similar to the movements of XPG protein. These findings lead us to propose a model in which distribution of XPG protein may regulate the rate of DNA repair within transcriptionally active and inactive compartments of the cell nucleus. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual prote