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Sample records for repeated multilocus microsatellite

  1. Novel Polymorphic Multilocus Microsatellite Markers to Distinguish Candida tropicalis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sharon; Kong, Fanrong; Wang, He; Zhang, Li; Hou, Xin; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Candida tropicalis is an important pathogen. Here we developed and evaluated a polymorphic multilocus microsatellite scheme employing novel genetic markers for genotyping of C. tropicalis. Using 10 isolates from 10 unique (separate) patients to screen over 4000 tandem repeats from the C. tropicalis genome (strain MYA-3404), six new candidate microsatellite loci (ctm1, ctm3, ctm8, ctm18, ctm24 and ctm26) were selected according to amplification success, observed polymorphisms and stability of flanking regions by preliminary testing. Two known microsatellite loci CT14 and URA3 were also studied. The 6-locus scheme was then tested against a set of 82 different isolates from 32 patients. Microsatellite genotypes of isolates from the same patient (two to five isolates per patient) were identical. The six loci produced eight to 17 allele types and identified 11 to 24 genotypes amongst 32 patients’ isolates, achieving a discriminatory power (DP) of 0.76 to 0.97 (versus 0.78 for both CT14 and URA3 loci, respectively). Testing of a combination of only three loci, ctm1, ctm3 and ctm24, also achieved maximum typing efficiency (DP = 0.99, 29 genotypes). The microsatellite typing scheme had good correlation compared with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, although was slightly less discriminatory. The new six-locus microsatellite typing scheme is a potentially valuable tool for genotyping and investigating microevolution of C. tropicalis. PMID:27820850

  2. Extensive polymorphism in Cryptosporidium parvum identified by multilocus microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, X; Rich, S M; Akiyoshi, D; Tumwine, J K; Kekitiinwa, A; Nabukeera, N; Tzipori, S; Widmer, G

    2000-08-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequence analysis discern two main types of Cryptosporidium parvum. We present a survey of length polymorphism at several microsatellite loci for type 1 and type 2 isolates. A total of 14 microsatellite loci were identified from C. parvum DNA sequences deposited in public databases. All repeats were mono-, di-, and trinucleotide repeats of A, AT, and AAT, reflecting the high AT content of the C. parvum genome. Several of these loci showed significant length polymorphism, with as many as seven alleles identified for a single locus. Differences between alleles ranged from 1 to 27 bp. Karyotype analysis using probes flanking three microsatellites localized each marker to an individual chromosomal band, suggesting that these markers are single copy. In a sample of 19 isolates for which at least three microsatellites were typed, a majority of isolates displayed a unique multilocus fingerprint. Microsatellite analysis of isolates passaged between different host species identified genotypic changes consistent with changes in parasite populations.

  3. Multilocus microsatellite typing of Leishmania and clinical applications: a review

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Srikanth; Hide, Mallorie; Michel, Gregory; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Marty, Pierre; Pomares, Christelle

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers have been used for Leishmania genetic studies worldwide, giving useful insight into leishmaniasis epidemiology. Understanding the geographic distribution, dynamics of Leishmania populations, and disease epidemiology improved markedly with this tool. In endemic foci, the origins of antimony-resistant strains and multidrug treatment failures were explored with multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT). High genetic variability was detected but no association between parasite genotypes and drug resistance was established. An association between MLMT profiles and clinical disease manifestations was highlighted in only three studies and this data needs further confirmation. At the individual level, MLMT provided information on relapse and reinfection when multiple leishmaniasis episodes occurred. This information could improve knowledge of epidemiology and guide therapeutic choices for active chronic visceral leishmaniasis, the disease form in some HIV-positive patients. PMID:25950900

  4. Typing Candida Species Using Microsatellite Length Polymorphism and Multilocus Sequence Typing.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    To gain more insight into the epidemiological relationships between isolates of Candida spp. obtained from various origins, several molecular typing techniques have been developed. Two methods have emerged in the 2000s as soon as enough knowledge of the Candida spp. genomes was available to choose adequate loci and primers, namely microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). To contrast with previous PCR-based methods, specific amplifications with stringent conditions easily reproducible are the basis of MLP and MLST. MLST relies on Sanger sequencing to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms within housekeeping genes. MLP needs a first in silico step to select tandemly repeated stretches of two to five nucleotides. One of the two primers used to amplify a microsatellite locus is labeled and fragment sizing is automatically performed using high-resolution electrophoresis platforms. MLST provides results easily comparable between laboratories and active MLST schemes are publicly available for the main Candida species. For comparative studies, MLP needs standards to compensate for the electrophoretic variations depending on the platforms used. Both methods can help us gain insight into the genetic relatedness of fungal isolates, both with advantages and drawbacks, and the choice of one method rather than the other depends on the task in question.

  5. Triplet-repeat microsatellites shared among hard and soft pines.

    PubMed

    Kutil, B L; Williams, C G

    2001-01-01

    Vascular plant species have shown a low level of microsatellite conservation compared to many animal species. Finding trans-specific microsatellites for plants may be improved by using a priori knowledge of genome organization. Fifteen triplet-repeat microsatellites from hard pine (Pinus taeda L.) were tested for trans-specific amplification across seven hard pines (P. palustris Mill., P. echinata Mill., P. radiata D. Don., P. patula Schiede et Deppe, P. halepensis Mill., P. kesiya Royle), a soft pine (P. strobus L.), and Picea rubens Sargent. Seven of 15 microsatellites had trans-specific amplification in both hard and soft pine subgenera. Two P. taeda microsatellites had conserved flanking regions and repeat motifs in all seven hard pines, soft pine P. strobus, and P. rubens. Perfect triplet-repeat P. taeda microsatellites appear to be better candidates for trans-specific polymorphism than compound microsatellites. Not all perfect triplet-repeat microsatellites were conserved, but all conserved microsatellites had perfect repeat motifs. Persistent microsatellites PtTX2123 and PtTX3020 had highly conserved flanking regions and a conserved repeat motif composition with variable repeat unit numbers. Using trinucleotide microsatellites improved trans-specific microsatellite recovery among hard and soft pine species.

  6. Moroccan Leishmania infantum: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure as Revealed by Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Lemrani, Meryem; Mouna, Idrissi; Mohammed, Hida; Mostafa, Sabri; Rhajaoui, Mohamed; Hamarsheh, Omar; Schönian, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania infantum causes Visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis in northern Morocco. It predominantly affects children under 5 years with incidence of 150 cases/year. Genetic variability and population structure have been investigated for 33 strains isolated from infected dogs and humans in Morocco. A multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) approach was used in which a MLMtype based on size variation in 14 independent microsatellite markers was compiled for each strain. MLMT profiles of 10 Tunisian, 10 Algerian and 21 European strains which belonged to zymodeme MON-1 and non-MON-1 according to multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) were included for comparison. A Bayesian model-based approach and phylogenetic analysis inferred two L.infantum sub-populations; Sub-population A consists of 13 Moroccan strains grouped with all European strains of MON-1 type; and sub-population B consists of 15 Moroccan strains grouped with the Tunisian and Algerian MON-1 strains. Theses sub-populations were significantly different from each other and from the Tunisian, Algerian and European non MON-1 strains which constructed one separate population. The presence of these two sub-populations co-existing in Moroccan endemics suggests multiple introduction of L. infantum from/to Morocco; (1) Introduction from/to the neighboring North African countries, (2) Introduction from/to the Europe. These scenarios are supported by the presence of sub-population B and sub-population A respectively. Gene flow was noticed between sub-populations A and B. Five strains showed mixed A/B genotypes indicating possible recombination between the two populations. MLMT has proven to be a powerful tool for eco-epidemiological and population genetic investigations of Leishmania. PMID:24147078

  7. Multilocus Microsatellite Typing as a New Tool for Discrimination of Leishmania infantum MON-1 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Kuhls, Katrin; Schaar, Matthias; Presber, Wolfgang; Schönian, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    The Leishmania donovani complex, which consists of L. donovani, L. infantum-L. chagasi, and L. archibaldi, is responsible for visceral manifestations of leishmaniasis. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis is the standard method for the characterization and identification of strains of Leishmania. For L. infantum, the predominance of zymodeme MON-1 significantly reduces the discriminative power of this approach. In the present study, we developed 17 independent polymorphic microsatellite markers for the typing of strains of L. infantum, with the main emphasis on zymodeme MON-1. The discriminative powers of 11 markers selected from among these markers were tested by using a panel of 63 isolates of the L. donovani complex. Unique multilocus genotypes were observed for the strains analyzed, with only three exceptions. Model-based and distance-based analyses of the data set showed comparable results. It was possible to discriminate between L. donovani sensu stricto, a non-MON-1 group of L. infantum isolates, and a MON-1 group of L. infantum isolates. Within MON-1, three clusters with geographical correlations became apparent. The frequency of heterozygosity in the alleles analyzed varied extremely between the different groups of isolates. The main clusters described are not consistent with species definitions based on isoenzyme analysis but confirm the results of former PCR-based investigations. PMID:16455904

  8. Vectorette PCR isolation of microsatellite repeat sequences using anchored dinucleotide repeat primers.

    PubMed Central

    Lench, N J; Norris, A; Bailey, A; Booth, A; Markham, A F

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a vectorette PCR approach to provide an improved method for isolation of microsatellite repeats. The modified procedure relies on PCR amplification using a vectorette-specific primer in combination with one of a panel of anchored dinucleotide repeat primers. The target DNA to be screened for microsatellite sequences can be from YAC, P1, cosmid, bacteriophage or plasmid clones. We have used this technique to isolate novel, polymorphic microsatellite repeats from clones containing the amelogenin gene (AMGX) located on human chromosome Xp22.3. PMID:8668553

  9. Development of a tandem repeat-based multilocus typing system distinguishing Babesia bovis geographic isolates.

    PubMed

    Perez-Llaneza, Agustina; Caballero, Marina; Baravalle, Eugenia; Mesplet, Maria; Mosqueda, Juan; Suarez, Carlos E; Echaide, Ignacio; Katzer, Frank; Pacheco, Gabriela M; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Schnittger, Leonhard

    2010-02-10

    Mini- and microsatellite sequences have proven to be excellent tools for the differentiation of strains and populations in several protozoan parasites due to their high variability. In the present work we have searched the genome of the tick-transmitted bovine hemoprotozoon Babesia bovis for tandem repeats (TRs) that could be useful for a multilocus typing system. Hundred and nineteen sequences were shortlisted and tested in five common B. bovis reference isolates originating from distinct geographic locations of North and South America: Texas, USA (T2Bo), Mexico (RAD and Mo7), and Santa Fe and Salta, Argentina (R1A and S2P, respectively). Satellite sequences were PCR-amplified using specific primers, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, visualized by silver staining and sized. Fourteen TR sequences could be reliably amplified in all isolates and displayed length polymorphism. All primers used were specific for B. bovis and did not amplify genomic DNA from the bovine host or from Babesia bigemina, the principal co-infecting bovine parasite in the Americas, allowing their future use in field surveys. The 14 satellite markers identified are distributed throughout the four chromosomes of B. bovis as follows: chromosome 1 (n=3), chromosome 2 (n=2), chromosome 3 (n=5), and chromosome 4 (n=4). Within the five B. bovis isolates we identified nine satellite marker loci with two alleles, three with three alleles, one with four and another with five alleles. In comparison to Theileria parva, a bovine hemoprotozoan that pertains to the same piroplasmida order and own a genome of similar size, the number of polymorphic TRs and the average number of alleles per TR locus seem to be significantly reduced in the B. bovis genome. Furthermore, the ratio of micro- to minisatellites in both B. bovis and T. parva is considerably lower than in other eukaryotes, as confirmed by bioinformatic analysis. The multilocus genotype of the five B. bovis isolates was assessed and the

  10. Comparison of microsatellite length polymorphism and multilocus sequence typing for DNA-Based typing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Cabaret, Odile; Lecellier, Gael; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Hoinard, Damien; Raoux, Dorothée; Costa, Jean-Marc; Dromer, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2007-12-01

    For genotyping Candida albicans isolates, two PCR-based methods have recently emerged: multilocus sequence typing (MLST), based on the sequence of selected genes, and microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP), based on the length of PCR products containing variable numbers of short DNA repeats. To compare the two methods in their abilities to differentiate and group C. albicans isolates, we selected 50 independent isolates collected at the National Reference Center for Mycoses and Antifungals. MLST typing was performed using sequencing of seven loci as described at (http://test1.mlst.net). The MLP method consisted of a single multiplex PCR testing three different loci. Dendrograms were constructed by the unweighted pair group cluster method with Euclidean metric for both methods. The correlation between the distance matrices was performed with a Mantel test tested with 1,000 random permutations. The sensitivity and specificity of the MLP typing system were determined after allocating MLST groups for the greater number of isolates of each distinct MLP group. The discriminatory power index was >0.99, and the distances between the isolates were highly correlated with both systems. The Mantel coefficient and the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient were 35,699 and 0.32, respectively (P < or = 1.2 x 10(-6)). Using MLP, the average specificity and sensitivity of clustering compared to MLST were 83% and 73%, respectively, when the singletons were excluded. The two methods are similarly discriminatory and can be interchangeable depending on the objectives. MLP is less expensive and faster than MLST. However, MLST is currently more accurate and additional standardization is needed for MLP.

  11. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Leishmania infantum from Southeastern France: Evaluation Using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Christelle; Marty, Pierre; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Pratlong, Francine; Faucher, Benoît; Jeddi, Fakhri; Moore, Sandy; Michel, Grégory; Aluru, Srikanth; Piarroux, Renaud; Hide, Mallorie

    2016-01-01

    In the south of France, Leishmania infantum is responsible for numerous cases of canine leishmaniasis (CanL), sporadic cases of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) and rare cases of cutaneous and muco-cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL and MCL, respectively). Several endemic areas have been clearly identified in the south of France including the Pyrénées-Orientales, Cévennes (CE), Provence (P), Alpes-Maritimes (AM) and Corsica (CO). Within these endemic areas, the two cities of Nice (AM) and Marseille (P), which are located 150 km apart, and their surroundings, concentrate the greatest number of French autochthonous leishmaniasis cases. In this study, 270 L. infantum isolates from an extended time period (1978–2011) from four endemic areas, AM, P, CE and CO, were assessed using Multi-Locus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT). MLMT revealed a total of 121 different genotypes with 91 unique genotypes and 30 repeated genotypes. Substantial genetic diversity was found with a strong genetic differentiation between the Leishmania populations from AM and P. However, exchanges were observed between these two endemic areas in which it seems that strains spread from AM to P. The genetic differentiations in these areas suggest strong epidemiological structuring. A model-based analysis using STRUCTURE revealed two main populations: population A (consisting of samples primarily from the P and AM endemic areas with MON-1 and non-MON-1 strains) and population B consisting of only MON-1 strains essentially from the AM endemic area. For four patients, we observed several isolates from different biological samples which provided insight into disease relapse and re-infection. These findings shed light on the transmission dynamics of parasites in humans. However, further data are required to confirm this hypothesis based on a limited sample set. This study represents the most extensive population analysis of L. infantum strains using MLMT conducted in France. PMID:26808522

  12. Low abundance of microsatellite repeats in the genome of the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longmire, J.L.; Hahn, D.C.; Roach, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    A cosmid library made from brown-headed cowbird (Molothrus ater) DNA was examined for representation of 17 distinct microsatellite motifs including all possible mono-, di-, and trinucleotide microsatellites, and the tetranucleotide repeat (GATA)n. The overall density of microsatellites within cowbird DNA was found to be one repeat per 89 kb and the frequency of the most abundant motif, (AGC)n, was once every 382 kb. The abundance of microsatellites within the cowbird genome is estimated to be reduced approximately 15-fold compared to humans. The reduced frequency of microsatellites seen in this study is consistent with previous observations indicating reduced numbers of microsatellites and other interspersed repeats in avian DNA. In addition to providing new information concerning the abundance of microsatellites within an avian genome, these results provide useful insights for selecting cloning strategies that might be used in the development of locus-specific microsatellite markers for avian studies.

  13. Discrepancy variation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huan; Cai, Shengli; Yan, Binlun; Chen, Baiyao; Yu, Fei

    2009-01-01

    To address whether there are differences of variation among repeat motif types and among taxonomic groups, we present here an analysis of variation and correlation of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats in eukaryotic genomes. Ten taxonomic groups were compared, those being primates, mammalia (excluding primates and rodentia), rodentia, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles, insects, molluscs, plants and fungi, respectively. The data used in the analysis is from the literature published in the Journal of Molecular Ecology Notes. Analysis of variation reveals that there are no significant differences between AC and AG repeat motif types. Moreover, the number of alleles correlates positively with the copy number in both AG and AC repeats. Similar conclusions can be obtained from each taxonomic group. These results strongly suggest that the increase of SSR variation is almost linear with the increase of the copy number of each repeat motif. As well, the results suggest that the variability of SSR in the genomes of low-ranking species seem to be more than that of high-ranking species, excluding primates and fungi.

  14. Efficient isolation of polymorphic microsatellites from high-throughput sequence data based on number of repeats.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sara D; Gonçalves, David; Robalo, Joana I; Almada, Vitor C; Canário, Adelino V M; Oliveira, Rui F

    2013-09-01

    Transcriptome data are a good resource to develop microsatellites due to their potential in targeting candidate genes. However, developing microsatellites can be a time-consuming enterprise due to the numerous primer pairs to be tested. Therefore, the use of methodologies that make it efficient to identify polymorphic microsatellites is desirable. Here we used a 62,038 contigs transcriptome assembly, obtained from pyrosequencing a peacock blenny (Salaria pavo) multi-tissue cDNA library, to mine for microsatellites and in silico evaluation of their polymorphism. A total of 4190 microsatellites were identified in 3670 unique unigenes, and from these microsatellites, in silico polymorphism was detected in 733. We selected microsatellites based either on their in silico polymorphism and annotation results or based only on their number of repeats. Using these two approaches, 28 microsatellites were successfully amplified in twenty-six individuals, and all but 2 were found to be polymorphic, being the first genetic markers for this species. Our results showed that the strategy of selection based on number of repeats is more efficient in obtaining polymorphic microsatellites than the strategy of in silico polymorphism (allelic richness was 8.2±3.85 and 4.56±2.45 respectively). This study demonstrates that combining the knowledge of number of repeats with other predictors of variability, for example in silico microsatellite polymorphism, improves the rates of polymorphism, yielding microsatellites with higher allelic richness, and decreases the number of monomorphic microsatellites obtained.

  15. Genomic DNA repeat from Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis (Venezuelan strain) containing simple repeats and microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, N; De Lima, H; Rodriguez, A; Brewster, S; Barker, D C

    1997-10-01

    In this paper the Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis complex is defined as containing all species of the actual subgenus Viannia. Organisms of the L. (V) braziliensis complex are the causative agents of localized human cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis in South America, much of Central America and some ares of North America. In our search for better species and subspecies diagnostic probes we focused our research on repetitive DNA, since it provides a greater number of target sites for hybridization. In this work we report the isolation and sequencing of a 1.8 kb DNA region, LbJ38, which is probably tandemly repeated or dispersed at least 4 times along one chromosome and is naturally present in L. (V) braziliensis genomic DNA. This region contains microsatellites and simple repeat DNA sequences and was isolated by screening a genomic DNA cosmid library with complex- and species-specific probes. No homology was found with other Leishmania microsatellite or repetitive DNA. The utility of this repetitive sequence and primers derived from it in the identification of L. (V) braziliensis is demonstrated. As far as we are aware, this is the first report of sequence characterized repetitive microsatellite and GC rich simple repeat DNA from the nuclear genome of New World Leishmania.

  16. Microsatellite Tandem Repeats Are Abundant in Human Promoters and Are Associated with Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Sterling; Bagshaw, Andrew; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Kumar, Pankaj; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Black, Michael A.; Gemmell, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Tandem repeats are genomic elements that are prone to changes in repeat number and are thus often polymorphic. These sequences are found at a high density at the start of human genes, in the gene’s promoter. Increasing empirical evidence suggests that length variation in these tandem repeats can affect gene regulation. One class of tandem repeats, known as microsatellites, rapidly alter in repeat number. Some of the genetic variation induced by microsatellites is known to result in phenotypic variation. Recently, our group developed a novel method for measuring the evolutionary conservation of microsatellites, and with it we discovered that human microsatellites near transcription start sites are often highly conserved. In this study, we examined the properties of microsatellites found in promoters. We found a high density of microsatellites at the start of genes. We showed that microsatellites are statistically associated with promoters using a wavelet analysis, which allowed us to test for associations on multiple scales and to control for other promoter related elements. Because promoter microsatellites tend to be G/C rich, we hypothesized that G/C rich regulatory elements may drive the association between microsatellites and promoters. Our results indicate that CpG islands, G-quadruplexes (G4) and untranslated regulatory regions have highly significant associations with microsatellites, but controlling for these elements in the analysis does not remove the association between microsatellites and promoters. Due to their intrinsic lability and their overlap with predicted functional elements, these results suggest that many promoter microsatellites have the potential to affect human phenotypes by generating mutations in regulatory elements, which may ultimately result in disease. We discuss the potential functions of human promoter microsatellites in this context. PMID:23405090

  17. Microsatellite tandem repeats are abundant in human promoters and are associated with regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Sterling; Bagshaw, Andrew; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Kumar, Pankaj; Chowdhury, Shantanu; Black, Michael A; Gemmell, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Tandem repeats are genomic elements that are prone to changes in repeat number and are thus often polymorphic. These sequences are found at a high density at the start of human genes, in the gene's promoter. Increasing empirical evidence suggests that length variation in these tandem repeats can affect gene regulation. One class of tandem repeats, known as microsatellites, rapidly alter in repeat number. Some of the genetic variation induced by microsatellites is known to result in phenotypic variation. Recently, our group developed a novel method for measuring the evolutionary conservation of microsatellites, and with it we discovered that human microsatellites near transcription start sites are often highly conserved. In this study, we examined the properties of microsatellites found in promoters. We found a high density of microsatellites at the start of genes. We showed that microsatellites are statistically associated with promoters using a wavelet analysis, which allowed us to test for associations on multiple scales and to control for other promoter related elements. Because promoter microsatellites tend to be G/C rich, we hypothesized that G/C rich regulatory elements may drive the association between microsatellites and promoters. Our results indicate that CpG islands, G-quadruplexes (G4) and untranslated regulatory regions have highly significant associations with microsatellites, but controlling for these elements in the analysis does not remove the association between microsatellites and promoters. Due to their intrinsic lability and their overlap with predicted functional elements, these results suggest that many promoter microsatellites have the potential to affect human phenotypes by generating mutations in regulatory elements, which may ultimately result in disease. We discuss the potential functions of human promoter microsatellites in this context.

  18. Multilocus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT) of Strains from Turkey and Cyprus Reveals a Novel Monophyletic L. donovani Sensu Lato Group

    PubMed Central

    Amro, Ahmad; Mentis, Andreas; Pratlong, Francine; Dedet, Jean-Pierre; Votypka, Jan; Volf, Petr; Ozensoy Toz, Seray; Kuhls, Katrin; Schönian, Gabriele; Soteriadou, Ketty

    2012-01-01

    Background New foci of human CL caused by strains of the Leishmania donovani (L. donovani) complex have been recently described in Cyprus and the Çukurova region in Turkey (L. infantum) situated 150 km north of Cyprus. Cypriot strains were typed by Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis (MLEE) using the Montpellier (MON) system as L. donovani zymodeme MON-37. However, multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT) has shown that this zymodeme is paraphyletic; composed of distantly related genetic subgroups of different geographical origin. Consequently the origin of the Cypriot strains remained enigmatic. Methodology/Principal Findings The Cypriot strains were compared with a set of Turkish isolates obtained from a CL patient and sand fly vectors in south-east Turkey (Çukurova region; CUK strains) and from a VL patient in the south-west (Kuşadasi; EP59 strain). These Turkish strains were initially analyzed using the K26-PCR assay that discriminates MON-1 strains by their amplicon size. In line with previous DNA-based data, the strains were inferred to the L. donovani complex and characterized as non MON-1. For these strains MLEE typing revealed two novel zymodemes; L. donovani MON-309 (CUK strains) and MON-308 (EP59). A population genetic analysis of the Turkish isolates was performed using 14 hyper-variable microsatellite loci. The genotypic profiles of 68 previously analyzed L. donovani complex strains from major endemic regions were included for comparison. Population structures were inferred by combination of Bayesian model-based and distance-based approaches. MLMT placed the Turkish and Cypriot strains in a subclade of a newly discovered, genetically distinct L. infantum monophyletic group, suggesting that the Cypriot strains may originate from Turkey. Conclusion The discovery of a genetically distinct L. infantum monophyletic group in the south-eastern Mediterranean stresses the importance of species genetic characterization towards better understanding, monitoring

  19. Population genetics of Leishmania (Leishmania) major DNA isolated from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients in Pakistan based on multilocus microsatellite typing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major and fast increasing public health problem, both among the local Pakistani populations and the Afghan refugees in camps. Leishmania (Leishmania) major is one of the etiological agents responsible for CL in Pakistan. Genetic variability and population structure have been investigated for 66 DNA samples of L. (L.) major isolated from skin biopsy of CL patients. Methods Multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT), employing 10 independent genetic markers specific to L. (L.) major, was used to investigate the genetic polymorphisms and population structures of Pakistani L. (L.) major DNA isolated from CL human cases. Their microsatellite profiles were compared to those of 130 previously typed strains of L. (L.) major from various geographical localities. Results All the markers were polymorphic and fifty-one MLMT profiles were recognized among the 66 L. (L.) major DNA samples. The data displayed significant microsatellite polymorphisms with rare allelic heterozygosities. A Bayesian model-based approach and phylogenetic analysis inferred two L. (L.) major populations in Pakistan. Thirty-four samples belonged to one population and the remaining 32 L. (L.) major samples grouped together into another population. The two Pakistani L. (L.) major populations formed separate clusters, which differ genetically from the populations of L. (L.) major from Central Asia, Iran, Middle East and Africa. Conclusions The considerable genetic variability of L. (L.) major might be related to the existence of different species of sand fly and/or rodent reservoir host in Sindh province, Pakistan. A comprehensive study of the epidemiology of CL including the situation or spreading of reservoirs and sand fly vectors in these foci is, therefore, warranted. PMID:25030377

  20. Assessment of population genetic structure in the arbovirus vector midge, Culicoides brevitarsis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), using multi-locus DNA microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Maria G; Beebe, Nigel W; Gopurenko, David; Bellis, Glenn; Nicholas, Adrian; Ogugo, Moses; Djikeng, Appolinaire; Kemp, Steve; Walker, Peter J; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard

    2015-09-25

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a major pathogen of ruminants that is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.). Australian BTV serotypes have origins in Asia and are distributed across the continent into two distinct episystems, one in the north and another in the east. Culicoides brevitarsis is the major vector of BTV in Australia and is distributed across the entire geographic range of the virus. Here, we describe the isolation and use of DNA microsatellites and gauge their ability to determine population genetic connectivity of C. brevitarsis within Australia and with countries to the north. Eleven DNA microsatellite markers were isolated using a novel genomic enrichment method and identified as useful for genetic analyses of sampled populations in Australia, northern Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Timor-Leste. Significant (P < 0.05) population genetic subdivision was observed between all paired regions, though the highest levels of genetic sub-division involved pair-wise tests with PNG (PNG vs. Australia (FST = 0.120) and PNG vs. Timor-Leste (FST = 0.095)). Analysis of multi-locus allelic distributions using STRUCTURE identified a most probable two-cluster population model, which separated PNG specimens from a cluster containing specimens from Timor-Leste and Australia. The source of incursions of this species in Australia is more likely to be Timor-Leste than PNG. Future incursions of BTV positive C. brevitarsis into Australia may be genetically identified to their source populations using these microsatellite loci. The vector's panmictic genetic structure within Australia cannot explain the differential geographic distribution of BTV serotypes.

  1. Variogram Analysis of the Spatial Genetic Structure of Continuous Populations Using Multilocus Microsatellite Data

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Helene H.; Holderegger, Rolf; Werth, Silke; Gugerli, Felix; Hoebee, Susan E.; Scheidegger, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    A geostatistical perspective on spatial genetic structure may explain methodological issues of quantifying spatial genetic structure and suggest new approaches to addressing them. We use a variogram approach to (i) derive a spatial partitioning of molecular variance, gene diversity, and genotypic diversity for microsatellite data under the infinite allele model (IAM) and the stepwise mutation model (SMM), (ii) develop a weighting of sampling units to reflect ploidy levels or multiple sampling of genets, and (iii) show how variograms summarize the spatial genetic structure within a population under isolation-by-distance. The methods are illustrated with data from a population of the epiphytic lichen Lobaria pulmonaria, using six microsatellite markers. Variogram-based analysis not only avoids bias due to the underestimation of population variance in the presence of spatial autocorrelation, but also provides estimates of population genetic diversity and the degree and extent of spatial genetic structure accounting for autocorrelation. PMID:15654102

  2. Multilocus microsatellite typing shows three different genetic clusters of Leishmania major in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mahnaz, Tashakori; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Kuhls, Katrin; Schönian, Gabriele

    2011-10-01

    Ten polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to analyse 25 strains of Leishmania major collected from cutaneous leishmaniasis cases in different endemic areas in Iran. Nine of the markers were polymorphic, revealing 21 different genotypes. The data displayed significant microsatellite polymorphism with rare allelic heterozygosity. Bayesian statistic and distance based analyses identified three genetic clusters among the 25 strains analysed. Cluster I represented mainly strains isolated in the west and south-west of Iran, with the exception of four strains originating from central Iran. Cluster II comprised strains from the central part of Iran, and cluster III included only strains from north Iran. The geographical distribution of L. major in Iran was supported by comparing the microsatellite profiles of the 25 Iranian strains to those of 105 strains collected in 19 Asian and African countries. The Iranian clusters I and II were separated from three previously described populations comprising strains from Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia whereas cluster III grouped together with the Central Asian population. The considerable genetic variability of L. major might be related to the existence of different populations of Phlebotomus papatasi and/or to differences in reservoir host abundance in different parts of Iran. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Multilocus microsatellite analysis of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' associated with citrus Huanglongbing worldwide.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md-Sajedul; Glynn, Jonathan M; Bai, Yang; Duan, Yong-Ping; Coletta-Filho, Helvecio D; Kuruba, Gopal; Civerolo, Edwin L; Lin, Hong

    2012-03-20

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive citrus diseases in the world. The disease is associated with the presence of a fastidious, phloem-limited α- proteobacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. Liberibacter africanus' or 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus'. HLB-associated Liberibacters have spread to North America and South America in recent years. While the causal agents of HLB have been putatively identified, information regarding the worldwide population structure and epidemiological relationships for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is limited. The availability of the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome sequence has facilitated development of molecular markers from this bacterium. The objectives of this study were to develop microsatellite markers and conduct genetic analyses of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' from a worldwide collection. Two hundred eighty seven isolates from USA (Florida), Brazil, China, India, Cambodia, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, and Japan were analyzed. A panel of seven polymorphic microsatellite markers was developed for 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. Microsatellite analyses across the samples showed that the genetic diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is higher in Asia than Americas. UPGMA and STRUCTURE analyses identified three major genetic groups worldwide. Isolates from India were genetically distinct. East-southeast Asian and Brazilian isolates were generally included in the same group; a few members of this group were found in Florida, but the majority of the isolates from Florida were clustered separately. eBURST analysis predicted three founder haplotypes, which may have given rise to three groups worldwide. Our results identified three major genetic groups of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' worldwide. Isolates from Brazil showed similar genetic makeup with east-southeast Asian dominant group, suggesting the possibility of a common origin. However, most of the isolates recovered from Florida were clustered in a separate group. While the sources of the dominant 'Ca. L

  4. Multilocus microsatellite analysis of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' associated with citrus Huanglongbing worldwide

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive citrus diseases in the world. The disease is associated with the presence of a fastidious, phloem-limited α- proteobacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. Liberibacter africanus' or 'Ca. Liberibacter americanus'. HLB-associated Liberibacters have spread to North America and South America in recent years. While the causal agents of HLB have been putatively identified, information regarding the worldwide population structure and epidemiological relationships for 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is limited. The availability of the 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome sequence has facilitated development of molecular markers from this bacterium. The objectives of this study were to develop microsatellite markers and conduct genetic analyses of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' from a worldwide collection. Two hundred eighty seven isolates from USA (Florida), Brazil, China, India, Cambodia, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, and Japan were analyzed. Results A panel of seven polymorphic microsatellite markers was developed for 'Ca. L. asiaticus'. Microsatellite analyses across the samples showed that the genetic diversity of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' is higher in Asia than Americas. UPGMA and STRUCTURE analyses identified three major genetic groups worldwide. Isolates from India were genetically distinct. East-southeast Asian and Brazilian isolates were generally included in the same group; a few members of this group were found in Florida, but the majority of the isolates from Florida were clustered separately. eBURST analysis predicted three founder haplotypes, which may have given rise to three groups worldwide. Conclusions Our results identified three major genetic groups of 'Ca. L. asiaticus' worldwide. Isolates from Brazil showed similar genetic makeup with east-southeast Asian dominant group, suggesting the possibility of a common origin. However, most of the isolates recovered from Florida were clustered in a separate group. While the sources

  5. Microsatellite repeat instability: Comparison of molecular lesions with tumor karyotype

    SciTech Connect

    Worsham, M.J.; Benninger, M.S.; Zarbo, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite repeat (MR) instability (MRI) (expansion or contraction of one or both alleles) has been observed in hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer, gastric cancers, non-small cell lung, endometrial, breast and bladder cancers, and occasionally in squamous cell carcinomas in the head and neck region (SCCHN). Of 44 SCCHN studied for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at MR loci, only HFH-SCC-20 exhibited extensive MRI. Tumor HFH-SCC-20 was a T4N3MO deeply invasive, poorly differentiated SCCHN of the right tonsillar fossa and base of tongue. The tumor karyotypes obtained from early cultures (7 and 10 day harvests) were: 46,XY,del(3)(p11p24),+i(5p),del(11)(q14q25),del(13)(q13),del(14)(q21),der(16)t(16,21)(q11;q21),-21[9]/92,idemx2[3], with net loss of the chromosomal segments 3p11-p24, 11q14-q25, 13q13-qter, 14q21-qter,16q11-qter, and 21pter-q21. The patient`s constitutional karyotype was 46,XY. Tumor and normal lymphocyte DNA from this patient were compared using 20 MRs on 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 9q, 18q, and 21q. The results were informative at 19 MR loci: 14 had MR1, two had LOH, and 3 retained heterozygosity. Expansion of one allele was observed at 10 MR loci and of both alleles at the D9S200 locus, D9S199 and D21S11 exhibited expansion of one allele and contraction of the other; and D8S897 exhibited LOH with expansion of the remaining allele. The LOH at the L1B3-15CA locus (at 3p21), and the absence of LOH at loci on 5q, 9p, 18q, and 21q are consistent with the karyotypic interpretation. LOH for the ABL (9q34) and D8S87 (8p22-cen) suggests that a submicroscopic deletion or other genetic change occurred at these loci. The pattern of genomic and cytogenetic alteration in HFH-SCC-20 indicates that (1) MR1 is not associated with visible cytogenetic alterations at the same site, (2) MR1 is the primary mechanism of mutation in some SCCHN tumors, and (3) patterns of MR1 and LOH will provide clues for tumor behavior and evolution.

  6. GENETIC VARIATION IN MULTILOCUS MICROSATELLITE GENOTYPES IN TWO SPECIES OF WOODRATS (NEOTOMA MACROTIS AND N. FUSCIPES) FROM CALIFORNIA

    PubMed Central

    Haynie, Michelle L.; Fulhorst, Charles F.; Rood, Michael; Bennett, Stephen G.; Hess, Barry D.; Bradley, ROBERT D.

    2009-01-01

    Five microsatellite loci were used to develop multilocus genotypes for Neotoma macrotis (n = 128) and N. fuscipes (n = 29). Several statistical analyses were used to estimate genetic structure, levels of genetic variability, and degree of relatedness within groups of these 2 species. Samples of N. macrotis represented 2 groups and 4 population clusters throughout southern California. Samples of N. fuscipes represented 2 regions in northern and southern California. Genetic structure was detected among samples of N. macrotis and N. fuscipes at a regional level. Both species displayed moderate to high genetic diversity in terms of mean expected heterozygosity (0.939 and 0.804 for N. macrotis and N. fuscipes, respectively) and mean polymorphic information content (0.930 and 0.761 for N. macrotis and N. fuscipes, respectively). Mean relatedness values within regions and populations of N. macrotis indicated 4th-order levels of relatedness within groups (e.g., distant-cousin relationships). Mean relatedness values within regions of N. fuscipes indicated 2nd-order (e.g., half-sibling) relationships within the northern region and 3rd-order (e.g., cousin) relationships in the southern region. One locus in particular (Nma04) was determined to be diagnostic in distinguishing between these 2 species. PMID:19920871

  7. Multilocus Microsatellite Typing reveals intra-focal genetic diversity among strains of Leishmania tropica in Chichaoua Province, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Krayter, Lena; Alam, Mohammad Zahangir; Rhajaoui, Mohamed; Schnur, Lionel F; Schönian, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    In Morocco, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) caused by Leishmania (L.) tropica is a major public health threat. Strains of this species have been shown to display considerable serological, biochemical, molecular biological and genetic heterogeneity; and Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis (MLEE), has shown that in many countries including Morocco heterogenic variants of L. tropica can co-exist in single geographical foci. Here, the microsatellite profiles discerned by MLMT of nine Moroccan strains of L. tropica isolated in 2000 from human cases of CL from Chichaoua Province were compared to those of nine Moroccan strains of L. tropica isolated between 1988 and 1990 from human cases of CL from Marrakech Province, and also to those of 147 strains of L. tropica isolated at different times from different worldwide geographical locations within the range of distribution of the species. Several programs, each employing a different algorithm, were used for population genetic analysis. The strains from each of the two Moroccan foci separated into two phylogenetic clusters independent of their geographical origin. Genetic diversity and heterogeneity existed in both foci, which are geographically close to each other. This intra-focal distribution of genetic variants of L. tropica is not considered owing to in situ mutation. Rather, it is proposed to be explained by the importation of pre-existing variants of L. tropica into Morocco. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence for an association between post-fledging dispersal and microsatellite multilocus heterozygosity in a large population of greater flamingos.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, Mark A F; Cézilly, Frank; Wattier, Rémi; Béchet, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal can be divided into three stages: departure, transience and settlement. Despite the fact that theoretical studies have emphasized the importance of heterozygosity on dispersal strategies, empirical evidence of its effect on different stages of dispersal is lacking. Here, using multi-event capture-mark-recapture models, we show a negative association between microsatellite multilocus heterozygosity (MLH; 10 loci; n = 1023) and post-fledging dispersal propensity for greater flamingos, Phoenicopterus roseus, born in southern France. We propose that the negative effects of inbreeding depression affects competitive ability and therefore more homozygous individuals are more likely to disperse because they are less able to compete within the highly saturated natal site. Finally, a model with the effect of MLH on propensity of post-fledgling dispersers to disperse to the long-distance sites of Africa was equivalent to the null model, suggesting that MLH had low to no effect on dispersal distance. Variations in individual genetic quality thus result in context-dependent heterogeneity in dispersal strategies at each stage of dispersal. Our results have important implications on fitness since sites visited early in life are known to influence site selection later on in life and future survival.

  9. Evidence for an Association between Post-Fledging Dispersal and Microsatellite Multilocus Heterozygosity in a Large Population of Greater Flamingos

    PubMed Central

    Gillingham, Mark A. F.; Cézilly, Frank; Wattier, Rémi; Béchet, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal can be divided into three stages: departure, transience and settlement. Despite the fact that theoretical studies have emphasized the importance of heterozygosity on dispersal strategies, empirical evidence of its effect on different stages of dispersal is lacking. Here, using multi-event capture-mark-recapture models, we show a negative association between microsatellite multilocus heterozygosity (MLH; 10 loci; n = 1023) and post-fledging dispersal propensity for greater flamingos, Phoenicopterus roseus, born in southern France. We propose that the negative effects of inbreeding depression affects competitive ability and therefore more homozygous individuals are more likely to disperse because they are less able to compete within the highly saturated natal site. Finally, a model with the effect of MLH on propensity of post-fledgling dispersers to disperse to the long-distance sites of Africa was equivalent to the null model, suggesting that MLH had low to no effect on dispersal distance. Variations in individual genetic quality thus result in context-dependent heterogeneity in dispersal strategies at each stage of dispersal. Our results have important implications on fitness since sites visited early in life are known to influence site selection later on in life and future survival. PMID:24278385

  10. A novel class of miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs) that contain hitchhiking (GTCY)n microsatellites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The insertion of transposable elements results in the modification of genome structure and gene expression, and also facilitates the propagation of derived internal sequences. We show that (GTCY)n microsatellite loci within genomes of Lepidoptera are mobile and multilocus due to hitchhiking within ...

  11. Efficient development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers based on polymorphic repeats in transcriptome sequences of multiple individuals.

    PubMed

    Vukosavljev, M; Esselink, G D; van 't Westende, W P C; Cox, P; Visser, R G F; Arens, P; Smulders, M J M

    2015-01-01

    The first hurdle in developing microsatellite markers, cloning, has been overcome by next-generation sequencing. The second hurdle is testing to differentiate polymorphic from nonpolymorphic loci. The third hurdle, somewhat hidden, is that only polymorphic markers with a large effective number of alleles are sufficiently informative to be deployed in multiple studies. Both steps are laborious and still performed manually. We have developed a strategy in which we first screen reads from multiple genotypes for repeats that show the most length variants, and only these are subsequently developed into markers. We validated our strategy in tetraploid garden rose using Illumina paired-end transcriptome sequences of 11 roses. Of 48 tested two markers failed to amplify, but all others were polymorphic. Ten loci amplified more than one locus, indicating duplicated genes or gene families. Completely avoiding duplicated loci will be difficult because the range of numbers of predicted alleles of highly polymorphic single- and multilocus markers largely overlapped. Of the remainder, half were replicate markers (i.e. multiple primer pairs for one locus), indicating the difficulty of correctly filtering short reads containing repeat sequences. We subsequently refined the approach to eliminate multiple primer sets to the same loci. The remaining 18 markers were all highly polymorphic, amplifying on average 11.7 alleles per marker (range = 6-20) in 11 tetraploid roses, exceeding the 8.2 alleles per marker of the 24 most polymorphic markers genotyped previously. This strategy therefore represents a major step forward in the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers.

  12. A novel multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis typing scheme for African phylotype III strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex

    PubMed Central

    Ravelomanantsoa, Santatra; Robène, Isabelle; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Guérin, Fabien; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable genotyping that provides an accurate description of diversity in the context of pathogen emergence is required for the establishment of strategies to improve disease management. MultiLocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a valuable genotyping method. It can be performed at small evolutionary scales where high discriminatory power is needed. Strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC) are highly genetically diverse. These destructive pathogens are the causative agent of bacterial wilt on an unusually broad range of host plants worldwide. In this study, we developed an MLVA scheme for genotyping the African RSSC phylotype III. Methods. We selected different publicly available tandem repeat (TR) loci and additional TR loci from the genome of strain CMR15 as markers. Based on these loci, a new phylotype III-MLVA scheme is presented. MLVA and multiLocus sequence typing (MLST) were compared at the global, regional, and local scales. Different populations of epidemiologically related and unrelated RSSC phylotype III strains were used. Results and Discussion. Sixteen polymorphic TR loci, which included seven microsatellites and nine minisatellites, were selected. These TR loci were distributed throughout the genome (chromosome and megaplasmid) and located in both coding and intergenic regions. The newly developed RS3-MLVA16 scheme was more discriminative than MLST. RS3-MLVA16 showed good ability in differentiating strains at global, regional, and local scales, and it especially highlighted epidemiological links between closely related strains at the local scale. RS3-MLVA16 also underlines genetic variability within the same MLST-type and clonal complex, and gives a first overview of population structure. Overall, RS3-MLVA16 is a promising genotyping method for outbreak investigation at a fine scale, and it could be used for outbreak investigation as a first-line, low-cost assay for the routine screening of RSSC

  13. A novel multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis typing scheme for African phylotype III strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Ravelomanantsoa, Santatra; Robène, Isabelle; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Guérin, Fabien; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. Reliable genotyping that provides an accurate description of diversity in the context of pathogen emergence is required for the establishment of strategies to improve disease management. MultiLocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a valuable genotyping method. It can be performed at small evolutionary scales where high discriminatory power is needed. Strains of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC) are highly genetically diverse. These destructive pathogens are the causative agent of bacterial wilt on an unusually broad range of host plants worldwide. In this study, we developed an MLVA scheme for genotyping the African RSSC phylotype III. Methods. We selected different publicly available tandem repeat (TR) loci and additional TR loci from the genome of strain CMR15 as markers. Based on these loci, a new phylotype III-MLVA scheme is presented. MLVA and multiLocus sequence typing (MLST) were compared at the global, regional, and local scales. Different populations of epidemiologically related and unrelated RSSC phylotype III strains were used. Results and Discussion. Sixteen polymorphic TR loci, which included seven microsatellites and nine minisatellites, were selected. These TR loci were distributed throughout the genome (chromosome and megaplasmid) and located in both coding and intergenic regions. The newly developed RS3-MLVA16 scheme was more discriminative than MLST. RS3-MLVA16 showed good ability in differentiating strains at global, regional, and local scales, and it especially highlighted epidemiological links between closely related strains at the local scale. RS3-MLVA16 also underlines genetic variability within the same MLST-type and clonal complex, and gives a first overview of population structure. Overall, RS3-MLVA16 is a promising genotyping method for outbreak investigation at a fine scale, and it could be used for outbreak investigation as a first-line, low-cost assay for the routine screening of RSSC

  14. Microsatellite and trinucleotide-repeat evolution: evidence for mutational bias and different rates of evolution in different lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsztein, D C; Amos, B; Cooper, G

    1999-01-01

    Microsatellites are stretches of repetitive DNA, where individual repeat units comprise one to six bases. These sequences are often highly polymorphic with respect to repeat number and include trinucleotide repeats, which are abnormally expanded in a number of diseases. It has been widely assumed that microsatellite loci are as likely to gain and lose repeats when they mutate. In this review, we present population genetic and empirical data arguing that microsatellites, including normal alleles at trinucleotide-repeat disease loci, are more likely to expand in length when they mutate. In addition, our experiments suggest that the rates of expansion of such sequences differ in related species. PMID:10434312

  15. What is a microsatellite: a computational and experimental definition based upon repeat mutational behavior at A/T and GT/AC repeats.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Yogeshwar D; Strubczewski, Noelle; Hile, Suzanne E; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Eckert, Kristin A; Makova, Kateryna D

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellites are abundant in eukaryotic genomes and have high rates of strand slippage-induced repeat number alterations. They are popular genetic markers, and their mutations are associated with numerous neurological diseases. However, the minimal number of repeats required to constitute a microsatellite has been debated, and a definition of a microsatellite that considers its mutational behavior has been lacking. To define a microsatellite, we investigated slippage dynamics for a range of repeat sizes, utilizing two approaches. Computationally, we assessed length polymorphism at repeat loci in ten ENCODE regions resequenced in four human populations, assuming that the occurrence of polymorphism reflects strand slippage rates. Experimentally, we determined the in vitro DNA polymerase-mediated strand slippage error rates as a function of repeat number. In both approaches, we compared strand slippage rates at tandem repeats with the background slippage rates. We observed two distinct modes of mutational behavior. At small repeat numbers, slippage rates were low and indistinguishable from background measurements. A marked transition in mutability was observed as the repeat array lengthened, such that slippage rates at large repeat numbers were significantly higher than the background rates. For both mononucleotide and dinucleotide microsatellites studied, the transition length corresponded to a similar number of nucleotides (approximately 10). Thus, microsatellite threshold is determined not by the presence/absence of strand slippage at repeats but by an abrupt alteration in slippage rates relative to background. These findings have implications for understanding microsatellite mutagenesis, standardization of genome-wide microsatellite analyses, and predicting polymorphism levels of individual microsatellite loci.

  16. MICdb3.0: a comprehensive resource of microsatellite repeats from prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Mudunuri, Suresh B; Patnana, Sujan; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2014-01-01

    The MICdb is a comprehensive relational database of perfect microsatellites extracted from completely sequenced and annotated genomes of bacteria and archaea. The current version MICdb3.0 is an updated and revised version of MICdb2.0. As compared with the previous version MICdb2.0, the current release is significantly improved in terms of much larger coverage of genomes, improved presentation of queried results, user-friendly administration module to manage Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) data such as addition of new genomes, deletion of obsolete data, etc., and also removal of certain features deemed to be redundant. The new web-interface to the database called Microsatellite Analysis Server (MICAS) version 3.0 has been improved by the addition of powerful high-quality visualization tools to view the query results in the form of pie charts and bar graphs. All the query results and graphs can be exported in different formats so that the users can use them for further analysis. MICAS3.0 is also equipped with a unique genome comparison module using which users can do pair-wise comparison of genomes with regard to their microsatellite distribution. The advanced search module can be used to filter the repeats based on certain criteria such as filtering repeats of a particular motif/repeat size, extracting repeats of coding/non-coding regions, sort repeats, etc. The MICdb database has, therefore, been made portable to be administered by a person with the necessary administrative privileges. The MICdb3.0 database and analysis server can be accessed for free from www.cdfd.org.in/micas. Database URL: http://www.cdfd.org.in/micas.

  17. Multilocus sequence and microsatellite identification of intra-specific hybrids and ancestor-like donors among natural Ethiopian isolates of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Hailu, Asrat; Schőnian, Gabriele; Lewis, Michael D; Miles, Michael A; Yeo, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae) cause widespread and devastating human diseases. Visceral leishmaniasis is endemic in Ethiopia where it has also been responsible for fatal epidemics. It is postulated that genetic exchange in Leishmania has implications for heterosis (hybrid vigour), spread of virulent strains, resistance to chemotherapeutics, and exploitation of different hosts and vectors. Here we analyse 11 natural Ethiopian Leishmania donovani isolates consisting of four putative hybrids, seven parent-like isolates and over 90 derived biological clones. We apply a novel combination of high resolution multilocus microsatellite typing (five loci) and multilocus sequence typing (four loci) that together distinguish parent-like and hybrid L. donovani strains. Results indicate that the four isolates (and their associated biological clones) are genetic hybrids, not the results of mixed infections, each possessing heterozygous markers consistent with inheritance of divergent alleles from genetically distinct Ethiopian L. donovani lineages. The allelic profiles of the putative hybrids may have arisen from a single hybridisation event followed by inbreeding or gene conversion, or alternatively from two or more hybridisation events. Mitochondrial sequencing showed uniparental maxicircle inheritance for all of the hybrids, each possessing a single mitochondrial genotype. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis of DNA content demonstrated that all hybrids and their associated clones were diploid. Together the data imply that intra-specific genetic exchange is a recurrent feature of natural L. donovani populations, with substantial implications for the phyloepidemiology of Leishmania.

  18. Developing microsatellites when they are rare: trinucleotide repeat loci in the northern mockingbird Mimus polyglottos.

    PubMed

    Hughes, C R; Deloach, D M

    1997-11-01

    The great value of microsatellite loci to population studies spurs their development. However, finding loci is difficult when microsatellites are uncommon in the genome. Because trinucleotide-repeat loci are rare in northern mockingbirds Mimus polyglottos, we sought a new method for developing a suite of loci. Here we show that a bacterio-phage cloning vector, Lambda Zap Express (Stratagene, La Jolla, CA, USA) has several features which make it suitable for this purpose. Using this vector, we made a library of 150,000 size-selected clones and screened with an AAT10 probe; 97 positives were identified. From these, 12 pairs of PCR primers were developed, nine of which amplify polymorphic loci. Certain combinations of these primer pairs enable simultaneous amplification of up to three loci.

  19. Development of a tandem repeat-based multilocus typing system distinguishing Babesia bovis geographic isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mini and microsatellite sequences have proven to be excellent tools for the differentiation of strains and populations in several protozoan parasites due to their high variability. In the present work we have searched the genome of the tick-transmitted bovine hemoprotozoon Babesia bovis for tandem r...

  20. Elimination of Toxic Microsatellite Repeat Expansion RNA by RNA-Targeting Cas9.

    PubMed

    Batra, Ranjan; Nelles, David A; Pirie, Elaine; Blue, Steven M; Marina, Ryan J; Wang, Harrison; Chaim, Isaac A; Thomas, James D; Zhang, Nigel; Nguyen, Vu; Aigner, Stefan; Markmiller, Sebastian; Xia, Guangbin; Corbett, Kevin D; Swanson, Maurice S; Yeo, Gene W

    2017-08-24

    Microsatellite repeat expansions in DNA produce pathogenic RNA species that cause dominantly inherited diseases such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 and 2 (DM1/2), Huntington's disease, and C9orf72-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (C9-ALS). Means to target these repetitive RNAs are required for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Here, we describe the development of a programmable CRISPR system capable of specifically visualizing and eliminating these toxic RNAs. We observe specific targeting and efficient elimination of microsatellite repeat expansion RNAs both when exogenously expressed and in patient cells. Importantly, RNA-targeting Cas9 (RCas9) reverses hallmark features of disease including elimination of RNA foci among all conditions studied (DM1, DM2, C9-ALS, polyglutamine diseases), reduction of polyglutamine protein products, relocalization of repeat-bound proteins to resemble healthy controls, and efficient reversal of DM1-associated splicing abnormalities in patient myotubes. Finally, we report a truncated RCas9 system compatible with adeno-associated viral packaging. This effort highlights the potential of RCas9 for human therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A set of microsatellite markers with long core repeat optimized for grape (Vitis spp.) genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Guido; Marrazzo, Maria Teresa; Di Gaspero, Gabriele; Pfeiffer, Antonella; Morgante, Michele; Testolin, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    Background Individual fingerprinting based on molecular markers has become a popular tool for studies of population genetics and analysis of genetic diversity in germplasm collections, including the solution of synonymy/homonymy and analysis of paternity and kinship. Genetic profiling of individuals is nowadays based on SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) markers, which have a number of positive features that make them superior to any other molecular marker developed so far. In humans, SSRs with core repeats three to five nucleotides long are preferred because neighbour alleles are more easily separated and distinguished from each other; while in plants, SSRs with shorter repeats, namely two-nucleotides long, are still in use although they suffer lower separation of neighbour alleles and uncomfortable stuttering. Results New microsatellite markers, containing tri-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide repeats, were selected from a total of 26,962 perfect microsatellites in the genome sequence of nearly homozogous grapevine PN40024, assembled from reads covering 8.4 X genome equivalents. Long nucleotide repeats were selected for fingerprinting, as previously done in many species including humans. The new grape SSR markers were tested for their reproducibility and information content in a panel of 48 grape cultivars. Allelic segregation was tested in progenies derived from two controlled crosses. Conclusion A list of 38 markers with excellent quality of peaks, high power of discrimination, and uniform genome distribution (1–3 markers/chromosome), is proposed for grape genotyping. The reasons for exclusion are given for those that were discarded. The construction of marker-specific allelic ladders is also described, and their use is recommended to harmonise allelic calls and make the data obtained with different equipment and by different laboratories fully comparable. PMID:19087321

  2. Minimal genetic change in Vibrio cholerae in Mozambique over time: Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis and whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Garrine, Marcelino; Mandomando, Inácio; Vubil, Delfino; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Acacio, Sozinho; Li, Shan; Paulson, Joseph N; Almeida, Mathieu; Domman, Daryl; Thomson, Nicholas R; Alonso, Pedro; Stine, Oscar Colin

    2017-06-01

    Although cholera is a major public health concern in Mozambique, its transmission patterns remain unknown. We surveyed the genetic relatedness of 75 Vibrio cholerae isolates from patients at Manhiça District Hospital between 2002-2012 and 3 isolates from river using multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and whole genome sequencing (WGS). MLVA revealed 22 genotypes in two clonal complexes and four unrelated genotypes. WGS revealed i) the presence of recombination, ii) 67 isolates descended monophyletically from a single source connected to Wave 3 of the Seventh Pandemic, and iii) four clinical isolates lacking the cholera toxin gene. This Wave 3 strain persisted for at least eight years in either an environmental reservoir or circulating within the human population. Our data raises important questions related to where these isolates persist and how identical isolates can be collected years apart despite our understanding of high change rate of MLVA loci and the V. cholerae molecular clock.

  3. Microsatellite instability at tetranucleotide repeats in sporadic colorectal cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kanae; Kanazawa, Shinsaku; Koike, Junichi; Sugiyama, Hisahiko; Xu, Can; Funahashi, Kimihiko; Boland, C Richard; Koi, Minoru; Hemmi, Hiromichi

    2010-02-01

    Most tumors of patients with Lynch syndrome and a fraction of sporadic colorectal cancers (CRCs) exhibit high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI) at mono- and dinucleotide repeat loci. A different type of instability, elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) has been found in non-colonic cancers. Our previous study demonstrated that EMAST is common in sporadic CRC. Here, we focused on the relationships between EMAST and other genomic instability parameters or clinicopathological features in an unselected series of 88 sporadic CRCs. Of the tumors in the sample, 4 (4.5%) were MSI-high (MSI-H), 9 (10.2%) were MSI-low (MSI-L) and 75 (85.2%) were microsatellite stable. EMAST status was determined using 7 EMAST markers. Fifty-three (60.2%) tumors without MSI-H showed instability at >or=1 EMAST loci. All 4 MSI-H tumors showed instability at several EMAST loci. Instability profiles of MSI-H tumors at EMAST loci were more complex than those of non-MSI-H tumors. A tendency of positive association was observed between MSI-L and EMAST (P=0.023). The frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for the 14 loci in EMAST-positive tumors was significantly higher than negative tumors (P=0.048). Among the clinicopathological parameters, only tumor location at the distal colon was associated with EMAST-negative tumors (P=0.0084, one-tailed). A relatively higher frequency of well-differentiated adenocarcinomas was observed in EMAST tumors as opposed to non-EMAST tumors, though the survival rate was similar. These results suggest that overlapping mechanisms that cause MSI-L, EMAST and LOH in CRCs may exist.

  4. Development and characterization of highly polymorphic long TC repeat microsatellite markers for genetic analysis of peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is a crop of economic and social importance, mainly in tropical areas, and developing countries. Its molecular breeding has been hindered by a shortage of polymorphic genetic markers due to a very narrow genetic base. Microsatellites (SSRs) are markers of choice in peanut because they are co-dominant, highly transferrable between species and easily applicable in the allotetraploid genome. In spite of substantial effort over the last few years by a number of research groups, the number of SSRs that are polymorphic for A. hypogaea is still limiting for routine application, creating the demand for the discovery of more markers polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Findings A plasmid genomic library enriched for TC/AG repeats was constructed and 1401 clones sequenced. From the sequences obtained 146 primer pairs flanking mostly TC microsatellites were developed. The average number of repeat motifs amplified was 23. These 146 markers were characterized on 22 genotypes of cultivated peanut. In total 78 of the markers were polymorphic within cultivated germplasm. Most of those 78 markers were highly informative with an average of 5.4 alleles per locus being amplified. Average gene diversity index (GD) was 0.6, and 66 markers showed a GD of more than 0.5. Genetic relationship analysis was performed and corroborated the current taxonomical classification of A. hypogaea subspecies and varieties. Conclusions The microsatellite markers described here are a useful resource for genetics and genomics in Arachis. In particular, the 66 markers that are highly polymorphic in cultivated peanut are a significant step towards routine genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection for the crop. PMID:22305491

  5. Microsatellite repeat instability fuels evolution of embryonic enhancers in Hawaiian Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Brittain, Andrew; Stroebele, Elizabeth; Erives, Albert

    2014-01-01

    For ∼30 million years, the eggs of Hawaiian Drosophila were laid in ever-changing environments caused by high rates of island formation. The associated diversification of the size and developmental rate of the syncytial fly embryo would have altered morphogenic gradients, thus necessitating frequent evolutionary compensation of transcriptional responses. We investigate the consequences these radiations had on transcriptional enhancers patterning the embryo to see whether their pattern of molecular evolution is different from non-Hawaiian species. We identify and functionally assay in transgenic D. melanogaster the Neurogenic Ectoderm Enhancers from two different Hawaiian Drosophila groups: (i) the picture wing group, and (ii) the modified mouthparts group. We find that the binding sites in this set of well-characterized enhancers are footprinted by diverse microsatellite repeat (MSR) sequences. We further show that Hawaiian embryonic enhancers in general are enriched in MSR relative to both Hawaiian non-embryonic enhancers and non-Hawaiian embryonic enhancers. We propose embryonic enhancers are sensitive to Activator spacing because they often serve as assembly scaffolds for the aggregation of transcription factor activator complexes. Furthermore, as most indels are produced by microsatellite repeat slippage, enhancers from Hawaiian Drosophila lineages, which experience dynamic evolutionary pressures, would become grossly enriched in MSR content.

  6. Microsatellite Repeat Instability Fuels Evolution of Embryonic Enhancers in Hawaiian Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, Andrew; Stroebele, Elizabeth; Erives, Albert

    2014-01-01

    For ∼30 million years, the eggs of Hawaiian Drosophila were laid in ever-changing environments caused by high rates of island formation. The associated diversification of the size and developmental rate of the syncytial fly embryo would have altered morphogenic gradients, thus necessitating frequent evolutionary compensation of transcriptional responses. We investigate the consequences these radiations had on transcriptional enhancers patterning the embryo to see whether their pattern of molecular evolution is different from non-Hawaiian species. We identify and functionally assay in transgenic D. melanogaster the Neurogenic Ectoderm Enhancers from two different Hawaiian Drosophila groups: (i) the picture wing group, and (ii) the modified mouthparts group. We find that the binding sites in this set of well-characterized enhancers are footprinted by diverse microsatellite repeat (MSR) sequences. We further show that Hawaiian embryonic enhancers in general are enriched in MSR relative to both Hawaiian non-embryonic enhancers and non-Hawaiian embryonic enhancers. We propose embryonic enhancers are sensitive to Activator spacing because they often serve as assembly scaffolds for the aggregation of transcription factor activator complexes. Furthermore, as most indels are produced by microsatellite repeat slippage, enhancers from Hawaiian Drosophila lineages, which experience dynamic evolutionary pressures, would become grossly enriched in MSR content. PMID:24978198

  7. Conservation of human chromosome 13 polymorphic microsatellite (CA){sub n} repeats in chimpanzees

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, R.; Shriver, M.D.; Yu, L.M.

    1994-07-01

    Tandemly repeated (dC-dA){sub n} {center_dot} (dG-dT){sub n} sequences occur abundantly and are found in most eukaryotic genomes. To investigate the level of conservation of these repeat sequences in nonhuman primates, the authors have analyzed seven human chromosome 13 dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeat loci in chimpanzees by DNA amplification using primers designed for analysis of human loci. Comparable levels of polymorphism at these loci in the two species, revealed by the number of alleles, heterozygosity, and allele sizes, suggest that the (CA){sub n} repeat arrays and their genomic locations are highly conserved. Even though the proportion of shared alleles between the two species varies enormously and the modal alleles are not the same, allelic lengths at each locus in the chimpanzees are detected within the bounds of the allele size range observed in humans. A similar observation has been noted in a limited number of gorillas and orangutans. Using a new measure of genetic distance that takes into account the size of alleles, they have compared the genetic distance between humans and chimpanzees. The genetic distance between these two species was found to be ninefold smaller than expected assuming there is no selection or mutational bias toward retention of (CA){sub n} repeat arrays. These findings suggest a functional significance for these microsatellite loci. 34 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Citosine-Adenine-Repeat Microsatellite of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 Gene in Hypertensive Children.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Carolina; Carvajal, Cristian A; Campino, Carmen; Allende, Fidel; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro; Baudrand, Rene; Vecchiola, Andrea; Lagos, Carlos F; Tapia-Castillo, Alejandra; Fuentes, Cristobal A; Aglony, Marlene; Solari, Sandra; Kalergis, Alexis M; García, Hernan; Owen, Gareth I; Fardella, Carlos E

    2016-01-01

    The impairment of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 enzyme (11βHSD2) results in an inefficient conversion of cortisol to cortisone, which triggers hypertension. Cytosine-adenine repeat (CA repeat) microsatellite has been associated with low HSD11B2 gene expression. To determine whether the CA-repeat length in intron 1 affect the serum cortisol to cortisone (F/E) ratio and/or blood pressure (BP) levels in pediatric subjects. Eighty-one hypertensive (HT) and 117 normotensive (NT) subjects participated in this study. We measured BP levels, as well as the F and E and F/E ratio in morning sera and 12-hour urine samples. The length of CA repeats was determined through fragment analysis. We compared the allele distribution between the HT and NT groups, and the patients were dichotomized into groups with short alleles (S) (<21 CA repeats) or long alleles (L), and also in groups according genotype (allele combination: S/S and S/L + L/L). We found no differences in the distribution of CA-repeat allelic length between the NT and HT groups (P = 0.7807), and there was no correlation between the CA-repeat allelic length and BP (P = 0.1151) levels or the serum F/E ratio (P = 0.6778). However, the serum F/E ratio was higher in the HT group than in the NT group (P = 0.0251). The serum F/E ratio was associated with systolic BP index independent of body mass index only in HT group. The CA-repeat length did not influence BP levels or serum F/E ratios in pediatric subjects. However, the serum F/E ratio was associated with BP, suggesting a role of 11βHSD2 in mineralocorticoid hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Clostridium tyrobutyricum strains isolated from cheese production environment.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hajime; Sudo, Tomoko; Kyoi, Daisuke; Kawahara, Toshio; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Takashi; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon; Yanahira, Shuichi

    2014-11-03

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a gram-positive spore-forming anaerobe that is considered as the main causative agent for late blowing in cheese due to butyric acid fermentation. In this study, multilocus variable-number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) for C. tyrobutyricum was developed to identify the source of contamination by C. tyrobutyricum spores in the cheese production environment. For each contig constructed from the results of a whole genome draft sequence of C. tyrobutyricum JCM11008(T) based on next-generation sequencing, VNTR loci that were effective for typing were searched using the Tandem Repeat Finder program. Five VNTR loci were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine their number of repeats by sequencing, and MLVA was conducted. 25 strains of C. tyrobutyricum isolated from the environment, raw milk, and silage were classified into 18 MLVA types (DI=0.963). Of the C. tyrobutyricum strains isolated from raw milk, natural cheese, and blown processed cheese, strains with identical MLVA type were detected, which suggested that these strains might have shifted from natural cheese to blown processed cheese. MLVA could be an effective tool for monitoring contamination of natural cheese with C. tyrobutyricum in the processed cheese production environment because of its high discriminability, thereby allowing the analyst to trace the source of contamination.

  10. Multi-laboratory validation study of multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 2015.

    PubMed

    Peters, Tansy; Bertrand, Sophie; Björkman, Jonas T; Brandal, Lin T; Brown, Derek J; Erdõsi, Tímea; Heck, Max; Ibrahem, Salha; Johansson, Karin; Kornschober, Christian; Kotila, Saara M; Le Hello, Simon; Lienemann, Taru; Mattheus, Wesley; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Rumore, Jillian; Sabol, Ashley; Torpdahl, Mia; Trees, Eija; Tuohy, Alma; de Pinna, Elizabeth

    2017-03-02

    Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a rapid and reproducible typing method that is an important tool for investigation, as well as detection, of national and multinational outbreaks of a range of food-borne pathogens. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the most common Salmonella serovar associated with human salmonellosis in the European Union/European Economic Area and North America. Fourteen laboratories from 13 countries in Europe and North America participated in a validation study for MLVA of S. Enteritidis targeting five loci. Following normalisation of fragment sizes using a set of reference strains, a blinded set of 24 strains with known allele sizes was analysed by each participant. The S. Enteritidis 5-loci MLVA protocol was shown to produce internationally comparable results as more than 90% of the participants reported less than 5% discrepant MLVA profiles. All 14 participating laboratories performed well, even those where experience with this typing method was limited. The raw fragment length data were consistent throughout, and the inter-laboratory validation helped to standardise the conversion of raw data to repeat numbers with at least two countries updating their internal procedures. However, differences in assigned MLVA profiles remain between well-established protocols and should be taken into account when exchanging data. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  11. Multi-laboratory validation study of multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Tansy; Bertrand, Sophie; Björkman, Jonas T; Brandal, Lin T; Brown, Derek J; Erdõsi, Tímea; Heck, Max; Ibrahem, Salha; Johansson, Karin; Kornschober, Christian; Kotila, Saara M; Le Hello, Simon; Lienemann, Taru; Mattheus, Wesley; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Rumore, Jillian; Sabol, Ashley; Torpdahl, Mia; Trees, Eija; Tuohy, Alma; de Pinna, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) is a rapid and reproducible typing method that is an important tool for investigation, as well as detection, of national and multinational outbreaks of a range of food-borne pathogens. Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is the most common Salmonella serovar associated with human salmonellosis in the European Union/European Economic Area and North America. Fourteen laboratories from 13 countries in Europe and North America participated in a validation study for MLVA of S. Enteritidis targeting five loci. Following normalisation of fragment sizes using a set of reference strains, a blinded set of 24 strains with known allele sizes was analysed by each participant. The S. Enteritidis 5-loci MLVA protocol was shown to produce internationally comparable results as more than 90% of the participants reported less than 5% discrepant MLVA profiles. All 14 participating laboratories performed well, even those where experience with this typing method was limited. The raw fragment length data were consistent throughout, and the inter-laboratory validation helped to standardise the conversion of raw data to repeat numbers with at least two countries updating their internal procedures. However, differences in assigned MLVA profiles remain between well-established protocols and should be taken into account when exchanging data. PMID:28277220

  12. Target genes of microsatellite sequences in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: mononucleotide repeats are not detected.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Liu, Xuejuan; Li, Yulin

    2012-09-10

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is detected in a wide variety of tumors. It is thought that mismatch repair gene mutation or inactivation is the major cause of MSI. Microsatellite sequences are predominantly distributed in intergenic or intronic DNA. However, MSI is found in the exonic sequences of some genes, causing their inactivation. In this report, we searched GenBank for candidate genes containing potential MSI sequences in exonic regions. Twenty seven target genes were selected for MSI analysis. Instability was found in 70% of these genes (14/20) with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Interestingly, no instability was detected in mononucleotide repeats in genes or in intergenic sequences. We conclude that instability of mononucleotide repeats is a rare event in HNSCC. High MSI phenotype in young HNSCC patients is limited to noncoding regions only. MSI percentage in HNSCC tumor is closely related to the repeat type, repeat location and patient's age.

  13. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis of Vibrio cholerae isolates from 2012 to 2013 cholera outbreaks in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, R; Sadeghy, J; Shokri Moghadam, M; Bakhshi, B

    2016-08-01

    Cholera remains to be an international threat, with high rates of illness and death. In 2012 and 2013, two cholera outbreak happened in Iran, affecting lots of people. Vibrio cholerae O1 was confirmed as the etiological agent. Source identification and controlling the spread of the cholera disease are two critical approaches in cholera outbreaks. In this study, thirty V. cholerae O1 isolates were selected and has been evaluated for antimicrobial resistant as well as molecular typing by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) method. Twenty-nine (97%) isolates were sero-grouped as El Tor (one isolate was classical) and 100% were related to Inaba serotype. All of the isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, ampicillin and gentamicin. On the other hand, 60% of the isolates were MDR (resistant to 3 or more classes). There were three resistance patterns. The most prevalent pattern was resistance to streptomycin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline (ST-SXT-E-T) which was seen in 50% of isolates. Using MLVA method 14 MLVA types were identified. MLVA type 2 (5-7-7-16-15) accounted for 43% of isolates. Isolates with the same genotype often did not have the same antibiogram. Overall, the data indicate that the Iranian V. cholerae were MDR and clonaly related. Furthermore, the results of this study shows that MLVA can be used as useful method for V. cholerae genotyping in epidemiological investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genotyping Brucella canis isolates using a highly discriminatory multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) assay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Yin; Poulsen, Elizabeth; Ransburgh, Russell; Liu, Xuming; An, Baoyan; Lu, Nanyan; Anderson, Gary; Wang, Chengming; Bai, Jianfa

    2017-04-21

    Differentiation of Brucella canis from other Brucella species are mainly performed through PCR-based methods and multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) procedures. Both PCR-based and MLVA methods are limited in discriminating B. canis strains. A new MLVA-13Bc method for B. canis genotyping was established by combining eight newly-developed VNTRs with five published ones. During 2010 and 2016, 377 B. canis PCR-positives were identified from 6,844 canine blood samples from 22 U.S. states, resulting in 229 B. canis isolates. The MLVA-13Bc method was able to differentiate each of these 229 isolates. The Hunter-Gaston Discriminatory Index of the individual VNTR loci ranged from 0.516 to 0.934 and the combined discriminatory index reached 1.000. Three major clusters (A, B and C) and 10 genotype groups were identified from the 229 B. canis isolates. Cluster A mainly contains genotype groups 1 and 2, and a few group 3 isolates; nearly all Cluster B isolates were from group 6; other genotype groups were classified into Cluster C. Our newly developed MLVA-13Bc assay is a highly discriminatory assay for B. canis genotyping, and can serve as a useful molecular epidemiological tool, especially for tracing the source of contamination in an event of a B. canis outbreak.

  15. Characterization of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from Italy by multilocus sequence typing and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Gasparrini, S; Alborali, G L; Pitozzi, A; Guarneri, F; Giacomini, E; Baldo, V; Scali, F; Lazzaro, M; Boniotti, M B

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the capabilities of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) techniques to characterize Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates and to investigate the relationship between pleuromutilin resistance and genetic variability. MLST genotyping was performed on 180 B. hyodysenteriae isolates, and the results were evaluated considering profiles from 108 other strains previously reported in the database. In total, 37 sequence types were obtained. The MLVA approach completely characterized 172 strains and grouped the isolates into 22 different profiles. The combination of MLST and MLVA showed a slight increase in the discriminatory power, identifying 33 joint profiles. An antibiotic resistance analysis showed a reduction in the susceptibility to pleuromutilins over time, and a weak association between susceptibility to valnemulin and inclusion in clonal complex 4. MLST and MLVA are reliable methods for characterizing B. hyodysenteriae strains and they have comparable discriminatory power. The genotyping of B. hyodysenteriae isolates and a database of all the genetic profiles collected during the diagnostic activities could support traditional epidemiological investigations in identifying infection sources and routes of transmission among herds, and in developing more effective control measures. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. PAI-1 4G/5G repeat is a target in gastric carcinomas with microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Guadagni, Fiorella; Savonarola, Annalisa; Ludovici, Giorgia; Nesi, Gabriella; Palli, Domenico; Falchetti, Mario; Ottini, Laura

    2011-06-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer. The 4G/5G promoter polymorphism of PAI-1 is potentially involved in regulating gene transcription. To explore the role of the PAI-1 4G/5G repeat as target of microsatellite instability (MSI), 50 gastric carcinomas (GCs), characterized for MSI, were screened. PAI-1 4G/5G was analysed by direct sequencing. Allelic imbalance was observed in 5 of the 50 (10%) GCs. Specifically, 2 cases (40%) harboured a G deletion and 3 (60%) a G insertion in tumour compared to normal DNA. These five cases were included in the subgroup of 20 GCs (25%) with high level of MSI (MSI-H). A statistically significant association emerged between PAI-1 mutations and MSI-H status (p=0.0073). The frequency of PAI-1 mutations was also evaluated, together with other known target genes, by analysing MSI-H GCs for mutations at selected coding repeats within genes controlling cell growth, apoptosis and DNA repair. Overall, mutation frequency ranged from 56.3% to 5.3%. The frequency of PAI-1 mutations here reported in MSI-H GCs is, accordingly, comparable with values obtained for real targets. The relatively high incidence of PAI-1 mutations is suggestive of a positive pressure towards selection in MSI-H GCs. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Profiling of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates from Blood Cultures and Gallbladder Specimens from Makassar, South-Sulawesi, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Mochammad; Pastoor, Rob; Scheelbeek, Pauline F. D.; Sultan, Andi R.; Dwiyanti, Ressy; Labeda, Ibrahim; Smits, Henk L.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis differentiated 297 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood culture isolates from Makassar in 76 genotypes and a single unique S. Typhi genotype was isolated from the cholecystectomy specimens of four patients with cholelithiasis. The high diversity in S. Typhi genotypes circulating in Makassar indicates that the number of carriers could be very large, which may complicate disease prevention and control. PMID:21949819

  18. Ruminant rhombencephalitis-associated Listeria monocytogenes alleles linked to a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis complex.

    PubMed

    Balandyté, Lina; Brodard, Isabelle; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna; Abril, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is among the most important food-borne pathogens and is well adapted to persist in the environment. To gain insight into the genetic relatedness and potential virulence of L. monocytogenes strains causing central nervous system (CNS) infections, we used multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) to subtype 183 L. monocytogenes isolates, most from ruminant rhombencephalitis and some from human patients, food, and the environment. Allelic-profile-based comparisons grouped L. monocytogenes strains mainly into three clonal complexes and linked single-locus variants (SLVs). Clonal complex A essentially consisted of isolates from human and ruminant brain samples. All but one rhombencephalitis isolate from cattle were located in clonal complex A. In contrast, food and environmental isolates mainly clustered into clonal complex C, and none was classified as clonal complex A. Isolates of the two main clonal complexes (A and C) obtained by MLVA were analyzed by PCR for the presence of 11 virulence-associated genes (prfA, actA, inlA, inlB, inlC, inlD, inlE, inlF, inlG, inlJ, and inlC2H). Virulence gene analysis revealed significant differences in the actA, inlF, inlG, and inlJ allelic profiles between clinical isolates (complex A) and nonclinical isolates (complex C). The association of particular alleles of actA, inlF, and newly described alleles of inlJ with isolates from CNS infections (particularly rhombencephalitis) suggests that these virulence genes participate in neurovirulence of L. monocytogenes. The overall absence of inlG in clinical complex A and its presence in complex C isolates suggests that the InlG protein is more relevant for the survival of L. monocytogenes in the environment.

  19. Characterisation of Brucella suis isolates from Southeast Europe by multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Duvnjak, Sanja; Račić, Ivana; Špičić, Silvio; Zdelar-Tuk, Maja; Reil, Irena; Cvetnić, Željko

    2015-10-22

    Porcine brucellosis is a common bacterial zoonosis which can cause significant financial losses. Its diverse and often complicated factors have hampered efforts to control disease spread. The aim of the study was to assess the epidemiological situation of porcine brucellosis primarily in Croatia and its relationship to genotypes present in other, mostly European countries. One hundred and seven Brucella suis strains isolated from swine, hares, cattle, humans, wild hares, a wild boar and a mare originating mainly from Croatia (112), but also a few from Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Macedonia (15) were tested using classical microbiological testing, Bruce-ladder, RFLP, Multiplex-suis and genotyped using multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). We determined 43 Brucella suis genotypes. Strains were grouped according to phylogenetic and geographic relationships, revealing both regional specificity and uniqueness and suggesting possible sources and modes of spread among animals. Our study also confirmed problems with Bruce19 locus that may hinder comparisons of new types with those in the international database. Forty-one novel genotypes were identified and deposited into the international database. Our study supports the idea of wild animals as a source of disease in domestic animals and also gives evidence to hypothesis of cross-border animal trafficking between former Yugoslavian countries. It also highlights the need to expand such research across more of southeast Europe, especially to countries with poorer social and economical situation in order to prevent a realistic outbreak and for better understanding of the biology of this pathogen.

  20. High mutation rate of TPE repeats: a microsatellite in the putative transposase of the hobo element in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Souames, Sémi; Bonnivard, Eric; Bazin, Claude; Higuet, Dominique

    2003-11-01

    The hobo transposable element contains a polymorphic microsatellite sequence located in its coding region, the TPE repeats. Previous surveys of natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster have detected at least seven different hobo transposons. These natural populations are geographically structured with regard to TPE polymorphism, and a scenario has been proposed for the invasion process. Natural populations have recently been completely invaded by hobo elements with three TPE repeats. New elements then appeared by mutation, triggering a new stage of invasion by other elements. Since TPE polymorphism appeared over a short period of time, we focused on estimating the mutation rate of these TPE repeats. We used transgenic lines harboring three TPE and/or five TPE hobo elements that had been evolving for at least 16 generations to search for a new TPE repeat polymorphism. We detected three mutants, with four, seven, and eight TPE repeats, respectively. The estimated mutation rate of the TPE repeats is therefore higher than that of neutral microsatellites in D. melanogaster (4.2 x 10-4 versus 6.5 x 10-6). The role of the transposition mechanism and the particular structure of the TPE repeats of the hobo element in this increase in the mutation rate are discussed.

  1. Parallel G-Quadruplexes Formed by Guanine-Rich Microsatellite Repeats Inhibit Human Topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Ogloblina, A M; Bannikova, V A; Khristich, A N; Oretskaya, T S; Yakubovskaya, M G; Dolinnaya, N G

    2015-08-01

    Using UV and CD spectroscopy, we studied the thermodynamic stability and folding topology of G-quadruplexes (G4), formed by G-rich fragments in human microsatellites that differ in the number of guanosines within the repeating unit. The oligonucleotides d(GGGT)4 and d(GGT)4 were shown to form propeller-type parallel-stranded intramolecular G-quadruplexes. The G4 melting temperature is dramatically decreased (by more than 45°C) in the transition from the tri-G-tetrad to the bi-G-tetrad structure. d(GT)n-repeats do not form perfect G-quadruplexes (one-G-tetrad); folded G4-like conformation is not stable at room temperature and is not stabilized by monovalent metal ions. The minimum concentration of K+ that promotes quadruplex folding of d(GGT)4 was found to depend on the supporting Na+ concentration. It was demonstrated for the first time that the complementary regions flanking G4-motifs (as in d(CACTGG-CC-(GGGT)4-TA-CCAGTG)) cannot form a double helix in the case of a parallel G4 due to the steric remoteness, but instead destabilize the structure. Additionally, we investigated the effect of the described oligonucleotides on the activity of topoisomerase I, one of the key cell enzymes, with a focus on the relationship between the stability of the formed quadruplexes and the inhibition degree of the enzyme. The most active inhibitor with IC50 = 0.08 µM was the oligonucleotide d(CACTGG-CC-(GGGT)4-TA-CCAGTG), whose flanking G4-motif sequences reduced the extreme stability of G-quadruplex formed by d(GGGT)4.

  2. Amplification of microsatellite repeat motifs is associated with the evolutionary differentiation and heterochromatinization of sex chromosomes in Sauropsida.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Kazumi; O'Meally, Denis; Azad, Bhumika; Georges, Arthur; Sarre, Stephen D; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Matsuda, Yoichi; Ezaz, Tariq

    2016-03-01

    The sex chromosomes in Sauropsida (reptiles and birds) have evolved independently many times. They show astonishing diversity in morphology ranging from cryptic to highly differentiated sex chromosomes with male (XX/XY) and female heterogamety (ZZ/ZW). Comparing such diverse sex chromosome systems thus provides unparalleled opportunities to capture evolution of morphologically differentiated sex chromosomes in action. Here, we describe chromosomal mapping of 18 microsatellite repeat motifs in eight species of Sauropsida. More than two microsatellite repeat motifs were amplified on the sex-specific chromosome, W or Y, in five species (Bassiana duperreyi, Aprasia parapulchella, Notechis scutatus, Chelodina longicollis, and Gallus gallus) of which the sex-specific chromosomes were heteromorphic and heterochromatic. Motifs (AAGG)n and (ATCC)n were amplified on the W chromosome of Pogona vitticeps and the Y chromosome of Emydura macquarii, respectively. By contrast, no motifs were amplified on the W chromosome of Christinus marmoratus, which is not much differentiated from the Z chromosome. Taken together with previously published studies, our results suggest that the amplification of microsatellite repeats is tightly associated with the differentiation and heterochromatinization of sex-specific chromosomes in sauropsids as well as in other taxa. Although some motifs were common between the sex-specific chromosomes of multiple species, no correlation was observed between this commonality and the species phylogeny. Furthermore, comparative analysis of sex chromosome homology and chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats between two closely related chelid turtles, C. longicollis and E. macquarii, identified different ancestry and differentiation history. These suggest multiple evolutions of sex chromosomes in the Sauropsida.

  3. Multilocus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis Reveals Multiple Introductions in Spain of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Spot Disease of Stone Fruits and Almond

    PubMed Central

    López-Soriano, Pablo; Boyer, Karine; Cesbron, Sophie; Morente, María Clara; Peñalver, Javier; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; Vernière, Christian; López, María M.; Pruvost, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is the causal agent of the bacterial spot disease of stone fruits, almond and some ornamental Prunus species. In Spain it was first detected in 2002 and since then, several outbreaks have occurred in different regions affecting mainly Japanese plum, peach and almond, both in commercial orchards and nurseries. As the origin of the introduction(s) was unknown, we have assessed the genetic diversity of 239 X. arboricola pv. pruni strains collected from 11 Spanish provinces from 2002 to 2013 and 25 reference strains from international collections. We have developed an optimized multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) scheme targeting 18 microsatellites and five minisatellites. A high discriminatory power was achieved since almost 50% of the Spanish strains were distinguishable, confirming the usefulness of this genotyping technique at small spatio-temporal scales. Spanish strains grouped in 18 genetic clusters (conservatively delineated so that each cluster contained haplotype networks linked by up to quadruple-locus variations). Furthermore, pairwise comparisons among populations from different provinces showed a strong genetic differentiation. Our results suggest multiple introductions of this pathogen in Spain and redistribution through contaminated nursery propagative plant material. PMID:27669415

  4. Multilocus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis Reveals Multiple Introductions in Spain of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Spot Disease of Stone Fruits and Almond.

    PubMed

    López-Soriano, Pablo; Boyer, Karine; Cesbron, Sophie; Morente, María Clara; Peñalver, Javier; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; Vernière, Christian; López, María M; Pruvost, Olivier

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is the causal agent of the bacterial spot disease of stone fruits, almond and some ornamental Prunus species. In Spain it was first detected in 2002 and since then, several outbreaks have occurred in different regions affecting mainly Japanese plum, peach and almond, both in commercial orchards and nurseries. As the origin of the introduction(s) was unknown, we have assessed the genetic diversity of 239 X. arboricola pv. pruni strains collected from 11 Spanish provinces from 2002 to 2013 and 25 reference strains from international collections. We have developed an optimized multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) scheme targeting 18 microsatellites and five minisatellites. A high discriminatory power was achieved since almost 50% of the Spanish strains were distinguishable, confirming the usefulness of this genotyping technique at small spatio-temporal scales. Spanish strains grouped in 18 genetic clusters (conservatively delineated so that each cluster contained haplotype networks linked by up to quadruple-locus variations). Furthermore, pairwise comparisons among populations from different provinces showed a strong genetic differentiation. Our results suggest multiple introductions of this pathogen in Spain and redistribution through contaminated nursery propagative plant material.

  5. Chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in Amazon cichlids genome (Pisces, Cichlidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Terencio, Maria Leandra; de Tavares, Édika Sabrina Girão Mitozo; Martins, Cesar; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fish of the family Cichlidae are recognized as an excellent model for evolutionary studies because of their morphological and behavioral adaptations to a wide diversity of explored ecological niches. In addition, the family has a dynamic genome with variable structure, composition and karyotype organization. Microsatellites represent the most dynamic genomic component and a better understanding of their organization may help clarify the role of repetitive DNA elements in the mechanisms of chromosomal evolution. Thus, in this study, microsatellite sequences were mapped in the chromosomes of Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831, Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823, and Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840. Four microsatellites demonstrated positive results in the genome of Cichla monoculus and Symphysodon discus, and five demonstrated positive results in the genome of Pterophyllum scalare. In most cases, the microsatellite was dispersed in the chromosome with conspicuous markings in the centromeric or telomeric regions, which suggests that sequences contribute to chromosome structure and may have played a role in the evolution of this fish family. The comparative genome mapping data presented here provide novel information on the structure and organization of the repetitive DNA region of the cichlid genome and contribute to a better understanding of this fish family’s genome. PMID:26753076

  6. Chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in Amazon cichlids genome (Pisces, Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Terencio, Maria Leandra; de Tavares, Édika Sabrina Girão Mitozo; Martins, Cesar; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Fish of the family Cichlidae are recognized as an excellent model for evolutionary studies because of their morphological and behavioral adaptations to a wide diversity of explored ecological niches. In addition, the family has a dynamic genome with variable structure, composition and karyotype organization. Microsatellites represent the most dynamic genomic component and a better understanding of their organization may help clarify the role of repetitive DNA elements in the mechanisms of chromosomal evolution. Thus, in this study, microsatellite sequences were mapped in the chromosomes of Cichla monoculus Agassiz, 1831, Pterophyllum scalare Schultze, 1823, and Symphysodon discus Heckel, 1840. Four microsatellites demonstrated positive results in the genome of Cichla monoculus and Symphysodon discus, and five demonstrated positive results in the genome of Pterophyllum scalare. In most cases, the microsatellite was dispersed in the chromosome with conspicuous markings in the centromeric or telomeric regions, which suggests that sequences contribute to chromosome structure and may have played a role in the evolution of this fish family. The comparative genome mapping data presented here provide novel information on the structure and organization of the repetitive DNA region of the cichlid genome and contribute to a better understanding of this fish family's genome.

  7. A new source of polymorphic DNA markers for sperm typing: Analysis of microsatellite repeats in single cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, R.; Schmitt, K.; Zhang, L.; Arnheim, N. ); Weber, J.L. )

    1992-11-01

    The authors show that dinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeat polymorphisms can be analyzed in single cells without using radioactivity or denaturing gels. This provides a new source of DNA polymorphisms for genetic mapping by sperm typing. The recombination fraction between two CA repeat polymorphisms was determined after whole genome amplification of single sperm, followed by typing of two different aliquots, one aliquot for each polymorphic locus. Single-cell analysis of microsatellites may also be valuable both for preimplantation genetic disease diagnosis based on single-blastomere or polar-body analysis and for the typing of forensic or ancient DNA samples containing very small amounts of nucleic acid. 26 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Multi-Locus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis for Rapid and Accurate Typing of Virulent Multidrug Resistant Escherichia coli Clones

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Umaer; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro E.; Woodford, Neil; Dhanji, Hiran; Cantón, Rafael; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Lindstedt, Bjørn-Arne

    2012-01-01

    One hundred E. coli isolates from Norway (n = 37), Sweden (n = 24), UK (n = 20) and Spain (n = 19), producing CTX-M-type - (n = 84), or SHV-12 (n = 4) extended spectrum β-lactamases, or the plasmid mediated AmpC, CMY-2 (n = 12), were typed using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and multi-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Isolates clustered into 33 Sequence Types (STs) and 14 Sequence Type Complexes (STCs), and 58 MLVA-Types (MTs) and 25 different MLVA-Type Complexes (MTCs). A strong agreement between the MLST profile and MLVA typing results was observed, in which all ST131-isolates (n = 39) and most of the STC-648 (n = 10), STC-38 (n = 9), STC-10 (n = 9), STC-405 (n = 8) and STC-23 (n = 6) isolates were clustered distinctly into MTC-29, -36, -20, -14, -10 and -39, respectively. MLVA is a rapid and accurate tool for genotyping isolates of globally disseminated virulent multidrug resistant E. coli lineages, including ST131. PMID:22859970

  9. Multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis for Clostridium botulinum type B isolates in Japan: comparison with other isolates and genotyping methods.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Kaoru; Wada, Takayuki; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji

    2013-06-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) and causes botulism in humans and animals. Recently, 15-loci multi-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for C. botulinum was developed for high-resolution and inter-lab comparative genotyping. This study examines the relation between MLVA and other genotyping methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), BoNT/B subtyping and bont/b gene location to evaluate MLVA as a method applicable to the genetic markers for C. botulinum type B. Japanese isolates were genotyped using MLVA and were compared with strains from other sources reported previously. Results show that the discriminatory power of MLVA was comparable to that of PFGE and higher than that of MLST. The topology of the minimum spanning tree (MST) constructed using MLVA data was very consistent with the phylogenetic classifications of PFGE and MLST. The MST topology also represented genetic diversity between the strains possessing bont/b gene on chromosomes and plasmids. Some Japanese isolates including those associated with infant botulism were inferred to be related to isolates of Europe origin from MLVA genotyping results. The MLVA scheme used for this study is apparently useful not only for high-resolution molecular typing, but also for phylogenetic characterization of C. botulinum type B.

  10. Unstable microsatellite repeats facilitate rapid evolution of coding and regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Jansen, A; Gemayel, R; Verstrepen, K J

    2012-01-01

    Tandem repeats are intrinsically highly variable sequences since repeat units are often lost or gained during replication or following unequal recombination events. Because of their low complexity and their instability, these repeats, which are also called satellite repeats, are often considered to be useless 'junk' DNA. However, recent findings show that tandem repeats are frequently found within promoters of stress-induced genes and within the coding regions of genes encoding cell-surface and regulatory proteins. Interestingly, frequent changes in these repeats often confer phenotypic variability. Examples include variation in the microbial cell surface, rapid tuning of internal molecular clocks in flies, and enhanced morphological plasticity in mammals. This suggests that instead of being useless junk DNA, some variable tandem repeats are useful functional elements that confer 'evolvability', facilitating swift evolution and rapid adaptation to changing environments. Since changes in repeats are frequent and reversible, repeats provide a unique type of mutation that bridges the gap between rare genetic mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, and highly unstable but reversible epigenetic inheritance.

  11. Novel microsatellite repeats (MSRs) and linkage disequilibrium analysis in the SMA region of 5q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Yaraghi, Z.; Roy, N.; MacKenzie, A.E.

    1994-09-01

    The spinal muscular atrophies (SMA) are characterized by degeneration of the anterior horn cells of the spinal cord, leading to muscular atrophy associated with progressive paralysis. The gene involved in SMA has been mapped by linkage analysis to a region of 5q13.1 flanked centromerically by D5S435 and telomerically by D5S557. We are in the process of identifying new microsatellite repeats to further define the genetic map of the SMA region. A contiguous array of YAC clones covering the SMA containing D5S435-D56S112 interval of 5q13.1 was established. From this contig, a 700 kb clone 76C1, which contains the 200 kb CMS-1/CATT-1 critical region, was used to generate a partial Sau3A1 phage library. We have previously shown that 2 CATT-1 subloci are in linkage disequilibrium with type I SMA. The 76C1 subloci are in linkage disequilibrium with type I SMA. The 76C1 phage library has been screened for human MSRs. To date we have identified two novel polymorphic microsatellites and four further candidates are being characterized. Results of linkage disequilibrium studies currently underway will be presented. The identification of a linkage disequilibrium maximum will be helpful in the further narrowing of the SMA region.

  12. Effective DNA fragmentation technique for simple sequence repeat detection with a microsatellite-enriched library and high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Ohtake, Rumi; Yoshida, Saki; Shinohara, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    Two different techniques for genomic DNA fragmentation before microsatellite-enriched library construction-restriction enzyme (NlaIII and MseI) digestion and sonication-were compared to examine their effects on simple sequence repeat (SSR) detection using high-throughput sequencing. Tens of thousands of SSR regions from 5 species of the plant family Myrtaceae were detected when the output of individual samples was >1 million paired-end reads. Comparison of the two DNA fragmentation techniques showed that restriction enzyme digestion was superior to sonication for identification of heterozygous genotypes, whereas sonication was superior for detection of various SSR flanking regions with both species-specific and common characteristics. Therefore, choosing the most suitable DNA fragmentation method depends on the type of analysis that is planned.

  13. Relatedness of Vibrio cholerae O1/O139 Isolates from Patients and Their Household Contacts, Determined by Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Emily A.; Chowdhury, Fahima; Begum, Yasmin; Khan, Ashraful I.; Li, Shan; Thierer, James H.; Bailey, Jason; Kreisel, Kristen; Tacket, Carol O.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Harris, Jason B.; Ryan, Edward T.; Qadri, Firdausi; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Stine, O. Colin

    2010-01-01

    The genetic relatedness of Vibrio cholerae O1/O139 isolates obtained from 100 patients and 146 of their household contacts in Dhaka, Bangladesh, between 2002 and 2005 was assessed by multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis. Isolate genotypes were analyzed at five loci containing tandem repeats. Across the population, as well as within households, isolates with identical genotypes were clustered in time. Isolates from individuals within the same household were more likely to have similar or identical genotypes than were isolates from different households, but even within a household, isolates from different individuals often had different genotypes. When household contacts were sampled regularly for 3 weeks after the illness of the household index patient, isolates with genotypes related to the index patient appeared in contacts, on average, ∼3 days after the index patient, while isolates with unrelated genotypes appeared in contacts ∼6 days after. Limited data revealed that multiple isolates from the same individual collected within days of each other or even from a single stool sample may have identical, similar, or unrelated genotypes as well. Our results demonstrate that genetically related V. cholerae strains cluster in local outbreaks but also suggest that multiple distinct strains of V. cholerae O1 may circulate simultaneously within a household. PMID:20585059

  14. Tissue identity testing of cancer by short tandem repeat polymorphism: pitfalls of interpretation in the presence of microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Much, Melissa; Buza, Natalia; Hui, Pei

    2014-03-01

    Tissue identity testing by short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism offers discriminating power in resolving tissue mix-up or contamination. However, one caveat is the presence of microsatellite unstable tumors, in which genetic alterations may drastically change the STR wild-type polymorphism leading to unexpected allelic discordance. We examined how tissue identity testing results can be altered by the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI). Eleven cases of MSI-unstable (9 intestinal and 2 endometrial adenocarcinomas) and 10 cases of MSI-stable tumors (all colorectal adenocarcinomas) were included. All had been previously tested by polymerase chain reaction testing at 5 National Cancer Institute (NCI) recommended MSI loci and/or immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2). Tissue identity testing targeting 15 STR loci was performed using AmpF/STR Identifiler Amplification. Ten of 11 MSI-unstable tumors demonstrated novel alleles at 5 to 12 STR loci per case and frequently with 3 or more allelic peaks. However, all affected loci showed identifiable germline allele(s) in MSI-high tumors. A wild-type allelic profile was seen in 7 of 10 MSI-stable tumors. In the remaining 3 cases, isolated novel alleles were present at a unique single locus in addition to germline alleles. Loss of heterozygosity was observed frequently in both MSI-stable (6/11 cases) and MSI-unstable tumors (8/10 cases). In conclusion, MSI may significantly alter the wild-type allelic polymorphism, leading to potential interpretation errors of STR genotyping. Careful examination of the STR allelic pattern, high index of suspicion, and follow-up MSI testing are crucial to avoid erroneous conclusions and subsequent clinical and legal consequences.

  15. Regional bias of intratumoral genetic heterogeneity of nucleotide repeats in colon cancers with microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Kim, Min Sung; An, Chang Hyeok; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2014-10-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) may produce regional biases in genotype and phenotype evaluation in a single tumor and may impede proper cancer diagnosis. To evaluate the extent of ITH in colorectal cancer (CRC) with microsatellite instability (MSI), we obtained 4-7 biopsies from 39 CRCs followed by MSI analysis either using the Bethesda MSI evaluation system or Promega system with 5 mononucleotide markers. We found decreased prevalence of MSI (+) by the Promega system compared to the Bethesda system. The overall discordance between the two systems was 54 %. In contrast to the previous studies that had shown discordance only in low MSI (MSI-L), our results showed the discordance not only in MSI-L, but also in high MSI (MSI-H) cases. Among the MSI (+) CRCs, ITH of MSI status was identified in 41.7 % of CRC by the Bethesda system and 22.2 % by the Promega system. In terms of MSI markers, the ITH originated from dinucleotide markers in most cases (69 %), but it originated from mononucleotide markers (31 %) as well. Pooling of DNA from a regional biopsy with MSI (+) with additional biopsies from stable MSI (MSS) showed that this approach was beneficial to increase the sensitivity of MSI detection. Our results indicate that ITH of MSI phenotype by the Bethesda system is more overestimated than previously identified. However, because there was considerable ITH of MSI subtypes and markers even by the Promega system, our data suggest that analysis of MSI status in multiple regional biopsies is needed for a better evaluation of MSI status in CRC.

  16. Multilocus microsatellite typing revealed high genetic variability of Leishmania donovani strains isolated during and after a Kala-azar epidemic in Libo Kemkem district, northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Cruz, Israel; Kuhls, Katrin; Alvar, Jorge; Cañavate, Carmen; Hailu, Asrat; Schönian, Gabriele

    2011-06-01

    In 2004, an outbreak of kala-azar (KA) occurred for the first time in Libo Kemkem district, in the highland area of northwest Ethiopia. In order to track the possible origins of the outbreak parasites, we have investigated 19 strains of Leishmania donovani that were collected during (n = 6) and after (n = 13) the outbreak by using 14 highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. Unique microsatellite profiles were obtained for all strains from Libo Kemkem. When compared to those of L. donovani strains from different Ethiopian, Kenyan and Sudanese foci, by genetic distance and Bayesian clustering model analyses, most strains from Libo Kemkem grouped with strains from: (i) Humera and Metema in the lowlands and Belessa in the highland of Ethiopia, and (ii) Sudan, at different hierarchal levels. The strains from Libo Kemkem district were assigned at least to three genetically distinct clusters (A, B1 and B2) of which only one, cluster B2, consisted exclusively of strains from Libo Kemkem. The fact that most of the outbreak strains were found to be related to strains from well-known KA foci in northwest Ethiopia and Sudan might suggest multiple introductions of L. donovani strains from these foci into Libo Kemkem district.

  17. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Feng, Yanxia; Sun, Haiyan; Deng, Yuanyu; Yu, Hanshou; Chen, Huaigu

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici is essential for the establishment of efficient disease control strategies. It is becoming clear that microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play an important role in genome organization and phenotypic diversity, and are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. In this study, we examined the G. graminis var. tritici genome (1) to analyze its pattern of SSRs, (2) to compare it with other plant pathogenic filamentous fungi, such as Magnaporthe oryzae and M. poae, and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for genetic diversity. The G. graminis var. tritici genome was rich in SSRs; a total 13,650 SSRs have been identified with mononucleotides being the most common motifs. In coding regions, the densities of tri- and hexanucleotides were significantly higher than in noncoding regions. The di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotide repeats in the G. graminis var. tritici genome were more abundant than the same repeats in M. oryzae and M. poae. From 115 devised primers, 39 SSRs are polymorphic with G. graminis var. tritici isolates, and 8 primers were randomly selected to analyze 116 isolates from China. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 and the expected heterozygosity (He) from 0.499 to 0.837. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic, and our analysis indicated that G. graminis var. tritici is a species with high genetic diversity. The results provide a pioneering report for several applications, such as the assessment of population structure and genetic diversity of G. graminis var. tritici.

  18. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Laccaria bicolor genome, with development of microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L; Murat, Claude; Morin, Emmanuelle; Le Tacon, F; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a significant role in fungal genome organization, and they are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. We identified SSRs in the Laccaria bicolor genome by in silico survey and analyzed their distribution in the different genomic regions. We also compared the abundance and distribution of SSRs in L. bicolor with those of the following fungal genomes: Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Coprinopsis cinerea, Ustilago maydis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the MISA computer program, we detected 277,062 SSRs in the L. bicolor genome representing 8% of the assembled genomic sequence. Among the analyzed basidiomycetes, L. bicolor exhibited the highest SSR density although no correlation between relative abundance and the genome sizes was observed. In most genomes the short motifs (mono- to trinucleotides) were more abundant than the longer repeated SSRs. Generally, in each organism, the occurrence, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the repeat unit increased. Furthermore, each organism had its own common and longest SSRs. In the L. bicolor genome, most of the SSRs were located in intergenic regions (73.3%) and the highest SSR density was observed in transposable elements (TEs; 6,706 SSRs/Mb). However, 81% of the protein-coding genes contained SSRs in their exons, suggesting that SSR polymorphism may alter gene phenotypes. Within a L. bicolor offspring, sequence polymorphism of 78 SSRs was mainly detected in non-TE intergenic regions. Unlike previously developed microsatellite markers, these new ones are spread throughout the genome; these markers could have immediate applications in population genetics.

  19. FMR1 CGG repeat distribution and linked microsatellite-SNP haplotypes in normal Mexican Mestizo and indigenous populations.

    PubMed

    Felix-López, Xóchitl Adriana; Argüello-García, Raúl; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Peñaloza-Espinoza, Rosenda I; Buentello-Malo, Leonor; Estrada-Mena, Francisco Javier; Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Gómez, Fabio Salamanca; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2006-10-01

    The (CGG)n repeat size distribution in the FMR1 gene was studied in healthy individuals: 80 X chromosomes of Mexican Mestizos from Mexico City and 33 X chromosomes of Mexican Amerindians from three indigenous communities (Purepechas, Nahuas, and Tzeltales), along with alleles and haplotypes defined by two microsatellite polymorphic markers (DXS548 and FRAXAC1) and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (FMRA and FMRB). Genetic frequencies of Mestizo and Amerindian subpopulations were statistically similar in almost all cases and thus were considered one population for comparisons with other populations. Sixteen (CGG)n alleles in the 17-38 size range were observed, and the most common were the 25 (38.0%), 26 (28.3%), and 24 (12.3%) repeat alleles. This pattern differs from most other populations reported, but a closer relation to Amerindian, European, and African populations was found, as expected from the historical admixture that gave rise to Mexican Mestizos. The results of the CA repeats analysis at DXS548-FRAXAC1 were restricted to nine haplotypes, of which haplotypes 7-4 (52.2%), 8-4 (23.8%), and 7-3 (11.5%) were predominant. The modal haplotype 7-4, instead of the nearly universal haplotype 7-3, had been reported exclusively in Eastern Asian populations. Likewise, only seven different FRAXAC1-FMRA-FMRB haplotypes were observed, including five novel haplotypes (3TA, 4TA, 3 - A, 4 - A, and 5 - A), compared with Caucasians. Of these, haplotypes - A (78.7%) and 3 - A (13.2%) were the most common in the Mexican population. These data suggest a singular but relatively low genetic diversity at FMR1 in the studied Mexican populations that may be related to the recent origin of Mestizos and the low admixture rate of Amerindians.

  20. Evaluating the Use of Multilocus Variable Number Tandem Repeat Analysis of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157 as a Routine Public Health Tool in England

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Lisa; Elson, Richard; Dallman, Timothy J.; Perry, Neil; Ashton, Philip; Wain, John; Adak, Goutam K.; Grant, Kathie A.; Jenkins, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) provides microbiological support for investigations of clusters of cases of infection with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O157. All confirmed STEC O157 isolated in England and submitted to the Gastrointestinal Bacteria Reference Unit (GBRU) during a six month period were typed using MLVA, with the aim of assessing the impact of this approach on epidemiological investigations. Of 539 cases investigated, 341 (76%) had unique (>2 single locus variants) MLVA profiles, 12% of profiles occurred more than once due to known household transmission and 12% of profiles occurred as part of 41 clusters, 21 of which were previously identified through routine public health investigation of cases. The remaining 20 clusters were not previously detected and STEC enhanced surveillance data for associated cases were retrospectively reviewed for epidemiological links including shared exposures, geography and/or time. Additional evidence of a link between cases was found in twelve clusters. Compared to phage typing, the number of sporadic cases was reduced from 69% to 41% and the diversity index for MLVA was 0.996 versus 0.782 for phage typing. Using MLVA generates more data on the spatial and temporal dispersion of cases, better defining the epidemiology of STEC infection than phage typing. The increased detection of clusters through MLVA typing highlights the challenges to health protection practices, providing a forerunner to the advent of whole genome sequencing as a diagnostic tool. PMID:24465775

  1. Comparison of inferred relatedness based on multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis and whole genome sequencing of Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mahamud-Ur; Almeida, Mathieu; Azman, Andrew S; Lindsay, Brianna R; Sack, David A; Colwell, Rita R; Huq, Anwar; Morris, J Glenn; Alam, Munirul; Stine, O Colin

    2016-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes cholera, a severe diarrheal disease. Understanding the local genetic diversity and transmission of V. cholerae will improve our ability to control cholera. Vibrio cholerae isolates clustered in genetically related groups (clonal complexes, CC) by multilocus variable tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) were compared by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Isolates in CC1 had been isolated from two geographical locations. Isolates in a second genetically distinct group, CC2, were isolated only at one location. Using WGS, CC1 isolates from both locations revealed, on average, 43.8 nucleotide differences, while those strains comprising CC2 averaged 19.7 differences. Strains from both MLVA-CCs had an average difference of 106.6. Thus, isolates comprising CC1 were more closely related (P < 10(-6)) to each other than to isolates in CC2. Within a MLVA-CC, after removing all paralogs, alternative alleles were found in all possible combinations on separate chromosomes indicative of recombination within the core genome. Including recombination did not affect the distinctiveness of the MLVA-CCs when measured by WGS. We found that WGS generally reflected the same genetic relatedness of isolates as MLVA, indicating that isolates from the same MLVA-CC shared a more recent common ancestor than isolates from the same location that clustered in a distinct MLVA-CC. © FEMS 2016.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Vibrio cholerae O1 in northern Vietnam (2007-2009), using multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dong Tu; Ngo, Tuan Cuong; Le, Thanh Huong; Nguyen, Hoai Thu; Morita, Masatomo; Arakawa, Eiji; Ohnishi, Makoto; Nguyen, Binh Minh; Izumiya, Hidemasa

    2016-09-01

    Cholera is an infectious disease of major concern in Vietnam and other Asian countries. In 2009, there was a large outbreak of cholera in northern Vietnam. To investigate relationships among isolates of the causative pathogen Vibrio cholerae in this region since 2007, we carried out a multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) of 170 isolates collected between 2007 and 2009. A total of 24 MLVA types were identified using seven loci. Five clones (1-5) were identified using five loci of the large V. cholerae chromosome; clones 1 and 2 were major, and the others were minor. Clone 1 isolates were responsible for the 2009 outbreak. A shift in the predominant clone occurred between 2007 and 2009, with clone 1 likely derived from clone 2. Moreover, the former was less diverse than the latter, suggesting a single source of cholera dissemination. Epidemiological data indicated a wavelet prior to the large outbreak, suggesting that drinking water source or food chain became contaminated during dissemination. Our results reveal the utility of MLVA for analysis of V. cholerae isolates within a relatively short period and broaden our understanding of its transmission and response to cholera.

  3. High-resolution genetic fingerprinting of European strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum by use of multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Bown, Kevin J; Lambin, Xavier; Ogden, Nicholas H; Petrovec, Miroslav; Shaw, Susan E; Woldehiwet, Zerai; Birtles, Richard J

    2007-06-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a widely distributed tick-borne pathogen of humans, livestock, and companion animals. We used in silico methods to identify 10 variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci within the genome sequence of the A. phagocytophilum HZ strain and used these data to develop a multilocus VNTR-based typing scheme for the species. Having confirmed the stability of four of the loci in replicates of the A. phagocytophilum strain that had been subjected to different numbers of passages through cell cocultures in vitro, we then used this typing scheme to discriminate between 20 A. phagocytophilum strains of diverse geographical and host provenances. Extensive diversity was found at each of the four loci studied, with total allele numbers ranging from 13 to 18 and Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index values ranging from 0.93 to 0.99. Only 2 of the 20 strains examined shared alleles at all four loci. The discriminatory power of VNTR analysis was found to be greater than that of either partial msp4 or 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. The extremely high sensitivity of this novel approach to the genetic fingerprinting of A. phagocytophilum strains should serve well in molecular epidemiological studies of infection transmission, particularly when fine-scale strain delineation is required.

  4. Subtyping of a Large Collection of Historical Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Ontario, Canada, by an Improved Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA)

    PubMed Central

    Saleh-Lakha, S.; Allen, V. G.; Li, J.; Pagotto, F.; Odumeru, J.; Taboada, E.; Lombos, M.; Tabing, K. C.; Blais, B.; Ogunremi, D.; Downing, G.; Lee, S.; Gao, A.; Nadon, C.

    2013-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for severe and often fatal food-borne infections in humans. A collection of 2,421 L. monocytogenes isolates originating from Ontario's food chain between 1993 and 2010, along with Ontario clinical isolates collected from 2004 to 2010, was characterized using an improved multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). The MLVA method was established based on eight primer pairs targeting seven variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci in two 4-plex fluorescent PCRs. Diversity indices and amplification rates of the individual VNTR loci ranged from 0.38 to 0.92 and from 0.64 to 0.99, respectively. MLVA types and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were compared using Comparative Partitions analysis involving 336 clinical and 99 food and environmental isolates. The analysis yielded Simpson's diversity index values of 0.998 and 0.992 for MLVA and PFGE, respectively, and adjusted Wallace coefficients of 0.318 when MLVA was used as a primary subtyping method and 0.088 when PFGE was a primary typing method. Statistical data analysis using BioNumerics allowed for identification of at least 8 predominant and persistent L. monocytogenes MLVA types in Ontario's food chain. The MLVA method correctly clustered epidemiologically related outbreak strains and separated unrelated strains in a subset analysis. An MLVA database was established for the 2,421 L. monocytogenes isolates, which allows for comparison of data among historical and new isolates of different sources. The subtyping method coupled with the MLVA database will help in effective monitoring/prevention approaches to identify environmental contamination by pathogenic strains of L. monocytogenes and investigation of outbreaks. PMID:23956391

  5. Chromosomal mapping of microsatellite repeats in the rock bream fish Oplegnathus fasciatus, with emphasis of their distribution in the neo-Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongdong; Lou, Bao; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello

    2013-03-19

    Despite the theoretical and experimental progress, our understanding on sex chromosome differentiation is still diagrammatic. The accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences is believed to occur in early stages of such differentiation. As fish species present a wide range of sex chromosome systems they are excellent models to examine the differentiation of these chromosomes. In the present study, the chromosomal distribution of 9 mono-, di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellites were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybrization (FISH) in rock bream fish (Oplegnathus fasciatus), which is characterized by an X1X2Y sex chromosome system. Generally, the males and females exhibited the same autosomal pattern of distribution for a specific microsatellite probe. The male specific Y chromosome displays a specific amount of distinct microsatellites repeats along both arms. However, the accumulation of these repetitive sequences was not accompanied by a huge heterochromatinization process. The present data provide new insights into the chromosomal constitution of the multiple sex chromosomes and allow further investigations on the true role of the microsatellite repeats in the differentiation process of this sex system.

  6. Determination of microsatellite repeats in the human thyroid peroxidase (TPOX) gene using an automated gene analysis system with nanoscale engineered biomagnetite.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takahito; Maruyama, Kohei; Takeyama, Haruko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2007-04-15

    The number of repeat in the microsatellite region (AATG)(5-14) of the human thyroid peroxidase gene (TOPX) was determined using an automated DNA analysis system with nano-scale engineered biomagnetite. Thermal melting curve analysis of DNA duplexes on biomagnetite indicated that shorter repeat sequences (less than 9 repeats) were easily discriminated. However, it was difficult to determine the number of repeats at more than nine. In order to improve the selectivity of this method for the longer repeats, a "double probe hybridization assay" was performed in which an intermediate probe was used to replace a target repeat sequence having more than 9 repeats with a shorter sequence possessing less than 9 repeats. Thermal probe melting curve analyses and Tm determination confirmed that the target with 10 repeats was converted to 5 repeats, 11 repeats converted to 4 and 12 to 3, respectively. Furthermore, rapid determination of repeat numbers was possible by measuring fluorescence intensities obtained by probe dissociation at 56 and 66 degrees C, and 40, 60 and 80 degrees C for signal normalization.

  7. Clostridium botulinum Group I Strain Genotyping by 15-Locus Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fillo, Silvia; Giordani, Francesco; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Gorgé, Olivier; Ramisse, Vincent; Vergnaud, Gilles; Riehm, Julia M.; Scholz, Holger C.; Splettstoesser, Wolf D.; Kieboom, Jasper; Olsen, Jaran-Strand; Fenicia, Lucia; Lista, Florigio

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation that encompasses a broad variety of spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria producing the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). C. botulinum is the etiologic agent of botulism, a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease. Fine-resolution genetic characterization of C. botulinum isolates of any BoNT type is relevant for both epidemiological studies and forensic microbiology. A 10-locus multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was previously applied to isolates of C. botulinum type A. The present study includes five additional loci designed to better address proteolytic B and F serotypes. We investigated 79 C. botulinum group I strains isolated from human and food samples in several European countries, including types A (28), B (36), AB (4), and F (11) strains, and 5 nontoxic Clostridium sporogenes. Additional data were deduced from in silico analysis of 10 available fully sequenced genomes. This 15-locus MLVA (MLVA-15) scheme identified 86 distinct genotypes that clustered consistently with the results of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and MLVA genotyping in previous reports. An MLVA-7 scheme, a subset of the MLVA-15, performed on a lab-on-a-chip device using a nonfluorescent subset of primers, is also proposed as a first-line assay. The phylogenetic grouping obtained with the MLVA-7 does not differ significantly from that generated by the MLVA-15. To our knowledge, this report is the first to analyze genetic variability among all of the C. botulinum group I serotypes by MLVA. Our data provide new insights into the genetic variability of group I C. botulinum isolates worldwide and demonstrate that this group is genetically highly diverse. PMID:22012011

  8. Clostridium botulinum group I strain genotyping by 15-locus multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis.

    PubMed

    Fillo, Silvia; Giordani, Francesco; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Gorgé, Olivier; Ramisse, Vincent; Vergnaud, Gilles; Riehm, Julia M; Scholz, Holger C; Splettstoesser, Wolf D; Kieboom, Jasper; Olsen, Jaran-Strand; Fenicia, Lucia; Lista, Florigio

    2011-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation that encompasses a broad variety of spore-forming, Gram-positive bacteria producing the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). C. botulinum is the etiologic agent of botulism, a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease. Fine-resolution genetic characterization of C. botulinum isolates of any BoNT type is relevant for both epidemiological studies and forensic microbiology. A 10-locus multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was previously applied to isolates of C. botulinum type A. The present study includes five additional loci designed to better address proteolytic B and F serotypes. We investigated 79 C. botulinum group I strains isolated from human and food samples in several European countries, including types A (28), B (36), AB (4), and F (11) strains, and 5 nontoxic Clostridium sporogenes. Additional data were deduced from in silico analysis of 10 available fully sequenced genomes. This 15-locus MLVA (MLVA-15) scheme identified 86 distinct genotypes that clustered consistently with the results of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and MLVA genotyping in previous reports. An MLVA-7 scheme, a subset of the MLVA-15, performed on a lab-on-a-chip device using a nonfluorescent subset of primers, is also proposed as a first-line assay. The phylogenetic grouping obtained with the MLVA-7 does not differ significantly from that generated by the MLVA-15. To our knowledge, this report is the first to analyze genetic variability among all of the C. botulinum group I serotypes by MLVA. Our data provide new insights into the genetic variability of group I C. botulinum isolates worldwide and demonstrate that this group is genetically highly diverse.

  9. Multi-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis of Chinese Brucella strains isolated from 1953 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guo-Zhong; Cui, Bu-Yun; Piao, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Hong-Yan; Li, Lan-Yu; Liu, Xi; Xiao, Pei; Zhao, Zhong-Zhi; Xu, Li-Qing; Jiang, Hai; Li, Zhen-Jun

    2017-05-02

    Brucellosis was a common human and livestock disease caused by Brucella strains, the category B priority pathogens by the US Center for Disease Control (CDC). Identified as a priority disease in human and livestock populations, the increasing incidence in recent years in China needs urgent control measures for this disease but the molecular background important for monitoring the epidemiology of Brucella strains at the national level is still lacking. A total of 600 Brucella isolates collected during 60 years (from 1953 to 2013) in China were genotyped by multiple locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and the variation degree of MLVA11 loci was calculated by the Hunter Gaston Diversity Index (HGDI) values. The charts and map were processed by Excel 2013, and cluster analysis and epidemiological distribution was performed using BioNumerics (version 5.1). The 600 representative Brucella isolates fell into 104 genotypes with 58 singleton genotypes by the MLVA11 assay, including B. melitensis biovars 2 and 3 (five main genotypes), B. abortus biovars 1 and 3 (two main genotypes), B. suis biovars 1 and 3 (three main genotypes), and B. canis (two main genotypes) respectively. While most B. suis biovar 1 and biovar 3 were respectively found in northern provinces and southern provinces, B. melitensis and B. abortus strains were dominant in China. Canine Brucellosis was only found in animals without any human cases reported. Eight Brucellosis epidemic peaks emerged during the 60 years between 1953 and 2013: 1955 - 1959, 1962 - 1969, 1971 - 1975, 1977 - 1983, 1985 - 1989, 1992 - 1997, 2000 - 2008 and 2010 - 2013 in China. Brucellosis has its unique molecular epidemiological patterns with specific spatial and temporal distribution according to MLVA. IDOP-D-16-00101.

  10. Analysis of Clostridium botulinum Serotype E Strains by Using Multilocus Sequence Typing, Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, and Botulinum Neurotoxin Gene Sequencing▿

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Thomas E.; Helma, Charles H.; Shou, Yulin; Valdez, Yolanda E.; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Foley, Brian T.; Davis, Stephen W.; Hannett, George E.; Kelly-Cirino, Cassandra D.; Barash, Jason R.; Arnon, Stephen S.; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu; Smith, Leonard A.; Smith, Theresa J.; Hill, Karen K.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 41 Clostridium botulinum serotype E strains from different geographic regions, including Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Greenland, Japan, and the United States, were compared by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis, and botulinum neurotoxin (bont) E gene sequencing. The strains, representing environmental, food-borne, and infant botulism samples collected from 1932 to 2007, were analyzed to compare serotype E strains from different geographic regions and types of botulism and to determine whether each of the strains contained the transposon-associated recombinase rarA, involved with bont/E insertion. MLST examination using 15 genes clustered the strains into several clades, with most members within a cluster sharing the same BoNT/E subtype (BoNT/E1, E2, E3, or E6). Sequencing of the bont/E gene identified two new variants (E7, E8) that showed regions of recombination with other E subtypes. The AFLP dendrogram clustered the 41 strains similarly to the MLST dendrogram. Strains that could not be differentiated by AFLP, MLST, or bont gene sequencing were further examined using three VNTR regions. Both intact and split rarA genes were amplified by PCR in each of the strains, and their identities were confirmed in 11 strains by amplicon sequencing. The findings suggest that (i) the C. botulinum serotype E strains result from the targeted insertion of the bont/E gene into genetically conserved bacteria and (ii) recombination events (not random mutations) within bont/E result in toxin variants or subtypes within strains. PMID:22003031

  11. Virulence Gene Profile and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA) of Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) Isolates From Patients With Diarrhea in Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Nave, Hossein; Mansouri, Shahla; Taati Moghadam, Majid; Moradi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) isolates cause dysentery in humans. Several virulence factors associated with EIEC pathogenesis have been characterized. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) is a PCR-based method that has been used for genotyping bacterial pathogens. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of virulence factor genes in EIEC isolates from patients with diarrhea in Kerman, Iran, as well as the genetic relationships between these isolates. Patients and Methods A total of 620 diarrheic stool samples were collected from patients attending two hospitals in Kerman from June 2013 to August 2014. All isolates were confirmed as EIEC by PCR for the ipaH gene. The EIEC isolates were evaluated by PCR for the presence of nine virulence genes (ial, set1A, sen, virF, invE, sat, sigA, pic, and sepA). MLVA was performed for all EIEC isolates. Results A total of 11 EIEC isolates were identified, and all were positive for the ial gene. The invE and virF genes were observed in 81.8% of the isolates, while sen, sigA, and pic were detected in 72.7%, 63.6%, and 27.3% of the isolates, respectively. None of the isolates were positive for the sat, set, and sepA genes. Using MLVA, the 11 total isolates were divided into five types. Conclusions By studying the profiles of virulence genes and MLVA, it can be concluded that EIEC isolates do not have high heterogeneity and are derived from a limited number of clones. PMID:27635212

  12. Comparison by multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis and antimicrobial resistance among atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from food samples and human and animal faecal specimens.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Nakamura, H; Kage-Nakadai, E; Hara-Kudo, Y; Nishikawa, Y

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed whether multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing discriminated diarrhoeagenic atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) from aEPEC indigenous to domestic animals or healthy people. MLVA genotyping of 142 aEPEC strains isolated from foods and faecal samples of domestic animals and humans revealed 126 distinct MLVA profiles that distributed to four clusters, yielding a Simpson's index of diversity (D) of 99·8%. Cluster 2 included 87% of cattle isolates and 67% of patient isolates. The plurality (15/34, 44%) of strains from healthy humans mapped to Cluster 1, while half (18/41, 44%) of the swine strains belonged to Cluster 4. Testing for antimicrobial susceptibility revealed that 52 strains (37%) of aEPEC were resistant to one or more agents; only 10 strains (7%) exhibited resistance to more than three agents. Strains isolated from swine or food exhibited a wider variety of resistance phenotypes than bovine or human strains. MLVA assigned the aEPEC isolates from cattle and patients to Cluster 2, distinct from aEPEC from other sources. Hog yards may be a larger source of drug-resistant strains than are cattle ranches. MLVA suggests that human diarrhoeagenic aEPEC are derived from cattle and are distinct from strains carried by healthy people and other animals. Cattle appear to be reservoirs of human diarrhoeagenic aEPEC. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Ruminant Rhombencephalitis-Associated Listeria monocytogenes Alleles Linked to a Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis Complex ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Balandyté, Lina; Brodard, Isabelle; Frey, Joachim; Oevermann, Anna; Abril, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is among the most important food-borne pathogens and is well adapted to persist in the environment. To gain insight into the genetic relatedness and potential virulence of L. monocytogenes strains causing central nervous system (CNS) infections, we used multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) to subtype 183 L. monocytogenes isolates, most from ruminant rhombencephalitis and some from human patients, food, and the environment. Allelic-profile-based comparisons grouped L. monocytogenes strains mainly into three clonal complexes and linked single-locus variants (SLVs). Clonal complex A essentially consisted of isolates from human and ruminant brain samples. All but one rhombencephalitis isolate from cattle were located in clonal complex A. In contrast, food and environmental isolates mainly clustered into clonal complex C, and none was classified as clonal complex A. Isolates of the two main clonal complexes (A and C) obtained by MLVA were analyzed by PCR for the presence of 11 virulence-associated genes (prfA, actA, inlA, inlB, inlC, inlD, inlE, inlF, inlG, inlJ, and inlC2H). Virulence gene analysis revealed significant differences in the actA, inlF, inlG, and inlJ allelic profiles between clinical isolates (complex A) and nonclinical isolates (complex C). The association of particular alleles of actA, inlF, and newly described alleles of inlJ with isolates from CNS infections (particularly rhombencephalitis) suggests that these virulence genes participate in neurovirulence of L. monocytogenes. The overall absence of inlG in clinical complex A and its presence in complex C isolates suggests that the InlG protein is more relevant for the survival of L. monocytogenes in the environment. PMID:21984240

  14. Analysis of candidate target genes for mononucleotide repeat mutation in microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kishimi, Arisa; Ogawa, Seiji; Kisu, Iori; Nomura, Hiroyuki; Hirasawa, Akira; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2009-11-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is an indicator of DNA instability and is caused by abnormalities in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes such as hMLH1, hMSH2 and hMSH6. MSI occurs frequently in endometrial cancer (in approximately 30% of cases), and accumulation of gene mutations due to MSI may therefore have a major role in the mechanism of malignant transformation. However, a responsible target gene has not been identified in endometrial cancer. In this study, we analyzed mutations in 11 cancer-related genes with mononucleotide repeats susceptible to MSI in a coding region [hMSH3 (A8), hMSH6 (C8), TGF-beta RII (A10), MBD4 (A10), BAX (G8), PTEN (A6 in exon 7), HDAC2 (A9), EPHB2 (A9), Caspase-5 (A10), TCF-4 (A9) and Axin2 (G7)] in 22 patients with MSI-H sporadic endometrial cancer. Mutations in hMSH6 (C8) and TGF-beta RII (A10) were found most frequently, at rates of 36.3% (8/22) each. Mutations of BAX (G8) and TCF-4 (A9), which are common in MSI-positive colorectal cancer, occurred at rates of 22.7 and 0%, respectively, which suggests that the MSI target gene may differ between endometrial and colorectal cancers. Mutations in hMSH6 (C8) were correlated with reduced protein expression (p=0.042) and patients with these mutations had significantly more mutations in mononucleotide repeats in other cancer-related genes compared to patients without hMSH6 (C8) mutations (p=0.042). This suggests the possibility of a novel cascade in carcinogenesis of endometrial cancer in which MSI mutates hMSH6 (C8), increases gene instability, and leads to accumulation of mutations in other cancer-related genes. To our knowledge, this is the first report to show that hMSH6 (C8) has an important role as an MSI target gene in sporadic endometrial cancer.

  15. New Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA) Scheme for Fine-Scale Monitoring and Microevolution-Related Study of Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum Phylotype I Populations

    PubMed Central

    Guinard, Jérémy; Latreille, Anne; Guérin, Fabien; Poussier, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial wilt caused by the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC) is considered one of the most harmful plant diseases in the world. Special attention should be paid to R. pseudosolanacearum phylotype I due to its large host range, its worldwide distribution, and its high evolutionary potential. So far, the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of this bacterium are poorly understood. Until now, the genetic structure of the RSSC has been analyzed on the worldwide and regional scales. Emerging questions regarding evolutionary forces in RSSC adaptation to hosts now require genetic markers that are able to monitor RSSC field populations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) approach for its ability to discriminate genetically close phylotype I strains and for population genetics studies. We developed a new MLVA scheme (MLVA-7) allowing us to genotype 580 R. pseudosolanacearum phylotype I strains extracted from susceptible and resistant hosts and from different habitats (stem, soil, and rhizosphere). Based on specificity, polymorphism, and the amplification success rate, we selected seven fast-evolving variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) markers. The newly developed MLVA-7 scheme showed higher discriminatory power than the previously published MLVA-13 scheme when applied to collections sampled from the same location on different dates and to collections from different locations on very small scales. Our study provides a valuable tool for fine-scale monitoring and microevolution-related study of R. pseudosolanacearum phylotype I populations. IMPORTANCE Understanding the evolutionary dynamics of adaptation of plant pathogens to new hosts or ecological niches has become a key point for the development of innovative disease management strategies, including durable resistance. Whereas the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence or pathogenicity changes have been studied thoroughly, the

  16. Comparison of Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis and Whole-Genome Sequencing for Investigation of Clostridium difficile Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Fawley, W. N.; Best, E. L.; Griffiths, D.; Stoesser, N. E.; Crook, D. W.; Peto, T. E. A.; Walker, A. S.; Wilcox, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    No study to date has compared multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in an investigation of the transmission of Clostridium difficile infection. Isolates from 61 adults with ongoing and/or recurrent C. difficile infections and 17 asymptomatic carriage episodes in children (201 samples), as well as from 61 suspected outbreaks affecting 2 to 41 patients in 31 hospitals in the United Kingdom (300 samples), underwent 7-locus MLVA and WGS in parallel. When the first and last samples from the same individual taken for a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 63 days (43 to 105 days) apart were compared, the estimated rates of the evolution of single nucleotide variants (SNVs), summed tandem-repeat differences (STRDs), and locus variants (LVs) were 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.00 to 1.75), 1.63 (95% CI, 0.00 to 3.59), and 1.21 (95% CI, 0.00 to 2.67)/called genome/year, respectively. Differences of >2 SNVs and >10 STRDs have been used to exclude direct case-to-case transmission. With the first serial sample per individual being used to assess discriminatory power, across all pairs of samples sharing a PCR ribotype, 192/283 (68%) differed by >10 STRDs and 217/283 (77%) by >2 SNVs. Among all pairs of cases from the same suspected outbreak, 1,190/1,488 (80%) pairs had concordant results using >2 SNVs and >10 STRDs to exclude transmission. For the discordant pairs, 229 (15%) had ≥2 SNVs but ≤10 STRDs, and 69 (5%) had ≤2 SNVs but ≥10 STRDs. Discordant pairs had higher numbers of LVs than concordant pairs, supporting the more diverse measure in each type of discordant pair. Conclusions on whether the potential outbreaks were confirmed were concordant in 58/61 (95%) investigations. Overall findings using MLVA and WGS were very similar despite the fact that they analyzed different parts of the bacterial genome. With improvements in WGS technology, it is likely that MLVA locus data will be available from WGS in the

  17. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Semi; Lim, Nara; Kwon, Seungjik; Shim, Taesun; Park, Misun; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seonghan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods. Methods Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), and VNTR assay targeting 44 M. intracellulare isolates obtained from patients with pulmonary infections were performed. Results All the antibiotic susceptibility patterns had no association with the molecular and sequence types tested in this study; however, the molecular and sequence types were related with each other. PFGE gave best results for discriminatory capacity, followed by VNTR, MLST, and MIRU-VNTR. Conclusion The high discriminatory power of PFGE, VNTR, and MLST is enough for differentiating between reinfection and relapse, as well as for other molecular epidemiological usages. The MLST could be regarded as a representative classification method, because it showed the clearest relation with the sequence types. PMID:25180144

  18. Three novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the glaucoma locus GLC1B by datamining tetranucleotide repeats on chromosome 2p12-q12

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In order to identify new markers around the glaucoma locus GLC1B as a tool to refine its critical region at 2p11.2-2q11.2, we searched the critical region sequence obtained from the UCSC database for tetranucleotide (GATA)n and (GTCT)n repeats of at least 10 units in length. Three out of four potential microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic, heterozygosity ranging from 64.56% to 79.59%. The identified markers are useful not only for GLC1B locus but also for the study of other disease loci at 2p11.2-2q11.2, a region with scarcity of microsatellite markers. PMID:21637444

  19. Three novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the glaucoma locus GLC1B by datamining tetranucleotide repeats on chromosome 2p12-q12.

    PubMed

    Murga-Zamalloa, Carlos; Guevara-Fujita, Maria Luisa; Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Fujita, Ricardo

    2009-10-01

    In order to identify new markers around the glaucoma locus GLC1B as a tool to refine its critical region at 2p11.2-2q11.2, we searched the critical region sequence obtained from the UCSC database for tetranucleotide (GATA)n and (GTCT)n repeats of at least 10 units in length. Three out of four potential microsatellite loci were found to be polymorphic, heterozygosity ranging from 64.56% to 79.59%. The identified markers are useful not only for GLC1B locus but also for the study of other disease loci at 2p11.2-2q11.2, a region with scarcity of microsatellite markers.

  20. Organellar genome, nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit, and microsatellites isolated from a small-scale of 454 GS FLX sequencing on two mosses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Forrest, Laura L; Bainard, Jillian D; Budke, Jessica M; Goffinet, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Recent innovations in high-throughput DNA sequencing methodology (next generation sequencing technologies [NGS]) allow for the generation of large amounts of high quality data that may be particularly critical for resolving ambiguous relationships such as those resulting from rapid radiations. Application of NGS technology to bryology is limited to assembling entire nuclear or organellar genomes of selected exemplars of major lineages (e.g., classes). Here we outline how organellar genomes and the entire nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat can be obtained from minimal amounts of moss tissue via small-scale 454 GS FLX sequencing. We sampled two Funariaceae species, Funaria hygrometrica and Entosthodon obtusus, and assembled nearly complete organellar genomes and the whole nuclear ribosomal DNA repeat unit (18S-ITS1-5.8S-ITS2-26S-IGS1-5S-IGS2) for both taxa. Sequence data from these species were compared to sequences from another Funariaceae species, Physcomitrella patens, revealing low overall degrees of divergence of the organellar genomes and nrDNA genes with substitutions spread rather evenly across their length, and high divergence within the external spacers of the nrDNA repeat. Furthermore, we detected numerous microsatellites among the 454 assemblies. This study demonstrates that NGS methodology can be applied to mosses to target large genomic regions and identify microsatellites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic diversity of bovine Neospora caninum determined by microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Salehi, N; Gottstein, B; Haddadzadeh, H R

    2015-10-01

    Neospora caninum is one of the most significant parasitic organisms causing bovine abortion worldwide. Despite the economic impact of this infection, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity of this parasite. In this study, using Nc5 and ITS1 nested PCR, N. caninum has been detected in 12 brain samples of aborted fetuses from 298 seropositive dairy cattle collected from four different regions in Tehran, Iran. These specimen (Nc-Iran) were genotyped in multilocus using 9 different microsatellite markers previously described (MS4, MS5, MS6A, MS6B, MS7, MS8, MS10, MS12 and MS21). Microsatellite amplification was completely feasible in 2 samples, semi-completely in 8 samples, and failed in 2 samples. Within the two completely performed allelic profiles of Nc-Iran strains, unique multilocus profiles were obtained for both and novel allelic patterns were found in the MS8 and MS10 microsatellite markers. The Jaccard's similarity index showed significant difference between these two strains and from other standard isolates derived from GenBank such as Nc-Liv, Nc-SweB1, Nc-GER1, KBA1, and KBA2. All samples originating from the same area showed identical allelic numbers and a correlation between the number of repeats and geographic districts was observed.

  2. A polymorphic microsatellite repeat within the ECE-1c promoter is involved in transcriptional start site determination, human evolution, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaosi; Seidel, Kerstin; Marschall, Peter; Klein, Michael; Hope, Antonia; Schacherl, Jens; Schmitz, Jennifer; Menk, Mario; Schefe, Jan H; Reinemund, Jana; Hugel, Rebecca; Walden, Peter; Schlosser, Andreas; Volkmer, Rudolf; Schimkus, Julia; Kölsch, Heike; Maier, Wolfgang; Kornhuber, Johannes; Frölich, Lutz; Klare, Sabrina; Kirsch, Sebastian; Schmerbach, Kristin; Scheele, Sylvia; Grittner, Ulrike; Zollmann, Frank; Goldin-Lang, Petra; Peters, Oliver; Kintscher, Ulrich; Unger, Thomas; Funke-Kaiser, Heiko

    2012-11-21

    Genetic factors strongly contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nevertheless, genome-wide association studies only yielded single nucleotide polymorphism loci of moderate importance. In contrast, microsatellite repeats are functionally less characterized structures within our genomes. Previous work has shown that endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) is able to reduce amyloid β content. Here we demonstrate that a CpG-CA repeat within the human ECE-1c promoter is highly polymorphic, harbors transcriptional start sites, is able to recruit the transcription factors poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and splicing factor proline and glutamine-rich, and is functional regarding haplotype-specific promoter activity. Furthermore, genotyping of 403 AD patients and 444 controls for CpG-CA repeat length indicated shifted allelic frequency distributions. Sequencing of 245 haplotype clones demonstrated that the overall CpG-CA repeat composition of AD patients and controls is distinct. Finally, we show that human and chimpanzee [CpG](m)-[CA](n) ECE-1c promoter repeats are genetically and functionally distinct. Our data indicate that a short genomic repeat structure constitutes a novel core promoter element, coincides with human evolution, and contributes to the pathogenesis of AD.

  3. Microsatellites for Lindera species

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt; D. Deemer; T.L. Kubisiak; C.D. Nelson

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed for conservation genetic studies of Lindera melissifolia (pondberry), a federally endangered shrub of southern bottomland ecosystems. Microsatellite sequences were obtained from DNA libraries that were enriched for the (AC)n simple sequence repeat motif. From 35 clone sequences, 20 primer...

  4. The chromosomal distribution of microsatellite repeats in the genome of the wolf fish Hoplias malabaricus, focusing on the sex chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, M B; Kejnovsky, E; Bertollo, L A C

    2011-01-01

    Distribution of 12 mono-, di- and tri-nucleotide microsatellites on the chromosomes of 2 karyomorphs with 2 distinct sex chromosome systems (a simple XX/XY - karyomorph B and a multiple X(1)X(1)X(2)X(2)/X(1)X(2)Y - karyomorph D) in Hoplias malabaricus, commonly referred to as wolf fish, was studied using their physical mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The distribution patterns of different microsatellites along the chromosomes varied considerably. Strong hybridization signals were observed at subtelomeric and heterochromatic regions of several autosomes, with a different accumulation on the sex chromosomes. A massive accumulation was found in the heterochromatic region of the X chromosome of karyomorph B, whereas microsatellites were gathered at centromeres of both X chromosomes as well as in corresponding regions of the neo-Y chromosome in karyomorph D. Our findings are likely in agreement with models that predict the accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences in regions with very low recombination. This process is however in contrast with what was observed in multiple systems, where such a reduction might be facilitated by the chromosomal rearrangements that are directly associated with the origin of these systems.

  5. Reconstruction of microsatellite mutation history reveals a strong and consistent deletion bias in invasive clonal snails, Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Weetman, David; Hauser, Lorenz; Carvalho, Gary R

    2002-10-01

    Direct observations of mutations and comparative analyses suggest that nuclear microsatellites show a tendency to expand, with reports of deletion biases limited to very long alleles or a few loci in multilocus studies. Here we investigate microsatellite evolution in clonal snails, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, since their introduction to Britain in the 19th century, using an analysis based on minimum spanning networks of multilocus microsatellite genotypes. British populations consist of a small number of highly distinct genotype groups with very few outlying genotypes, suggesting clonal lineages containing minor variation generated by mutation. Network patterns suggest that a single introduced genotype was the ancestor of all extant variation and also provide support for wholly apomictic reproduction within the most common clonal lineage (group A). Microsatellites within group A showed a strong tendency to delete repeats, with an overall bias exceeding 88%, irrespective of the exact method used to infer mutations. This highly unusual pattern of deletion bias is consistent across populations and loci and is unrelated to allele size. We suggest that for persistence of microsatellites in this clone, some change in the mutation mechanism must have occurred in relatively recent evolutionary time. Possible causes of such a change in mechanism are discussed.

  6. Instability of a dinucleotide repeat in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) gene in microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cherukuri, Durga Prasad; Deignan, Joshua L; Das, Kingshuk; Grody, Wayne W; Herschman, Harvey

    2015-08-01

    DNA mismatch-repair gene mutations, with consequent loss of functional protein expression, result in microsatellite instability (MSI). Microsatellite sequences are found in coding regions and in regulatory regions of genes (i.e., 5'-UTRs and 3'-UTRs). In addition to being a surrogate marker of defective mismatch repair, deletion or insertion microsatellite sequences can dysregulate gene expression in MSI-H (microsatellite instability-high) tumors. The microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) gene product, mPGES-1, participates in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. Moreover, mPGES-1 is often overexpressed in human colorectal tumors, and is thought to contribute to progression of these tumors. Here we identified a dinucleotide repeat, (GT)24, in the mPGES-1 gene 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR), and analyzed its mutation frequencies in MSI-H and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. The (GT)24 repeat exhibited instability in all MSI-H tumors examined (14), but not in any of the MSS tumors (13). In most cases, (GT)24 repeat instability resulted in insertion of additional GT units. We also determined mPGES-1 mRNA levels in MSI-H and MSS colorectal cancer cell lines. Three of four previously designated "MSI-H" cell lines showed higher mPGES-1 mRNA levels compared to MSS cell lines; correlations between elevated mPGES-1 mRNA levels and microsatellite (GT)24 repeat characteristics are present for all six cell lines. Our results demonstrate that mPGES-1 is a target gene of defective mismatch repair in human colorectal cancer, with functional consequence. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Informativeness of dinucleotide repeat-based primers in fungal pathogen of rice Magnaporthe grisea.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Sonia; Gopalakrishna, T

    2009-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) occur ubiquitously and show complex patterns in length, motif size and sequence. Among SSRs, dinucleotide repeats occur in high abundance in fungi with shorter length as compared to other organisms. In this study, multilocus profiles obtained in Magnaporthe grisea, a model plant pathogen were evaluated. The results showed lower rate of polymorphism by (GT)(n)/(TG)(n) repeat-based primers and suggested occurrence of (GA)(n)/(AG)(n) repeats as integral repeats and (TC)(n)/(CT)(n) and (AC)(n)/(CA)(n) as non-integral repeats. Low repeat length variation was found to be correlated with less number of repeat motifs. The study provides an insight into the possibility of molecular coevolution of mobile elements and dinucleotide repeats in fungi. The study could be applied to other species for wider applications including evolutionary and population genetics.

  8. Estimation of genotyping error rate from repeat genotyping, unintentional recaptures and known parent-offspring comparisons in 16 microsatellite loci for brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus).

    PubMed

    Hess, Maureen A; Rhydderch, James G; LeClair, Larry L; Buckley, Raymond M; Kawase, Mitsuhiro; Hauser, Lorenz

    2012-11-01

    Genotyping errors are present in almost all genetic data and can affect biological conclusions of a study, particularly for studies based on individual identification and parentage. Many statistical approaches can incorporate genotyping errors, but usually need accurate estimates of error rates. Here, we used a new microsatellite data set developed for brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus) to estimate genotyping error using three approaches: (i) repeat genotyping 5% of samples, (ii) comparing unintentionally recaptured individuals and (iii) Mendelian inheritance error checking for known parent-offspring pairs. In each data set, we quantified genotyping error rate per allele due to allele drop-out and false alleles. Genotyping error rate per locus revealed an average overall genotyping error rate by direct count of 0.3%, 1.5% and 1.7% (0.002, 0.007 and 0.008 per allele error rate) from replicate genotypes, known parent-offspring pairs and unintentionally recaptured individuals, respectively. By direct-count error estimates, the recapture and known parent-offspring data sets revealed an error rate four times greater than estimated using repeat genotypes. There was no evidence of correlation between error rates and locus variability for all three data sets, and errors appeared to occur randomly over loci in the repeat genotypes, but not in recaptures and parent-offspring comparisons. Furthermore, there was no correlation in locus-specific error rates between any two of the three data sets. Our data suggest that repeat genotyping may underestimate true error rates and may not estimate locus-specific error rates accurately. We therefore suggest using methods for error estimation that correspond to the overall aim of the study (e.g. known parent-offspring comparisons in parentage studies).

  9. Cytomolecular discrimination of the A(m) chromosomes of Triticum monococcum and the A chromosomes of Triticum aestivum using microsatellite DNA repeats.

    PubMed

    Megyeri, Mária; Mikó, Péter; Farkas, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Molnár, István

    2017-02-01

    The cytomolecular discrimination of the A(m)- and A-genome chromosomes facilitates the selection of wheat-Triticum monococcum introgression lines. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the commonly used DNA probes Afa family, 18S rDNA and pSc119.2 showed that the more complex hybridisation pattern obtained in T. monococcum relative to bread wheat made it possible to differentiate the A(m) and A chromosomes within homoeologous groups 1, 4 and 5. In order to provide additional chromosomal landmarks to discriminate the A(m) and A chromosomes, the microsatellite repeats (GAA)n, (CAG)n, (CAC)n, (AAC)n, (AGG)n and (ACT)n were tested as FISH probes. These showed that T. monococcum chromosomes have fewer, generally weaker, simple sequence repeat (SSR) signals than the A-genome chromosomes of hexaploid wheat. A differential hybridisation pattern was observed on 6A(m) and 6A chromosomes with all the SSR probes tested except for the (ACT)n probe. The 2A(m) and 2A chromosomes were differentiated by the signals given by the (GAA)n, (CAG)n and (AAC)n repeats, while only (GAA)n discriminated the chromosomes 3A(m) and 3A. Chromosomes 7A(m) and 7A could be differentiated by the lack of (GAA)n and (AGG)n signals on 7A. As potential landmarks for identifying the A(m) chromosomes, SSR repeats will facilitate the introgression of T. monococcum chromatin into wheat.

  10. Concerted evolution of the tandemly repeated genes encoding primate U2 small nuclear RNA (the RNU2 locus) does not prevent rapid diversification of the (CT){sub n} {center_dot} (GA){sub n} microsatellite embedded within the U2 repeat unit

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, D.; Weiner, A.M.

    1995-12-10

    The RNU2 locus encoding human U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is organized as a nearly perfect tandem array containing 5 to 22 copies of a 5.8-kb repeat unit. Just downstream of the U2 snRNA gene in each 5.8-kb repeat unit lies a large (CT){sub n}{center_dot}(GA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat (n {approx} 70). This form of genomic organization, in which one repeat is embedded within another, provides an unusual opportunity to study the balance of forces maintaining the homogeneity of both kinds of repeats. Using a combination of field inversion gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction, we have been able to study the CT microsatellites within individual U2 tandem arrays. We find that the CT microsatellites within an RNU2 allele exhibit significant length polymorphism, despite the remarkable homogeneity of the surrounding U2 repeat units. Length polymorphism is due primarily to loss or gain of CT dinucleotide repeats, but other types of deletions, insertions, and substitutions are also frequent. Polymorphism is greatly reduced in regions where pure (CT){sub n} tracts are interrupted by occasional G residues, suggesting that irregularities stabilize both the length and the sequence of the dinucleotide repeat. We further show that the RNU2 loci of other catarrhine primates (gorilla, chimpanzee, ogangutan, and baboon) contain orthologous CT microsatellites; these also exhibit length polymorphism, but are highly divergent from each other. Thus, although the CT microsatellite is evolving far more rapidly than the rest of the U2 repeat unit, it has persisted through multiple speciation events spanning >35 Myr. The persistence of the CT microsatellite, despite polymorphism and rapid evolution, suggests that it might play a functional role in concerted evolution of the RNU2 loci, perhaps as an initiation site for recombination and/or gene conversion. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  11. New multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis tool for surveillance and local epidemiology of bacterial leaf blight and bacterial leaf streak of rice caused by Xanthomonas oryzae.

    PubMed

    Poulin, L; Grygiel, P; Magne, M; Gagnevin, L; Rodriguez-R, L M; Forero Serna, N; Zhao, S; El Rafii, M; Dao, S; Tekete, C; Wonni, I; Koita, O; Pruvost, O; Verdier, V; Vernière, C; Koebnik, R

    2015-01-01

    Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) is efficient for routine typing and for investigating the genetic structures of natural microbial populations. Two distinct pathovars of Xanthomonas oryzae can cause significant crop losses in tropical and temperate rice-growing countries. Bacterial leaf streak is caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, and bacterial leaf blight is caused by X. oryzae pv. oryzae. For the latter, two genetic lineages have been described in the literature. We developed a universal MLVA typing tool both for the identification of the three X. oryzae genetic lineages and for epidemiological analyses. Sixteen candidate variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci were selected according to their presence and polymorphism in 10 draft or complete genome sequences of the three X. oryzae lineages and by VNTR sequencing of a subset of loci of interest in 20 strains per lineage. The MLVA-16 scheme was then applied to 338 strains of X. oryzae representing different pathovars and geographical locations. Linkage disequilibrium between MLVA loci was calculated by index association on different scales, and the 16 loci showed linear Mantel correlation with MLSA data on 56 X. oryzae strains, suggesting that they provide a good phylogenetic signal. Furthermore, analyses of sets of strains for different lineages indicated the possibility of using the scheme for deeper epidemiological investigation on small spatial scales.

  12. Close linkage of a gene for X linked deafness to three microsatellite repeats at Xq21 in radiologically normal and abnormal families.

    PubMed

    Bitner-Glindzicz, M; de Kok, Y; Summers, D; Huber, I; Cremers, F P; Ropers, H H; Reardon, W; Pembrey, M E; Malcolm, S

    1994-12-01

    We have used three highly polymorphic microsatellite repeats from Xq21 to type families in whom a gene for X linked deafness with perilymphatic gusher (DFN 3) was segregating. All three markers were tightly linked to the disease in its radiologically normal and abnormal forms, with a maximum lod score of 10.37 with DXS995 and 8.44 with DXS986 at zero recombination, and 14.03 with DXS1002 at theta = 0.01. In an isolated case of deafness of this type, DXS995 indicated either the first recombination observed between the marker and the disease gene or a new mutation in the proband. Southern blotting using a cosmid fragment from the candidate region has confirmed a de novo mutation by showing a deletion in the proband which is not present in his mother as judged by dosage analysis. We also describe a family with a paracentric inversion associated with a microdeletion and discuss how deletion mapping using these and other markers in the region has helped to define a candidate region for the gene.

  13. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Ustilaginoidea virens genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mina; Yu, Junjie; Li, Huanhuan; Wang, Yahui; Yin, Xiaole; Bo, Huiwen; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Yuxin; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Ustilaginoidea virens is the causal agent of rice false smut, causing quantitative and qualitative losses in rice industry. However, the development and application of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for genetic diversity studies in U. virens were limited. This study is the first to perform large-scale development of SSR markers of this pathogen at the genome level, to (1) compare these SSR markers with those of other fungi, (2) analyze the pattern of the SSRs, and (3) obtain more informative genetic markers. U. virens is rich in SSRs, and 13,778 SSRs were identified with a relative abundance of 349.7SSRs/Mb. The most common motifs in the genome or in noncoding regions were mononucleotides, whereas trinucleotides in coding sequences. A total of 6 out of 127 primers were randomly selected to be used to analyze 115 isolates, and these 6 primers showed high polymorphism in U. virens. This study may serve as an important resource for molecular genetic studies in U. virens.

  14. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  15. GT microsatellite repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm in Croatian patients.

    PubMed

    Gregorek, Andrea Crkvenac; Gornik, Kristina Crkvenac; Polancec, Darija Stupin; Dabelic, Sanja

    2013-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex genetic disorder caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental risk factors. The number of (GT)(n) repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter modulates transcription of this enzyme, which might have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and antiproliferative effect. The distribution of alleles and genotypes in Croatian individuals genotyped for the (GT)(n) HO-1 polymorphism was similar to that in other European populations. Frequency of the short (S) alleles (GT < 25) was higher in AAA patients (41.9%) than in non-AAA individuals (28.2%, p = 0.0026) because there were more SL heterozygotes among the AAA patients. The SL genotype appeared to increase the risk for AAA, but the increase was not statistically significant after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia (OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.90-3.09, p = 0.062). These findings contradict those of the only other study performed so far on the association of (GT)(n) HO-1 polymorphism and AAA.

  16. The analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites in 56 complete genomes of Herpesvirales.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolong; Zhou, Lan; Zhao, Xiangyan; Tan, Zhongyang

    2014-11-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, are special DNA/RNA sequences with repeated unit of 1-6 bp. The genomes of Herpesvirales have many repeating structures, which is an excellent system to study the evolution and roles of microsatellites and compound microsatellites in viruses. Therefore, 56 genomes of Herpesvirales were selected and the occurrence, composition and complexity of different repeats were investigated in the genomes. A total of 63,939 microsatellites and 5825 compound microsatellites were extracted from 56 genomes. It found that GC content has a significant strong correlation with both the counts of microsatellites (CM) and the counts of compound microsatellites (CCM). However, genome size has a moderate correlation only with CM and almost no correlation with CCM. The compound microsatellites occurring in genic regions are obviously more than that in intergenic regions. In general, the number of compound microsatellite decreases with the increase of complexity (C) (the count of individual microsatellites being part of a compound microsatellite) and the complexity hardly exceeds C=4. The vast majority of compound microsatellites exist in intergenic regions, when C≥10. The distributions of SSRs tend to be organism-specific rather than host-specific in herpesvirus genomes. The diversity of microsatellites and compound microsatellites may be helpful for a better understanding of the viral genetic diversity, genotyping, and evolutionary biology in herpesviruses genomes.

  17. Development of new multilocus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) for Listeria innocua and its application in a food processing plant.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hajime; Ohshima, Chihiro; Nakagawa, Miku; Thanatsang, Krittaporn; Phraephaisarn, Chirapiphat; Chaturongkasumrit, Yuphakhun; Keeratipibul, Suwimon; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2014-01-01

    Listeria innocua is an important hygiene indicator bacterium in food industries because it behaves similar to Listeria monocytogenes, which is pathogenic to humans. PFGE is often used to characterize bacterial strains and to track contamination source. However, because PFGE is an expensive, complicated, time-consuming protocol, and poses difficulty in data sharing, development of a new typing method is necessary. MLVA is a technique that identifies bacterial strains on the basis of the number of tandem repeats present in the genome varies depending on the strains. MLVA has gained attention due to its high reproducibility and ease of data sharing. In this study, we developed a MLVA protocol to assess L. innocua and evaluated it by tracking the contamination source of L. innocua in an actual food manufacturing factory by typing the bacterial strains isolated from the factory. Three VNTR regions of the L. innocua genome were chosen for use in the MLVA. The number of repeat units in each VNTR region was calculated based on the results of PCR product analysis using capillary electrophoresis (CE). The calculated number of repetitions was compared with the results of the gene sequence analysis to demonstrate the accuracy of the CE repeat number analysis. The developed technique was evaluated using 60 L. innocua strains isolated from a food factory. These 60 strains were classified into 11 patterns using MLVA. Many of the strains were classified into ST-6, revealing that this MLVA strain type can contaminate each manufacturing process in the factory. The MLVA protocol developed in this study for L. innocua allowed rapid and easy analysis through the use of CE. This technique was found to be very useful in hygiene control in factories because it allowed us to track contamination sources and provided information regarding whether the bacteria were present in the factories.

  18. Aridification drove repeated episodes of diversification between Australian biomes: evidence from a multi-locus phylogeny of Australian toadlets (Uperoleia: Myobatrachidae).

    PubMed

    Catullo, Renee A; Scott Keogh, J

    2014-10-01

    Australia is a large and complex landmass that comprises diverse biomes ranging from tropical rainforests to harsh deserts. While Australian biotic diversity has evolved in response to landscape and climate changes, evidence of Miocene or later biome shifts are few. The Australo-Papuan endemic frog genus Uperoleia is widely distributed across mesic, monsoonal tropic and arid regions of Australia. Thus, it represents an ideal system to evaluate biome shifts as they relate to known landscape and climate history. We comprehensively sampled the distributional range of 25 described Uperoleia species and generated a detailed molecular phylogeny for the genus based on one mitochondrial and five nuclear loci. Our results support a single origin of monsoonal tropic taxa, followed by diversification within the region under the influence of the Australian monsoon. Molecular dating analyses suggest the major divergence between eastern mesic and monsoonal species occurred in the Miocene approximately 17million years ago, with repeated evolution of species from monsoonal biomes to arid or mesic biomes in the later Miocene, early Pliocene and at the beginning of the Pleistocene. Our detailed sampling helps to clarify the true distributions of species and contributes to on-going work to improve the taxonomy of the genus. Topological differences between nuclear and mitochondrial phylogenies within major clades suggest a history of mitochondrial introgression and capture, and reduce the ability to resolve close interspecific relationships.

  19. Characterization of Genetic Diversity of Bacillus anthracis in France by Using High-Resolution Melting Assays and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Derzelle, S.; Laroche, S.; Le Flèche, P.; Hauck, Y.; Thierry, S.; Vergnaud, G.; Madani, N.

    2011-01-01

    Using high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, we developed a cost-effective method to genotype a set of 13 phylogenetically informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the genome of Bacillus anthracis. SNP discrimination assays were performed in monoplex or duplex and applied to 100 B. anthracis isolates collected in France from 1953 to 2009 and a few reference strains. HRM provided a reliable and cheap alternative to subtype B. anthracis into one of the 12 major sublineages or subgroups. All strains could be correctly positioned on the canonical SNP (canSNP) phylogenetic tree, except the divergent Pasteur vaccine strain ATCC 4229. We detected the cooccurrence of three canSNP subgroups in France. The dominant B.Br.CNEVA sublineage was found to be prevalent in the Alps, the Pyrenees, the Auvergne region, and the Saône-et-Loire department. Strains affiliated with the A.Br.008/009 subgroup were observed throughout most of the country. The minor A.Br.001/002 subgroup was restricted to northeastern France. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis using 24 markers further resolved French strains into 60 unique profiles and identified some regional patterns. Diversity found within the A.Br.008/009 and B.Br.CNEVA subgroups suggests that these represent old, ecologically established clades in France. Phylogenetic relationships with strains from other parts of the world are discussed. PMID:21998431

  20. Current Situation of Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Differences in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Complex Isolates by Multilocus Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is one of several opportunistic pathogens of growing significance. Several studies on the molecular epidemiology of S. maltophilia have shown clinical isolates to be genetically diverse. Materials and Methods A total of 121 clinical isolates tentatively identified as S. malophilia from seven tertiary-care hospitals in Korea from 2007 to 2011 were included. Species and groups were identified using partial gyrB gene sequences and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using a broth microdilution method. Multi locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) surveys are used for subtyping. Results Based on partial gyrB gene sequences, 118 isolates were identified as belonging to the S. maltophilia complex. For all S. maltophilia isolates, the resistance rates to trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) and levofloxacin were the highest (both, 30.5%). Resistance rate to ceftazidime was 28.0%. 11.0% and 11.9% of 118 S. maltophilia isolates displayed resistance to piperacillin/tazobactam and tigecycline, respectively. Clade 1 and Clade 2 were definitely distinguished from the data of MLVA with amplification of loci. All 118 isolates were classified into several clusters as its identification. Conclusion Because of high resistance rates to TMP/SMX and levofloxacin, the clinical laboratory department should consider providing the data about other antimicrobial agents and treatment of S. maltophilia infections with a combination of antimicrobials can be considered in the current practice. The MLVA evaluated in this study provides a fast, portable, relatively low cost genotyping method that can be employed in genotypic linkage or transmission networks comparing to analysis of the gyrB gene. PMID:28032486

  1. Sequence determinants of human microsatellite variability

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Microsatellite loci are frequently used in genomic studies of DNA sequence repeats and in population studies of genetic variability. To investigate the effect of sequence properties of microsatellites on their level of variability we have analyzed genotypes at 627 microsatellite loci in 1,048 worldwide individuals from the HGDP-CEPH cell line panel together with the DNA sequences of these microsatellites in the human RefSeq database. Results Calibrating PCR fragment lengths in individual genotypes by using the RefSeq sequence enabled us to infer repeat number in the HGDP-CEPH dataset and to calculate the mean number of repeats (as opposed to the mean PCR fragment length), under the assumption that differences in PCR fragment length reflect differences in the numbers of repeats in the embedded repeat sequences. We find the mean and maximum numbers of repeats across individuals to be positively correlated with heterozygosity. The size and composition of the repeat unit of a microsatellite are also important factors in predicting heterozygosity, with tetra-nucleotide repeat units high in G/C content leading to higher heterozygosity. Finally, we find that microsatellites containing more separate sets of repeated motifs generally have higher heterozygosity. Conclusions These results suggest that sequence properties of microsatellites have a significant impact in determining the features of human microsatellite variability. PMID:20015383

  2. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis of clinical isolates of Aspergillus flavus from Iran reveals the first cases of Aspergillus minisclerotigenes associated with human infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspergillus flavus is intensively studied for its role in infecting crop plants and contaminating produce with aflatoxin, but its role as a human pathogen is less well understood. In parts of the Middle East and India, A. flavus surpasses A. fumigatus as a cause of invasive aspergillosis and is a significant cause of cutaneous, sinus, nasal and nail infections. Methods A collection of 45 clinical and 10 environmental A. flavus isolates from Iran were analysed using Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat (VNTR) markers with MICROSAT and goeBURST to determine their genetic diversity and their relatedness to clinical and environmental A. flavus isolates from Australia. Phylogeny was assessed using partial β-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequencing, and mating type was determined by PCR. Antifungal susceptibility testing was performed on selected isolates using a reference microbroth dilution method. Results There was considerable diversity in the A. flavus collection, with no segregation on goeBURST networks according to source or geographic location. Three Iranian isolates, two from sinus infections and one from a paranasal infection grouped with Aspergillus minisclerotigenes, and all produced B and G aflatoxin. Phylogenic analysis using partial β-tubulin and calmodulin sequencing confirmed two of these as A. minisclerotigenes, while the third could not be differentiated from A. flavus and related species within Aspergillus section flavi. Based on epidemiological cut-off values, the A. minisclerotigens and A. flavus isolates tested were susceptible to commonly used antifungal drugs. Conclusions This is the first report of human infection due to A. minisclerotigenes, and it raises the possiblity that other species within Aspergillus section flavi may also cause clinical disease. Clinical isolates of A. flavus from Iran are not distinct from Australian isolates, indicating local environmental, climatic or host features, rather than fungal features, govern the high

  3. Temperature-Dependent Growth Modeling of Environmental and Clinical Legionella pneumophila Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Sharaby, Yehonatan; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Oks, Olga; Pecellin, Marina; Mizrahi, Hila; Peretz, Avi; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G; Halpern, Malka

    2017-04-15

    Legionella pneumophila causes waterborne infections resulting in severe pneumonia. High-resolution genotyping of L. pneumophila isolates can be achieved by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Recently, we found that different MLVA genotypes of L. pneumophila dominated different sites in a small drinking-water network, with a genotype-related temperature and abundance regime. The present study focuses on understanding the temperature-dependent growth kinetics of the genotypes that dominated the water network. Our aim was to model mathematically the influence of temperature on the growth kinetics of different environmental and clinical L. pneumophila genotypes and to compare it with the influence of their ecological niches. Environmental strains showed a distinct temperature preference, with significant differences among the growth kinetics of the three studied genotypes (Gt4, Gt6, and Gt15). Gt4 strains exhibited superior growth at lower temperatures (25 and 30°C), while Gt15 strains appeared to be best adapted to relatively higher temperatures (42 and 45°C). The temperature-dependent growth traits of the environmental genotypes were consistent with their distribution and temperature preferences in the water network. Clinical isolates exhibited significantly higher growth rates and reached higher maximal cell densities at 37°C and 42°C than the environmental strains. Further research on the growth preferences of L. pneumophila clinical and environmental genotypes will result in a better understanding of their ecological niches in drinking-water systems as well as in the human body.IMPORTANCELegionella pneumophila is a waterborne pathogen that threatens humans in developed countries. The bacteria inhabit natural and man-made freshwater environments. Here we demonstrate that different environmental L. pneumophila genotypes have different temperature-dependent growth kinetics. Moreover, Legionella strains that belong to the same species

  4. Origin of the Outbreak in France of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Biovar 3, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Canker of Kiwifruit, Revealed by a Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunty, A; Cesbron, S; Poliakoff, F; Jacques, M-A; Manceau, C

    2015-10-01

    The first outbreaks of bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 were detected in France in 2010. P. syringae pv. actinidiae causes leaf spots, dieback, and canker that sometimes lead to the death of the vine. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum, which is pathogenic on kiwi as well, causes only leaf spots. In order to conduct an epidemiological study to track the spread of the epidemics of these two pathogens in France, we developed a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). MLVA was conducted on 340 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 isolated in Chile, China, France, Italy, and New Zealand and on 39 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum isolated in Australia, France, and New Zealand. Eleven polymorphic VNTR loci were identified in the genomes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 ICMP 18744 and of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum ICMP 18807. MLVA enabled the structuring of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains in 55 and 16 haplotypes, respectively. MLVA and discriminant analysis of principal components revealed that strains isolated in Chile, China, and New Zealand are genetically distinct from P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains isolated in France and in Italy, which appear to be closely related at the genetic level. In contrast, no structuring was observed for P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum. We developed an MLVA scheme to explore the diversity within P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and to trace the dispersal routes of epidemic P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 in Europe. We suggest using this MLVA scheme to trace the dispersal routes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae at a global level.

  5. Origin of the Outbreak in France of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Biovar 3, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Canker of Kiwifruit, Revealed by a Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cunty, A.; Cesbron, S.; Poliakoff, F.; Jacques, M.-A.

    2015-01-01

    The first outbreaks of bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 were detected in France in 2010. P. syringae pv. actinidiae causes leaf spots, dieback, and canker that sometimes lead to the death of the vine. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum, which is pathogenic on kiwi as well, causes only leaf spots. In order to conduct an epidemiological study to track the spread of the epidemics of these two pathogens in France, we developed a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). MLVA was conducted on 340 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 isolated in Chile, China, France, Italy, and New Zealand and on 39 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum isolated in Australia, France, and New Zealand. Eleven polymorphic VNTR loci were identified in the genomes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 ICMP 18744 and of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum ICMP 18807. MLVA enabled the structuring of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains in 55 and 16 haplotypes, respectively. MLVA and discriminant analysis of principal components revealed that strains isolated in Chile, China, and New Zealand are genetically distinct from P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains isolated in France and in Italy, which appear to be closely related at the genetic level. In contrast, no structuring was observed for P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum. We developed an MLVA scheme to explore the diversity within P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and to trace the dispersal routes of epidemic P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 in Europe. We suggest using this MLVA scheme to trace the dispersal routes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae at a global level. PMID:26209667

  6. Housekeeping Gene Sequencing and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis To Identify Subpopulations within Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato That Correlate with Host Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Gironde, S.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola causes bacterial spot on Brassicaceae worldwide, and for the last 10 years severe outbreaks have been reported in the Loire Valley, France. P. syringae pv. maculicola resembles P. syringae pv. tomato in that it is also pathogenic for tomato and causes the same types of symptoms. We used a collection of 106 strains of P. syringae to characterize the relationships between P. syringae pv. maculicola and related pathovars, paying special attention to P. syringae pv. tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and rpoD gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. maculicola, which causes diseases in Brassicaceae, forms six genetic lineages within genomospecies 3 of P. syringae strains as defined by L. Gardan et al. (Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49[Pt 2]:469–478, 1999), whereas P. syringae pv. tomato forms two distinct genetic lineages. A multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) conducted with eight minisatellite loci confirmed the genetic structure obtained with rpoD and gyrB sequence analyses. These results provide promising tools for fine-scale epidemiological studies on diseases caused by P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato. The two pathovars had distinct host ranges; only P. syringae pv. maculicola strains were pathogenic for Brassicaceae. A subpopulation of P. syringae pv. maculicola strains that are pathogenic for Pto-expressing tomato plants were shown to lack avrPto1 and avrPtoB or to contain a disrupted avrPtoB homolog. Taking phylogenetic and pathological features into account, our data suggest that the DC3000 strain belongs to P. syringae pv. maculicola. This study shows that P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato appear multiclonal, as they did not diverge from a single common ancestral group within the ancestral P. syringae genomospecies 3, and suggests that pathovar specificity within P. syringae may be due to independent genetic events. PMID:22389364

  7. Multilocus variable-number-tandem-repeats analysis (MLVA) distinguishes a clonal complex of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains isolated from recent outbreaks of bacterial wilt and canker in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Zaluga, Joanna; Stragier, Pieter; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Maes, Martine; De Vos, Paul

    2013-06-05

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) causes bacterial wilt and canker in tomato. Cmm is present nearly in all European countries. During the last three years several local outbreaks were detected in Belgium. The lack of a convenient high-resolution strain-typing method has hampered the study of the routes of transmission of Cmm and epidemiology in tomato cultivation. In this study the genetic relatedness among a worldwide collection of Cmm strains and their relatives was approached by gyrB and dnaA gene sequencing. Further, we developed and applied a multilocus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) scheme to discriminate among Cmm strains. A phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and dnaA gene sequences of 56 Cmm strains demonstrated that Belgian Cmm strains from recent outbreaks of 2010-2012 form a genetically uniform group within the Cmm clade, and Cmm is phylogenetically distinct from other Clavibacter subspecies and from non-pathogenic Clavibacter-like strains. MLVA conducted with eight minisatellite loci detected 25 haplotypes within Cmm. All strains from Belgian outbreaks, isolated between 2010 and 2012, together with two French strains from 2010 seem to form one monomorphic group. Regardless of the isolation year, location or tomato cultivar, Belgian strains from recent outbreaks belonged to the same haplotype. On the contrary, strains from diverse geographical locations or isolated over longer periods of time formed mostly singletons. We hypothesise that the introduction might have originated from one lot of seeds or contaminated tomato seedlings that was the source of the outbreak in 2010 and that these Cmm strains persisted and induced infection in 2011 and 2012. Our results demonstrate that MLVA is a promising typing technique for a local surveillance and outbreaks investigation in epidemiological studies of Cmm.

  8. Multilocus Variable-Number-Tandem-Repeats Analysis (MLVA) distinguishes a clonal complex of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains isolated from recent outbreaks of bacterial wilt and canker in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) causes bacterial wilt and canker in tomato. Cmm is present nearly in all European countries. During the last three years several local outbreaks were detected in Belgium. The lack of a convenient high-resolution strain-typing method has hampered the study of the routes of transmission of Cmm and epidemiology in tomato cultivation. In this study the genetic relatedness among a worldwide collection of Cmm strains and their relatives was approached by gyrB and dnaA gene sequencing. Further, we developed and applied a multilocus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) scheme to discriminate among Cmm strains. Results A phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and dnaA gene sequences of 56 Cmm strains demonstrated that Belgian Cmm strains from recent outbreaks of 2010–2012 form a genetically uniform group within the Cmm clade, and Cmm is phylogenetically distinct from other Clavibacter subspecies and from non-pathogenic Clavibacter-like strains. MLVA conducted with eight minisatellite loci detected 25 haplotypes within Cmm. All strains from Belgian outbreaks, isolated between 2010 and 2012, together with two French strains from 2010 seem to form one monomorphic group. Regardless of the isolation year, location or tomato cultivar, Belgian strains from recent outbreaks belonged to the same haplotype. On the contrary, strains from diverse geographical locations or isolated over longer periods of time formed mostly singletons. Conclusions We hypothesise that the introduction might have originated from one lot of seeds or contaminated tomato seedlings that was the source of the outbreak in 2010 and that these Cmm strains persisted and induced infection in 2011 and 2012. Our results demonstrate that MLVA is a promising typing technique for a local surveillance and outbreaks investigation in epidemiological studies of Cmm. PMID:23738754

  9. Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns in Discrimination of Sporadic and Outbreak-Related Strains of Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We assessed the potential of multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for discriminating 104 sporadic and outbreak-related Yersinia enterocolitica (YE) bio/serotype 3-4/O:3 and 2/O:9 isolates. MLVA using six VNTR markers was performed in two separate multiplex PCRs, and the fluorescently labeled PCR products were accurately sized on an automated DNA sequencer. Results MLVA discriminated 82 sporadic YE 3-4/O:3 and 2/O:9 strains into 77 types, whereas PFGE with the restriction enzyme NotI discriminated the strains into 23 different PFGE pulsotypes. The discriminatory index for a sporadic strain was 0.862 for PFGE and 0.999 for MLVA. MLVA confirmed that a foodborne outbreak in the city of Kotka, Finland in 2003 had been caused by a multiresistant YE 4/O:3 strain that was distinctly different from those of epidemiologically unrelated strains with an identical PFGE pulsotype. The multiresistance of Y. enterocolitica strains (19% of the sporadic strains) correlated significantly (p = 0.002) with travel abroad. All of the multiresistant Y. enterocolitica strains belonged to four PFGE pulsotypes that did not contain any susceptible strains. Resistance to nalidixic acid was related to changes in codons 83 or 87 that stemmed from mutations in the gyrA gene. The conjugation experiments demonstrated that resistance to CHL, STR, and SUL was carried by a conjugative plasmid. Conclusions MLVA using six loci had better discriminatory power than PFGE with the NotI enzyme. MLVA was also a less labor-intensive method than PFGE and the results were easier to analyze. The conjugation experiments demonstrated that a resistance plasmid can easily be transferred between Y. enterocolitica strains. Antimicrobial multiresistance of Y. enterocolitica strains was significantly associated with travel abroad. PMID:21349206

  10. Survey of compound microsatellites in multiple Lactobacillus genomes.

    PubMed

    Basharat, Zarrin; Yasmin, Azra

    2015-12-01

    Distinct simple sequence repeats with 2 or more individual microsatellites joined together or lying adjacent to each other are identified as compound microsatellites. Investigation of such composite microsatellites in the genomes of genus Lactobacillus was the aim of this study. In silico inspection of microsatellite clustering in genomes of 14 Lactobacillus species revealed a wealth of compound microsatellites. All of the mined compound microsatellites were imperfect, were composed of variant motifs, and increased in all genomes, with maximum distance (dMAX) increments of 10 to 50. The majority of these repeats were present in the coding regions. A correlation of microsatellite to compound microsatellite density was detected. The difference established in compound microsatellite division among eukaryotes, Escherichia coli, and lactobacilli is suggestive of diverse genomic features and elementary distinction between creation and fixation methods of compound microsatellites among these organisms.

  11. A novel Giraffidae-specific interspersed repeat with a microsatellite, originally found in an intron of a ruminant paralogous p97bcnt gene.

    PubMed

    Hon-Nami, Koyu; Ueno, Sadao; Endo, Hideki; Nishimura, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Takashi; David, Lior; Iwashita, Shintaro

    2004-10-13

    The ruminant-specific p97bcnt gene (bcntp97) is a paralogous gene that includes a region derived from a retrotransposable element 1 (RTE-1). The region comprises an exon (RTE-1 exon) encoding 325 amino acids in the middle of the p97bcnt protein. To understand how the bcntp97 paralog evolved, we examined its organization in several ruminants. We found a 700-base pair (bp) insert in the 5' intron of the RTE-1 exon in giraffe bcntp97. This insert is missing in the corresponding regions of bovine and sika deer. Furthermore, the sequence of the insert is interspersed in the genome of giraffe but not bovine and also contains a (GA)n microsatellite. A highly homologous insert harboring significantly different (GA)n microsatellite was detected in the corresponding region of okapi bcntp97. Therefore, the interspersed fragments with (GA)n microsatellite might serve as a marker for tracking how duplicated genes evolve in a family-specific manner.

  12. Microsatellite DNA fingerprinting, differentiation, and genetic relationships of clones, cultivars, and varieties of six poplar species from three sections of the genus Populus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Muhammad H; Rajora, Om P

    2002-12-01

    Accurate identification of Populus clones and cultivars is essential for effective selection, breeding, and genetic resource management programs. The unit of cultivation and breeding in poplars is a clone, and individual cultivars are normally represented by a single clone. Microsatellite DNA markers of 10 simple sequence repeat loci were used for genetic fingerprinting and differentiation of 96 clones/cultivars and varieties belonging to six Populus species (P. deltoides, P. nigra, P. balsamifera, P. trichocarpa, P. grandidentata, and P maximowiczii) from three sections of the genus. All 96 clones/cultivars could be uniquely fingerprinted based on their single- or multilocus microsatellite genotypes. The five P. grandidentata clones could be differentiated based on their single-locus genotypes, while six clones of P. trichocarpa and 11 clones of P. maximowiczii could be identified by their two-locus genotypes. Twenty clones of P. deltoides and 25 clones of P. nigra could be differentiated by their multilocus genotypes employing three loci, and 29 clones of P. balsamifera required the use of multilocus genotypes at five loci for their genetic fingerprinting and differentiation. The loci PTR3, PTR5, and PTR7 were found to be the most informative for genetic fingerprinting and differentiation of the clones. The mean number of alleles per locus ranged from 2.9 in P. trichocarpa or P. grandidentata to 6.0 in P. balsamifera and 11.2 in 96 clones of the six species. The mean number of observed genotypes per locus ranged from 2.4 in P. grandidentata to 7.4 in P. balsamifera and 19.6 in 96 clones of the six species. The mean number of unique genotypes per locus ranged from 1.3 in P. grandidentata to 3.9 in P. deltoides and 8.8 in 96 clones of the six species. The power of discrimination of the microsatellite DNA markers in the 96 clones ranged from 0.726 for PTR4 to 0.939 for PTR7, with a mean of 0.832 over the 10 simple sequence repeat loci. Clones/cultivars from the same

  13. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Serra Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus brasiliensis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirteen nuclear-encoded microsatellites from a genomic DNA library of Serra Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus brasiliensis, were isolated and characterized. The microsatellites include 10 perfect repeats (8 tetranucleotide and 2 dinucleotide) and 3 imperfect repeats (2 tetranucleotide and 1 dinucleo...

  14. Detection of Sequence Polymorphism in Rubus Occidentalis L. Monomorphic Microsatellite Markers by High Resolution Melting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. Development of microsatellite primers through the identification of appropriate repeate...

  15. Microsatellite primers for vulnerable and thriving Acacia (Fabaceae) species from Australia’s arid zone1

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Cairo N.; Roberts, David G.; Denham, Andrew J.; Ayre, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for the common arid Australian shrub Acacia ligulata (Fabaceae) and the threatened overstory trees A. melvillei and A. pendula. Methods and Results: DNA sequence data generated by 454 sequencing were used to identify microsatellite nucleotide repeat motifs. Including previously developed primer sets, we report on the development of 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci for each species. Six of these were novel for A. melvillei and A. ligulata, and five were novel for A. pendula, while five more each were transferred from primers developed for related species (A. carneorum and A. loderi). We found three to 17 alleles per locus for each species, with high multilocus genotypic diversity within each of two A. ligulata and A. pendula stands, and one A. melvillei population. A second A. melvillei stand appeared to be monoclonal. Conclusions: These markers will allow assessment of population genetics, mating systems, and connectedness of populations of these and possibly other arid-zone acacias. PMID:25909043

  16. [Differentiation, identification and development of database of T. aestivum L. varieties of Ukrainian selection on the basis of sequence-tagged analysis of microsatellite repeats].

    PubMed

    Chebotar', S V; Sivolap, Iu M

    2001-01-01

    Determination of the variety genotype is very important for the development of theory and practice of plant breeding and for right protection of a variety originator. In this reason attention is focused on the molecular markers generated by polymerase chain reaction. On the basis of STMS-analysis principles of identification and development of database, which reflect molecular-genetics peculiarities of some varieties of the Plant Breeding and Genetics Institute and other Ukrainian breeding organizations, are formulated. Allelic state at microsatellite loci and their distribution were investigated. Wheat varieties were ranged according to genetic distances, data on pedigree and cluster distribution of varieties obtained using computer programs were compared.

  17. Mini- and microsatellites.

    PubMed Central

    Ramel, C

    1997-01-01

    While the faithful transmission of genetic information requires a fidelity and stability of DNA that is involved in translation into proteins, it has become evident that a large part of noncoding DNA is organized in repeated sequences, which often exhibit a pronounced instability and dynamics. This applies both to longer repeated sequences, minisatellites (about 10-100 base pairs), and microsatellites (mostly 2-4 base pairs). Although these satellite DNAs are abundantly distributed in all kinds of organisms, no clear function has been discerned for them. However, extension of trinucleotide microsatellite sequences has been associated with several severe human disorders, such as Fragile X syndrome and Huntington's disease. Rare alleles of a minisatellite sequence have been reported to be associated with the ras oncogene leading to an increased risk for several human cancers. A dynamic behavior of repeated DNA sequences also applies to telomeres, constituting the ends of the chromosomes. Repeated DNA sequences protect the chromosome ends from losing coding sequences at cell divisions. The telomeres are maintained by the enzyme telomerase. Somatic cells, however, lose telomerase function and gradually die. Cancer cells have activated telomerase and therefore they acquire immortality. PMID:9255562

  18. Transpecific microsatellites for hard pines.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, M.; Cross, M.; Maguire, L.; Dieters, J.; Williams, G.; Henry, J.

    2002-04-01

    Microsatellites are difficult to recover from large plant genomes so cross-specific utilisation is an important source of markers. Fifty microsatellites were tested for cross-specific amplification and polymorphism to two New World hard pine species, slash pine ( Pinus elliottii var. elliottii) and Caribbean pine ( P. caribaea var. hondurensis). Twenty-nine (58%) markers amplified in both hard pine species, and 23 of these 29 were polymorphic. Soft pine (subgenus Strobus) microsatellite markers did amplify, but none were polymorphic. Pinus elliottii var. elliottii and P. caribaea var. hondurensis showed mutational changes in the flanking regions and the repeat motif that were informative for Pinus spp. phylogenetic relationships. Most allele length variation could be attributed to variability in repeat unit number. There was no evidence for ascertainment bias.

  19. Blueberry Microsatellite Markers Identify Cranberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Forty-six blueberry simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers or microsatellites were tested for the ability to amplify a polymorphic marker in eight American cranberry accessions. Sixteen SSRs resulted in informative and polymorphic SSR primer pairs and were used to fingerprint 16 economically important...

  20. Sequences characterization of microsatellite DNA sequences in Pacific abalone ( Haliotis discus hannai)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Akihiro, Kijima

    2007-01-01

    The microsatellite-enriched library was constructed using magnetic bead hybridization selection method, and the microsatellite DNA sequences were analyzed in Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai. Three hundred and fifty white colonies were screened using PCR-based technique, and 84 clones were identified to potentially contain microsatellite repeat motif. The 84 clones were sequenced, and 42 microsatellites and 4 minisatellites with a minimum of five repeats were found (13.1% of white colonies screened). Besides the motif of CA contained in the oligoprobe, we also found other 16 types of microsatellite repeats including a dinucleotide repeat, two tetranucleotide repeats, twelve pentanucleotide repeats and a hexanucleotide repeat. According to Weber (1990), the microsatellite sequences obtained could be categorized structurally into perfect repeats (73.3%), imperfect repeats (13.3%), and compound repeats (13.4%). Among the microsatellite repeats, relatively short arrays (<20 repeats) were most abundant, accounting for 75.0%. The largest length of microsatellites was 48 repeats, and the average number of repeats was 13.4. The data on the composition and length distribution of microsatellites obtained in the present study can be useful for choosing the repeat motifs for microsatellite isolation in other abalone species.

  1. Targeted stock identification using multilocus genotype 'familyprinting'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, B.H.; King, T.L.

    1999-01-01

    We present an approach to stock identification of small, targeted populations that uses multilocus microsatellite genotypes of individual mating adults to uniquely identify first- and second-generation offspring in a mixture. We call the approach 'familyprinting'; unlike DNA fingerprinting where tissue samples of individuals are matched, offspring from various families are assigned to pairs of parents or sets of four grandparents with known genotypes. The basic unit of identification is the family, but families can be nested within a variety of stock units ranging from naturally reproducing groups of fish in a small tributary or pond from which mating adults can be sampled to large or small collections of families produced in hatcheries and stocked in specific locations. We show that, with as few as seven alleles per locus using four loci without error, first-generation offspring can be uniquely assigned to the correct family. For second-generation applications in a hatchery more alleles per locus (10) and loci (10) are required for correct assignment of all offspring to the correct set of grandparents. Using microsatellite DNA variation from an Atlantic salmon (Salmo solar) restoration river (Connecticut River, USA), we also show that this population contains sufficient genetic diversity in sea-run returns for 100% correct first, generation assignment and 97% correct second-generation assignment using 14 loci. We are currently using first- and second-generation familyprinting in this population with the ultimate goal of identifying stocking tributary. In addition to within-river familyprinting, there also appears to be sufficient genetic diversity within and between Atlantic salmon populations for identification of 'familyprinted' fish in a mixture of multiple populations. We also suggest that second-generation familyprinting with multiple populations may also provide a tool for examining stock structure. Familyprinting with microsatellite DNA markers is a viable

  2. [Microsatellite markers and their application in genetic diversity research of Plasmodium spp].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Wei; Zhou, Shui-Sen; Huang, Fang

    2012-04-01

    Microsatellites, namely simple sequence repeats (SSR), are simple tandemly repeated sequences with repeat units of 1-6 bp in length. As genetic markers, microsatellites are abundant and distributed throughout the eukaryotic genomes. Their advantages include high polymorphism and abundance, co-dominance, selective neutrality and high reliability. In recent years, microsatellite markers are often used to study the biologically genetic diversity. In this paper, we briefly review the application of microsatellite technique in the study of Plasmodium spp. genetic diversity.

  3. Microsatellite (GT)(n) repeats and SNPs in the von Willebrand factor gene promoter do not influence circulating von Willebrand factor levels under normal conditions.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Viviana; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Pontara, Elena; Sartorello, Francesca; Gallinaro, Lisa; Marotti, Alberto; Scaroni, Carla; Pagnan, Antonio; Casonato, Alessandra

    2009-02-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels vary considerably in normal individuals, influenced by inherited and acquired modulators. ABO blood group is the major inherited determinant of VWF levels, but a role has also been attributed to the VWF gene promoter, haplotype 1 (-3268G/-2709C/-2661A/-2527G) being associated with higher VWF levels than haplotype 2 (-3268C/-2709T/-2661G/-2527A), and the polymorphic locus (GT)(n) modulating the shear stress-induced activation of the VWF promoter. We characterized the (GT)(n) of the VWF promoter in 394 healthy individuals and assessed whether its variable length influenced VWF levels in normal conditions. (GT)(n) proved highly polymorphic, with alleles from 15 to 24 repeats long. (GT)(21) and (GT)(19) were the most common variants (37.4% and 34.4%, respectively). Short GT repeats (15-19) segregated mainly with haplotype 1, long GT repeats (20-24) with haplotype 2 (p < 0.0001). The number of GT repeats did not correlate with VWF levels, nor did such levels correlate with haplotypes 1 and 2, considered alone or in association with the (GT)(n) locus. We conclude that (GT)(n) and -3268/-2709/-2661/-2527 loci are in strong linkage disequilibrium. This polymorphic region of the VWF promoter does not affect VWF levels under normal conditions, though it might represent an environmentally activable VWF regulation site.

  4. A Comprehensive Survey of Human Y-Chromosomal Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Manfred ; Kittler, Ralf ; Erler, Axel ; Hedman, Minttu ; Lee, Andrew C. ; Mohyuddin, Aisha ; Mehdi, S. Qasim ; Rosser, Zoë ; Stoneking, Mark ; Jobling, Mark A. ; Sajantila, Antti ; Tyler-Smith, Chris 

    2004-01-01

    We have screened the nearly complete DNA sequence of the human Y chromosome for microsatellites (short tandem repeats) that meet the criteria of having a repeat-unit size of ⩾3 and a repeat count of ⩾8 and thus are likely to be easy to genotype accurately and to be polymorphic. Candidate loci were tested in silico for novelty and for probable Y specificity, and then they were tested experimentally to identify Y-specific loci and to assess their polymorphism. This yielded 166 useful new Y-chromosomal microsatellites, 139 of which were polymorphic, in a sample of eight diverse Y chromosomes representing eight Y-SNP haplogroups. This large sample of microsatellites, together with 28 previously known markers analyzed here—all sharing a common evolutionary history—allowed us to investigate the factors influencing their variation. For simple microsatellites, the average repeat count accounted for the highest proportion of repeat variance (∼34%). For complex microsatellites, the largest proportion of the variance (again, ∼34%) was explained by the average repeat count of the longest homogeneous array, which normally is variable. In these complex microsatellites, the additional repeats outside the longest homogeneous array significantly increased the variance, but this was lower than the variance of a simple microsatellite with the same total repeat count. As a result of this work, a large number of new, highly polymorphic Y-chromosomal microsatellites are now available for population-genetic, evolutionary, genealogical, and forensic investigations. PMID:15195656

  5. Development of highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers using genome-wide microsatellite variant analysis in Foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Tang, Chanjuan; Zhao, Qiang; Li, Jing; Yang, Lifang; Qie, Lufeng; Fan, Xingke; Li, Lin; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Meicheng; Liu, Xiaotong; Chai, Yang; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Hailong; Li, Yingtao; Li, Wen; Zhi, Hui; Jia, Guanqing; Diao, Xianmin

    2014-01-28

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.) is an important gramineous grain-food and forage crop. It is grown worldwide for human and livestock consumption. Its small genome and diploid nature have led to foxtail millet fast becoming a novel model for investigating plant architecture, drought tolerance and C4 photosynthesis of grain and bioenergy crops. Therefore, cost-effective, reliable and highly polymorphic molecular markers covering the entire genome are required for diversity, mapping and functional genomics studies in this model species. A total of 5,020 highly repetitive microsatellite motifs were isolated from the released genome of the genotype 'Yugu1' by sequence scanning. Based on sequence comparison between S. italica and S. viridis, a set of 788 SSR primer pairs were designed. Of these primers, 733 produced reproducible amplicons and were polymorphic among 28 Setaria genotypes selected from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles detected by these SSR markers ranged from 2 to 16, with an average polymorphism information content of 0.67. The result obtained by neighbor-joining cluster analysis of 28 Setaria genotypes, based on Nei's genetic distance of the SSR data, showed that these SSR markers are highly polymorphic and effective. A large set of highly polymorphic SSR markers were successfully and efficiently developed based on genomic sequence comparison between different genotypes of the genus Setaria. The large number of new SSR markers and their placement on the physical map represent a valuable resource for studying diversity, constructing genetic maps, functional gene mapping, QTL exploration and molecular breeding in foxtail millet and its closely related species.

  6. Development of highly polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers using genome-wide microsatellite variant analysis in Foxtail millet [Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv.

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.) is an important gramineous grain-food and forage crop. It is grown worldwide for human and livestock consumption. Its small genome and diploid nature have led to foxtail millet fast becoming a novel model for investigating plant architecture, drought tolerance and C4 photosynthesis of grain and bioenergy crops. Therefore, cost-effective, reliable and highly polymorphic molecular markers covering the entire genome are required for diversity, mapping and functional genomics studies in this model species. Result A total of 5,020 highly repetitive microsatellite motifs were isolated from the released genome of the genotype 'Yugu1’ by sequence scanning. Based on sequence comparison between S. italica and S. viridis, a set of 788 SSR primer pairs were designed. Of these primers, 733 produced reproducible amplicons and were polymorphic among 28 Setaria genotypes selected from diverse geographical locations. The number of alleles detected by these SSR markers ranged from 2 to 16, with an average polymorphism information content of 0.67. The result obtained by neighbor-joining cluster analysis of 28 Setaria genotypes, based on Nei’s genetic distance of the SSR data, showed that these SSR markers are highly polymorphic and effective. Conclusions A large set of highly polymorphic SSR markers were successfully and efficiently developed based on genomic sequence comparison between different genotypes of the genus Setaria. The large number of new SSR markers and their placement on the physical map represent a valuable resource for studying diversity, constructing genetic maps, functional gene mapping, QTL exploration and molecular breeding in foxtail millet and its closely related species. PMID:24472631

  7. Cost-effective development of highly polymorphic microsatellite in Japanese quail facilitated by next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tadano, R; Nunome, M; Mizutani, M; Kawahara-Miki, R; Fujiwara, A; Takahashi, S; Kawashima, T; Nirasawa, K; Ono, T; Kono, T; Matsuda, Y

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing technologies permit rapid and cost-effective identification of numerous putative microsatellite loci. Here, from the genome sequences of Japanese quail, we developed microsatellite markers containing dinucleotide repeats and employed these for characterisation of genetic diversity and population structure. A total of 385 individuals from 12 experimental and one wild-derived Japanese quail lines were genotyped with newly developed autosomal markers. The maximum number of alleles, expected heterozygosity and polymorphic information content (PIC) per locus were 10, 0.80 and 0.77 respectively. Approximately half of the markers were highly informative (PIC ≥ 0.50). The mean number of alleles per locus and observed heterozygosity within a line were in the range of 1.3-4.1 and 0.11-0.53 respectively. Compared with the wild-derived line, genetic diversity levels were low in the experimental lines. Genetic differentiation (FST ) between all pairs of the lines ranged from 0.13 to 0.83. Genetic clustering analyses based on multilocus genotypes of individuals showed that most individuals formed clearly defined clusters corresponding to the origins of the lines. These results suggest that Japanese quail experimental lines are highly structured. Microsatellite markers developed in this study may be effective for future genetic studies of Japanese quail.

  8. Mutation at intronic repeats of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene and ATM protein loss in primary gastric cancer with microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Sung; Choi, Seung Im; Min, Hae Lim; Kim, Min A; Kim, Woo Ho

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that plays a critical role in DNA damage-induced signaling and initiation of cell cycle checkpoint signaling in response to DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. We have previously reported the ATM protein loss by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 16% of human gastric cancer (GC) tissue. We hypothesized that ATM gene intron mutations targeted by microsatellite instability (MSI) cause ATM protein loss in a subset of GC. We studied mononucleotide mutations at the intron of ATM gene, ATM IHC and MSI in GC. Ten human gastric cancer cell lines were studied for the ATM gene mutation at introns, RT-PCR, direct sequencing, and immunohistochemistry. GC tissues of 839 patients were analyzed for MSI and ATM IHC. Among them, 604 cases were analyzed for the ATM mutations at introns preceding exon 6, exon 10 and exon 20. Two human GC cell lines (SNU-1 and -638) showed ATM intron mutations, deletion in RT-PCR and direct sequencing, and ATM protein loss by IHC. The frequencies of ATM mutation, MSI, and ATM protein loss were 12.9% (78/604), 9.2% (81/882) and 15.2% (134/839), respectively. Analysis of associations among MSI, ATM gene mutation, and ATM protein loss revealed highly co-existing ATM gene alterations and MSI. ATM intron mutation and ATM protein loss were detected in 69.3% (52/75) and 53.3% (40/75) of MSI positive GC. MSI positivity and ATM protein loss were present in 68.4% (52/76) and 48.7% (37/76) of GC with ATM intron mutation. ATM mutation and ATM protein loss had characteristics of old age, distal location of tumor, large tumor size, and histologic intestinal type. Our study might be interpreted as that ATM gene mutation at intron might be targeted by MSI and lead to ATM protein loss in a selected group of GC.

  9. Mutation at Intronic Repeats of the Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) Gene and ATM Protein Loss in Primary Gastric Cancer with Microsatellite Instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sung; Choi, Seung Im; Min, Hae Lim; Kim, Min A.; Kim, Woo Ho

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that plays a critical role in DNA damage-induced signaling and initiation of cell cycle checkpoint signaling in response to DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. We have previously reported the ATM protein loss by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 16% of human gastric cancer (GC) tissue. We hypothesized that ATM gene intron mutations targeted by microsatellite instability (MSI) cause ATM protein loss in a subset of GC. We studied mononucleotide mutations at the intron of ATM gene, ATM IHC and MSI in GC. Ten human gastric cancer cell lines were studied for the ATM gene mutation at introns, RT-PCR, direct sequencing, and immunohistochemistry. GC tissues of 839 patients were analyzed for MSI and ATM IHC. Among them, 604 cases were analyzed for the ATM mutations at introns preceding exon 6, exon 10 and exon 20. Two human GC cell lines (SNU-1 and -638) showed ATM intron mutations, deletion in RT-PCR and direct sequencing, and ATM protein loss by IHC. The frequencies of ATM mutation, MSI, and ATM protein loss were 12.9% (78/604), 9.2% (81/882) and 15.2% (134/839), respectively. Analysis of associations among MSI, ATM gene mutation, and ATM protein loss revealed highly co-existing ATM gene alterations and MSI. ATM intron mutation and ATM protein loss were detected in 69.3% (52/75) and 53.3% (40/75) of MSI positive GC. MSI positivity and ATM protein loss were present in 68.4% (52/76) and 48.7% (37/76) of GC with ATM intron mutation. ATM mutation and ATM protein loss had characteristics of old age, distal location of tumor, large tumor size, and histologic intestinal type. Our study might be interpreted as that ATM gene mutation at intron might be targeted by MSI and lead to ATM protein loss in a selected group of GC. PMID:24324828

  10. Comparative analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites in T4-like viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lan; Deng, Liang; Fu, Yongzhuo; Wu, Xiaolong; Zhao, Xiangyan; Chen, Yubao; Li, Mingfu; Tan, Zhongyang

    2016-01-10

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are known to present ubiquitously in genomes of eukaryotes and prokaryotes, as well as viruses. A comprehensive analysis of microsatellites and compound microsatellites (CM) was performed for 67 T4-like bacteriophage genomes. We found that the number of repeats was generally proportional to the size of the genome. CM were more abundant in genic regions, while their relative abundance was higher in intergenic regions. Meanwhile, the number of CM rapidly decreased with the increase of complexity but gradually increased with higher dMAX (maximum distance between any two adjacent microsatellites). (A)n/(T)n, (AT)n/(TA)n and (AAG)n were the most abundant repeats of mono-, di- and trinucleotide microsatellites, respectively. The number of microsatellites in reference sequences was significantly lower than that in corresponding random sequences. This result was mainly attributed to mono- and dinucleotide repeats which hardly exceeded 6bp in T4-like viruses. These observations may be helpful to understand the distribution of microsatellites and viral genetic diversity in T4-like viruses.

  11. Short (GT)n microsatellite repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter are associated with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status in Mexican pediatric patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Armenta, Gabriela; González-Leal, Natalia; J Vázquez-de la Torre, Mayra; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Ramos-Márquez, Martha E; Hernández-Cañaveral, Iván; Plascencia-Hernández, Arturo; Siller-López, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    An adequate immune and antioxidant response is a key to the resolution of sepsis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) is a stress protein with a polymorphic (GT)n repeat in its gene promoter that regulates its expression in response to oxidative injury, such as that present in sepsis. HMOX1 is the rate-limiting enzyme of heme degradation, and the heme breakdown products, CO, Fe, and bilirubin, are considered to be biologically active metabolites with direct or indirect antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the inflammatory and antioxidant response and the relationship with the HMOX1 levels and HMOX1 polymorphism in Mexican septic pediatric patients. In a case-control pilot study, we enrolled 64 septic patients and 72 hospitalized control patients without a diagnosis of sepsis. DNA extracted from buffy coat was genotyped for HMOX1 (GT)n polymorphism by PCR and markers of antioxidant and inflammatory status were quantified in plasma by analysis of the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), protein carbonyl (PC), interleukin (IL) 6, IL10, and HMOX1 levels. In septic children, oxidative and inflammatory markers were elevated, and HMOX1 levels were positively correlated with IL10 levels. Genotypic and allelic distribution of HMOX1 polymorphism showed no difference between groups. HMOX1 short-allele septic carriers (< 25 GT repeats) presented favorable ORAC, PC and IL10 levels. This study confirms that an active response against pediatric sepsis involves the expression of HMOX1 and IL10, suggesting that the high antioxidant status associated with HMOX1 short-allele septic carriers might provide a beneficial environment for sepsis resolution.

  12. Longest form of CCTG microsatellite repeat in the promoter of the CD2BP1/PSTPIP1 gene is associated with aseptic abscesses and with Crohn disease in French patients.

    PubMed

    André, Marc F J; Aumaître, Olivier; Grateau, Gilles; Chamaillard, Mathias; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Cardoso, Marie-Céleste; Henry-Berger, Joëlle; Ramakrishna, Balakrishnan S; Delpech, Marc; Piette, Jean-Charles; Creveaux, Isabelle

    2010-06-01

    Aseptic abscesses syndrome (AA) is an inflammatory disease in which non-infectious deep abscesses develop; these respond quickly to corticosteroids. AA is associated with Crohn disease (CD) in 57% of cases and with neutrophilic dermatosis (ND) in 20%. Pyoderma gangrenosum is usually a sporadic ND. A hereditary autosomal dominant syndromic kind of pyoderma gangrenosum, the PAPA syndrome, is linked to mutations in the CD2BP1/PSTPIP1 gene. We systematically screened this gene in French AA patients. One microsatellite (CCTG)n with 3 alleles was identified in the promoter. The longest form (CCTG)7 was significantly more frequent in AA patients than in French controls (P = 0.0154). We also found an association of the (CCTG)7 allele with CD in French patients (P = 0.0351). This association was not found in a sample of Indian patients. The CCTG repeat in the PSTPIP1 promoter may play a role in the pathogenesis of AA and of CD. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the possible modulation of gene expression by the (CCTG)n motif.

  13. Development of Microsatellites for Genetic Analyses and Population Assignment of the Cat Flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Husseneder, Claudia; Garner, Susan P.; Foil, Lane D.; MaCaluso, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), are common ectoparasites of companion animals that negatively impact their hosts directly by causing dermatitis and blood loss during feeding and indirectly through the potential transmission of disease causing agents. We isolated and characterized seven novel microsatellite loci from a partial genomic library of the cat flea enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. We screened these loci in cat fleas from two laboratory colonies and one wild-caught population collected at a temporary animal shelter (Parker coliseum) in Baton Rouge, LA. Six loci were polymorphic, with two to 15 alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.21 across populations. Although the two laboratory cat flea colonies were isolated from each other for many years, they did not significantly differ in their genotypic composition. The cat flea population from Parker coliseum was genetically different from the laboratory colonies, but also showed high degrees of inbreeding. Multilocus genotypes of the polymorphic loci were sufficient to assign over 85% of cat fleas to their population of origin. Genetic markers for flea population identity will allow further studies to examine the origins and movement of cat fleas with important genetic traits such as insecticide resistance or pathogen susceptibility. The use of microsatellites also could determine if there are host-specific strains of cat fleas and add insight into the development of the different subspecies of C. felis. PMID:21175050

  14. Development of microsatellites for genetic analyses and population assignment of the cat flea (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae).

    PubMed

    Husseneder, Claudia; Garner, Susan P; Foil, Lane D; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2010-11-01

    Cat fleas, Ctenocephalidesfelis (Bouché) (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), are common ectoparasites of companion animals that negatively impact their hosts directly by causing dermatitis and blood loss during feeding and indirectly through the potential transmission of disease causing agents. We isolated and characterized seven novel microsatellite loci from a partial genomic library of the cat flea enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. We screened these loci in cat fleas from two laboratory colonies and one wild-caught population collected at a temporary animal shelter (Parker coliseum) in Baton Rouge, LA. Six loci were polymorphic, with two to 15 alleles per locus and an average observed heterozygosity of 0.21 across populations. Although the two laboratory cat flea colonies were isolated from each other for many years, they did not significantly differ in their genotypic composition. The cat flea population from Parker coliseum was genetically different from the laboratory colonies, but also showed high degrees of inbreeding. Multilocus genotypes of the polymorphic loci were sufficient to assign over 85% of cat fleas to their population of origin. Genetic markers for flea population identity will allow further studies to examine the origins and movement of cat fleas with important genetic traits such as insecticide resistance or pathogen susceptibility. The use of microsatellites also could determine if there are host-specific strains of cat fleas and add insight into the development of the different subspecies of C. felis.

  15. Can multilocus heterozygosity reveal inbreeding depression?

    PubMed

    Syukri, F; Nakajima, T; Nakajima, M

    2016-07-01

    Inbred lines of fish have been widely exploited as model organisms to determine the effect of inbreeding, which is often closely related to fitness such as endurance and productivity compared to morphological traits. Until now, much is unknown about the effects of inbreeding to fish. In the present study, inbred lines of guppies were used to examine the inbreeding effect on morphological traits corresponding to genotype variation. Two strains, called AY and NA1, were selected from the closed culture system. Both strains showed different levels of inbreeding coefficients when compared to microsatellite markers. The AY strain was less inbred as compared to NA1 strain. However, correlation between the standard lengths with multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) at the individual level was observed in the AY, but not in the NA1 strain. This indicated that highly inbred animals have higher similarity in morphological traits as compared to less inbred ones. The inbreeding process showed the importance of heterozygosity, even in laboratory-reared animals. This experiment illustrated the effects of inbreeding towards morphological and genetic changes. ?

  16. Survey and Analysis of Microsatellites in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, M. Dharma; Muthulakshmi, M.; Madhu, M.; Archak, Sunil; Mita, K.; Nagaraju, J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied microsatellite frequency and distribution in 21.76-Mb random genomic sequences, 0.67-Mb BAC sequences from the Z chromosome, and 6.3-Mb EST sequences of Bombyx mori. We mined microsatellites of ≥15 bases of mononucleotide repeats and ≥5 repeat units of other classes of repeats. We estimated that microsatellites account for 0.31% of the genome of B. mori. Microsatellite tracts of A, AT, and ATT were the most abundant whereas their number drastically decreased as the length of the repeat motif increased. In general, tri- and hexanucleotide repeats were overrepresented in the transcribed sequences except TAA, GTA, and TGA, which were in excess in genomic sequences. The Z chromosome sequences contained shorter repeat types than the rest of the chromosomes in addition to a higher abundance of AT-rich repeats. Our results showed that base composition of the flanking sequence has an influence on the origin and evolution of microsatellites. Transitions/transversions were high in microsatellites of ESTs, whereas the genomic sequence had an equal number of substitutions and indels. The average heterozygosity value for 23 polymorphic microsatellite loci surveyed in 13 diverse silkmoth strains having 2–14 alleles was 0.54. Only 36 (18.2%) of 198 microsatellite loci were polymorphic between the two divergent silkworm populations and 10 (5%) loci revealed null alleles. The microsatellite map generated using these polymorphic markers resulted in 8 linkage groups. B. mori microsatellite loci were the most conserved in its immediate ancestor, B. mandarina, followed by the wild saturniid silkmoth, Antheraea assama. PMID:15371363

  17. Characterization of microsatellites in wild and sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)--markers for individual identification and reproductive processes.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Schuster, Mirko; Ziegenhagen, Birgit

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear microsatellites were characterized in Prunus avium and validated as markers for individual and cultivar identification, as well as for studies of pollen- and seed-mediated gene flow. We used 20 primer pairs from a simple sequence repeat (SSR) library of Prunus persica and identified 7 loci harboring polymorphic microsatellite sequences in P. avium. In a natural population of 75 wild cherry trees, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 9 and expected heterozygosity from 0.39 to 0.77. The variability of the SSR markers allowed an unambiguous identification of individual trees and potential root suckers. Additionally, we analyzed 13 sweet cherry cultivars and differentiated 12 of them. An exclusion probability of 0.984 was calculated, which indicates that the seven loci are suitable markers for paternity analysis. The woody endocarp was successfully used for resolution of all microsatellite loci and exhibited the same multilocus genotype as the mother tree, as shown in a single seed progeny. Hence, SSR fingerprinting of the purely maternal endocarp was also successful in this Prunus species, allowing the identification of the mother tree of the dispersed seeds. The linkage of microsatellite loci with PCR-amplified alleles of the self-incompatibility locus was tested in two full-sib families of sweet cherry cultivars. From low recombination frequencies, we inferred that two loci are linked with the S locus. The present study provides markers that will significantly facilitate studies of spatial genetic variation and gene flow in wild cherry, as well as breeding programs in sweet cherry.

  18. Functionally relevant microsatellites in sugarcane unigenes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Unigene sequences constitute a rich source of functionally relevant microsatellites. The present study was undertaken to mine the microsatellites in the available unigene sequences of sugarcane for understanding their constitution in the expressed genic component of its complex polyploid/aneuploid genome, assessing their functional significance in silico, determining the extent of allelic diversity at the microsatellite loci and for evaluating their utility in large-scale genotyping applications in sugarcane. Results The average frequency of perfect microsatellite was 1/10.9 kb, while it was 1/44.3 kb for the long and hypervariable class I repeats. GC-rich trinucleotides coding for alanine and the GA-rich dinucleotides were the most abundant microsatellite classes. Out of 15,594 unigenes mined in the study, 767 contained microsatellite repeats and for 672 of these putative functions were determined in silico. The microsatellite repeats were found in the functional domains of proteins encoded by 364 unigenes. Its significance was assessed by establishing the structure-function relationship for the beta-amylase and protein kinase encoding unigenes having repeats in the catalytic domains. A total of 726 allelic variants (7.42 alleles per locus) with different repeat lengths were captured precisely for a set of 47 fluorescent dye labeled primers in 36 sugarcane genotypes and five cereal species using the automated fragment analysis system, which suggested the utility of designed primers for rapid, large-scale and high-throughput genotyping applications in sugarcane. Pair-wise similarity ranging from 0.33 to 0.84 with an average of 0.40 revealed a broad genetic base of the Indian varieties in respect of functionally relevant regions of the large and complex sugarcane genome. Conclusion Microsatellite repeats were present in 4.92% of sugarcane unigenes, for most (87.6%) of which functions were determined in silico. High level of allelic diversity in repeats

  19. Chloroplast microsatellite primers for cacao (Theobroma cacao) and other Malvaceae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji Y; Motilal, Lambert A; Dempewolf, Hannes; Maharaj, Kamaldeo; Cronk, Q C B

    2011-12-01

    Chloroplast microsatellites were developed in Theobroma cacao to examine the genetic diversity of cacao cultivars in Trinidad and Tobago. Nine polymorphic microsatellites were designed from the chloroplast genomes of two T. cacao accessions. These microsatellites were tested in 95 hybrid accessions from Trinidad and Tobago. An average of 2.9 alleles per locus was found. These chloroplast microsatellites, particularly the highly polymorphic pentameric repeat, were useful in assessing genetic variation in T. cacao. In addition, these markers should also prove to be useful for population genetic studies in other species of Malvaceae.

  20. A New Electrophoresis Technique to Seperate Microsatellite Alleles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traditional agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis have been used commonly for microsatellite (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) analysis, but they are labor- intensive and not always able to provide accurate sizes for different alleles. Capillary sequencers provide automated analysis and accur...

  1. Detecting microsatellites within genomes: significant variation among algorithms.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2007-04-18

    Microsatellites are short, tandemly-repeated DNA sequences which are widely distributed among genomes. Their structure, role and evolution can be analyzed based on exhaustive extraction from sequenced genomes. Several dedicated algorithms have been developed for this purpose. Here, we compared the detection efficiency of five of them (TRF, Mreps, Sputnik, STAR, and RepeatMasker). Our analysis was first conducted on the human X chromosome, and microsatellite distributions were characterized by microsatellite number, length, and divergence from a pure motif. The algorithms work with user-defined parameters, and we demonstrate that the parameter values chosen can strongly influence microsatellite distributions. The five algorithms were then compared by fixing parameters settings, and the analysis was extended to three other genomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Drosophila melanogaster) spanning a wide range of size and structure. Significant differences for all characteristics of microsatellites were observed among algorithms, but not among genomes, for both perfect and imperfect microsatellites. Striking differences were detected for short microsatellites (below 20 bp), regardless of motif. Since the algorithm used strongly influences empirical distributions, studies analyzing microsatellite evolution based on a comparison between empirical and theoretical size distributions should therefore be considered with caution. We also discuss why a typological definition of microsatellites limits our capacity to capture their genomic distributions.

  2. Detecting microsatellites within genomes: significant variation among algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are short, tandemly-repeated DNA sequences which are widely distributed among genomes. Their structure, role and evolution can be analyzed based on exhaustive extraction from sequenced genomes. Several dedicated algorithms have been developed for this purpose. Here, we compared the detection efficiency of five of them (TRF, Mreps, Sputnik, STAR, and RepeatMasker). Results Our analysis was first conducted on the human X chromosome, and microsatellite distributions were characterized by microsatellite number, length, and divergence from a pure motif. The algorithms work with user-defined parameters, and we demonstrate that the parameter values chosen can strongly influence microsatellite distributions. The five algorithms were then compared by fixing parameters settings, and the analysis was extended to three other genomes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Neurospora crassa and Drosophila melanogaster) spanning a wide range of size and structure. Significant differences for all characteristics of microsatellites were observed among algorithms, but not among genomes, for both perfect and imperfect microsatellites. Striking differences were detected for short microsatellites (below 20 bp), regardless of motif. Conclusion Since the algorithm used strongly influences empirical distributions, studies analyzing microsatellite evolution based on a comparison between empirical and theoretical size distributions should therefore be considered with caution. We also discuss why a typological definition of microsatellites limits our capacity to capture their genomic distributions. PMID:17442102

  3. Rapid microsatellite marker development using next generation pyrosequencing to inform invasive Burmese python -- Python molurus bivittatus -- management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%–77%) heterozygosity and 3.7 (2–6) alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae.

  4. Rapid Microsatellite Marker Development Using Next Generation Pyrosequencing to Inform Invasive Burmese Python—Python molurus bivittatus—Management

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Margaret E.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%–77%) heterozygosity and 3.7 (2–6) alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae. PMID:23449030

  5. Rapid Microsatellite Marker Development Using Next Generation Pyrosequencing to Inform Invasive Burmese Python-Python molurus bivittatus-Management.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Margaret E; Hart, Kristen M

    2013-02-28

    Invasive species represent an increasing threat to native ecosystems, harming indigenous taxa through predation, habitat modification, cross-species hybridization and alteration of ecosystem processes. Additionally, high economic costs are associated with environmental damage, restoration and control measures. The Burmese python, Python molurus bivittatus, is one of the most notable invasive species in the US, due to the threat it poses to imperiled species and the Greater Everglades ecosystem. To address population structure and relatedness, next generation sequencing was used to rapidly produce species-specific microsatellite loci. The Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium platform provided 6616 di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in 117,516 sequences. Using stringent criteria, 24 of 26 selected tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified and 18 were polymorphic. An additional six cross-species loci were amplified, and the resulting 24 loci were incorporated into eight PCR multiplexes. Multi-locus genotypes yielded an average of 61% (39%-77%) heterozygosity and 3.7 (2-6) alleles per locus. Population-level studies using the developed microsatellites will track the invasion front and monitor population-suppression dynamics. Additionally, cross-species amplification was detected in the invasive Ball, P. regius, and Northern African python, P. sebae. These markers can be used to address the hybridization potential of Burmese pythons and the larger, more aggressive P. sebae.

  6. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

    Treesearch

    T.N. Jennings; B.J. Knaus; T.D. Mullins; S.M. Haig; R.C. Cronn

    2011-01-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of...

  7. New softwares for automated microsatellite marker development

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Wellington; de Sousa, Daniel; Proite, Karina; Guimarães, Patrícia; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Bertioli, David

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellites are repeated small sequence motifs that are highly polymorphic and abundant in the genomes of eukaryotes. Often they are the molecular markers of choice. To aid the development of microsatellite markers we have developed a module that integrates a program for the detection of microsatellites (TROLL), with the sequence assembly and analysis software, the Staden Package. The module has easily adjustable parameters for microsatellite lengths and base pair quality control. Starting with large datasets of unassembled sequence data in the form of chromatograms and/or text data, it enables the creation of a compact database consisting of the processed and assembled microsatellite containing sequences. For the final phase of primer design, we developed a program that accepts the multi-sequence ‘experiment file’ format as input and produces a list of primer pairs for amplification of microsatellite markers. The program can take into account the quality values of consensus bases, improving success rate of primer pairs in PCR. The software is freely available and simple to install in both Windows and Unix-based operating systems. Here we demonstrate the software by developing primer pairs for 427 new candidate markers for peanut. PMID:16493138

  8. New softwares for automated microsatellite marker development.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wellington; de Sousa, Daniel; Proite, Karina; Guimarães, Patrícia; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Bertioli, David

    2006-02-21

    Microsatellites are repeated small sequence motifs that are highly polymorphic and abundant in the genomes of eukaryotes. Often they are the molecular markers of choice. To aid the development of microsatellite markers we have developed a module that integrates a program for the detection of microsatellites (TROLL), with the sequence assembly and analysis software, the Staden Package. The module has easily adjustable parameters for microsatellite lengths and base pair quality control. Starting with large datasets of unassembled sequence data in the form of chromatograms and/or text data, it enables the creation of a compact database consisting of the processed and assembled microsatellite containing sequences. For the final phase of primer design, we developed a program that accepts the multi-sequence 'experiment file' format as input and produces a list of primer pairs for amplification of microsatellite markers. The program can take into account the quality values of consensus bases, improving success rate of primer pairs in PCR. The software is freely available and simple to install in both Windows and Unix-based operating systems. Here we demonstrate the software by developing primer pairs for 427 new candidate markers for peanut.

  9. Multilocus phylogeography and phylogenetics using sequence-based markers.

    PubMed

    Brito, Patrícia H; Edwards, Scott V

    2009-04-01

    We review recent trends in phylogeography and phylogenetics and argue that these two fields stand to be reunited by the common yardstick provided by sequence and SNP data and by new multilocus methods for phylogenetic analysis. Whereas the modern incarnation of both fields was spawned by PCR approaches applied to mitochondrial DNA in the late 1980s, the two fields diverged during the 1990s largely due to the adoption by phylogeographers of microsatellites, in contrast to the adoption of nuclear sequence data by phylogeneticists. Sequence-based markers possess a number of advantages over microsatellites, even on the recent time scales that are the purview of phylogeography. Using examples primarily from vertebrates, we trace the maturation of nuclear gene phylogeography and phylogenetics and suggest that the abundant instances of gene tree heterogeneity beckon a new generation of phylogenetic methods that focus on estimating species trees as distinct from gene trees. Whole genomes provide a powerful common yardstick on which both phylogeography and phylogenetics can assume their proper place as ends of a continuum.

  10. Wide variation in microsatellite sequences within each Pfcrt mutant haplotype.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Mittra, Pooja; Sharma, Yagya D

    2006-05-01

    Flanking microsatellites for each of the Pfcrt mutant haplotype of Plasmodium falciparum remain conserved among geographical isolates. We describe here heterogeneity in the intragenic microsatellites among each of the Pfcrt haplotype. There were fourteen different alleles of AT repeats of intron 2 and eight alleles of TA repeats of intron 4 of the pfcrt gene among Indian isolates. This resulted in 33 different two-locus (intron 2 plus intron 4) microsatellite genotypes among 224 isolates. There were 15 different two-locus microsatellite genotypes within the South American Pfcrt haplotype (S72V73M74N75T76S220) and 11 genotypes in the southeast Asian haplotype (C72V73I74E75T76S220) in these isolates. Indian isolates with Pfcrt haplotype C72V73I74E75T76S220 shared one of its two-locus microsatellite genotype with southeast Asian P. falciparum parasite lines from Thailand (K1) and Indochina (Dd2 and W2). Conversely, Indian isolates containing S72V73M74N75T76S220 Pfcrt haplotype did not share any of their two-locus microsatellite genotype with South American parasite line 7G8 from Brazil. Significantly, large number of newer two-locus microsatellite genotypes were detected in a 2-year time period (P<0.05). Microsatellite variation was more prominent in the areas of high malaria transmission. It is concluded that the genetic recombination in the intragenic microsatellites continues in the parasite population even after microsatellites flanking the pfcrt gene had already been fixed. Presence of various Pfcrt haplotypes and a variety of intragenic microsatellites indicates that there is a wide spectrum of chloroquine resistant parasite population in India. This information should be useful for malaria control programs of the country.

  11. Microsatellite markers for species of genus Dionda (Cyprinidae) from the American southwest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty-eight microsatellite markers were developed from an enriched genomic DNA library of the cyprinid fish (minnow) Dionda episcopa. The microsatellites include 31 perfect-repeat motifs (29 dinucleotide, 1 trinucleotide, and 1 tetranucleotide) and seven imperfect-repeat dinucleotide motifs. The ...

  12. Analysis of new microsatellite markers developed from reported sequences of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiyang; Jiang, Liming; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xubo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2010-12-01

    The expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, were selected from GenBank to identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites. A bioinformatic analysis of 11111 ESTs identified 751 SSR-containing ESTs, including 440 dinucleotide, 254 trinucleotide, 53 tetranucleotide, 95 pentanucleotide and 40 hexanucleotide microsatellites respectively. The CA/TG and GA/TC repeats were the most abundant microsatellites. AT-rich types were predominant among trinucleotide and tetranucleotide microsatellites. PCR primers were designed to amplify 10 identified microsatellites loci. The PCR results from eight pairs of primers showed polymorphisms in wild populations. In 30 wild individuals, the mean observed and expected heterozygosities of these 8 polymorphic SSRs were 0.71 and 0.83 respectively and the average PIC value was 0.8. These microsatellite markers should prove to be a useful addition to the microsatellite markers that are now available for this species.

  13. Microsatellite variation in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    PubMed

    Williams, C Lenney; Homan, H J; Johnston, J J; Linz, G M

    2004-02-01

    Territorial male red-winged blackbirds from five locations in the United States and Canada were genotyped using a suite of six microsatellite loci. Each population possessed unique alleles, but numbers of alleles per locus (range = 7.3-8.8) and expected multilocus heterozygosities (range = 0.76-0.80) were similar in all populations. Significant overall allele frequency differences were detected between some population pairs, and some pairwise Fst values were significant (but small). However, Fst among populations, although significant, was also small (0.009). Despite revealing low levels of population structure, the high multilocus polymorphism indicates these loci will be valuable in the genetic analysis of behavior and reproductive strategies in this species.

  14. Microsatellite primer resource for Populus developed from

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; Yang, Xiaohan; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Li, Shuxian; Zhang, Xinye

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  15. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, T.N.; Knaus, B.J.; Mullins, T.D.; Haig, S.M.; Cronn, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5M (USD).

  16. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jennings, T N; Knaus, B J; Mullins, T D; Haig, S M; Cronn, R C

    2011-11-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356,958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5 M (USD).

  17. Analyses of carnivore microsatellites and their intimate association with tRNA-derived SINEs

    PubMed Central

    López-Giráldez, Francesc; Andrés, Olga; Domingo-Roura, Xavier; Bosch, Montserrat

    2006-01-01

    Background The popularity of microsatellites has greatly increased in the last decade on account of their many applications. However, little is currently understood about the factors that influence their genesis and distribution among and within species genomes. In this work, we analyzed carnivore microsatellite clones from GenBank to study their association with interspersed repeats and elucidate the role of the latter in microsatellite genesis and distribution. Results We constructed a comprehensive carnivore microsatellite database comprising 1236 clones from GenBank. Thirty-three species of 11 out of 12 carnivore families were represented, although two distantly related species, the domestic dog and cat, were clearly overrepresented. Of these clones, 330 contained tRNALys-derived SINEs and 357 contained other interspersed repeats. Our rough estimates of tRNA SINE copies per haploid genome were much higher than published ones. Our results also revealed a distinct juxtaposition of AG and A-rich repeats and tRNALys-derived SINEs suggesting their coevolution. Both microsatellites arose repeatedly in two regions of the insterspersed repeat. Moreover, microsatellites associated with tRNALys-derived SINEs showed the highest complexity and less potential instability. Conclusion Our results suggest that tRNALys-derived SINEs are a significant source for microsatellite generation in carnivores, especially for AG and A-rich repeat motifs. These observations indicate two modes of microsatellite generation: the expansion and variation of pre-existing tandem repeats and the conversion of sequences with high cryptic simplicity into a repeat array; mechanisms which are not specific to tRNALys-derived SINEs. Microsatellite and interspersed repeat coevolution could also explain different distribution of repeat types among and within species genomes. Finally, due to their higher complexity and lower potential informative content of microsatellites associated with t

  18. Analyses of carnivore microsatellites and their intimate association with tRNA-derived SINEs.

    PubMed

    López-Giráldez, Francesc; Andrés, Olga; Domingo-Roura, Xavier; Bosch, Montserrat

    2006-10-23

    The popularity of microsatellites has greatly increased in the last decade on account of their many applications. However, little is currently understood about the factors that influence their genesis and distribution among and within species genomes. In this work, we analyzed carnivore microsatellite clones from GenBank to study their association with interspersed repeats and elucidate the role of the latter in microsatellite genesis and distribution. We constructed a comprehensive carnivore microsatellite database comprising 1236 clones from GenBank. Thirty-three species of 11 out of 12 carnivore families were represented, although two distantly related species, the domestic dog and cat, were clearly overrepresented. Of these clones, 330 contained tRNALys-derived SINEs and 357 contained other interspersed repeats. Our rough estimates of tRNA SINE copies per haploid genome were much higher than published ones. Our results also revealed a distinct juxtaposition of AG and A-rich repeats and tRNALys-derived SINEs suggesting their coevolution. Both microsatellites arose repeatedly in two regions of the interspersed repeat. Moreover, microsatellites associated with tRNALys-derived SINEs showed the highest complexity and less potential instability. Our results suggest that tRNALys-derived SINEs are a significant source for microsatellite generation in carnivores, especially for AG and A-rich repeat motifs. These observations indicate two modes of microsatellite generation: the expansion and variation of pre-existing tandem repeats and the conversion of sequences with high cryptic simplicity into a repeat array; mechanisms which are not specific to tRNALys-derived SINEs. Microsatellite and interspersed repeat coevolution could also explain different distribution of repeat types among and within species genomes.Finally, due to their higher complexity and lower potential informative content of microsatellites associated with tRNALys-derived SINEs, we recommend avoiding

  19. Lessons learned from microsatellite development for nonmodel organisms using 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Schoebel, C N; Brodbeck, S; Buehler, D; Cornejo, C; Gajurel, J; Hartikainen, H; Keller, D; Leys, M; Ríčanová, S; Segelbacher, G; Werth, S; Csencsics, D

    2013-03-01

    Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are among the most commonly used marker types in evolutionary and ecological studies. Next Generation Sequencing techniques such as 454 pyrosequencing allow the rapid development of microsatellite markers in nonmodel organisms. 454 pyrosequencing is a straightforward approach to develop a high number of microsatellite markers. Therefore, developing microsatellites using 454 pyrosequencing has become the method of choice for marker development. Here, we describe a user friendly way of microsatellite development from 454 pyrosequencing data and analyse data sets of 17 nonmodel species (plants, fungi, invertebrates, birds and a mammal) for microsatellite repeats and flanking regions suitable for primer development. We then compare the numbers of successfully lab-tested microsatellite markers for the various species and furthermore describe diverse challenges that might arise in different study species, for example, large genome size or nonpure extraction of genomic DNA. Successful primer identification was feasible for all species. We found that in species for which large repeat numbers are uncommon, such as fungi, polymorphic markers can nevertheless be developed from 454 pyrosequencing reads containing small repeat numbers (five to six repeats). Furthermore, the development of microsatellite markers for species with large genomes was also with Next Generation Sequencing techniques more cost and time-consuming than for species with smaller genomes. In this study, we showed that depending on the species, a different amount of 454 pyrosequencing data might be required for successful identification of a sufficient number of microsatellite markers for ecological genetic studies.

  20. The microsatellites and minisatellites in the genome of Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huan; Kong, Jie

    2005-12-01

    Through two-time sequencing randomly in Fenneropenaeus chinensis, 2,597,000 bp cumulative length random genomic sequences about occupying 1.23 per thousand of the entire genome are obtained, in which the length of the first time sequencing is 884,000 bp, by cutting the genome DNA with Sau3AI enzyme, and the second is 1,713,000 bp by breaking the genome DNA with the physical method, ultrasonic. Using tandem repeat finder (TRF) soft to analyze the sequences, 4,588 tandem repeats are found, in which the number of microsatellites (1-6 bp) is 3,888, and 700 for minisatellites ( >or= 7 bp). The cumulative length of repeats is 305,555 bp, accounting for 11.72% of total cumulative sequence length, in which the cumulative length of microsatellites is 232,979 bp, accounting for 8.97% of total sequence length, and greater than those of other organisms, such as human and mosquito, etc. The dinucleotide repeat type is dominant in which the dominant repeat class is AT. The second abundant repeat type is trinucleotide, of which the dominant repeat class is AAT. Interestingly, of all of repeat types, the repeat numbers and repeat classes of primer number repeat types, such as pentanucleotide, heptanucleotide, elevennucleotide, etc. are less than those of repeat types beside them. The phenomena may involve the genesis and the evolution of microsatellites and minisatellites.

  1. Microsatellite instability in early sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. A.; Walsh, T.; Chappell, S. A.; Carey, N.; Johnson, K.; Walker, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the incidence of microsatellite instability at three trinucleotide repeats and seven dinucleotide repeats from five chromosomal regions, in a group of 30 mammographically detected 'early' invasive breast cancers and correlated its occurrence with clinicopathological parameters. The myotonic dystrophy (DM-1) trinucleotide repeat was analysed in 48 additional cases. In 4 out of 78 (5%) paired tumour-normal DNA samples we found evidence of somatic microsatellite instability at DM-1: a novel allele of a different size was seen in the tumour DNA which was not present in the normal DNA sample. All four tumours that showed evidence of instability were from the core group of 30 cases (13%) and were well or moderately differentiated, oestrogen receptor-positive, infiltrating ductal carcinomas. Two of these tumours were unstable at nine of ten loci studied, both trinucleotide and dinucleotide repeats. DNA prepared from different normal tissues showed no evidence of instability, for all four instability cases. These data indicate that microsatellite instability is specific to the tumour DNA and is an early event in the genesis of some sporadic breast cancers. Images Figure 1 PMID:8645585

  2. Microsatellites evolve more rapidly in humans than in chimpanzees

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinsztein, D.C.; Leggo, J.; Amos, W.

    1995-12-10

    Microsatellites are highly polymorphic markers consisting of varying numbers of tandem repeats. At different loci, these repeats can consist of one to five nucleotides. Microsatellites have been used in many fields of genetics, including genetic mapping, linkage disequilibrium analyses, forensic studies, and population genetics. It is important that we understand their mutational processes better so that they can be exploited optimally for studies of human diversity and evolutionary genetics. We have analyzed 24 microsatellite loci in chimpanzees, East Anglians, and Sub-Saharan Africans. The stepwise-weighted genetic distances between the humans and the chimpanzees and between the two human populations were calculated according to the method described by Deka et al. The ratio of the genetic distances between the chimpanzees and the humans relative to that between the Africans and the East Anglians was more than 10 times smaller than expected. This suggests that microsatellites have evolved more rapidly in humans than in chimpanzees. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Characterization of microsatellite markers in eastern white pine

    Treesearch

    C. S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt; M. Hseih; R. Zahorchak

    1996-01-01

    An enrichment cloning method was evaluated for the isolation of microsatellite loci from eastern white pine and the resulting markers were examined for polymorphisms. A 200-fold enrichment was achieved for highly abundant (AC)n repeats, but for much less abundant (ACAG)n repeats an enrichment of only 20-fold was obtained....

  4. Characterization of microsatellite markers in eastern white pine

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt; P. May-Marquardt; M. Hseih; R. Zahorchak

    1996-01-01

    An enrichment cloning method was evaluated for the isolation of microsatellite loci from eastern white pine and the resulting markers were examined for polymorphisms. A 200-fold enrichment was achieved for highly abundant (AC), repeats, but for much less abundant (ACAG), repeats an enrichment of only 20-fold was obtained. Using a single set of PCR conditions, 19...

  5. Simple sequence repeat markers useful for sorghum downy mildew (Peronosclerospora sorghi) and related species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Among the 55 primers pairs designed from clones from pathotype 3 of P. sorghi, 36 flanked microsatellite loci containing simple repeats, including 28 (55%) with dinucleotide repeats and 6 (11%) with trinucleotide repeats. A total of 22 microsatellites with CA/AC or GT/TG repeats were the most abund...

  6. Application of Microsatellite Loci for Molecular Identification of Elite Genotypes, Analysis of Clonality, and Genetic Diversity in Aspen Populus tremula L. (Salicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Politov, Dmitry V.; Belokon, Maryana M.; Belokon, Yuri S.; Polyakova, Tatyana A.; Shatokhina, Anna V.; Mudrik, Elena A.; Azarova, Anna B.; Filippov, Mikhail V.; Shestibratov, Konstantin A.

    2015-01-01

    Testing systems for molecular identification of micropropagated elite aspen (Populus tremula L.) genotypes were developed on the base on microsatellite (SSR) loci. Out of 33 tested microsatellite loci, 14 were selected due to sustainable PCR amplification and substantial variability in elite clones of aspen aimed for establishment of fast-rotated forest plantations. All eight tested clones had different multilocus genotypes. Among 114 trees from three reference native stands located near the established plantations, 80 haplotypes were identified while some repeated genotypes were attributed to natural clones which appeared as a result of sprouting. The selected set of SSR markers showed reliable individual identification with low probability of appearance of identical aspen genotypes (a minimum of 4.8 · 10−10 and 1 × 10−4 for unrelated and related individuals, resp.). Case studies demonstrating practical applications of the test system are described including analysis of clonal structure and levels of genetic diversity in three natural aspen stands growing in the regions where plantations made of elite clones were established. PMID:26823661

  7. Fourteen new microsatellite markers for Atlantic herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Libungan, L A; Ólafsdóttir, G; Skírnisdóttir, S; Pálsson, S; Pampoulie, C; Björnsdóttir, S H; Ólafsson, K; Óskarsson, G J; Daníelsdóttir, A K

    2012-09-01

    Fourteen new microsatellite loci were developed and tested on Atlantic herring Clupea harengus with 39 individuals from Iceland and 49 individuals from Norway. The microsatellites, which contain di, tri and tetranucleotide repeats, are polymorphic (7-30 alleles), with observed heterozygosity ranging between 0·69 and 1·00 and expected heterozygosity between 0·55 and 0·97. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  8. Microsatellite landscape evolutionary dynamics across 450 million years of vertebrate genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard H; Blackmon, Heath; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Schield, Drew R; Card, Daren C; Andrew, Audra L; Waynewood, Nyimah; Castoe, Todd A

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites) across the vertebrate tree of life remain largely undocumented and poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed patterns of genomic microsatellite abundance and evolution across 71 vertebrate genomes. The highest abundances of microsatellites exist in the genomes of ray-finned fishes, squamate reptiles, and mammals, while crocodilian, turtle, and avian genomes exhibit reduced microsatellite landscapes. We used comparative methods to infer evolutionary rates of change in microsatellite abundance across vertebrates and to highlight particular lineages that have experienced unusually high or low rates of change in genomic microsatellite abundance. Overall, most variation in microsatellite content, abundance, and evolutionary rate is observed among major lineages of reptiles, yet we found that several deeply divergent clades (i.e., squamate reptiles and mammals) contained relatively similar genomic microsatellite compositions. Archosauromorph reptiles (turtles, crocodilians, and birds) exhibit reduced genomic microsatellite content and the slowest rates of microsatellite evolution, in contrast to squamate reptile genomes that have among the highest rates of microsatellite evolution. Substantial branch-specific shifts in SSR content in primates, monotremes, rodents, snakes, and fish are also evident. Collectively, our results support multiple major shifts in microsatellite genomic landscapes among vertebrates.

  9. Analysis of microsatellites derived from bee Ests.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Xia, Qing-You; Lu, Cheng; Zhou, Ze-Yang

    2004-10-01

    To accelerate the molecular analysis of genetics,evolution and behavior, etc. in the honey bee (Apis), the frequency and density of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have been analyzed from the bee EST (expressed sequence tag) database comprising 15 869 sequences amounting to 7.9 Mb. Results showed that the frequency of SSRs was 1/0.52 kb in bee ESTs, and hexanucleotide repeats (45.0%) motifs appeared to be the most abundant type in bee,the dinucleotide, mononucleotide, trinucleotide, tetranucleotide and pentanucleotide repeats are 17.9%, 14.1%, 11.6%, 9.2% and 2.2%, respectively. Meanwhile, the A-rich repeats are predominant in each type of SSRs, such as A, AT, AG, AC, AAT, AAG, AAC, AAAT, AAAG, AAAAG, AAAAT, AATAT, AAAAAG and AAAAAT repeats, whereas G-rich repeats are rare in the coding regions. The further analysis suggests that, apart from minor deviations, there is no significant difference in the distribution and density of microsatellites in the redundant and non-redundant set of bee ESTs. Furthermore, the availability of microsatellite markers can be expected to enhance the power and resolution of genome analysis in bee.

  10. Development of Seven Microsatellite Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing for the Conservation on the Korean Population of Dorcus hopei (E. Saunders, 1854) (Coleoptera, Lucanidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2015-01-01

    We developed microsatellite markers for genetic structural analyses of Dorcus hopei, a stag beetle species, using next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping for regional populations. A total of 407,070,351 base pairs of genomic DNA containing >4000 microsatellite loci except AT repeats were sequenced. From 76 loci selected for primer design, 27 were polymorphic. Of these 27 markers, 10 were tested on three regional populations: two Chinese (Shichuan and Guangxi) and one Korean (Wanju). Three markers were excluded due to inconsistent amplification, genotyping errors, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). By multi-locus genotyping, the allele number, observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content of seven microsatellite loci were ranged 2‒10, 0.1333‒1.0000, and 0.1228‒0.8509, respectively. In an analysis on the genetic differentiation among regional populations including one Japanese population and one cross-breeding population, the individual colored bar-plots showed that both Chinese populations were closer to each other than to the Far East Asian populations. In Far East Asian populations, Wanju and Nirasaki populations could not be distinguished from each other because the frequency of genetic contents was very similar in some individuals of two populations. Moreover, the cross-breeding population contained all patterns of genetic contents shown in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese populations, compared with the genetic content frequency of each regional population. As a result, we examined whether the cross-breeding population might be a hybrid population, and might contain a possibility of interbreeding with Chinese populations in parental generations. Therefore, these markers will be useful for analyses of genetic diversity in populations, genetic relationships between regional populations, genetic structure analyses, and origin tests. PMID:26370965

  11. Development of Seven Microsatellite Markers Using Next Generation Sequencing for the Conservation on the Korean Population of Dorcus hopei (E. Saunders, 1854) (Coleoptera, Lucanidae).

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Hwa; Han, Sang Hoon; Park, Sun Jae

    2015-09-07

    We developed microsatellite markers for genetic structural analyses of Dorcus hopei, a stag beetle species, using next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping for regional populations. A total of 407,070,351 base pairs of genomic DNA containing >4000 microsatellite loci except AT repeats were sequenced. From 76 loci selected for primer design, 27 were polymorphic. Of these 27 markers, 10 were tested on three regional populations: two Chinese (Shichuan and Guangxi) and one Korean (Wanju). Three markers were excluded due to inconsistent amplification, genotyping errors, and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). By multi-locus genotyping, the allele number, observed heterozygosity and polymorphism information content of seven microsatellite loci were ranged 2-10, 0.1333-1.0000, and 0.1228-0.8509, respectively. In an analysis on the genetic differentiation among regional populations including one Japanese population and one cross-breeding population, the individual colored bar-plots showed that both Chinese populations were closer to each other than to the Far East Asian populations. In Far East Asian populations, Wanju and Nirasaki populations could not be distinguished from each other because the frequency of genetic contents was very similar in some individuals of two populations. Moreover, the cross-breeding population contained all patterns of genetic contents shown in Chinese, Korean, and Japanese populations, compared with the genetic content frequency of each regional population. As a result, we examined whether the cross-breeding population might be a hybrid population, and might contain a possibility of interbreeding with Chinese populations in parental generations. Therefore, these markers will be useful for analyses of genetic diversity in populations, genetic relationships between regional populations, genetic structure analyses, and origin tests.

  12. An analysis of microsatellite loci in Arabidopsis thaliana: mutational dynamics and application.

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, V Vaughan; Lloyd, Alan M

    2003-01-01

    Microsatellite loci are among the most commonly used molecular markers. These loci typically exhibit variation for allele frequency distribution within a species. However, the factors contributing to this variation are not well understood. To expand on the current knowledge of microsatellite evolution, 20 microsatellite loci were examined for 126 accessions of the flowering plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. Substantial variability in mutation pattern among loci was found, most of which cannot be explained by the assumptions of the traditional stepwise mutation model or infinite alleles model. Here it is shown that the degree of locus diversity is strongly correlated with the number of contiguous repeats, more so than with the total number of repeats. These findings support a strong role for repeat disruptions in stabilizing microsatellite loci by reducing the substrate for polymerase slippage and recombination. Results of cluster analyses are also presented, demonstrating the potential of microsatellite loci for resolving relationships among accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:14668396

  13. Microsatellites in the Genome of the Edible Mushroom, Volvariella volvacea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingjie; Wang, Hong; Bao, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Using bioinformatics software and database, we have characterized the microsatellite pattern in the V. volvacea genome and compared it with microsatellite patterns found in the genomes of four other edible fungi: Coprinopsis cinerea, Schizophyllum commune, Agaricus bisporus, and Pleurotus ostreatus. A total of 1346 microsatellites have been identified, with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motif. The relative abundance of microsatellites was lower in coding regions with 21 No./Mb. However, the microsatellites in the V. volvacea gene models showed a greater tendency to be located in the CDS regions. There was also a higher preponderance of trinucleotide repeats, especially in the kinase genes, which implied a possible role in phenotypic variation. Among the five fungal genomes, microsatellite abundance appeared to be unrelated to genome size. Furthermore, the short motifs (mono- to tri-nucleotides) outnumbered other categories although these differed in proportion. Data analysis indicated a possible relationship between the most frequent microsatellite types and the genetic distance between the five fungal genomes. PMID:24575404

  14. Mature Microsatellites: Mechanisms Underlying Dinucleotide Microsatellite Mutational Biases in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baptiste, Beverly A.; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D.; Krasilnikova, Maria M.; Eckert, Kristin A.

    2013-01-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans. PMID:23450065

  15. Mature microsatellites: mechanisms underlying dinucleotide microsatellite mutational biases in human cells.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, Beverly A; Ananda, Guruprasad; Strubczewski, Noelle; Lutzkanin, Andrew; Khoo, Su Jen; Srikanth, Abhinaya; Kim, Nari; Makova, Kateryna D; Krasilnikova, Maria M; Eckert, Kristin A

    2013-03-01

    Dinucleotide microsatellites are dynamic DNA sequences that affect genome stability. Here, we focused on mature microsatellites, defined as pure repeats of lengths above the threshold and unlikely to mutate below it in a single mutational event. We investigated the prevalence and mutational behavior of these sequences by using human genome sequence data, human cells in culture, and purified DNA polymerases. Mature dinucleotides (≥10 units) are present within exonic sequences of >350 genes, resulting in vulnerability to cellular genetic integrity. Mature dinucleotide mutagenesis was examined experimentally using ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We observe an expansion bias for dinucleotide microsatellites up to 20 units in length in somatic human cells, in agreement with previous computational analyses of germ-line biases. Using purified DNA polymerases and human cell lines deficient for mismatch repair (MMR), we show that the expansion bias is caused by functional MMR and is not due to DNA polymerase error biases. Specifically, we observe that the MutSα and MutLα complexes protect against expansion mutations. Our data support a model wherein different MMR complexes shift the balance of mutations toward deletion or expansion. Finally, we show that replication fork progression is stalled within long dinucleotides, suggesting that mutational mechanisms within long repeats may be distinct from shorter lengths, depending on the biochemistry of fork resolution. Our work combines computational and experimental approaches to explain the complex mutational behavior of dinucleotide microsatellites in humans.

  16. Complex evolution of a highly conserved microsatellite locus in several fish species.

    PubMed

    Liu, J-X; Ely, B

    2009-08-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of a highly conserved microsatellite locus (Dla 11) were studied in several fish species. The data indicated that multiple types of compound microsatellites arose through point mutations that were sometimes followed by expansion of the derived motif. Furthermore, extensive length variation was detected among species in the regions immediately flanking the repeat region.

  17. Microsatellites in Pursuit of Microbial Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Abdullah F.; Wang, Rongzhi; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites or short sequence repeats are widespread genetic markers which are hypermutable 1–6 bp long short nucleotide motifs. Significantly, their applications in genetics are extensive due to their ceaseless mutational degree, widespread length variations and hypermutability skills. These features make them useful in determining the driving forces of evolution by using powerful molecular techniques. Consequently, revealing important questions, for example, what is the significance of these abundant sequences in DNA, what are their roles in genomic evolution? The answers of these important questions are hidden in the ways these short motifs contributed in altering the microbial genomes since the origin of life. Even though their size ranges from 1 –to- 6 bases, these repeats are becoming one of the most popular genetic probes in determining their associations and phylogenetic relationships in closely related genomes. Currently, they have been widely used in molecular genetics, biotechnology and evolutionary biology. However, due to limited knowledge; there is a significant gap in research and lack of information concerning hypermutational mechanisms. These mechanisms play a key role in microsatellite loci point mutations and phase variations. This review will extend the understandings of impacts and contributions of microsatellite in genomic evolution and their universal applications in microbiology. PMID:26779133

  18. Informative genomic microsatellite markers for efficient genotyping applications in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Parida, Swarup K; Kalia, Sanjay K; Kaul, Sunita; Dalal, Vivek; Hemaprabha, G; Selvi, Athiappan; Pandit, Awadhesh; Singh, Archana; Gaikwad, Kishor; Sharma, Tilak R; Srivastava, Prem Shankar; Singh, Nagendra K; Mohapatra, Trilochan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic microsatellite markers are capable of revealing high degree of polymorphism. Sugarcane (Saccharum sp.), having a complex polyploid genome requires more number of such informative markers for various applications in genetics and breeding. With the objective of generating a large set of microsatellite markers designated as Sugarcane Enriched Genomic MicroSatellite (SEGMS), 6,318 clones from genomic libraries of two hybrid sugarcane cultivars enriched with 18 different microsatellite repeat-motifs were sequenced to generate 4.16 Mb high-quality sequences. Microsatellites were identified in 1,261 of the 5,742 non-redundant clones that accounted for 22% enrichment of the libraries. Retro-transposon association was observed for 23.1% of the identified microsatellites. The utility of the microsatellite containing genomic sequences were demonstrated by higher primer designing potential (90%) and PCR amplification efficiency (87.4%). A total of 1,315 markers including 567 class I microsatellite markers were designed and placed in the public domain for unrestricted use. The level of polymorphism detected by these markers among sugarcane species, genera, and varieties was 88.6%, while cross-transferability rate was 93.2% within Saccharum complex and 25% to cereals. Cloning and sequencing of size variant amplicons revealed that the variation in the number of repeat-units was the main source of SEGMS fragment length polymorphism. High level of polymorphism and wide range of genetic diversity (0.16-0.82 with an average of 0.44) assayed with the SEGMS markers suggested their usefulness in various genotyping applications in sugarcane.

  19. Novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are developing extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for smaller-faster-cheaper spacecraft attitude and control systems. They will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses the novel control system to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source.

  20. Isolation of novel microsatellites using FIASCO by dual probe enrichment from Jatropha curcas L. and study on genetic equilibrium and diversity of Indian population revealed by isolated microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, Pamidimarri D V N; Rahman, Hifzur; Mastan, Shaik G; Reddy, Muppala P

    2010-12-01

    Jatropha curcas L. belongs to family Euphorbiaceae, native to South America attained significant importance for its seed oil which can be converted to biodiesel, a renewable energy source alternative to conventional petrodiesel. Very few attempts were made to isolate novel microsatellite markers and assessment of the extent of genetic equilibrium and diversity that exists in J. curcas. Therefore, the present investigation was undertaken to isolate the novel microsatellites and access genetic equilibrium, diversity that exists among 44 diverse germplasm collected from distinct geographical areas in India using isolated microsatellites. The overall efficiency of the enrichment of microsatellite by dual probe in the present study found to be 54% and among the sequences obtained the percentage of sequences having suitable flanking regions for the primer designing was found to be 89.58%. The mean co-efficient of genetic similarity (CGS) was found to be 0.97. The overall diversity obtained by microsatellites was found to be low in comparison with the diversity reported by multilocus markers systems observed in earlier studies; however, the good allele polymorphism was observed. The overall dendrogram of microsatellite analysis resulted in random clustering of germplasm and not in accordance to geographical area of collection. The present study, diversity analysis using microsatellite markers concludes the low genetic diversity and genetic disequlibrium of J. curcas in India and will provide pavement for further intra-population studies on narrow geographical areas to understand the population genetic structure, phylogeography and molecular ecological studies. The germplasm characterized, and the microsatellite markers isolated and characterized in the present study can be employed efficiently in breeding programs for genetic improvement of the species through marker assisted selection and QTL analysis, for further genetic resource management and help in making the J

  1. Multilocus enzyme analysis of Legionella dumoffii.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, T C; McKinney, R M; Plikaytis, B D; Steigerwalt, A G; Bibb, W F; Brenner, D J

    1988-01-01

    Variability among 29 clinical and environmental strains of Legionella dumoffii was investigated by multilocus enzyme analysis by use of starch gel electrophoresis. Based on results of analysis at 20 enzyme loci, the strains were separated into five closely related electrophoretic types (ETs), which were clearly distinguished from 53 strains representing 53 ETs of L. pneumophila. DNA hybridization results (hydroxyapatite method, 60 and 75 degrees C) for representative strains confirmed that all L. dumoffii ETs were a single genetic species. Although multilocus enzyme analysis indicated that L. dumoffii was genetically a quite uniform species, sufficient variability existed to warrant electromorph fingerprinting for epidemiologic studies. PMID:3384905

  2. Microsatellite-Based Fingerprinting of Western Blackberries from Plants, IQF Berries and Puree

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The blackberry industry needs a reliable method to ensure trueness-to-type of blackberry products. Microsatellite markers or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are ideal for cultivar fingerprinting, paternity testing and identity certification. Fingerprinting is valuable for variety identification, qual...

  3. Analysis of microsatellite polymorphism in inbred knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Baofen; Du, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huixin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Yanhua; Lu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Zhenwen

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that the genotype of 42 out of 198 mouse microsatellite loci, which are distributed among all chromosomes except the Y chromosome, changed from monomorphism to polymorphism (CMP) in a genetically modified inbred mouse strain. In this study, we further examined whether CMP also relates to the homologous recombination in gene knockout (KO) mouse strains. The same 42 microsatellite loci were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 29 KO inbred mouse strains via short tandem sequence repeat (STR) scanning and direct sequence cloning to justify microsatellite polymorphisms. The C57BL/6J and 129 mouse strains, from which these 29 KO mice were derived, were chosen as the background controls. The results indicated that 10 out of 42 (23.8%) loci showed CMP in some of these mouse strains. Except for the trinucleotide repeat locus of D3Mit22, which had microsatellite CMP in strain number 9, the core sequences of the remaining 41 loci were dinucleotide repeats, and 9 out of 41 (21.95%) showed CMPs among detected mouse strains. However, 11 out of 29 (37.9%) KO mice strains were recognized as having CMPs. The popular dinucleotide motifs in CMP were (TG)(n) (50%, 2/4), followed by (GT)(n) (27.27%, 3/11) and (CA)(n) (23.08%, 3/13). The microsatellite CMP in (CT)(n) and (AG)(n) repeats were 20% (1/5). According to cloning sequencing results, 6 KO mouse strains showed insertions of nucleotides whereas 1 showed a deletion. Furthermore, 2 loci (D13Mit3 and D14Mit102) revealed CMP in 2 strains, and mouse strain number 9 showed CMPs in two loci (D3Mit22 and D13Mit3) simultaneously. Collectively, these results indicated that microsatellite polymorphisms were present in the examined inbred KO mice.

  4. Analysis of Microsatellite Polymorphism in Inbred Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Huixin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Yanhua; Lu, Jing; Wang, Ying; Chen, Zhenwen

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we found that the genotype of 42 out of 198 mouse microsatellite loci, which are distributed among all chromosomes except the Y chromosome, changed from monomorphism to polymorphism (CMP) in a genetically modified inbred mouse strain. In this study, we further examined whether CMP also relates to the homologous recombination in gene knockout (KO) mouse strains. The same 42 microsatellite loci were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 29 KO inbred mouse strains via short tandem sequence repeat (STR) scanning and direct sequence cloning to justify microsatellite polymorphisms. The C57BL/6J and 129 mouse strains, from which these 29 KO mice were derived, were chosen as the background controls. The results indicated that 10 out of 42 (23.8%) loci showed CMP in some of these mouse strains. Except for the trinucleotide repeat locus of D3Mit22, which had microsatellite CMP in strain number 9, the core sequences of the remaining 41 loci were dinucleotide repeats, and 9 out of 41 (21.95%) showed CMPs among detected mouse strains. However, 11 out of 29 (37.9%) KO mice strains were recognized as having CMPs. The popular dinucleotide motifs in CMP were (TG)n (50%, 2/4), followed by (GT)n (27.27%, 3/11) and (CA)n (23.08%, 3/13). The microsatellite CMP in (CT)n and (AG)n repeats were 20% (1/5). According to cloning sequencing results, 6 KO mouse strains showed insertions of nucleotides whereas 1 showed a deletion. Furthermore, 2 loci (D13Mit3 and D14Mit102) revealed CMP in 2 strains, and mouse strain number 9 showed CMPs in two loci (D3Mit22 and D13Mit3) simultaneously. Collectively, these results indicated that microsatellite polymorphisms were present in the examined inbred KO mice. PMID:22509320

  5. Optimizing selection of microsatellite loci from 454 pyrosequencing via post-sequencing bioinformatic analyses.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Toonen, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The comparatively low cost of massive parallel sequencing technology, also known as next-generation sequencing (NGS), has transformed the isolation of microsatellite loci. The most common NGS approach consists of obtaining large amounts of sequence data from genomic DNA or enriched microsatellite libraries, which is then mined for the discovery of microsatellite repeats using bioinformatics analyses. Here, we describe a bioinformatics approach to isolate microsatellite loci, starting from the raw sequence data through a subset of microsatellite primer pairs. The primary difference to previously published approaches includes analyses to select the most accurate sequence data and to eliminate repetitive elements prior to the design of primers. These analyses aim to minimize the testing of primer pairs by identifying the most promising microsatellite loci.

  6. Comparison of microsatellite distribution in genomes of Centruroides exilicauda and Mesobuthus martensii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Kubiak, Lukasz Jakub; Du, Lian-Ming; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jian, Zuo-Yi; Tang, Ce; Fan, Zhen-Xin; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-12-05

    In this study, we characterized the distribution of microsatellites in the genomes and genes of Centruroides exilicauda and Mesobuthus martensii, carried out Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and GO enrichment analysis of coding sequences (CDSs) with microsatellite (SSR). In addition, over-represented GO functions related to environmental interactions, development process and methylation were identified to develop functional markers and facilitate further analysis of microsatellite function in the genes of scorpions. Location analysis indicated that microsatellites were predominantly concentrated at both ends of genes. Most genes containing microsatellite had the SSR present at only one locus, from which we infer that the number of SSRs per gene is limited even though intragenic tandem repeats can generate functional variability. Lastly, we identified 75 SSRs in 64 genes of 54 expanded gene families and 1 SSR in the toxin gene of Mesobuthus martensii, allowing future studies on the effect of microsatellites on gene function.

  7. Microsatellite instability confounds engraftment analysis of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Li-Hui; Tang, Jih-Luh; Haley, Lisa; Beierl, Katie; Gocke, Christopher D; Eshleman, James R; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2014-07-01

    Polymorphic short tandem-repeat, or microsatellite, loci have been widely used to analyze chimerism status after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. In molecular diagnostic laboratories, it is recommended to calculate mixed chimerism for at least 2 informative loci and to avoid microsatellite loci on chromosomes with copy number changes. In this report, we show that microsatellite instability observed in 2 patients with acute leukemia may confound chimerism analysis. Interpretation errors may occur even if 2 to 3 loci are analyzed because of length variation in multiple microsatellite loci. Although microsatellite loci with length variation should not be selected for chimerism analysis, the presence of microsatellite instability, like copy number alteration because of aberrant chromosomes, provides evidence of recurrent or residual cancer cells after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  8. Using Next Generation RAD Sequencing to Isolate Multispecies Microsatellites for Pilosocereus (Cactaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Bonatelli, Isabel A. S.; Carstens, Bryan C.; Moraes, Evandro M.

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers (also known as SSRs, Simple Sequence Repeats) are widely used in plant science and are among the most informative molecular markers for population genetic investigations, but the development of such markers presents substantial challenges. In this report, we discuss how next generation sequencing can replace the cloning, Sanger sequencing, identification of polymorphic loci, and testing cross-amplification that were previously required to develop microsatellites. We report the development of a large set of microsatellite markers for five species of the Neotropical cactus genus Pilosocereus using a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) on a Roche 454 platform. We identified an average of 165 microsatellites per individual, with the absolute numbers across individuals proportional to the sequence reads obtained per individual. Frequency distribution of the repeat units was similar in the five species, with shorter motifs such as di- and trinucleotide being the most abundant repeats. In addition, we provide 72 microsatellites that could be potentially amplified in the sampled species and 22 polymorphic microsatellites validated in two populations of the species Pilosocereus machrisii. Although low coverage sequencing among individuals was observed for most of the loci, which we suggest to be more related to the nature of the microsatellite markers and the possible bias inserted by the restriction enzymes than to the genome size, our work demonstrates that an NGS approach is an efficient method to isolate multispecies microsatellites even in non-model organisms. PMID:26561396

  9. Using Next Generation RAD Sequencing to Isolate Multispecies Microsatellites for Pilosocereus (Cactaceae).

    PubMed

    Bonatelli, Isabel A S; Carstens, Bryan C; Moraes, Evandro M

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite markers (also known as SSRs, Simple Sequence Repeats) are widely used in plant science and are among the most informative molecular markers for population genetic investigations, but the development of such markers presents substantial challenges. In this report, we discuss how next generation sequencing can replace the cloning, Sanger sequencing, identification of polymorphic loci, and testing cross-amplification that were previously required to develop microsatellites. We report the development of a large set of microsatellite markers for five species of the Neotropical cactus genus Pilosocereus using a restriction-site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) on a Roche 454 platform. We identified an average of 165 microsatellites per individual, with the absolute numbers across individuals proportional to the sequence reads obtained per individual. Frequency distribution of the repeat units was similar in the five species, with shorter motifs such as di- and trinucleotide being the most abundant repeats. In addition, we provide 72 microsatellites that could be potentially amplified in the sampled species and 22 polymorphic microsatellites validated in two populations of the species Pilosocereus machrisii. Although low coverage sequencing among individuals was observed for most of the loci, which we suggest to be more related to the nature of the microsatellite markers and the possible bias inserted by the restriction enzymes than to the genome size, our work demonstrates that an NGS approach is an efficient method to isolate multispecies microsatellites even in non-model organisms.

  10. Characterization of genome-wide microsatellites of Saccharina japonica based on a preliminary assembly of Illumina sequencing reads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linan; Peng, Jie; Li, Xiaojie; Cui, Cuiju; Sun, Juan; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-06-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) function widely and locate dependently in genome. However, their characteristics are often ignored due to the lack of genomic sequences of most species. Kelp ( Saccharina japonica), a brown macroalga, is extensively cultured in China. In this study, the genome of S. japonica was surveyed using an Illumina sequencing platform, and its microsatellites were characterized. The preliminarily assembled genome was 469.4 Mb in size, with a scaffold N50 of 20529 bp. Among the 128370 identified microsatellites, 90671, 25726 and 11973 were found in intergenic regions, introns and exons, averaging 339.3, 178.8 and 205.4 microsatellites per Mb, respectively. These microsatellites distributed unevenly in S. japonica genome. Mononucleotide motifs were the most abundant in the genome, while trinucleotide ones were the most prevalent in exons. The microsatellite abundance decreased significantly with the increase of motif repeat numbers, and the microsatellites with a small number of repeats accounted for a higher proportion of the exons than those of the intergenic regions and introns. C/G-rich motifs were more common in exons than in intergenic regions and introns. These characteristics of microsatellites in S. japonica genome may associate with their functions, and ultimately their adaptation and evolution. Among the 120140 pairs of designed microsatellite primers, approximately 75% were predicted to be able to amplify S. japonica DNA. These microsatellite markers will be extremely useful for the genetic breeding and population evolution studies of kelp.

  11. Evolutionary Dynamics of Microsatellite Distribution in Plants: Insight from the Comparison of Sequenced Brassica, Arabidopsis and Other Angiosperm Species

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Fu, Donghui; Yu, Jinyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2013-01-01

    Despite their ubiquity and functional importance, microsatellites have been largely ignored in comparative genomics, mostly due to the lack of genomic information. In the current study, microsatellite distribution was characterized and compared in the whole genomes and both the coding and non-coding DNA sequences of the sequenced Brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species to investigate their evolutionary dynamics in plants. The variation in the microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species was much smaller than those for their microsatellite numbers and genome sizes, suggesting that microsatellite frequency may be relatively stable in plants. The microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species were significantly negatively correlated with both their genome sizes and transposable elements contents. The pattern of microsatellite distribution may differ according to the different genomic regions (such as coding and non-coding sequences). The observed differences in many important microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif length, type and repeat number) of these angiosperm species were generally accordant with their phylogenetic distance, which suggested that the evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution may be generally consistent with plant divergence/evolution. Importantly, by comparing these microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif type) the angiosperm species (aside from a few species) all clustered into two obviously different groups that were largely represented by monocots and dicots, suggesting a complex and generally dichotomous evolutionary pattern of microsatellite distribution in angiosperms. Polyploidy may lead to a slight increase in microsatellite frequency in the coding sequences and a significant decrease in microsatellite frequency in the whole genome/non-coding sequences, but have little effect on the microsatellite distribution with

  12. Evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution in plants: insight from the comparison of sequenced brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Fu, Donghui; Yu, Jinyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2013-01-01

    Despite their ubiquity and functional importance, microsatellites have been largely ignored in comparative genomics, mostly due to the lack of genomic information. In the current study, microsatellite distribution was characterized and compared in the whole genomes and both the coding and non-coding DNA sequences of the sequenced Brassica, Arabidopsis and other angiosperm species to investigate their evolutionary dynamics in plants. The variation in the microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species was much smaller than those for their microsatellite numbers and genome sizes, suggesting that microsatellite frequency may be relatively stable in plants. The microsatellite frequencies of these angiosperm species were significantly negatively correlated with both their genome sizes and transposable elements contents. The pattern of microsatellite distribution may differ according to the different genomic regions (such as coding and non-coding sequences). The observed differences in many important microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif length, type and repeat number) of these angiosperm species were generally accordant with their phylogenetic distance, which suggested that the evolutionary dynamics of microsatellite distribution may be generally consistent with plant divergence/evolution. Importantly, by comparing these microsatellite characteristics (especially the distribution with respect to motif type) the angiosperm species (aside from a few species) all clustered into two obviously different groups that were largely represented by monocots and dicots, suggesting a complex and generally dichotomous evolutionary pattern of microsatellite distribution in angiosperms. Polyploidy may lead to a slight increase in microsatellite frequency in the coding sequences and a significant decrease in microsatellite frequency in the whole genome/non-coding sequences, but have little effect on the microsatellite distribution with

  13. The art of attrition: development of robust oat microsatellites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are important tools for genetic analyses, especially those targeting diversity, based on the fact that multiple alleles can occur at a given locus. Currently, only 160 genomic-based SSR markers are publicly available for oat, most of which have...

  14. Transferability of Rubus Microsatellite Markers for use in Black Raspberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. To date, SSR marker development in Rubus has focused on red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L., subgenu...

  15. A multiplexed microsatellite fingerprinting set for hazelnut cultivar identification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to develop a robust and cost-effective fingerprinting set for hazelnuts using microsatellite (SSR) markers. Twenty SSRs containing repeat motifs of = three nucleotides distributed throughout the hazelnut genome were screened on eight genetically diverse cultivars to a...

  16. Transferability of Rubus Microsatellite Markers to Black Raspberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers have been developed from genomic and expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L., subgenus Idaeobatus) and also in blackberry (Rubus L. subgenus Rubus). Recently, there has also been increased interest in the use of...

  17. Use of microsatellite markers in management of conifer forest species

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt

    1999-01-01

    Within the past ten years a new class of genetic marker1 has risen to prominence as the tool of choice for many geneticists. Microsatellite DNAs, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), were first characterized as highly informative genetic markers in humans (Weber and May, 1990; Litt and Luty, 1990), and have since been found in practically all...

  18. megasat: automated inference of microsatellite genotypes from sequence data.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Luyao; Paterson, Ian G; Fraser, Bonnie A; Watson, Beth; Bradbury, Ian R; Nadukkalam Ravindran, Praveen; Reznick, David; Beiko, Robert G; Bentzen, Paul

    2017-03-01

    megasat is software that enables genotyping of microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing data. Microsatellites are amplified in large multiplexes, and then sequenced in pooled amplicons. megasat reads sequence files and automatically scores microsatellite genotypes. It uses fuzzy matches to allow for sequencing errors and applies decision rules to account for amplification artefacts, including nontarget amplification products, replication slippage during PCR (amplification stutter) and differential amplification of alleles. An important feature of megasat is the generation of histograms of the length-frequency distributions of amplification products for each locus and each individual. These histograms, analogous to electropherograms traditionally used to score microsatellite genotypes, enable rapid evaluation and editing of automatically scored genotypes. megasat is written in Perl, runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux systems, and includes a simple graphical user interface. We demonstrate megasat using data from guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We genotype 1024 guppies at 43 microsatellites per run on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. We evaluated the accuracy of automatically called genotypes using two methods, based on pedigree and repeat genotyping data, and obtained estimates of mean genotyping error rates of 0.021 and 0.012. In both estimates, three loci accounted for a disproportionate fraction of genotyping errors; conversely, 26 loci were scored with 0-1 detected error (error rate ≤0.007). Our results show that with appropriate selection of loci, automated genotyping of microsatellite loci can be achieved with very high throughput, low genotyping error and very low genotyping costs.

  19. Minisatellite and microsatellite length variation at a complex bovine VNTR locus.

    PubMed

    Nave, A; Kashi, Y; Soller, M

    1997-02-01

    Length variation at the BTGL1 variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) locus, which includes both minisatellite and microsatellite motifs, was examined in a wide sample of cattle. A total of 22 alleles were uncovered. The distribution of allele size variation implicated mechanisms involving both minisatellite and microsatellite sequences. This was confirmed by direct sequences of two alleles. Differences between the two alleles involved repeat number variation of microsatellite motifs and a complex event involving the minisatellite motif, but point mutations were not observed.

  20. Application of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and fisheries management: recent advances in population structure analysis and conservation strategies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Muneer, P M

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are the most popular and versatile genetic marker with myriads of applications in population genetics, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology. These are the arrays of DNA sequences, consisting of tandemly repeating mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide units, which are distributed throughout the genomes of most eukaryotic species. Microsatellites are codominant in nature, highly polymorphic, easily typed, and Mendelian inherited, all properties which make them very suitable for the study of population structure and pedigree analysis and capable of detecting differences among closely related species. PCR for microsatellites can be automated for identifying simple sequence repeat polymorphism. Small amount of blood samples or alcohol preserved tissue is adequate for analyzing them. Most of the microsatellites are noncoding, and therefore variations are independent of natural selection. These properties make microsatellites ideal genetic markers for conservation genetics and fisheries management. This review addresses the applications of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and recent advances in population structure analysis in the context of fisheries management.

  1. Seed dispersal by animals: exact identification of source trees with endocarp DNA microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Godoy, J A; Jordano, P

    2001-09-01

    A long-standing challenge in studies of seed dispersal by animal frugivores has been the characterization of the spatial relationships between dispersed seeds and the maternal plants, i.e. the seed shadow. The difficulties to track unambiguously the origin of frugivore-dispersed seeds in natural communities has been considered an unavoidable limitation of the research field and precluded a robust analysis of the direct consequences of zoochory. Here we report that the multilocus genotype at simple sequence repeat (SSR; microsatellite) loci of the woody endocarp, a tissue of maternal origin, provides an unequivocal genetic fingerprint of the source tree. By comparing the endocarp genotype against the complete set of genotypes of reproductive trees in the population, we could unambiguously identify the source tree for 82.1% of the seeds collected in seed traps and hypothesize that the remaining 17.9% of sampled seeds come from other populations. Identification of the source tree for Prunus mahaleb seeds dispersed by frugivores revealed a marked heterogeneity in the genetic composition of the seed rain in different microhabitats, with a range of 1-5 distinct maternal trees contributing seeds to a particular landscape patch. Within-population dispersal distances ranged between 0 and 316 m, with up to 62% of the seeds delivered within 15 m of the source trees. Long distance dispersal events, detected by the exclusion of all reproductive trees in the population, accounted for up to 17.9% of the seeds sampled. Our results indicate strong distance limitation of seed delivery combined with infrequent long-distance dispersal events, extreme heterogeneity in the landscape pattern of genetic makeup, and a marked mosaic of multiple parentage for the seeds delivered to a particular patch.

  2. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Ransler, F.A.; Quinn, T.W.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primers for 16 microsatellite loci were developed for the trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator), a species recovering from a recent population bottleneck. In a screen of 158 individuals, the 16 loci were found to have levels of variability ranging from two to seven alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although two loci repeatedly revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amplification in the closely related tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) was successful for all except one locus. These microsatellite loci will be applicable for population genetic analyses and ultimately aid in management efforts. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  3. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae).

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhiwu; Pan, Lei; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and identified in the aquatic plant Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae). This species, which belongs to basal Magnoliophyta, reproduces sexually. All of these 11 microsatellite markers yielded 25 alleles in a survey of a wild population of 34 individuals. Two or three alleles per locus were detected, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.056 to 0.634 and observed heterozygosity from 0.000 to 0.088. These simple sequence repeat markers will be useful for evaluating the genetic structure of the E. ferox population in the future. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iacopetta, Barry; Grieu, Fabienne; Amanuel, Benhur

    2010-12-01

    Approximately 20 percent of right-sided colon cancers and 5 percent of left-sided colon and rectal cancers have a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. This results in the widespread accumulation of mutations to nucleotide repeats, some of which occur within the coding regions of cancer-related genes such as TGFβRII and BAX. A standardized definition for microsatellite instability (MSI) based on the presence of deletions to mononucleotide repeats is gaining widespread acceptance in both research and the clinic. Colorectal cancer (CRC) with MSI are characterized histologically by an abundance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, poor differentiation and a signet ring or mucinous phenotype. In younger patients these tumors usually develop along the chromosomal instability pathway, in which case the mismatch repair genes are inactivated by germline mutation, somatic mutation and loss of heterozygosity. In older patients MSI CRC usually develops against a background of widespread hypermethylation that includes methylation-induced silencing of the mismatch repair gene MLH1. The overall biological and clinical phenotype of MSI CRC that arise in these two pathways is likely to be different and may account for some of the discordant results reported in the literature relating to the clinical properties of these tumors. The available evidence indicates that MSI is unlikely to be a clinically useful marker for the prognostic stratification of early-stage CRC. The predictive value of MSI for response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy remains controversial, while for other agents the predictive value is difficult to assess because they are used in combination regimens. The MSI phenotype is being actively investigated for novel therapeutic approaches based on the principle of synthetic lethality. Finally, the MSI status of CRC is an extremely useful marker for population-based screening programs that aim to identify individuals and families with the hereditary cancer

  5. Microsatellite analyses across three diverse vertebrate transcriptomes (Acipenser fulvescens, Ambystoma tigrinum, and Dipodomys spectabilis).

    PubMed

    Doyle, Jacqueline M; Siegmund, Gregor; Ruhl, Joseph D; Eo, Soo Hyung; Hale, Matthew C; Marra, Nicholas J; Waser, Peter M; Dewoody, J Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Historically, many population genetics studies have utilized microsatellite markers sampled at random from the genome and presumed to be selectively neutral. Recent studies, however, have shown that microsatellites can occur in transcribed regions, where they are more likely to be under selection. In this study, we mined microsatellites from transcriptomes generated by 454-pyrosequencing for three vertebrate species: lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis). We evaluated (i) the occurrence of microsatellites across species; (ii) whether particular gene ontology terms were over-represented in genes that contained microsatellites; (iii) whether repeat motifs were located in untranslated regions or coding sequences of genes; and (iv) in silico polymorphism. Microsatellites were less common in tiger salamanders than in either lake sturgeon or kangaroo rats. Across libraries, trinucleotides were found more frequently than any other motif type, presumably because they do not cause frameshift mutations. By evaluating variation across reads assembled to a given contig, we were able to identify repeat motifs likely to be polymorphic. Our study represents one of the first comparative data sets on the distribution of vertebrate microsatellites within expressed genes. Our results reinforce the idea that microsatellites do not always occur in noncoding DNA, but commonly occur in expressed genes.

  6. Student's Microsatellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelentsov, Victor; Kopik, Anatoliy; Karpenko, Stanislav; Mayorova, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays BMSTU Youth space center carries on development of the microsatellite project. The project is based on principles of students direct involvement on all stages of development and maintenance of the satellite. The group of students was organized within the university with purpose of coordination of work at the program. Project current condition The work on creation of an experimental model of the micro satellite is performed. The aim is to define the structure and parameters of on-board devices (mass-overall dimensions characteristics, energy consumption and so on). developed. According to the simplified model an active stabilization system (three orthogonal electro-magnetic coils) and orientation characterization system (sunlight detector and magnitometer) are included in OCS structure. most suitable battery storage, power-supply controlling system. Student micro-satellite program goals 1.Scientific Information gaining in the field of Earth study- using perspective research methods. Studying of new devices behavior in space conditions. 2. Educative a. Students derive real experience of projecting, building of a spacecraft from the point of view of an experimenter, a constructor and a researcher. b. Organization of student's cooperation with key men of aerospace industry and other branches. c. Brainpower and material base preparation for micro-satellite systems' development. d. Attraction of youth interest to the topic, by: - Students' and pupils' groups attraction and involvement in experiments conduction and results processing. - Seminars and lections devoted to Earth study from the space organization - Specific scientific data distribution over World Wide Web. 3. International With purpose of program expansion, the developers' group looks to start of an international project. Within the project new experiments conduction and scientific information exchange are expected. 4. Status Bauman Moscow State Technical University's status improvement in the field

  7. Development of eighteen microsatellite loci in walleye (Sander vitreus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coykendall, Dolly K.; Morrison, Cheryl L.; Stott, Wendylee; Springmann, Marcus J.

    2014-01-01

    A suite of tri- and tetra-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed for walleye (Sander vitreus) from 454 pyrosequencing data. Eighteen of the 50 primer sets tested amplified consistently in 35 walleye from two lakes on Isle Royale, Lake Superior: Chickenbone Lake and Whittlesey Lake. The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 5.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 35.8 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and detect phylogeographic structuring as individuals assigned back to their population of origin. Cross-species amplification within S. canadensis(sauger) was successful for 15 loci, and 11 loci were diagnostic to species. The loci characterized here will be useful for detecting fine-scale spatial structuring, resolving the taxonomic status of Sander species and sub-species, and detecting walleye/sauger hybrids.

  8. Highly Informative Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers for Fingerprinting Hazelnut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite markers have many applications in breeding and genetic studies of plants, including fingerprinting of cultivars and investigations of genetic diversity, and therefore provide information for better management of germplasm collections. They are repeatab...

  9. Identification of common, unique and polymorphic microsatellites among 73 cyanobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Ritika; Kapil, Aditi; Attarwala, Kherunnisa; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2016-04-01

    Microsatellites also known as Simple Sequence Repeats are short tandem repeats of 1-6 nucleotides. These repeats are found in coding as well as non-coding regions of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and play a significant role in the study of gene regulation, genetic mapping, DNA fingerprinting and evolutionary studies. The availability of 73 complete genome sequences of cyanobacteria enabled us to mine and statistically analyze microsatellites in these genomes. The cyanobacterial microsatellites identified through bioinformatics analysis were stored in a user-friendly database named CyanoSat, which is an efficient data representation and query system designed using ASP.net. The information in CyanoSat comprises of perfect, imperfect and compound microsatellites found in coding, non-coding and coding-non-coding regions. Moreover, it contains PCR primers with 200 nucleotides long flanking region. The mined cyanobacterial microsatellites can be freely accessed at www.compubio.in/CyanoSat/home.aspx. In addition to this 82 polymorphic, 13,866 unique and 2390 common microsatellites were also detected. These microsatellites will be useful in strain identification and genetic diversity studies of cyanobacteria.

  10. Cross-amplification and sequence variation of microsatellite loci in Eurasian hard pines.

    PubMed

    González-Martínez, S C; Robledo-Arnuncio, J J; Collada, C; Díaz, A; Williams, C G; Alía, R; Cervera, M T

    2004-06-01

    Microsatellite transfer across coniferous species is a valued methodology because de novo development for each species is costly and there are many species with only a limited commodity value. Cross-species amplification of orthologous microsatellite regions provides valuable information on mutational and evolutionary processes affecting these loci. We tested 19 nuclear microsatellite markers from Pinus taeda L. (subsection Australes) and three from P. sylvestris L. (subsection Pinus) on seven Eurasian hard pine species ( P. uncinata Ram., P. sylvestris L., P. nigra Arn., P. pinaster Ait., P. halepensis Mill., P. pinea L. and P. canariensis Sm.). Transfer rates to species in subsection Pinus (36-59%) were slightly higher than those to subsections Pineae and Pinaster (32-45%). Half of the trans-specific microsatellites were found to be polymorphic over evolutionary times of approximately 100 million years (ten million generations). Sequencing of three trans-specific microsatellites showed conserved repeat and flanking regions. Both a decrease in the number of perfect repeats in the non-focal species and a polarity for mutation, the latter defined as a higher substitution rate in the flanking sequence regions close to the repeat motifs, were observed in the trans-specific microsatellites. The transfer of microsatellites among hard pine species proved to be useful for obtaining highly polymorphic markers in a wide range of species, thereby providing new tools for population and quantitative genetic studies.

  11. Distribution, function and evolution characterization of microsatellite in Sargassum thunbergii (Fucales, Phaeophyta) transcriptome and their application in marker development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuli; Hu, Zimin; Liu, Wenhui; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Wenjun; Liang, Zhourui; Wang, Feijiu; Sun, Xiutao

    2016-01-06

    Using transcriptome data to mine microsatellite and develop markers has growingly become prevalent. However, characterizing the possible function of microsatellite is relatively rare. In this study, we explored microsatellites in the transcriptome of the brown alga Sargassum thunbergii and characterized the frequencies, distribution, function and evolution, and developed primers to validate these microsatellites. Our results showed that Tri-nucleotide is the most abundant, followed by di- and mono-nucleotide. The length of microsatellite was significantly affected by the repeat motif size. The density of microsatellite in the CDS region is significantly lower than that in the UTR region. The annotation of the transcripts containing microsatellite showed that 573 transcripts have GO terms and can be categorized into 42 groups. Pathways enrichment showed that microsatellites were significantly overrepresented in the genes involved in pathways such as Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, RNA degradation, Spliceosome, etc. Primers flanking 961 microsatellite loci were designed, and among the 30 pairs of primer selected randomly for availability test, 23 were proved to be efficient. These findings provided new insight into the function and evolution of microsatellite in transcriptome, and the identified microsatellite loci within the annotated gene will be useful for developing functional markers in S. thunbergii.

  12. Distribution, function and evolution characterization of microsatellite in Sargassum thunbergii (Fucales, Phaeophyta) transcriptome and their application in marker development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fuli; Hu, Zimin; Liu, Wenhui; Li, Jingjing; Wang, Wenjun; Liang, Zhourui; Wang, Feijiu; Sun, Xiutao

    2016-01-01

    Using transcriptome data to mine microsatellite and develop markers has growingly become prevalent. However, characterizing the possible function of microsatellite is relatively rare. In this study, we explored microsatellites in the transcriptome of the brown alga Sargassum thunbergii and characterized the frequencies, distribution, function and evolution, and developed primers to validate these microsatellites. Our results showed that Tri-nucleotide is the most abundant, followed by di- and mono-nucleotide. The length of microsatellite was significantly affected by the repeat motif size. The density of microsatellite in the CDS region is significantly lower than that in the UTR region. The annotation of the transcripts containing microsatellite showed that 573 transcripts have GO terms and can be categorized into 42 groups. Pathways enrichment showed that microsatellites were significantly overrepresented in the genes involved in pathways such as Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, RNA degradation, Spliceosome, etc. Primers flanking 961 microsatellite loci were designed, and among the 30 pairs of primer selected randomly for availability test, 23 were proved to be efficient. These findings provided new insight into the function and evolution of microsatellite in transcriptome, and the identified microsatellite loci within the annotated gene will be useful for developing functional markers in S. thunbergii. PMID:26732855

  13. Molecular characterization and multilocus genotypes of Enterocytozoon bieneusi among horses in southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Zhong, Zhijun; Gong, Chao; Liu, Xuehan; Huang, Xiangming; Xiao, Li; Zhao, Ruoxuan; Wang, Wuyou; Feng, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Hu, Yanchun; Fu, Hualin; He, Min; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Kongju; Peng, Guangneng

    2016-10-25

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi is one of the most prevalent causative species of diarrhea and enteric diseases in various hosts. E. bieneusi has been identified in humans, mammals, birds, rodents and reptiles in China, but few studies have reported E. bieneusi in horses. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the prevalence, molecular characteristics and zoonotic potential of E. bieneusi among horses in southwestern China. Three hundred and thirty-three fecal specimens were collected from horses on five farms in the Sichuan and Yunnan provinces of southwestern China. The prevalence of E. bieneusi was 22.5 % (75/333), as determined by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA gene of E. bieneusi. Altogether, 10 genotypes were identified among the 75 E. bieneusi-positive samples: four of these genotypes were known (horse1, horse2, SC02 and D) and six were novel (SCH1-4 and YNH1-2). Multilocus sequence typing using three microsatellites (MS1, MS3 and MS7) and one minisatellite (MS4) revealed three, two, three and three genotypes at these four loci, respectively. In phylogenetic analysis, all the genotypes of E. bieneusi obtained in this study were clustered into three distinct groups: D, SC02 and SCH1-3 were clustered into group 1 (zoonotic potential); SCH4 was clustered into group 2 (cattle-hosted); whereas horse2, YNH1 and YNH2 were clustered into group 6 (unclear zoonotic potential). This is the first report of E. bieneusi among horses in southwestern China. This is also the first multilocus genotyping analysis using microsatellite and minisatellite markers of E. bieneusi in horses. The presence of genotype D, which was previously identified in humans, and genotypes SC02 and SCH1-3, which belong to potential zoonotic group 1, these results indicate that horses are a potential source of human E. bieneusi infections in China.

  14. Microsatellite markers for Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Caesalpinioideae, Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    López-Roberts, M. Cristina; Barbosa, Ariane R.; Paganucci de Queiroz, Luciano; van den Berg, Cássio

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Fabaceae) is a South and Central American tree of great ecological importance and one of the most common species in several sites of seasonally dry forests. Our goal was to develop microsatellite markers to assess the genetic diversity and structure of this species. Methods and Results: We designed and assessed 53 loci obtained from a microsatellite-enriched library and an intersimple sequence repeat library. Fourteen loci were polymorphic, and they presented a total of 39 alleles in a sample of 61 individuals from six populations. The mean values of observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.355 and 0.479, respectively. Polymorphism information content was 0.390 and the Shannon index was 0.778. Conclusions: Polymorphism information content and Shannon index indicate that at least nine of the 14 microsatellite loci developed are moderate to highly informative, and potentially useful for population genetic studies in this species. PMID:26819856

  15. Association of microsatellite pairs with segmental duplications in insect genomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Segmental duplications (SDs), also known as low-copy repeats, are DNA sequences of length greater than 1 kb which are duplicated with a high degree of sequence identity (greater than 90%) causing instability in genomes. SDs are generally found in the genome as mosaic forms of duplicated sequences which are generated by a two-step process: first, multiple duplicated sequences are aggregated at specific genomic regions, and then, these primary duplications undergo multiple secondary duplications. However, the mechanism of how duplicated sequences are aggregated in the first place is not well understood. Results By analyzing the distribution of microsatellite sequences among twenty insect species in a genome-wide manner it was found that pairs of microsatellites along with the intervening sequences were duplicated multiple times in each genome. They were found as low copy repeats or segmental duplications when the duplicated loci were greater than 1 kb in length and had greater than 90% sequence similarity. By performing a sliding-window genomic analysis for number of paired microsatellites and number of segmental duplications, it was observed that regions rich in repetitive paired microsatellites tend to get richer in segmental duplication suggesting a “rich-gets-richer” mode of aggregation of the duplicated loci in specific regions of the genome. Results further show that the relationship between number of paired microsatellites and segmental duplications among the species is independent of the known phylogeny suggesting that association of microsatellites with segmental duplications may be a species-specific evolutionary process. It was also observed that the repetitive microsatellite pairs are associated with gene duplications but those sequences are rarely retained in the orthologous genes between species. Although some of the duplicated sequences with microsatellites as termini were found within transposable elements (TEs) of Drosophila, most of

  16. Multilocus microsatellite analysis of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ associated with citrus Huanglongbing worldwide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive citrus diseases worldwide. In the United States (US), HLB is typically associated with the presence of a fastidious phloem-limited bacterium named ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, though other Liberibacter species also have been associated with ...

  17. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  18. Microsatellite and Chromosome Evolution of Parthenogenetic Sitobion Aphids in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Sunnucks, P.; England, P. R.; Taylor, A. C.; Hales, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    Single-locus microsatellite variation correlated perfectly with chromosome number in Sitobion miscanthi aphids. The microsatellites were highly heterozygous, with up to 10 alleles per locus in this species. Despite this considerable allelic variation, only seven different S. miscanthi genotypes were discovered in 555 individuals collected from a wide range of locations, hosts and sampling periods. Relatedness between genotypes suggests only two successful colonizations of Australia. There was no evidence for genetic recombination in 555 S. miscanthi so the occurrence of recent sexual reproduction must be near zero. Thus diversification is by mutation and chromosomal rearrangement alone. Since the aphids showed no sexual recombination, microsatellites can mutate without meiosis. Five of seven microsatellite differences were a single repeat unit, and one larger jump is likely. The minimum numbers of changes between karyotypes corresponded roughly one-to-one with microsatellite allele changes, which suggests very rapid chromosomal evolution. A chromosomal fission occurred in a cultured line, and a previously unknown chromosomal race was detected. All 121 diverse S. near fragariae were heterozygous but revealed only one genotype. This species too must have a low rate of sexual reproduction and few colonizations of Australia. PMID:8889535

  19. Genomic Microsatellites as Evolutionary Chronometers: A Test in Wild Cats

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Carlos A.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Nelson, George; Goldstein, David; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear microsatellite loci (2- to 5-bp tandem repeats) would seem to be ideal markers for population genetic monitoring because of their abundant polymorphism, wide dispersal in vertebrate genomes, near selective neutrality, and ease of assessment; however, questions about their mode of generation, mutation rates and ascertainment bias have limited interpretation considerably. We have assessed the patterns of genomic diversity for ninety feline microsatellite loci among previously characterized populations of cheetahs, lions and pumas in recapitulating demographic history. The results imply that the microsatellite diversity measures (heterozygosity, allele reconstitution and microsatellite allele variance) offer proportionate indicators, albeit with large variance, of historic population bottlenecks and founder effects. The observed rate of reconstruction of new alleles plus the growth in the breadth of microsatellite allele size (variance) was used here to develop genomic estimates of time intervals following historic founder events in cheetahs (12,000 yr ago), in North American pumas (10,000–17,000 yr ago), and in Asiatic lions of the Gir Forest (1000–4000 yr ago). [Supplemental material available online at http://rex.nci.nih.gov/lgd/front_page.htm and at http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11875029

  20. A Novel Approach for Characterizing Microsatellite Instability in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuheng; Soong, T. David; Elemento, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is characterized by the expansion or contraction of DNA repeat tracts as a consequence of DNA mismatch repair deficiency (MMRD). Accurate detection of MSI in cancer cells is important since MSI is associated with several cancer subtypes and can help inform therapeutic decisions. Although experimental assays have been developed to detect MSI, they typically depend on a small number of known microsatellite loci or mismatch repair genes and have limited reliability. Here, we report a novel genome-wide approach for MSI detection based on the global detection of insertions and deletions (indels) in microsatellites found in expressed genes. Our large-scale analyses of 20 cancer cell lines and 123 normal individuals revealed striking indel features associated with MSI: there is a significant increase of short microsatellite deletions in MSI samples compared to microsatellite stable (MSS) ones, suggesting a mechanistic bias of repair efficiency between insertions and deletions in normal human cells. By incorporating this observation into our MSI scoring metric, we show that our approach can correctly distinguish between MSI and MSS cancer cell lines. Moreover, when we applied this approach to primal tumor samples, our metric is also well consistent with diagnosed MSI status. Thus, our study offers new insight into DNA mismatch repair system, and also provides a novel MSI diagnosis method for clinical oncology with better reliability. PMID:23671654

  1. varver: a database of microsatellite variation in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Yashima, Akiko Sato; Innan, Hideki

    2016-10-31

    Understanding how genetic variation is maintained within a species is important in ecology, evolution, conservation and population genetics. Tremendous efforts have been made to evaluate the patterns of genetic variation in natural populations of various species. For this purpose, microsatellites have played a major role since the 1990s. Here we describe a comprehensive database, varver (Variation in Vertebrates) that provides complete information regarding microsatellite variation in natural populations of vertebrates. For each species, varver includes basic information of the species, a list of publications reporting the microsatellite variation, and tables of genetic variation within and between populations (heterozygosity and FST ). The geographic location and rough sampling range are also shown for each sampled population. The database should be useful for researchers interested in not only specific species but also comparing multiple species. We discuss the utility of microsatellite data, particularly for meta-analyses that involve multiple microsatellite loci from various species. We show that in such analyses, it is extremely important to correct for biases caused by differences in mutation rate, mainly due to repeat unit and number.

  2. Genomic microsatellites as evolutionary chronometers: a test in wild cats.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Carlos A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Nelson, George; Goldstein, David; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2002-03-01

    Nuclear microsatellite loci (2- to 5-bp tandem repeats) would seem to be ideal markers for population genetic monitoring because of their abundant polymorphism, wide dispersal in vertebrate genomes, near selective neutrality, and ease of assessment; however, questions about their mode of generation, mutation rates and ascertainment bias have limited interpretation considerably. We have assessed the patterns of genomic diversity for ninety feline microsatellite loci among previously characterized populations of cheetahs, lions and pumas in recapitulating demographic history. The results imply that the microsatellite diversity measures (heterozygosity, allele reconstitution and microsatellite allele variance) offer proportionate indicators, albeit with large variance, of historic population bottlenecks and founder effects. The observed rate of reconstruction of new alleles plus the growth in the breadth of microsatellite allele size (variance) was used here to develop genomic estimates of time intervals following historic founder events in cheetahs (12,000 yr ago), in North American pumas (10,000-17,000 yr ago), and in Asiatic lions of the Gir Forest (1000-4000 yr ago).

  3. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers for Primula sikkimensis (Primulaceae) using a 454 sequencing approach1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Han; Liu, Yun-Jiao; Zhang, Cai-Yun; Yan, Hai-Fei; Ge, Xue-Jun; Hao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers from Primula sikkimensis (Primulaceae) were developed for testing deep lineage divergence and speciation events. Methods and Results: A total of 3112 microsatellites were identified from 61,755 unique reads though 454 pyrosequencing technology. Twenty-nine microsatellite loci were selected for PCR amplification and polymorphic analyses. Among the 29 tested markers, 17 microsatellite loci were further used for genotyping in three wild P. sikkimensis populations. The number of alleles varied from one to eight, and the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.111 to 1.000. Ten simple sequence repeat loci could be successfully cross-amplified in two Primula species. The transferability values were 76.5% in P. florindae and 58.8% in P. alpicola, respectively. Conclusions: These microsatellite markers will be valuable for testing the hypothesis of lineage divergence, genetic introgression, and cryptic speciation events between P. sikkimensis and its closely related taxa. PMID:27437171

  4. Effect of microsatellite selection on individual and population genetic inferences: an empirical study using cross-specific and species-specific amplifications.

    PubMed

    Queirós, J; Godinho, R; Lopes, S; Gortazar, C; de la Fuente, J; Alves, P C

    2015-07-01

    Although whole-genome sequencing is becoming more accessible and feasible for nonmodel organisms, microsatellites have remained the markers of choice for various population and conservation genetic studies. However, the criteria for choosing microsatellites are still controversial due to ascertainment bias that may be introduced into the genetic inference. An empirical study of red deer (Cervus elaphus) populations, in which cross-specific and species-specific microsatellites developed through pyrosequencing of enriched libraries, was performed for this study. Two different strategies were used to select the species-specific panels: randomly vs. highly polymorphic markers. The results suggest that reliable and accurate estimations of genetic diversity can be obtained using random microsatellites distributed throughout the genome. In addition, the results reinforce previous evidence that selecting the most polymorphic markers leads to an ascertainment bias in estimates of genetic diversity, when compared with randomly selected microsatellites. Analyses of population differentiation and clustering seem less influenced by the approach of microsatellite selection, whereas assigning individuals to populations might be affected by a random selection of a small number of microsatellites. Individual multilocus heterozygosity measures produced various discordant results, which in turn had impacts on the heterozygosity-fitness correlation test. Finally, we argue that picking the appropriate microsatellite set should primarily take into account the ecological and evolutionary questions studied. Selecting the most polymorphic markers will generally overestimate genetic diversity parameters, leading to misinterpretations of the real genetic diversity, which is particularly important in managed and threatened populations.

  5. Genome-wide survey and analysis of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster genome: abundance, distribution, and potential for marker development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Qi, Haigang; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are a ubiquitous component of the eukaryote genome and constitute one of the most popular sources of molecular markers for genetic studies. However, no data are currently available regarding microsatellites across the entire genome in oysters, despite their importance to the aquaculture industry. We present the first genome-wide investigation of microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas by analysis of the complete genome, resequencing, and expression data. The Pacific oyster genome is rich in microsatellites. A total of 604 653 repeats were identified, in average of one locus per 815 base pairs (bp). A total of 12 836 genes had coding repeats, and 7 332 were expressed normally, including genes with a wide range of molecular functions. Compared with 20 different species of animals, microsatellites in the oyster genome typically exhibited 1) an intermediate overall frequency; 2) relatively uniform contents of (A)n and (C)n repeats and abundant long (C)n repeats (≥24 bp); 3) large average length of (AG)n repeats; and 4) scarcity of trinucleotide repeats. The microsatellite-flanking regions exhibited a high degree of polymorphism with a heterozygosity rate of around 2.0%, but there was no correlation between heterozygosity and microsatellite abundance. A total of 19 462 polymorphic microsatellites were discovered, and dinucleotide repeats were the most active, with over 26% of loci found to harbor allelic variations. In all, 7 451 loci with high potential for marker development were identified. Better knowledge of the microsatellites in the oyster genome will provide information for the future design of a wide range of molecular markers and contribute to further advancements in the field of oyster genetics, particularly for molecular-based selection and breeding.

  6. MICAS: a fully automated web server for microsatellite extraction and analysis from prokaryote and viral genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Vattipally B; Ranjitkumar, Gundu; Swaminathan, Sugavanam; Priya, Sasidharan; Bose, Buddhaditta; Pavan, Mogili N; Thanu, Geeta; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A

    2003-01-01

    MICAS is a web server for extracting microsatellite information from completely sequenced prokaryote and viral genomes, or user-submitted sequences. This server provides an integrated platform for MICdb (database of prokaryote and viral microsatellites), W-SSRF (simple sequence repeat finding program) and Autoprimer (primer design software). MICAS, through dynamic HTML page generation, helps in the systematic extraction of microsatellite information from selected genomes hosted on MICdb or from user-submitted sequences. Further, it assists in the design of primers with the help of Autoprimer, for sequences containing selected microsatellite tracts.

  7. Microsatellite markers characterized in the mosquito Aedes taeniorhynchus (Diptera, Culicidae), a disease vector and major pest on the American coast and the Galápagos Islands.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Arnaud; Horsburgh, Gavin J; Dawson, Deborah A; Cunningham, Andrew A; Goodman, Simon J

    2009-09-01

    The black salt-marsh mosquito, Aedes taeniorhynchus, plays an important role in the transmission of arboviruses such as West Nile virus and other pathogens of concern for human and animal health in North and Latin America. This mosquito is notably the only widely distributed mosquito species found in the Galápagos Islands, where its impact as disease vector has not yet been studied. The use of microsatellite markers can significantly improve our understanding of the population structure and dynamics of A. taeniorhynchus and its role in the transmission of diseases. Here we report the isolation of 12 unique microsatellite loci using an enrichment protocol. We also identified other multi-locus microsatellites linked to transposable elements. The presence of such elements may explain why the isolation of useful scorable microsatellite markers in the Aedes genus is often difficult. Four of the markers isolated amplified polymorphic products in Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and/or Aedes japonicus.

  8. Polymorphism, monomorphism, and sequences in conserved microsatellites in primate species.

    PubMed

    Blanquer-Maumont, A; Crouau-Roy, B

    1995-10-01

    Dimeric short tandem repeats are a source of highly polymorphic markers in the mammalian genome. Genetic variation at these hypervariable loci is extensively used for linkage analysis, for the identification of individuals, and may be useful for interpopulation and interspecies studies. In this paper, we analyze the variability and the sequences of a segment including three microsatellites, first described in man, in several species of primates (chimpanzee, orangutan, gibbon, and macaque) using the heterologous primers (man primers). This region is located on the human chromosome 6p, near the tumor necrosis factor genes, in the major histocompatibility complex. The fact that these primers work in all species studied indicates that they are conserved throughout the different lineages of the two superfamilies, the Hominoidea and the Cercopithecidea, represented by the macaques. However, the intervening sequence displays intraspecific and interspecific variability. The sites of base substitutions and the insertion/deletion events are not evenly distributed within this region. The data suggest that it is necessary to have a minimal number of repeats to increase the rate of mutation sufficiently to allow the development of polymorphism. In some species, the microsatellites present single base variations which reduce the number of contiguous repeats, thus apparently slowing the rate of additional slippage events. Species with such variations or a low number of repeats are monomorphic. These microsatellite sequences are informative in the comparison of closely related species and reflect the phylogeny of the Old World monkeys, apes, and man.

  9. Functional interaction between SNPs and microsatellite in the transcriptional regulation of insulin-like growth factor 1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Holly Y; Huang, Wei; Leung, Vincent H K; Fung, Simon L M; Ma, Suk Ling; Jiang, Hongling; Tang, Nelson L S

    2013-09-01

    A CA-repeat microsatellite in insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) promoter was associated with interindividual variation of circulating IGF1 level. Previously, we reported that such association was due to variation of haplotype unit in a linkage disequilibrium block composed of microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), suggesting the presence of an interaction between them. In this study, reporter assays were performed to investigate the regulatory effect and interaction of genetic variants on gene expression. We used an in vitro system to compare the transcriptional activities of haplotypes (rs35767:T>C, the CA-repeat microsatellite, rs5742612:T>C, and rs2288377:T>A) in evolutionarily conserved region of IGF1 promoter. In haplotype C-T-T, a longer microsatellite had a lower transcriptional activity (17.6 ± 2.4-fold for 17 repeats and 8.3 ± 1.1-fold for 21 repeats), whereas in haplotype T-C-A, such trend could not be observed, as the microsatellite with 21 repeats had the highest transcriptional activity (17.5 ± 2.3-fold). Because the microsatellite and SNPs affected the transcriptional activity of each other, there may be an interaction between them in the regulation of IGF1 expression. For the first time, we demonstrated that a noncoding microsatellite polymorphism could act as a functional unit and interact with SNPs in the regulation of transcription in human genome.

  10. Microsatellite instability is rare in sporadic ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Han, H.; Schwartz, P.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability was first demonstrated to be a common underlying mechanism in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and has recently been implicated in the development of several other human cancers. Although numerous genetic changes have been documented in ovarian cancer, their molecular bases are poorly understood. In investigating the molecular genetics of ovarian cancer, we analyzed twelve short tandem repeats that were amplified by PCR from DNA of 48 tumors and their corresponding lymphocyte samples. All of the 48 cases studied have no noticeable family history and, of them, 42 are epithelial (benign/borderline, 5; grade I, 4; GII, 4; GIII, 29) and 6 are nonepithelial. A microsatellite instability has been shown to be inversely correlated with the occurrence of allelic losses, half of those cases chosen have a fractional allele loss of {le}15 (median = .18 of 50 tumors tested for 86 loci from every chromosomal arm). The loci examined included eight dinucleotide repeats (D2S123, D9S104, D10S197, D11S904, D16S408, D16S421, D17S250, and D17S579), two trinucleotide repeats (DM and AR) and two tetranucleotide repeats (DXS981 and VWF). Despite the fact that HNPCC phenotype includes ovarian cancer and that microsatellite instability has been shown in one ovarian cancer from an HNPCC family, the allele sizes of 12 loci were found to be identical in all paired tumor and normal samples we studied except for one tumor at a single locus. The band shift displayed on polyacrylamide gel representing an additional allele of VWF was only observed in one grade III tumor. Our results are thus a strong indication that the alteration of microsatellite repeats may not play a major role in the development of sporadic ovarian cancer.

  11. High tandem repeat content in the genome of the short-lived annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri: a new vertebrate model for aging research

    PubMed Central

    Reichwald, Kathrin; Lauber, Chris; Nanda, Indrajit; Kirschner, Jeanette; Hartmann, Nils; Schories, Susanne; Gausmann, Ulrike; Taudien, Stefan; Schilhabel, Markus B; Szafranski, Karol; Glöckner, Gernot; Schmid, Michael; Cellerino, Alessandro; Schartl, Manfred; Englert, Christoph; Platzer, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Background The annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri is the vertebrate with the shortest known life span in captivity. Fish of the GRZ strain live only three to four months under optimal laboratory conditions, show explosive growth, early sexual maturation and age-dependent physiological and behavioral decline, and express aging related biomarkers. Treatment with resveratrol and low temperature significantly extends the maximum life span. These features make N. furzeri a promising new vertebrate model for age research. Results To contribute to establishing N. furzeri as a new model organism, we provide a first insight into its genome and a comparison to medaka, stickleback, tetraodon and zebrafish. The N. furzeri genome contains 19 chromosomes (2n = 38). Its genome of between 1.6 and 1.9 Gb is the largest among the analyzed fish species and has, at 45%, the highest repeat content. Remarkably, tandem repeats comprise 21%, which is 4-12 times more than in the other four fish species. In addition, G+C-rich tandem repeats preferentially localize to centromeric regions. Phylogenetic analysis based on coding sequences identifies medaka as the closest relative. Genotyping of an initial set of 27 markers and multi-locus fingerprinting of one microsatellite provides the first molecular evidence that the GRZ strain is highly inbred. Conclusions Our work presents a first basis for systematic genomic and genetic analyses aimed at understanding the mechanisms of life span determination in N. furzeri. PMID:19210790

  12. High tandem repeat content in the genome of the short-lived annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri: a new vertebrate model for aging research.

    PubMed

    Reichwald, Kathrin; Lauber, Chris; Nanda, Indrajit; Kirschner, Jeanette; Hartmann, Nils; Schories, Susanne; Gausmann, Ulrike; Taudien, Stefan; Schilhabel, Markus B; Szafranski, Karol; Glöckner, Gernot; Schmid, Michael; Cellerino, Alessandro; Schartl, Manfred; Englert, Christoph; Platzer, Matthias

    2009-02-11

    The annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri is the vertebrate with the shortest known life span in captivity. Fish of the GRZ strain live only three to four months under optimal laboratory conditions, show explosive growth, early sexual maturation and age-dependent physiological and behavioral decline, and express aging related biomarkers. Treatment with resveratrol and low temperature significantly extends the maximum life span. These features make N. furzeri a promising new vertebrate model for age research. To contribute to establishing N. furzeri as a new model organism, we provide a first insight into its genome and a comparison to medaka, stickleback, tetraodon and zebrafish. The N. furzeri genome contains 19 chromosomes (2n = 38). Its genome of between 1.6 and 1.9 Gb is the largest among the analyzed fish species and has, at 45%, the highest repeat content. Remarkably, tandem repeats comprise 21%, which is 4-12 times more than in the other four fish species. In addition, G+C-rich tandem repeats preferentially localize to centromeric regions. Phylogenetic analysis based on coding sequences identifies medaka as the closest relative. Genotyping of an initial set of 27 markers and multi-locus fingerprinting of one microsatellite provides the first molecular evidence that the GRZ strain is highly inbred. Our work presents a first basis for systematic genomic and genetic analyses aimed at understanding the mechanisms of life span determination in N. furzeri.

  13. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T B; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-06-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers that have been used for identification and genetic diversity; however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke is published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for a genetic diversity study in C. sinensis, using a genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥12 base pairs) were identified from a genome database of C. sinensis, with hexanucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by pentanucleotide (18.3%) and trinucleotide (12.7%). The tetranucleotide, dinucleotide, and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75, 7.63, and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72% of 547 Mb of the whole genome size, and the frequency of microsatellites was found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%), and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT, and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed to be heterozygous with observed heterozygosity that ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites, and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for the genetic study of C. sinensis.

  14. Repeated praziquantel treatments remodel the genetic and spatial landscape of schistosomiasis risk and transmission.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Lúcio M; Reis, Eliana A; Dos Santos, Cláudio R A; Costa, Jackson M; Carmo, Theomira M; Aminu, Peace T; Pitanga, Thassila N; Ponce-Terashima, Rafael; Blank, Walter A; Silva, Luciano K; Reis, Mitermayer G; Blanton, Ronald E

    2016-05-01

    Repeated treatments with praziquantel reduce schistosomiasis prevalence and morbidity, but transmission persists and populations often recover within a few years. To identify factors associated with persistence, we surveyed and treated all identified Schistosoma mansoni infections in two rural Brazilian communities (Jenipapo and Volta do Rio) in 2009, 2012 and 2013. Eggs were collected from all infected individuals and genotyped with 11 microsatellite markers to evaluate parasite differentiation and diversity. After successive rounds of community-wide treatment, prevalence decreased from 45% to 24% then 16%. Intensity of infection decreased by 57% over this period, and the number of eggs transmitted to the environment decreased by 92%. During all time periods the majority of eggs were excreted by those >15years of age. The incidence was 23% in 2012 and 15% in 2013, consistent with a decrease in transmission. There was little immigration or gene flow over a distance of 6km. On reinfection, infrapopulations were moderately differentiated indicating that pretreatment multilocus genotypes were not fully reacquired. The effective population size responded to census population decline more rapidly than differentiation. Reinfection was concentrated in the downstream portion of Jenipapo, consistent with the observed increased human fecal contamination. At this scale and in this area S. mansoni infections exist on a fragmented landscape with a highly focal pattern of transmission that may facilitate future elimination.

  15. Microsatellite spreading in the human genome: evolutionary mechanisms and structural implications.

    PubMed

    Nadir, E; Margalit, H; Gallily, T; Ben-Sasson, S A

    1996-06-25

    Microsatellites are tandem repeat sequences abundant in the genomes of higher eukaryotes and hitherto considered as "junk DNA." Analysis of a human genome representative data base (2.84 Mb) reveals a distinct juxtaposition of A-rich microsatellites and retroposons and suggests their coevolution. The analysis implies that most microsatellites were generated by a 3'-extension of retrotranscripts, similar to mRNA polyadenylylation, and that they serve in turn as "retroposition navigators," directing the retroposons via homology-driven integration into defined sites. Thus, they became instrumental in the preservation and extension of primordial genomic patterns. A role is assigned to these reiterating A-rich loci in the higher-order organization of the chromatin. The disease-associated triplet repeats are mostly found in coding regions and do not show an association with retroposons, constituting a unique set within the family of microsatellite sequences.

  16. An annotated genetic map of loblolly pine based on microsatellite and cDNA markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genetic linkage maps have been based on a variety of DNA polymorphisms, such as AFLPs, RAPDs, RFLPs, and ESTPs, but only a few SSRs (simple sequence repeats), also known as simple tandem repeats or microsatellites, have been mapped in P. taeda. The objective o...

  17. Applications of Microsatellites in Two Big Bracted Dogwood Species, Flowering and Kousa Dogwood

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellite or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are tandem 1-6 bases repeated motifs, found in coding and noncoding regions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. Due to the high nucleotide substitution rate in noncoding regions, SSRs exhibit a high degree of molecular polymorphism. SSRs markers ar...

  18. An annotated genetic map of loblolly pine based on microsatellite and cDNA markers

    Treesearch

    Craig S. Echt; Surya Saha; Konstantin V. Krutovsky; Kokulapalan Wimalanathan; John E. Erpelding; Chun Liang; C Dana Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Previous loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) genetic linkage maps have been based on a variety of DNA polymorphisms, such as AFLPs, RAPDs, RFLPs, and ESTPs, but only a few SSRs (simple sequence repeats), also known as simple tandem repeats or microsatellites, have been mapped in P. taeda. The objective of this study was to integrate a large set of SSR markers from a variety...

  19. Multilocus homozygosity mapping and autozygosity patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, E.A.; Wijsman, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    Exact computation of likelihoods is often not possible for multipoint linkage analyses on complex pedigrees with missing data, such as arise in homozygosity mapping of rare recessive diseases. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) can provide an estimate of the likelihood function and lod score. Usually, the genotypes of individuals are taken as the latent variables to be sampled in MCMC analyses of computationally intractable genetic problems, but in the case of a very few sampled individuals in an extended pedigree the space of latent variables can be reduced. Our latent variables are the indicators of grandparental origins of genes for each locus and each segregation. This greatly improves the efficiency of MCMC estimates of multilocus lod scores. For homozygosity mapping, in addition to providing estimates of lod scores, MCMC provides posterior probabilities of multilocus patterns of gene identity by descent. Although in the region of the disease locus, the posterior probability of autozygosity may be high for each pedigree, the probability is low that all of a large set of inbred affected individuals exhibit autozygosity. For each segregation, in the absence of interference, the process of grandparental origin is Markov along the chromosome, but the autozygosity of a descendant individual results from grouping segregation patterns. Hence, the multilocus autozygosity of inbred individuals exhibits interesting patterns, with a clumping of autozygous loci, interspersed by small regions of non-autozygosity, these clumps being more widely separated than predicted by a simple Markov process along the chromosome. These patterns also can be analyzed by Monte Carlo, and also have practical implications in homozygosity mapping, where sometimes a heretozygous marker intervenes in a region of homozygosity. These ideas are illustrated by application to some Werner`s Syndrome pedigrees, a very rare recessive disease of premature aging.

  20. Identification and characterization of microsatellites in Norway spruce (Picea abies K.).

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, A; Olivieri, A M; Morgante, M

    1997-08-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) genomic libraries were screened for presence of dinucleotide AC/GT and AG/CT microsatellites (or simple sequence repeats). On average, one (AG)n microsatellite every 194 kb and one (AC)n microsatellite every 406 kb were found. Forty-six positive clones were sequenced and primers flanking 24 AG microsatellites and 12 AC microsatellites diesigned. Only seven (20%) of them produced the expected single-locus polymorphic pattern when used to amplify Norway spruce DNAs. The other primer pairs gave either multiple bands or bad amplification, or a single monomorphic fragment. Such a small proportion of successful primer pairs was attributed to the high level of complexity of the Norway spruce genome. Dot blot analysis of the clones showed that many of them contained repetitive DNA and that those giving the single-locus polymorphic patterns usually corresponded to single-copy sequences. A family of repetitive DNA that contained AG repeats was identified and was present in about 40,000 copies per haploid genome. Simple Mendelian inheritance was observed for all the polymorphisms tested. The average number of alleles was 13, ranging from 6 to 22, and the expected heterozygosity was 0.79 when seven microsatellites were used to genotype a panel of 18 trees representing different populations. Compared with isozymes, microsatellites are about five times more informative and could provide an extremely valuable source of markers for genome mapping and genetic diversity studies.

  1. Isolation and characterization of 20 polymorphic microsatellite markers for Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Mei; Han, Shi-Jie; Yuan, Shu-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jing-Hua

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Fifty microsatellite loci were developed for the endangered species Juglans mandshurica to investigate its genetic diversity and population structure. • Methods and Results: In all, 50 microsatellite markers were isolated from J. mandshurica, using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences COntaining repeats (FIASCO) protocol. Twenty of these polymorphic markers were assessed in samples collected from 98 individuals among five populations in northeastern China. Across all of the J. mandshurica samples, the number of alleles per locus ranged from one to 17. • Conclusions: These new microsatellite loci will be useful for conservation genetics studies of J. mandshurica. PMID:25202563

  2. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  3. Microsatellite primers in the lichen symbiotic alga Trebouxia decolorans (Trebouxiophyceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Dal Grande, Francesco; Beck, Andreas; Singh, Garima; Schmitt, Imke

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the symbiotic green alga Trebouxia decolorans to study fine-scale population structure and clonal diversity. • Methods and Results: Using Illumina pyrosequencing, 20 microsatellite primer sets were developed for T. decolorans. The primer sets were tested on 43 individuals sampled from four subpopulations in Germany. The primers amplified di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats with three to 15 alleles per locus, and the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.636 to 0.821. • Conclusions: The identified microsatellite markers will be useful to study the genetic diversity, dispersal, and reproductive mode of this common lichen photobiont. PMID:25202529

  4. Microsatellite loci in Vallisneria natans (Hydrocharitaceae) and cross-reactivity with V. spinulosa and V. denseserrulata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Liao, Hui; Zhao, Yao; Li, Wei; Song, Zhiping

    2011-03-01

    Microsatellite primers were characterized in Vallisneria natans, a dominant submerged macrophyte occurring in freshwater bodies of tropical and subtropical zones. Using the Microsatellite Sequence Enrichment protocol, 16 novel polymorphic codominant loci were developed and characterized in V. natans. In addition to these, six existing microsatellite loci from V. spinulosa were successfully amplified and characterized for V. natans. These primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with 2-7 alleles per locus. Most primers also amplified successfully in V. spinulosa and V. denseserrulata. These results indicate the utility of primers in V. natans for future studies of population genetic structure, as well as their applicability across the genus.

  5. Joint inference of microsatellite mutation models, population history and genealogies using transdimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chieh-Hsi; Drummond, Alexei J

    2011-05-01

    We provide a framework for Bayesian coalescent inference from microsatellite data that enables inference of population history parameters averaged over microsatellite mutation models. To achieve this we first implemented a rich family of microsatellite mutation models and related components in the software package BEAST. BEAST is a powerful tool that performs Bayesian MCMC analysis on molecular data to make coalescent and evolutionary inferences. Our implementation permits the application of existing nonparametric methods to microsatellite data. The implemented microsatellite models are based on the replication slippage mechanism and focus on three properties of microsatellite mutation: length dependency of mutation rate, mutational bias toward expansion or contraction, and number of repeat units changed in a single mutation event. We develop a new model that facilitates microsatellite model averaging and Bayesian model selection by transdimensional MCMC. With Bayesian model averaging, the posterior distributions of population history parameters are integrated across a set of microsatellite models and thus account for model uncertainty. Simulated data are used to evaluate our method in terms of accuracy and precision of estimation and also identification of the true mutation model. Finally we apply our method to a red colobus monkey data set as an example.

  6. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Kabat, Susan M; Dick, Christopher W; Hunter, Mark D

    2010-05-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed for the common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., to assist in genet identification and the analysis of spatial genetic structure. Using an enrichment cloning protocol, eight microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized in a Michigan population of A. syriaca. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with 4-13 alleles per locus. The primers will be useful for studies of clonality and gene flow in natural populations.

  7. Microsatellite analysis of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Orjuela-Sánchez, Pamela; Brandi, Michelle C; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites have been increasingly used to investigate the population structure of malaria parasites, to map genetic loci contributing to phenotypes such as drug resistance and virulence in laboratory crosses and genome-wide association studies and to distinguish between treatment failures and new infections in clinical trials. Here, we provide optimized protocols for genotyping highly polymorphic microsatellites sampled from across the genomes of the human malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax that have been extensively used in research laboratories worldwide.

  8. Positive fragile X microsatellite associations point to a common mechanism of dynamic mutation evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Zhong, N.; Dobkin, C.

    1996-03-01

    We recently reported that the size of fragile X gene (FMR1) triplet repeats and two nearby microsatellites show positive allele-size associations. The larger alleles of microsatellite DXS548, located {approximately}150 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, and of FRAXAC1 (AC1), located 7 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, tend to occur together, and smaller alleles also tend to occur together. Also, fragile X chromosomes are more commonly found on the larger combined microsatellite-allele haplotypes. We now have extended these observations to include two other nearby repeats, FRAXAC2 (AC2), a complex three-part polymorphism located 12 kb distal, and the FRAXE triplet repeat, located 600 kb distal. We divided the chromosomes into controls with FMR1 repeats of <60 and fragile X chromosomes with repeats {>=}60, since FMR1 alleles with repeats {>=}60 show high intergenerational instability. In the 133 controls, previously analyzed for AGG interspersions, and in 119 fragile X chromosomes, we found that these repeats show nonrandom size associations. To describe this numerically, we calculated correlation coefficients for the repeat lengths. These repeats showed significantly positive correlations with each other. Although FRAXE alleles showed no correlation with the control repeats, they did have positive correlations with fragile X chromosome microsatellites (AC1 and AC2 but not DXS548), which may reflect the larger recombinational distances involved and the possibly more recent origin of the fragile X mutations. The correlations tended to be higher for the number of 3{prime} pure CGGs than for total FMR1 repeats in controls. These findings strengthen our hypothesis that there may be a common underlying mutational mechanism that simultaneously affects these repeat loci. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Comparative analysis of microsatellites in chloroplast genomes of lower and higher plants.

    PubMed

    George, Biju; Bhatt, Bhavin S; Awasthi, Mayur; George, Binu; Singh, Achuit K

    2015-11-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), contain repetitive DNA sequence where tandem repeats of one to six base pairs are present number of times. Chloroplast genome sequences have been  shown to possess extensive variations in the length, number and distribution of SSRs. However, a comparative analysis of chloroplast microsatellites is not available. Considering their potential importance in generating genomic diversity, we have systematically analysed the abundance and distribution of simple and compound microsatellites in 164 sequenced chloroplast genomes from wide range of plants. The key findings of these studies are (1) a large number of mononucleotide repeats as compared to SSR(2-6)(di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexanucleotide repeats) are present in all chloroplast genomes investigated, (2) lower plants such as algae show wide variation in relative abundance, density and distribution of microsatellite repeats as compared to flowering plants, (3) longer SSRs are excluded from coding regions of most chloroplast genomes, (4) GC content has a weak influence on number, relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide as well as SSR(2-6). However, GC content strongly showed negative correlation with relative density (R (2) = 0.5, P < 0.05) and relative abundance (R (2) = 0.6, P < 0.05) of cSSRs. In summary, our comparative studies of chloroplast genomes illustrate the variable distribution of microsatellites and revealed that chloroplast genome of smaller plants possesses relatively more genomic diversity compared to higher plants.

  10. Multilocus Detection of Wolf x Dog Hybridization in Italy, and Guidelines for Marker Selection

    PubMed Central

    Randi, Ettore; Hulva, Pavel; Fabbri, Elena; Galaverni, Marco; Galov, Ana; Kusak, Josip; Bigi, Daniele; Bolfíková, Barbora Černá; Smetanová, Milena; Caniglia, Romolo

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression can impact the evolution of natural populations. Several wild canid species hybridize in nature, sometimes originating new taxa. However, hybridization with free-ranging dogs is threatening the genetic integrity of grey wolf populations (Canis lupus), or even the survival of endangered species (e.g., the Ethiopian wolf C. simensis). Efficient molecular tools to assess hybridization rates are essential in wolf conservation strategies. We evaluated the power of biparental and uniparental markers (39 autosomal and 4 Y-linked microsatellites, a melanistic deletion at the β-defensin CBD103 gene, the hypervariable domain of the mtDNA control-region) to identify the multilocus admixture patterns in wolf x dog hybrids. We used empirical data from 2 hybrid groups with different histories: 30 presumptive natural hybrids from Italy and 73 Czechoslovakian wolfdogs of known hybrid origin, as well as simulated data. We assessed the efficiency of various marker combinations and reference samples in admixture analyses using 69 dogs of different breeds and 99 wolves from Italy, Balkans and Carpathian Mountains. Results confirmed the occurrence of hybrids in Italy, some of them showing anomalous phenotypic traits and exogenous mtDNA or Y-chromosome introgression. Hybridization was mostly attributable to village dogs and not strictly patrilineal. The melanistic β-defensin deletion was found only in Italian dogs and in putative hybrids. The 24 most divergent microsatellites (largest wolf-dog FST values) were equally or more informative than the entire panel of 39 loci. A smaller panel of 12 microsatellites increased risks to identify false admixed individuals. The frequency of F1 and F2 was lower than backcrosses or introgressed individuals, suggesting hybridization already occurred some generations in the past, during early phases of wolf expansion from their historical core areas. Empirical and simulated data indicated the identification of the past

  11. Multilocus detection of wolf x dog hybridization in italy, and guidelines for marker selection.

    PubMed

    Randi, Ettore; Hulva, Pavel; Fabbri, Elena; Galaverni, Marco; Galov, Ana; Kusak, Josip; Bigi, Daniele; Bolfíková, Barbora Černá; Smetanová, Milena; Caniglia, Romolo

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression can impact the evolution of natural populations. Several wild canid species hybridize in nature, sometimes originating new taxa. However, hybridization with free-ranging dogs is threatening the genetic integrity of grey wolf populations (Canis lupus), or even the survival of endangered species (e.g., the Ethiopian wolf C. simensis). Efficient molecular tools to assess hybridization rates are essential in wolf conservation strategies. We evaluated the power of biparental and uniparental markers (39 autosomal and 4 Y-linked microsatellites, a melanistic deletion at the β-defensin CBD103 gene, the hypervariable domain of the mtDNA control-region) to identify the multilocus admixture patterns in wolf x dog hybrids. We used empirical data from 2 hybrid groups with different histories: 30 presumptive natural hybrids from Italy and 73 Czechoslovakian wolfdogs of known hybrid origin, as well as simulated data. We assessed the efficiency of various marker combinations and reference samples in admixture analyses using 69 dogs of different breeds and 99 wolves from Italy, Balkans and Carpathian Mountains. Results confirmed the occurrence of hybrids in Italy, some of them showing anomalous phenotypic traits and exogenous mtDNA or Y-chromosome introgression. Hybridization was mostly attributable to village dogs and not strictly patrilineal. The melanistic β-defensin deletion was found only in Italian dogs and in putative hybrids. The 24 most divergent microsatellites (largest wolf-dog FST values) were equally or more informative than the entire panel of 39 loci. A smaller panel of 12 microsatellites increased risks to identify false admixed individuals. The frequency of F1 and F2 was lower than backcrosses or introgressed individuals, suggesting hybridization already occurred some generations in the past, during early phases of wolf expansion from their historical core areas. Empirical and simulated data indicated the identification of the past

  12. Microsatellite variation in the Australian dingo.

    PubMed

    Wilton, A N; Steward, D J; Zafiris, K

    1999-01-01

    The dingo is thought to have arrived in Australia from Asia about 5,000 years ago. It is currently in danger because of interbreeding with domestic dogs. Several morphological, behavioral, and reproductive characteristics distinguish dingoes from domestic dog. Skull morphometrics are currently used to try to classify wild canids as pure dingo, dog, or hybrid. Molecular techniques based on diagnostic DNA differences between dogs and dingoes would make a much more reliable and practical test. A small number of markers (about 10) would allow detection of animals with domestic dog in their ancestry several generations back. We have typed 16 dingoes and 16 dogs of mixed breed for 14 microsatellites. The amount of variation in the Australian dingo is much less than in domestic dogs. The size distributions of microsatellites in the two groups usually overlap. The number of alleles in the dingo is much smaller in all cases. One dinucleotide repeat locus shows a size difference of 1 bp in allele classes between dog and dingo. This locus may be diagnostic for dog or dingo ancestry. The differences in distributions of alleles at other loci can also be used to classify animals using a likelihood method.

  13. Microsatellite Length Scoring by Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing – Effects of Sequence Structure and PCR Regime

    PubMed Central

    Liljegren, Mikkel Meyn; de Muinck, Eric Jacques; Trosvik, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are DNA sequences consisting of repeated, short (1–6 bp) sequence motifs that are highly mutable by enzymatic slippage during replication. Due to their high intrinsic variability, microsatellites have important applications in population genetics, forensics, genome mapping, as well as cancer diagnostics and prognosis. The current analytical standard for microsatellites is based on length scoring by high precision electrophoresis, but due to increasing efficiency next-generation sequencing techniques may provide a viable alternative. Here, we evaluated single molecule real time (SMRT) sequencing, implemented in the PacBio series of sequencing apparatuses, as a means of microsatellite length scoring. To this end we carried out multiplexed SMRT sequencing of plasmid-carried artificial microsatellites of varying structure under different pre-sequencing PCR regimes. For each repeat structure, reads corresponding to the target length dominated. We found that pre-sequencing amplification had large effects on scoring accuracy and error distribution relative to controls, but that the effects of the number of amplification cycles were generally weak. In line with expectations enzymatic slippage decreased proportionally with microsatellite repeat unit length and increased with repetition number. Finally, we determined directional mutation trends, showing that PCR and SMRT sequencing introduced consistent but opposing error patterns in contraction and expansion of the microsatellites on the repeat motif and single nucleotide level. PMID:27414800

  14. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Murat, C; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbé, J; Morin, E; Tisserant, E; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, F

    2011-06-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexa-nucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  15. Profile of candidate microsatellite markers in Sebastiscus marmoratus using 454 pyrosequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Na; Chen, Muyan; Gao, Tianxiang; Yanagimoto, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Sebastiscus marmoratus is an important sedentary ovoviparous fish distributed in near-shore coastal waters from the coast of China to Japan. Candidate S. marmoratus microsatellite markers were developed in the present study using 454 pyrosequencing, and the marker profile was analyzed. A total of 2 000 000 raw sequence reads were assembled to reduce redundancy. Among them, 1 043 dinucleotide, 925 trinucleotide, 692 tetranucleotide, and 315 pentanucleotide repeats were detected. AC repeats were the most frequent motifs among the dinucleotide repeats, and AAT was the most abundant among the trinucleotide repeats. AAAT, ATAG, and ATCC were the three most common tetranucleotide motifs, and AAGAT and AATAT were the most dominant pentanucleotide motifs. The greatest numbers of loci and potentially amplifiable loci were found in dinucleotide repeats, whereas trinucleotide repeats had the fewest. In summary, a wide range of candidate microsatellite markers were identified in the present study using a rapid and efficient 454 pyrosequencing approach.

  16. High frequency of RPL22 mutations in microsatellite-unstable colorectal and endometrial tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana M; Tuominen, Iina; van Dijk-Bos, Krista; Sanjabi, Bahram; van der Sluis, Tineke; van der Zee, Ate G; Hollema, Harry; Zazula, Monika; Sijmons, Rolf H; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Westers, Helga; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2014-12-01

    Ribosomal Protein L22 (RPL22) encodes a protein that is a component of the 60S subunit of the ribosome. Variants in this gene have recently been linked to cancer development. Mutations in an A8 repeat in exon 2 were found in a recent study in 52% of microsatellite-unstable endometrial tumors. These tumors are particularly prone to mutations in repeats due to mismatch repair deficiency. We screened this coding repeat in our collection of microsatellite-unstable endometrial tumors (EC) and colorectal tumors (CRC). We found 50% mutation frequency for EC and 77% mutation frequency for CRC. These results confirm the previous study on the involvement of RPL22 in EC and, more importantly, reports for the first time such high mutation frequency in this gene in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, considering the high mutation frequency found, our data point toward an important role for RPL22 in microsatellite instability carcinogenesis.

  17. Microsatellite analysis in the genome of Acanthaceae: An in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Kaliswamy, Priyadharsini; Vellingiri, Srividhya; Nathan, Bharathi; Selvaraj, Saravanakumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthaceae is one of the advanced and specialized families with conventionally used medicinal plants. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a major role as molecular markers for genome analysis and plant breeding. The microsatellites existing in the complete genome sequences would help to attain a direct role in the genome organization, recombination, gene regulation, quantitative genetic variation, and evolution of genes. Objective: The current study reports the frequency of microsatellites and appropriate markers for the Acanthaceae family genome sequences. Materials and Methods: The whole nucleotide sequences of Acanthaceae species were obtained from National Center for Biotechnology Information database and screened for the presence of SSRs. SSR Locator tool was used to predict the microsatellites and inbuilt Primer3 module was used for primer designing. Results: Totally 110 repeats from 108 sequences of Acanthaceae family plant genomes were identified, and the occurrence of dinucleotide repeats was found to be abundant in the genome sequences. The essential amino acid isoleucine was found rich in all the sequences. We also designed the SSR-based primers/markers for 59 sequences of this family that contains microsatellite repeats in their genome. Conclusion: The identified microsatellites and primers might be useful for breeding and genetic studies of plants that belong to Acanthaceae family in the future. PMID:25709226

  18. Comparative Genomics and Molecular Dynamics of DNA Repeats in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Guy-Franck; Kerrest, Alix; Dujon, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Repeated elements can be widely abundant in eukaryotic genomes, composing more than 50% of the human genome, for example. It is possible to classify repeated sequences into two large families, “tandem repeats” and “dispersed repeats.” Each of these two families can be itself divided into subfamilies. Dispersed repeats contain transposons, tRNA genes, and gene paralogues, whereas tandem repeats contain gene tandems, ribosomal DNA repeat arrays, and satellite DNA, itself subdivided into satellites, minisatellites, and microsatellites. Remarkably, the molecular mechanisms that create and propagate dispersed and tandem repeats are specific to each class and usually do not overlap. In the present review, we have chosen in the first section to describe the nature and distribution of dispersed and tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes in the light of complete (or nearly complete) available genome sequences. In the second part, we focus on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fast evolution of two specific classes of tandem repeats: minisatellites and microsatellites. Given that a growing number of human neurological disorders involve the expansion of a particular class of microsatellites, called trinucleotide repeats, a large part of the recent experimental work on microsatellites has focused on these particular repeats, and thus we also review the current knowledge in this area. Finally, we propose a unified definition for mini- and microsatellites that takes into account their biological properties and try to point out new directions that should be explored in a near future on our road to understanding the genetics of repeated sequences. PMID:19052325

  19. Genotyping the clonal structure of a gorgonian coral, Junceella juncea (Anthozoa: Octocorallia), using microsatellite loci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang-Yin Vanson; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Fan, Tung-Yung; Dai, Chang-Feng

    2005-11-01

    The identification of different clones is fundamental to the study of population structure among organisms with mixed reproductive modes such as cnidarians. However, due to the low genetic variation of coral mtDNA and contamination by zooxanthellate DNA, very few molecular markers are available for studying the clonal structure of cnidarians. Herein we used four polymorphic loci of microsatellite DNA isolated from a zooxanthellae-free octocoral, Junceella juncea, to study its clonal structure in seven populations collected from three localities in Taiwan. In total, 40 multilocus genotypes were found among 152 colonies, and the number of genotypes (clones) identified in the seven populations ranged from 2 to 16. Each of the 40 multilocus genotypes was restricted to a single population, even where adjacent populations were only 100 m distant. The ratio of observed to expected genotypic diversity (Go:Ge) ranged from 0.217 to 0.650, and Go showed a significant departure from Ge ( p<0.05) at each site indicating that asexual fragmentation may play a major role in the maintenance of established populations. Mean relatedness ( R) values showed that genotypes within reefs were more closely related than those between regions. The results indicate that microsatellites are useful for discerning the clonal structures among and within populations at different spatial scales.

  20. Development of Pineapple Microsatellite Markers and Germplasm Genetic Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Helin; Chen, You; Wang, Jingyi; Chen, Yeyuan; Sun, Guangming; He, Junhu; Wu, Yaoting

    2013-01-01

    Two methods were used to develop pineapple microsatellite markers. Genomic library-based SSR development: using selectively amplified microsatellite assay, 86 sequences were generated from pineapple genomic library. 91 (96.8%) of the 94 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci were dinucleotide repeats (39 AC/GT repeats and 52 GA/TC repeats, accounting for 42.9% and 57.1%, resp.), and the other three were mononucleotide repeats. Thirty-six pairs of SSR primers were designed; 24 of them generated clear bands of expected sizes, and 13 of them showed polymorphism. EST-based SSR development: 5659 pineapple EST sequences obtained from NCBI were analyzed; among 1397 nonredundant EST sequences, 843 were found containing 1110 SSR loci (217 of them contained more than one SSR locus). Frequency of SSRs in pineapple EST sequences is 1SSR/3.73 kb, and 44 types were found. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats dominate, accounting for 95.6% in total. AG/CT and AGC/GCT were the dominant type of dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats, accounting for 83.5% and 24.1%, respectively. Thirty pairs of primers were designed for each of randomly selected 30 sequences; 26 of them generated clear and reproducible bands, and 22 of them showed polymorphism. Eighteen pairs of primers obtained by the one or the other of the two methods above that showed polymorphism were selected to carry out germplasm genetic diversity analysis for 48 breeds of pineapple; similarity coefficients of these breeds were between 0.59 and 1.00, and they can be divided into four groups accordingly. Amplification products of five SSR markers were extracted and sequenced, corresponding repeat loci were found and locus mutations are mainly in copy number of repeats and base mutations in the flanking region. PMID:24024187

  1. Isolation and characterization of the bovine microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Chung, H Y; Kim, T H; Choi, B H; Jang, G W; Lee, J W; Lee, K T; Ha, J M

    2006-12-01

    Microsatellite loci were isolated using five repetitive probes for Korean native cattle. Eleven microsatellite loci were developed based on a biotin hybrid capture method, and enrichment of the genomic libraries (AAAT, TG, AG, T, and TGC repeats) was performed using Sau3AI adapters. The isolated markers were tested in two half-sib Korean cattle families and four imported breeds (Angus, Limousine, Holstein, and Shorthorn). Nine informative microsatellite loci were observed, and two microsatellite loci were revealed as monomorphic in Korean cattle. In the imported breeds, however, all of the markers were informative. In total, 213 alleles were obtained at the 11 loci across five breeds, and the average number of alleles found per locus, considering all populations, was 4.26. Heterozygosity was 0.71 (expected) and 0.57 (observed). The range of the polymorphic information content for the markers in all cattle populations was 0.43-0.69. Eleven percent of genetic variation was attributed to differentiation between populations as determined by the mean F (ST) values. The remaining 89% corresponded to differences among individuals. The isolated markers may be used to identify and classify the local breeds on a molecular basis.

  2. Analysis of clinical and environmental Candida parapsilosis isolates by microsatellite genotyping--a tool for hospital infection surveillance.

    PubMed

    Sabino, R; Sampaio, P; Rosado, L; Videira, Z; Grenouillet, F; Pais, C

    2015-10-01

    Candida parapsilosis emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen, causing candidaemia worldwide. Nosocomial outbreaks triggered by this species have been frequently described, particularly in cancer patients. For a better understanding of its epidemiology, several typing methods are used and microsatellite analysis has been reported as highly discriminant. The main objective of this work was to study C. parapsilosis isolates by application of microsatellite genotyping to distinguish epidemiologically related strains, compare clinical and environmental isolates and determine possible routes of dispersion of the isolates in the hospital setting. A total of 129 C. parapsilosis isolates from different origins, including hospital environment and hands of healthcare workers, were genotyped using four microsatellite markers. The isolates were recovered from different health institutions. Analysis of C. parapsilosis isolates from hospital environment showed great genotypic diversity; however, the same or very similar genotypes were also found. The same multilocus genotype was shared by isolates recovered from the hand of a healthcare worker, from the hospital environment and from patients of the same healthcare institution, suggesting that these could be possible routes of transmission and that infections due to C. parapsilosis may be mainly related with exogenous transmission to the patient. Examination of sequential isolates from the same patients showed that colonizing and bloodstream isolates had the same multilocus genotype in the majority of cases. We demonstrate that this typing method is able to distinguish clonal clusters from genetically unrelated genotypes and can be a valuable tool to support epidemiologic investigations in the hospital setting.

  3. Development of novel microsatellite markers for strain-specific identification of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Jo, Beom-Ho; Lee, Chang Soo; Song, Hae-Ryong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2014-09-01

    A strain-specific identification method is required to secure Chlorella strains with useful genetic traits, such as a fast growth rate or high lipid productivity, for application in biofuels, functional foods, and pharmaceuticals. Microsatellite markers based on simple sequence repeats can be a useful tool for this purpose. Therefore, this study developed five novel microsatellite markers (mChl-001, mChl-002, mChl-005, mChl-011, and mChl-012) using specific loci along the chloroplast genome of Chlorella vulgaris. The microsatellite markers were characterized based on their allelic diversities among nine strains of C. vulgaris with the same 18S rRNA sequence similarity. Each microsatellite marker exhibited 2~5 polymorphic allele types, and their combinations allowed discrimination between seven of the C. vulgaris strains. The two remaining strains were distinguished using one specific interspace region between the mChl-001 and mChl-005 loci, which was composed of about 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 13~15 specific sequence sites, and (T)n repeat sites. Thus, the polymorphic combination of the five microsatellite markers and one specific locus facilitated a clear distinction of C. vulgaris at the strain level, suggesting that the proposed microsatellite marker system can be useful for the accurate identification and classification of C. vulgaris.

  4. A modified enrichment method to construct microsatellite library from plateau pika genome (Ochotona curzoniae).

    PubMed

    Geng, Jianing; Li, Kexin; Zhang, Yanming; Hu, Songnian

    2010-03-01

    A microsatellite-enriched library of plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae) was constructed according to the strong affinity between biotin and streptavidin. Firstly, genomic DNA was fragmented by ultrasonication, which is a major improvement over traditional methods. Linker-ligated DNA fragments were hybridized with biotinylated microsatellite probes, and then were subjected to streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. PCR amplification was performed to obtain double-stranded DNA fragments containing microsatellites. Ligation and transformation were carried out by using the pGEM-T Vector System I and Escherichia coli DH10B competent cells. Sequencing results showed that 80.2% of clones contained microsatellite repeat motif. Several modifications make this protocol time-efficient and technically easier than the traditional ones; particularly, composition and relative abundance of microsatellite repeats in plateau pika genome were truly represented through the optimized PCR conditions. This method has also been successfully applied to construct microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries of Chinese hamster (Cricetulus griseus) and small abalone [Haliotis diversicolor (Reeve)] with high rates of positive clones, demonstrating its feasibility and stability. 2010 Beijing Genomics Institute. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Taranis microsatellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Elisabeth; Lefeuvre, Francois; Pincon, Jean-Louis

    TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of RAdiations from lightNIngs and Sprites) is a microsatellite project of the CNES Myriade program. TARANIS is dedicated to the investigation of impulsive transfers of energy between the neutral atmosphere and the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas. The main objective is the determination of the mechanisms at the origin of such transitory processes with a multi-instrument payload dedicated to the measurements of all expected wave and particle emissions. The science objectives include: characterization of TLEs (Transient Luminous Events including sprites, jets elves and halos) and TGFs (Terrestrial Gamma ray Flashes), global mapping and occurrence rates, relation of TLEs, TGFs, associated electromagnetic emissions and high energy electrons in order to determine the source mechanisms, determination of triggering factors and formation conditions, characterization of the parent lightning that cause TLEs and TGFs and precipitate electrons, investigation of Wave Plasma Interactions leading to precipitated (LEP) and accelerated (runaway) electrons, effects on the radiationbelt of low altitude sources, tracking of the variability of the radiation belts from electron and wave measurements, effects on thermospheric parameters (ionisation rate, NOx, O3). The satellite observations will be correlated with observations at ground and by balloon. The project is multidisciplinary, based on different kind of sensors including: two micro cameras and three photometers (NIR to UV) looking at the nadir, X and gamma detectors (20 keV - 10 MeV), energetic electrons detectors (70 keV - 4 MeV) and electric and magnetic sensors in a wide frequency range (1 Hz - 30 MHz for the electric sensors). The orbit will be polar sun-synchronous at 650 km altitude, with a slow drift of the order of 2 local hours per year. The scientific payload weight is 30 kg, the power used by the scientific instrumentation is about 35 W, data of 'event' and 'survey' modes will be

  6. Development of highly variable microsatellite markers for the tetraploid Silene stellata (Caryophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juannan; Dudash, Michele R; Fenster, Charles B; Zimmer, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    We designed and tested microsatellite markers for the North American native species Silene stellata (Caryophyllaceae) to investigate its population genetic structure and identify selection on floral design through male reproductive success. A total of 153 candidate microsatellite loci were isolated based on next-generation sequencing. We identified 18 polymorphic microsatellite loci in three populations of S. stellata, with di- or trinucleotide repeats. Genotyping results showed the number of alleles per locus ranged from six to 45 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.511 to 0.951. Five of these loci were successfully amplified in S. virginica and S. caroliniana and were also polymorphic. The microsatellite markers reported here provide a valuable tool for paternity analysis in S. stellata. They will also be useful for investigating the population genetic structures of S. stellata and related species.

  7. WebSat ‐ A web software for microsatellite marker development

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Wellington Santos; Soares Lucas, Divino César; de Souza Neves, Kelligton Fabricio; Bertioli, David John

    2009-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR), also known as microsatellites, have been extensively used as molecular markers due to their abundance and high degree of polymorphism. We have developed a simple to use web software, called WebSat, for microsatellite molecular marker prediction and development. WebSat is accessible through the Internet, requiring no program installation. Although a web solution, it makes use of Ajax techniques, providing a rich, responsive user interface. WebSat allows the submission of sequences, visualization of microsatellites and the design of primers suitable for their amplification. The program allows full control of parameters and the easy export of the resulting data, thus facilitating the development of microsatellite markers. Availability The web tool may be accessed at http://purl.oclc.org/NET/websat/ PMID:19255650

  8. Development of microsatellite loci in Mediterranean sarsaparilla (Smilax aspera; Smilacaceae) using transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhe-Chen; Shen, Chao; Han, Yu-Wei; Shen, Wei; Yang, Man; Liu, Jinliang; Liang, Zong-Suo; Li, Pan; Fu, Cheng-Xin

    2017-04-01

    Although several microsatellite markers of Smilax aspera (Smilacaceae) have been reported in a previous study, due to universality issues in cross-population amplification, we have newly developed microsatellite markers for S. aspera based on transcriptome data to further investigate gene flow and genetic structure of its circum-Mediterranean, East African, and South Asian populations. A total of 4854 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from 99,193 contigs acquired from public transcriptome data of S. bona-nox. Forty-six microsatellite loci were selected for further genotyping in 12 S. aspera populations. The number of alleles varied from three to 28, and 93.5% of the developed microsatellite markers could be cross-amplified in least one of three congeneric Smilax species. The SSR markers developed in this study will facilitate further studies on genetic diversity and phylogeographic patterns of S. aspera in intercontinental geographical scales.

  9. Development of highly transferable microsatellites for Panax ginseng (Araliaceae) using whole-genome data1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Shi, Feng-Xue; Li, Ya-Ling; Liu, Bao; Li, Lin-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Highly transferable expressed sequence tag (EST) microsatellites were developed for Panax ginseng (Araliaceae), one of the most celebrated traditional Chinese medicines and an endangered species in East Asia, using whole-genome data. Methods and Results: Twenty-one EST microsatellites were characterized from next-generation sequencing and were composed of di- and trinucleotide repeats. Polymorphisms and genetic diversity were evaluated for 45 accessions of three ginseng landraces. The number of alleles for each locus ranged from one to five among the landraces, and the polymorphism information content varied from 0.0000 to 0.6450. These microsatellites were also tested for congeneric amplification with P. notoginseng, P. stipuleanatus, P. quinquefolius, P. bipinnatifidus, and the closely related species Aralia elata. Conclusions: These novel EST-derived microsatellite markers will facilitate further population genetic studies of the genera Panax and Aralia. PMID:27843725

  10. Development of highly variable microsatellite markers for the tetraploid Silene stellata (Caryophyllaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juannan; Dudash, Michele R.; Fenster, Charles B.; Zimmer, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: We designed and tested microsatellite markers for the North American native species Silene stellata (Caryophyllaceae) to investigate its population genetic structure and identify selection on floral design through male reproductive success. Methods and Results: A total of 153 candidate microsatellite loci were isolated based on next-generation sequencing. We identified 18 polymorphic microsatellite loci in three populations of S. stellata, with di- or trinucleotide repeats. Genotyping results showed the number of alleles per locus ranged from six to 45 and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.511 to 0.951. Five of these loci were successfully amplified in S. virginica and S. caroliniana and were also polymorphic. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers reported here provide a valuable tool for paternity analysis in S. stellata. They will also be useful for investigating the population genetic structures of S. stellata and related species. PMID:28101439

  11. Characterization and transferability of microsatellite markers of the cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Marcos A; Hoshino, Andrea A; Barbosa, Andrea VG; Palmieri, Dario A; Lopes, Catalina R

    2007-01-01

    Background The genus Arachis includes Arachis hypogaea (cultivated peanut) and wild species that are used in peanut breeding or as forage. Molecular markers have been employed in several studies of this genus, but microsatellite markers have only been used in few investigations. Microsatellites are very informative and are useful to assess genetic variability, analyze mating systems and in genetic mapping. The objectives of this study were to develop A. hypogaea microsatellite loci and to evaluate the transferability of these markers to other Arachis species. Results Thirteen loci were isolated and characterized using 16 accessions of A. hypogaea. The level of variation found in A. hypogaea using microsatellites was higher than with other markers. Cross-transferability of the markers was also high. Sequencing of the fragments amplified using the primer pair Ah11 from 17 wild Arachis species showed that almost all wild species had similar repeated sequence to the one observed in A. hypogaea. Sequence data suggested that there is no correlation between taxonomic relationship of a wild species to A. hypogaea and the number of repeats found in its microsatellite loci. Conclusion These results show that microsatellite primer pairs from A. hypogaea have multiple uses. A higher level of variation among A. hypogaea accessions can be detected using microsatellite markers in comparison to other markers, such as RFLP, RAPD and AFLP. The microsatellite primers of A. hypogaea showed a very high rate of transferability to other species of the genus. These primer pairs provide important tools to evaluate the genetic variability and to assess the mating system in Arachis species. PMID:17326826

  12. Heterozygosity increases microsatellite mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Amos, William

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of families of Arabidopsis has recently lent strong support to the heterozygote instability (HI) hypothesis that heterozygosity locally increases mutation rate. However, there is an important theoretical difference between the impact on base substitutions, where mutation rate increases in regions surrounding a heterozygous site, and the impact of HI on sequences such as microsatellites, where mutations are likely to occur at the heterozygous site itself. At microsatellite loci, HI should create a positive feedback loop, with heterozygosity and mutation rate mutually increasing each other. Direct support for HI acting on microsatellites is limited and contradictory. I therefore analysed AC microsatellites in 1163 genome sequences from the 1000 genomes project. I used the presence of rare alleles, which are likely to be very recent in origin, as a surrogate measure of mutation rate. I show that rare alleles are more likely to occur at locus-population combinations with higher heterozygosity even when all populations carry exactly the same number of alleles. PMID:26740567

  13. An empirical review: Characteristics of plant microsatellite markers that confer higher levels of genetic variation1

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Benjamin J.; Culley, Theresa M.; Avanesyan, Alina; Stokes, Richard; Brzyski, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    During microsatellite marker development, researchers must choose from a pool of possible primer pairs to further test in their species of interest. In many cases, the goal is maximizing detectable levels of genetic variation. To guide researchers and determine which markers are associated with higher levels of genetic variation, we conducted a literature review based on 6782 genomic microsatellite markers published from 1997–2012. We examined relationships between heterozygosity (He or Ho) or allele number (A) with the following marker characteristics: repeat type, motif length, motif region, repeat frequency, and microsatellite size. Variation across taxonomic groups was also analyzed. There were significant differences between imperfect and perfect repeat types in A and He. Dinucleotide motifs exhibited significantly higher A, He, and Ho than most other motifs. Repeat frequency and motif region were positively correlated with A, He, and Ho, but correlations with microsatellite size were minimal. Higher taxonomic groups were disproportionately represented in the literature and showed little consistency. In conclusion, researchers should carefully consider marker characteristics so they can be tailored to the desired application. If researchers aim to target high genetic variation, dinucleotide motif lengths with large repeat frequencies may be best. PMID:26312192

  14. Genetic Diversity and Geographic Population Structure of Bovine Neospora caninum Determined by Microsatellite Genotyping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; García-Culebras, Alicia; Moore, Dadín P.; González-Warleta, Marta; Cuevas, Carmen; Schares, Gereon; Katzer, Frank; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; Mezo, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The cyst-forming protozoan parasite Neosporacaninum is one of the main causes of bovine abortion worldwide and is of great economic importance in the cattle industry. Recent studies have revealed extensive genetic variation among N. caninum isolates based on microsatellite sequences (MSs). MSs may be suitable molecular markers for inferring the diversity of parasite populations, molecular epidemiology and the basis for phenotypic variations in N. caninum, which have been poorly defined. In this study, we evaluated nine MS markers using a panel of 11 N. caninum-derived reference isolates from around the world and 96 N. caninum bovine clinical samples and one ovine clinical sample collected from four countries on two continents, including Spain, Argentina, Germany and Scotland, over a 10-year period. These markers were used as molecular tools to investigate the genetic diversity, geographic distribution and population structure of N. caninum. Multilocus microsatellite genotyping based on 7 loci demonstrated high levels of genetic diversity in the samples from all of the different countries, with 96 microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLGs) identified from 108 N. caninum samples. Geographic sub-structuring was present in the country populations according to pairwise FST. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Neighbor Joining tree topologies also suggested MLG segregation partially associated with geographical origin. An analysis of the MLG relationships, using eBURST, confirmed that the close genetic relationship observed between the Spanish and Argentinean populations may be the result of parasite migration (i.e., the introduction of novel MLGs from Spain to South America) due to cattle movement. The eBURST relationships also revealed genetically different clusters associated with the abortion. The presence of linkage disequilibrium, the co-existence of specific MLGs to individual farms and eBURST MLG relationships suggest a predominant clonal propagation for

  15. Microsatellites for Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia (Onagraceae), and their utility in section Calylophus1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Emily M.; Fant, Jeremie B.; Moore, Michael J.; Hastings, Amy P.; Larson, Erica L.; Agrawal, Anurag A.; Skogen, Krissa A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Eleven nuclear and four plastid microsatellite markers were screened for two gypsum endemic species, Oenothera gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia, and tested for cross-amplification in the remaining 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus (Onagraceae). Methods and Results: Microsatellite markers were tested in two to three populations spanning the ranges of both O. gayleana and O. hartwegii subsp. filifolia. The nuclear microsatellite loci consisted of both di- and trinucleotide repeats with one to 17 alleles per population. Several loci showed significant deviation from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium, which may be evidence of chromosomal rings. The plastid microsatellite markers identified one to seven haplotypes per population. The transferability of these markers was confirmed in all 11 taxa within Oenothera sect. Calylophus. Conclusions: The microsatellite loci characterized here are the first developed and tested in Oenothera sect. Calylophus. These markers will be used to assess whether pollinator foraging distance influences population genetic parameters in predictable ways. PMID:26949578

  16. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Ma, H-T; Jiang, H-B; Liu, X-Q; Wu, X-P; Wei, X-M

    2015-01-15

    The razor clam, Sinonovacula constricta, is an important commercial bivalve and a popular mollusca food in China. Twelve polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated from the razor clam using a partial genomic library enriched for tandem repeat sequences of (CA)16, (GA)16. Polymorphisms of these loci were evaluated in a wild population of 30 individuals. The allele number of these polymorphic markers ranged from 5-15 per locus with an average of 9.333. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.192-1.000 and 0.219-0.906. Polymorphism information content ranged from 0.209-0.892 with an average of 0.704. Three loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium after Bonferroni correction. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected between these loci. This set of microsatellite loci are useful for genetic studies in S. constricta.

  17. Estimation of genetic diversity in Gute sheep: pedigree and microsatellite analyses of an ancient Swedish breed.

    PubMed

    Rochus, Christina M; Johansson, Anna M

    2017-01-01

    Breeds with small population size are in danger of an increased inbreeding rate and loss of genetic diversity, which puts them at risk for extinction. In Sweden there are a number of local breeds, native breeds which have adapted to specific areas in Sweden, for which efforts are being made to keep them pure and healthy over time. One example of such a breed is the Swedish Gute sheep. The objective of this study was to estimate inbreeding and genetic diversity of Swedish Gute sheep. Three datasets were analysed: pedigree information of the whole population, pedigree information for 100 animals of the population, and microsatellite genotypes for 94 of the 100 animals. The average inbreeding coefficient for lambs born during a six year time period (2007-2012) did not increase during that time period. The inbreeding calculated from the entire pedigree (0.038) and for a sample of the population (0.018) was very low. Sheep were more heterozygous at the microsatellite markers than expected (average multilocus heterozygosity and Ritland inbreeding estimates 1.01845 and -0.03931) and five of seven microsatellite markers were not in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium due to heterozygosity excess. The total effective population size estimated from the pedigree information was 155.4 and the average harmonic mean effective population size estimated from microsatellites was 88.3. Pedigree and microsatellite genotype estimations of inbreeding were consistent with a breeding program with the purpose of reducing inbreeding. Our results showed that current breeding programs of the Swedish Gute sheep are consistent with efforts of keeping this breed viable and these breeding programs are an example for other small local breeds in conserving breeds for the future.

  18. Microsatellite data support subpopulation structuring among Basques.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miranda, Ana M; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Kalantar, Arif; García-Obregón, Susana; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Peña, José A; Herrera, Rene J

    2005-01-01

    Genomic diversity based on 13 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (D3S1358, vWA, FGA, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, D7S820, D16S539, TH01, TPOX, and CSF1PO) is reported for the first time in Basques from the provinces of Guipúzcoa and Navarre (Spain). STR data from previous studies on Basques from Alava and Vizcaya provinces were also examined using hierarchal analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and genetic admixture estimations to ascertain whether the Basques are genetically heterogeneous. To assess the genetic position of Basques in a broader geographic context, we conducted phylogenetic analyses based on F(ST) genetic distances [neighbor-joining trees and multidimensional scaling (MDS)] using data compiled in previous publications. The genetic profile of the Basque groups revealed distinctive regional partitioning of short tandem repeat (STR) diversity. Consistent with the above, native Basques clearly segregated from other populations from Europe (including Spain), North Africa, and the Middle East. The main line of genetic discontinuity inferred from the spatial variability of the microsatellite diversity in Basques significantly overlapped the geographic distribution of the Basque language. The genetic heterogeneity among native Basque groups correlates with the peculiar geography of peopling and marital structure in rural Basque zones and with language boundaries resulting from the uneven impact of Romance languages in the different Basque territories.

  19. Repeated nightmares

    MedlinePlus

    ... different from night terrors . Alternative Names Nightmares - repeated; Dream anxiety disorder References American Academy of Family Physicians. Information from your family doctor. Nightmares and night terrors in children. ...

  20. Microsatellite measures of inbreeding: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Coltman, D W; Slate, J

    2003-05-01

    Meta-analyses of published and unpublished correlations between phenotypic variation and two measures of genetic variation at microsatellite loci, multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) and mean d2, revealed that the strength of these associations are generally weak (mean r < 0.10). Effects on life-history trait variation were significantly greater than zero for both measures over all reported effect sizes (r = 0.0856 and 0.0479 for MLH and mean d2, respectively), whereas effects on morphometric traits were not (r = 0.0052 and r = 0.0038), which is consistent with the prediction that life-history traits exhibit greater inbreeding depression than morphometric traits. Effect sizes reported using mean d2 were smaller and more variable than those reported using MLH, suggesting that MLH may be a better metric for capturing inbreeding depression most of the time. However, analyses of paired effect sizes reported using both measures from the same data did not differ significantly. Several lines of evidence suggest that published effects sizes are upwardly biased. First, effect sizes from published studies were significantly higher than those reported in unpublished studies. Second, fail-safe numbers for reported effect sizes were generally quite low, with the exception of correlations between MLH and life-history traits. Finally, the slope of the regression of effect size on sample size was negative for most sets of traits. Taken together, these results suggest that studies designed to detect inbreeding depression on a life-history trait using microsatellites will need to sample in excess of 600 individuals to detect an average effect size (r = 0.10) with reasonable statistical power (0.80). Very few published studies have used samples sizes approaching this value.

  1. Multilocus sequence typing of Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Marion; Nicolas, Pierre; Falentin, Hélène; Valence, Florence; Tanskanen, Jarna; Jatila, Hanna; Salusjärvi, Tuomas; Thierry, Anne

    2011-01-31

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is used as a ripening culture in Swiss cheese manufacture. This study investigates the molecular diversity and the population structure of this bacterium via multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Internal fragments of seven genes sequenced for 113 strains of different subspecies and origins allowed the resolution of 46 sequence types (STs) with occurrence frequencies ranging from 1 to 11. The core genome of the species harbours a low level of nucleotide polymorphism. In our data, single nucleotide polymorphisms account for only 2.28% of the concatenated sequences, and the average polymorphism rate in pairwise comparisons is 0.46%. The analyses reveal quantitatively comparable contributions of recombination and mutation in nucleotide changes at core genome loci along cell lineages. Remarkably, the STs exhibit little if any dairy biotope specialization. Phenotypic characterisation of the strains, based on their aptitude to use lactose and nitrate, shows that the two previously identified subspecies (freudenreichii and shermani) do not reflect the ancestral relationships in the P. freudenreichii population. The considerable phenotypic heterogeneity, found even at the ST level, suggests instead a history of recurrent switches between phenotypes.

  2. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Clostridium difficile▿

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, David; Fawley, Warren; Kachrimanidou, Melina; Bowden, Rory; Crook, Derrick W.; Fung, Rowena; Golubchik, Tanya; Harding, Rosalind M.; Jeffery, Katie J. M.; Jolley, Keith A.; Kirton, Richard; Peto, Tim E.; Rees, Gareth; Stoesser, Nicole; Vaughan, Alison; Walker, A. Sarah; Young, Bernadette C.; Wilcox, Mark; Dingle, Kate E.

    2010-01-01

    A robust high-throughput multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for Clostridium difficile was developed and validated using a diverse collection of 50 reference isolates representing 45 different PCR ribotypes and 102 isolates from recent clinical samples. A total of 49 PCR ribotypes were represented overall. All isolates were typed by MLST and yielded 40 sequence types (STs). A web-accessible database was set up (http://pubmlst.org/cdifficile/) to facilitate the dissemination and comparison of C. difficile MLST genotyping data among laboratories. MLST and PCR ribotyping were similar in discriminatory abilities, having indices of discrimination of 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. Some STs corresponded to a single PCR ribotype (32/40), other STs corresponded to multiple PCR ribotypes (8/40), and, conversely, the PCR ribotype was not always predictive of the ST. The total number of variable nucleotide sites in the concatenated MLST sequences was 103/3,501 (2.9%). Concatenated MLST sequences were used to construct a neighbor-joining tree which identified four phylogenetic groups of STs and one outlier (ST-11; PCR ribotype 078). These groups apparently correlate with clades identified previously by comparative genomics. The MLST scheme was sufficiently robust to allow direct genotyping of C. difficile in total stool DNA extracts without isolate culture. The direct (nonculture) MLST approach may prove useful as a rapid genotyping method, potentially benefiting individual patients and informing hospital infection control. PMID:20042623

  3. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) in prokaryotic taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Stefanie P; Kämpfer, Peter

    2015-06-01

    To obtain a higher resolution of the phylogenetic relationships of species within a genus or genera within a family, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) is currently a widely used method. In MLSA studies, partial sequences of genes coding for proteins with conserved functions ('housekeeping genes') are used to generate phylogenetic trees and subsequently deduce phylogenies. However, MLSA is not only suggested as a phylogenetic tool to support and clarify the resolution of bacterial species with a higher resolution, as in 16S rRNA gene-based studies, but has also been discussed as a replacement for DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) in species delineation. Nevertheless, despite the fact that MLSA has become an accepted and widely used method in prokaryotic taxonomy, no common generally accepted recommendations have been devised to date for either the whole area of microbial taxonomy or for taxa-specific applications of individual MLSA schemes. The different ways MLSA is performed can vary greatly for the selection of genes, their number, and the calculation method used when comparing the sequences obtained. Here, we provide an overview of the historical development of MLSA and critically review its current application in prokaryotic taxonomy by highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of the method's numerous variations. This provides a perspective for its future use in forthcoming genome-based genotypic taxonomic analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Historical and contemporary multilocus population structure of Ascochyta rabiei (teleomorph: Didymella rabiei) in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

    PubMed

    Peever, T L; Salimath, S S; Su, G; Kaiser, W J; Muehlbauer, F J

    2004-02-01

    The historical and contemporary population genetic structure of the chickpea Ascochyta blight pathogen, Ascochyta rabiei (teleomorph: Didymella rabiei), was determined in the US Pacific Northwest (PNW) using 17 putative AFLP loci, four genetically characterized, sequence-tagged microsatellite loci (STMS) and the mating type locus (MAT). A single multilocus genotype of A. rabiei (MAT1-1) was detected in 1983, which represented the first recorded appearance of Ascochyta blight of chickpea in the PNW. During the following year many additional alleles, including the other mating type allele (MAT1-2), were detected. By 1987, all alleles currently found in the PNW had been introduced. Highly significant genetic differentiation was detected among contemporary subpopulations from different hosts and geographical locations indicating restricted gene flow and/or genetic drift occurring within and among subpopulations and possible selection by host cultivar. Two distinct populations were inferred with high posterior probability which correlated to host of origin and date of sample using Bayesian model-based population structure analyses of multilocus genotypes. Allele frequencies, genotype distributions and population assignment probabilities were significantly different between the historical and contemporary samples of isolates and between isolates sampled from a resistance screening nursery and those sampled from commercial chickpea fields. A random mating model could not be rejected in any subpopulation, indicating the importance of the sexual stage of the fungus both as a source of primary inoculum for Ascochyta blight epidemics and potentially adaptive genotypic diversity.

  5. Development of microsatellite markers for buffalograss (Buchloë dactyloides; Poaceae), a drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative1

    PubMed Central

    Hadle, Jacob J.; Konrade, Lauren A.; Beasley, Rochelle R.; Lance, Stacey L.; Jones, Kenneth L.; Beck, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Buchloë dactyloides (Poaceae) is an important component of Great Plains prairies and a popular drought-tolerant turfgrass alternative in North America. This species comprises an autopolyploid series, and microsatellite primers were developed to understand the distribution of genetic variation among cytotypes and across its large geographic range. Methods and Results: Fifteen microsatellite loci were designed and successfully amplified in six B. dactyloides populations. Within-population genetic diversity was comparatively high, consistent with B. dactyloides’ life history. Allelic variation at 13 loci was consistent with the cytotype established in chromosome-counted samples. Conclusions: This variable, interpretable set of loci allows for the determination of multilocus genotype in B. dactyloides individuals of varying cytotype. Data such as these from a range-wide sample set can provide important insights for germplasm conservation and crop improvement in this ecologically and economically important species. PMID:27610277

  6. A panel of microsatellite markers to discriminate and study interactions between Haemonchus contortus and Haemonchus placei.

    PubMed

    Santos, Michelle C; Redman, Elizabeth; Amarante, Mônica R V; Gilleard, John S; Amarante, Alessandro F T

    2017-09-15

    Haemonchus contortus and Haemonchus placei are two closely related economically important parasites of ruminants. Their close morphological similarity, common occurrence as co-infections and ability to hybridize makes definitive diagnosis and epidemiological studies in field populations challenging. In this paper, we describe the development of a panel of microsatellite markers that can be used to discriminate and study the genetics of these two parasite species in co-infections and mixed field populations. We have identified two additional microsatellites (Hp52 and Hp53), in addition to three previously reported microsatellites (Hcms3561, Hcms53265 and Hcms36) that have a discrete set of alleles between the two species. Multilocus genotyping of worms with this 5 marker panel from 3 geographically diverse H. placei isolates and 4 geographically diverse H. contortus populations allows unambiguous species assignment of individual worms. This panel of markers should provide a valuable resource in studying the biology and epidemiology of these important ruminant parasite species in the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multilocus typing and population structure of Cryptosporidium from children in Zaragoza, Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramo, Ana; Quílez, Joaquín; Vergara-Castiblanco, Claudia; Monteagudo, Luis; Del Cacho, Emilio; Clavel, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    A multilocus typing approach with eight variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci and the GP60 gene was used to analyze the inter- and intra-species variation of 44 Cryptosporidium isolates from pediatric patients in Zaragoza city (NE, Spain). Restriction and sequence analyses of the SSU rRNA gene revealed that Cryptosporidium transmission is mostly anthroponotic in this area, with the predominance of Cryptosporidium hominis (n: 41) over Cryptosporidium parvum (n: 3). GP60 subtyping showed limited genetic diversity and four subtypes were identified, including IbA10G2 (n: 35), IaA24R3 (n: 6), IIaA15G1R1 (n: 1) and IIaA15G2R1 (n: 2). Five out of eight VNTR loci showed a discriminatory power higher than the GP60 gene, although each locus had a predominant allele exhibited by more than 50% of isolates. All but four alleles were associated to either C. hominis or C. parvum and linked alleles at different loci were found. Multilocus typing substantially increased the discriminatory power (Hunter-Gaston index: 0.807, 95% CI, 0.683-0.926) and revealed that genetic diversity is much higher than that reported by GP60 sequencing, since 17 multilocus subtypes (MLTs) were identified. Nearly half of the specimens were allocated to a single major MLT. However, no more than three specimens were allocated to each of the remaining MLTs. Both phylogenetic and population analyses revealed a population clustering of C. hominis according to the GP60 subtype, which indicates the robustness of this marker to differentiate genetic subpopulations. Subpopulations had an overall clonal genetic structure, although traces of genetic flow between them were also observed.

  8. Multilocus DNA fingerprints in gallinaceous birds: general approach and problems.

    PubMed

    Hanotte, O; Bruford, M W; Burke, T

    1992-06-01

    Multilocus profiles were investigated in five different species of Galliformes (ring-necked pheasant Phasianus colchicus, Indian peafowl Pavo cristatus, Japanese quail Coturnix coturnix japonica, domestic chicken Gallus gallus, and red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus) using two human multilocus probes (33.6 and 33.15) in combination with each of four restriction enzymes (AluI, DdeI, HaeIII or HinfI). All the species show a DNA fingerprint-like pattern using at least one restriction enzyme in combination with each multilocus probe. The number of bands detected and the value of the index of similarity for each species differ significantly between the profiles obtained with each multilocus probe. Some enzyme/probe combinations reveal strong cross-hybridization of the multilocus probes with satellite or satellite-like DNA sequences in pheasant, peacock, quail and chicken, which partially or completely prevented scoring of the profile. The choice of restriction enzyme was found to influence the number of bands, the value of the index of similarity and the probability of obtaining an identical fingerprint between unrelated individuals. The Mendelian inheritance and independent segregation of the fragments detected using AluI was investigated in three species (ring-necked pheasant, Indian peafowl and red grouse). Some bands were shown to be tightly linked. An extreme case was encountered in the red grouse, where 12 of the 15 bands scored in one parent represented only two, apparently allelic, haplotypes and so derived from a single locus. However, fingerprint patterns will often be adequate for use in paternity analyses, such as in behavioural studies, despite the occurrence of haplotypic sets of bands. Identical DNA multilocus profiles were sometimes observed between captive-bred siblings in one species. These results emphasize the desirability of determining, in each new species, the optimal experimental conditions as a preliminary to any behavioural or population

  9. What phylogeny and gene genealogy analyses reveal about homoplasy in citrus microsatellite alleles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sixty-five microsatellite alleles from three Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) loci (cAGG9, CCT01 and GT03) of various Citrus, Fortunella or Poncirus accessions were cloned and sequenced to determine their mode of evolution. This data was used to assess sequence variation by calculating the average numb...

  10. High resolution melting detects sequence polymorphism in rubus occidentalis L. monomorphic microsatellite markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. However, primer pairs designed from the regions that flank SSRs often generate fragment...

  11. New carrot microsatellites – linkage mapping, diversity analysis and transferability to other apiaceae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nearly 300 new microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed from genomic sequences of carrot. Efforts to map these markers and evaluate their usefulness in diversity studies are underway. In one F2 carrot population, a total of 51 polymorphic markers, including 37 codominan...

  12. Discrimination of American cranberry cultivars and assessment of clonal heterogeneity using microsatellite markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cranberries (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) are an economically important fruit crop derived from a North American native species. We report the application of 12 simple sequence repeats (SSR) or microsatellite markers to assess the genetic diversity of cranberry cultivars. We studied 164 samples of 21...

  13. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers (SSR) in Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.) species.

    PubMed

    Spandana, B; Reddy, V Prathap; Prasanna, G John; Anuradha, G; Sivaramakrishnan, S

    2012-11-01

    Microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs), are the class of repetitive DNA sequences present throughout the genome of many plant and animal species. Recent advances in molecular genetics had been the introduction of microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic structuring of natural plant populations. We have employed an enrichment strategy for microsatellite isolation by using multi-enzymes digestion, microsatellite oligoprobes, and streptavidin magnetic beads in Sesamum (Sesamum indicum L.). More than 200 SSR motifs were detected (SSR motifs ≥2 repeat units or 6 bp); 80 % of the clones contained SSR motifs. When regarding SSRs with four or more repeat units and a minimum length of 10 bp, 132 of them showed repeats. Eighteen SSR markers were initially characterized for optimum annealing temperature using a gradient PCR technique. Among the 18 SSR markers characterized, five were found to be polymorphic and used to analyze 60 Sesamum germplasm accessions. The maximum number of alleles detected was four with a single primer and the least number of two alleles with three primers with an average PIC value of 0.77. SSRs are a valuable tool for estimating genetic diversity and analyzing the evolutionary and historical development of cultivars at the genomic level in sesame breeding programs.

  14. Characterization of 14 microsatellite markers for genetic analysis and cultivar identification of walnut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One hundred and forty-seven primer pairs originally designed to amplify microsatellites, also known as simple sequence repeats (SSR), in black walnut (Juglans nigra L.) were screened for utility in persian walnut (J. regia L.). Based on scorability and number of informative polymorphisms, the best 1...

  15. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers in Fraser fir (Abies fraseri)

    Treesearch

    S.A. Josserand; K.M. Potter; G. Johnson; J.A. Bowen; J. Frampton; C.D. Nelson

    2006-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of 14 microsatellite loci from Fraser fir (Abies fraseri). These markers originated from cloned inserts enriched for DNA sequences containing tandem di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. In total, 36 clones were selected, sequenced and evaluated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers for 14 of these...

  16. Development of microsatellite markers for Fusicladium effusum, the causal agent of pecan scab

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pecan scab (caused by F. effusum) is the most important diseases of pecan in the southeastern U.S. Microsatellite (simple sequence repeat, SSR) motifs were mined from the genome of Fusicladium effusum assembled from 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina Miseq reads. A total of 278 SSR primers were designe...

  17. Microsatellite DNA in genomic survey sequences and UniGenes of loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    Craig S Echt; Surya Saha; Dennis L Deemer; C Dana Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA sequence databases are a potential and growing resource for simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker development in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). Loblolly pine also has many expressed sequence tags (ESTs) available for microsatellite (SSR) marker development. We compared loblolly pine SSR densities in genome survey sequences (GSSs) to those in non-redundant...

  18. Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci identified from a small insert genomic library for Peronospora tabacina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ten polymorphic microsatellite loci for the oomycete obligate, biotrophic pathogen Peronospora tabacina of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) were identified from a small insert genomic library enriched for GT motifs. Eighty-five percent of the loci were composed of dinucleotide repeats, whereas only 4% ...

  19. Taxonomy of the Rhizopogon vinicolor species complex based on analysis of ITS sequences and microsatellite loci.

    Treesearch

    Annette M. Kretzer; Daniel L. Luoma; Randy Molina; Joseph W. Spatafora

    2003-01-01

    We are re-addressing species concepts in the Rhizopogon vinicolor species complex (Boletales, Basidiomycota) using sequence data from the interna transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the nuclear ribosomal repeat, as well as genoLypic data from five microsatellite loci. The R. vinicolor species complex by our definition includes,...

  20. Development and transferability of black and red raspberry microsatellite markers from short-read sequences

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has been a boon to the cost-effective development of molecular markers, particularly in non-model species. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker development from short-read sequences using th...

  1. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Lactobacillus casei Reveals a Clonal Population Structure with Low Levels of Homologous Recombination▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Chervaux, Christian; Garault, Peggy; Smokvina, Tamara; Brisse, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    Robust genotyping methods for Lactobacillus casei are needed for strain tracking and collection management, as well as for population biology research. A collection of 52 strains initially labeled L. casei or Lactobacillus paracasei was first subjected to rplB gene sequencing together with reference strains of Lactobacillus zeae, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and other species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all 52 strains belonged to a single compact L. casei-L. paracasei sequence cluster, together with strain CIP107868 (= ATCC 334) but clearly distinct from L. rhamnosus and from a cluster with L. zeae and CIP103137T (= ATCC 393T). The strains were genotyped using amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing based on internal portions of the seven housekeeping genes fusA, ileS, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, and recG, and tandem repeat variation (multilocus variable-number tandem repeats analysis [MLVA] using nine loci). Very high concordance was found between the three methods. Although amounts of nucleotide variation were low for the seven genes (π ranging from 0.0038 to 0.0109), 3 to 12 alleles were distinguished, resulting in 31 sequence types. One sequence type (ST1) was frequent (17 strains), but most others were represented by a single strain. Attempts to subtype ST1 strains by MLVA, ribotyping, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat characterization, and single nucleotide repeat variation were unsuccessful. We found clear evidence for homologous recombination during the diversification of L. casei clones, including a putative intragenic import of DNA into one strain. Nucleotides were estimated to change four times more frequently by recombination than by mutation. However, statistical congruence between individual gene trees was retained, indicating that recombination is not frequent enough to disrupt the phylogenetic signal. The developed multilocus sequence typing scheme should be useful for future studies of L. casei

  2. A novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1998-02-01

    The authors are researching extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for ``smaller-faster-cheaper`` spacecraft attitude and control systems. The will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses their novel control method to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source. Though still in design infancy, the ``Nervous Net`` controllers described could allow for space missions not currently possible given conventional satellite hardware. Result, prospects and details are presented.

  3. Genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in the sequenced Brassica crop species.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species.

  4. Genome-Wide Microsatellite Characterization and Marker Development in the Sequenced Brassica Crop Species

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-01-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species. PMID:24130371

  5. Contrasting microsatellite diversity in the evolutionary lineages of Phytophthora lateralis.

    PubMed

    Vettraino, AnnaMaria; Brasier, Clive M; Webber, Joan F; Hansen, Everett M; Green, Sarah; Robin, Cecile; Tomassini, Alessia; Bruni, Natalia; Vannini, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Following recent discovery of Phytophthora lateralis on native Chamaecyparis obtusa in Taiwan, four phenotypically distinct lineages were discriminated: the Taiwan J (TWJ) and Taiwan K (TWK) in Taiwan, the Pacific Northwest (PNW) in North America and Europe and the UK in west Scotland. Across the four lineages, we analysed 88 isolates from multiple sites for microsatellite diversity. Twenty-one multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were resolved with high levels of diversity of the TWK and PNW lineages. No alleles were shared between the PNW and the Taiwanese lineages. TWK was heterozygous at three loci, whereas TWJ isolates were homozygous apart from one isolate, which exhibited a unique allele also present in the TWK lineage. PNW lineage was heterozygous at three loci. The evidence suggests its origin may be a yet unknown Asian source. North American and European PNW isolates shared all their alleles and also a dominant MLG, consistent with a previous proposal that this lineage is a recent introduction into Europe from North America. The UK lineage was monomorphic and homozygous at all loci. It shared its alleles with the PNW and the TWJ and TWK lineages, hence a possible origin in a recent hybridisation event between a Taiwan lineage and PNW cannot be ruled out.

  6. Tracing the origin of HLA-DRB1 alleles by microsatellite polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, T F; Engkvist, H; Erlandsson, R; Josefsson, A; Mack, S J; Erlich, H A; Gyllensten, U

    1999-01-01

    We analyzed the origin of allelic diversity at the class II HLA-DRB1 locus, using a complex microsatellite located in intron 2, close to the polymorphic second exon. A phylogenetic analysis of human, gorilla, and chimpanzee DRB1 sequences indicated that the structure of the microsatellite has evolved, primarily by point mutations, from a putative ancestral (GT)x(GA)y-complex-dinucleotide repeat. In all contemporary DRB1 allelic lineages, with the exception of the human *04 and the gorilla *08 lineages, the (GA)y repeat is interrupted, often by a G-->C substitution. In general, the length of the 3' (GA)y repeat correlates with the allelic lineage and thus evolves more slowly than a middle (GA)z repeat, whose length correlates with specific alleles within the lineage. Comparison of the microsatellite sequence from 30 human DRB1 alleles showed the longer 5' (GT)x to be more variable than the shorter middle (GA)z and 3' (GA)y repeats. Analysis of multiple samples with the same exon sequence, derived from different continents, showed that the 5' (GT)x repeat evolves more rapidly than the middle (GA)z and the 3' (GA)y repeats, which is consistent with findings of a higher mutation rate for longer tracts. The microsatellite-repeat-length variation was used to trace the origin of new DRB1 alleles, such as the new *08 alleles found in the Cayapa people of Ecuador and the Ticuna people of Brazil. PMID:10330359

  7. Partners in crime: bidirectional transcription in unstable microsatellite disease.

    PubMed

    Batra, Ranjan; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Swanson, Maurice S

    2010-04-15

    Nearly two decades have passed since the discovery that the expansion of microsatellite trinucleotide repeats is responsible for a prominent class of neurological disorders, including Huntington disease and fragile X syndrome. These hereditary diseases are characterized by genetic anticipation or the intergenerational increase in disease severity accompanied by a decrease in age-of-onset. The revelation that the variable expansion of simple sequence repeats accounted for anticipation spawned a number of pathogenesis models and a flurry of studies designed to reveal the molecular events affected by these expansions. This work led to our current understanding that expansions in protein-coding regions result in extended homopolymeric amino acid tracts, often polyglutamine or polyQ, and deleterious protein gain-of-function effects. In contrast, expansions in noncoding regions cause RNA-mediated toxicity. However, the realization that the transcriptome is considerably more complex than previously imagined, as well as the emerging regulatory importance of antisense RNAs, has blurred this distinction. In this review, we summarize evidence for bidirectional transcription of microsatellite disease genes and discuss recent suggestions that some repeat expansions produce variable levels of both toxic RNAs and proteins that influence cell viability, disease penetrance and pathological severity.

  8. New methods employing multilocus genotypes to select or exclude populations as origins of individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Cornuet, J M; Piry, S; Luikart, G; Estoup, A; Solignac, M

    1999-01-01

    A new method for assigning individuals of unknown origin to populations, based on the genetic distance between individuals and populations, was compared to two existing methods based on the likelihood of multilocus genotypes. The distribution of the assignment criterion (genetic distance or genotype likelihood) for individuals of a given population was used to define the probability that an individual belongs to the population. Using this definition, it becomes possible to exclude a population as the origin of an individual, a useful extension of the currently available assignment methods. Using simulated data based on the coalescent process, the different methods were evaluated, varying the time of divergence of populations, the mutation model, the sample size, and the number of loci. Likelihood-based methods (especially the Bayesian method) always performed better than distance methods. Other things being equal, genetic markers were always more efficient when evolving under the infinite allele model than under the stepwise mutation model, even for equal values of the differentiation parameter F(st). Using the Bayesian method, a 100% correct assignment rate can be achieved by scoring ca. 10 microsatellite loci (H approximately 0.6) on 30-50 individuals from each of 10 populations when the F(st) is near 0.1. PMID:10581301

  9. Multi-locus Analyses Reveal Four Giraffe Species Instead of One.

    PubMed

    Fennessy, Julian; Bidon, Tobias; Reuss, Friederike; Kumar, Vikas; Elkan, Paul; Nilsson, Maria A; Vamberger, Melita; Fritz, Uwe; Janke, Axel

    2016-09-26

    Traditionally, one giraffe species and up to eleven subspecies have been recognized [1]; however, nine subspecies are commonly accepted [2]. Even after a century of research, the distinctness of each giraffe subspecies remains unclear, and the genetic variation across their distribution range has been incompletely explored. Recent genetic studies on mtDNA have shown reciprocal monophyly of the matrilines among seven of the nine assumed subspecies [3, 4]. Moreover, until now, genetic analyses have not been applied to biparentally inherited sequence data and did not include data from all nine giraffe subspecies. We sampled natural giraffe populations from across their range in Africa, and for the first time individuals from the nominate subspecies, the Nubian giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis camelopardalis Linnaeus 1758 [5], were included in a genetic analysis. Coalescence-based multi-locus and population genetic analyses identify at least four separate and monophyletic clades, which should be recognized as four distinct giraffe species under the genetic isolation criterion. Analyses of 190 individuals from maternal and biparental markers support these findings and further suggest subsuming Rothschild's giraffe into the Nubian giraffe, as well as Thornicroft's giraffe into the Masai giraffe [6]. A giraffe survey genome produced valuable data from microsatellites, mobile genetic elements, and accurate divergence time estimates. Our findings provide the most inclusive analysis of giraffe relationships to date and show that their genetic complexity has been underestimated, highlighting the need for greater conservation efforts for the world's tallest mammal.

  10. Evolution of Microsatellite Loci in the Adaptive Radiation of Hawaiian Honeycreepers

    PubMed Central

    Beadell, Jon S.; McClung, Andrew; McIntosh, Carl E.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have examined germ-line mutations to infer the processes that generate and maintain variability in microsatellite loci. Few studies, however, have examined patterns to infer processes that act on microsatellite loci over evolutionary time. Here, we examine changes in 8 dinucleotide loci across the adaptive radiation of Hawaiian honeycreepers. The loci were found to be highly variable across the radiation, and we did not detect ascertainment bias with respect to allelic diversity or allele size ranges. In examining patterns at the sequence level, we found that changes in flanking regions, repeat motifs, or repeat interruptions were often shared between closely related species and may be phylogenetically informative. Genetic distance measures based on microsatellites were strongly correlated with those based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences as well as with divergence time up to 3 My. Phylogenetic inferences based on microsatellite genetic distances consistently recovered 2 of the 4 honeycreeper clades observed in a tree based on mtDNA sequences but differed from the mtDNA tree in the relationships among clades. Our results confirm that microsatellite loci may be conserved over evolutionary time, making them useful in population-level studies of species that diverged from the species in which they were characterized as long as 5 Ma. Despite this, we found that their use in phylogenetic inference was limited to closely related honeycreeper species. PMID:19153085

  11. Novel microsatellite markers acquired from Rubus coreanus Miq. and cross-amplification in other Rubus species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-An; Song, Jae Young; Choi, Heh-Ran; Chung, Jong-Wook; Jeon, Young-Ah; Lee, Jung-Ro; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Myung-Chul

    2015-04-10

    The Rubus genus consists of more than 600 species that are distributed globally. Only a few Rubus species, including raspberries and blueberries, have been domesticated. Genetic diversity within and between Rubus species is an important resource for breeding programs. We developed genomic microsatellite markers using an SSR-enriched R. coreanus library to study the diversity of the Rubus species. Microsatellite motifs were discovered in 546 of 646 unique clones, and a dinucleotide repeat was the most frequent (75.3%) type of repeat. From 97 microsatellite loci with reproducible amplicons, we acquired 29 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Rubus coreanus collection. The transferability values ranged from 59.8% to 84% across six Rubus species, and Rubus parvifolius had the highest transferability value (84%). The average number of alleles and the polymorphism information content were 5.7 and 0.541, respectively, in the R. coreanus collection. The diversity index of R. coreanus was similar to the values reported for other Rubus species. A phylogenetic dendrogram based on SSR profiles revealed that seven Rubus species could be allocated to three groups, and that R. coreanus was genetically close to Rubus crataegifolius (mountain berry). These new microsatellite markers might prove useful in studies of the genetic diversity, population structure, and evolutionary relationships among Rubus species.

  12. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellites for Abies koreana and A. nephrolepis (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Hong, J K; Lim, J; Lee, B Y; Kwak, M

    2016-04-28

    Abies koreana is an endemic and rare species from Korea and is classified as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Although the genetic diversity assessment for current population of A. koreana needs to be performed urgently, no microsatellite markers have been developed for this species. In the present study, we developed 22 novel polymorphic microsatellite loci and the characteristics of these loci were determined in A. koreana as well as in Abies nephrolepis, the most closely related species, and these loci were compared with previously reported microsatellite markers developed for the Abies genus. Genomic sequence (161 Mbp; 325,776 reads) was obtained from one individual of A. koreana using Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium sequencing and 19,258 repeat motifs were identified from it. A total of 288 primer pairs with high copy numbers of di-repeat motifs were evaluated for amplification in A. koreana and A. nephrolepis. A total of 71 primer pairs successfully amplified fragments, of which 22 showed polymorphisms in A. koreana and A. nephrolepis. The average expected diversity was 0.767 and 0.717 in A. koreana and A. nephrolepis, respectively; these heterozygosity levels were moderate compared to the previously reported microsatellite loci from Abies species. This is the first set of microsatellite markers developed for A. koreana as well as A. nephrolepis and further population genetic studies of both species and genetic delimitation can be carried out for the species conservation and management.

  13. Adenovirus Microsatellite Reveals Dynamics of Transmission during a Recent Epidemic of Human Adenovirus Serotype 14 Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Houng, Huo-Shu H.; Lott, Lisa; Gong, Heping; Kuschner, Robert A.; Lynch, Julia A.; Metzgar, David

    2009-01-01

    This study reveals diverse-length polymorphisms in long mononucleotide repeats (microsatellites) in several serotypes of epidemic human respiratory adenovirus. The length of one of these microsatellites, a homopolymeric thymidine [poly(T)] repeat, is measured in 68 isolates of adenovirus serotype 14. These isolates were collected during a series of sudden and sometimes fatal outbreaks among both military recruits and civilians as the virus emerged for the first time in the United States in 2006 and 2007. The results demonstrate the usefulness of adenoviral microsatellites as high-resolution molecular strain markers. The described homopolymer is hypervariable in length, varying from 12 to 17 bp in the analyzed sample set. All intermediate lengths were identified in at least one isolate. Furthermore, the specific length of the marker is stable for significant periods of time (up to 7 months) at individual sites where the virus is in consistent circulation. The microsatellite also can maintain specific length identity through site-to-site transmission events, as determined by the analysis of isolates from three advanced training sites that appeared to be subject to pathogen transfer from one of the affected recruit training installations. Public database searches revealed that the polymorphic nature of the microsatellite extends to other species B serotypes, and that other polymorphic microsatellites can be identified readily in a variety of epidemic respiratory adenovirus clades. This study shows that microsatellites are a ubiquitous source of polymorphic markers for human adenoviruses and demonstrates their use through an epidemiological analysis of isolates from a recent North American epidemic. PMID:19403773

  14. Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus thynnus) population structure in the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Jens; McDowell, Jan R; Díaz-Jaimes, Píndaro; Carlsson, Jeanette E L; Boles, Sandra B; Gold, John R; Graves, John E

    2004-11-01

    Genetic variation was surveyed at nine microsatellite loci and the mitochondrial control region (868 bp) to test for the presence of genetic stock structure in young-of-the-year Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus thynnus) from the Mediterranean Sea. Bluefin tuna were sampled over a period of 5 years from the Balearic and Tyrrhenian seas in the western basin of the Mediterranean Sea, and from the southern Ionian Sea in the eastern basin of the Mediterranean Sea. Analyses of multilocus microsatellite genotypes and mitochondrial control region sequences revealed no significant heterogeneity among collections taken from the same location in different years; however, significant spatial genetic heterogeneity was observed across all samples for both microsatellite markers and mitochondrial control region sequences (FST=0.0023, P=0.038 and PhiST=0.0233, P=0.000, respectively). Significant genetic differentiation between the Tyrrhenian and Ionian collections was found for both microsatellite and mitochondrial markers (FST=0.0087, P=0.015 and PhiST=0.0367, P=0.030, respectively). These results suggest the possibility of a genetically discrete population in the eastern basin of the Mediterranean Sea.

  15. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Sassafras randaiense (Lauraceae).

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuo-Fang; Lin, Ting-Ting; Tsai, Yung-Shin; Lin, Shu-Tzong; Peng, Ching-I

    2011-11-01

    Microsatellite loci were developed in Sassafras randaiense, an endemic tree species in Taiwan, to investigate the conservation genetics of this invaluable plant that is at risk for continuing population decline. Using a magnetic bead enrichment method, 27 primer pairs amplifying di-, tri, and tetranucleotide repeats were developed. Across the populations tested, 16 primer sets showed polymorphism, with an average of 4.06 alleles per polymorphic locus. Twenty of the 27 developed primer sets were also successfully amplified in its congener S. tzumu from China. The new primer sets described here are a powerful tool for investigating the spatial patterns of genetic diversity and for designing effective management strategies for this invaluable plant.

  16. Design and Implementation of Degenerate Microsatellite Primers for the Mammalian Clade

    PubMed Central

    Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; Beck, Josephine S.; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellites are popular genetic markers in molecular ecology, genetic mapping and forensics. Unfortunately, despite recent advances, the isolation of de novo polymorphic microsatellite loci often requires expensive and intensive groundwork. Primers developed for a focal species are commonly tested in a related, non-focal species of interest for the amplification of orthologous polymorphic loci; when successful, this approach significantly reduces cost and time of microsatellite development. However, transferability of polymorphic microsatellite loci decreases rapidly with increasing evolutionary distance, and this approach has shown its limits. Whole genome sequences represent an under-exploited resource to develop cross-species primers for microsatellites. Here we describe a three-step method that combines a novel in silico pipeline that we use to (1) identify conserved microsatellite loci from a multiple genome alignments, (2) design degenerate primer pairs, with (3) a simple PCR protocol used to implement these primers across species. Using this approach we developed a set of primers for the mammalian clade. We found 126,306 human microsatellites conserved in mammalian aligned sequences, and isolated 5,596 loci using criteria based on wide conservation. From a random subset of ∼1000 dinucleotide repeats, we designed degenerate primer pairs for 19 loci, of which five produced polymorphic fragments in up to 18 mammalian species, including the distinctly related marsupials and monotremes, groups that diverged from other mammals 120–160 million years ago. Using our method, many more cross-clade microsatellite loci can be harvested from the currently available genomic data, and this ability is set to improve exponentially as further genomes are sequenced. PMID:22216321

  17. Paternity identification in sugarcane polycrosses by using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Xavier, M A; Pinto, L R; Fávero, T M; Perecin, D; Carlini-Garcia, L A; Landell, M G A

    2014-03-31

    Although polycrosses have been used to test the potential of cross-combination of a large number of sugarcane parents, the male parent of the half-sib progenies produced is unknown. The present study aimed to integrate the molecular marker technology to the sugarcane polycross approach by the application of microsatellite markers to identify the male parent of 41 elite clones derived from polycross families. Ten microsatellite [single sequence repeats (SSRs)] primer pairs were used to identify the most likely male parent considering markers present in the selected clone but absent in the female parent. The number of alleles generated by the 10 microsatellite primer pairs ranged from 102 (cross-pollination lantern 4) to 120 (cross-pollination lantern 2) with an average of 113.25 alleles per SSR. The average genetic similarity among the involved parents in the polycrosses was 45.9%. The results of the analysis of the SSR markers absent in the female parent and present only in the selected clone as well as the genetic similarity values allowed the identification of the most likely male parent in 73% of the total clones evaluated and also to detect probable contaminations. The obtained results highlight the importance of using molecular marker technology in the identification and confirmation of the male parent of high-performance clones derived from polycrosses in the sugarcane breeding programs.

  18. Microsatellite data support an early population expansion in Africa.

    PubMed

    Shriver, M D; Jin, L; Ferrell, R E; Deka, R

    1997-06-01

    We have developed a method for the analysis of microsatellite data that is useful in the elucidation of the demographic history of populations. This method, the PK distribution method of pairwise comparisons, is analogous to the mismatch distribution of sequence comparisons developed for the analysis of mitochondrial sequence data by Rodgers and Harpending and is defined as the distribution of the number of repeat unit differences between alleles when each allele in a sample is compared with every other allele in the sample. Using computer simulations of microsatellite loci, we show that the shape of the distribution of PK changes in a distinctive manner as a function either of time since population expansion or effective population size. Increases in both of these affect the PK distribution in a similar fashion leading to a change from a steep distribution with a Po peak to one with a nonzero peak. Analysis of three data sets from surveys of microsatellite loci in ethnographically defined populations reveals that most (9/12) of the African populations analyzed, but none of the 30 non-African populations showed PK distributions with nonzero peaks. These PK distributions indicate either an earlier expansion or a larger effective population size for African populations. This observation is consistent with the hypothesized African origin of modern human.

  19. Profiling the Dead: Generating Microsatellite Data from Fossil Bones of Extinct Megafauna—Protocols, Problems, and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Allentoft, Morten E.; Oskam, Charlotte; Houston, Jayne; Hale, Marie L.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P; Rasmussen, Morten; Spencer, Peter; Jacomb, Christopher; Willerslev, Eske; Holdaway, Richard N.; Bunce, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We present the first set of microsatellite markers developed exclusively for an extinct taxon. Microsatellite data have been analysed in thousands of genetic studies on extant species but the technology can be problematic when applied to low copy number (LCN) DNA. It is therefore rarely used on substrates more than a few decades old. Now, with the primers and protocols presented here, microsatellite markers are available to study the extinct New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) and, as with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technology, the markers represent a means by which the field of ancient DNA can (preservation allowing) move on from its reliance on mitochondrial DNA. Candidate markers were identified using high throughput sequencing technology (GS-FLX) on DNA extracted from fossil moa bone and eggshell. From the ‘shotgun’ reads, >60 primer pairs were designed and tested on DNA from bones of the South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus). Six polymorphic loci were characterised and used to assess measures of genetic diversity. Because of low template numbers, typical of ancient DNA, allelic dropout was observed in 36–70% of the PCR reactions at each microsatellite marker. However, a comprehensive survey of allelic dropout, combined with supporting quantitative PCR data, allowed us to establish a set of criteria that maximised data fidelity. Finally, we demonstrated the viability of the primers and the protocols, by compiling a full Dinornis microsatellite dataset representing fossils of c. 600–5000 years of age. A multi-locus genotype was obtained from 74 individuals (84% success rate), and the data showed no signs of being compromised by allelic dropout. The methodology presented here provides a framework by which to generate and evaluate microsatellite data from samples of much greater antiquity than attempted before, and opens new opportunities for ancient DNA research. PMID:21304955

  20. Comparative analysis of the within-population genetic structure in wild cherry (Prunus avium L.) at the self-incompatibility locus and nuclear microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Scholz, Florian

    2006-10-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) systems in plants exhibit high polymorphism at the SI controlling S-locus because individuals with rare alleles have a higher probability to successfully pollinate other plants than individuals with more frequent alleles. This process, referred to as frequency-dependent selection, is expected to shape number, frequency distribution, and spatial distribution of self-incompatibility alleles in natural populations. We investigated the genetic diversity and the spatial genetic structure within a Prunus avium population at two contrasting gene loci: nuclear microsatellites and the S-locus. The S-locus revealed a higher diversity (15 alleles) than the eight microsatellites (4-12 alleles). Although the frequency distribution of S-alleles differed significantly from the expected equal distribution, the S-locus showed a higher evenness than the microsatellites (Shannon's evenness index for the S-locus: E = 0.91; for the microsatellites: E = 0.48-0.83). Also, highly significant deviations from neutrality were found for the S-locus whereas only minor deviations were found for two of eight microsatellites. A comparison of the frequency distribution of S-alleles in three age-cohorts revealed no significant differences, suggesting that different levels of selection acting on the S-locus or on S-linked sites might also affect the distribution and dynamics of S-alleles. Autocorrelation analysis revealed a weak but significant spatial genetic structure for the multilocus average of the microsatellites and for the S-locus, but could not ascertain differences in the extent of spatial genetic structure between these locus types. An indirect estimate of gene dispersal, which was obtained to explain this spatial genetic pattern, indicated high levels of gene dispersal within our population (sigma(g) = 106 m). This high gene dispersal, which may be partly due to the self-incompatibility system itself, aids the effective gene flow of the

  1. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Murat, Claude; Riccioni, C; Belfiori, B; Cichocki, N; Labbe, Jessy L; Morin, Emmanuelle; Tisserant, Emilie; Paolocci, F; Rubini, A; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  2. Development of an affordable typing method for Meyerozyma guilliermondii using microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Wrent, Petra; Rivas, Eva-María; Peinado, José M; de Silóniz, María-Isabel

    2016-01-18

    Despite previously published methods, there is still a lack of rapid and affordable methods for genotyping the Meyerozyma guilliermondii yeast species. The development of microsatellite markers is a useful genotyping method in several yeast species. Using the Tandem Repeat Finder Software, a total of 19 microsatellite motifs (di-, tri-, and tetra- repetition) were found in silico in seven of the nine scaffolds published so far. Primer pairs were designed for all of them, although only four were used in this work. All microsatellite amplifications showed size polymorphism, and the results were identical when repeated. The combination of three microsatellite markers (sc15F/R, sc32 F/R and sc72 F/R) produced a different pattern for each of the Type Culture Collection strains of M. guilliermondii used to optimize the method. The three primer pairs can be used in the same PCR reaction, which reduces costs, in tandem with the fluorescent labeling of only the forward primer in each primer pair. Microsatellite typing was applied on 40 more M. guilliermondii strains. The results showed that no pattern is repeated between the different environmental niches. Four M. guilliermondii strains were only amplified with primer pair sc32 F/R, and subsequently identified as Meyerozyma caribbica by Taq I-RFLP of the 5.8S ITS rDNA. Most out-group species gave negative results even for physiologically similarly species such as Debaryomyces hansenii. The microsatellite markers used in this work were stable over time, which enables their use as a traceability tool.

  3. Population structure of hyperinvasive serotype 12F, clonal complex 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by multilocus boxB sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    Rakov, Alexey V.; Ubukata, Kimiko; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2011-01-01

    At least four outbreaks of invasive disease caused by serotype 12F, clonal complex 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae have occurred in the United States over the past two decades. We studied the population structure of this clonal complex using a sample of 203 outbreak and surveillance isolates that were collected over 22 years from 34 US states and eight other countries. Conventional multilocus sequence typing identified five types and distinguished a single outbreak from the others. To improve typing resolution, multilocus boxB sequence typing (MLBT) was developed from 10 variable boxB minisatellite loci. MLBT identified 86 types and distinguished between each of the four outbreaks. Diversity across boxB loci tended to be positively correlated with repeat array size and, overall, best fit the infinite alleles mutation model. Multilocus linkage disequilibrium was strong, but pairwise disequilibrium decreased with the physical distance between loci and was strongest in one large region of the chromosome, indicating recent recombinations. Two major clusters were identified in the sample, and they were differentiated geographically, as western and more easterly US clusters, and temporally, as clusters that predominated before and after the licensure of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. The diversity and linkage disequilibrium within these two clusters also differed, suggesting different population dynamics. MLBT revealed hidden aspects of the population structure of these hyperinvasive pneumococci, and it may provide a useful adjunct tool for outbreak investigations, surveillance, and population genetics studies of other pneumococcal clonal complexes. PMID:21888992

  4. Development, characterization and cross species amplification of polymorphic microsatellite markers from expressed sequence tags of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    PubMed

    Siju, S; Dhanya, K; Syamkumar, S; Sasikumar, B; Sheeja, T E; Bhat, A I; Parthasarathy, V A

    2010-02-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were used for the screening of type and frequency of Class I (hypervariable) simple sequence repeats (SSRs). A total of 231 microsatellite repeats were detected from 12,593 EST sequences of turmeric after redundancy elimination. The average density of Class I SSRs accounts to one SSR per 17.96 kb of EST. Mononucleotides were the most abundant class of microsatellite repeat in turmeric ESTs followed by trinucleotides. A robust set of 17 polymorphic EST-SSRs were developed and used for evaluating 20 turmeric accessions. The number of alleles detected ranged from 3 to 8 per loci. The developed markers were also evaluated in 13 related species of C. longa confirming high rate (100%) of cross species transferability. The polymorphic microsatellite markers generated from this study could be used for genetic diversity analysis and resolving the taxonomic confusion prevailing in the genus.

  5. Multilocus sequence analysis of the family Halomonadaceae.

    PubMed

    de la Haba, Rafael R; Márquez, M Carmen; Papke, R Thane; Ventosa, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) protocols have been developed for species circumscription for many taxa. However, at present, no studies based on MLSA have been performed within any moderately halophilic bacterial group. To test the usefulness of MLSA with these kinds of micro-organisms, the family Halomonadaceae, which includes mainly halophilic bacteria, was chosen as a model. This family comprises ten genera with validly published names and 85 species of environmental, biotechnological and clinical interest. In some cases, the phylogenetic relationships between members of this family, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons, are not clear and a deep phylogenetic analysis using several housekeeping genes seemed appropriate. Here, MLSA was applied using the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, atpA, gyrB, rpoD and secA genes for species of the family Halomonadaceae. Phylogenetic trees based on the individual and concatenated gene sequences revealed that the family Halomonadaceae formed a monophyletic group of micro-organisms within the order Oceanospirillales. With the exception of the genera Halomonas and Modicisalibacter, all other genera within this family were phylogenetically coherent. Five of the six studied genes (16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and secA) showed a consistent evolutionary history. However, the results obtained with the atpA gene were different; thus, this gene may not be considered useful as an individual gene phylogenetic marker within this family. The phylogenetic methods produced variable results, with those generated from the maximum-likelihood and neighbour-joining algorithms being more similar than those obtained by maximum-parsimony methods. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays an important evolutionary role in the family Halomonadaceae; however, the impact of recombination events in the phylogenetic analysis was minimized by concatenating the six loci, which agreed with the current taxonomic scheme for this family. Finally, the findings of

  6. Characterization of microsatellites in the coding regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Li, Shuxian; Yin, Tongming; Wang, Prof. Mingxiu

    2009-01-01

    With the development of high-throughput sequencing techniques, transcriptome sequencing projects which provide valuable resources for designing simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers have been carried out for many plants. However, the utility of SSRs for molecular breeding depends on genomewide distribution and coverage, as well as moderately high allelic variability, in the available SSR library. In this study, we characterized the exonic SSRs developed from the publicly available Populus genome as a case study to determine their value for molecular breeding. As expected, our results confirmed that microsatellites occurred approximately three times less often in coding regions than in non-coding regions. Mutability test also showed that exonic SSRs contained less allelic variability than intronic SSRs. More importantly, exonic SSRs were unevenly distributed both among and within chromosomes. Large exonic SSRs deserts were observed on several chromosomes. Differential selection between paralogous chromosomes, at the gene level, appears to be responsible for these SSR deserts, though the mechanisms that cause chromosome-specific SSR deserts are not known. This work provides ample evidence that the candidate gene approach based on unigenes identified from transcribed sequences may not be the best strategy to identify highly polymorphic SSRs.

  7. Construction of multilocus genetic linkage maps in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Lander, E S; Green, P

    1987-01-01

    Human genetic linkage maps are most accurately constructed by using information from many loci simultaneously. Traditional methods for such multilocus linkage analysis are computationally prohibitive in general, even with supercomputers. The problem has acquired practical importance because of the current international collaboration aimed at constructing a complete human linkage map of DNA markers through the study of three-generation pedigrees. We describe here several alternative algorithms for constructing human linkage maps given a specified gene order. One method allows maximum-likelihood multilocus linkage maps for dozens of DNA markers in such three-generation pedigrees to be constructed in minutes. PMID:3470801

  8. Characterization of polymorphic microsatellites for the invasive grass Microstegium vimineum (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Novy, Ari; Flory, S Luke; Honig, Joshua A; Bonos, Stacy; Hartman, Jean Marie

    2012-02-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed for the invasive plant Microstegium vimineum (Poaceae) to assess its population structure and to facilitate tracking of invasion expansion. Using 454 sequencing, 11 polymorphic and six monomorphic microsatellite primer sets were developed for M. vimineum. The primer sets were tested on individuals sampled from six populations in the United States and China. The polymorphic primers amplified di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats with three to 10 alleles per locus. These markers will be useful for a variety of applications including tracking of invasion dynamics and population genetics studies.

  9. Microsatellite markers for Kleinia neriifolia, an endemic Asteraceae species on the Canary Islands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Lin; Li, Chun; Sun, Ye; Wang, Fa-Guo; Xing, Fu-Wu

    2012-12-01

    Microsatellite makers were developed in Kleinia neriifolia, an endemic Asteraceae species on the Canary Islands, for investigation of the population genetic structure and colonization history of this insular species. • Seventeen polymorphic and seven monomorphic microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from K. neriifolia using the protocol of Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences COntaining repeats (FIASCO). At the population level, the number of alleles detected per locus varied from two to 16, and the observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.105-1.000 and 0.100-0.923, respectively. • These highly informative loci are potentially useful to obtain a deeper understanding of the evolutionary process of K. neriifolia.

  10. Development of microsatellite loci for the invasive weed Wedelia trilobata (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zhou, Ren-Chao; Huang, Hui-Run; Ge, Xue-Jun

    2010-11-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed to help elucidate the population genetics of the invasive species Wedelia trilobata. • Using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences COntaining (FIASCO) repeats protocol, 23 sets of primers for amplifying microsatellite loci were identified in W. trilobata, 10 of which showed polymorphism (two to five alleles per locus) in samples of two populations of W. trilobata, one from China and one from Peru. Six of these loci were successfully amplified from samples of the native congener W. chinensis, with expected sizes. • These markers may be useful for further investigation of population genetics of Wedelia trilobata and other congener species.

  11. RNA-binding proteins in microsatellite expansion disorders: mediators of RNA toxicity.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Gloria V; Cooper, Thomas A

    2012-06-26

    Although protein-mediated toxicity in neurological disease has been extensively characterized, RNA-mediated toxicity is an emerging mechanism of pathogenesis. In microsatellite expansion disorders, expansion of repeated sequences in noncoding regions gives rise to RNA that produces a toxic gain of function, while expansions in coding regions can disrupt protein function as well as produce toxic RNA. The toxic RNA typically aggregates into nuclear foci and contributes to disease pathogenesis. In many cases, toxicity of the RNA is caused by the disrupted functions of RNA-binding proteins. We will discuss evidence for RNA-mediated toxicity in microsatellite expansion disorders. Different microsatellite expansion disorders are linked with alterations in the same as well as disease-specific RNA-binding proteins. Recent studies have shown that microsatellite expansions can encode multiple repeat-containing toxic RNAs through bidirectional transcription and protein species through repeat-associated non-ATG translation. We will discuss approaches that have characterized the toxic contributions of these various factors.

  12. Campylobacter jejuni Multilocus Sequence Types in Humans, Northwest England, 2003–2004

    PubMed Central

    Birtles, Andrew; Matthews, Margaret; Fox, Andrew; Gee, Steven; Painter, Michael; Regan, Martyn; Syed, Qutub; Bolton, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the epidemiology of Campylobacter is increasingly facilitated through use of universal and reproducible techniques for accurate strain differentiation and subtyping. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) enables discriminatory subtyping and grouping of isolate types into genetically related clonal complexes; it also has the advantage of ease of application and repeatability. Recent studies suggest that a measure of host association may be distinguishable with this system. We describe the first continuous population-based survey to investigate the potential of MLST to resolve questions of campylobacteriosis epidemiology. We demonstrate the ability of MLST to identify variations in the epidemiology of campylobacteriosis between distinct populations and describe the distribution of key subtypes of interest. PMID:17176563

  13. Role for the EWS domain of EWS/FLI in binding GGAA-microsatellites required for Ewing sarcoma anchorage independent growth.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kirsten M; Mahler, Nathan R; Saund, Ranajeet S; Theisen, Emily R; Taslim, Cenny; Callender, Nathan W; Crow, Jesse C; Miller, Kyle R; Lessnick, Stephen L

    2017-09-12

    Ewing sarcoma usually expresses the EWS/FLI fusion transcription factor oncoprotein. EWS/FLI regulates myriad genes required for Ewing sarcoma development. EWS/FLI binds GGAA-microsatellite sequences in vivo and in vitro. These sequences provide EWS/FLI-mediated activation to reporter constructs, suggesting that they function as EWS/FLI-response elements. We now demonstrate the critical role of an EWS/FLI-bound GGAA-microsatellite in regulation of the NR0B1 gene as well as for Ewing sarcoma proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Clinically, genomic GGAA-microsatellites are highly variable and polymorphic. Current data suggest that there is an optimal "sweet-spot" GGAA-microsatellite length (of 18-26 GGAA repeats) that confers maximal EWS/FLI-responsiveness to target genes, but the mechanistic basis for this remains unknown. Our biochemical studies, using recombinant Δ22 (a version of EWS/FLI containing only the FLI portion), demonstrate a stoichiometry of one Δ22-monomer binding to every two consecutive GGAA-repeats on shorter microsatellite sequences. Surprisingly, the affinity for Δ22 binding to GGAA-microsatellites significantly decreased, and ultimately became unmeasureable, when the size of the microsatellite was increased to the sweet-spot length. In contrast, a fully functional EWS/FLI mutant (Mut9, which retains approximately half of the EWS portion of the fusion) showed low affinity for smaller GGAA-microsatellites but instead significantly increased its affinity at sweet-spot microsatellite lengths. Single-gene ChIP and genome-wide ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and RNA-seq studies extended these findings to the in vivo setting. Together, these data demonstrate the critical requirement of GGAA-microsatellites as EWS/FLI activating response elements in vivo and reveal an unexpected role for the EWS portion of the EWS/FLI fusion in binding to sweet-spot GGAA-microsatellites.

  14. Rapid microsatellite development for tree peony and its implications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microsatellites are ubiquitous in genomes of various organisms. With the realization that they play roles in developmental and physiological processes, rather than exist as ‘junk’ DNA, microsatellites are receiving increasing attention. Next-generation sequencing allows acquisition of large-scale microsatellite information, and is especially useful for plants without reference genome sequences. Results In this study, enriched DNA libraries of tree peony, a well-known ornamental woody shrub, were used for high-throughput microsatellite development by 454 GS-FLX Titanium pyrosequencing. We obtained 675,221 reads with an average length of 356 bp. The total size of examined sequences was 240,672,018 bp, from which 237,134 SSRs were identified. Of these sequences, 164,043 contained SSRs, with 27% featuring more than one SSR. Interestingly, a high proportion of SSRs (43%) were present in compound formation. SSRs with repeat motifs of 1–4 bp (mono-, di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide repeats) accounted for 99.8% of SSRs. Di-nucleotide repeats were the most abundant. As in most plants, the predominant motif in tree peony was (A/T)n, with (G/C)n less common. The lengths of SSRs were classified into 11 groups. The shortest SSRs (10 bp) represented 1% of the total number, whereas SSRs 21–30 and 101–110 bp long accounted for 26% and 29%, respectively, of all SSRs. Many sequences (42,111) were mapped to CDS (coding domain sequence) regions using Arabidopsis as a reference. GO annotation analysis predicted that CDSs with SSRs performed various functions associated with cellular components, molecular functions, and biological processes. Of 100 validated primer pairs, 24 were selected for polymorphism analysis among 23 genotypes; cluster analysis of the resulting data grouped genotypes according to known relationships, confirming the usefulness of the developed SSR markers. Conclusions The results of our large-scale SSR marker development using tree peony

  15. Development of twelve microsatellite loci in the red tree corals Primnoa resedaeformis and Primnoa pacifica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrison, Cheryl; Springmann, Marcus J.; Shroades, Kelsey; Stone, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    A suite of tetra-, penta-, and hexa-nucleotide microsatellite loci were developed from Roche 454 pyrosequencing data for the cold-water octocorals Primnoa resedaeformis and P. pacifica. Twelve of 98 primer sets tested consistently amplified in 30 P. resedaeformis samples from Baltimore Canyon (western North Atlantic Ocean) and in 24 P. pacifica samples (Shutter Ridge, eastern Gulf of Alaska). The loci displayed moderate levels of allelic diversity (average 7.5 alleles/locus) and heterozygosity (average 47 %). Levels of genetic diversity were sufficient to produce unique multi-locus genotypes and to distinguish species. These common species are long-lived (hundreds of years) and provide essential fish habitat (P. pacifica), yet populations are provided little protection from human activities. These loci will be used to determine regional patterns of population connectivity to inform effective marine spatial planning and ecosystem-based fisheries management.

  16. Characterization of Microsatellites in Pseudogymnoascus destructans for White-nose Syndrome Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Drees, Kevin P; Parise, Katy L; Rivas, Stephanie M; Felton, Lindsey L; Puechmaille, Sébastien J; Keim, Paul; Foster, Jeffrey T

    2017-10-01

    Despite only emerging in the past decade, white-nose syndrome has become among the most devastating wildlife diseases known. The pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans infects hibernating bats and typically leads to high rates of mortality at hibernacula during winter in North America. We developed a set of genetic markers to better differentiate P. destructans isolates. We designed and successfully characterized these 23 microsatellite markers of P. destructans for use in disease ecology and epidemiology research. We validated these loci with DNA extracted from a collection of P. destructans isolates from the US and Canada, as well as from Europe (the likely introduction source based on currently available data). Genetic diversity calculated for each locus and for the multilocus panel as a whole indicates sufficient allelic diversity to differentiate among and between samples from both Europe and North America. Indices of genetic diversity indicate a loss of allelic diversity that is consistent with the recent introduction and rapid spread of an emerging pathogen.

  17. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers for the Brazil nut tree Bertholletia excelsa Humb. & Bonpl. (Lecythidaceae).

    PubMed

    Reis, Alessandra M M; Braga, Aline C; Lemes, Maristerra R; Gribel, Rogério; Collevatti, Rosane G

    2009-05-01

    Twelve polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa), one of the most valuable non-timber forest products from the Amazon, based on enrichment protocol. Six to 18 (mean 10.4) alleles per locus were identified and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.663 to 0.923 based on a screen of 40 individuals from one population of B. excelsa. The combined probabilities of genetic identity (8.39 × 10(-17) ) and paternity exclusion (0.999999) indicated that multilocus genotypes are likely to be unique allowing precise analyses of genetic structure, gene flow, and mating system of this economically important species.

  18. Population size estimation in Yellowstone wolves with error-prone noninvasive microsatellite genotypes.

    PubMed

    Creel, Scott; Spong, Goran; Sands, Jennifer L; Rotella, Jay; Zeigle, Janet; Joe, Lawrence; Murphy, Kerry M; Smith, Douglas

    2003-07-01

    Determining population sizes can be difficult, but is essential for conservation. By counting distinct microsatellite genotypes, DNA from noninvasive samples (hair, faeces) allows estimation of population size. Problems arise because genotypes from noninvasive samples are error-prone, but genotyping errors can be reduced by multiple polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For faecal genotypes from wolves in Yellowstone National Park, error rates varied substantially among samples, often above the 'worst-case threshold' suggested by simulation. Consequently, a substantial proportion of multilocus genotypes held one or more errors, despite multiple PCR. These genotyping errors created several genotypes per individual and caused overestimation (up to 5.5-fold) of population size. We propose a 'matching approach' to eliminate this overestimation bias.

  19. DNA fingerprints of farm animals generated by microsatellite and minisatellite DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Haberfeld, A; Cahaner, A; Yoffe, O; Plotsky, Y; Hillel, J

    1991-01-01

    A multi-locus DNA probe, R18.1, derived from a bovine genomic library, detected DNA fingerprints of highly polymorphic loci in hybridization to genomic DNA from poultry and sheep, and of moderate polymorphic loci in cattle and human DNA. The average numbers of detected bands in chickens and sheep were 27.8 and 21.4, and the average band sharing levels were 0.25 and 0.33, respectively. In hybridization to cattle and human DNA, the results were less polymorphic; nevertheless, individual identification is feasible using probe R18.1. The results obtained by R18.1 were compared to results obtained by Jeffreys minisatellite probe 33.6 and two microsatellite oligonucleotides, (GT)12 and (GTG)5. The total number of detected loci using probes R18.1 and 33.6 were estimated in chickens through family analysis of broilers and the maximal number of detectable loci was calculated.

  20. Microsatellite DNA markers for delineating population structure and kinship among the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Henderson, A.P.; Bocetti, Carol I.; Currie, D.; Wunderle, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 23 microsatellite DNA markers for the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii), a Nearctic/Neotropical migrant passerine. This suite of markers revealed moderate to high levels of allelic diversity (averaging 7.7 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 72%). Genotypic frequencies at 22 of 23 (95%) markers conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and no linkage disequilibrium was observed in blood samples taken from 14 warblers found on the wintering grounds in the Bahamas archipelago. Multilocus genotypes resulting from this suite of markers should reduce the amount of resources required for initiating new genetic studies assessing breeding structure, parentage, demographics, and individual-level ecological interactions for D. kirtlandii. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in Alasmidonta heterodon (Bivalvia: Unionidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, K.M.; King, T.L.; Lellis, W.A.; Eackles, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    We developed 13 species-specific microsatellite markers for the federally endangered Atlantic slope unionid Alasmidonta heterodon. Four to 18 alleles per locus were observed among 30 individuals. Observed heterozygosity throughout the loci ranged from 26.9 to 86.2% and averaged 63.6%. Estimates of individual pairwise genetic distances indicated that levels of genetic diversity among loci were sufficient to produce unique multilocus genotypes for all animals surveyed. Randomization tests showed that genotypes for this collection were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed between loci. These loci therefore appear suitable for population surveys, kinship assessment and other such applications. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species. PMID:25620112

  3. Developing genome-wide microsatellite markers of bamboo and their applications on molecular marker assisted taxonomy for accessions in the genus Phyllostachys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hansheng; Yang, Li; Peng, Zhenhua; Sun, Huayu; Yue, Xianghua; Lou, Yongfeng; Dong, Lili; Wang, Lili; Gao, Zhimin

    2015-01-26

    Morphology-based taxonomy via exiguously reproductive organ has severely limitation on bamboo taxonomy, mainly owing to infrequent and unpredictable flowering events of bamboo. Here, we present the first genome-wide analysis and application of microsatellites based on the genome of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) to assist bamboo taxonomy. Of identified 127,593 microsatellite repeat-motifs, the primers of 1,451 microsatellites were designed and 1,098 markers were physically mapped on the genome of moso bamboo. A total of 917 markers were successfully validated in 9 accessions with ~39.8% polymorphic potential. Retrieved from validated microsatellite markers, 23 markers were selected for polymorphic analysis among 78 accessions and 64 alleles were detected with an average of 2.78 alleles per primers. The cluster result indicated the majority of the accessions were consistent with their current taxonomic classification, confirming the suitability and effectiveness of the developed microsatellite markers. The variations of microsatellite marker in different species were confirmed by sequencing and in silico comparative genome mapping were investigated. Lastly, a bamboo microsatellites database (http://www.bamboogdb.org/ssr) was implemented to browse and search large information of bamboo microsatellites. Consequently, our results of microsatellite marker development are valuable for assisting bamboo taxonomy and investigating genomic studies in bamboo and related grass species.

  4. Microsatellite primers for red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this note, we document polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) primer pairs for 101, nuclear-encoded microsatellites designed and developed from a red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) genomic library. The 101 microsatellites (Genbank Accession Numbers EU015882-EU015982) were amplified successfully and used to...

  5. Isolation and characterization of novel microsatellite markers from the sika deer (Cervus nippon) genome.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Bai, C Y; Niu, W P; Yu, H; Yang, R J; Yan, S Q; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, M J; Zhao, Z H

    2015-09-28

    Microsatellite markers are widely and evenly distributed, and are highly polymorphic. Rapid and convenient detection through automated analysis means that microsatellite markers are widely used in the construction of plant and animal genetic maps, in quantitative trait loci localization, marker-assisted selection, identification of genetic relationships, and genetic diversity and phylogenetic tree construction. However, few microsatellite markers remain to be isolated. We used streptavidin magnetic beads to affinity-capture and construct a (CA)n microsatellite DNA-enriched library from sika deer. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers. Clear bands were selected, which were amplified using non-specific primers following PCR amplification to screen polymorphisms in a group of 65 unrelated sika deer. The positive clone rate reached 82.9% by constructing the enriched library, and we then selected positive clones for sequencing. There were 395 sequences with CA repeats, and the CA repeat number was 4-105. We selected sequences containing more than six repeats to design primers, of which 297 pairs were designed. We next selected clear bands and used non-specific primers to amplify following PCR amplification. In total, 245 pairs of primers were screened. We then selected 50 pairs of primers to randomly screen for polymorphisms. We detected 47 polymorphic and 3 monomorphic loci in 65 unrelated sika deer. These newly isolated and characterized microsatellite loci can be used to construct genetic maps and for lineage testing in deer. In addition, they can be used for comparative genomics between Cervidae species.

  6. Rapid Microsatellite Isolation from a Butterfly by De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing: Performance and a Comparison with AFLP-Derived Distances

    PubMed Central

    Mikheyev, Alexander S.; Vo, Tanya; Wee, Brian; Singer, Michael C.; Parmesan, Camille

    2010-01-01

    Background The isolation of microsatellite markers remains laborious and expensive. For some taxa, such as Lepidoptera, development of microsatellite markers has been particularly difficult, as many markers appear to be located in repetitive DNA and have nearly identical flanking regions. We attempted to circumvent this problem by bioinformatic mining of microsatellite sequences from a de novo-sequenced transcriptome of a butterfly (Euphydryas editha). Principal Findings By searching the assembled sequence data for perfect microsatellite repeats we found 10 polymorphic loci. Although, like many expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellites, our markers show strong deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in many populations, and, in some cases, a high incidence of null alleles, we show that they nonetheless provide measures of population differentiation consistent with those obtained by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. Estimates of pairwise population differentiation between 23 populations were concordant between microsatellite-derived data and AFLP analysis of the same samples (r = 0.71, p<0.00001, 425 individuals from 23 populations). Significance De novo transcriptional sequencing appears to be a rapid and cost-effective tool for developing microsatellite markers for difficult genomes. PMID:20585453

  7. Application of Microsatellite Markers in Conservation Genetics and Fisheries Management: Recent Advances in Population Structure Analysis and Conservation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Muneer, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites are the most popular and versatile genetic marker with myriads of applications in population genetics, conservation biology, and evolutionary biology. These are the arrays of DNA sequences, consisting of tandemly repeating mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide units, which are distributed throughout the genomes of most eukaryotic species. Microsatellites are codominant in nature, highly polymorphic, easily typed, and Mendelian inherited, all properties which make them very suitable for the study of population structure and pedigree analysis and capable of detecting differences among closely related species. PCR for microsatellites can be automated for identifying simple sequence repeat polymorphism. Small amount of blood samples or alcohol preserved tissue is adequate for analyzing them. Most of the microsatellites are noncoding, and therefore variations are independent of natural selection. These properties make microsatellites ideal genetic markers for conservation genetics and fisheries management. This review addresses the applications of microsatellite markers in conservation genetics and recent advances in population structure analysis in the context of fisheries management. PMID:24808959

  8. Infrequent microsatellite instability in oesophageal cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Muzeau, F.; Fléjou, J. F.; Belghiti, J.; Thomas, G.; Hamelin, R.

    1997-01-01

    Alterations of microsatellites have been found at relatively high frequency in hereditary and sporadic colorectal cancer and gastric and pancreatic cancers and at lower frequency in some other cancers. We determined the frequency of instability at 39 poly-CA microsatellite loci in 20 squamous cell carcinomas and 26 Barrett's adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. None of the tumours presented instability for a high percentage of the tested loci. Four squamous cell carcinomas and six Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at one locus, and three Barrett's adenocarcinomas showed microsatellite instability at two loci. The presence of few loci showing microsatellite instability could be due to an instability background. We conclude that genetic defects in the DNA mismatch repair system do not play an important role in oesophageal cancers. Images Figure 1 PMID:9155055

  9. RNA toxicity and foci formation in microsatellite expansion diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2017-02-13

    More than 30 incurable neurological and neuromuscular diseases are caused by simple microsatellite expansions consisted of 3-6 nucleotides. These repeats can occur in non-coding regions and often result in a dominantly inherited disease phenotype that is characteristic of a toxic RNA gain-of-function. The expanded RNA adopts unusual secondary structures, sequesters various RNA binding proteins to form insoluble nuclear foci, and causes cellular defects at a multisystem level. Nuclear foci are dynamic in size, shape and colocalization of RNA binding proteins in different expansion diseases and tissue types. This review sets to provide new insights into the disease mechanisms of RNA toxicity and foci modulation, in light of recent advancement on bi-directional transcription, antisense RNA, repeat-associated non-ATG translation and beyond.

  10. Microsatellite markers for the yam bean Pachyrhizus (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Delêtre, Marc; Soengas, Beatriz; Utge, José; Lambourdière, Josie; Sørensen, Marten

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were developed for the understudied root crop yam bean (Pachyrhizus spp.) to investigate intraspecific diversity and interspecific relationships within the genus Pachyrhizus. • Methods and Results: Seventeen nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with perfect di- and trinucleotide repeats were developed from 454 pyrosequencing of SSR-enriched genomic libraries. Loci were characterized in P. ahipa and wild and cultivated populations of four closely related species. All loci successfully cross-amplified and showed high levels of polymorphism, with number of alleles ranging from three to 12 and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.095 to 0.831 across the genus. • Conclusions: By enabling rapid assessment of genetic diversity in three native neotropical crops, P. ahipa, P. erosus, and P. tuberosus, and two wild relatives, P. ferrugineus and P. panamensis, these markers will allow exploration of the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of the genus Pachyrhizus. PMID:25202568

  11. Genome Variability and Gene Content in Chordopoxviruses: Dependence on Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Eneida L.; Wang, Chunlin; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate gene loss in poxviruses belonging to the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily, we assessed the gene content of representative members of the subfamily, and determined whether individual genes present in each genome were intact, truncated, or fragmented. When nonintact genes were identified, the early stop mutations (ESMs) leading to gene truncation or fragmentation were analyzed. Of all the ESMs present in these poxvirus genomes, over 65% co-localized with microsatellites—simple sequence nucleotide repeats. On average, microsatellites comprise 24% of the nucleotide sequence of these poxvirus genomes. These simple repeats have been shown to exhibit high rates of variation, and represent a target for poxvirus protein variation, gene truncation, and reductive evolution. PMID:25912716

  12. Microsatellite instability in thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzereschi, D; Palmirotta, R; Ranieri, A; Ottini, L; Verì, M C; Cama, A; Cetta, F; Nardi, F; Colletta, G; Mariani-Costantini, R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-one thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions were analysed for instability at ten dinucleotide microsatellite loci and at two coding mononucleotide repeats within the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptor (IGFIIR) genes respectively. Microsatellite instability (MI) was detected in 11 out of 51 cases (21.5%), including six (11.7%) with MI at one or two loci and five (9.8%) with Ml at three or more loci (RER+ phenotype). No mutations in the TβRII and IGFIIR repeats were observed. The overall frequency of MI did not significantly vary in relation to age, gender, benign versus malignant status and tumour size. However, widespread MI was significantly more frequent in follicular adenomas and carcinomas than in papillary and Hürthle cell tumours: three out of nine tumours of follicular type (33.3%) resulted in replication error positive (RER+), versus 1 out of 29 papillary carcinomas (3.4%, P = 0.01), and zero out of eight Hürthle cell neoplasms. Regional lymph node metastases were present in five MI-negative primary cancers and resulted in MI-positive in two cases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888478

  13. First multilocus sequence typing scheme for Arcobacter spp.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arcobacter spp. are a common contaminant of food and water, and some species, primarily A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus, have been isolated increasingly from human diarrheal stool samples. Here, we describe a novel Arcobacter multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method suitable for typing A. butzleri,...

  14. The effects of multilocus balancing selection on neutral variability.

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Arcadio; Barton, Nick H

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of multilocus balancing selection on neutral nucleotide variability at linked sites by simulating a model where diallelic polymorphisms are maintained at an arbitrary number of selected loci by means of symmetric overdominance. Different combinations of alleles define different genetic backgrounds that subdivide the population and strongly affect variability. Several multilocus fitness regimes with different degrees of epistasis and gametic disequilibrium are allowed. Analytical results based on a multilocus extension of the structured coalescent predict that the expected linked neutral diversity increases exponentially with the number of selected loci and can become extremely large. Our simulation results show that although variability increases with the number of genetic backgrounds that are maintained in the population, it is reduced by random fluctuations in the frequencies of those backgrounds and does not reach high levels even in very large populations. We also show that previous results on balancing selection in single-locus systems do not extend to the multilocus scenario in a straightforward way. Different patterns of linkage disequilibrium and of the frequency spectrum of neutral mutations are expected under different degrees of epistasis. Interestingly, the power to detect balancing selection using deviations from a neutral distribution of allele frequencies seems to be diminished under the fitness regime that leads to the largest increase of variability over the neutral case. This and other results are discussed in the light of data from the Mhc. PMID:12072479

  15. Multilocus sequence analysis of phytopathogenic species of the genus Streptomyces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The identification and classification of species within the genus Streptomyces is difficult because there are presently 576 validly described species and this number increases every year. The value of the application of multilocus sequence analysis scheme to the systematics of Streptomyces species h...

  16. Fourteen polymorphic microsatellite markers for the threatened Arnica montana (Asteraceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Duwe, Virginia K.; Ismail, Sascha A.; Buser, Andres; Sossai, Esther; Borsch, Thomas; Muller, Ludo A. H.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed to investigate population genetic structure in the threatened species Arnica montana. • Methods and Results: Fourteen microsatellite markers with di-, tetra-, and hexanucleotide repeat motifs were developed for A. montana using 454 pyrosequencing without and with library-enrichment methods, resulting in 56,545 sequence reads and 14,467 sequence reads, respectively. All loci showed a high level of polymorphism, with allele numbers ranging from four to 11 in five individuals from five populations (25 samples) and an expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.192 to 0.648 across the loci. • Conclusions: This set of microsatellite markers is the first one described for A. montana and will facilitate conservation genetic applications as well as the understanding of phylogeographic patterns in this species. PMID:25606354

  17. Development and characterization of nine microsatellites for an endangered tree, Pinus wangii (Pinaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Jing-Jing; Zhou, Ren-Chao; Tang, An-Jun; Ge, Xue-Jun; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Pinus wangii is an endemic and endangered species in southwestern China, and microsatellite primers were developed to characterize its genetic diversity and population structure. • Methods and Results: Using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequences COntaining repeats (FIASCO) protocol, nine sets of microsatellite primers were developed in P. wangii. One population with 26 individuals of P. wangii, as well as 11 individuals each for two congeneric species, P. taiwanensis and P. squamata, were used to test their polymorphism and transferability. The number of alleles per locus ranged from one to seven with an average of 3.7, and the observed heterozygosity and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0 to 0.91 and 0 to 0.75, respectively. • Conclusions: We developed nine sets of polymorphic microsatellite loci that are suitable for investigating genetic diversity and population structure of P. wangii, and these markers may be useful for other Pinus species. PMID:25202511

  18. Evidence on the evolution of polymorphism of microsatellite markers in varieties of Vitis vinifera L.

    PubMed

    Crespan, M

    2004-01-01

    This paper contributes a description of four mutations in microsatellite allele-length found within strains of each of the varieties known as Muscat d'Alsace, Greco di Tufo, Primitivo and Corvina veronese: the comparison of microsatellite sequences of wild and mutated strains showed in all cases an increase of one or more repeats of the core GA sequence. Whereas studies on animals reported mutations which originated in gametes, in grapevines somatic cell-mutations take place and are eventually fixed and transmitted to new individuals through vegetative propagation. The mutations detected in 1998 were found again 3 years later in seven out of eight plants. A chimeric situation was clearly noted and resolved in three of the four cases described. Considerations about the genesis of microsatellite alleles and the reliability of fingerprinting with these markers are provided.

  19. Isolation and characterization of sixteen polymorphic microsatellite loci in the golden apple snail Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lian; Xu, Haigen; Li, Hong; Wu, Jun; Ding, Hui; Liu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    We report the characterization of 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, a pest registered in the list of "100 of the world's worst invasive alien species". The fast isolation by AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) method was used to isolate microsatellite loci, and polymorphism was explored with 29 individuals collected in an invasive region from China. These primers showed a number of alleles per locus ranging from three to 13. The ranges of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.310-0.966 and 0.523-0.898, respectively. These microsatellite markers described here will be useful for population genetic studies of P. canaliculata.

  20. Genetic variation at microsatellite loci in the tropical herb Aphelandra aurantiaca (Acanthaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Montes, Pilar; Tapia-López, Rosalinda; Núñez-Farfán, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: To assess the effect of forest fragmentation on genetic variation and population structure of Aphelandra aurantiaca (Acanthaceae), a tropical and ornamental herbaceous perennial plant, we developed the first microsatellite primers for the species. Methods and Results: Fourteen microsatellite markers were isolated and characterized from A. aurantiaca genomic libraries enriched for di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeat motifs. Polymorphism was evaluated in 107 individuals from four natural populations. Twelve out of 14 genetic markers were polymorphic. The number of alleles per locus ranged from two to 12, and the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.22 to 0.96 and from 0.20 to 0.87, respectively. Fixation indices ranged from −0.41 to 0.44. Conclusions: These newly developed microsatellite markers for A. aurantiaca will be useful for future population genetic studies, specifically to detect the possible loss of genetic diversity due to habitat fragmentation. PMID:26649265

  1. Development of microsatellites in Machilus thunbergii (Lauraceae), a warm-temperate coastal tree species in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuko; Lian, Chunlan; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Shimatani, Ken-ichiro; Sakio, Hitoshi; Noma, Naohiko

    2012-07-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized in a typically coastal, widespread, and dominant tree species of the evergreen broadleaf forests, Machilus thunbergii, for comparison of the genetic diversity and structure of inland populations surrounding the ancient Lake Biwa and coastal populations in Japan. Eighteen polymorphic microsatellites of this species were isolated using an improved technique for isolating codominant compound microsatellite markers. These isolated loci provided compound simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers with polymorphisms of three to 19 alleles per locus, with an average of 10.9. The expected and observed within-population heterozygosities ranged from 0.16 to 0.86 and from 0.13 to 0.72, respectively. These markers may be useful tools for further investigation of the population genetic structure and biogeographic history of M. thunbergii in the warm-temperate zone of East Asia.

  2. Development and evaluation of microsatellite markers for the critically endangered birch Betula chichibuensis (Betulaceae).

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Yuji; Aihara, Hiroki; Handa, Yoshihiro; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Masanori; Nakano, Koichiro; Hirao, Toshihide

    2017-05-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized for the critically endangered birch Betula chichibuensis (Betulaceae) to investigate the genetic structure of this species for conservation purposes. Sixteen microsatellite markers with di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeat motifs were developed and optimized using MiSeq paired-end sequencing. Of these, 14 were polymorphic, with two to five alleles per locus, in 47 individuals from two newly discovered populations of B. chichibuensis in Japan. Observed and unbiased expected heterozygosities per locus ranged from 0.000 to 0.617 and from 0.000 to 0.629, respectively. These markers were tested for cross-species amplification in B. maximowicziana, B. platyphylla var. japonica, and B. schmidtii. This set of microsatellite markers, the first developed for B. chichibuensis, will help elucidate spatial patterns of gene flow and levels of inbreeding in this species to aid its conservation.

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Sixteen Polymorphic Microsatellite Loci in the Golden Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lian; Xu, Haigen; Li, Hong; Wu, Jun; Ding, Hui; Liu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    We report the characterization of 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the golden apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, a pest registered in the list of “100 of the world’s worst invasive alien species”. The fast isolation by AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) of sequences containing repeats (FIASCO) method was used to isolate microsatellite loci, and polymorphism was explored with 29 individuals collected in an invasive region from China. These primers showed a number of alleles per locus ranging from three to 13. The ranges of observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.310–0.966 and 0.523–0.898, respectively. These microsatellite markers described here will be useful for population genetic studies of P. canaliculata. PMID:22016640

  4. Characterization of nuclear microsatellite markers for Rumex bucephalophorus (Polygonaceae) using 454 sequencing1

    PubMed Central

    Viruel, Juan; Ortiz, Pedro L.; Arista, Montserrat; Talavera, María

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Nuclear microsatellite markers were developed in Rumex bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis (Polygonaceae) to investigate its genetic diversity and structure. Methods and Results: Sixteen polymorphic microsatellite markers were obtained using 454 next-generation sequencing with di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats. The average number of alleles was 5.688 and 3.813 for R. bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis var. canariensis and var. fruticescens, respectively. Slightly higher levels of mean genetic diversity were found in var. canariensis (expected heterozygosity = 0.600) than in var. fruticescens (expected heterozygosity = 0.514). Cross-amplifications in related taxa within R. bucephalophorus showed good amplification and polymorphic patterns. Conclusions: These 16 novel nuclear microsatellite markers are the first in the genus Rumex and may serve as valuable tools to carry out studies on genetic diversity and structure as well as progeny studies. PMID:26697279

  5. A new approach to improve the scoring of mononucleotide microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Whipple, Amy V

    2011-03-01

    Mononucleotide microsatellites markers are useful for detecting genetic variation among individuals; however, scoring can be error-prone. We developed a new approach to improve the accuracy of allele scoring. A set of 14 mononucleotide microsatellite primers of the chloroplast were developed based on published Pinus spp. chloroplast genomes. Due to substantial scoring error for mononucleotide repeats≥10 bp, we included part of the microsatellite in the reverse primer to reduce slippage and improve the scoring of these polymorphic markers. For markers 10-20 bp, the error rate in scoring with this method has a binomial 95% confidence interval of 0.7-2.1%. These new primers provide variable chloroplast markers in species of subsection Cembroides and other Pinus spp. with more accurate assignment of the alleles. This approach can be used to improve the allele scoring of mononucleotide or dinucleotide repeats from nuclear and chloroplast genomes.

  6. The same but different: monomorphic microsatellite markers as a new tool for genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Alison G; dos Reis, Mauricio S

    2011-10-01

    The nucleotide variation at a microsatellite locus lacking length polymorphisms among its alleles was assessed to generate an informative tool for genetic analysis. From a set of microsatellite markers, a monomorphic microsatellite locus developed for the palm species Butia eriospatha was used to elucidate whether there are polymorphic sites in its flanking regions. DNA sequences ≈133 bp long were obtained. Aligned sequences show variation at 17 polymorphic sites with both insertions and nucleotide substitutions. Fourteen distinct sequences (alleles) among 22 individuals were identified. The percent sequence difference varied from 0.0 to 5%, indicating that there is significant variation among sequences. Due to significant levels of information and sequence diversity on a simple sequence repeat (SSR) locus of identical size, our study highlights that this molecular marker class can be a useful tool for population genetics and evolutionary studies for many plant species.

  7. Isolation and characterization of 12 microsatellite loci in soapbark, Quillaja saponaria (Quillajaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Letelier, Luis; Harvey, Nick; Valderrama, Aly; Stoll, Alexandra; González-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for the endemic Chilean tree Quillaja saponaria (Quillajaceae), a common member of the sclerophyllous Mediterranean forest, to investigate intraspecific patterns of genetic diversity and structure. Methods and Results: Using an enriched library, 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed in Q. saponaria. All loci consisted of dinucleotide repeats. The average number of alleles per locus was 5.3 (2–13), with a total of 64 alleles recorded in 39 individuals from three populations. Conclusions: The microsatellite markers described here are the first characterized for Q. saponaria. The polymorphic loci will be useful in studies of genetic diversity and genetic population differentiation in natural populations of this species. PMID:25995980

  8. Development of new microsatellite markers from Mango (Mangifera indica) and cross-species amplification.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Kundapura Venkataramana; Mani, Bellam Hanumantha-Reddy; Anand, Lalitha; Dinesh, Makki Ramachandra

    2011-04-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized to assess the genetic diversity among mango (Mangifera indica) cultivars and to test their amplification in closely related species. Thirty-six microsatellite (simple sequence repeats; SSR) loci were isolated by a microsatellite-enriched partial genomic library method. Primers designed for these loci were characterized using 30 diverse mango cultivars. The number of alleles ranged from 3 to 19 with an average of 9.2 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content values ranged from 0.185 to 0.920 with a mean of 0.687. The total value for the probability of identity was 2.42 × 10(-31). The newly identified SSRs would be useful in genetic diversity studies, finger-printing, and mapping. Loci from five related species, M. odorata, M. anadamanica, M. zeylanica, M. camptosperma, and M. griffithii, were successfully amplified using these SSR primers, showing their potential utility across species.

  9. New multilocus genotypes of Giardia lamblia human isolates.

    PubMed

    Faria, Clarissa Perez; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Dias, Gisele Silva; da Silva, Sidnei; Sousa, Maria do Céu

    2017-10-01

    Giardia lamblia is considered a species complex, whose members show little differences in their morphology, but have remarkable genetic variability. The aim of this study was to identify inter- and intra-assemblage genetic variation in G. lamblia among patients in Rio de Janeiro. The parasitological study was performed on faeces, and DNA was extracted from the samples which tested positive for G. lamblia. The genetic assemblages and subtypes were determined via multilocus sequence typing (MLST) using β-giardin, triose phosphate isomerase and glutamate dehydrogenase gene loci. Fourteen assemblage A samples were successfully genotyped at the three MLST loci (bg/tpi/gdh). Two previously identified multilocus genotypes were found (AII-1 and AII-4), and two novel multilocus genotypes are proposed (AII-8, profile A2/A2/A4; AII-9, profile A3/A2/A2). Sequence analysis showed that assemblage B isolates have a higher nucleotide variation than those from assemblage A. Novel assemblage B sequences are described and most (66.7%) have heterogeneous nucleotides, which prevent the definition of multilocus genotypes. This is the first time that MLST has been used to characterise G. lamblia isolates in human clinical samples from Rio de Janeiro. In addition, MLST has enabled the detection of novel subtypes in both assemblages and the description of two novel multilocus genotypes in assemblage A. This study provides new insights into the genetic diversity of assemblage A and shows that MLST should be used to characterise G. lamblia both in Brazil and globally. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeats in Cucumber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The whole genome sequence of the cucumber cultivar Gy14 was recently sequenced at 15× coverage with the Roche 454 Titanium technology. The microsatellite DNA sequences (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) in the assembled scaffolds were computationally explored and characterized. A total of 112,073 SSRs ...

  11. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci in the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knowlton, A.L.; Pierson, Barbara J.; Talbot, S.L.; Highsmith, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    GA- and CA-enriched genomic libraries were constructed for the intertidal sponge Halichondria panicea. Unique repeat motifs identified varied from the expected simple dinucleotide repeats to more complex repeat units. All sequences tended to be highly repetitive but did not necessarily contain the targeted motifs. Seven microsatellite loci were evaluated on sponges from the clone source population. All seven were polymorphic with 5.43??0.92 mean number of alleles. Six of the seven loci that could be resolved had mean heterozygosities of 0.14-0.68. The loci identified here will be useful for population studies.

  12. The number of alleles at a microsatellite defines the allele frequency spectrum and facilitates fast accurate estimation of theta.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2010-12-01

    Theoretical work focused on microsatellite variation has produced a number of important results, including the expected distribution of repeat sizes and the expected squared difference in repeat size between two randomly selected samples. However, closed-form expressions for the sampling distribution and frequency spectrum of microsatellite variation have not been identified. Here, we use coalescent simulations of the stepwise mutation model to develop gamma and exponential approximations of the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum, a distribution central to the description of microsatellite variation across the genome. For both approximations, the parameter of biological relevance is the number of alleles at a locus, which we express as a function of θ, the population-scaled mutation rate, based on simulated data. Discovered relationships between θ, the number of alleles, and the frequency spectrum support the development of three new estimators of microsatellite θ. The three estimators exhibit roughly similar mean squared errors (MSEs) and all are biased. However, across a broad range of sample sizes and θ values, the MSEs of these estimators are frequently lower than all other estimators tested. The new estimators are also reasonably robust to mutation that includes step sizes greater than one. Finally, our approximation to the microsatellite allele frequency spectrum provides a null distribution of microsatellite variation. In this context, a preliminary analysis of the effects of demographic change on the frequency spectrum is performed. We suggest that simulations of the microsatellite frequency spectrum under evolutionary scenarios of interest may guide investigators to the use of relevant and sometimes novel summary statistics.

  13. Development of microsatellite markers in Cratylia mollis and their transferability to C. argentea (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    López-Roberts, M. Cristina; de Queiroz, Luciano Paganucci; van den Berg, Cássio

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: This work aimed to develop microsatellite markers for Cratylia mollis as tools to assess its genetic diversity and structure and to evaluate their potential cross-amplification in related species. • Methods and Results: Microsatellite markers were developed using a microsatellite-enriched library and an intersimple sequence repeat library. From a set of 19 markers, 12 microsatellite loci were polymorphic and presented considerable variation in allele number (2–11), expected heterozygosity (0.226–0.883), and polymorphism information content per locus (0.212–0.870). Cross-amplification in C. argentea was successful in 16 loci, 12 of which were polymorphic (2–10 alleles). • Conclusions: The polymorphism of this set of microsatellite markers for C. mollis, as well as their successful cross-amplification in C. intermedia and C. bahiensis and their transferability to C. argentea, supports their use in future comparative studies to understand the mechanism involved in population divergence and speciation in the genus. PMID:25202484

  14. Bulk development and stringent selection of microsatellite markers in the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li-Jun; Li, Ze-Min; Wang, Ze-Hua; Zhu, Liang; Gong, Ya-Jun; Chen, Min; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled investigation of microsatellites on a genome-wide scale. Faced with a huge amount of candidates, the use of appropriate marker selection criteria is crucial. Here, we used the western flower thrips Frankliniella occidentalis for an empirical microsatellite survey and validation; 132,251 candidate microsatellites were identified, 92,102 of which were perfect. Dinucleotides were the most abundant category, while (AG)n was the most abundant motif. Sixty primer pairs were designed and validated in two natural populations, of which 30 loci were polymorphic, stable, and repeatable, but not all in Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) and linkage equilibrium. Four marker panels were constructed to understand effect of marker selection on population genetic analyses: (i) only accept loci with single nucleotide insertions (SNI); (ii) only accept the most polymorphic loci (MP); (iii) only accept loci that did not deviate from HWE, did not show SNIs, and had unambiguous peaks (SS) and (iv) all developed markers (ALL). Although the MP panel resulted in microsatellites of highest genetic diversity followed by the SNI, the SS performed best in individual assignment. Our study proposes stringent criteria for selection of microsatellites from a large-scale number of genomic candidates for population genetic studies. PMID:27197749

  15. Sporadic Breast Cancer Patients' Germline DNA Exhibit an AT-Rich Microsatellite Signature

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Cristi L.; McIver, Lauren J.; Tae, Hongseok; McCormick, John F.; Skinner, Michael A.; Hoeschele, Ina; Lewis, Cheryl M.; Minna, John D.; Boothman, David A.; Garner, Harold R.

    2011-01-01

    Using a custom CGH-like oligonucleotide array to measure the global microsatellite content in the genomes of 72 cancer, cancer-free, and high risk patient and cell line samples (56 germline DNA and 16 in tumor or tumor cell line DNA) we found a unique, reproducible, and statistically significant pattern of 18 motif-specific microsatellite families (out of 962 possible 1-6 mer repeats) in breast cancer patient germline and tumor DNA, but not in germline DNA of cancer-free volunteer controls or in breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations. These high-similarity A/T rich repetitive motifs were also more pronounced in the germlines and tumors of colon cancer tumor patients (3/6 samples) and microsatellite unstable colon cancer cell lines; however, germline DNA of sporadic breast cancer patients exhibited the largest global content shift for those motifs with extreme AT/GC ratios. These results indicate that global microsatellite variability is complex, suggest the existence of a previously unknown genomic destabilization mechanism in breast cancer patients' germline DNA, and warrant further testing of such microsatellite variability as a predictor of future breast cancer development. PMID:21319262

  16. Microsatellite abundance across the Anthozoa and Hydrozoa in the phylum Cnidaria.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ramos, Dannise V; Baums, Iliana B

    2014-10-27

    Microsatellite loci have high mutation rates and thus are indicative of mutational processes within the genome. By concentrating on the symbiotic and aposymbiotic cnidarians, we investigated if microsatellite abundances follow a phylogenetic or ecological pattern. Individuals from eight species were shotgun sequenced using 454 GS-FLX Titanium technology. Sequences from the three available cnidarian genomes (Nematostella vectensis, Hydra magnipapillata and Acropora digitifera) were added to the analysis for a total of eleven species representing two classes, three subclasses and eight orders within the phylum Cnidaria. Trinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeats were the most abundant motifs, followed by hexa- and dinucleotides. Pentanucleotides were the least abundant motif in the data set. Hierarchical clustering and log likelihood ratio tests revealed a weak relationship between phylogeny and microsatellite content. Further, comparisons between cnidaria harboring intracellular dinoflagellates and those that do not, show microsatellite coverage is higher in the latter group. Our results support previous studies that found tri- and tetranucleotides to be the most abundant motifs in invertebrates. Differences in microsatellite coverage and composition between symbiotic and non-symbiotic cnidaria suggest the presence/absence of dinoflagellates might place restrictions on the host genome.

  17. FANCJ is essential to maintain microsatellite structure genome-wide during replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Barthelemy, Joanna; Hanenberg, Helmut; Leffak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellite DNAs that form non-B structures are implicated in replication fork stalling, DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and human disease. Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited disorder in which mutations in at least nineteen genes are responsible for the phenotypes of genome instability and cancer predisposition. FA pathway proteins are active in the resolution of non-B DNA structures including interstrand crosslinks, G quadruplexes and DNA triplexes. In FANCJ helicase depleted cells, we show that hydroxyurea or aphidicolin treatment leads to loss of microsatellite polymerase chain reaction signals and to chromosome recombination at an ectopic hairpin forming CTG/CAG repeat in the HeLa genome. Moreover, diverse endogenous microsatellite signals were also lost upon replication stress after FANCJ depletion, and in FANCJ null patient cells. The phenotype of microsatellite signal instability is specific for FANCJ apart from the intact FA pathway, and is consistent with DSBs at microsatellites genome-wide in FANCJ depleted cells following replication stress. PMID:27179029

  18. Morphological and microsatellite diversity associated with ecological factors in natural populations of Medicago laciniata Mill. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Badri, Mounawer; Zitoun, Adel; Ilahi, Houcine; Huguet, Thierry; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2008-12-01

    Genetic variability in 10 natural Tunisian populations of Medicago laciniata were analysed using 19 quantitative traits and 12 polymorphic microsatellite loci. A large degree of genetic variability within-populations and among-populations was detected for both quantitative characters and molecular markers. High genetic differentiation among populations for quantitative traits was seen, with Q(ST) = 0.47, and F(ST) = 0.47 for microsatellite markers. Several quantitative traits displayed no statistical difference in the levels of Q(ST) and F(ST). Further, significant correlations between quantitative traits and eco-geographical factors suggest that divergence in the traits among populations may track environmental differences. There was no significant correlation between genetic variability at quantitative traits and microsatellite markers within populations. The site-of-origin of eco-geographical factors explain between 18.13% and 23.40% of genetic variance among populations at quantitative traits and microsatellite markers, respectively. The environmental factors that most influence variation in measured traits among populations are assimilated phosphorus (P(2)0(5)) and mean annual rainfall, followed by climate and soil texture, altitude and organic matter. Significant associations between eco-geographical factors and gene diversity, He, were established in five microsatellite loci suggesting that these simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are not necessarily biologically neutral.

  19. Radiation hybrid mapping of 304 novel microsatellites in the domestic cat genome.

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, M; David, V A; Agarwala, R; Schäffer, A A; Stephens, R; O'Brien, S J; Murphy, W J

    2003-01-01

    Effective utilization of the domestic cat as an animal model for hereditary and infectious disease requires the development and implementation of high quality gene maps incorporating microsatellites and conserved coding gene markers. Previous feline linkage and radiation hybrid maps have lacked sufficient microsatellite coverage on all chromosomes to make effective use of full genome scans. Here we report the isolation and genomic mapping of 304 novel polymorphic repeat loci in the feline genome. The new loci were mapped in the domestic cat radiation hybrid panel using an automated fluorescent TAQ-Man based assay. The addition of these 304 microsatellites brings the total number of microsatellites mapped in the feline genome to 580, and the total number of loci placed onto the RH map to 1,126. Microsatellites now span every autosome with an average spacing of roughly one polymorphic STR every five centimorgans, and full genome coverage of one marker every 2.7 megabases. These loci now provide a useful tool for undertaking full-genome scans to identify genes associated with phenotypes of interest, such as those relating to hereditary disease, coat color, patterning and morphology. These resources can also be extended to the remaining 36 species of the cat family for population genetic and evolutionary genomic analyses.

  20. Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, C. Richard; Goel, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a hypermutable phenotype caused by the loss of DNA mismatch repair activity. MSI is detected in about 15% of all colorectal cancers; 3% are of these are associated with Lynch syndrome and the other 12% are caused by sporadic, acquired hypermethylation of the promoter of the MLH1 gene, which occurs in tumors with the CpG island methylator phenotype. Colorectal tumors with MSI have distinctive features, including a tendency to arise in the proximal colon, lymphocytic infiltrate, and a poorly differentiated, mucinous or signet ring appearance. They have a slightly better prognosis than colorectal tumors without MSI and do not have the same response to chemotherapeutics. Discovery of MSI in colorectal tumors has increased awareness of the diversity of colorectal cancers and implications for specialized management of patients. PMID:20420947

  1. Passive cryocooler for microsatellite payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Mayes; Thomas, Paul J.; Harron, John W.; Duggan, Philip; Sinclair, Peter M.; Khanna, Shyam M.

    1998-11-01

    A passive cryocooler has been developed for the cooling of small payloads to temperatures as low as 145 K. Although designed for a specific electronics experiment on the STRV-1d microsatellite, the device is suitable for a wide range of applications. The cryocooler uses coated surfaces for tailored radiative cooling. Mechanical support between components is provided by fiberglass struts. The measured end temperature reached is 151 K in a liquid nitrogen dewar which extrapolates to an end temperature of lower than 145 K in space. Thermal vacuum testing and random vibration testing at levels consistent with an Ariane 5 launch have been performed as part of formal qualification for the STRV mission. In this paper, details of the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of the passive cryocooler are presented.

  2. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  3. Genome-wide mining and comparative analysis of microsatellites in three macaque species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sanxu; Hou, Wei; Sun, Tianlin; Xu, Yongtao; Li, Peng; Yue, Bisong; Fan, Zhenxin; Li, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Microsatellites are found in taxonomically different organisms, and such repeats are related with genomic structure, function and certain diseases. To characterize microsatellites for macaques, we searched and compared SSRs with 1-6 bp nucleotide motifs in rhesus, cynomolgus and pigtailed macaque. A total of 1395671, 1284929 and 1266348 perfect SSRs were mined, respectively. The most frequent perfect SSRs were mononucleotide SSRs. The most GC-content was in dinucleotide SSRs and the least was in the mononucleotide SSRs. Chromosome size was positively correlated with SSR number and negatively correlated with the relative frequency and density of SSRs. The GC content of chromosome SSRs were negatively correlated with relative frequency of SSRs and GC content of chromosome sequences. The features of microsatellite distribution in assembled genomes of the three species were greatly similar, which revealed that the distributional pattern of microsatellites is probably conservative in genus Macaca. The degenerated number of repeat motifs was found to be different in pentanucleotide and hexanucleotide repeats. Species-specific motifs for each macaque were significantly underrepresented. Overall, SSR frequencies of each chromosome in rhesus macaque were higher than in cynomolgus macaque. The maximum repeat times of mono- to pentanucleotide repeats in cynomolgus macaque was more than other two macaques. These results emphasize the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship of genus Macaca species. Our data will be beneficial for comparative genome mapping, understanding the distribution of SSRs and genome structure between these animal models, and provide a foundation for further development and identification of more macaque-specific SSRs.

  4. STAMP: Extensions to the STADEN sequence analysis package for high throughput interactive microsatellite marker design.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Lars; Beszteri, Bánk; Gäbler-Schwarz, Steffi; Held, Christoph; Leese, Florian; Mayer, Christoph; Pöhlmann, Kevin; Frickenhaus, Stephan

    2009-01-30

    Microsatellites (MSs) are DNA markers with high analytical power, which are widely used in population genetics, genetic mapping, and forensic studies. Currently available software solutions for high-throughput MS design (i) have shortcomings in detecting and distinguishing imperfect and perfect MSs, (ii) lack often necessary interactive design steps, and (iii) do not allow for the development of primers for multiplex amplifications. We present a set of new tools implemented as extensions to the STADEN package, which provides the backbone functionality for flexible sequence analysis workflows. The possibility to assemble overlapping reads into unique contigs (provided by the base functionality of the STADEN package) is important to avoid developing redundant markers, a feature missing from most other similar tools. Our extensions to the STADEN package provide the following functionality to facilitate microsatellite (and also minisatellite) marker design: The new modules (i) integrate the state-of-the-art tandem repeat detection and analysis software PHOBOS into workflows, (ii) provide two separate repeat detection steps - with different search criteria - one for masking repetitive regions during assembly of sequencing reads and the other for designing repeat-flanking primers for MS candidate loci, (iii) incorporate the widely used primer design program PRIMER3 into STADEN workflows, enabling the interactive design and visualization of flanking primers for microsatellites, and (iv) provide the functionality to find optimal locus- and primer pair combinations for multiplex primer design. Furthermore, our extensions include a module for storing analysis results in an SQLite database, providing a transparent solution for data access from within as well as from outside of the STADEN Package. The STADEN package is enhanced by our modules into a highly flexible, high-throughput, interactive tool for conventional and multiplex microsatellite marker design. It gives the user

  5. Life on the rocks: Multilocus phylogeography of rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) from southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Maswanganye, K Amanda; Cunningham, Michael J; Bennett, Nigel C; Chimimba, Christian T; Bloomer, Paulette

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the role of geography and climatic cycles in determining patterns of biodiversity is important in comparative and evolutionary biology and conservation. We studied the phylogeographic pattern and historical demography of a rock-dwelling small mammal species from southern Africa, the rock hyrax Procavia capensis capensis. Using a multilocus coalescent approach, we assessed the influence of strong habitat dependence and fluctuating regional climates on genetic diversity. We sequenced a mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b) and two nuclear introns (AP5, PRKC1) supplemented with microsatellite genotyping, in order to assess evolutionary processes over multiple temporal scales. In addition, distribution modelling was used to investigate the current and predicted distribution of the species under different climatic scenarios. Collectively, the data reveal a complex history of isolation followed by secondary contact shaping the current intraspecific diversity. The cyt b sequences confirmed the presence of two previously proposed geographically and genetically distinct lineages distributed across the southern African Great Escarpment and north-western mountain ranges. Molecular dating suggests Miocene divergence of the lineages, yet there are no discernible extrinsic barriers to gene flow. The nuclear markers reveal incomplete lineage sorting or ongoing mixing of the two lineages. Although the microsatellite data lend some support to the presence of two subpopulations, there is weak structuring within and between lineages. These data indicate the presence of gene flow from the northern into the southern parts of the southern African sub-region likely following the secondary contact. The distribution modelling predictably reveal the species' preference for rocky areas, with stable refugia through time in the northern mountain ranges, the Great Escarpment, as well as restricted areas of the Northern Cape Province and the Cape Fold Mountains of South Africa

  6. Mechanisms of global diversification in the brown booby (Sula leucogaster) revealed by uniting statistical phylogeographic and multilocus phylogenetic methods.

    PubMed

    Morris-Pocock, J A; Anderson, D J; Friesen, V L

    2011-07-01

    Recent theoretical and empirical research suggests that statistical models based on coalescent theory can improve both phylogeographic and phylogenetic inference. An approach that involves elements of both statistical phylogeography (e.g. Isolation with Migration analyses) and multilocus phylogenetic inference (e.g. *beast) may be particularly useful when applied to populations with relatively old divergence times. Here, we use such an approach in the globally distributed brown booby (Sula leucogaster). We sampled 215 individuals from all major breeding areas and genotyped them at eight microsatellite and three nuclear intron loci. We found that brown booby populations were highly differentiated and that colonies can be grouped into four major genetic populations (Caribbean Sea, Central Atlantic Ocean, Indo-Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific). These populations apparently diverged in the absence of gene flow and, with one exception, currently exchange few to no migrants. The Eastern Pacific population diverged from all other populations approximately one million years ago [90% highest posterior density: 330,000-2,000,000 years ago] and exhibits a distinct male plumage, relative to other populations. However, recent gene flow from the Indo-Central Pacific into the Eastern Pacific appears to have occurred, suggesting that approximately one million years of genetic isolation and divergence in male plumage colour are not sufficient to prevent interbreeding. Gene flow following secondary contact of the Indo-Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific populations was not detected in previous mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) studies, and the contrast between the mtDNA results and our current results highlights the advantage of a multilocus phylogeographic approach. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Novel microsatellite markers for the high-alpine Geum reptans (Rosaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Elena; Kesselring, Halil; Stöcklin, Jürg; Armbruster, Georg F. J.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Geum reptans reproduces by outcrossing or by the formation of stolons. Sexual and clonal reproduction are not exclusive and occur mostly simultaneously. We developed novel microsatellite primers for this species, which will be used in a study about local adaptation, phenotypic plasticity, and random molecular divergence of alpine plants. • Methods and Results: Twelve microsatellite primer sets were developed for G. reptans, of which nine were polymorphic. Initially, the forward primers had an M13 tail, and the allelic signals of each locus were amplified using a single fluorescent-labeled M13 forward sequence. In the running phase, a multiplex PCR assay was developed using different fluorophore-labeled forward primers. Two to 11 alleles were found per locus, depending on the studied population. • Conclusions: Identical multilocus genotypes (i.e., clonal offspring) were not found because individuals in our sampling were at least 4 m distant from each other. FST–QST analysis will be applied to detect selection processes in populations of G. reptans across the Alps. PMID:25202633

  8. Population genetic structure of the tropical moss Acanthorrhynchium papillatum as measured with microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Leonardía, A A P; Tan, B C; Kumar, P P

    2013-03-01

    Mosses and other bryophytes are vital components of forests, because they sustain a tremendous diversity of invertebrates and influence significant ecological functions. There have been few studies on moss population diversity in Southeast Asia, despite the escalating deforestation in this region of rich biodiversity. The genetic diversity of the tropical moss Acanthorrhynchium papillatum (Harv.) Fleisch., collected from forested areas in Singapore and Peninsular Malaysia, was elucidated using eight microsatellite markers developed for this species. Significant levels of allelic and haplotypic diversity were observed among clumps of the moss. Differences in allelic richness and genotypic diversity among the populations were higher in less disturbed forests compared to the more disturbed areas, suggesting that genetic diversity is affected by habitat quality. Genetic diversity levels within the clumps studied were low, indicating that vegetative reproduction was more important within clumps than sexual reproduction. However, multilocus genotypes of samples within the clumps studied were not all alike, providing evidence of microsatellite mutation or of occasional sexuality. Despite the isolation of populations, A. papillatum can introduce genetic variability by mutation among vegetatively propagated individuals. This study provides baseline information on the genetic diversity of A. papillatum tropical rain forests.

  9. Hybridization between Crocodylus acutus and Crocodylus moreletii in the Yucatan Peninsula: II. Evidence from microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, David; Cedeño-Vázquez, José Rogelio; Forstner, Michael R J; Densmore, Llewellyn D

    2008-12-01

    Detecting and quantifying hybridization between endangered or threatened taxa can provide valuable information with regards to conservation and management strategies. Hybridization between members of the genus Crocodylus has been known to occur in captivity and in some wild populations. We tested for hybridization among wild populations of American crocodile (C. acutus) and Morelet's crocodile (C. moreletii) in the Yucatan Peninsula by comparing Bayesian assignment tests, based on microsatellite data, to mitochondrial and morphological assignments. Skin clips from 83 individuals were taken for genetic identification, and a total of 32 individuals (38.6%) exhibited some evidence of hybridization by combined morphological, mitochondrial and microsatellite analyses. The majority of hybrids were classified as F(2) hybrids and backcrosses to C. moreletii. Most of the introgression occurs in two national biosphere reserves located on the northern and eastern coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula. Preliminary tests did not find a significant decrease in hybridity across three life stages, thus far indicating a low level of selection against hybrids. Model-based analyses on multilocus genotypes of pure individuals returned little geographic partitioning in both C. acutus and C. moreletii. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Colonization of Ireland: revisiting 'the pygmy shrew syndrome' using mitochondrial, Y chromosomal and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, A D; Vega, R; Rambau, R V; Yannic, G; Herman, J S; Hayden, T J; Searle, J B

    2011-12-01

    There is great uncertainty about how Ireland attained its current fauna and flora. Long-distance human-mediated colonization from southwestern Europe has been seen as a possible way that Ireland obtained many of its species; however, Britain has (surprisingly) been neglected as a source area for Ireland. The pygmy shrew has long been considered an illustrative model species, such that the uncertainty of the Irish colonization process has been dubbed 'the pygmy shrew syndrome'. Here, we used new genetic data consisting of 218 cytochrome (cyt) b sequences, 153 control region sequences, 17 Y-intron sequences and 335 microsatellite multilocus genotypes to distinguish between four possible hypotheses for the colonization of the British Isles, formulated in the context of previously published data. Cyt b sequences from western Europe were basal to those found in Ireland, but also to those found in the periphery of Britain and several offshore islands. Although the central cyt b haplotype in Ireland was found in northern Spain, we argue that it most likely occurred in Britain also, from where the pygmy shrew colonized Ireland as a human introduction during the Holocene. Y-intron and microsatellite data are consistent with this hypothesis, and the biological traits and distributional data of pygmy shrews argue against long-distance colonization from Spain. The compact starburst of the Irish cyt b expansion and the low genetic diversity across all markers strongly suggests a recent colonization. This detailed molecular study of the pygmy shrew provides a new perspective on an old colonization question.

  11. Meaningful application of the new 454 large scale pyrosequencing technology (Roche GS-FLX 454) to the identification of microsatellites for small-scale research projects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Technical abstract: Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats are DNA sequences that consist of tandem repeats of 1-6 nucleotides. Because of high levels of polymorphism, ease to use and co-dominance, they are generally seen as the most pertinent markers to study at a fine scale level the genetic s...

  12. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    microsatellie loci had high or medium polymorphism in these Amur tigers and had high genetic diversity. At the same time, we only found even bases variability which showed the even bases repeat sequence (CA/GT) maybe the basic unit for length variability of microsatellite in all loci. In this study, the samples were made up of 75 hair specimens, 23 blood specimens and 15 tissue specimens, we obtained the genome DNA from hairs using the non-invasive DNA technology and demonstrated that DNA derived from hair samples is as good as that obtained from blood samples for the analysis of microsatellite polymorphism. These results imply that microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive DNA technology can help study the genetic diversity of Amur tiger. This method could be used in the captive management of other endangered species.

  13. Multilocus heterozygosity, parental relatedness and individual fitness components in a wild mountain goat, Oreamnos americanus population.

    PubMed

    Mainguy, Julien; Côté, Steeve D; Coltman, David W

    2009-05-01

    Matings between relatives lead to a decrease in offspring genetic diversity which can reduce fitness, a phenomenon known as inbreeding depression. Because alpine ungulates generally live in small structured populations and often exhibit a polygynous mating system, they are susceptible to inbreeding. Here, we used marker-based measures of pairwise genetic relatedness and inbreeding to investigate the fitness consequences of matings between relatives in a long-term study population of mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus) at Caw Ridge, Alberta, Canada. We first assessed whether individuals avoided mating with kin by comparing actual and random mating pairs according to their estimated genetic relatedness, which was derived from 25 unlinked polymorphic microsatellite markers and reflected pedigree relatedness. We then examined whether individual multilocus heterozygosity H, used as a measure of inbreeding, was predicted by parental relatedness and associated with yearling survival and the annual probability of giving birth to a kid in adult females. Breeding pairs identified by genetic parentage analyses of offspring that survived to 1 year of age were less genetically related than expected under random matings. Parental relatedness was negatively correlated with offspring H, and more heterozygous yearlings had higher survival to 2 years of age. The probability of giving birth was not affected by H in adult females. Because kids that survived to yearling age were mainly produced by less genetically related parents, our results suggest that some individuals experienced inbreeding depression in early life. Future research will be required to quantify the levels of gene flow between different herds, and evaluate their effects on population genetic diversity and dynamics.

  14. Prevalence and multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium andersoni in dairy cattle and He cattle in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Wang, Rongjun; Jing, Bo; Jian, Fuchun; Ning, Changshen; Zhang, Longxian

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni is the predominant species in post-weaned and adult cattle in China. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and understand the transmission of cattle cryptosporidiosis in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China, a total of 1827 fecal samples (436 from He cattle and 1391 from dairy cattle) were examined for the presence of C. andersoni-like oocysts by microscopy after Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The overall prevalence of C. andersoni-like was 3.8% (70/1827) and all the C. andersoni-like isolates were identified as C. andersoni at the SSU rRNA locus. Among the C. andersoni isolates, a total of 60 isolates were successfully characterized into eight multilocus sequence typing (MLST) subtypes using MLST analysis at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16), and three new subtypes were identified. The MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 showed a predominance and a wide distribution among the eight MLST subtypes obtained in the investigated areas. The MLST subtypes A2,A4,A2,A1 and A4,A5,A2,A1 showed a unique distribution in the investigated areas. A linkage disequilibrium analysis showed the presence of an epidemic population genetic structure of C. andersoni isolated from dairy and He cattle in Xinjiang. These findings provide new insights into the genetic structure of C. andersoni isolates and are also helpful to explore the infection source of C. andersoni in cattle in Xinjiang, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The first report of Cryptosporidium andersoni in horses with diarrhea and multilocus subtype analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Zhang, Jia; Zhao, Jingmin; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Longxian

    2015-09-22

    Horses interact with humans in a wide variety of sport competitions and non-competitive recreational pursuits as well as in working activities. Cryptosporidium spp are one of the most important zoonotic pathogens causing diarrhea of humans and animals. The reports of Cryptosporidium in horses and the findings of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species/genotypes show a necessity to carry out molecular identification of Cryptosporidium in horses, especially in diarrheic ones. The aim of the present study was to understand Cryptosporidium infection and species/genotypes in diarrheic horses, and to trace the source of infection of horse-derived Cryptosporidium isolates at a subtype level. Fecal specimens of 29 diarrheic adult horses were collected in Taikang County in northeastern China's Heilongjiang Province. Cryptosporidium oocysts were concentrated by Sheather's sugar flotation technique, and then examined by a bright-field microscope. Meanwhile, all the specimens were subjected to PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium. C. andersoni isolates were further subtyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16). One and two Cryptosporidium-positive isolates were obtained in horses by microscopy and by PCR, respectively. The two C. andersoni isolates were identified by sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium. Both of them were identical to each other at the MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16 loci, and MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 was found here. This is the first report of C. andersoni in horses. The fact that the MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 was reported in cattle suggests a large possibility of transmission of C. andersoni between cattle and horses.

  16. Prevalence, risk factors and multilocus genotyping of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in farmed foxes (Vulpes lagopus), Northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Cong, Wei; Lou, Zhi-Long; Ma, Jian-Gang; Zheng, Wen-Bin; Yao, Qiu-Xia; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-02-05

    Microsporidiosis is a common disease in animals and humans around the world. Enterocytozoon bieneusi is the most common microsporidian species in humans. Many animal species may be a potential source of human microsporidiosis. However, information concerning prevalence and genotypes of E. bieneusi infection in farmed foxes (Vulpes lagopus) is scarce. Therefore, the present study examined prevalence, risk factors and genotypes of E. bieneusi in farmed foxes in northern China using a genetic approach. Of 302 fecal samples from farmed foxes, 37 (12.25%, 95% CI 8.55-15.95) were PCR-positive for E. bieneusi, and the prevalence was highly associated with the farming mode in that foxes raised outdoors (26.03% positive, 95% CI 18.91-33.15) had a significantly higher E. bieneusi prevalence than those raised indoors. Eleven internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotypes were identified among the positive samples: four known E. bieneusi genotypes (Peru 8, Types IV, CHN-DC1 and D) and seven novel genotypes (NCF1-NCF7). Genotype NCF2 was the commonest (n = 13) and was found in five farms across three provinces (Jilin, Heilongjiang and Hebei). All genotypes belonged to phylogenetic group 1. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analyses revealed additional diversity. These findings indicate the presence of zoonotic E. bieneusi infection in farmed foxes in northern China. This is also the first report of genotypes Peru8, CHN-DC1 and Type IV, and seven novel genotypes (NCF1-NCF7) in farmed foxes by ITS combining with microsatellite and minisatellite markers for the first time. The results will provide baseline data for preventing and controlling E. bieneusi infection in farmed foxes, other animals and humans.

  17. Development, inheritance, and linkage-group assignment of 60 novel microsatellite markers for the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Nicolas; Westenberger, Scott J; Mahaney, Susan M; Lindley, Peter; VandeBerg, John L; Samollow, Paul B

    2005-12-01

    Short-tandem-repeat (SSR) or microsatellite polymorphisms are some of the most extensively employed genetic markers in contemporary linkage mapping studies. To date, only a limited number of microsatellites have been isolated in the gray, short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica, a South American marsupial widely used for comparative biological and biomedical research. To increase the number of potentially useful mapping markers, we screened 2 microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries containing alternatively (CA)n or (GA)n repeats. A total of 184 clones were sequenced, from which 60 polymorphic microsatellite markers were successfully optimized. The efficiency of this enrichment protocol for M. domestica microsatellite isolation is discussed, and suggestions to improve the outcome are made. All 60 loci showed high allelic diversity, with allele numbers ranging from 2 to 10 in a subset of 33 unrelated animals. Normal Mendelian inheritance was confirmed for all loci by analyzing allelic segregation in 5 two-generation families. One microsatellite appeared to be X linked, and null alleles were found in 5 others. Two-point linkage analyses were implemented using the data on the 5 families, leading to the assignment of 59 of these loci to the existing linkage groups. The 60 novel microsatellites developed in this study will contribute significantly to the M. domestica linkage map, and further QTL mapping studies.

  18. Microsatellite marker development by partial sequencing of the sour passion fruit genome (Passiflora edulis Sims).

    PubMed

    Araya, Susan; Martins, Alexandre M; Junqueira, Nilton T V; Costa, Ana Maria; Faleiro, Fábio G; Ferreira, Márcio E

    2017-07-21

    The Passiflora genus comprises hundreds of wild and cultivated species of passion fruit used for food, industrial, ornamental and medicinal purposes. Efforts to develop genomic tools for genetic analysis of P. edulis, the most important commercial Passiflora species, are still incipient. In spite of many recognized applications of microsatellite markers in genetics and breeding, their availability for passion fruit research remains restricted. Microsatellite markers in P. edulis are usually limited in number, show reduced polymorphism, and are mostly based on compound or imperfect repeats. Furthermore, they are confined to only a few Passiflora species. We describe the use of NGS technology to partially assemble the P. edulis genome in order to develop hundreds of new microsatellite markers. A total of 14.11 Gbp of Illumina paired-end sequence reads were analyzed to detect simple sequence repeat sites in the sour passion fruit genome. A sample of 1300 contigs containing perfect repeat microsatellite sequences was selected for PCR primer development. Panels of di- and tri-nucleotide repeat markers were then tested in P. edulis germplasm accessions for validation. DNA polymorphism was detected in 74% of the markers (PIC = 0.16 to 0.77; number of alleles/locus = 2 to 7). A core panel of highly polymorphic markers (PIC = 0.46 to 0.77) was used to cross-amplify PCR products in 79 species of Passiflora (including P. edulis), belonging to four subgenera (Astrophea, Decaloba, Distephana and Passiflora). Approximately 71% of the marker/species combinations resulted in positive amplicons in all species tested. DNA polymorphism was detected in germplasm accessions of six closely related Passiflora species (P. edulis, P. alata, P. maliformis, P. nitida, P. quadrangularis and P. setacea) and the data used for accession discrimination and species assignment. A database of P. edulis DNA sequences obtained by NGS technology was examined to identify microsatellite repeats in

  19. MitoSatPlant: mitochondrial microsatellites database of viridiplantae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manjeet; Kapil, Aditi; Shanker, Asheesh

    2014-11-01

    Microsatellites also known as simple sequence repeats (SSRs) consist of 1-6 nucleotide long repeating units. The importance of mitochondrial SSRs (mtSSRs) in fields like population genetics, plant phylogenetics and genome mapping motivated us to develop MitoSatPlant, a repository of plant mtSSRs. It contains information for perfect, imperfect and compound SSRs mined from 92 mitochondrial genomes of green plants, available at NCBI (as of 1 Feb 2014). A total of 72,798 SSRs were found, of which PCR primers were designed for 72,495 SSRs. Among all sequences, tetranucleotide repeats (26,802) were found to be most abundant whereas hexanucleotide repeats (2751) were detected with least frequency. MitoSatPlant was developed using SQL server 2008 and can be accessed through a front end designed in ASP.Net. It is an easy to use, user-friendly database and will prove to be a useful resource for plant scientists. To the best of our knowledge MitoSatPlant is the only database available for plant mtSSRs and can be freely accessed at http://compubio.in/mitosatplant/. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Likelihoods of multilocus DNA fingerprints in extended families.

    PubMed Central

    Bockel, B; Nürnberg, P; Krawczak, M

    1992-01-01

    A concept for the application of complex pedigree analysis to multilocus DNA fingerprinting is described. By following this approach, the extent to which the DNA fingerprints of grandparents influence the phenotype likelihoods of their offspring was determined. It was demonstrated by simulation that approximately 90% of paternity disputes can be solved if mother, child, and paternal grandparents, instead of the putative father, are tested. If only phenotype information on a single paternal sib is allowed for, true paternity will be detected with reasonable persuasive power in up to 64% of cases. Exclusion of false paternity remains possible for 40% of cases. Finally, the analysis concept is modified by reducing the number of genotype variations considered in likelihood computations. This time-saving procedure is shown to yield sufficiently accurate likelihoods in the analysis of both simulation data and multilocus DNA fingerprints obtained in two large families. PMID:1496987

  1. Gametogenesis processes and multilocus gene identity by descent.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S. W.

    1996-01-01

    With few exceptions, the determination of unconditional probability of genes shared identical by descent (IBD) by relatives can be very difficult, especially if the relationship is complex or if multiple loci are involved. It is particularly difficult if one needs the IBD probability in a explicit form, expressed in terms of interlocus recombination fractions. In this paper, I will further extend the concept of gametogenesis process introduced elsewhere and indicate that it completely determines the gene IBD events of interest in pedigrees. I will demonstrate that the gametogenesis process not only serves as a convenient conceptual framework in considering IBD events in pedigrees but also provides a simple yet powerful tool to solve a wide range of seemingly difficult problems. In particular, I consider the problem of multilocus IBD probability for relative pairs, k siblings, and a group of pedigree members. In addition, I consider the problem of multilocus autozygosity probability and the problem of gene preservation in close relatives. PMID:8571968

  2. A multilocus sequence typing scheme for Streptococcus pneumoniae: identification of clones associated with serious invasive disease.

    PubMed

    Enright, M C; Spratt, B G

    1998-11-01

    The population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae is poorly understood. Most of the important issues could be addressed by the molecular characterization of large, well sampled populations from carriage and from the different manifestations of pneumococcal disease. The authors have therefore developed a pneumococcal multilocus sequence typing scheme and database by sequencing approximately 450 bp fragments of seven housekeeping loci from 295 isolates. The combination of alleles at the seven loci provided an allelic profile, or sequence type (ST), and the relatedness between isolates was obtained by constructing a dendrogram from the matrix of pairwise differences between STs. The typing scheme was validated using pneumococci of known genetic relatedness and could resolve >6 billion STs. Among 274 isolates from recent cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in eight countries, 143 STs were resolved, but 12 STs contained at least five isolates (range 5-21 isolates). The repeated recovery of indistinguishable isolates from invasive disease in different countries implies that these STs define strains with an increased capacity to cause invasive disease. The relationship between STs and serotypes suggested that, in the longer term, capsular genes have been distributed horizontally within the pneumococcal population, but in the short term, expansion of clones occurs with only occasional changes of serotype. The multilocus sequence typing scheme provides a powerful new approach to the characterization of pneumococci, since it provides molecular typing data that are electronically portable between laboratories, and which can be used to probe aspects of the population and evolutionary biology of these organisms. A Web site for the molecular characterization of pneumococci by MLST is available (http ://mlst.zoo.ox.ac.uk).

  3. Microsatellites as targets of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2013-02-01

    The ability to survey polymorphism on a genomic scale has enabled genome-wide scans for the targets of natural selection. Theory that connects patterns of genetic variation to evidence of natural selection most often assumes a diallelic locus and no recurrent mutation. Although these assumptions are suitable to selection that targets single nucleotide variants, fundamentally different types of mutation generate abundant polymorphism in genomes. Moreover, recent empirical results suggest that mutationally complex, multiallelic loci including microsatellites and copy number variants are sometimes targeted by natural selection. Given their abundance, the lack of inference methods tailored to the mutational peculiarities of these types of loci represents a notable gap in our ability to interrogate genomes for signatures of natural selection. Previous theoretical investigations of mutation-selection balance at multiallelic loci include assumptions that limit their application to inference from empirical data. Focusing on microsatellites, we assess the dynamics and population-level consequences of selection targeting mutationally complex variants. We develop general models of a multiallelic fitness surface, a realistic model of microsatellite mutation, and an efficient simulation algorithm. Using these tools, we explore mutation-selection-drift equilibrium at microsatellites and investigate the mutational history and selective regime of the microsatellite that causes Friedreich's ataxia. We characterize microsatellite selective events by their duration and cost, note similarities to sweeps from standing point variation, and conclude that it is premature to label microsatellites as ubiquitous agents of efficient adaptive change. Together, our models and simulation algorithm provide a powerful framework for statistical inference, which can be used to test the neutrality of microsatellites and other multiallelic variants.

  4. Microsatellites as Targets of Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Haasl, Ryan J.; Payseur, Bret A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to survey polymorphism on a genomic scale has enabled genome-wide scans for the targets of natural selection. Theory that connects patterns of genetic variation to evidence of natural selection most often assumes a diallelic locus and no recurrent mutation. Although these assumptions are suitable to selection that targets single nucleotide variants, fundamentally different types of mutation generate abundant polymorphism in genomes. Moreover, recent empirical results suggest that mutationally complex, multiallelic loci including microsatellites and copy number variants are sometimes targeted by natural selection. Given their abundance, the lack of inference methods tailored to the mutational peculiarities of these types of loci represents a notable gap in our ability to interrogate genomes for signatures of natural selection. Previous theoretical investigations of mutation-selection balance at multiallelic loci include assumptions that limit their application to inference from empirical data. Focusing on microsatellites, we assess the dynamics and population-level consequences of selection targeting mutationally complex variants. We develop general models of a multiallelic fitness surface, a realistic model of microsatellite mutation, and an efficient simulation algorithm. Using these tools, we explore mutation-selection-drift equilibrium at microsatellites and investigate the mutational history and selective regime of the microsatellite that causes Friedreich’s ataxia. We characterize microsatellite selective events by their duration and cost, note similarities to sweeps from standing point variation, and conclude that it is premature to label microsatellites as ubiquitous agents of efficient adaptive change. Together, our models and simulation algorithm provide a powerful framework for statistical inference, which can be used to test the neutrality of microsatellites and other multiallelic variants. PMID:23104080

  5. Rapid Multi-Locus Sequence Typing Using Microfluidic Biochips

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-12

    Rapid Multi-Locus Sequence Typing Using Microfluidic Biochips Timothy D. Read1,2*, Rosemary S. Turingan3, Christopher Cook1, Heidi Giese3, Ulrich...sequencing of 6–8 housekeeping loci to assign unique sequence types. In this work we adapted MLST to a rapid microfluidics platform in order to...enhance speed and reduce laboratory labor time. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using two integrated microfluidic devices, DNA was purified from 100

  6. Major clades of Agaricales: a multilocus phylogenetic overview.

    Treesearch

    P. Brandon Matheny; Judd M. Curtis; Valerie Hofstetter; M. Catherine Aime; Jean-Marc Moncalvo; Zai-Wei Ge; Zhu-Liang Yang; Joseph F. Ammirati; Timothy J. Baroni; Neale L. Bougher; Karen W. Lodge Hughes; Richard W. Kerrigan; Michelle T. Seidl; Aanen; Matthew Duur K. DeNitis; Graciela M. Daniele; Dennis E. Desjardin; Bradley R. Kropp; Lorelei L. Norvell; Andrew Parker; Else C. Vellinga; Rytas Vilgalys; David S. Hibbett

    2006-01-01

    An overview of the phylogeny of the Agaricales is presented based on a multilocus analysis of a six-gene region supermatrix. Bayesian analyses of 5611 nucleotide characters of rpb1, rpb1-intron 2, rpb2 and 18S, 25S, and 5.8S ribosomal RNA genes recovered six major clades, which are recognized informally and labeled the Agaricoid, Tricholomatoid, Marasmioid, Pluteoid,...

  7. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) for Characterization of Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Ohmagari, Norio; Shimojima, Masahiro; Kirikae, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is an important emerging pathogen, which sometime causes respiratory infection, surgical site infection, urinary infection, sepsis, and outbreaks at neonatal units. We have developed a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme utilizing seven housekeeping genes and evaluated the performance in 101 clinical isolates. The MLST scheme yielded 83 sequence types (ST) including 78 novel STs found in the clinical isolates. These findings supported the robustness of the MLST scheme developed in this study. PMID:23776664

  8. Characterization of 10 new nuclear microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Klabunde, Gustavo H. F.; Olkoski, Denise; Vilperte, Vinicius; Zucchi, Maria I.; Nodari, Rubens O.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were identified and characterized in Acca sellowiana in order to expand the limited number of pre-existing polymorphic markers for use in population genetic studies for conservation, phylogeography, breeding, and domestication. • Methods and Results: A total of 10 polymorphic microsatellite primers were designed from clones obtained from a simple sequence repeat (SSR)–enriched genomic library. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with four to 27 alleles per locus. In all tested populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 1.0. • Conclusions: These new polymorphic SSR markers will allow future genetic studies to be denser, either for genetic structure characterization of natural populations or for studies involving genetic breeding and domestication process in A. sellowiana. PMID:25202632

  9. Characterization of 10 new nuclear microsatellite markers in Acca sellowiana (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Klabunde, Gustavo H F; Olkoski, Denise; Vilperte, Vinicius; Zucchi, Maria I; Nodari, Rubens O

    2014-06-01

    Microsatellite primers were identified and characterized in Acca sellowiana in order to expand the limited number of pre-existing polymorphic markers for use in population genetic studies for conservation, phylogeography, breeding, and domestication. • A total of 10 polymorphic microsatellite primers were designed from clones obtained from a simple sequence repeat (SSR)-enriched genomic library. The primers amplified di- and trinucleotide repeats with four to 27 alleles per locus. In all tested populations, the observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.269 to 1.0. • These new polymorphic SSR markers will allow future genetic studies to be denser, either for genetic structure characterization of natural populations or for studies involving genetic breeding and domestication process in A. sellowiana.

  10. Genetic evidence that both dNTP-stabilized and strand slippage mechanisms may dictate DNA polymerase errors within mononucleotide microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Baptiste, Beverly A; Jacob, Kimberly D; Eckert, Kristin A

    2015-05-01

    Mononucleotide microsatellites are tandem repeats of a single base pair, abundant within coding exons and frequent sites of mutation in the human genome. Because the repeated unit is one base pair, multiple mechanisms of insertion/deletion (indel) mutagenesis are possible, including strand-slippage, dNTP-stabilized, and misincorportion-misalignment. Here, we examine the effects of polymerase identity (mammalian Pols α, β, κ, and η), template sequence, dNTP pool size, and reaction temperature on indel errors during in vitro synthesis of mononucleotide microsatellites. We utilized the ratio of insertion to deletion errors as a genetic indicator of mechanism. Strikingly, we observed a statistically significant bias toward deletion errors within mononucleotide repeats for the majority of the 28 DNA template and polymerase combinations examined, with notable exceptions based on sequence and polymerase identity. Using mutator forms of Pol β did not substantially alter the error specificity, suggesting that mispairing-misalignment mechanism is not a primary mechanism. Based on our results for mammalian DNA polymerases representing three structurally distinct families, we suggest that dNTP-stabilized mutagenesis may be an alternative mechanism for mononucleotide microsatellite indel mutation. The change from a predominantly dNTP-stabilized mechanism to a strand-slippage mechanism with increasing microsatellite length may account for the differential rates of tandem repeat mutation that are observed genome-wide.

  11. Molecular Identification Key for Cultivars and Lines of Cornus florida and C. kousa Based on Microsatellite Loci

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida L.) and kousa dogwood (C. kousa Hance.) are popular ornamental species commonly used in the horticultural industry. Both trees are valued for their beautiful floral display and four season appeal. Species specific microsatellite (SSRs: simple sequence repeats) loci ...

  12. Multilocus inference of species trees and DNA barcoding

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented amount of data resulting from next-generation sequencing has opened a new era in phylogenetic estimation. Although large datasets should, in theory, increase phylogenetic resolution, massive, multilocus datasets have uncovered a great deal of phylogenetic incongruence among different genomic regions, due both to stochastic error and to the action of different evolutionary process such as incomplete lineage sorting, gene duplication and loss and horizontal gene transfer. This incongruence violates one of the fundamental assumptions of the DNA barcoding approach, which assumes that gene history and species history are identical. In this review, we explain some of the most important challenges we will have to face to reconstruct the history of species, and the advantages and disadvantages of different strategies for the phylogenetic analysis of multilocus data. In particular, we describe the evolutionary events that can generate species tree—gene tree discordance, compare the most popular methods for species tree reconstruction, highlight the challenges we need to face when using them and discuss their potential utility in barcoding. Current barcoding methods sacrifice a great amount of statistical power by only considering one locus, and a transition to multilocus barcodes would not only improve current barcoding methods, but also facilitate an eventual transition to species-tree-based barcoding strategies, which could better accommodate scenarios where the barcode gap is too small or inexistent. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481787

  13. Microsatellite characterization of Cimarron Uruguayo dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Rosa; Llambí, Silvia; García, Cristina; Arruga, María Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Various genetic markers, including microsatellites, have been used to analyze the genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in canine breeds. In this work, we used nine microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic variability in Cimarron Uruguayo dogs, the only officially recognized native canine breed in Uruguay. DNA from 30 Cimarron Uruguayo dogs from northeastern and southern Uruguay was analyzed. The allelic frequencies for each microsatellite, the genetic variability and the consanguinity were calculated, as were the polymorphic information content (PIC) and the probability of exclusion (PE). All of the microsatellites studied were polymorphic. FH 2361, FH 2305 and PEZ 03 were the most informative, with PIC values > 0.7, in agreement with results for other canine breeds. The PE values for the markers were within the ranges previously described and were generally greater for microsatellites with higher PIC values. The heterozygosity value (0.649) was considered high since only nine microsatellites were analyzed. Compared with data for other breeds, the results obtained here indicate that Cimarron Uruguayo dogs have high genetic diversity. PMID:21637561

  14. The report of my death was an exaggeration: A review for researchers using microsatellites in the 21st century1

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Richard G. J.; Segovia-Salcedo, M. Claudia; Landis, Jacob B.; Crowl, Andrew A.; Sun, Miao; Liu, Xiaoxian; Gitzendanner, Matthew A.; Douglas, Norman A.; Germain-Aubrey, Charlotte C.; Chen, Shichao; Soltis, Douglas E.; Soltis, Pamela S.

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), have long played a major role in genetic studies due to their typically high polymorphism. They have diverse applications, including genome mapping, forensics, ascertaining parentage, population and conservation genetics, identification of the parentage of polyploids, and phylogeography. We compare SSRs and newer methods, such as genotyping by sequencing (GBS) and restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq), and offer recommendations for researchers considering which genetic markers to use. We also review the variety of techniques currently used for identifying microsatellite loci and developing primers, with a particular focus on those that make use of next-generation sequencing (NGS). Additionally, we review software for microsatellite development and report on an experiment to assess the utility of currently available software for SSR development. Finally, we discuss the future of microsatellites and make recommendations for researchers preparing to use microsatellites. We argue that microsatellites still have an important place in the genomic age as they remain effective and cost-efficient markers. PMID:27347456

  15. Tandem repeat distribution of gene transcripts in three plant families

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Tandem repeats (microsatellites or SSRs) are molecular markers with great potential for plant genetic studies. Modern strategies include the transfer of these markers among widely studied and orphan species. In silico analyses allow for studying distribution patterns of microsatellites and predicting which motifs would be more amenable to interspecies transfer. Transcribed sequences (Unigene) from ten species of three plant families were surveyed for the occurrence of micro and minisatellites. Transcripts from different species displayed different rates of tandem repeat occurrence, ranging from 1.47% to 11.28%. Both similar and different patterns were found within and among plant families. The results also indicate a lack of association between genome size and tandem repeat fractions in expressed regions. The conservation of motifs among species and its implication on genome evolution and dynamics are discussed. PMID:21637460

  16. Nonradioactive sequence-tagged microsatellite site analyses: a method transferable to the tropics.

    PubMed

    Lagoda, P J; Dambier, D; Grapin, A; Baurens, F C; Lanaud, C; Noyer, J L

    1998-02-01

    Utilization of existing isozyme analysis facilities to detect sequence-tagged microsatellite site (STMS) polymorphism or any simple sequence repeat (SSR) variation is described. Different parameters concerning the difficulties in transferring molecular techniques to less sophisticated laboratory infrastructures (i.e. tropical outstations) are discussed (e.g. reproducibility, efficacy, precision). Nonradioactive STMS analysis is bound to foster collaborative research between "biodiversity" and "biotechnology" centers.

  17. Toward fully automated genotyping: genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution.

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, M W; Lancia, G; Ng, S K

    1995-01-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA)n repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. PMID:7485172

  18. (GTG)5 microsatellite regions in citrinin-producing Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Di Conza, José Alejandro; Nepote, Andrea Fabiana; González, Ana María; Lurá, María Cristina

    2007-03-01

    Morphological and cultural characteristics, as well as biochemical properties, are the main criteria used in fungal taxonomy and in the standard description of fungi species. Sometimes, however, this criterion is difficult to apply due to fungal phenotypic variations. This is particularly true in the genus Penicillium. The aims of this work were to determine (GTG)5 microsatellite sequence in potentially citrinin-producing Penicillium strains and to investigate if this sequence could be useful to characterize such fungi. Penicillium citrinum Thom and Penicillium chrysogenum Thom were isolated from different foods. The identification of the isolates at species level was carried out according to classical taxonomy. The production of citrinin was determined by thin layer chromatography. This study proved that microsatellite regions exist as short repeated sequences in all tested strains. The patterns were very similar for all P. citrinum isolates and it was possible to group them in function of the quantity of citrinin produced. Yet, not similar clusters were obtained when P. chrysogenum isolates were analyzed.

  19. FullSSR: Microsatellite Finder and Primer Designer.

    PubMed

    Metz, Sebastián; Cabrera, Juan Manuel; Rueda, Eva; Giri, Federico; Amavet, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are genomic sequences comprised of tandem repeats of short nucleotide motifs widely used as molecular markers in population genetics. FullSSR is a new bioinformatic tool for microsatellite (SSR) loci detection and primer design using genomic data from NGS assay. The software was tested with 2000 sequences of Oryza sativa shotgun sequencing project from the National Center of Biotechnology Information Trace Archive and with partial genome sequencing with ROCHE 454® from Caiman latirostris, Salvator merianae, Aegla platensis, and Zilchiopsis collastinensis. FullSSR performance was compared against other similar SSR search programs. The results of the use of this kind of approach depend on the parameters set by the user. In addition, results can be affected by the analyzed sequences because of differences among the genomes. FullSSR simplifies the detection of SSRs and primer design on a big data set. The command line interface of FullSSR was intended to be used as part of genomic analysis tools pipeline; however, it can be used as a stand-alone program because the results are easily interpreted for a nonexpert user.

  20. FullSSR: Microsatellite Finder and Primer Designer

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Sebastián; Cabrera, Juan Manuel; Rueda, Eva; Giri, Federico; Amavet, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are genomic sequences comprised of tandem repeats of short nucleotide motifs widely used as molecular markers in population genetics. FullSSR is a new bioinformatic tool for microsatellite (SSR) loci detection and primer design using genomic data from NGS assay. The software was tested with 2000 sequences of Oryza sativa shotgun sequencing project from the National Center of Biotechnology Information Trace Archive and with partial genome sequencing with ROCHE 454® from Caiman latirostris, Salvator merianae, Aegla platensis, and Zilchiopsis collastinensis. FullSSR performance was compared against other similar SSR search programs. The results of the use of this kind of approach depend on the parameters set by the user. In addition, results can be affected by the analyzed sequences because of differences among the genomes. FullSSR simplifies the detection of SSRs and primer design on a big data set. The command line interface of FullSSR was intended to be used as part of genomic analysis tools pipeline; however, it can be used as a stand-alone program because the results are easily interpreted for a nonexpert user. PMID:27366148

  1. Microsatellite interruptions stabilize primate genomes and exist as population-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms within individual human genomes.

    PubMed

    Ananda, Guruprasad; Hile, Suzanne E; Breski, Amanda; Wang, Yanli; Kelkar, Yogeshwar; Makova, Kateryna D; Eckert, Kristin A

    2014-07-01

    Interruptions of microsatellite sequences impact genome evolution and can alter disease manifestation. However, human polymorphism levels at interrupted microsatellites (iMSs) are not known at a genome-wide scale, and the pathways for gaining interruptions are poorly understood. Using the 1000 Genomes Phase-1 variant call set, we interrogated mono-, di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats up to 10 units in length. We detected ∼26,000-40,000 iMSs within each of four human population groups (African, European, East Asian, and American). We identified population-specific iMSs within exonic regions, and discovered that known disease-associated iMSs contain alleles present at differing frequencies among the populations. By analyzing longer microsatellites in primate genomes, we demonstrate that single interruptions result in a genome-wide average two- to six-fold reduction in microsatellite mutability, as compared with perfect microsatellites. Centrally located interruptions lowered mutability dramatically, by two to three orders of magnitude. Using a biochemical approach, we tested directly whether the mutability of a specific iMS is lower because of decreased DNA polymerase strand slippage errors. Modeling the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene sequence, we observed that a single base substitution interruption reduced strand slippage error rates five- to 50-fold, relative to a perfect repeat, during synthesis by DNA polymerases α, β, or η. Computationally, we demonstrate that iMSs arise primarily by base substitution mutations within individual human genomes. Our biochemical survey of human DNA polymerase α, β, δ, κ, and η error rates within certain microsatellites suggests that interruptions are created most frequently by low fidelity polymerases. Our combined computational and biochemical results demonstrate that iMSs are abundant in human genomes and are sources of population-specific genetic variation that may affect genome stability. The

  2. DNA Slippage Occurs at Microsatellite Loci without Minimal Threshold Length in Humans: A Comparative Genomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of microsatellite, or short tandem repeats (STRs), is well documented for long, polymorphic loci, but much less is known for shorter ones. For example, the issue of a minimum threshold length for DNA slippage remains contentious. Model-fitting methods have generally concluded that slippage only occurs over a threshold length of about eight nucleotides, in contradiction with some direct observations of tandem duplications at shorter repeated sites. Using a comparative analysis of the human and chimpanzee genomes, we examined the mutation patterns at microsatellite loci with lengths as short as one period plus one nucleotide. We found that the rates of tandem insertions and deletions at microsatellite loci strongly deviated from background rates in other parts of the human genome and followed an exponential increase with STR size. More importantly, we detected no lower threshold length for slippage. The rate of tandem duplications at unrepeated sites was higher than expected from random insertions, providing evidence for genome-wide action of indel slippage (an alternative mechanism generating tandem repeats). The rate of point mutations adjacent to STRs did not differ from that estimated elsewhere in the genome, except around dinucleotide loci. Our results suggest that the emergence of STR depends on DNA slippage, indel slippage, and point mutations. We also found that the dynamics of tandem insertions and deletions differed in both rates and size at which these mutations take place. We discuss these results in both evolutionary and mechanistic terms. PMID:20624737

  3. Development of microsatellite markers for the Korean Mussel, Mytilus coruscus (Mytilidae) using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    An, Hye Suck; Lee, Jang Wook

    2012-01-01

    Mytilus coruscus (family Mytilidae) is one of the most important marine shellfish species in Korea. During the past few decades, this species has become endangered due to the loss of habitats and overfishing. Despite this species' importance, information on its genetic background is scarce. In this study, we developed microsatellite markers for M. coruscus using next-generation sequencing. A total of 263,900 raw reads were obtained from a quarter-plate run on the 454 GS-FLX titanium platform, and 176,327 unique sequences were generated with an average length of 381 bp; 2569 (1.45%) sequences contained a minimum of five di- to tetra-nucleotide repeat motifs. Of the 51 loci screened, 46 were amplified successfully, and 22 were polymorphic among 30 individuals, with seven of trinucleotide repeats and three of tetranucleotide repeats. All loci exhibited high genetic variability, with an average of 17.32 alleles per locus, and the mean observed and expected heterozygosities were 0.67 and 0.90, respectively. In addition, cross-amplification was tested for all 22 loci in another congener species, M. galloprovincialis. None of the primer pairs resulted in effective amplification, which might be due to their high mutation rates. Our work demonstrated the utility of next-generation 454 sequencing as a method for the rapid and cost-effective identification of microsatellites. The high degree of polymorphism exhibited by the 22 newly developed microsatellites will be useful in future conservation genetic studies of this species.

  4. Identification and Evaluation of 21 Novel Microsatellite Markers from the Autumnal Moth (Epirrita autumnata) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae)

    PubMed Central

    Aarnes, Siv Grethe; Fløystad, Ida; Schregel, Julia; Vindstad, Ole Petter Laksforsmo; Jepsen, Jane Uhd; Eiken, Hans Geir; Ims, Rolf A.; Hagen, Snorre B.

    2015-01-01

    The autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) is a cyclically outbreaking forest Lepidoptera with circumpolar distribution and substantial impact on Northern ecosystems. We have isolated 21 microsatellites from the species to facilitate population genetic studies of population cycles, outbreaks, and crashes. First, PCR primers and PCR conditions were developed to amplify 19 trinucleotide loci and two tetranucleotide loci in six multiplex PCR approaches and then analyzed for species specificity, sensitivity and precision. Twelve of the loci showed simple tandem repeat array structures while nine loci showed imperfect repeat structures, and repeat numbers varied in our material between six and 15. The application in population genetics for all the 21 microsatellites were further validated in 48 autumnal moths sampled from Northern Norway, and allelic variation was detected in 19 loci. The detected numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.04 to 0.69 and 0.04 to 0.79, respectively. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found for six loci as well as indication of one null allele. We find that these novel microsatellites and their multiplex-PCR assays are suitable for further research on fine- and large-scale population-genetic studies of Epirrita autumnata. PMID:26393576

  5. Identification and Evaluation of 21 Novel Microsatellite Markers from the Autumnal Moth (Epirrita autumnata) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

    PubMed

    Aarnes, Siv Grethe; Fløystad, Ida; Schregel, Julia; Vindstad, Ole Petter Laksforsmo; Jepsen, Jane Uhd; Eiken, Hans Geir; Ims, Rolf A; Hagen, Snorre B

    2015-09-17

    The autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) is a cyclically outbreaking forest Lepidoptera with circumpolar distribution and substantial impact on Northern ecosystems. We have isolated 21 microsatellites from the species to facilitate population genetic studies of population cycles, outbreaks, and crashes. First, PCR primers and PCR conditions were developed to amplify 19 trinucleotide loci and two tetranucleotide loci in six multiplex PCR approaches and then analyzed for species specificity, sensitivity and precision. Twelve of the loci showed simple tandem repeat array structures while nine loci showed imperfect repeat structures, and repeat numbers varied in our material between six and 15. The application in population genetics for all the 21 microsatellites were further validated in 48 autumnal moths sampled from Northern Norway, and allelic variation was detected in 19 loci. The detected numbers of alleles per locus ranged from two to 13, and the observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.04 to 0.69 and 0.04 to 0.79, respectively. Evidence for linkage disequilibrium was found for six loci as well as indication of one null allele. We find that these novel microsatellites and their multiplex-PCR assays are suitable for further research on fine- and large-scale population-genetic studies of Epirrita autumnata.

  6. Construction of integrated genetic linkage maps of the tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) using microsatellite and AFLP markers.

    PubMed

    You, E-M; Liu, K-F; Huang, S-W; Chen, M; Groumellec, M L; Fann, S-J; Yu, H-T

    2010-08-01

    The linkage maps of male and female tiger shrimp (P. monodon) were constructed based on 256 microsatellite and 85 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Microsatellite markers obtained from clone sequences of partial genomic libraries, tandem repeat sequences from databases and previous publications and fosmid end sequences were employed. Of 670 microsatellite and 158 AFLP markers tested for polymorphism, 341 (256 microsatellite and 85 AFLP markers) were used for genotyping with three F(1) mapping panels, each comprising two parents and more than 100 progeny. Chi-square goodness-of-fit test (chi(2)) revealed that only 19 microsatellite and 28 AFLP markers showed a highly significant segregation distortion (P < 0.005). Linkage analysis with a LOD score of 4.5 revealed 43 and 46 linkage groups in male and female linkage maps respectively. The male map consisted of 176 microsatellite and 49 AFLP markers spaced every approximately 11.2 cM, with an observed genome length of 2033.4 cM. The female map consisted of 171 microsatellite and 36 AFLP markers spaced every approximately 13.8 cM, with an observed genome length of 2182 cM. Both maps shared 136 microsatellite markers, and the alignment between them indicated 38 homologous pairs of linkage groups including the linkage group representing the sex chromosome. The karyotype of P. monodon is also presented. The tentative assignment of the 44 pairs of P. monodon haploid chromosomes showed the composition of forty metacentric, one submetacentric and three acrocentric chromosomes. Our maps provided a solid foundation for gene and QTL mapping in the tiger shrimp.

  7. Transcriptome-Derived Tetranucleotide Microsatellites and Their Associated Genes from the Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Song, Xuhao; Shen, Fujun; Huang, Jie; Huang, Yan; Du, Lianming; Wang, Chengdong; Fan, Zhenxin; Hou, Rong; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2016-09-01

    Recently, an increasing number of microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have been found and characterized from transcriptomes. Such SSRs can be employed as putative functional markers to easily tag corresponding genes, which play an important role in biomedical studies and genetic analysis. However, the transcriptome-derived SSRs for giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) are not yet available. In this work, we identified and characterized 20 tetranucleotide microsatellite loci from a transcript database generated from the blood of giant panda. Furthermore, we assigned their predicted transcriptome locations: 16 loci were assigned to untranslated regions (UTRs) and 4 loci were assigned to coding regions (CDSs). Gene identities of 14 transcripts contained corresponding microsatellites were determined, which provide useful information to study the potential contribution of SSRs to gene regulation in giant panda. The polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.293 to 0.789 with an average of 0.603 for the 16 UTRs-derived SSRs. Interestingly, 4 CDS-derived microsatellites developed in our study were also polymorphic, and the instability of these 4 CDS-derived SSRs was further validated by re-genotyping and sequencing. The genes containing these 4 CDS-derived SSRs were embedded with various types of repeat motifs. The interaction of all the length-changing SSRs might provide a way against coding region frameshift caused by microsatellite instability. We hope these newly gene-associated biomarkers will pave the way for genetic and biomedical studies for giant panda in the future. In sum, this set of transcriptome-derived markers complements the genetic resources available for giant panda.

  8. Chloroplast microsatellite markers for Artocarpus (Moraceae) developed from transcriptome sequences.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Elliot M; Laricchia, Kristen M; Murphy, Matthew; Ragone, Diane; Scheffler, Brian E; Simpson, Sheron; Williams, Evelyn W; Zerega, Nyree J C

    2015-09-01

    Chloroplast microsatellite loci were characterized from transcriptomes of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and A. camansi (breadnut). They were tested in A. odoratissimus (terap) and A. altilis and evaluated in silico for two congeners. Fifteen simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified in chloroplast sequences from four Artocarpus transcriptome assemblies. The markers were evaluated using capillary electrophoresis in A. odoratissimus (105 accessions) and A. altilis (73). They were also evaluated in silico in A. altilis (10), A. camansi (6), and A. altilis × A. mariannensis (7) transcriptomes. All loci were polymorphic in at least one species, with all 15 polymorphic in A. camansi. Per species, average alleles per locus ranged between 2.2 and 2.5. Three loci had evidence of fragment-length homoplasy. These markers will complement existing nuclear markers by enabling confident identification of maternal and clone lines, which are often important in vegetatively propagated crops such as breadfruit.

  9. Identification and characterization of microsatellites from calafate (Berberis microphylla, Berberidaceae).

    PubMed

    Varas, Benjamín; Castro, María H; Rodriguez, Roberto; von Baer, Dietrich; Mardones, Claudia; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2013-07-01

    Southern barberry or calafate (Berberis microphylla) is a shrub species endemic to the Patagonian region of South America that is used for human consumption. The fruit is very rich in vitamin C and anthocyanins and has a very high antioxidant capacity. There have been only a few genetic studies of this and other closely related species. • Here we present the first 18 microsatellite markers of B. microphylla that were characterized using 66 accessions of calafate from Patagonia. On average, they had 7.6 alleles per marker, with an expected heterozygosity of 0.688. The informativeness of these markers was also evaluated in another 15 Berberis species, including most of the native and endemic Chilean species. • The results confirm that these new simple sequence repeat markers are very polymorphic and potentially useful in genetic studies in any species of the genus Berberis.

  10. Microsatellite markers derived from Calophyllum inophyllum (Clusiaceae) expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Setsuko, Suzuki; Uchiyama, Kentaro; Sugai, Kyoko; Hanaoka, So; Yoshimaru, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Robust markers are required (inter alia) for assessing origins of Calophyllum inophyllum populations on the Bonin Islands, Japan. Therefore, informative expressed sequence tag (EST)-based microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSRs) markers in the species were sought. Using 135378 ESTs derived from de novo pyrosequencing, primers for 475 EST-SSRs were developed, 48 of which were tested for PCR amplification. Thirty-six of the 48 primers showed clear amplification, with 23 displaying polymorphism in sampled populations. Expected heterozygosity in the samples from the Bonin Islands and Ryukyu Islands populations ranged from 0.041 to 0.697 and from 0.041 to 0.773, respectively. As EST-SSRs are potentially tightly linked with functional genes, and reportedly more transferable to related species than anonymous genomic SSRs, the developed primers have utility for future studies of the origins, genetic structure, and conservation of C. inophyllum and related species.

  11. The Unstable Repeats - Three Evolving Faces of Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David L.; Orr, Harry T.; Warren, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Disorders characterized by expansion of an unstable nucleotide repeat account for a number of inherited neurological diseases. Here, we review examples of unstable repeat disorders that nicely illustrate the three of the major pathogenic mechanisms associated with these diseases: loss-of-function typically by disrupting transcription of the mutated gene, RNA toxic gain-of-function, and protein toxic gain-of-function. In addition to providing insight into the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurological disorders, the study of these unstable microsatellite repeat disorders has provided insight into very basic aspects of neuroscience. PMID:23473314

  12. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in three genomes of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongmei

    2016-06-15

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites, which composed of tandem repeated short units of 1-6 bp, have been paying attention continuously. Here, the distribution, composition and polymorphism of microsatellites and compound microsatellites were analyzed in three available genomes of Candida species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata and Candida orthopsilosis). The results show that there were 118,047, 66,259 and 61,119 microsatellites in genomes of C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata and C. orthopsilosis, respectively. The SSRs covered more than 1/3 length of genomes in the three species. The microsatellites, which just consist of bases A and (or) T, such as (A)n, (T)n, (AT)n, (TA)n, (AAT)n, (TAA)n, (TTA)n, (ATA)n, (ATT)n and (TAT)n, were predominant in the three genomes. The length of microsatellites was focused on 6 bp and 9 bp either in the three genomes or in its coding sequences. What's more, the relative abundance (19.89/kbp) and relative density (167.87 bp/kbp) of SSRs in sequence of mitochondrion of C. glabrata were significantly great than that in any one of genomes or chromosomes of the three species. In addition, the distance between any two adjacent microsatellites was an important factor to influence the formation of compound microsatellites. The analysis may be helpful for further studying the roles of microsatellites in genomes' origination, organization and evolution of Candida species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microsatellite instability in sarcoma: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Monument, Michael J; Lessnick, Stephen L; Schiffman, Joshua D; Randall, Rl Tx

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a unique molecular abnormality, indicative of a deficient DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. Described and characterized in the colorectal cancer literature, the MSI-positive phenotype is predictive of disease susceptibility, pathogenesis, and prognosis. The clinical relevance of MSI in colorectal cancer has inspired similar inquisition within the sarcoma literature, although unfortunately, with very heterogeneous results. Evolving detection techniques, ill-defined sarcoma-specific microsatellite loci and small study numbers have hampered succinct conclusions. The literature does suggest that MSI in sarcoma is observed at a frequency similar to that of sporadic colorectal cancers, although there is little evidence to suggest that MSI-positive tumors share distinct biological attributes. Emerging evidence in Ewing sarcoma has demonstrated an intriguing mechanistic role of microsatellite DNA in the activation of key EWS/FLI-target genes. These findings provide an alternative perspective to the biological implications of microsatellite instability in sarcoma and warrant further investigation using sophisticated detection techniques, sensitive microsatellite loci, and appropriately powered study designs.

  14. Characterization of 24 microsatellite markers in 11 species of fire ants in the genus Solenopsis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Ascunce, Marina S; Bouwma, Andrew M; Shoemaker, Dewayne

    2009-11-01

    The social parasite ant Solenopsis daguerrei infests colonies of several mound-building fire ant species. Twenty-four microsatellite markers were isolated from a repeat-enriched genomic library of S. daguerrei. Eleven loci were polymorphic in this ant with two to six alleles per locus. Expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.0222 to 0.7940 among loci. Most microsatellites amplified successfully across the 11 Solenopsis species tested and will be useful for evolutionary genetic studies in this diverse ant group. Published 2009. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Characterization of 32 novel microsatellite loci for population and mating system studies using Campostoma anomalum (central stoneroller).

    PubMed

    Landis, J B; Hudman, S P; Grose, M J; Skalski, G T; Wiley, E O

    2009-01-01

    The central stoneroller (Campostoma anomalum) is an abundant, widespread and sexually dimorphic stream minnow that is a useful model for mating system studies as well as a sentinel species for understanding population-level processes for fishes in headwater communities. We developed one genomic library enriched for dinucleotide repeats and isolated 48 putative, novel microsatellite loci. Of those, we present 32 polymorphic and independent microsatellite markers with 3 to 16 alleles per locus and heterozygosity ranging from 0.23 to 0.95. Hence, these markers will be useful for future behavioural, ecological and evolutionary studies using C. anomalum. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    PubMed

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-07-30

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs.

  17. Genome-wide microsatellite identification in the fungus Anisogramma anomala using Illumina sequencing and genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guohong; Leadbetter, Clayton W; Muehlbauer, Megan F; Molnar, Thomas J; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has been dramatically accelerating the discovery of microsatellite markers (also known as Simple Sequence Repeats). Both 454 and Illumina reads have been used directly in microsatellite discovery and primer design (the "Seq-to-SSR" approach). However, constraints of this approach include: 1) many microsatellite-containing reads do not have sufficient flanking sequences to allow primer design, and 2) difficulties in removing microsatellite loci residing in longer, repetitive regions. In the current study, we applied the novel "Seq-Assembly-SSR" approach to overcome these constraints in Anisogramma anomala. In our approach, Illumina reads were first assembled into a draft genome, and the latter was then used in microsatellite discovery. A. anomala is an obligate biotrophic ascomycete that causes eastern filbert blight disease of commercial European hazelnut. Little is known about its population structure or diversity. Approximately 26 M 146 bp Illumina reads were generated from a paired-end library of a fungal strain from Oregon. The reads were assembled into a draft genome of 333 Mb (excluding gaps), with contig N50 of 10,384 bp and scaffold N50 of 32,987 bp. A bioinformatics pipeline identified 46,677 microsatellite motifs at 44,247 loci, including 2,430 compound loci. Primers were successfully designed for 42,923 loci (97%). After removing 2,886 loci close to assembly gaps and 676 loci in repetitive regions, a genome-wide microsatellite database of 39,361 loci was generated for the fungus. In experimental screening of 236 loci using four geographically representative strains, 228 (96.6%) were successfully amplified and 214 (90.7%) produced single PCR products. Twenty-three (9.7%) were found to be perfect polymorphic loci. A small-scale population study using 11 polymorphic loci revealed considerable gene diversity. Clustering analysis grouped isolates of this fungus into two clades in accordance with their geographic origins. Thus, the

  18. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium

    PubMed Central

    Pajuelo, Mónica J.; Eguiluz, María; Dahlstrom, Eric; Requena, David; Guzmán, Frank; Ramirez, Manuel; Sheen, Patricia; Frace, Michael; Sammons, Scott; Cama, Vitaliano; Anzick, Sarah; Bruno, Dan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Wilkins, Patricia; Nash, Theodore; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Porcella, Steve; Zimic, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen. Methods For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples. Results The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome) T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt) were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites. Conclusions/Significance The availability of draft

  19. Identification and Characterization of Microsatellite Markers Derived from the Whole Genome Analysis of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Pajuelo, Mónica J; Eguiluz, María; Dahlstrom, Eric; Requena, David; Guzmán, Frank; Ramirez, Manuel; Sheen, Patricia; Frace, Michael; Sammons, Scott; Cama, Vitaliano; Anzick, Sarah; Bruno, Dan; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Wilkins, Patricia; Nash, Theodore; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H; Gilman, Robert H; Porcella, Steve; Zimic, Mirko

    2015-12-01

    Infections with Taenia solium are the most common cause of adult acquired seizures worldwide, and are the leading cause of epilepsy in developing countries. A better understanding of the genetic diversity of T. solium will improve parasite diagnostics and transmission pathways in endemic areas thereby facilitating the design of future control measures and interventions. Microsatellite markers are useful genome features, which enable strain typing and identification in complex pathogen genomes. Here we describe microsatellite identification and characterization in T. solium, providing information that will assist in global efforts to control this important pathogen. For genome sequencing, T. solium cysts and proglottids were collected from Huancayo and Puno in Peru, respectively. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly, we assembled two draft genomes and one hybrid genome. Microsatellite sequences were identified and 36 of them were selected for further analysis. Twenty T. solium isolates were collected from Tumbes in the northern region, and twenty from Puno in the southern region of Peru. The size-polymorphism of the selected microsatellites was determined with multi-capillary electrophoresis. We analyzed the association between microsatellite polymorphism and the geographic origin of the samples. The predicted size of the hybrid (proglottid genome combined with cyst genome) T. solium genome was 111 MB with a GC content of 42.54%. A total of 7,979 contigs (>1,000 nt) were obtained. We identified 9,129 microsatellites in the Puno-proglottid genome and 9,936 in the Huancayo-cyst genome, with 5 or more repeats, ranging from mono- to hexa-nucleotide. Seven microsatellites were polymorphic and 29 were monomorphic within the analyzed isolates. T. solium tapeworms were classified into two genetic groups that correlated with the North/South geographic origin of the parasites. The availability of draft genomes for T. solium represents a significant step

  20. Empirical evaluation reveals best fit of a logistic mutation model for human Y-chromosomal microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father-son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a maximum-likelihood approach to evaluate one of several single-step mutation models on the basis of the data. For five of the six loci considered, a novel logistic mutation model was found to provide the best fit according to Akaike's information criterion. This implies that the mutation probability at the loci increases (nonlinearly) with allele length at a rate that differs between upward and downward mutations. For DYS392, the best fit was provided by a linear model in which upward and downward mutation probabilities increase equally with allele length. This is the first study to empirically compare different microsatellite mutation models in a locus-specific fashion.

  1. Identification of microsatellites from an extinct moa species using high-throughput (454) sequence data.

    PubMed

    Allentoft, Morten; Schuster, Stephan C; Holdaway, Richard; Hale, Marie; McLay, Emma; Oskam, Charlotte; Gilbert, M Thomas; Spencer, Peter; Willerslev, Eske; Bunce, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Genetic variation in microsatellites is rarely examined in the field of ancient DNA (aDNA) due to the low quantity of nuclear DNA in the fossil record together with the lack of characterized nuclear markers in extinct species. 454 sequencing platforms provide a new high-throughput technology capable of generating up to 1 gigabases per run as short (200-400-bp) read lengths. 454 data were generated from the fossil bone of an extinct New Zealand moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes). We identified numerous short tandem repeat (STR) motifs, and here present the successful isolation and characterization of one polymorphic microsatellite (Moa_MS2). Primers designed to flank this locus amplified all three moa species tested here. The presented method proved to be a fast and efficient way of identifying microsatellite markers in ancient DNA templates and, depending on biomolecule preservation, has the potential of enabling high-resolution population genetic studies of extinct taxa. As sequence read lengths of the 454 platforms and its competitors (e.g., the SOLEXA and SOLiD platforms) increase, this approach will become increasingly powerful in identifying microsatellites in extinct (and extant) organisms, and will afford new opportunities to study past biodiversity and extinction processes.

  2. G-IMEx: A comprehensive software tool for detection of microsatellites from genome sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mudunuri, Suresh B; Kumar, Pankaj; Rao, Allam Appa; Pallamsetty, S; Nagarajaram, H A

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellites are ubiquitous short tandem repeats found in all known genomes and are known to play a very important role in various studies and fields including DNA fingerprinting, paternity studies, evolutionary studies, virulence and adaptation of certain bacteria and viruses etc. Due to the sequencing of several genomes and the availability of enormous amounts of sequence data during the past few years, computational studies of microsatellites are of interest for many researchers. In this context, we developed a software tool called Imperfect Microsatellite Extractor (IMEx), to extract perfect, imperfect and compound microsatellites from genome sequences along with their complete statistics. Recently we developed a user-friendly graphical-interface using JAVA for IMEx to be used as a stand-alone software named G-IMEx. G-IMEx takes a nucleotide sequence as an input and the results are produced in both html and text formats. The Linux version of G-IMEx can be downloaded for free from http://www.cdfd.org.in/imex PMID:21364802

  3. Evolution of hypervariable microsatellites in apomictic polyploid lineages of Ranunculus carpaticola: directional bias at dinucleotide loci.

    PubMed

    Paun, Ovidiu; Hörandl, Elvira

    2006-09-01

    Microsatellites are widely used in genetic and evolutionary analyses, but their own evolution is far from simple. The mechanisms maintaining the mutational patterns of simple repeats and the typical stable allele-frequency distributions are still poorly understood. Asexual lineages may provide particularly informative models for the indirect study of microsatellite evolution, because their genomes act as complete linkage groups, with mutations being the only source of genetic variation. Here, we study the direction of accumulated dinucleotide microsatellite mutations in wild asexual lineages of hexaploid Ranunculus carpaticola. Whereas the overall number of contractions is not significantly different from that of expansions, the within-locus frequency of contractions, but not of expansions, significantly increases with allele length. Moreover, within-locus polymorphism is positively correlated with allele length, but this relationship is due solely to the influence of contraction mutations. Such asymmetries may explain length constraints generally observed with microsatellites and are consistent with stable, bell-shaped allele-frequency distributions. Although apomictic and allohexaploid, the R. carpaticola lineages show mutational patterns resembling the trends observed in a broad range of organisms, including sexuals and diploids, suggesting that, even if not of germline origin, the mutations in these apomicts may be the consequence of similar mechanisms.

  4. Genetic polymorphism of Hucul horse population based on 17 microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Fornal, Agnieszka; Radko, Anna; Piestrzyńska-Kajtoch, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) loci, i.e. microsatellites are a class of genetic markers commonly used for population studies and parentage control. This study determined the usefulness of microsatellite markers recommended by International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) for identification and pedigree analysis in horses based on the example of Polish Hucul horse population (Equus caballus). The set of seventeen microsatellites loci was tested (AHT4, AHT5, ASB2, HMS2, HMS3, HMS6, HMS7, HTG10, HTG4, HTG6, HTG7, VHL20, ASB17, ASB23, CA425, HMS1, LEX3) for 216 individuals. All samples were genotyped and mean number of alleles per locus was estimated (7.00). Means of observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosity were calculated 0.7288 and 0.7027, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was similar to the results of research on Hucul horse population in another area of Carpathians Mountains. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) for analyses of seventeen microsatellite markers indicates the usefulness of this set of markers for Hucul horse parentage testing.

  5. CRISPR–Cas9-targeted fragmentation and selective sequencing enable massively parallel microsatellite analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, GiWon; Grimes, Susan M.; Lee, HoJoon; Lau, Billy T.; Xia, Li C.; Ji, Hanlee P.

    2017-01-01

    Microsatellites are multi-allelic and composed of short tandem repeats (STRs) with individual motifs composed of mononucleotides, dinucleotides or higher including hexamers. Next-generation sequencing approaches and other STR assays rely on a limited number of PCR amplicons, typically in the tens. Here, we demonstrate STR-Seq, a next-generation sequencing technology that analyses over 2,000 STRs in parallel, and provides the accurate genotyping of microsatellites. STR-Seq employs in vitro CRISPR–Cas9-targeted fragmentation to produce specific DNA molecules covering the complete microsatellite sequence. Amplification-free library preparation provides single molecule sequences without unique molecular barcodes. STR-selective primers enable massively parallel, targeted sequencing of large STR sets. Overall, STR-Seq has higher throughput, improved accuracy and provides a greater number of informative haplotypes compared with other microsatellite analysis approaches. With these new features, STR-Seq can identify a 0.1% minor genome fraction in a DNA mixture composed of different, unrelated samples. PMID:28169275

  6. Empirical Evaluation Reveals Best Fit of a Logistic Mutation Model for Human Y-Chromosomal Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father–son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analy