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Sample records for repeated-dose toxicity studies

  1. Single and 14-day repeated dose inhalation toxicity studies of hexabromocyclododecane in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Naining; Li, Lei; Li, Haishan; Ai, Wenchao; Xie, Wenping; Yu, Wenlian; Liu, Wei; Wang, Cheng; Shen, Guolin; Zhou, Lili; Wei, Changlei; Li, Dong; Chen, Huiming

    2016-05-01

    Limited toxicological information is available for hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD),a widely used additive brominated flame retardant. Inhalation is a major route of human exposure to HBCD. The aim of this study was to determine the acute inhalation toxicity and potential subchronic inhalation toxicity of HBCD in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to HBCD only through inhalation. The acute inhalation toxicity of HBCD was determined using the limit test method on five male and five female Sprague-Dawley rats at a HBCD concentration of 5000 mg/m(3). Repeated-dose toxicity tests were also performed, with 20 males and 20 females randomly assigned to four experimental groups (five rats of each sex in each group). There were three treatment groups (exposed to HBCD concentrations of 125,500, and 2000 mg/m(3)) and a blank control group (exposed to fresh air). In the acute inhalation toxicity study, no significant clinical signs were observed either immediately after exposure or during the recovery period. Gross pathology examination revealed no evidence of organ-specific toxicity in any rat. The inhalation LC50(4 h) for HBCD was higher than 5312 ± 278 mg/m3 for both males and females. In the repeated dose inhalation study, daily head/nose-only exposure to HBCD at 132 ± 8.8, 545.8 ± 35.3, and 2166.0 ± 235.9 mg/m(3) for 14 days caused no adverse effects. No treatment-related clinical signs were observed at any of the test doses. The NOAEL for 14-day repeated dose inhalation toxicity study of HBCD is 2000 mg/m(3). PMID:26929994

  2. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different β-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals.

  3. Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility.

    PubMed

    Dent, M P

    2007-08-01

    The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low NOAELs and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert

  4. Thirteen-week repeated dose toxicity study of wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Muto, Tomoko; Watanabe, Takao; Okamura, Miwa; Moto, Mitsuyoshi; Kashida, Yoko; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi

    2003-12-01

    Wormwood, Artemisia absinthium, is a very bitter plant, and its extract has been used as food additives such as seasonings for food and drinks. A 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of wormwood extract was performed in both sexes of Wistar Hannover (GALAS) rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups consisting of 10 males and 10 females each, and were given water containing 0, 0.125, 0.5, or 2% wormwood extract. All rats had survived at the end of the study, and no changes indicating obvious toxicities that are attributable to the treatment of wormwood extract were observed in the body weights, hematological and serum biochemical examinations, organ weights, and histopathological examinations. Based on the results of the present study, the NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of wormwood extract of Wistar Hannover rats was estimated to be 2% (equivalent to 1.27 g/kg/day in males and 2.06 g/kg/day in females) or more.

  5. Validation study of the combined repeated-dose toxicity and genotoxicity assay using gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Takeshi; Cho, Young-Man; Mizuta, Yasuko; Nohmi, Takehiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2015-05-01

    Transgenic rodents carrying reporter genes to detect organ-specific in vivo genetic alterations are useful for risk assessment of genotoxicity that causes cancer. Thus, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has established the guideline for genotoxicity tests using transgenic animals, which may be combined with repeated-dose toxicity studies. Here, we provide evidence to support equivalence of gpt delta and wild type (WT) rats in terms of toxicological responses to a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), and a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). gpt delta rats treated with DEHP showed similar increases in liver and kidney weights, serum albumin, albumin/globulin ratios, and incidence of diffuse hepatocyte hypertrophy compared to WT F344 and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. DEN-treated gpt delta rats showed equivalent increases in the number and area of precancerous GST-P-positive foci in the liver compared to WT rats. The livers of DEN-treated gpt delta rats also showed increased frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutations; such changes were not observed in DEHP-treated gpt delta rats. These results indicated that gpt delta rats (both F344 and SD backgrounds) showed comparable DEHP-induced toxicity and DEN-induced genotoxicity to those observed in WT rats. With regard to the administration period, the general toxicity of 1.2% DEHP was evident throughout the experimental period, and the genotoxicity of 10 p.p.m. DEN could be detected after 2 weeks of administration and further increased at 4 weeks. These results suggested that combined assays using gpt delta rats could detect both general toxicity and genotoxicity by the canonical 4-week administration protocol. Therefore, this assay using gpt delta rats would be applicable for risk assessment including early detection of genotoxic carcinogens and ultimately serve to reduce cancer risks in humans from environmental chemicals.

  6. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... addition, it can be used to provide initial information on possible effects on male and female reproductive... tests for repeated dose toxicity as described in § 799.9305 of this part and reproductive/developmental... in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...

  7. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition, it can be used to provide initial information on possible effects on male and female reproductive... tests for repeated dose toxicity as described in § 799.9305 of this part and reproductive/developmental... in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...

  8. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... addition, it can be used to provide initial information on possible effects on male and female reproductive... tests for repeated dose toxicity as described in § 799.9305 of this part and reproductive/developmental... in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...

  9. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... addition, it can be used to provide initial information on possible effects on male and female reproductive... tests for repeated dose toxicity as described in § 799.9305 of this part and reproductive/developmental... in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The...

  10. Repeated-Doses Toxicity Study of the Essential Oil of Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) in Swiss Mice

    PubMed Central

    Freire Rocha Caldas, Germana; Araújo, Alice Valença; Albuquerque, Giwellington Silva; Silva-Neto, Jacinto da Costa; Costa-Silva, João Henrique; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Wanderley, Almir Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) is found in abundance in Northeastern Brazil where it is used in traditional medicine to treat gastric disorders. Since there are no studies reporting the toxicity and safety profile of this species, we investigated repeated-doses toxicity of the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii (EOHM). Swiss mice of both sexes were orally treated with EOHM (100 and 500 mg/kg) for 30 days, and biochemical, hematological, and morphological parameters were determined. No toxicity signs or deaths were recorded during the treatment with EOHM. The body weight gain was not affected, but there was an occasional variation in water and food consumption among mice of both sexes treated with both doses. The hematological and biochemical profiles did not show significant differences except for a decrease in the MCV and an increase in albumin, but these variations are within the limits described for the species. The microscopic analysis showed changes in liver, kidneys, lungs, and spleen; however, these changes do not have clinical relevance since they varied among the groups, including the control group. The results indicate that the treatment of repeated-doses with the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii showed low toxicity in mice. PMID:24151521

  11. Acute toxicity and the 28-day repeated dose study of a Siddha medicine Nuna Kadugu in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuna Kadugu (NK), a Siddha medicine prepared from leaves and fruits of Morinda Pubescens, used for the treatment of various skin diseases. Though NK has been widely used for several decades, no scientific report was available on its safety. Present study was undertaken to demonstrate the oral toxicity of NK in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods Acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with minor modifications. In acute oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 2000mg/kg b.wt., p.o and animals were observed for toxic signs at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, 24 h and for next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose, the 28- day oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg b.wt./p.o/day. Two satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of NK. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Haematology, clinical biochemistry, electrolytes, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed with NK administration. In the repeated dose study, no significant differences in body weight changes, food / water intake, haematology, clinical biochemistry and electrolytes content were observed between control and NK groups. No gross pathological findings and difference in relative organ weights were observed between control and NK treated rats. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities with NK treatment. Conclusion Acute study reveals that the LD50 of NK is greater than 2000mg/kg, b.wt. in fasted female rats and can be classified as Category 5. 28-day repeated oral toxicity demonstrates that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level of NK is greater than 900 mg/kg b.wt./day, p.o in rats. There were no delayed effects

  12. Toxicity evaluation of zinc aluminium levodopa nanocomposite via oral route in repeated dose study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Hassan, Zurina; Tengku Azmi, Tengku Ibrahim; Hussein, Nor Fuzina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology, through nanomedicine, allowed drugs to be manipulated into nanoscale sizes for delivery to the different parts of the body, at the same time, retaining the valuable pharmacological properties of the drugs. However, efficient drug delivery and excellent release potential of these delivery systems may be hindered by possible untoward side effects. In this study, the sub-acute toxicity of oral zinc aluminium nanocomposite with and without levodopa was assessed using the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines. No sign or symptom of toxicity was observed in orally treated rats with the nanocomposite at 5 and 500 mg/kg concentrations. Body weight gain, feeding, water intake, general survival and organosomatic index were not significantly different between control and treatment groups. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (169 ± 30 U/L), 5 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (172 ± 49 U/L), and 500 mg/kg layered double hydroxides (LDH) nanocomposite (175 ± 25 U/L) were notably elevated compared to controls (143 ± 05 U/L); but the difference were not significant ( p > 0.05). However, the differences in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio of 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (0.32 ± 0.12) and 500 mg/kg LDH nanocomposite (0.34 ± 0.12) were statistically significant ( p < 0.05) compared to the control (0.51 ± 0.07). Histology of the liver, spleen and brain was found to be of similar morphology in both control and experimental groups. The kidneys of 500-mg/kg-treated rats with levodopa nanocomposite and LDH nanocomposite were found to have slight inflammatory changes, notably leukocyte infiltration around the glomeruli. The ultra-structure of the neurons from the substantia nigra of nanocomposite-exposed group was similar to those receiving only normal saline. The observed result has suggested possible liver and renal toxicity in orally administered levodopa intercalated

  13. A 4-week Repeated Dose Toxicity Study of Glycine in Rats by Gavage Administration

    PubMed Central

    Shibui, Yusuke; Miwa, Tadashi; Yamashita, Mayumi; Chin, Keigi; Kodama, Terutaka

    2013-01-01

    In order to examine the toxicity profile of glycine, an authorized food additive, a solution of glycine in water for injection was administered orally (via gavage) to male SD rats (Crl:CD(SD)) once daily for 4 weeks at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a volume of 10 mL/kg. Control animals received vehicle only. No animals died, and no glycine-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, water consumption, hematology, organ weight, gross pathological examination or histopathological examination. In urinalysis, daily urinary volume and urinary Cl excretion were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group, and urine pH and urinary protein showed lower trends in the glycine-treated groups. However, these changes were considered to be of little toxicological significance, because there were no histopathological changes in the kidneys or urinary bladder and no changes in other urinary parameters. As regards blood chemistry, phospholipids were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group. However, the increase was small and was not considered to be toxicologically significant. In conclusion, none of the animals in any of the glycine-treated groups showed changes that were considered toxicologically significant. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of glycine was estimated to be at least 2000 mg/kg/day under the conditions of this study. PMID:24526813

  14. A 4-week Repeated Dose Toxicity Study of Glycine in Rats by Gavage Administration.

    PubMed

    Shibui, Yusuke; Miwa, Tadashi; Yamashita, Mayumi; Chin, Keigi; Kodama, Terutaka

    2013-12-01

    In order to examine the toxicity profile of glycine, an authorized food additive, a solution of glycine in water for injection was administered orally (via gavage) to male SD rats (Crl:CD(SD)) once daily for 4 weeks at doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a volume of 10 mL/kg. Control animals received vehicle only. No animals died, and no glycine-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, water consumption, hematology, organ weight, gross pathological examination or histopathological examination. In urinalysis, daily urinary volume and urinary Cl excretion were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group, and urine pH and urinary protein showed lower trends in the glycine-treated groups. However, these changes were considered to be of little toxicological significance, because there were no histopathological changes in the kidneys or urinary bladder and no changes in other urinary parameters. As regards blood chemistry, phospholipids were significantly higher in the 2000 mg/kg/day dose group. However, the increase was small and was not considered to be toxicologically significant. In conclusion, none of the animals in any of the glycine-treated groups showed changes that were considered toxicologically significant. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level of glycine was estimated to be at least 2000 mg/kg/day under the conditions of this study. PMID:24526813

  15. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  16. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  17. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions. The definitions in section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... strains of young healthy adult animals should be employed. The females should be nulliparous and...

  18. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions. The definitions in section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... strains of young healthy adult animals should be employed. The females should be nulliparous and...

  19. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions. The definitions in section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... strains of young healthy adult animals should be employed. The females should be nulliparous and...

  20. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... indication of immunological effects and reproductive organ toxicity. (c) Definitions. The definitions in section 3 of TSCA and in 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laboratory Practice Standards apply to this section. The... strains of young healthy adult animals should be employed. The females should be nulliparous and...

  1. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dose level. If interim sacrifices are planned, the number should be increased by the number of animals.... Measurements of food consumption should be made at least weekly. If the test substance is administered via the... requirements of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C.......

  2. A 4-week Repeated dose Oral Toxicity Study of Mecasin in Sprague-Dawley Rats to Determine the Appropriate Doses for a 13-week, Repeated Toxicity Test

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eunhye; Lee, Jongchul; Lee, Seongjin; Park, Manyong; Song, Inja; Son, Ilhong; Song, Bong-Keun; Kim, Dongwoung; Lee, Jongdeok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we investigated the 4-week repeated-dose oral toxicity of gami-jakyak gamcho buja decoction (Mecasin) to develop safe treatments. Methods: In order to investigate the 4-week oral toxicity of Mecasin, we administered Mecasin orally to rats. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups of five male and five female animals per group: group 1 being the control group and groups 2, 3, and 4 being the experimental groups. Doses of Mecasin of 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution of 10 mL/kg was administered to the control group. We examined the survival rate, weight, clinical signs, and gross findings for four weeks. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the four groups. No significant changes in weights or food consumption between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. Serum biochemistry revealed that some groups showed significant decrease in inorganic phosphorus (IP) (P < 0.05). During necropsy on the rats, one abnormal macroscopic feature, a slight loss of fur, was observed in the mid dosage (1,000 mg/ kg) male group. No abnormalities were observed in any other rats. In histopathological findings, the tubular basophilia and cast of the kidney and extramedullary hematopoiesis of the spleen were found. However, those changes were minimal and had occurred naturally or sporadically. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion: During this 4-week, repeated, oral toxicity test of Mecasin in SD rats, no toxicity changes due to Mecasin were observed in any of the male or the female rats in the high dosage group. Thus, we suggest that the doses in a 13-week, repeated test should be 0, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg respectively. PMID:26998389

  3. Repeated dose 28-days oral toxicity study of Carica papaya L. leaf extract in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Afzan, Adlin; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Halim, Siti Zaleha; Rashid, Badrul Amini; Semail, Raja Hazlini Raja; Abdullah, Noordini; Jantan, Ibrahim; Muhammad, Hussin; Ismail, Zakiah

    2012-04-10

    Carica papaya L. leaves have been used in ethnomedicine for the treatment of fevers and cancers. Despite its benefits, very few studies on their potential toxicity have been described. The aim of the present study was to characterize the chemical composition of the leaf extract from 'Sekaki' C. papaya cultivar by UPLC-TripleTOF-ESI-MS and to investigate the sub-acute oral toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats at doses of 0.01, 0.14 and 2 g/kg by examining the general behavior, clinical signs, hematological parameters, serum biochemistry and histopathology changes. A total of twelve compounds consisting of one piperidine alkaloid, two organic acids, six malic acid derivatives, and four flavonol glycosides were characterized or tentatively identified in the C. papaya leaf extract. In the sub-acute study, the C. papaya extract did not cause mortality nor were treatment-related changes in body weight, food intake, water level, and hematological parameters observed between treatment and control groups. Some biochemical parameters such as the total protein, HDL-cholesterol, AST, ALT and ALP were elevated in a non-dose dependent manner. Histopathological examination of all organs including liver did not reveal morphological alteration. Other parameters showed non-significant differences between treatment and control groups. The present results suggest that C. papaya leaf extract at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in practical use in traditional medicine in Malaysia could be considered safe as a medicinal agent.

  4. Influence of coefficient of variation in determining significant difference of quantitative values obtained from 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Sakuratani, Yuki; Abe, Takemaru; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Jun; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of coefficient of variation (CV) in determining significant difference of quantitative values of 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies, we examined 59 parameters of 153 studies conducted in accordance with Chemical Substance Control Law in 12 test facilities. Sex difference was observed in 12 parameters and 10 parameters showed large CV in females. The minimum CV was 0.74% for sodium. CV of electrolytes was comparatively small, whereas enzymes had large CV. Large differences in CV were observed for major parameters among 7-8 test facilities. The changes in CV were grossly classified into 11. Our study revealed that a statistical significant difference is usually detected if there is a difference of 7% in mean values between the groups and the groups have a CV of about 7%. A parameter with a CV as high as 30% may be significantly different, if the difference of the mean between the groups is 30%. It would be ideal to use median value to assess the treatment-related effect, rather than mean, when the CV is very high. We recommend using CV of the body weight as a standard to judge the adverse effect level.

  5. Screening study for repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity of rubber accelerator, N,N-dicyclohexyl-2-benzothiazolesulfenamide, in rats.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Ito, Yoshihiko; Matsumoto, Mariko; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi

    2007-01-01

    A screening study for a vulcanization accelerator N,N-dicyclohexyl-2-benzothiazole-sulfenamide (DCBS) was performed in rats. Rats were given DCBS by gavage daily at 0, 6, 25, 100, or 400 mg/kg. Males were dosed for a total of 44 days beginning 14 days before mating. Females were dosed for a total of 40-51 days beginning 14 days before mating to day 3 of lactation. Toxicologic changes were significantly noted only at 400 mg/kg. Three females died. An increased incidence of females showing decreased locomotor activity, soil of the lower abdominal fur, and reddish tears was observed. A lowered body weight was found in males and females. Increased urinary ketones and serum inorganic phosphorus and decreased serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase in males were found. Increased absolute and relative weights of the kidneys in males and decreased absolute weight of the thymus in both sexes were noted. Significant fatty degeneration of the renal tubular epithelia, vacuolation of the adrenocortical cells, and atrophy of the spleen were observed in females. Significant decreases in the gestation index, numbers of corpura lutea, implantations, pups born and pups born alive, live birth index, and viability index were detected. It is concluded that the No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAELs) for repeat dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity are 100 mg kg-1 day-1 in this screening study. PMID:17613004

  6. Collaborative work to evaluate toxicity on male reproductive organs by repeated dose studies in rats 19). Effects of two-week repeated dosing of enoxacin on the male reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Kizawa, K; Furubo, S; Sanzen, T; Kawamura, Y

    2000-10-01

    The toxicity of Enoxacin (ENX), a fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent, on the testis and epididymis was studied in rats. ENX was administered to 5 male rats orally once daily for 2 weeks at the dose level of 3000 mg/kg/day. ENX-treated rats showed a marked decrease in body weight, and two of them died on Day 10. At the end of the dosing period, absolute weights of the epididymis were decreased; in contrast, relative weights of testis were increased in the ENX-treated group. On histopathological examination, testis of ENX-treated rats exhibited the following regressive changes: degeneration of spermatids and spermatocytes, retention of Step 19 spermatids, chromatin margination in nuclei of spermatids, multinucleated giant cell formation, and/or vacuolar degeneration of Sertoli cells. Additionally, desquamated cell debris was observed in the epididymis. Degenerative spermatids and spermatocytes were strongly positive by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL). From these results, it is concluded that a 2-week treatment is sufficient to detect toxic effects of ENX on reproductive organs in male rats, and that testicular toxicity induced by ENX is associated with germ cell apoptosis.

  7. Proposal of an in silico profiler for categorisation of repeat dose toxicity data of hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Nelms, M D; Ates, G; Madden, J C; Vinken, M; Cronin, M T D; Rogiers, V; Enoch, S J

    2015-05-01

    This study outlines the analysis of 94 chemicals with repeat dose toxicity data taken from Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety opinions for commonly used hair dyes in the European Union. Structural similarity was applied to group these chemicals into categories. Subsequent mechanistic analysis suggested that toxicity to mitochondria is potentially a key driver of repeat dose toxicity for chemicals within each of the categories. The mechanistic hypothesis allowed for an in silico profiler consisting of four mechanism-based structural alerts to be proposed. These structural alerts related to a number of important chemical classes such as quinones, anthraquinones, substituted nitrobenzenes and aromatic azos. This in silico profiler is intended for grouping chemicals into mechanism-based categories within the adverse outcome pathway paradigm. PMID:24888375

  8. The relationship between repeat-dose toxicity and aromatic-ring class profile of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Roth, Randy N; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Gray, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    A study was undertaken within the context of the U.S. EPA HPV Chemical Challenge Program to (1) characterize relationships between PAC content and repeat-dose toxicities of high-boiling petroleum substances (HBPS) and (2) develop statistical models that could be used to predict the repeat-dose toxicity of similar untested substances. The study evaluated 47 repeat-dose dermal toxicity and 157 chemical compositional studies. The four most sensitive endpoints of repeat-dose toxicity were platelet count, hemoglobin concentration, relative liver weight and thymus weight. Predictive models were developed for the dose-response relationships between the wt.% concentration of each of seven ring classes of aromatic compounds (the "ARC profile") and specific effects, with high correlations (r=0.91-0.94) between the observed and model-predicted data. The development of the mathematical models used to generate the results reported in this study is described by Nicolich et al. (2013). Model-generated dose-response curves permit the prediction of either the effect at a given dose or the dose that causes a given effect. The models generate values that are consistent with other standard measures. The models, using compositional data, can be used for predicting the repeat-dose toxicity of untested HBPS.

  9. A 28-day repeat dose toxicity study of steroidal glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine in the Syrian Golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, Søren; Mandimika, Tafadzwa; Schrøder, Malene; Meyer, Otto; Slob, Wout; Peijnenburg, Ad; Poulsen, Morten

    2009-06-01

    Glycoalkaloids alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine are naturally present toxicants in the potato plant (Solanumtuberosum). Human intake of high doses of glycoalkaloids has led to acute intoxication, in severe cases coma and death. Previous studies have indicated that the ratio of alpha-solanine to alpha-chaconine may determine the degree and nature of the glycoalkaloid toxicity in potatoes, as the toxicity of the two alkaloids act synergistically. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an altered ratio of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine would reduce the toxicity of the glycoalkaloids. The Syrian Golden hamster was given daily doses of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine by gavage for 28 days. Doses of up to 33.3 mg total glycoalkaloids/kg body weight were applied in ratios of 1:3.7 and 1:70 (alpha-solanine:alpha-chaconine). Administration of the highest doses of both ratios resulted in distended and fluid filled small intestines and stomach. Animals receiving the ratio with the reduced content of alpha-solanine were less affected compared to those receiving the other ratio. Gene expression profiling experiments were conducted using RNA from epithelial scrapings from the small intestines of the hamsters administered the highest doses of the glycoalkaloid treatments. In general, more differential gene expression was observed in the epithelial scrapings of the hamsters fed the ratio of 1:3.7. Mostly, pathways involved in lipid and energy metabolism were affected by the ratio of 1:3.7.

  10. Repeated dose oral toxicity of Trivanga Bhasma in Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Jamadagni, Pallavi S.; Jamadagni, Shrirang B.; Singh, Rajendrakumar; Gaidhani, Sudesh N.; Upadhyay, Sachchidanand; Hazra, Jayram

    2013-01-01

    Trivanga Bhasma, a metallic preparation containing Bhasmas of Naga (lead), Vanga (tin) and Yashada (zinc), was studied for repeated dose toxicity in Swiss albino mice to estimate No Observed Effect Level (NOEL) or No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL). A total of 80 Swiss albino mice of either sex with an average body weight of 28-30 g were equally divided into four groups (Group I, II, III, and IV). Group I served as control and was given vehicle (honey: water in 2:3 ratio) Group II, III, and IV received Trivanga Bhasma @ 7.8, 39.5,and 78 mg/kg body weight for 90 consecutive days. The effect of drug was assessed on body weight, feed and water consumption changes, hematological, and histopathological parameters. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed and examined for gross pathological changes. Histopathological evaluation was performed for control and high dose group. Trivanga Bhasma was found to be safe. No significant clinical signs were noted in all groups studied. No major alterations were observed during histopathological evaluation. Hence, dose rate of 78 mg/kg body weight was established as NOAEL. It is suggested to carry out a toxicity study at possible higher doses and in a different species so as to establish target organ of toxicity. PMID:24049417

  11. A 90-day repeated dose oral (gavage) toxicity study of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) in rats (with functional observational battery and motor activity determinations).

    PubMed

    Chengelis, Christopher P; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie B; Radovsky, Ann; Shinohara, Motoki

    2009-06-01

    Possible toxic effects of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) were evaluated when administered orally by gavage to rats at levels up to 200mg/kg/day for 90 days. Lower body weight gains were noted in the 10, 50 and 200mg/kg/day group males (not dose-responsive) throughout dosing. Other changes included lower red blood cell parameters, higher reticulocyte counts and lower globulin in the 200mg/kg/day group males and females, higher liver enzymes in males at 50 and 200mg/kg/day, lower total protein and higher albumin/globulin ratio, and lower cholesterol, calcium in males at 200mg/kg/day. Minimal centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy was present in 200mg/kg/day group males and correlated with higher liver weights and slightly higher peroxisome beta oxidation activity at the end of the dosing period. Based on liver histopathology and liver weight changes, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for oral administration was 50mg/kg/day for males and 200mg/kg/day for females.

  12. The OSIRIS Weight of Evidence approach: ITS for the endpoints repeated-dose toxicity (RepDose ITS).

    PubMed

    Tluczkiewicz, Inga; Batke, Monika; Kroese, Dinant; Buist, Harrie; Aldenberg, Tom; Pauné, Eduard; Grimm, Helvi; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Escher, Sylvia E

    2013-11-01

    In the FP6 European project OSIRIS, Integrated Testing Strategies (ITSs) for relevant toxicological endpoints were developed to avoid new animal testing and thus to reduce time and costs. The present paper describes the development of an ITS for repeated-dose toxicity called RepDose ITS which evaluates the conditions under which in vivo non-guideline studies are reliable. In a tiered approach three aspects of these "non-guideline" studies are assessed: the documentation of the study (reliability), the quality of the study design (adequacy) and the scope of examination (validity). The reliability is addressed by the method "Knock-out criteria", which consists of four essential criteria for repeated-dose toxicity studies. A second tool, termed QUANTOS (Quality Assessment of Non-guideline Toxicity Studies), evaluates and weights the adequacy of the study by using intra-criterion and inter-criteria weighting. Finally, the Coverage approach calculates a probability that the detected Lowest-Observed-Effect-Level (LOEL) is similar to the LOEL of a guideline study dependent on the examined targets and organs of the non-guideline study. If the validity and adequacy of the non-guideline study are insufficient for risk assessment, the ITS proposes to apply category approach or the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) concept, and only as a last resort new animal-testing.

  13. Inhalation threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) - Structural alerts discriminate high from low repeated-dose inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schüürmann, Gerrit; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Tluczkiewicz, Inga; Escher, Sylvia E; Kühne, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    The threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) of a compound represents an exposure value below which the associated human health risk is considered negligible. As such, this approach offers assessing the risk of potential toxicants when little or no toxicological information is available. For the inhalation repeated-dose TTC, the goal was to derive structural alerts that discriminate between high- and low-toxic compounds. A further aim was to identify physicochemical parameters related to the inhalation-specific bioavailability of the compounds, and to explore their use as predictors of high vs low toxicity. 296 compounds with subacute, subchronic and chronic inhalation toxicity NOEC (no-observed effect concentration) values were subdivided into three almost equal-sized high-, medium- and low-toxic (HTox, MTox, LTox) potency classes. Whereas the derived 14 HTox and 7 LTox structural alerts yield an only moderate discrimination between these three groups, the high-toxic vs low-toxic mis-classification is very low: LTox-predicted compounds are not HTox to 97.5%, and HTox-predicted compounds not LTox to 88.6%. The probability of a compound being HTox vs LTox is triggered further by physicochemical properties encoding the tendency to evaporate from blood. The new structural alerts may aid in the predictive inhalation toxicity assessment of compounds as well as in designing low-toxicity chemicals, and provide a rationale for the chemistry underlying the toxicological outcome that can also be used for scoping targeted experimental studies.

  14. Inhalation threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) - Structural alerts discriminate high from low repeated-dose inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schüürmann, Gerrit; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Tluczkiewicz, Inga; Escher, Sylvia E; Kühne, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    The threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) of a compound represents an exposure value below which the associated human health risk is considered negligible. As such, this approach offers assessing the risk of potential toxicants when little or no toxicological information is available. For the inhalation repeated-dose TTC, the goal was to derive structural alerts that discriminate between high- and low-toxic compounds. A further aim was to identify physicochemical parameters related to the inhalation-specific bioavailability of the compounds, and to explore their use as predictors of high vs low toxicity. 296 compounds with subacute, subchronic and chronic inhalation toxicity NOEC (no-observed effect concentration) values were subdivided into three almost equal-sized high-, medium- and low-toxic (HTox, MTox, LTox) potency classes. Whereas the derived 14 HTox and 7 LTox structural alerts yield an only moderate discrimination between these three groups, the high-toxic vs low-toxic mis-classification is very low: LTox-predicted compounds are not HTox to 97.5%, and HTox-predicted compounds not LTox to 88.6%. The probability of a compound being HTox vs LTox is triggered further by physicochemical properties encoding the tendency to evaporate from blood. The new structural alerts may aid in the predictive inhalation toxicity assessment of compounds as well as in designing low-toxicity chemicals, and provide a rationale for the chemistry underlying the toxicological outcome that can also be used for scoping targeted experimental studies. PMID:26735350

  15. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: assessment of causality and dose in reported cases.

    PubMed

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L; Bond, G Randall; Clark, Richard F; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S; Dart, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study was to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years who were administered repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. We reviewed US Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reports, and US Manufacturer Safety Reports describing adverse effects after acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death after acetaminophen administration to children younger than 6 years were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supratherapeutic. Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Although we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death after repeated doses of acetaminophen, all the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses more than 75 mg/kg per day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg per day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years.

  16. Screening of repeated dose toxicity data present in SCC(NF)P/SCCS safety evaluations of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Vinken, Mathieu; Pauwels, Marleen; Ates, Gamze; Vivier, Manon; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2012-03-01

    Alternative methods, replacing animal testing, are urgently needed in view of the European regulatory changes in the field of cosmetic products and their ingredients. In this context, a joint research initiative called SEURAT was recently raised by the European Commission and COLIPA, representing the European cosmetics industry, with the overall goal of developing an animal-free repeated dose toxicity testing strategy for human safety assessment purposes. Although cosmetic ingredients are usually harmless for the consumer, one of the initial tasks of this research consortium included the identification of organs that could potentially be affected by cosmetic ingredients upon systemic exposure. The strategy that was followed hereof is described in the present paper and relies on the systematic evaluation, by using a self-generated electronic databank, of published reports issued by the scientific committee of DG SANCO responsible for the safety of cosmetic ingredients. By screening of the repeated dose toxicity studies present in these reports, it was found that the liver is potentially the most frequently targeted organ by cosmetic ingredients when orally administered to experimental animals, followed by the kidney and the spleen. Combined listing of altered morphological, histopathological, and biochemical parameters subsequently indicated the possible occurrence of hepatotoxicity, including steatosis and cholestasis, triggered by a limited number of cosmetic compounds. These findings are not only of relevance for the in vitro modeling efforts and choice of compounds to be tested in the SEURAT project cluster, but also demonstrate the importance of using previously generated toxicological data through an electronic databank for addressing specific questions regarding the safety evaluation of cosmetic ingredients.

  17. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general.

  18. The development of statistical models to determine the relationship between aromatic-ring class profile and repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Nicolich, Mark J; Simpson, Barry J; Murray, F Jay; Roth, Randy N; Gray, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of certain petroleum refinery streams are related to their polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) content (Feuston et al., 1994). Building on this foundation, and working within the context of the US EPA High Production Volume (HPV) Chemical Challenge Program, we: (1) characterized relationships between PAC content and repeat-dose and developmental toxicities of high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), and (2) developed statistical models that can be used to predict critical effects of similar untested substances. Data from 39 dermal toxicity studies of HBPS were used to develop statistical models to predict the dose-response relationships between the weight percent concentration of each of their 1-7 aromatic ring classes and 4 repeat-dose and 3 developmental endpoints (absolute thymus weight, hemoglobin count, platelet count, liver to body weight, live fetus count, fetal weight, and percent resorptions). The correlations between the observed and model-predicted values are >0.90. The predictive ability of the models was tested via a series of evaluation or corroboration methods. As is shown in the paper, using only compositional data of untested HBPS, the models can be used to predict the effect at a given dose or the dose that causes an effect of a stipulated magnitude.

  19. A 13-week dermal repeat-dose neurotoxicity study of hydrodesulfurized kerosene in rats.

    PubMed

    Breglia, Rudolph; Bui, Quang; Burnett, Donald; Koschier, Francis; Lapadula, Elizabeth; Podhasky, Paula; Schreiner, Ceinwen; White, Russell

    2014-01-01

    A 13-week dermal repeat-dose toxicity study was conducted with hydrodesulfurized (HDS) kerosene, a test material that also met the commercial specifications for aviation turbine fuel (jet A). The objectives were to assess the potential for target organ toxicity and neurotoxicity. The HDS kerosene was applied to the shaved backs of Sprague-Dawley CD rats, 12/sex/group, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk in doses of 0 (vehicle control), 165 mg/kg (20% HDS kerosene), 330 mg/kg (40% HDS kerosene), or 495 mg/kg (60% HDS kerosene). Additional rats (12/sex) from the control and the high-dose groups were held without treatment for 4 weeks to assess recovery. Standard parameters of toxicity were investigated during the in-life phase. At necropsy, organs were weighed and selected tissues were processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurobehavioral evaluations included tests of motor activity and functional observations that were conducted pretest, at intervals during the exposure period and after recovery. No test substance-related effects on mortality, clinical observations (except dermal irritation), body weight, or clinical chemistry values were observed. A dose-related increase in skin irritation, confirmed histologically as minimal, was evident at the dosing site. The only statistically significant change considered potentially treatment related was an increase in the neutrophil count in females at 13 weeks. No test article-related effects were observed in the neurobehavioral assessments or gross or microscopic findings in the peripheral or central nervous system tissues in any of the dose groups. Excluding skin irritation, the no observed adverse effect level value for all effects was considered 495 mg/kg/d. PMID:24351872

  20. A 13-week dermal repeat-dose neurotoxicity study of hydrodesulfurized kerosene in rats.

    PubMed

    Breglia, Rudolph; Bui, Quang; Burnett, Donald; Koschier, Francis; Lapadula, Elizabeth; Podhasky, Paula; Schreiner, Ceinwen; White, Russell

    2014-01-01

    A 13-week dermal repeat-dose toxicity study was conducted with hydrodesulfurized (HDS) kerosene, a test material that also met the commercial specifications for aviation turbine fuel (jet A). The objectives were to assess the potential for target organ toxicity and neurotoxicity. The HDS kerosene was applied to the shaved backs of Sprague-Dawley CD rats, 12/sex/group, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk in doses of 0 (vehicle control), 165 mg/kg (20% HDS kerosene), 330 mg/kg (40% HDS kerosene), or 495 mg/kg (60% HDS kerosene). Additional rats (12/sex) from the control and the high-dose groups were held without treatment for 4 weeks to assess recovery. Standard parameters of toxicity were investigated during the in-life phase. At necropsy, organs were weighed and selected tissues were processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurobehavioral evaluations included tests of motor activity and functional observations that were conducted pretest, at intervals during the exposure period and after recovery. No test substance-related effects on mortality, clinical observations (except dermal irritation), body weight, or clinical chemistry values were observed. A dose-related increase in skin irritation, confirmed histologically as minimal, was evident at the dosing site. The only statistically significant change considered potentially treatment related was an increase in the neutrophil count in females at 13 weeks. No test article-related effects were observed in the neurobehavioral assessments or gross or microscopic findings in the peripheral or central nervous system tissues in any of the dose groups. Excluding skin irritation, the no observed adverse effect level value for all effects was considered 495 mg/kg/d.

  1. The ToxBank Data Warehouse: Supporting the Replacement of In Vivo Repeated Dose Systemic Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Kohonen, Pekka; Benfenati, Emilio; Bower, David; Ceder, Rebecca; Crump, Michael; Cross, Kevin; Grafström, Roland C; Healy, Lyn; Helma, Christoph; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Maggioni, Silvia; Miller, Scott; Myatt, Glenn; Rautenberg, Michael; Stacey, Glyn; Willighagen, Egon; Wiseman, Jeff; Hardy, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the SEURAT-1 (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-1) research cluster, comprised of seven EU FP7 Health projects co-financed by Cosmetics Europe, is to generate a proof-of-concept to show how the latest technologies, systems toxicology and toxicogenomics can be combined to deliver a test replacement for repeated dose systemic toxicity testing on animals. The SEURAT-1 strategy is to adopt a mode-of-action framework to describe repeated dose toxicity, combining in vitro and in silico methods to derive predictions of in vivo toxicity responses. ToxBank is the cross-cluster infrastructure project whose activities include the development of a data warehouse to provide a web-accessible shared repository of research data and protocols, a physical compounds repository, reference or "gold compounds" for use across the cluster (available via wiki.toxbank.net), and a reference resource for biomaterials. Core technologies used in the data warehouse include the ISA-Tab universal data exchange format, REpresentational State Transfer (REST) web services, the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the OpenTox standards. We describe the design of the data warehouse based on cluster requirements, the implementation based on open standards, and finally the underlying concepts and initial results of a data analysis utilizing public data related to the gold compounds. PMID:27481023

  2. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using 2,4-dinitrotoluene: a report of a collaborative study by CSGMT/JEMS.MMS.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Akihisa; Tsuchiyama, Hiromi; Asaoka, Yoshiji; Hirakata, Mikito; Miyoshi, Tomoya; Oshida, Keiyu; Miyamoto, Yohei

    2015-03-01

    The liver micronucleus assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect liver carcinogens by repeated dosing, and could be expected to be integrated into repeated-dose toxicity studies using a hepatocyte isolation method without the traditional in situ collagenase perfusion. In this study, to assess the performance of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), which is a rodent liver carcinogen, was administered orally to male rats at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg/day once daily for 14 or 28 consecutive days, and the frequencies of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) and micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) were examined. Significant increases in the MNHEPs were observed at 50 mg/kg/day or more in the 14-day treatment, and 50 and 100 mg/kg/day in the 28-day treatment. These increases were dependent on both the dose and the number of administrations, which indicates the possibility that the MNHEPs accumulate as a result of repeated dosing. In contrast, no increase in the MNIMEs was observed. In conclusion, the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using young adult rats is sufficiently sensitive to detect the genotoxicity of 2,4-DNT at a low dose.

  3. A 13-week repeated-dose oral toxicity and bioaccumulation of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Sim, Jaehoon; Kim, Younghun; Han, Beom Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Lee, Somin; Cho, Myung-Haing; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Because of an increase in the commercial applications of manufactured nanoparticles, the issue of potential adverse health effects of nanoparticles following intended or unintended exposure is rapidly gaining attention. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlNPs, rod-type, 1.5, 3, and 6 mg/kg) after oral administration to mice for 13 weeks. Compared with the control group, the consumption of diet and drinking water and body weight gain decreased in the group treated with AlNPs. The group treated with 6 mg/kg AlNPs also showed a marked elevation in the count of white blood cells that associated with a significant decrease and increase to the proportion of eosinophils and lymphocytes, respectively. In addition, the secretion of IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased in a dose-dependent manner in the treated groups. Furthermore, AlNPs showed the highest accumulation in the liver and kidneys compared with the control group, increased the lactate dehydrogenase level in the blood, and induced the development of a pathological lesion in the liver and kidneys. Taken together, we suggest that the target organs of rod-type AlNPs may be the liver, kidneys and the immune system, and the not-observed adverse effect level may be lower than 6 mg/kg.

  4. The enhancement of the subacute repeat dose toxicity test OECD TG 407 for the detection of endocrine active chemicals: comparison with toxicity tests of longer duration.

    PubMed

    Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Hofmann, Andreas; Owens, J William; Freyberger, Alexius

    2007-04-01

    The OECD conventional 28-day repeat dose toxicity test (OECD TG 407) is widely employed in the initial hazard identification and characterization for commercial chemicals. The OECD has recently undertaken an international effort to "enhance" the conventional 28-day repeat dose toxicity test (OECD TG 407) in order to ensure that chemicals acting through (anti)estrogenic, (anti)androgenic, and (anti)thyroid mechanisms are identified. The enhancements include additional parameters based on the respective target organs from the male and female reproductive tracts, the thyroid, and circulating hormone levels. Ten chemicals with known endocrine modes of action and different potencies were administered using the "enhanced TG 407" test protocol to investigate the performance of this procedure. In the present evaluation, these "enhanced TG 407" protocol results, drawn from a report of the OECD validation studies, are compared to studies of the same or similar chemicals with longer and/or in utero exposures in order to evaluate the capability of the this "enhanced TG 407" in identifying the chemicals' mode of action. The major conclusions that can be drawn from these comparisons are: 1. The "enhanced TG 407" will reliably identify chemicals with a strong to moderate potential to act through endocrine modes of action on the gonads and the thyroid. In addition, this test method gives a first indication for the dose-related potency. 2. Substances with a low potency for an endocrine mode of action, i.e., having only marginal effects in the most comprehensive in vivo studies such as multi-generation studies, may not elicit clear endocrine-related effects in the "enhanced TG 407". In these cases, the primary or principal effects observed will be driven by other toxic actions of the test materials in the "enhanced TG 407". 3. It may be concluded from the present database that prolongation of exposure from 28 days up to 90 days is unlikely to improve the chance of detecting an

  5. The repeated dose toxicity of a zinc oxide/hexachloroethane smoke.

    PubMed

    Marrs, T C; Colgrave, H F; Edginton, J A; Brown, R F; Cross, N L

    1988-01-01

    Mice, rats and guinea pigs were exposed to the smoke produced by ignition of a zinc oxide/hexachloroethane pyrotechnic composition, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, at three different dose levels, together with controls. The animals received 100 exposures except for the high dose guinea pigs, which underwent 15 exposures, because of high death rate during the first few days of exposure. The test material had very little effect on weight gain, but there was a high rate of early deaths in the top dose of mice. A variety of incidental findings was seen in both decedents and survivors, but organ specific toxicity was, with one exception, confined to the respiratory tract. The most important of these findings was a statistically significant increase in the frequency of alveologenic carcinoma in the high dose group mice (p less than 0.01) and a statistically significant trend in the prevalence of the same tumour over all dose groups and the controls. A variety of inflammatory changes was seen in the lungs of all species and some appeared to be treatment-related. Fatty change in the mouse liver was more common in the middle and high dose groups than the controls. The aetiology of the tumour incidence is discussed and it is pointed out that hexachloroethane and zinc, as well as carbon tetrachloride, which may be present in the smoke, may be animal carcinogens in appropriate circumstances. Carbon tetrachloride is a known human carcinogen.

  6. In Silico Models for Repeated-Dose Toxicity (RDT): Prediction of the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) and Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) for Drugs.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Fabiola; Benfenati, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical stage in drug development requires the determination of repeated-dose toxicity (RDT) in animal models. The main outcome of RDT studies is the determination of the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) and the lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL). NOAEL is important since it serves to calculate the maximum recommended starting dose (MRSD) which is the safe starting dose for clinical studies in human beings. Since in vivo RDT studies are expensive and time-consuming, in silico approaches could offer a valuable alternative. However, NOAEL and LOAEL modeling suffer some limitations since they do not refer to a single end point but to several different effects and the doses used in experimental studies strongly influence the final results. Few attempts to model NOAEL and LOAEL have been reported. The available database and models for the prediction of NOAEL and LOAEL are reviewed here. PMID:27311467

  7. Development of QSAR models using artificial neural network analysis for risk assessment of repeated-dose, reproductive, and developmental toxicities of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Aiba Née Kaneko, Maki; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    Use of laboratory animals for systemic toxicity testing is subject to strong ethical and regulatory constraints, but few alternatives are yet available. One possible approach to predict systemic toxicity of chemicals in the absence of experimental data is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. Here, we present QSAR models for prediction of maximum "no observed effect level" (NOEL) for repeated-dose, developmental and reproductive toxicities. NOEL values of 421 chemicals for repeated-dose toxicity, 315 for reproductive toxicity, and 156 for developmental toxicity were collected from Japan Existing Chemical Data Base (JECDB). Descriptors to predict toxicity were selected based on molecular orbital (MO) calculations, and QSAR models employing multiple independent descriptors as the input layer of an artificial neural network (ANN) were constructed to predict NOEL values. Robustness of the models was indicated by the root-mean-square (RMS) errors after 10-fold cross-validation (0.529 for repeated-dose, 0.508 for reproductive, and 0.558 for developmental toxicity). Evaluation of the models in terms of the percentages of predicted NOELs falling within factors of 2, 5 and 10 of the in-vivo-determined NOELs suggested that the model is applicable to both general chemicals and the subset of chemicals listed in International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI). Our results indicate that ANN models using in silico parameters have useful predictive performance, and should contribute to integrated risk assessment of systemic toxicity using a weight-of-evidence approach. Availability of predicted NOELs will allow calculation of the margin of safety, as recommended by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). PMID:25786522

  8. Development of QSAR models using artificial neural network analysis for risk assessment of repeated-dose, reproductive, and developmental toxicities of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Aiba Née Kaneko, Maki; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    Use of laboratory animals for systemic toxicity testing is subject to strong ethical and regulatory constraints, but few alternatives are yet available. One possible approach to predict systemic toxicity of chemicals in the absence of experimental data is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. Here, we present QSAR models for prediction of maximum "no observed effect level" (NOEL) for repeated-dose, developmental and reproductive toxicities. NOEL values of 421 chemicals for repeated-dose toxicity, 315 for reproductive toxicity, and 156 for developmental toxicity were collected from Japan Existing Chemical Data Base (JECDB). Descriptors to predict toxicity were selected based on molecular orbital (MO) calculations, and QSAR models employing multiple independent descriptors as the input layer of an artificial neural network (ANN) were constructed to predict NOEL values. Robustness of the models was indicated by the root-mean-square (RMS) errors after 10-fold cross-validation (0.529 for repeated-dose, 0.508 for reproductive, and 0.558 for developmental toxicity). Evaluation of the models in terms of the percentages of predicted NOELs falling within factors of 2, 5 and 10 of the in-vivo-determined NOELs suggested that the model is applicable to both general chemicals and the subset of chemicals listed in International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI). Our results indicate that ANN models using in silico parameters have useful predictive performance, and should contribute to integrated risk assessment of systemic toxicity using a weight-of-evidence approach. Availability of predicted NOELs will allow calculation of the margin of safety, as recommended by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS).

  9. Prospective evaluation of potential toxicity of repeated doses of Thymus vulgaris L. extracts in rats by means of clinical chemistry, histopathology and NMR-based metabonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Benourad, Fouzia; Kahvecioglu, Zehra; Youcef-Benkada, Mokhtar; Colet, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-01

    In the field of natural extracts, research generally focuses on the study of their biological activities for food, cosmetic, or pharmacological purposes. The evaluation of their adverse effects is often overlooked. In this study, the extracts of Thymus vulgaris L. were obtained by two different extraction methods. Intraperitoneal injections of both extracts were given daily for four days to male Wistar Han rats, at two different doses for each extract. The evaluation of the potential toxic effects included histopathological examination of liver, kidney, and lung tissues, as well as serum biochemistry of liver and kidney parameters, and (1)H-NMR-based metabonomic profiles of urine. The results showed that no histopathological changes were observed in the liver and kidney in rats treated with both extracts of thyme. Serum biochemical investigations revealed significant increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid in animals treated with polyphenolic extract at both doses. In these latter groups, metabonomic analysis revealed alterations in a number of urine metabolites involved in the energy metabolism in liver mitochondria. Indeed, the results showed alterations of glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and β-oxidative pathways as evidenced by increases in lactate and ketone bodies, and decreases in citrate, α-ketoglutarate, creatinine, hippurate, dimethylglycine, and dimethyalanine. In conclusion, this work showed that i.p. injection of repeated doses of thyme extracts causes some disturbances of intermediary metabolism in rats. The metabonomic study revealed interesting data which could be further used to determine the cellular pathways affected by such treatments.

  10. Evaluation of repeated dose micronucleus assays of the liver and gastrointestinal tract using potassium bromate: a report of the collaborative study by CSGMT/JEMS.MMS.

    PubMed

    Okada, Emiko; Fujiishi, Yohei; Narumi, Kazunori; Kado, Shoichi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Kaneko, Kimiyuki; Ohyama, Wakako

    2015-03-01

    The food additive potassium bromate (KBrO3) is known as a renal carcinogen and causes chromosomal aberrations in vitro without metabolic activation and in vivo in hematopoietic and renal cells. As a part of a collaborative study by the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study group, which is a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, we administered KBrO3 to rats orally for 4, 14, and 28 days and examined the micronucleated (MNed) cell frequency in the liver, glandular stomach, colon, and bone marrow to confirm whether the genotoxic carcinogen targeting other than liver and gastrointestinal (GI) tract was detected by the repeated dose liver and GI tract micronucleus (MN) assays. In our study, animals treated with KBrO3 showed some signs of toxicity in the kidney and/or stomach. KBrO3 did not increase the frequency of MNed cells in the liver and colon in any of the repeated dose studies. However, KBrO3 increased the frequency of MNed cells in the glandular stomach and bone marrow. Additionally, the MNed cell frequency in the glandular stomach was not significantly affected by the difference in the length of the administration period. These results suggest that performing the MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first tissue to contact agents after oral ingestion, is useful for evaluating the genotoxic potential of chemicals and that the glandular stomach MN assay could be integrated into general toxicity studies.

  11. Evaluation of repeated dose micronucleus assays of the liver using N-nitrosopyrrolidine: a report of the collaborative study by CSGMT/JEMS.MMS.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Izumi; Hagioa, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay has the potential to detect liver carcinogens, and can be integrated into a general toxicological study. To assess the performance of the assay, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was tested in 14- or 28-day RDLMN assays. NPYR was orally administered to rats at a daily dose of 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg. One day after the last administration, a portion of the liver was removed and hepatocyte micronucleus (MN) specimens were prepared by the new method recently established by Narumi et al. In addition, a bone marrow MN assay and a histopathological examination of the liver were conducted. The detection of Phospho-Histone H3 was performed by immunohistochemistry to evaluate the proliferation rate of hepatocytes. The results showed significant increase in the number of micronucleated hepatocytes and Phospho-Histone H3-positive cells from the lowest dose in both 14- and 28-day RDLMN assays. On the other hand, the bone marrow MN assay yielded a negative result, which was in accordance with the existing report of the bone marrow MN assay using mice. Upon histopathological examination, inflammatory lesions and hypertrophy were noted, which may explain the increase in the hepatocyte proliferation and the enhancement of MN induction by NPYR. Our findings indicate that the RDLMN assay could be a useful tool for comprehensive risk assessment of carcinogenicity by providing information on both genotoxicity and histopathology when integrated into a general repeat dosing toxicity assay.

  12. The haemotoxicity of azathioprine in repeat dose studies in the female CD-1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Molyneux, Gemma; Gibson, Frances M; Chen, Christabelle M; Marway, Harpal K; McKeag, Sean; Mifsud, Charles V J; Pilling, Andrew M; Whayman, Matthew J; Turton, John A

    2008-04-01

    Azathioprine (AZA) is a cytotoxic immunosuppressive drug used in the prevention of rejection in organ transplants and the treatment of auto-immune diseases. However, AZA is haemotoxic causing significant bone marrow depression. The present studies were to characterize the haemotoxicity of AZA in the female CD-1 mouse. In Experiment 1, a dose-ranging study, with AZA gavaged daily for 10 days, clinical evidence of toxicity was evident at 125 mg/kg and above. Experiment 2 was a dose-response study with AZA gavaged daily for 10 days at 40-120 mg/kg. At day 1 after the final dose, AZA induced a dose-related pancytopaenia, reduced femoral marrow cellularity, increases in serum levels of the cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, reduction in granulocyte-monocyte colony-forming units and erythroid colonies, and increased bone marrow apoptosis. Histology demonstrated hepatocyte hypertrophy, thymic atrophy, reduced splenic extramedullary haemopoiesis, and reduced cellularity of sternal bone marrow. In Experiment 3, AZA was dosed for 10 days at 100 mg/kg with autopsies at 1, 3, 9, 22, 29, 43 and 57 days postdosing. At 1, 3 and 9 days, haematological parameters reflected changes in Experiment 2. At 22/29 days, many blood parameters were returning towards normal; at 43/57 days, most parameters compared with controls. However, there was some evidence of a persistent (i.e. residual/late-stage) mild reduction in RBC and erythroid progenitor cell counts at day 43/57. We conclude that the CD-1 mouse provides an acceptable model for the haemotoxicity of AZA in man.

  13. Prediction of the Carcinogenic Potential of Human Pharmaceuticals Using Repeated Dose Toxicity Data and Their Pharmacological Properties

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Buitenhuis, Wenny H. W.; Wagenaar, Laura; Soffers, Ans E. M. F.; van Someren, Eugene P.; Krul, Cyrille A. M.; Woutersen, Ruud A.

    2016-01-01

    In an exercise designed to reduce animal use, we analyzed the results of rat subchronic toxicity studies from 289 pharmaceutical compounds with the aim to predict the tumor outcome of carcinogenicity studies in this species. The results were obtained from the assessment reports available at the Medicines Evaluation Board of the Netherlands for 289 pharmaceutical compounds that had been shown to be non-genotoxic. One hundred forty-three of the 239 compounds not inducing putative preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study did not induce tumors in the carcinogenicity study [true negatives (TNs)], whereas 96 compounds were categorized as false negatives (FNs) because tumors were observed in the carcinogenicity study. Of the remaining 50 compounds, 31 showed preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study and tumors in the carcinogenicity study [true positives (TPs)], and 19 only showed preneoplastic lesions in subchronic studies but no tumors in the carcinogenicity study [false positives (FPs)]. In addition, we then re-assessed the prediction of the tumor outcome by integrating the pharmacological properties of these compounds. These pharmacological properties were evaluated with respect to the presence or absence of a direct or indirect proliferative action. We found support for the absence of cellular proliferation for 204 compounds (TN). For 67 compounds, the presence of cellular hyperplasia as evidence for proliferative action could be found (TP). Therefore, this approach resulted in an ability to predict non-carcinogens at a success rate of 92% and the ability to detect carcinogens at 98%. The combined evaluation of pharmacological and histopathological endpoints eventually led to only 18 unknown outcomes (17 categorized as FN and 1 as FP), thereby enhancing both the negative and positive predictivity of an evaluation based upon histopathological evaluation only. The data show the added value of a consideration of the pharmacological properties of compounds in

  14. Metabolite profiles of rats in repeated dose toxicological studies after oral and inhalative exposure.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Bordag, N; Herold, M; Kamp, H; Krennrich, G; Looser, R; Ma-Hock, L; Mellert, W; Montoya, G; Peter, E; Prokudin, A; Spitzer, M; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Zbranek, R; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2016-07-25

    The MetaMap(®)-Tox database contains plasma-metabolome and toxicity data of rats obtained from oral administration of 550 reference compounds following a standardized adapted OECD 407 protocol. Here, metabolic profiles for aniline (A), chloroform (CL), ethylbenzene (EB), 2-methoxyethanol (ME), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and tetrahydrofurane (THF), dosed inhalatively for six hours/day, five days a week for 4 weeks were compared to oral dosing performed daily for 4 weeks. To investigate if the oral and inhalative metabolome would be comparable statistical analyses were performed. Best correlations for metabolome changes via both routes of exposure were observed for toxicants that induced profound metabolome changes. e.g. CL and ME. Liver and testes were correctly identified as target organs. In contrast, route of exposure dependent differences in metabolic profiles were noted for low profile strength e.g. female rats dosed inhalatively with A or THF. Taken together, the current investigations demonstrate that plasma metabolome changes are generally comparable for systemic effects after oral and inhalation exposure. Differences may result from kinetics and first pass effects. For compounds inducing only weak changes, the differences between both routes of exposure are visible in the metabolome.

  15. In Silico Modeling for the Prediction of Dose and Pathway-Related Adverse Effects in Humans From In Vitro Repeated-Dose Studies.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sebastian; Maggioni, Silvia; Bucher, Joachim; Mueller, Daniel; Niklas, Jens; Shevchenko, Valery; Mauch, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar; Noor, Fozia

    2016-01-01

    Long-term repeated-dose toxicity is mainly assessed in animals despite poor concordance of animal data with human toxicity. Nowadays advanced human in vitro systems, eg, metabolically competent HepaRG cells, are used for toxicity screening. Extrapolation of in vitro toxicity to in vivo effects is possible by reverse dosimetry using pharmacokinetic modeling. We assessed long-term repeated-dose toxicity of bosentan and valproic acid (VPA) in HepaRG cells under serum-free conditions. Upon 28-day exposure, the EC50 values for bosentan and VPA decreased by 21- and 33-fold, respectively. Using EC(10) as lowest threshold of toxicity in vitro, we estimated the oral equivalent doses for both test compounds using a simplified pharmacokinetic model for the extrapolation of in vitro toxicity to in vivo effect. The model predicts that bosentan is safe at the considered dose under the assumed conditions upon 4 weeks exposure. For VPA, hepatotoxicity is predicted for 4% and 47% of the virtual population at the maximum recommended daily dose after 3 and 4 weeks of exposure, respectively. We also investigated the changes in the central carbon metabolism of HepaRG cells exposed to orally bioavailable concentrations of both drugs. These concentrations are below the 28-day EC(10) and induce significant changes especially in glucose metabolism and urea production. These metabolic changes may have a pronounced impact in susceptible patients such as those with compromised liver function and urea cycle deficiency leading to idiosyncratic toxicity. We show that the combination of modeling based on in vitro repeated-dose data and metabolic changes allows the prediction of human relevant in vivo toxicity with mechanistic insights. PMID:26420750

  16. Evaluation of the repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using young adult rats with cyclophosphamide monohydrate: a report of a collaborative study by CSGMT/JEMS.MMS.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazumi; Zaizen, Kazuyo; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Ishida, Hisao

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect liver carcinogens, and this assay could be integrated into general toxicological studies. In this study, in order to assess the performance of the assay, cyclophosphamide monohydrate (CP) was tested in a 14-day RDLMN assay. Based on the results of the 4-day repeated dose-finding study, 10 mg/kg/day of CP was selected as the highest dose and the lower doses were set at 5, 2.5, 1.25, and 0.625 mg/kg/day for the 14-day RDLMN assay. On the day after the completion of the dosing period, specimens of hepatocytes and bone marrow cells were prepared and the induction of micronuclei was assessed. No changes were observed in the incidences of micronucleated hepatocytes. Nevertheless, the incidences of micronucleated immature erythrocytes in the bone marrow were increased significantly at CP doses of 1.25 mg/kg/day or more. These findings are consistent with reports that CP induces tumors in various tissues but it does not induce liver tumors.

  17. Evaluation of 90-day Repeated Dose Oral Toxicity, Glycometabolism, Learning and Memory Ability, and Related Enzyme of Chromium Malate Supplementation in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiwei; Wu, Huiyu; Li, Qian; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Yao; Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Mao, Guanghua; Li, Fang; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-11-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the 90-day oral toxicity of chromium malate in Sprague-Dawley rats. The present study inspected the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes, lipid metabolism, and learning and memory ability in metabolically healthy Sprague-Dawley rats. The results showed that all rats survived and pathological, toxic, feces, and urine changes were not observed. Chromium malate did not cause measurable damage on liver, brain, and kidney. The fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance index, C-peptide, hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels of normal rats in chromium malate groups had no significant change when compared with control group and chromium picolinate group under physiologically relevant conditions. The serum and organ content of Cr in chromium malate groups had no significant change compared with control group. No significant changes were found in morris water maze test and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and true choline esterase (TChE) activity. The results indicated that supplementation with chromium malate did not cause measurable toxicity and has no obvious effect on glycometabolism and related enzymes, learning and memory ability, and related enzymes and lipid metabolism of female and male rats. The results of this study suggest that chromium malate is safe for human consumption.

  18. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study. PMID:25892624

  19. [A relative bioavailability study of 2 oral formulations of omeprazole after their administration in repeated doses to healthy volunteers].

    PubMed

    Richards, J P; Gimeno, M; Moreland, T A; McEwen, J

    1999-04-01

    To determine the relative bioavailability of Ulceral (study formula) with respect to Losec (reference standard formula) and establish their bioequivalence daily doses of 20 mg of omeprazole were given during 5 consecutive days to 24 healthy volunteers. No significant differences were observed in the area under the curve (AUC0-t), a parameter directly related to the inhibition of acid secretion induced by omeprazole. The confidence interval of 90% for the difference between the two formulations for AUC0-t was within the interval of acceptance (0.80-1.25). The confidence interval for the difference between the two formulations for Cmax were also within the range of acceptance (0.70-1.43). In relation to the time for achieving (Cmax (tmax), the difference between the two formulations and the confidence interval of 95% for the tmax was 0.75 (-0.5-1.75) h indicating that no significant differences were observed between the two treatments. This study confirms the bioequivalence of Ulceral with the standard reference formulation as well as the tolerability of the two formulae. PMID:10349786

  20. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... The stability of the test substance in the vehicle should be determined. (f) Procedure—(1) Number and... number should be increased by the number of animals scheduled to be sacrificed before the completion of... carried out if the known properties of the test......

  1. Rupatadine does not potentiate the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam: randomized, double-blind, crossover, repeated dose, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    García-Gea, Consuelo; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Martínez, Juan; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Donado, Esther; Izquierdo, Iñaki; Barbanoj, Manuel-José

    2010-01-01

    AIM The main objective was to assess whether benzodiazepine intake when rupatadine plasma concentrations were at steady-state would increase the CNS depressant effects. Rupatadine is a new H1-antihistamine which also inhibits platelet activating factor (PAF) release and has been shown to be clinically effective at doses of 10 mg. METHODS Sixteen healthy young volunteers took part in a crossover, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial comprising two experimental periods (repeated administration for 7 days of rupatadine 10 mg or placebo as single oral daily doses, separated by a washout of 14 days). On days 5 and 7, according to a fully balanced design, a single oral dose of lorazepam 2 mg or placebo was added. CNS effects were evaluated on these days by seven objective tests of psychomotor performance and eight subjective visual analogue scales (VAS) at pre-dose and several times after drug intake. Four treatment conditions were evaluated: placebo, rupatadine 10 mg, lorazepam 2 mg and rupatadine 10 mg + lorazepam 2 mg. RESULTS Significant CNS effects, either impairment of psychomotor performance or subjective sedation, were observed when lorazepam was administered, either alone or in combination with steady state concentrations of rupatadine. No significant differences were found between these two conditions. In addition, rupatadine was not different from placebo. All treatments were well tolerated. CONCLUSION Repeated doses of rupatadine (10 mg orally) did not enhance the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam (2 mg orally, single dose) either in objective psychomotor tasks or in subjective evaluations. PMID:20565458

  2. Drug- not carrier-dependent haematological and biochemical changes in a repeated dose study of cyclosporine encapsulated polyester nano- and micro-particles: size does not matter.

    PubMed

    Venkatpurwar, V P; Rhodes, S; Oien, K A; Elliott, M A; Tekwe, C D; Jørgensen, H G; Kumar, M N V Ravi

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradable nanoparticles are being considered more often as drug carriers to address pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic issues, yet nano-product safety has not been systematically proven. In this study, haematological, biochemical and histological parameters were examined on 28 day daily dosing of rats with nano- or micro-particle encapsulated cyclosporine (CsA) to confirm if any changes observed were drug or carrier dependent. CsA encapsulated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) [PLGA] nano- (nCsA) and micro-particles (mCsA) were prepared by emulsion techniques. CsA (15, 30, 45 mg/kg) were administered by oral gavage to Sprague Dawley (SD) rats over 28 days. Haematological and biochemical metrics were followed with tissue histology performed on sacrifice. Whether presented as nCsA or mCsA, 45 mg/kg dose caused significant loss of body weight and lowered food consumption compared to untreated control. Across the doses, both nCsA and mCsA produce significant decreases in lymphocyte numbers compared to controls, commensurate with the proprietary product, Neoral(®) 15. Dosing with nCsA showed higher serum drug levels than mCsA presumably owing to the smaller particle size facilitating absorption. The treatment had no noticeable effects on inflammatory/oxidative stress markers or antioxidant enzyme levels, except an increase in ceruloplasmin (CP) levels for high dose nCsA/mCsA group. Further, only subtle, sub-lethal changes were observed in histology of nCsA/mCsA treated rat organs. Blank (drug-free) particles did not induce changes in the parameters studied. Therefore, it is extremely important that the encapsulated drug in the nano-products is considered when safety of the overall product is assessed rather than relying on just the particle size. This study has addressed some concerns surrounding particulate drug delivery, demonstrating safe delivery of CsA whilst achieving augmented serum concentrations.

  3. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs.

  4. Studying toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  5. Protocol of the adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes (DILfrequency): a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose, open-label, response-adaptive study

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Lucy A; Pekalski, Marcin L; Kareclas, Paula; Evangelou, Marina; Walker, Neil M; Howlett, James; Mander, Adrian P; Kennet, Jane; Wicker, Linda S; Bond, Simon; Todd, John A; Waldron-Lynch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the pancreatic islets, leading to insulinopenia and hyperglycaemia. Genetic analyses indicate that alterations of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) pathway mediating immune activation and tolerance predispose to T1D, specifically the polymorphic expression of the IL-2 receptor-α chain (CD25) on T lymphocytes. Replacement of physiological doses of IL-2 could restore self-tolerance and prevent further autoimmunity by enhancing the function of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) to limit the activation of auto reactive T effector cells (Teffs). In this experimental medicine study, we use an adaptive trial design to determine the optimal dosing regimen for IL-2 to improve Treg function while limiting activation of Teffs in participants with T1D. Methods and analysis The Adaptive study of IL-2 dose frequency on Tregs in type 1 diabetes(DILfrequency) is a mechanistic, non-randomised, repeat dose open-label, response-adaptive study of 36 participants with T1D. The objective is to establish the optimal dose and frequency of ultra-low dose IL-2: to increase Treg frequency within the physiological range, to increase CD25 expression on Tregs, without increasing CD4+ Teffs. DILfrequency has an initial learning phase where 12 participants are allocated to six different doses and frequencies followed by an interim statistical analysis. After analysis of the learning phase, the Dose and Frequency Committee will select the optimal targets for Treg frequency, Treg CD25 expression and Teff frequency. Three groups of eight participants will be treated consecutively in the confirming phase. Each dose and frequency selected will be based on statistical analysis of all data collected from the previous groups. Ethics Ethical approval for DILfrequency was granted on 12 August 2014. Results The results of this study will be reported, through peer-reviewed journals, conference presentations and

  6. Ketoprofen versus paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen in the management of fever: results of two randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies in children.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja

    2010-01-01

    Fever is a common symptom in children and one of the major concerns of parents of younger and preschool-age children. To compare the efficacy and safety of ketoprofen with that of paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprofen in the treatment of febrile conditions in children. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies with two parallel groups in each study were conducted in primary-care outpatient clinics. Children aged 6 months to 6 years presenting with a febrile condition and an oral body temperature of > or =38.8 degrees C or rectal temperature of > or =39 degrees C were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomized to receive either ketoprofen syrup 0.5 mg/kg, ibuprofen suspension 5 mg/kg or paracetamol suspension 15 mg/kg every 6 hours by the oral route. The primary outcome measure was the change in temperature at 3 hours (H3), compared with baseline (H0). All three treatments provided similar mean maximum decreases of 1.4-1.5 degrees C in body temperature at H3 compared with H0. Use of ketoprofen was not associated with any increased risk of adverse events compared with the two reference compounds. Ketoprofen 0.5 mg/kg appeared to be equivalent to the standard antipyretic doses of the reference products ibuprofen 5 mg/kg and paracetamol 15 mg/kg. Ketoprofen at the 0.5 mg/kg dose should be an effective and safe option for symptomatic management of fever in children. PMID:20380479

  7. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using N-nitrosomorpholine in young adult rats: report on collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS)-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study (MMS) Group.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Aya; Kosaka, Mizuki; Kimura, Aoi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (LMN) assay in young adult rats as a collaborative study by the Mammalian mutagenicity study (MMS) group. All procedures were performed in accordance with the standard protocols of the MMS Group. Six-week-old male Crl:CD(SD) rats (5 animals/group) received oral doses of the hepatocarcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) at 0 (control), 5, 10, and 30mg/kg/day (10mL/kg) for 14 days. Control animals received vehicle (water). Hepatocytes were collected from the liver 24h after the last dose, and the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was determined by microscopy. The number of micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) in the femoral bone marrow was also determined. The liver was examined using histopathologic methods after formalin fixation. The results showed statistically significant and dose-dependent increases in the number of MNHEPs in the liver at doses of 10mg/kg and greater when compared with the vehicle control. However, no significant increase was noted in the number of MNIMEs in the bone marrow at doses of up to 30mg/kg. Histopathology of the liver revealed hypertrophy and single cell necrosis of hepatocytes at doses of 5mg/kg and above. These results showed that the induction of micronuclei by NMOR was detected by the repeated-dose LMN assay, but not by the repeated-dose bone marrow micronucleus assay.

  8. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully.

  9. Evaluating the male and female reproductive toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Murray, F Jay; Gray, Thomas M; Roberts, Linda G; Roth, Randy N; Nicolich, Mark J; Simpson, Barry J

    2013-11-01

    To meet the EPA HPV Chemical Challenge Program requirement for reproductive toxicity data on sponsored high-boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), an analysis was conducted using the results of 39 repeat-dose and 59 developmental rat dermal toxicity studies on HBPS samples spanning the boiling range of the sponsored substances, and the results of three one-generation reproductive toxicity studies on two samples spanning the concentration range of polycyclic aromatic compounds of sponsored substances. The analysis found little evidence of male or female reproductive tract toxicity based on histopathology, reproductive organ weight, and sperm parameters, and no evidence of effects on fertility, while significant developmental toxicity and/or systemic repeat-dose toxicity were frequently observed. Among 14 samples of HBPS tested in both repeat-dose toxicity and developmental toxicity studies, there were no studies in which an adverse reproductive tract finding occurred at a dose lower than that producing developmental toxicity or other adverse effects in repeat-dose toxicity studies. The current analysis supports the hypothesis that effects in developmental and/or repeat-dose toxicity studies of HBPS occur at doses lower than those that might affect fertility in rat one-generation reproductive studies. When adequate developmental and repeat-dose toxicity studies are available, a reproductive toxicity study of HBPS appears unnecessary.

  10. Evaluation of Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Sodium 2,2 Dimethylbutyrate, a Novel Short Chain Fatty Acid Derivative, in a Phase 1, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Single- and Repeat-Dose Studies in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Susan P.; Wargin, William A.; Boosalis, Michael S.; Wallis, Wayne J.; Case, Sally; Keefer, Jeffrey R.; Faller, Douglas V.; Welch, William C.; Berenson, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacologic induction of fetal globin synthesis is an accepted therapeutic strategy for treatment of the beta hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias, as even small increases in hemoglobin F (HbF) levels reduce clinical severity in sickle cell disease and reduce anemia in beta thalassemia. Prior generation short chain fatty acid therapeutics, arginine butyrate and phenylbutyrate, increased fetal and total hemoglobin levels in patients, but were limited by high doses or intravenous infusion. A fetal globin-inducing therapeutic with convenient oral dosing would be an advance for these classic molecular diseases. Healthy adult human subjects were treated with a novel SCFA derivative, sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (SDMB), or placebo, with one of four single dose levels (2, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) or daily doses (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) over 14 days, and monitored for adverse clinical and laboratory events, drug levels, reticulocytes, and HbF assays. SDMB was well-tolerated with no clinically significant adverse events related to study medication. The terminal half-life ranged from 9–15 hours. Increases in mean absolute reticulocytes were observed at all dose levels in the 14-day study. The favorable PK profiles and safety findings indicate that SDMB warrants further investigation for treatment of anemic subjects with beta hemoglobinopathies. PMID:21422239

  11. Evaluation of safety and pharmacokinetics of sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate, a novel short chain fatty acid derivative, in a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, and repeat-dose studies in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Perrine, Susan P; Wargin, William A; Boosalis, Michael S; Wallis, Wayne J; Case, Sally; Keefer, Jeffrey R; Faller, Douglas V; Welch, William C; Berenson, Ronald J

    2011-08-01

    Pharmacologic induction of fetal globin synthesis is an accepted therapeutic strategy for treatment of the beta hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias, as even small increases in hemoglobin F (HbF) levels reduce clinical severity in sickle cell disease (SCD) and reduce anemia in beta thalassemia. Prior generation short chain fatty acid therapeutics, arginine butyrate (AB), and phenylbutyrate, increased fetal and total hemoglobin levels in patients, but were limited by high doses or intravenous (IV) infusion. A fetal globin-inducing therapeutic with convenient oral dosing would be an advance for these classic molecular diseases. Healthy adult human subjects were treated with a novel short chain fatty acids (SCFA) derivative, sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (SDMB), or placebo, with 1 of 4 single dose levels (2, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) or daily doses (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) over 14 days, and monitored for adverse clinical and laboratory events, drug levels, reticulocytes, and HbF assays. SDMB was well-tolerated with no clinically significant adverse events related to study medication. The terminal half-life ranged from 9 to 15 hours. Increases in mean absolute reticulocytes were observed at all dose levels in the 14-day study. The favorable pharmacokinetics (PK) profiles and safety findings indicate that SDMB warrants further investigation for treatment of anemic subjects with beta hemoglobinopathies.

  12. Clinical experience and results of treatment with suprofen in pediatrics. 3rd communication: Antipyretic effect and tolerability of repeat doses of suprofen and paracetamol syrup in hospitalized children/A single-blind study.

    PubMed

    Weippl, G; Michos, N; Sundal, E J; Stocker, H

    1985-01-01

    Antipyretic effect and tolerability of alpha-methyl-4-(2-thienylcarbonyl)-phenyl acetic acid (suprofen, Suprol), syrup and paracetamol (acetaminophen) were compared within the scope of the present randomized single-blind study; the test population included a total of 115 children ranging in age from 6 months to 12 years. All patients were admitted to the hospital with an average temperature of 39.3 degrees C, their disease being caused by bacterial or viral infections. The dose levels for treatment with syrup depended upon the children's age and body weight. Treatment was in most cases given for two days; a three-times-a-day schedule was used. The (rectal) temperature as well as pulse and respiratory rates were measured prior to treatment and 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 h after first administration of the test preparations. The results showed that the antipyretic effect of suprofen was in both age groups at all rating times statistically significantly superior to that of paracetamol. Pulse and respiratory rates dropped in both age groups after treatment; the means were within the normal range at all rating times. Adverse drug reactions were seen in 5 patients on suprofen and in 3 cases on paracetamol. It is, however, questionable whether such reactions are drug-dependent. PMID:3911963

  13. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  14. Inhibitory effect of single and repeated doses of nilotinib on the pharmacokinetics of CYP3A substrate midazolam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Sheng, Jennifer; Ko, Jin H; Zheng, Cheng; Zhou, Wei; Priess, Petra; Lin, Wen; Novick, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Effects of single and repeated doses of nilotinib on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substrate, were assessed in 2 separate studies. In the single-dose nilotinib study, 18 healthy subjects were randomized to 6 treatment sequences to receive single dose of nilotinib 600 mg, midazolam 4 mg, and coadministration of both in a crossover manner. In the repeated-dose nilotinib study, 19 chronic myeloid leukemia patients took a single dose of midazolam 2 mg on days 1 and 13, and nilotinib 400 mg twice daily from days 2-13. In the single-dose study, the geometric mean ratio of the area under the plasma concentration time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC(inf)) of midazolam plus nilotinib vs. midazolam was 1.3 (90%CI, 1.2-1.5) and the maximum observed serum concentration (C(max)) was 1.2 (90%CI, 1.0-1.4). In the repeated-dose study, the values for AUC(inf) and C(max) were 2.6 (90%CI, 2.1-3.3) and 2.0 (90%CI, 1.7-2.4), respectively. These results indicate that single-dose and repeated-dose administration of nilotinib results in weak and moderate inhibition of CYP3A, respectively. Therefore, appropriate monitoring and dose adjustment may be needed for drugs that are mainly metabolized by CYP3A, and have narrow therapeutic index, when coadministered with nilotinib.

  15. Repeated dose toxicity and relative potency of 1,2,3,4,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 66) 1,2,3,5,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 67) compared to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and thymic atrophy in female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hooth, Michelle J; Nyska, Abraham; Fomby, Laurene M; Vasconcelos, Daphne Y; Vallant, Molly; DeVito, Michael J; Walker, Nigel J

    2012-11-15

    In this study we assessed the relative toxicity and potency of the chlorinated naphthalenes 1,2,3,4,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 66) and 1,2,3,5,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 67) relative to that of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Chemicals were administered in corn oil:acetone (99:1) by gavage to female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats at dosages of 0 (vehicle), 500, 1500, 5000, 50,000 and 500,000 ng/kg (PCN 66 and PCN 67) and 1, 3, 10, 100, and 300 ng/kg (TCDD) for 2 weeks. Histopathologic changes were observed in the thymus, liver and lung of TCDD treated animals and in the liver and thymus of PCN treated animals. Significant increases in CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 associated enzyme activity were observed in all animals exposed to TCDD, PCN 66 and PCN 67. Dose response modeling of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and thymic atrophy gave ranges of estimated relative potencies, as compared to TCDD, of 0.0015-0.0072, for PCN 66 and 0.00029-0.00067 for PCN 67. Given that PCN 66 and PCN 67 exposure resulted in biochemical and histopathologic changes similar to that seen with TCDD, this suggests that they should be included in the WHO toxic equivalency factor (TEF) scheme, although the estimated relative potencies indicate that these hexachlorinated naphthalenes should not contribute greatly to the overall human body burden of dioxin-like activity.

  16. Influence of Two Depuration Periods on the Activity and Transcription of Antioxidant Enzymes in Tilapia Exposed to Repeated Doses of Cylindrospermopsin under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Victoria; Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Moreno, Isabel M.; Prieto, Ana I.; Puerto, María; Jos, Angeles; Cameán, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterial toxin Cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a potent protein synthesis inhibitor, is increasingly being found in freshwater bodies infested by cyanobacterial blooms worldwide. Moreover, it has been reported to be implicated in human intoxications and animal mortality. Recently, the alteration of the activity and gene expression of some glutathione related enzymes in tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus) exposed to a single dose of CYN has been reported. However, little is known about the effects induced by repeated doses of this toxin in tilapias exposed by immersion and the potential reversion of these biochemical alterations after two different depuration periods (3 or 7 days). In the present study, tilapias were exposed by immersion to repeated doses of a CYN-containing culture of Aphanizomenon ovalisporum during 14 days, and then were subjected to depuration periods (3 or 7 days) in clean water in order to examine the potential reversion of the effects observed. The activity and relative mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and soluble glutathione-S-transferases (sGST), and also the sGST protein abundance by Western blot analysis were evaluated in liver and kidney of fish. Results showed significant alterations in most of the parameters evaluated and their recovery after 3 days (GPx activity, sGST relative abundance) or 7 days (GPx gene expression, sGST activity). These findings not only confirm the oxidative stress effects produced in fish by cyanobacterial cells containing CYN, but also show the effectiveness of depuration processes in mitigating the CYN-containing culture toxic effects. PMID:24632554

  17. Assessment of methyl methanesulfonate using the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay in young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Muto, Shigeharu; Yamada, Katsuya; Kato, Tatsuya; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Iwase, Yumiko; Uno, Yoshifumi

    2015-03-01

    A repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using young adult rats was conducted with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) as a part of a collaborative study supported by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test/the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group. MMS is a classical DNA-reactive carcinogen, but it is not a liver carcinogen. In the first experiment (14-day study), MMS was administered per os to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats every day for 14 days at a dose of 12.5, 25, or 50mg/kg/day. In the second experiment (28-day study), 6-week-old male SD rats were treated with MMS at 7.5, 15, or 30mg/kg/day for 28 days, because the highest dose used in the 14-day study (50mg/kg/day) caused mortality. Hepatocyte and bone marrow cell specimens were prepared on the day after the final dose. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) in the liver and that of micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) in the bone marrow were evaluated. Exposure to 50mg/kg/day MMS for 14 days resulted in an increased frequency of MNHEPs, but MMS had no effect on the frequency of MNHEPs in the rats exposed to the chemical for 28 days at doses up to 30mg/kg/day. MMS induced MNIMEs production at doses of 25 and 50mg/kg/day in the 14-day study and at doses of 15 and 30mg/kg/day in the 28-day study. Overall, the effect of MMS on the frequency of MNHEPs was considered to be equivocal.

  18. Toxicity of nanosilver in intragastric studies: Biodistribution and metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Olga D; Klochkov, Sergey G; Novikova, Oksana V; Bravova, Irina M; Shevtsova, Elena F; Safenkova, Irina V; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Bachurin, Sergey O; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2016-01-22

    The unique physicochemical properties of silver nanoparticles explain their extensive application in consumer goods, food, and medicinal products. However, the biological effects of nanosilver after peroral exposure of mammals are still debatable. This study describes the biodistribution and biological action of 12nm non-coated silver nanoparticles intragastrically administered to male rats after acute (single exposure) and sub-acute (multiple exposures over 30 days) toxicity experiments. The daily doses were 2000 and 250mg/kg of body weight for single and multiple administrations, respectively. Silver tissue detection was conducted by elemental analysis with the help of atomic absorption spectroscopy. An estimation of the state of exposed animals was made and the dynamics of hematological and biochemical parameters of rats was studied. It was demonstrated that single and multiple administrations resulted in silver accumulation in the liver, kidneys, spleen, stomach, and small intestine. After both one- and repeated-dose exposures, the highest Ag contents were detected in the liver (0.87±0.37μg/g of organ) and kidneys (0.24±0.02μg/g of organ). The concentrations of silver detected in tissues were far smaller than the administered doses (<99%), indicating its efficient excretion from the organism. Acute and sub-acute exposures caused no animal mortality or signs of toxicity, manifested as changes in outward appearance or notable deviations in behavior or locomotor activity. Postmortem study revealed no visible pathomorphological abnormalities of internal organs. Hematological indices and biochemical parameters of the treated rats did not differ from those of the vehicle control animals. Overall, it can be concluded that nanosilver is able to be absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and accumulate in the secondary organs of rats. It showed no distinct toxicity under the experimental conditions of this study.

  19. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity Study of Euphorbia hirta L. Methanol Extract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuet Ping, Kwan; Darah, Ibrahim; Chen, Yeng; Sreeramanan, Subramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Despite Euphorbia hirta L. ethnomedicinal benefits, very few studies have described the potential toxicity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo toxicity of methanolic extracts of E. hirta. The acute and subchronic oral toxicity of E. hirta was evaluated in Sprague Dawley rats. The extract at a single dose of 5000 mg/kg did not produce treatment related signs of toxicity or mortality in any of the animals tested during the 14-day observation period. Therefore, the LD 50 of this plant was estimated to be more than 5000 mg/kg. In the repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study, the administration of 50 mg/kg, 250 mg/kg, and 1000 mg/kg/day of E. hirta extract per body weight revealed no significant difference (P > 0.05) in food and water consumptions, body weight change, haematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and gross findings compared to the control group. Macropathology and histopathology examinations of all organs including the liver did not reveal morphological alteration. Analyses of these results with the information of signs, behaviour, and health monitoring could lead to the conclusion that the long-term oral administration of E. hirta extract for 90 days does not cause sub-chronic toxicity. PMID:24386634

  20. Safety Evaluation of Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. Rhizome Extract: Acute and Chronic Toxicity Studies in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Poachanukoon, Orapan; Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Dechatiwongse Na Ayudhya, Thaweephol; Khonsung, Parirat; Jaijoy, Kanjana; Soawakontha, Ruedee; Chanchai, Monraudee

    2014-01-01

    Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. has been used for traditional medicine, but few studies have described its potential toxicity. In this study, the acute and chronic oral toxicity of Z. cassumunar extract granules were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The extract at a single dose of 5000 mg/kg body weight did not produce treatment related signs of toxicity or mortality in any of the animals tested during the 14-day observation period. However, a decrease in body weights was observed in treated males (P < 0.05). The weights of lung and kidney of treated females were increased (P < 0.05). Treated males were increased in spleen and epididymis weights (P < 0.05). In repeated dose 270-day oral toxicity study, the administration of the extracts at concentrations of 0.3, 3, 30, 11.25, 112.5, and 1,125 mg/kg body weight/day revealed no-treatment toxicity. Although certain endpoints among those monitored (i.e., organ weight, hematological parameters, and clinical chemistry) exhibited statistically significant effects, none was adverse. Gross and histological observations revealed no toxicity. Our findings suggest that the Z. cassumunar extract granules are well tolerated for both single and chronic administration. The oral no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for the extract was 1,125 mg/kg body weight/day for males and females. PMID:27379341

  1. Effects of repeated doses of aspartame on serotonin and its metabolite in various regions of the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R P; Coulombe, R A

    1987-08-01

    Following a finding that single doses (approximating to average intakes and to potential 'over-use') of aspartame administered orally to mice caused significant increases in norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in various brain regions, the effect of repeated exposure to aspartame was studied. Male CD-1 mice were given a daily oral dose of 0, 13, 133 or 650 mg/kg for 30 days and 1 day after the last dose the animals were decapitated and their brain regions were quickly isolated. Analyses of the different regions for catecholamine and indoleamine neurotransmitters and their major metabolites indicated that the increases in adrenergic chemicals observed shortly after a single exposure were not apparent after repeated dosing. In contrast, concentrations of serotonin and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, were decreased in several regions. An increased supply of phenylalanine may be responsible for a decrease in tryptophan uptake by the brain tissue or for a depression in tryptophan conversion to serotonin.

  2. Baltimore Air Toxics Study (BATS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    The Baltimore Air Toxics Study is one of the three urban air toxics initiatives funded by EPA to support the development of the national air toxics strategy. As part of this project, the Air Quality Integrated Management System (AIMS) is under development. AIMS is designed to bring together the key components of urban air quality management into an integrated system, including emissions assessment, air quality modeling, and air quality monitoring. Urban area source emissions are computed for a wide range of pollutants and source categories, and are joined with existing point source emissions data. Measured air quality data are used to evaluate the adequacy of the emissions data and model treatments as a function of season, meteorological parameters, and daytime/nighttime conditions. Based on tested model performance, AIMS provides the potential to improve the ability to predict air quality benefits of alternative control options for criteria and toxic air pollutants. This paper describes the methods used to develop AIMS, and provides examples from its application in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The use of AIMS in the future to enhance environmental management of major industrial facilities also will be addressed in the paper.

  3. How toxic is coal ash? A laboratory toxicity case study

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrard, Rick M.; Carriker, Neil; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-08

    Under a consent agreement among the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and proponents both for and against stricter regulation, EPA is to issue a new coal ash disposal rule by the end of 2014. Laboratory toxicity investigations often yield conservative estimates of toxicity because many standard test species are more sensitive than resident species, thus could provide information useful to the rule-making. However, few laboratory studies of coal ash toxicity are available; most studies reported in the literature are based solely on field investigations. In this paper, we describe a broad range of toxicity studies conducted for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash spill, results of which help provide additional perspective on the toxicity of coal ash.

  4. How toxic is coal ash? A laboratory toxicity case study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sherrard, Rick M.; Carriker, Neil; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-08

    Under a consent agreement among the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and proponents both for and against stricter regulation, EPA is to issue a new coal ash disposal rule by the end of 2014. Laboratory toxicity investigations often yield conservative estimates of toxicity because many standard test species are more sensitive than resident species, thus could provide information useful to the rule-making. However, few laboratory studies of coal ash toxicity are available; most studies reported in the literature are based solely on field investigations. In this paper, we describe a broad range of toxicity studies conducted for the Tennessee Valley Authoritymore » (TVA) Kingston ash spill, results of which help provide additional perspective on the toxicity of coal ash.« less

  5. Safety Profile of a Polyherbal Formulation (Gynocare capsules) in Female Rats by Subchronic Oral Toxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Tatke, Pratima A.; Nidhiya, I. S. R.; Deshpande, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Gynocare capsules, is a polyherbal formulation, are used as uterine tonic and for treating gynaecological ailments like infertility, leucorrhea, and menstrual disorders. The formulation contains ingredients of herbal origin, such as, extracts of Ashoka, Vasaka, Durva, Chandan, Musk, and so on. It was evaluated for its safety at the therapeutic dose level by a repeated dose oral toxicity study in albino Wistar rats. The herbal formulation was administered orally at a therapeutic dose of 100 mg/kg/day, for 90 days. All animals were monitored daily for their health status and signs of abnormalities. The body weight, water consumption, and food intake were measured once weekly. At the end of the experimental period, various hematological and biochemical parameters were estimated and histopathologies of selected organs were conducted. The study resulted from the long-term oral administration of Gynocare capsules (100 mg/kg), did not cause any relevant signs of toxicity nor significant changes in the physical, hematological and biochemical parameters. However, statistically significant differences were seen in the relative organ weights of adrenal gland, ovary, and serum creatinine levels. The reduction in ovary weight revealed the possibility of the drug targeting the ovary. Moreover, no pathological features were identified in the treated group as monitored by the histopathological analysis of the internal organs. The study established that Gynocare capsules at the dose given (100 mg/kg) did not induce any remarkable or significant toxic effects, indicating that it was safe in rats following oral administration for 90 consecutive days. PMID:22778505

  6. Preliminary toxicity study of dichloromethane extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Obici, Simoni; Otobone, Fernanda Jacques; da Silva Sela, Vânia Ramos; Ishida, Kelly; da Silva, José Carlos; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Garcia Cortez, Diógenes Aparício; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    Kielmeyera coriacea Mart. (Clusiaceae), known as "Pau Santo" or "Saco de Boi" in the central Brazilian plateau region, is used to treat several tropical diseases. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of dichloromethane (DcM) extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems, administered to rodents. In the acute toxicity tests, mice receiving doses of this extract by the oral and intraperitoneal routes, showed reversible effects, with LD50 values of 1503.0 and 538.8 mg/kg, respectively. In the repeated-dose oral (90 days) toxicity tests, male and female Wistar rats were treated by gavage with different doses of DcM extract (5, 25 or 125 mg/kg). In biochemical and haematological evaluations, the results varied widely in respect to dose and sex, with no linear profile, and did not show clinical correlations. In the histopathological examinations, the groups exhibited some changes, but there were no significant differences between the groups compared to the controls. In conclusion, these investigations appeared to indicate the safety of acute and repeated oral administration of the DcM extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems, which can therefore be continuously used with safety.

  7. [Preclinical study of noopept toxicity].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Smol'nikova, N M; Alekseeva, S V; Nemova, E P; Sorokina, A V; Miramedova, M G; Kurapova, S P; Sidorina, E I; Kulakova, A V; Daugel'-Dauge, N O

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a preclinical investigation, the new nootrope drug noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-propyl-glycine ethylate) was tested for chronic toxicity upon peroral administration in a dose of 10 or 100 mg/kg over 6 months in both male and female rabbits. The results of observations showed that noopept administered in this dose range induced no irreversible pathologic changes in the organs and systems studied and exhibited no allergenic, immunotoxic, and mutagen activity. The drug affected neither the generative function nor the antenatal or postnatal progeny development. Noopept produced a dose-dependent suppression of inflammation reaction to concanavalin A and stimulated the cellular and humoral immune response in mice. PMID:12025790

  8. A European pharmaceutical company initiative challenging the regulatory requirement for acute toxicity studies in pharmaceutical drug development.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sally; Delongeas, Jean-Luc; Donald, Elizabeth; Dreher, David; Festag, Matthias; Kervyn, Sophie; Lampo, Ann; Nahas, Kamil; Nogues, Vicente; Ockert, Deborah; Quinn, Kirsty; Old, Sally; Pickersgill, Nigel; Somers, Kev; Stark, Claudia; Stei, Peter; Waterson, Lynne; Chapman, Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    Regulatory guidelines indicate acute toxicity studies in animals are considered necessary for pharmaceuticals intended for human use. This is the only study type where lethality is mentioned as an endpoint. The studies are carried out, usually in rodents, to support marketing of new drugs and to identify the minimum lethal dose. A European initiative including 18 companies has undertaken an evidence-based review of acute toxicity studies and assessed the value of the data generated. Preclinical and clinical information was shared on 74 compounds. The analysis indicated acute toxicity data was not used to (i) terminate drugs from development (ii) support dose selection for repeat dose studies in animals or (iii) to set doses in the first clinical trials in humans. The conclusion of the working group is that acute toxicity studies are not needed prior to first clinical trials in humans. Instead, information can be obtained from other studies, which are performed at more relevant doses for humans and are already an integral part of drug development. The conclusions have been discussed and agreed with representatives of regulatory bodies from the US, Japan and Europe.

  9. Toxicity and Safety Profiles of Methanolic Extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharwan, Gotmi; Jain, Parag; Pandey, Ravindra; Shukla, Shiv Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goals of this research were to evaluate acute (single-dose) and sub-acute (repeated-dose) toxicity profiles of methanolic extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar rats and to assess the safety profile of PI by observing physiological changes, mortality, changes in body weight, the histopathology of body organs, the hematology and the biochemistry of the animals. Methods: The toxicity profile of PI was evaluated using Wistar rats of both sexes. Animals were divided into four groups: Group 1; control group (normal saline), Group 2; PI-1 (250 mg/kg), Group 3; PI-2 (500 mg/kg), Group 4; PL-3 (1,000 mg/kg). An acute-toxicity study in which animals received a single dose of PI extract (2,000 mg/ kg) and were then observed for 14 days for changes in skin, fur, eye color, mucous membrane secretions and excretions, gait, posture, and tonic or clonic movements was performed according to guideline 425 of the Organization of Economic and Corporation Development (OECD). In the repeated-dose toxicity study (OECD – 407) animals received a daily dose of PI extract for 28 days (4 weeks). The parameters observed in this study include body weight, hematology and biochemistry of the animals. Results: In the acute toxicity study, no mortalities or changes in behavior were noted in the animals. The repeated-dose toxicity study was also devoid of any toxicity in the animals during the 28 days of testing with PI extract. The extract did not alter- the body weight, hematology or biochemistry of the animals. The methanolic extract of PI was to be found safe to the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for the single- dose and repeated-dose toxicity tests in rats. Conclusion: The methanolic extract of PI was devoid of toxicity; hence, it can be used for various ayurvedic preparations and treatments of diseases.

  10. Toxicity and Safety Profiles of Methanolic Extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharwan, Gotmi; Jain, Parag; Pandey, Ravindra; Shukla, Shiv Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goals of this research were to evaluate acute (single-dose) and sub-acute (repeated-dose) toxicity profiles of methanolic extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar rats and to assess the safety profile of PI by observing physiological changes, mortality, changes in body weight, the histopathology of body organs, the hematology and the biochemistry of the animals. Methods: The toxicity profile of PI was evaluated using Wistar rats of both sexes. Animals were divided into four groups: Group 1; control group (normal saline), Group 2; PI-1 (250 mg/kg), Group 3; PI-2 (500 mg/kg), Group 4; PL-3 (1,000 mg/kg). An acute-toxicity study in which animals received a single dose of PI extract (2,000 mg/ kg) and were then observed for 14 days for changes in skin, fur, eye color, mucous membrane secretions and excretions, gait, posture, and tonic or clonic movements was performed according to guideline 425 of the Organization of Economic and Corporation Development (OECD). In the repeated-dose toxicity study (OECD – 407) animals received a daily dose of PI extract for 28 days (4 weeks). The parameters observed in this study include body weight, hematology and biochemistry of the animals. Results: In the acute toxicity study, no mortalities or changes in behavior were noted in the animals. The repeated-dose toxicity study was also devoid of any toxicity in the animals during the 28 days of testing with PI extract. The extract did not alter- the body weight, hematology or biochemistry of the animals. The methanolic extract of PI was to be found safe to the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for the single- dose and repeated-dose toxicity tests in rats. Conclusion: The methanolic extract of PI was devoid of toxicity; hence, it can be used for various ayurvedic preparations and treatments of diseases. PMID:27695635

  11. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™) in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Koura, Seiko; Chung, Catherine; Tafazoli, Shahrzad; Roberts, Ashley

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium salt (BioPQQ™), as a supplemental food ingredient, was evaluated in a range of oral toxicity studies in rats including an acute study, a 14-day preliminary and a 28-day repeated-dose study, and a 13-week subchronic study. The median lethal dose of BioPQQ™ was shown to be 1000-2000mg/kg body weight (bw) in male and 500-1000mg/kgbw in female rats. In the 14-day study, high doses of BioPQQ™ resulted in increases in relative kidney weights with associated histopathology in female rats only, while a follow-up 28-day study in female animals resulted in increases in urinary protein and crystals. These findings were reversible, and resolved during the recovery period. In the 13-week study, a number of clinical chemistry findings and histopathological changes were noted, which were deemed to be of no toxicological significance, as the levels were within the historical control range, were not dose-dependent, occurred at a similar frequency in control groups, or only occurred in the control group. Based on these findings, a no-observed-adverse-effect level of 100mg/kgbw/day was determined for BioPQQ™ in rats, the highest dose tested in the 13-week study.

  12. Clinical and Pathological Effects of Short-term Cyanide Repeated Dosing to Goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this work is to determine and describe the effects of subacute cyanide toxicity to goats. Eight female goats were divided into two groups. The first group of five animals was treated with 8.0mg KCN kg-1 body weight day -1 for seven consecutive days. The second group of three animal...

  13. The toxicity and pharmacokinetics of dihydrosanguinarine in rat: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vrublova, Eva; Vostalova, Jitka; Vecera, Rostislav; Klejdus, Borivoj; Stejskal, David; Kosina, Pavel; Zdarilova, Adela; Svobodova, Alena; Lichnovsky, Vaclav; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dvorak, Zdenek; Vicar, Jaroslav; Simanek, Vilim; Ulrichova, Jitka

    2008-07-01

    The quaternary benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid sanguinarine (SG) is the main component of Sangrovit, a natural livestock feed additive. Dihydrosanguinarine (DHSG) has recently been identified as a SG metabolite in rat. The conversion of SG to DHSG is a likely elimination pathway of SG in mammals. This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of DHSG in male Wistar rats at concentrations of 100 and 500 ppm DHSG in feed for 90 days (average doses of 14 and 58 mg DHSG/kg body weight/day). No significant alterations in body or organ weights, macroscopic details of organs, histopathology of liver, ileum, kidneys, tongue, heart or gingiva, clinical chemistry or hematology markers in blood in the DHSG-treated animals were found compared to controls. No lymphocyte DNA damage by Comet assay, formation of DNA adducts in liver by 32P-postlabeling, modulation of cytochrome P450 1A1/2 or changes in oxidative stress parameters were found. Thus, repeated dosing of DHSG for 90 days at up to 500 ppm in the diet (i.e. approximately 58 mg/kg/day) showed no evidence of toxicity in contrast to results published in the literature. In parallel, DHSG pharmacokinetics was studied in rat after oral doses 9.1 or 91 mg/kg body weight. The results showed that DHSG undergoes enterohepatic cycling with maximum concentration in plasma at the first or second hour following application. DHSG is cleared from the body relatively quickly (its plasma levels drop to zero after 12 or 18 h, respectively). PMID:18495316

  14. Effects of repeated doses and continuous infusions of the growth hormone-releasing peptide hexarelin in conscious male rats.

    PubMed

    Conley, L K; Gaillard, R C; Giustina, A; Brogan, R S; Wehrenberg, W B

    1998-09-01

    We have previously shown that hexarelin, a novel GH-releasing peptide (GHRP), is able to elicit GH release when administered i.v., s.c. or by mouth and that it is a more potent GH secretagogue than GHRP-6. In the current study, we investigated the effects of hexarelin administered as repeated doses at 2 h intervals or as a continuous 6, 30 or 174 h infusion to conscious male rats. In the first experiment, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared with dual indwelling jugular catheters. On the day of experimentation, these animals received three 25 micrograms/kg i.v. boluses of hexarelin at 2 h intervals with blood sampling at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after each dose. The mean peak GH response and the mean area under the GH response curve (AUC) for the 30 min after each administration were calculated and are reported as the mean +/- S.E.M. For both the peak and AUC results there was a significant (P < 0.05) difference in the GH response noted between the first (peak 301 +/- 37 ng/ml; AUC 5585 +/- 700 ng/ml per 30 min) and second (peak 149 +/- 47 ng/ml; AUC 3056 +/- 908 ng/ml per 30 min) injections of hexarelin, but not between the first and third (peak 214 +/- 49 ng/ml; AUC 3862 +/- 844 ng/ml per 30 min). In a second series of experiments, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received continuous infusions (100 micrograms/h) of hexarelin or saline (1 ml/h) for 6, 30 or 174 h. Blood samples were collected every 20 min for the duration of the 6 h infusion and for the last 6 h of the two longer hexarelin infusions. Plasma GH concentrations peaked within 40 min of the initiation of infusion, but soon returned to basal levels. Mean plasma GH concentrations did not differ between any of the treatment groups, nor did any of the parameters of pulsatile hormone release analyzed. No significant differences in plasma corticosterone concentrations were noted between any of the treatment groups. On the other hand, while neither the 6 h (941 +/- 70 ng/ml) nor the 30 h (954

  15. Profiling the reproductive toxicity of chemicals from multigeneration studies in the toxicity reference database

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multigeneration reproduction studies are used to characterize parental and offspring systemic toxicity, as well as reproductive toxicity of pesticides, industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Results from 329 multigeneration studies on 316 chemicals have been digitized into sta...

  16. Modeling Single and Repeated Dose Pharmacokinetics of PFOA in Mice (J)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) displays complicated pharmacokinetics in that serum concentrations indicate long half-lives despite which steady state appears to be achieved rapidly. In this study, serum and tissue concentration time-courses were obtained for male and female CD1 m...

  17. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of

  18. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of

  19. Pharmacokinetics of repeated doses of intravenous cocaine across the menstrual cycle in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzette M; Foltin, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies in rodents suggest that there are sex differences in response to cocaine that are related to fluctuations in the ovarian hormones of females. Given that female rhesus monkeys have menstrual cycles that are remarkably similar to those of humans, they provide an ideal laboratory animal model for assessing the effects of cocaine across the menstrual cycle. The present study assessed the effects of 4 injections of intravenous (i.v.) cocaine (0.00, 0.25 or 0.50 mg/kg), spaced 15 min apart, in 4 female rhesus monkeys. Each monkey was tested with each dose during 4 phases of the menstrual cycle: menses, midfollicular, periovulatory and midluteal. Estradiol and progesterone levels were measured each session before cocaine administration to verify phase of the menstrual cycle. Cocaine and cocaine metabolite levels were measured 5 min after each cocaine dose and 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min after the last cocaine dose. Similarly, levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin levels were measured before, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 120 min after the last cocaine dose. Cocaine and metabolite levels increased as a function of dose, but there were minimal differences across the menstrual cycle following repeated injections of cocaine. With a few exceptions, LH levels decreased as a function of time within the session, with no differences as a function of cocaine dose. Cocaine produced transient increases in LH levels during the luteal phase, with maximal levels occurring after the second cocaine injection. Lastly, cocaine substantially decreased prolactin levels across all menstrual cycle phases. Taken together, these data indicate that any behavioral differences observed either across the menstrual cycle or between males and females, are probably not related to alterations in the pharmacokinetics of cocaine across the menstrual cycle. PMID:16426669

  20. TOXICANT IDENTIFICATION STUDIES ON A HARBOR SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation summarizes the results of experiments on sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) techniques that allow researchers to characterize and identify chemical causes of acute toxicity in sediments that can be applied using the 10-d solid-phase sediment toxicity t...

  1. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats.

  2. Acute Toxicity-Supported Chronic Toxicity Prediction: A k-Nearest Neighbor Coupled Read-Across Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Swapnil; Friedman, Ran; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    A k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification model was constructed for 118 RDT NEDO (Repeated Dose Toxicity New Energy and industrial technology Development Organization; currently known as the Hazard Evaluation Support System (HESS)) database chemicals, employing two acute toxicity (LD50)-based classes as a response and using a series of eight PaDEL software-derived fingerprints as predictor variables. A model developed using Estate type fingerprints correctly predicted the LD50 classes for 70 of 94 training set chemicals and 19 of 24 test set chemicals. An individual category was formed for each of the chemicals by extracting its corresponding k-analogs that were identified by k-NN classification. These categories were used to perform the read-across study for prediction of the chronic toxicity, i.e., Lowest Observed Effect Levels (LOEL). We have successfully predicted the LOELs of 54 of 70 training set chemicals (77%) and 14 of 19 test set chemicals (74%) to within an order of magnitude from their experimental LOEL values. Given the success thus far, we conclude that if the k-NN model predicts LD50 classes correctly for a certain chemical, then the k-analogs of such a chemical can be successfully used for data gap filling for the LOEL. This model should support the in silico prediction of repeated dose toxicity. PMID:26006240

  3. Transcriptomic studies on liver toxicity of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Toska, Endrit; Zagorsky, Robert; Figler, Bryan; Cheng, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen is widely used as a pain reliever and to reduce fever. At high doses, it can cause severe hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen overdose has become the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. The mechanisms for acetaminophen-induced liver injury are unclear. Transcriptomic studies can identify the changes in expression of thousands of genes when exposed to supratherapeutic doses of acetaminophen. These studies elucidated the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and also provide insight into future development of diagnosis and treatment options for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. The following is a brief overview of some recent transcriptomic studies and gene-expression-based prediction models on liver toxicity induced by acetaminophen.

  4. Toxicity Evaluation of Pũrṇa Cantirotaya Centũram, a Siddha Medicine in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, B.; Ramaswamy, R. S.; Suba, V.

    2015-01-01

    Pũrṇa Cantirotaya Centũram (PCC), a herbometallic formulation of Siddha medicine, consists of mercury, sulphur, and gold, processed with red cotton flower and plantain stem pith juices. To evaluate its safety, acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. In acute study, PCC was administered orally at 5, 50, 300, and 2000 mg/kg body weight. Animals were observed for toxic signs for 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose toxicity study, PCC was administered at 2.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg body weight daily for 28 days. Satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of PCC. In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed. It revealed that the LD50 cut-off value of PCC is between 2000 and 5000 mg/kg body weight. The repeated dose study did not show evidence of any treatment related changes in all observations up to the high dose level, when compared with the control. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities except mild hyperplasia of stomach in high dose group. This study provides scientific validation for the safety of PCC. PMID:27347522

  5. Toxicity Evaluation of Pũrṇa Cantirotaya Centũram, a Siddha Medicine in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Chitra, B; Ramaswamy, R S; Suba, V

    2015-01-01

    Pũrṇa Cantirotaya Centũram (PCC), a herbometallic formulation of Siddha medicine, consists of mercury, sulphur, and gold, processed with red cotton flower and plantain stem pith juices. To evaluate its safety, acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. In acute study, PCC was administered orally at 5, 50, 300, and 2000 mg/kg body weight. Animals were observed for toxic signs for 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose toxicity study, PCC was administered at 2.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg body weight daily for 28 days. Satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of PCC. In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed. It revealed that the LD50 cut-off value of PCC is between 2000 and 5000 mg/kg body weight. The repeated dose study did not show evidence of any treatment related changes in all observations up to the high dose level, when compared with the control. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities except mild hyperplasia of stomach in high dose group. This study provides scientific validation for the safety of PCC. PMID:27347522

  6. Bull Run Fossil Plant toxicity biomonitoring study

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, P.A.; Moses, J.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the results of toxicity testing of the whole waste discharge from the Bull Run Steam-Electric Plant ashpond. Water chemistry tests were conducted for heavy metals content and suspended solids. Both acute and chronic toxicity tests were conducted on Daphnia pulex, Ceriodaphnia spp., Pimephales promelas, Micropterus salmoides, Lepomis macrochirus, and Cyprinus carpio. (ACR)

  7. Meta-analysis of toxicity and teratogenicity of 133 chemicals from zebrafish developmental toxicity studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish developmental toxicity testing is an emerging field, which faces considerable challenges regarding data meta-analysis and the establishment of standardized test protocols. Here, we present an initial correlation study on toxicity of 133 chemicals based on data in the li...

  8. Corrosion-induced Whole Effluent Toxicity from a cooling tower: A toxicity reduction evaluation case study

    SciTech Connect

    Fort, D.J.; Stover, E.L.; Talley, J.M.; Copenhaver, M.B.

    1996-11-01

    As the result of Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) test failures with Daphnia pulex, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) required an industrial facility discharging approximately 5 million gallons per day (MGD) of recirculating cooling water obtained from a large freshwater river to conduct a Toxicity Reduction Evaluation (TRE) program. Under the terms of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit, the facility was required to conduct 48-hour acute toxicity tests with D. pulex and Pimephales promelas (fathead minnow). Although effluent toxicity to D. pulex was consistently observed, no toxicity was induced to the fathead minnow during the TRE program. The situation was further complicated by the fact that the recirculating cooling water was discharged back into the same river. The objectives of the TRE program were to investigate the causes of toxicity, locate potential sources of the suspected toxicant(s), and identify practicable toxicity reduction methodologies to be used. The TRE program approach and results from the associated studies are presented in this report, including a successful remedy for the WET problem.

  9. Assessing the mammalian toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances under the rubric of the HPV program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Verstuyft, Allen W; Roth, Randy N; McKee, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In 1998, the US EPA announced the HPV Challenge Program, a voluntary chemical data collection effort. The Petroleum HPV Testing Group (PHPVTG(1)) volunteered to provide data on approximately 110 high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), i.e. substances with final boiling points ≥ approximately 650°F (343°C). These HBPS are substances of unknown and variable composition (UVCBs) that are composed of numerous individual constituents. Toxicity studies have shown that some HBPS can produce systemic (repeat-dose) and developmental effects, and some are mutagenic under in vitro conditions. The papers in this supplement show that these effects are related to the profiles of aromatic constituents in these substances. Further, it is shown that the effects on selected repeat-dose and developmental toxicity endpoints and mutagenic activity in bacterial assays can be predicted from compositional information using models based on the aromatic-ring class profile, "ARC profile" as defined by gas chromatographic separation of the DMSO-soluble fraction of the starting materials. This chromatographic method and the predictive models provide an efficient means of characterizing for screening purposes the potential for repeat-dose, developmental effects and bacterial mutagenicity of HBPS and can reduce the number of animal tests that would be required if these tests were conducted on all 110 HBPS.

  10. A strategy for safety assessment of chemicals with data gaps for developmental and/or reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Karen; Daston, George; Fisher, Joan; Lester, Cathy; Naciff, Jorge M; Rufer, Echoleah S; Stuard, Sharon B; Woeller, Kara

    2015-07-01

    Alternative methods for full replacement of in vivo tests for systemic endpoints are not yet available. Read across methods provide a means of maximizing utilization of existing data. A limitation for the use of read across methods is that they require analogs with test data. Repeat dose data are more frequently available than are developmental and/or reproductive toxicity (DART) studies. There is historical precedent for using repeat dose data in combination with a database uncertainty factor (UF) to account for missing DART data. We propose that use of the DART decision tree (Wu et al., 2013), in combination with a database UF, provides a path forward for DART data gap filling that better utilizes all of the data. Our hypothesis was that chemical structures identified by the DART tree as being related to structures with known DART toxicity would potentially have lower DART NOAELs compared to their respective repeat dose NOAELs than structures that lacked this association. Our analysis supports this hypothesis and as a result also supports that the DART decision tree can be used as part of weight of evidence in the selection of an appropriate DART database UF factor.

  11. Assessing the mammalian toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances under the rubric of the HPV program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Verstuyft, Allen W; Roth, Randy N; McKee, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In 1998, the US EPA announced the HPV Challenge Program, a voluntary chemical data collection effort. The Petroleum HPV Testing Group (PHPVTG(1)) volunteered to provide data on approximately 110 high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), i.e. substances with final boiling points ≥ approximately 650°F (343°C). These HBPS are substances of unknown and variable composition (UVCBs) that are composed of numerous individual constituents. Toxicity studies have shown that some HBPS can produce systemic (repeat-dose) and developmental effects, and some are mutagenic under in vitro conditions. The papers in this supplement show that these effects are related to the profiles of aromatic constituents in these substances. Further, it is shown that the effects on selected repeat-dose and developmental toxicity endpoints and mutagenic activity in bacterial assays can be predicted from compositional information using models based on the aromatic-ring class profile, "ARC profile" as defined by gas chromatographic separation of the DMSO-soluble fraction of the starting materials. This chromatographic method and the predictive models provide an efficient means of characterizing for screening purposes the potential for repeat-dose, developmental effects and bacterial mutagenicity of HBPS and can reduce the number of animal tests that would be required if these tests were conducted on all 110 HBPS. PMID:23247262

  12. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure. PMID:23569765

  13. Distribution of radio-labeled N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Sprague-Dawley rats and its effect on glutathione metabolism following single and repeat dosing by oral gavage.

    PubMed

    Arfsten, Darryl P; Johnson, Eric W; Wilfong, Erin R; Jung, Anne E; Bobb, Andrew J

    2007-01-01

    were measured in the skin and kidney in association with repeat administration of 1,200 mg/kg NAC. Glutathione peroxidase (GxP) activity was increased in the skin, kidney, and liver suggesting that oxidative stress was occurring in these tissues in response to repeat dosing with NAC. Overall, the results of this study present the possibility that NAC could provide some benefit in preventing or reducing toxicity related to exposure to chemical irritants (particularly sulfur mustard) in some tissues by increasing tissue NAC and/or cysteine levels, GSH concentrations, and GST activity. However, follow-on studies in animals are needed to confirm that oral administration of single and multiple doses of NAC can significantly reduce skin, eye, and lung toxicity associated with sulfur mustard exposure. The finding that GxP activity is elevated, albeit transiently, following repeat administration of NAC suggests that repeat administration of NAC may induce oxidative stress in some tissues and further studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  14. Toxicity studies of a polyurethane rigid foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Relative toxicity tests were performed on a polyurethane foam containing a trimethylopropane-based polyol and an organophosphate flame retardant. The routine screening procedure involved the exposure of four Swiss albino male mice in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber to the products generated by pyrolyzing a 1.00 g sample at a heating rate of 40 deg C/min from 200 to 800 C in the absence of air flow. In addition to the routine screening, experiments were performed with a very rapid rise to 800 C, with nominal 16 and 48 ml/sec air flow and with varying sample rates. No unusual toxicity was observed with either gradual or rapid pyrolysis to 800 C. Convulsions and seizures similar to those previously reported were observed when the materials were essentially flash pyrolyzed at 800 C in the presence of air flow, and the toxicity appeared unusual because of low sample weights required to produce death.

  15. Ingestion of chromium(VI) in drinking water by human volunteers: Absorption, distribution, and excretion of single and repeated doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kerger, B.D.; Corbett, G.E.; Dodge, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the magnitude of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] absorption, distribution, and excretion following oral exposure to 5 and 10 mg Cr(VI)/L in drinking water administered as a single bolus dose or for 3 d at a dosage of 1 L/d. Adult male volunteers were used. In the bolus dose studies, a fairly consistent pattern of urinary chromium excretion was observed, with an average half life of about 39 h. However, 4-d total urinary chromium excretion and peak concentrations in urine and blood varied considerably among the 5 volunteers. Studies of repeated exposure to small volumes ingested at a more gradual rate showed similar urinary chromium excretion patterns but generally lower chromium uptake/excretion. These data suggest that virtually all of the ingested Cr(VI) at 5 and 10 mg Cr(VI)/L was reduced to Cr(III) before entering the bloodstream. The interindividual differences in total chromium uptake and excretion are plausibly explained by ingestion of appreciable doses on an empty stomach, likely results in the formation of well-absorbed Cr(III) organic complexes. No clinical indications of toxicity in the volunteers and the patterns of blood uptake and urinary excretion of chromium are consistent with a predominant uptake of Cr(III) organic complexes that are excreted more slowly than inorganic forms of Cr(III). Therefore, it appears that the endogenous reducing agents within the upper gastrointestinal tract and the blood provide sufficient reducing potential to prevent any substantial systemic uptake of Cr(VI) following drinking-water exposures at 5-10 mg Cr(VI)/L. Based on these data, the chemical environment in the gastrointestinal tract and the blood is effective even under relative fasting condition in reducing Cr(VI) to one or more forms of Cr(III). 54 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL[number sign]830331, MG-122IBP-420[degree]F, MG-122 420--720[degree]F, and MG-122 720[degree]F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC[number sign]11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC[number sign]11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  17. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL{number_sign}830331, MG-122IBP-420{degree}F, MG-122 420--720{degree}F, and MG-122 720{degree}F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC{number_sign}11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC{number_sign}11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  18. Reproductive and developmental toxicity testing: Examination of the extended one-generation reproductive toxicity study guideline.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Shakil A; Dorato, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    An important aspect of safety assessment of chemicals (industrial and agricultural chemicals and pharmaceuticals) is determining their potential reproductive and developmental toxicity. A number of guidelines have outlined a series of separate reproductive and developmental toxicity studies from fertilization through adulthood and in some cases to second generation. The Extended One-Generation Reproductive Toxicity Study (EOGRTS) is the most recent and comprehensive guideline in this series. EOGRTS design makes toxicity testing progressive, comprehensive, and efficient by assessing key endpoints across multiple life-stages at relevant doses using a minimum number of animals, combining studies/evaluations and proposing tiered-testing approaches based on outcomes. EOGRTS determines toxicity during preconception, development of embryo/fetus and newborn, adolescence, and adults, with specific emphasis on the nervous, immunological, and endocrine systems, EOGRTS also assesses maternal and paternal toxicity. However, EOGRTS guideline is complex, criteria for selecting doses is unclear, and monitoring systemic dose during the course of the study for better interpretation and human relevance is not clear. This paper discusses potential simplification of EOGRTS, suggests procedures for relevant dose selection and monitors systemic dose at multiple life-stages for better interpretation of data and human relevance.

  19. Drinking water toxicity study of the environmental contaminant--Bromate.

    PubMed

    Dongmei, Liu; Zhiwei, Wang; Qi, Zhu; Fuyi, Cui; Yujuan, Shan; Xiaodong, Liu

    2015-12-01

    Bromate is a byproduct of water disinfection that is produced when waters contain bromide treated with ozone. To investigate the level of the toxicity of bromate and find the most sensitive indicators in a short time, a series of toxicological assessments were conducted including the acute toxicity, cumulative toxicity, genetic toxicity and subacute toxicity of bromate (using Potassium Bromate to represent bromate). The LD50 of orally administered Potassium Bromate was 215 mg/kg in Wistar rats and 464 mg/kg in ICR mice. The cumulative toxicity of Potassium Bromate was not obvious. The Ames test, mouse bone marrow cell micronucleus test and mouse sperm abnormality test did not indicate mutagenicity. The results of the subacute study did not exhibit significant differences in most of the parameters, except the white blood cell count, which was significantly decreased in male rats. In addition, Potassium Bromate influenced the albumin, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in male rats to various extents. A thorough analysis of the above tests clearly demonstrates that bromate has toxicity, not obvious cumulative toxicity and the white blood cell count can be used as an indicator to reflect the toxicity of bromate and investigate bromate's toxic mechanism.

  20. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  1. Harmonization of animal clinical pathology testing in toxicity and safety studies. The Joint Scientific Committee for International Harmonization of Clinical Pathology Testing.

    PubMed

    Weingand, K; Brown, G; Hall, R; Davies, D; Gossett, K; Neptun, D; Waner, T; Matsuzawa, T; Salemink, P; Froelke, W; Provost, J P; Dal Negro, G; Batchelor, J; Nomura, M; Groetsch, H; Boink, A; Kimball, J; Woodman, D; York, M; Fabianson-Johnson, E; Lupart, M; Melloni, E

    1996-02-01

    Ten scientific organizations formed a joint international committee to provide expert recommendations for clinical pathology testing of laboratory animal species used in regulated toxicity and safety studies. For repeated-dose studies in rodent species, clinical pathology testing is necessary at study termination. Interim study testing may not be necessary in long-duration studies provided that it has been done in short-duration studies using dose levels not substantially lower than those used in the long-duration studies. For repeated-dose studies in nonrodent species, clinical pathology testing is recommended at study termination and at least once at an earlier interval. For studies of 2 to 6 weeks in duration in nonrodent species, testing is also recommended within 7 days of initiation of dosing, unless it compromises the health of the animals. If a study contains recovery groups, clinical pathology testing at study termination is recommended. The core hematology tests recommended are total leukocyte (white blood cell) count, absolute differential leukocyte count, erythrocyte (red blood cell) count, evaluation of red blood cell morphology, platelet (thrombocyte) count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit (or packed cell volume), mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. In the absence of automated reticulocyte counting capabilities, blood smears from each animal should be prepared for reticulocyte counts. Bone marrow cytology slides should be prepared from each animal at termination. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time (or appropriate alternatives) and platelet count are the minimum recommended laboratory tests of hemostasis. The core clinical chemistry tests recommended are glucose, urea nitrogen, creatinine, total protein, albumin, calculated globulin, calcium, sodium, potassium, total cholesterol, and appropriate hepatocellular and hepatobiliary tests. For hepatocellular

  2. The role of metabolic biomarkers in drug toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolic profiling is a technique that can potentially provide more sensitive and specific biomarkers of toxicity than the current clinical measures benefiting preclinical and clinical drug studies. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) platforms have been used for metabolic profiling studies of drug toxicity. Not only can both techniques provide novel biomarker(s) of toxicity but the combination of both techniques gives a broader range of metabolites evaluated. Changes in metabolic patterns can provide insight into mechanism(s) of toxicity and help to eliminate a potentially toxic new chemical entity earlier in the developmental process. Metabolic profiling offers numerous advantages in toxicological research and screening as sample collection and preparation are relatively simple. Further, sample throughput, reproducibility, and accuracy are high. The area of drug toxicity of therapeutic compounds has already been impacted by metabolic profiling studies and will continue to be impacted as new, more specific biomarker(s) are found. In order for a biomarker or pattern of biomarkers to be accepted, it must be shown that they originate from the target tissue of interest. Metabolic profiling studies are amenable to any biofluid or tissue sample making it possible to link the changes noted in urine for instance as originating from renal injury. Additionally, the ease of sample collection makes it possible to follow a single animal or subject over time in order to determine whether and when the toxicity resolves itself. This review focuses on the advantages of metabolic profiling for drug toxicity studies.

  3. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Taylor, Larry

    2008-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. NASA established the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, LADTAG has recommended investigating its toxicity in the lungs of laboratory animals. After receiving this recommendation, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in exposed rodents. The rodent pulmonary toxicity studies proposed here are the same as those proposed by the LADTAG. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal instillation (ITI). This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. We succeeded in completing an ITI study on JSC-1 lunar dust simulant in mice (Lam et al., Inhalation Toxicology 14:901-916, 2002, and Inhalation Toxicology 14: 917-928, 2002), and have conducted a pilot ITI study to examine the acute toxicity of an Apollo lunar (highland) dust sample. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies have been planned to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The ITI results will also be

  4. Toxicity study of oxfendazole in pregnant sows.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D W

    1982-08-21

    The safety of oxfendazole when administered to pregnant sows was assessed. Thirty-six pregnant sows were dosed orally on repeated occasions at dose rates of 4.5 mg/kg bodyweight and 13.5 mg/kg during the critical period of embryo organogenesis and implantation. Twelve sows were observed as untreated controls. Oxfendazole was administered as 6.48 per cent medicated pellets. Records were kept of the reproductive performance of all 48 sows. There were no obviously drug-related clinical signs of toxicity in the sows after treatment with oxfendazole, neither were drug-related anatomical or behavioural abnormalities detected in the newborn pigs.

  5. Studies on the mechanism of benzene toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, R; Dimitriadis, E; Guy, R; Hu, P; Cooper, K; Bauer, H; Witz, G; Goldstein, B D

    1989-01-01

    Using the 59Fe uptake method of Lee et al. it was shown that erythropoiesis in female mice was inhibited following IP administration of benzene, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, and muconaldehyde. Toluene protected against the effects of benzene. Coadministration of phenol plus either hydroquinone or catechol resulted in greatly increased toxicity. The combination of metabolites most effective in reducing iron uptake was hydroquinone plus muconaldehyde. We have also shown that treating animals with benzene leads to the formation of adducts of bone marrow DNA as measured by the 32P-postlabeling technique. PMID:2792049

  6. Sub-acute toxicity evaluation of an aqueous extract of Labisia pumila, a Malaysian herb.

    PubMed

    Singh, G D; Ganjoo, M; Youssouf, M S; Koul, A; Sharma, R; Singh, S; Sangwan, P L; Koul, S; Ahamad, D B; Johri, R K

    2009-10-01

    Labisia pumila (Myrsinaceae), is a popular herb among the women in Malaysia known locally as "Kacip Fatimah". Recently many nutraceutical products containing the powdered or extracted parts of the plant have become available for women's health care. However no evaluation of the effect of the repeated dosing of any herbal product of this plant had been undertaken prior to a 28-day sub-acute study presented in this report. The results showed that a dose of 50mg/kg of an aqueous extract of L. pumila corresponded to no-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL), whereas higher doses were associated with some toxicity concerns. PMID:19654032

  7. Study on wastewater toxicity using ToxTrak™ method.

    PubMed

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Ślęzak, Radoslaw; Klink, Małgorzata

    2016-05-01

    ToxTrak™ method is an analytical tool for the measurement of toxicity of drinking water, wastewater and natural water. It is based upon the estimation of the inhibitive effect on bacterial respiration processes. The main aim of this work was to test the applicability of ToxTrak™ method in the assessment of wastewater toxicity in a full-scale WWTP in Poland. In order to achieve it, the study was divided into two parts. First, the validation of ToxTrak™ method was performed. Second, wastewater toxicity was monitored in the long- and short-term campaigns. Validation of ToxTrak™ method revealed that the indigenous biomass (mixed cultures of activated sludge microorganisms) was more sensitive than Escherichia coli for both materials (wastewater and phenol) tested. The values of degree of inhibition determined for phenol towards indigenous biomass and E. coli were close to each other, and no statistically significant difference between them was found. It confirmed the reliability of the results obtained with the help of ToxTrak™ test. The toxicity of the effluent was always lower than that of the influent and the linear correlation between them was found. Despite, the decrease of wastewater toxicity in the WWTP, the effluents were ranked as toxic or highly toxic according to the classification of wastewater based upon the acute toxicity. PMID:26832868

  8. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  9. Acute and chronic toxicity studies with monochlorobenzene in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahlich, G.M.; Larson, R.E.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicity of monochlorobenzene (CB) was investigated in rainbow trout following acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration and chronic exposure via the water in a continuously flowing system for 15 or 30 days. In the acute study overt toxicity and hepatotoxicity were monitored over a 96-h time period. Variables measured to assess toxicity included weight changes, liver weight to body weight ratios, behavioral changes, alanine aminotransferase activity (GPT), sulfobromophthalein (BSP) retention, total plasma protein concentration and liver histopathology. In the chronic study the same measures of toxicity were followed as well as food consumption and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity. Upon acute i.p. exposure the toxicant (9.8 mmol/kg) caused behavioral changes in the fish which were consistent with the known anesthetic properties of CB in mammals. Elevations in BSP retention and GPT activity, and histopathology indicated that CB was hepatotoxic in fish. The LC50 of CB in trout exposed via the water for 96 h was 4.7 mg/l. Chronic exposure of trout to 2 or 3 mg/l CB resulted in similar behavioral changes as seen in the acute study. Liver toxicity was evident from elevations in GPT activity. BSP retention and AP activity appeared to be affected by the nutritional status of the trout as much as by the CB treatment. After 30 days of exposure to 3 mg/l CB, trout appeared to have developed some tolerance to the toxic effects.

  10. Subchronic (13-week) toxicity and prenatal developmental toxicity studies of dietary astaxanthin in rats.

    PubMed

    Vega, Katherine; Edwards, James; Beilstein, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Two studies examined the effects of dietary astaxanthin on Hanlbm Wistar (SPF) rats. Male and female rats receiving astaxanthin concentrations up to 1.52% of the feed for 13 weeks showed no evidence of toxicity; no effects were noted in the offspring of female rats exposed to astaxanthin at up to 1.39% of the feed during the period of organogenesis (GD 7-16). Discoloration of the feces and yellow pigmentation of adipose tissue was seen in the 13-week study, an intrinsic property of the substance, and not a sign of toxicity. Differences between the control and astaxanthin groups, some of which reached statistical significance, were generally sporadic (i.e., transient and/or not related to astaxanthin concentration) and not considered of biological or toxicological significance. Blood cholesterol levels, for example, were greater in animals receiving astaxanthin for 13 weeks, but remained within the normal range. The highest dietary concentration of astaxanthin in each of the studies is proposed as a no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). Specifically, 1.52% for the 13-week study, corresponding to a mean intake of 1033 mg/kg bw/day (range: 880-1240 mg/kg bw/day), and 1.39% for the developmental toxicity study, corresponding to a mean intake of approximately 830 mg/kg bw/day (range: 457-957 mg/kg bw/day).

  11. Toxic Hazards Research Unit annual report, 1990. Annual report No. 27 (Final), 1 Oct 89-15 Nov 90

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, H.G.; Vinegar, A.; Kinkead, E.R.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents a review of the activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit for the period of 1 October 1989 through 15 November 1990. Research activities focused on toxicity evaluations of aerospace and naval chemicals to include aircraft fuels and rocket fuels, hydraulic fluids, ground water contaminants, and chemical defense simulants. There was increased utilization of multidisciplinary efforts for quantitative toxicology studies and the development and validation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for predicting toxicity responses. The General Toxicology Laboratory conducted acute studies, toxicokinetic studies, repeated-dose studies, and subchronic inhalation studies to include a 90-day continuous inhalation study using the Thomas Domes. The development and characterization of a unique high pressure aerosol generator was a significant adjunct benefitting the study conducted in the Thomas Domes.

  12. Flavorings Boost Toxicity of E-Cigarettes in Lab Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... studies on animals often do not predict clinical effects in humans, the same is true of cell toxicity studies," Conley said. The study findings were published online recently in the journal Tobacco Control . Earlier this year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration extended its authority over tobacco ...

  13. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures.

  14. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. PMID:25857839

  15. Analysis of public oral toxicity data from REACH registrations 2008-2014.

    PubMed

    Luechtefeld, Thomas; Maertens, Alexandra; Russo, Daniel P; Rovida, Costanza; Zhu, Hao; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The European Chemicals Agency, ECHA, made available a total of 13,832 oral toxicity studies for 8,568 substances up to December 2014. 75% of studies were from the retired OECD Test Guideline 401 (11% TG 420, 11% TG 423 and 1.5% TG 425). Concordance across guidelines, evaluated by comparing LD50 values ≥ 2000 or < 2000 mg/kg body weight from chemicals tested multiple times between different guidelines, was at least 75% and for their own repetition more than 90%. In 2009, Bulgheroni et al. created a simple model for predicting acute oral toxicity using no observed adverse effect levels (NOAEL) from 28-day repeated dose toxicity studies in rats. This was reproduced here for 1,625 substances. In 2014, Taylor et al. suggested no added value of the 90-day repeated dose oral toxicity test given the availability of a low 28-day study with some constraints. We confirm that the 28-day NOAEL is predictive (albeit imperfectly) of 90-day NOAELs, however, the suggested constraints did not affect predictivity. 1,059 substances with acute oral toxicity data (268 positives, 791 negatives, all Klimisch score 1) were used for modeling: The Chemical Development Kit was used to generate 27 molecular descriptors and a similarity-informed multilayer perceptron showing 71% sensitivity and 72% specificity. Additionally, the k-nearest neighbors (KNN) algorithm indicated that similarity-based approaches alone may be poor predictors of acute oral toxicity, but can be used to inform the multilayer perceptron model, where this was the feature with highest information value. PMID:26863198

  16. Development of safety profile evaluating pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity of a combination of pioglitazone and olmesartan medoxomil in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pinaki; Nandi, Utpal; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO), an antidiabetic drug and olmesartan medoxomil (OLM), an antihypertensive drug were administered orally alone and in combination to Wistar albino rats for evaluation of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity of individual drugs and their combination. Pharmacokinetic study was performed by orally administering PIO and OLM at single dose of 3 and 2mg/kg, respectively alone and in combination analyzing the plasma samples using LC-MS/MS. Antidiabetic activity evaluation was done in type-2 diabetes mellitus induced animals at same dose level as in pharmacokinetic study daily for 30 days. PIO and/or OLM were administered orally to animals at daily doses of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg for 28 days for toxicity study. There was no significant alteration in the pharmacokinetic parameters of either drug indicating absence of any pharmacokinetic interaction when co-administered. Positive pharmacodynamic interaction between PIO and OLM was established in this study. Two drugs in combination showed no evidence of potentiation of 28-day repeated dose toxicity in animals. Again, drugs, alone and in combination, caused only minor changes in clinical-laboratory tests and histopathological change was not found in the experiment performed. In conclusion, PIO and OLM combination can primarily be stated as safe in terms of present toxicity and pharmacokinetics findings.

  17. Two-generation reproduction toxicity study in rats with methoxychlor.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Hiroaki; Hojo, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Ken L; Shimizu-Endo, Naoko; Araki, Masayuki; Takeuchi-Kashimoto, Yukiko; Saka, Machiko; Teramoto, Shoji

    2012-03-01

    A two-generation reproduction toxicity study was conducted in rats with a reference estrogenic pesticide, methoxychlor, to validate the sensitivity and competency of current guidelines recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency; Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries; and Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development for predicting reproductive toxicity of the test compound based on estrogenic endocrine disrupting effects. Both sexes of SD rats were exposed to methoxychlor in the diet at concentrations of 0, 10, 500 and 1500 ppm for two successive generations. The present study has successfully detected estrogenic activities and reproductive toxicities of methoxychlor, as well as its systemic toxicity. Body weights, body weight gains and food consumption of both sexes of animals were suppressed significantly in the 500 and 1500 ppm groups. Typical reproductive toxicities observed in females of these groups included, but were not limited to, prolonged estrous cycle, reduced fertility, decreased numbers of implantation sites and newborns, decreased ovary weights and/or increased incidences of cystic ovary. Uterine weights of weanlings increased significantly in these groups, suggesting that the sensitivity of this parameter for predicting estrogenic ability of the test compound is comparable to that of the uterotrophic assay. Reproductive toxicities of methoxychlor seemed less potent in males than in females. Methoxychlor delayed preputial separation and significantly reduced sperm counts and reproductive organ weights of males of the 500 and/or 1500 ppm groups; however, most males that failed to impregnate females in the same group showed normal fertility when they were re-mated with untreated females. Neither systemic nor reproductive toxicities appeared in the 10 ppm group.

  18. Historical control data on developmental toxicity studies in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Endoh, Katsumi; Fukushima, Ryou; Fujii, Sakiko; Hara, Hiroaki; Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Hirose, Akihiko; Hojo, Hitoshi; Horimoto, Masao; Hoshino, Nobuhito; Hosokawa, Yoshinori; Imai, Yukari; Inada, Hiroshi; Inawaka, Kunifumi; Itoh, Keiichi; Katsumata, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hirohito; Maeda, Maki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Matsuo, Seiki; Matsuoka, Toshiki; Matsuura, Ikuo; Mineshima, Hiroshi; Miwa, Yoji; Nakano, Nao; Naya, Masato; Noyori, Hiroko; Ohta, Takafumi; Oku, Harutaka; Ono, Atsushi; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Takakura, Ikuro; Tanaka, Ryota; Tateishi, Taishi; Tominaga, Yuko; Uesugi, Tohru; Urakawa, Chizuru; Yabe, Kaoru; Yamashita, Akihito; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Yokoi, Ryohei

    2014-08-01

    Historical control data on rodent developmental toxicity studies, performed between 1994 and 2010, were obtained from 19 laboratories in Japan, including 10 pharmaceutical and chemical companies and nine contract research organizations. Rats, mice, and hamsters were used for developmental toxicity studies. Data included maternal reproductive findings at terminal cesarean sections and fetal findings including the spontaneous incidences of external, visceral, and skeletal anomalies. No noticeable differences were observed in maternal reproductive data between laboratories. Inter-laboratory variations in the incidences of fetuses with anomalies appeared to be due to differences in the selection of observation parameters, observation criteria, classification of the findings, and terminology of fetal alterations. Historical control data are useful for the appropriate interpretation of experimental results and evaluation of the effects of chemical on reproductive and developmental toxicities. PMID:24666250

  19. Aqueous extract of Senecio candicans DC induce liver and kidney damage in a sub-chronic oral toxicity study in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Hariprasath; Raman, Jegadeesh; Pandian, Arjun; Kuppamuthu, Kumaresan; Nanjian, Raaman; Sabaratam, Vikineswary; Naidu, Murali

    2016-08-01

    Senecio candicans DC. (Asteraceae) is used as a remedy for gastric ulcer and stomach pain in the Nilgiris, district, Tamil Nadu. The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the sub-chronic toxicity of an aqueous extract of Senecio candicans (AESC) plant in Wistar albino rats. The study was conducted in consideration of the OECD 408 study design (Repeated Dose 90-Day Oral Toxicity Study in Rodents) and the extract was administered via gavage at doses of 250, 500 or 750 mg/kg body weight per day for 90-days. Hematological, biochemical parameters were determined on days 0, 30, 60 and 90 of administration. Animals were euthanized after 90 d treatment and its liver and kidney sections were taken for histological study. The results of sub-chronic study showed significant increase (P < 0.05) in serum uric acid, creatinine, aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALP) levels. Histological examination of liver showed mild mononuclear infiltration in the portal trait, enlarged nucleus around the central vein and mild loss of hepatocyte architecture in rats treated with 750 mg/kg of AESC. Histological examination of kidney showed focal interstitial fibrosis, crowding of glomeruli and mild hydropic change with hypercellular glomeruli in rats treated with 750 mg/kg of AESC. However, no remarkable histoarchitectural change in hepatocytes and glomeruli were observed in rats treated with lower concentrations (250 and 500 mg/kg b.w.) of AESC compared to control group animals. The no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of AESC in the present study was 500 mg/kg b.w. Signs of toxic effects are evident from the current study. Although AESC contains low concentrations of PA, findings from this study suggest that regular consumers of herbal remedies derived from this plant may develop kidney and liver toxicity. Further studies on the isolation and characterization of PAs are necessary to determine the safe dose level of the extract for therapeutic use

  20. [Study on the toxicity of horseshoe crabs in mice].

    PubMed

    Liao, Y; Li, X

    2000-05-30

    In order to study the toxicity of horseshoe crabs(tachypleus tridentatus and carcinoscorpius rotundicauda) in the sea of China, the extracts of tissues from tachypleus tridentatus and carcinoscorpius rotundicauda were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice for testing their poisoning effects. The results showed that the toxicity of carcinoscorpius rotundicauda was much higher than that of tachypleus tridentatus. The length of time from the injection to the death was much shorter for Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda than that for tachypleus tridentatus. The signs before death for Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda poisoning were restless, jumping and spasm but that for Tachypleus tridentatus was lethargy. The toxicity of adult horseshoe crabs was much higher than that of young horseshoe crabs.

  1. Macrolide-induced digoxin toxicity: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, T; Mamdani, M M; Juurlink, D N

    2009-10-01

    In this 15-year, population-based, nested case-control study, we investigated the association between hospitalization for digoxin toxicity and recent exposure to individual macrolide antibiotics. Clarithromycin was associated with the highest risk of digoxin toxicity (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 14.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.9-27.9), whereas erythromycin and azithromycin were associated with much lower risk (adjusted OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.7-7.9; and adjusted OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.1-12.5, respectively). We found no increased risk with a neutral comparator, cefuroxime (adjusted OR 0.8; 95% CI 0.2-3.4).

  2. Chronic arsenic toxicity: studies in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Guha Mazumder, Debendranath; Dasgupta, U B

    2011-09-01

    Chronic arsenic toxicity (arsenicosis) as a result of drinking arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a major environmental health hazard throughout the world, including India. A lot of research on health effects, including genotoxic effect of chronic arsenic toxicity in humans, have been carried out in West Bengal during the last 2 decades. A review of literature including information available from West Bengal has been made to characterize the problem. Scientific journals, monographs, and proceedings of conferences with regard to human health effects, including genotoxicity, of chronic arsenic toxicity have been reviewed. Pigmentation and keratosis are the specific skin diseases characteristic of chronic arsenic toxicity. However, in West Bengal, it was found to produce various systemic manifestations, such as chronic lung disease, characterized by chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive and/or restrictive pulmonary disease, and bronchiectasis; liver diseases, such as non cirrhotic portal fibrosis; polyneuropathy; peripheral vascular disease; hypertension; nonpitting edema of feet/hands; conjunctival congestion; weakness; and anemia. High concentrations of arsenic, greater than or equal to 200 μg/L, during pregnancy were found to be associated with a sixfold increased risk for stillbirth. Cancers of skin, lung, and urinary bladder are the important cancers associated with this toxicity. Of the various genotoxic effects of arsenic in humans, chromosomal aberration and increased frequency of micronuclei in different cell types have been found to be significant. Various probable mechanisms have been incriminated to cause DNA damage because of chronic arsenic toxicity. The results of the study in West Bengal suggest that deficiency in DNA repair capacity, perturbation of methylation of promoter region of p53 and p16 genes, and genomic methylation alteration may be involved in arsenic-induced disease manifestation in humans. P53 polymorphism has been found to be

  3. PROSPECTIVE PREGNANCY STUDY DESIGNS FOR ASSESSING REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective Pregnancy Study Designs for Assessing Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants
    Germaine M. Buck,1 Courtney D. Johnson,1 Joseph Stanford,2 Anne Sweeney,3 Laura Schieve,4 John Rockett,5 Sherry G. Selevan,6 Steve Schrader 7

    Abstract
    The origin of successfu...

  4. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies.

  5. Malaria in cynomolgus monkeys used in toxicity studies in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Etsuko; Nagayama, Yuko; Koyama, Naoki; Kakiuchi, Dai; Hosokawa, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium spp. protozoa cause malaria and are known to infect humans and a variety of animal species including macaque monkeys. Here we report both our experience with malaria recrudescence in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) in a toxicity study and the results of a survey on Plasmodium infection in cynomolgus monkeys imported to Japan for laboratory use. A cynomolgus monkey from the toxicity study presented with severe anemia and Plasmodium protozoa in erythrocytes on a thin blood smear and was subsequently diagnosed with symptomatic malaria. In this animal, congestion and accumulation of hemozoin (malaria pigment) in macrophages were noted in the enlarged and darkly discolored spleen. As a follow-up for the experience, spleen sections from 800 cynomolgus monkeys in toxicity studies conducted between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively examined for hemozoin deposition as a marker of Plasmodium infection. The origin of the animals included Cambodia, China, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Hemozoin deposition was confirmed in 44% of all examined monkeys. Monkeys from Indonesia showed the highest incidence of hemozoin deposition (approx. 80%). A high prevalence of Plasmodium infection in laboratory monkeys was also confirmed with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using Plasmodium genus-specific primers. Although Japan is not a country with endemic malaria, it is important to be aware of the prevalence and potential impact of background infection with Plasmodium spp. and recrudescence of symptomatic malaria in imported laboratory monkeys on pharmaceutical toxicity studies. PMID:26989299

  6. Antithrombotic effect of repeated doses of the ethanolic extract of local olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dub, Abdallah M; Dugani, Aisha M

    2013-05-22

    The incidence of thromboembolic diseases is increasing, and they are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Mediterranean diet is known for its high content of olive products, especially olive oil, which has known cardiovascular health benefits, including those on blood pressure, cholesterol level, and thrombogenesis. All previous animal and clinical studies investigating the beneficial antithrombotic effects of olives have focused on olive oil and a few on olive leaves (OLEs). In this study, the ethanolic extract of OLE was evaluated for its antithrombotic activity in the rabbit model of thrombosis induced by ligature of the vena cava and intravenous administration of tissue thromboplastin. Pre-treatment with 100 or 200 mg/kg per day of the ethanolic extract for 8 weeks significantly prolonged the prothrombin time (PT) in comparison to the control group (12.10 ± 0.35 sec and 14.38 ± 0.29 sec vs. 10.8 ± 0.32 sec, p < 0.05 and 0.001, respectively). In comparison to the control group, the same doses had no statistically significant effect on thrombus weight (16.85 ± 0.67 mg, 16.32 ± 0.35 mg, and 17.81 ± 0.75 mg; p = 0.18 and 0.06) or on activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (19.17 ± 0.33 sec, 19.12 ± 0.73 sec, and 18.97 ± 0.41 sec; p = 0.36 and 0.43, respectively). One important finding in this study concerns thrombus morphology. In the extract treatment groups, the thrombus was filament-like and did not adhere to blood vessel walls, whereas in the control group the thrombus was thick and almost completely occluded the vein. Therefore, these results suggest that OLE ethanolic extract can modify the extrinsic coagulation pathway as evidenced by the prolongation of PT and changes in thrombus morphology, enough to justify further research to evaluate its possible antithrombotic effects.

  7. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  8. Studies of skin toxicity in vitro: dose-response studies on JB6 cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, P T; Fitzpatrick, M J; Phelps, P C; Berezesky, I K; Trump, B F

    1992-01-01

    There are many reasons for developing in vitro tests of toxicity including cost, speed, studies of mechanisms, and studies utilizing human cells and tissues. The present study focuses on the development of in vitro tests to predict in vivo toxicity by comparing them to data from the literature. A broad spectrum of model toxic compounds was evaluated for toxicity on mouse skin JB6 cells in culture. These included mercuric chloride, sodium lauryl sulfate, formaldehyde, dimethyl sulfoxide, benzoyl peroxide, and ionomycin, all of which have been proven to be positive in the Draize test or in cutaneous toxicity studies. Cell viability was evaluated every 15 min for up to 1 hr, and then after 24 hr of treatment using the Trypan Blue exclusion method; morphological changes were evaluated using phase-contrast and transmission electron microscopy. Dose- and time-dependent cell death and morphological changes were observed at concentrations ranging from 10(-14) to 10(-2) M. Arbitrary rankings were assigned based on 1) IC50 value estimated from the present data, and 2) in vivo toxicity reported in the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances. Good correlation between in vitro and in vivo toxicity based on arbitrary rankings was observed. Thus, these findings suggest that the JB6 cell culture model can be used for predicting in vivo toxicity. In the future, it may be possible to utilize this system for the study of intracellular ionized calcium ([Ca2+]i), and the expression of oncogenes as early indicators of toxicity.

  9. ILSI/HESI Maternal Toxicity Workshop Summary: Maternal Toxicity and its Impact on Study Design and Data Interpretation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Workshops on maternal toxicity were held at the annual meetings of the Society of Toxicology, Teratology Society, and European Teratology Society in 2009. Prior to a general discussion of the issues involved with maternal toxicity and its impact on study design and data interpret...

  10. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-10-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu{sup III}(OH){sub 3}] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  11. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

  12. Metabolomics and its application to studying metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Booth, Sean C; Workentine, Matthew L; Weljie, Aalim M; Turner, Raymond J

    2011-11-01

    Here we explain the omics approach of metabolomics and how it can be applied to study a physiological response to toxic metal exposure. This review aims to educate the metallomics field to the tool of metabolomics. Metabolomics is becoming an increasingly used tool to compare natural and challenged states of various organisms, from disease states in humans to toxin exposure to environmental systems. This approach is key to understanding and identifying the cellular or biochemical targets of metals and the underlying physiological response. Metabolomics steps are described and overviews of its application to metal toxicity to organisms are given. As this approach is very new there are yet only a small number of total studies and therefore only a brief overview of some metal metabolomics studies is described. A frank critical evaluation of the approach is given to provide newcomers to the method a clear idea of the challenges and the rewards of applying metabolomics to their research.

  13. A new methyl bromide gas generator for inhalation toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Hori, H; Hyakudo, T; Tanaka, I

    1992-09-01

    A simple generator for methyl bromide gas has been newly developed by us. For inhalation toxicity studies, until now, there have been few generators capable of producing a constant and stable concentration of methyl bromide gas easily because of its high volatility. The principle of this new generator is based on gas-liquid equilibrium. The gas is generated from the surface of liquid methyl bromide in an evaporator made of a Teflon tube. The generator can produce up to 10,000 ppm of methyl bromide gas in a 0.1 m3 exposure chamber, and the concentration of this generated gas is able to be kept within +/- 0.8% over a long period of time. The generator has proved to be useful for investigating the effects of methyl bromide on health in inhalation toxicity studies.

  14. Toxicity study of isolated polypeptide from wool hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Jing; Han, Yanxia; Zhou, Dangxia

    2013-07-01

    The cytotoxicity of wool polypeptide has been evaluated by both cell and animal models. Wool was dissolved in sodium hydroxide solution, the pH value of the solution was adjusted to 5.55 and the precipitate was harvested as wool polypeptide. The spray-dried polypeptide was collected as powders and characterized by SEM, FTIR and TG-DSC. The cell culturing results showed that wool polypeptide had no obvious negative effect on cell viability in vitro. Both acute oral toxicity and subacute 30-day oral toxicology studies showed that wool polypeptide had no influence on body weight, feed consumption, blood chemistry, and hematology at any dose levels. There were no treatment related findings on gross or detailed necroscopy, organ weights, organ/body weight ratios and histology. Our study indicated the absence of toxicity in wool polypeptide and supported its safe use as a food ingredient or drug carrier.

  15. Toxicity study of isolated polypeptide from wool hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Jing; Han, Yanxia; Zhou, Dangxia

    2013-07-01

    The cytotoxicity of wool polypeptide has been evaluated by both cell and animal models. Wool was dissolved in sodium hydroxide solution, the pH value of the solution was adjusted to 5.55 and the precipitate was harvested as wool polypeptide. The spray-dried polypeptide was collected as powders and characterized by SEM, FTIR and TG-DSC. The cell culturing results showed that wool polypeptide had no obvious negative effect on cell viability in vitro. Both acute oral toxicity and subacute 30-day oral toxicology studies showed that wool polypeptide had no influence on body weight, feed consumption, blood chemistry, and hematology at any dose levels. There were no treatment related findings on gross or detailed necroscopy, organ weights, organ/body weight ratios and histology. Our study indicated the absence of toxicity in wool polypeptide and supported its safe use as a food ingredient or drug carrier. PMID:23597444

  16. Relationship between coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity and mitochondrial function in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Fujii, Wataru; Hori, Hisako; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2016-04-01

    The manifestation of coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity may differ and depends on the frequency of administration to rats. A single coumarin dose induces hepatocellular necrosis while repeated doses induce only hepatocyte degeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism of coumarin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Coumarin was administered to male rats as a single dose or for 4 consecutive days, and samples were obtained 4 or 24 h after a single dose or 24 h after the repeated doses. A single coumarin dose significantly induced hepatocellular necrosis in rats; however, toxicity was attenuated after repeated dosing. With a single dose, hepatocellular necrosis was preceded by increased mitochondrial number and size and decreased mitochondrial function. An increased expression of granular cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 protein was observed in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of coumarin-treated rats compared to the expression in the untreated controls. Nevertheless, repeated dosing showed mitochondrial function that was equivalent to that of the control while enlarged CYP2E1 protein droplets were distributed outside the mitochondria. These results suggest that mitochondrial function and CYP2E1 expression might be involved in coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity in rats. A reduction in mitochondrial CYP2E1 might be implicated in the acquisition of coumarin resistance after repeated doses.

  17. Translational research into species differences of endocrine toxicity via steroidogenesis inhibition by SMP-028 — For human safety in clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizato, Yohei; Imai, Satoki; Okahashi, Noriko; Yabunaka, Atsushi; Kunimatsu, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Yabuki, Masashi

    2014-05-01

    SMP-028 is a drug candidate developed for the treatment of asthma. In a 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of SMP-028 in rats and monkeys, differences of endocrine toxicological events between rats and monkeys were observed. In rats, these toxicological events mainly consisted of pathological changes in the adrenal, testis, ovary, and the other endocrine-related organs. On the other hand, in monkeys, no toxicological events were observed. The goal of this study is to try to understand the reason why only rats, but not monkeys, showed toxicological events following treatment with SMP-028 and to eventually predict the possible toxicological effect of this compound on human endocrine organs. Our results show that SMP-028 inhibits neutral cholesterol esterase more strongly than other steroidogenic enzymes in rats. Although SMP-028 also inhibits monkeys and human neutral cholesterol esterase, this inhibition is much weaker than that of rat neutral cholesterol esterase. These results indicate (1) that the difference in endocrine toxicological events between rats and monkeys is mainly due to inhibition of steroidogenesis by SMP-028 in rats, not in monkeys, and (2) that SMP-028 may not affect steroidogenesis in humans and therefore might cause no endocrine toxicological events in clinical studies. - Highlights: • SMP-028 inhibits neutral CEase more strongly than other steroidogenic enzymes in rats. • Inhibition of neutral CEase in rats by SMP-028 suppresses steroidogenesis in vivo. • SMP-028 does not inhibit neutral CEase in monkeys in vivo. • Steroidogenesis pathway in monkeys treated with SMP-028 was not suppressed. • SMP-028 may not inhibit LIPE in humans in vivo.

  18. Multiple Air-Toxics Exposure Study Working Paper Number 3. Urban air-toxics exposure model: development and application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District of California completed a Multiple Air Toxics Exposure Study (MATES) that examines the additive risk from a number of air toxics on an urban area. The project, though partially funded by EPA, is an example of how a State or local agency may approach assessing their local air-toxics risks as is encouraged by EPA's Urban Air Toxics Program which results from EPA's Air Toxic Strategy. The report is a summary of the methods used by the California agency. Though not intended as an endorsement of the entire contents of the report, EPA is reproducing their report (Working Paper Number 3) to benefit and encourage other agencies that may be contemplating such an assessment.

  19. Acute and 28-day sub-acute oral toxicity evaluation of two dietary bamboo charcoal powders in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhen-chao; Luo, Sha; Zhong, Yu-ting; Li, Xiao; Chen, Jin-yao; Zhang, Li-shi

    2015-04-01

    No data were available on the acute oral toxicity, short-term oral toxicity of vegetable carbon in animals. This study was designed to evaluate the safety of two commercially available dietary bamboo charcoal powders (BCP1 and BCP2). The size distribution of the two powders was determined by a Mastersizer 2000 laser particle size analyzer prior to the in vivo safety studies. For the acute toxicity study, a single dose of 11.24 g/kg body weight of BCP1 and BCP2 was given once orally to healthy Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Mortality and clinical symptoms were observed and recorded for the first 30 min after treatment, at 4 h post-administration, and then at least once daily for 14 days after administration. In the repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study, BCP1 and BCP2 were administered orally at doses of 2.81, 5.62, and 11.24 g/kg body weight for 28 days to SD rats. Animals were sacrificed and organs and blood samples were analyzed. Results showed that both BCP1 and BCP2 were micro-sized and various in size. In the acute toxicity and the repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity studies, BCP caused neither mortality nor visible signs of toxicity in rats. No significant differences were found in the relative organ weights or in biochemical parameters in BCP treated groups compared to a control group. No treatment-related histological changes were observed in the organs of these animals. Based on these data, it is concluded that the median lethal dose (LD50) of BCP for both male and female rats is more than 11.24 g/kg body weight and the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) is >11.24 g/kg body weight for 28 days.

  20. Histopathology of Incidental Findings in Beagles Used in Toxicity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Junko; Doi, Takuya; Wako, Yumi; Hamamura, Masao; Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Narama, Isao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our publication is to widely communicate the pictures of spontaneous findings occurring in beagles. Spontaneous arteritis occurs commonly in beagles. Frequent sites of arteritis are the heart, spleen, pancreas, epididymis and spinal cord. Morphological similarities between spontaneous and drug-induced arterial lesions may cause confusion when evaluating vascular toxicity of chemicals such as vasodilating agents. Focal and minimal inflammatory lesions are occasionally seen in the lung and may be associated with aspiration of food particles or of unknown causes. A cystic change with copious mucin production occurs occasionally in the mucosal epithelium of the gall bladder. Nesidioblastosis is seen rarely in the pancreas of beagles. C-cell complex and lymphocytic thyroiditis are common thyroid lesions. Spontaneous focal hypospermatogenesis and lobular Sertoli-cell-only seminiferous tubules occurring frequently in beagles must be distinguished from drug-induced damage of the seminiferous tubules in toxicity studies. The morphological differences of the female genital system in each cycle need to be understood; therefore, we present the normal features of the cyclic changes of the female genital organs. Further, we provide more information on spontaneous findings in beagles for exact diagnoses in toxicity studies. PMID:22481862

  1. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm).

    PubMed

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2014-06-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus test. To assess the repeated dose toxicity, the powder was administered once daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The parameters which were applied to the study were mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings and histopathologic examination. The freezedried powder of T. molitor larvae was not mutagenic or clastogenic based on results of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Furthermore, no treatment-related changes or findings were observed in any parameters in rats after 28 days oral administration. In conclusion, the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae was considered to be non-genotoxic and the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) was determined to be 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of SD rats under our experimental conditions. PMID:25071922

  2. SAR STUDY OF NASAL TOXICITY: LESSONS FOR MODELING SMALL TOXICITY DATASETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most toxicity data, particularly from whole animal bioassays, are generated without the needs or capabilities of structure-activity relationship (SAR) modeling in mind. Some toxicity endpoints have been of sufficient regulatory concern to warrant large scale testing efforts (e.g....

  3. Review of toxicity studies performed on an underground coal gasification condensate water

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F.P.

    1987-09-01

    Three studies related to the toxicity of underground coal gasification (UCG) waters have bee conducted: (1) toxicity study of UCG water and its fractions as determined by the Microtox test, (2) toxicity study of biotreated UCG water as determined by the Microtox test, and (3) toxicity study of UCG water to macroinvertebrates. The results of these studies are summarized herein. The gas condensate water from the UCG process is extremely toxic as determined by assays with photoluminescent bacteria (Microtox), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates (mayflies), and Daphnia magna (water flea). Microtox bioassays reveal that the toxic components of the water reside in both the organophilic and hydrophilic fractions, although the organophilic fraction is notably more toxic. A sequential treatment process reduced the toxicity of the UCG water, as measured by the Microtox test. Solvent extraction (to remove phenols) followed by ammonia stripping yielded a less toxic water. Additional treatment by activated sludge further reduced toxicity. Finally, the addition of powdered activated carbon to the activated sludge yielded the least toxic water. A bioassay technique was developed for lotic (running water) macroinvertebrates (Drunella doddsi and Iron longimanus). The toxicity results were compared with results from the traditional test animal, Daphnia magna. Short-term exposures to the UCG waters were more toxic to Daphnia magna than to Drunella doddsi or Iron longimanus, although the toxicity values begin to merge with longer test exposure. The greater toxicity seems to be related to a thinner exoskeleton. 26 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. An amphibian model for studies of developmental reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Berg, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The developmental programming of the reproductive system is vulnerable to chemical exposure. It is therefore important to evaluate long-term consequences of early life-stage exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. The African clawed frog Xenopus tropicalis has several characteristics which facilitates studies of developmental reproductive toxicity. Here, I present a X. tropicalis test protocol, including study design, exposure regime, and endpoints for chemical disruption of sex differentiation, reproductive organ development, the thyroxin-regulated metamorphosis, oestrogen synthesis (activity of the CYP19 aromatase enzyme), and fertility. PMID:22669660

  5. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological

  6. Toxicity study of Lauha Bhasma (calcined iron) in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Namrata; Dash, Manoj Kumar; Dwivedi, Laxmikant; Khilnani, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lauha Bhasma (LB) is a complex herbomineral preparation widely used as an Ayurvedic hematinic agent. It is an effective remedy for chronic fever (jīrṇa jvara), phthisis (kṣaya), Breathlessness (śvāsa) etc., and possesses vitality enhancing (vājīkara), strength promoting and anti aging (rasāyana) properties. Objectives: The present work was conducted to establish the safety aspects of the use of Lauha bhasma. Setting and Design: LB was prepared by Ayurvedic procedures of purification (śodhana), sun drying (bhānupāka), sthālīpāka, followed by repeated calcination (māraṇa) and “nectarization” (amṛtīkaraṇa). The resultant product was subjected to acute and sub acute toxicity studies. Materials and Methods: Acute and subacute toxicity study of LB was conducted in albino rats. Criteria for assessment included ponderal changes, change in biochemical parameters viz., LFT and KFT and hematological parameters. Histopathological studies of different organs including liver, kidney, spleen, testis etc., were also conducted to observe pathological changes if any. Results: In the acute toxicity study, the animal group did not manifest any signs of toxicity and no mortality was observed up to 100 times the therapeutic dose (TD). Significant increase in blood urea (27.83%, P < 0.01), serum creatinine (30.92%, P < 0.05), Aspartate aminotransferase (15.09%, P < 0.05), and serum alkaline phosphatase (27.5%, P < 0.01) was evident in group IV (10 TD). A significant increase in serum total protein (6.04%, P < 0.05) level was observed in group III (5 TD). Histopathological examination of livers in group IV (10 TD) showed mild inflammation in terms of bile stasis, peri-portal hepatic inflammation and sinusoidal congestion; lymphocyte infiltration in kidney and intracellular deposits in the splenic tissue. Conclusion: Lauha Bhasma was found to be safe at the therapeutic dose and also at five times the therapeutic dose levels. However, alteration in

  7. GENE INDUCTION STUDIES AND TOXICITY OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its mixtures program the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) supports in vitro and limited in vivo toxicity testing to further our understanding of the toxicity and health effects of chemical mixtures. There are increasing concerns that environment...

  8. Developmental toxicity studies of four fragrances in rats.

    PubMed

    Christian, M S; Parker, R M; Hoberman, A M; Diener, R M; Api, A M

    1999-12-20

    Four fragrances, 6-acetyl-1,1,2,4,4,7-hexamethyltetraline (AHTN), 1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethylcyclopenta-gamma-2-ben zopyran (HHCB), musk ketone and musk xylene were tested for developmental toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats (25/group, 3 groups/fragrance, 2 fragrances/corn oil control). Dosages tested were HHCB: 50, 150, 500 mg/kg per day; AHTN: 5, 15, 50 mg/kg per day; musk ketone: 15, 45, 150 mg/kg per day; musk xylene: 20, 60, 200 mg/kg per day. All dosages tested exceeded multiples of the estimated maximal daily human dermal exposure. Treatment (gavage, 5 ml/kg) occurred on GDs 7-17 and Caesarean-sectioning on GD 20. Based on the results of these studies, none of the four fragrances tested were more toxic in the conceptuses than in the dams. Maternal NOAELs were 50, 5, 15 and 20 mg/kg per day for HHCB, AHTN, musk ketone and musk xylene, respectively (150, 50, 45 and 60 mg/kg per day caused clinical signs and reduced weight gain and feed consumption). Developmental NOAELs were 150, 50, 45 and 200 mg/kg per day for HHCB, AHTN, musk ketone and musk xylene, respectively. No adverse effects on embryo-fetal viability, growth or morphology occurred at the highest dosages of AHTN (50 mg/kg per day) or musk xylene (200 mg/kg per day). Developmental toxicity occurred at the high-dosages of HHCB (axial skeletal malformations at 500 mg/kg per day) and musk ketone (increased postimplantation loss and reduced fetal body weight at 150 mg/kg per day). The results of this study indicate that under conditions of normal use, the tested fragrances do not pose a risk to human conceptuses.

  9. A Study on Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity of 1-Chloropropane

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Han, Jeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure toxicity of 1-chloropropane (CAS No. : 540-54-5). According to the OECD Test Guideline 413 (Subchronic inhalation toxicity: 90-day study), SD rats were exposed to 0, 310, 1,250, and 5,000 ppm of 1-chloropropane for 6 h/day, 5 day/week for 13 weeks via whole-body inhalation. Mortality, clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, motor activity, ophthalmoscopy, hematology, serum chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, gross and histopathological findings were compared between control and all tested groups. No mortality or remarkable clinical signs were examined during the study. No gross lesions or adverse effects on body weight, food consumption, motor activity, ophthalmoscopy, urinalysis, hematology, organ weights were observed in any of male or female rats in all tested groups. In serum biochemistry, glucose was significantly decreased in males of 1,250 and 5,000 ppm groups compared to control group in dose-dependent relationship. In histopathological examination, vacuolation of acinar cells was observed in pancreas of all male and female groups exposed to 1-chloropropane. In conclusion, no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) was considered to be below 310 ppm/6 h/day, 5 day/week for rats. PMID:26877841

  10. Studies of the toxic interaction of disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Laurie, R.D.; Bercz, J.P.; Wessendarp, T.K.; Condie, L.W.

    1986-11-01

    A large number and variety of compounds are formed in the process of chlorinating drinking water. Many of the compounds have been shown to be toxic and are currently being further evaluated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). One group of the halopropanones found in chlorinated drinking water is the dichloropropanones. The toxicological properties of this group have not been well characterized. In addition, a number of investigators have shown that ketones potentiate the hepatotoxicity of haloalkanes. The authors conducted a series of studies to explore both the toxicity of the dichloropropanones and their potential interaction with a well-characterized haloalkane, carbon tetrachloride. A variety of toxicological and biochemical endpoints were used to evaluate the toxicity of the dichloropropanones and their interaction with CCl/sub 4/, including cytochrome P-450 concentration, reduced glutathione levels, pentane generation, serum enzyme activities, and histopathology. Administration of 1,1-dichloropropanone (DCP) resulted in elevated serum enzymes associated with periportal necrosis. Glutathione levels were reduced by the administration of 1,1-DCP; pentane generation was not increased. When 1,1-DCP was given prior to CCl/sub 4/, the data were consistent with additivity. Administration of 1,3-DCP did not result in elevated serum enzymes, nor was there histopathologic evidence of necrosis. Glutathione levels and pentane generation in the 1,3-DCP-treated groups were the same as those of controls. Inhibition of the toxicologic effects of CCl/sub 4/ in a dose-related manner was observed when 1,3-DCP was administered prior to CCl/sub 4/.

  11. Dose Ranging, Expanded Acute Toxicity and Safety Pharmacology Studies for Intravenously Administered Functionalized Graphene Nanoparticle Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Kanakia, Shruti; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Tembulkar, Tanuf; Lee, Stephen; Jiang, Ya-Ping; Lin, Richard Z.; Shroyer, Kenneth R.; Moore, William; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanoparticles dispersions show immense potential as multifunctional agents for in vivo biomedical applications. Herein, we follow regulatory guidelines for pharmaceuticals that recommend safety pharmacology assessment at least 10 – 100 times higher than the projected therapeutic dose, and present comprehensive single dose response, expanded acute toxicology, toxicokinetics, and respiratory/cardiovascular safety pharmacology results for intravenously administered dextran-coated graphene oxide nanoplatelet (GNP-Dex) formulations to rats at doses between 1–500 mg/kg. Our results indicate that the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of GNP-Dex is between 50 mg/kg ≤ MTD < 125 mg/kg, blood half-life < 30 minutes, and majority of nanoparticles excreted within 24 hours through feces. Histopathology changes were noted at ≥ 250 mg/kg in the heart, liver, lung, spleen, and kidney; we found no changes in the brain and no GNP-Dex related effects in the cardiovascular parameters or hematological factors (blood, lipid, and metabolic panels) at doses < 125 mg/kg. The results open avenues for pivotal preclinical single and repeat dose safety studies following good laboratory practices (GLP) as required by regulatory agencies for investigational new drug (IND) application. PMID:24854092

  12. Fumonisin toxicity and metabolism studies at the USDA. Fumonisin toxicity and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Norred, W P; Voss, K A; Riley, R T; Plattner, R D

    1996-01-01

    Fumonisins are responsible for many of the toxic effects of the common corn fungus, Fusarium moniliforme. They are acute renal and liver toxins in rats, and have tumor promoting activity. Fumonisin B1 is poorly absorbed, rapidly excreted, and persists in small amounts in the liver and kidney. Fumonisins are specific inhibitors of ceramide synthase, and the toxic effects they produce may be related to their ability to disrupt sphingolipid metabolism, resulting in a myriad of problems in cell regulation and communication. In this paper, research that has been conducted on F. monilforme and the fumonisins at the USDA's Russell Research Center is reviewed.

  13. Toxicity and toxicokinetics of metformin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Quaile, Michael P.; Melich, David H.; Jordan, Holly L.; Nold, James B.; Chism, Jack P.; Polli, Joseph W.; Smith, Glenn A.; Rhodes, Melissa C.

    2010-03-15

    Metformin is a first-line drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is often prescribed in combination with other drugs to control a patient's blood glucose level and achieve their HbA1c goal. New treatment options for T2D will likely include fixed dose combinations with metformin, which may require preclinical combination toxicology studies. To date, there are few published reports evaluating the toxicity of metformin alone to aid in the design of these studies. Therefore, to understand the toxicity of metformin alone, Crl:CD(SD) rats were administered metformin at 0, 200, 600, 900 or 1200 mg/kg/day by oral gavage for 13 weeks. Administration of >= 900 mg/kg/day resulted in moribundity/mortality and clinical signs of toxicity. Other adverse findings included increased incidence of minimal necrosis with minimal to slight inflammation of the parotid salivary gland for males given 1200 mg/kg/day, body weight loss and clinical signs in rats given >= 600 mg/kg/day. Metformin was also associated with evidence of minimal metabolic acidosis (increased serum lactate and beta-hydroxybutyric acid and decreased serum bicarbonate and urine pH) at doses >= 600 mg/kg/day. There were no significant sex differences in mean AUC{sub 0-24} or C{sub max} nor were there significant differences in mean AUC{sub 0-24} or C{sub max} following repeated dosing compared to a single dose. The no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) was 200 mg/kg/day (mean AUC{sub 0-24} = 41.1 mug h/mL; mean C{sub max} = 10.3 mug/mL based on gender average week 13 values). These effects should be taken into consideration when assessing potential toxicities of metformin in fixed dose combinations.

  14. Recent studies on biomethylation and demethylation of toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Ridley, W P; Dizikes, L; Cheh, A; Wood, J M

    1977-08-01

    Methylcobalamin (methyl-B12) has been implicated in the biomethylation of the heavy metals (mercury, tin, platinum, gold, and thallium) as well as the metalloids (arsenic, selenium, tellurium and sulfur). In addition, methylcobalamin has been shown to react with lead, but the lead-alkyl product is unstable in water. Details of the kinetics and mechanisms for biomethylation of arsenic are presented, with special emphasis on synergistic reactions between metal and metalloids in different oxidation states. This study explains why synergistic, or antagonistic, processes can occur when one toxic element reacts in the presence of another. The relative importance of biomethylation reactions involving methylcobalamin will be compared to those reactions where S-adenosylmethionine is involved.

  15. Historical control data in reproductive and developmental toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Mylchreest, Eve; Harris, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies in laboratory animals are conducted as part of the process of evaluating the risk of pharmaceuticals and chemicals to human reproduction and development. In these studies, comparison of data from groups dosed with the test article to a concurrent control group is considered the most relevant approach for the interpretation of adverse effects. However, differences between the concurrent control and treated groups may arise by chance alone, and in some instances may even appear to be dose-related. These limitations of the concurrent control group are of particular concern when interpreting fetal malformation data because malformations are rare events that can be better characterized when incidences in both concurrent control and treated groups are compared to a larger set of control values. Historical control data can be useful not only to understand the range of normal for a given endpoint but also to monitor the biological variability over time due to various external factors (e.g., genetic changes in a strain, changes at the breeding facility). It can also serve to track the performance of the laboratory and identify any changes in the data that may be the result of internal factors at the performing laboratory due to modification in animal diet, seasonal changes, or even the proficiency of the technicians in handling animals and recording fetal and offspring observations. This chapter will provide the reader with guidance on building a laboratory historical control database and applying it to the scientific interpretation of reproductive and developmental toxicity data. Information on sources of external historical control data will be provided and some perspective given on the utility of this data. A discussion of the presentation of historical control data with descriptive statistics will be accompanied by examples of tabulation of the data. Supernumerary rib will be used as an example of how historical control

  16. Historical control data in reproductive and developmental toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Mylchreest, Eve; Harris, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies in laboratory animals are conducted as part of the process of evaluating the risk of pharmaceuticals and chemicals to human reproduction and development. In these studies, comparison of data from groups dosed with the test article to a concurrent control group is considered the most relevant approach for the interpretation of adverse effects. However, differences between the concurrent control and treated groups may arise by chance alone, and in some instances may even appear to be dose-related. These limitations of the concurrent control group are of particular concern when interpreting fetal malformation data because malformations are rare events that can be better characterized when incidences in both concurrent control and treated groups are compared to a larger set of control values. Historical control data can be useful not only to understand the range of normal for a given endpoint but also to monitor the biological variability over time due to various external factors (e.g., genetic changes in a strain, changes at the breeding facility). It can also serve to track the performance of the laboratory and identify any changes in the data that may be the result of internal factors at the performing laboratory due to modification in animal diet, seasonal changes, or even the proficiency of the technicians in handling animals and recording fetal and offspring observations. This chapter will provide the reader with guidance on building a laboratory historical control database and applying it to the scientific interpretation of reproductive and developmental toxicity data. Information on sources of external historical control data will be provided and some perspective given on the utility of this data. A discussion of the presentation of historical control data with descriptive statistics will be accompanied by examples of tabulation of the data. Supernumerary rib will be used as an example of how historical control

  17. Repeat-dose toxicology evaluation in cynomolgus monkeys of AVI-4658, a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug for the treatment of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sazani, Peter; Ness, Kirk P Van; Weller, Doreen L; Poage, Duane W; Palyada, Kiran; Shrewsbury, Stephen B

    2011-05-01

    AVI-4658 is a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug designed to restore dystrophin expression in a subset of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Previous reports demonstrated this clinical proof-of-principle in patients with DMD following intramuscular injection of AVI-4658. This preclinical study evaluated the toxicity and toxicokinetic profile of AVI-4658 when administered either intravenously (IV) or subcutaneously (SC) to cynomolgus monkeys once weekly over 12 weeks, at doses up to the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg per injection. No drug-related effects were noted on survival, clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, opthalmoscopic or electrocardiographic evaluations, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, and macroscopic evaluations. Drug-related microscopic renal effects were dose-dependent, apparently reversible, and included basophilic granules (minimal), basophilic tubules (minimal to moderate), and tubular vacuolation (minimal to mild). These data establish the tolerability of AVI-4658 at doses up to and including the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg by IV bolus or SC injection.

  18. Toxicity and recovery studies of two ayurvedic preparations of iron.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, P K; Prajapati, P K; Shukla, V J; Ravishankar, B; Choudhary, A K

    2009-12-01

    Lauha Bhasma and Mandura Bhasma in 55 mg/kg dose (5 times the therapeutic effective dose) for 60 days exhibited no serious toxic effects in Charles Foster albino rats. Both the drugs showed significant recovery from chronic toxic effect after 45 days of recovery period. PMID:20329703

  19. A Study on the D. magna and V. fischeri Toxicity Relationship of Industrial Wastewater from Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, S.; Lee, S.; Chun Sang, H.; Park, T. J.; Kim, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that high concentration of TDS (total dissolved solid) in industrial effluent gives rise to the toxicity to the Daphnia magna toxicity test. D. magna is vulnerable to relatively low TDS concentration showing the 24-hr EC50 of Salinity 0.6% (as the sea salt concentration). Recently, standard mandatory toxicity testing using Daphnia magna has been used to monitor industrial effluent toxicity according to Korea standard method (Acute Toxicity Test Method of the Daphnia magna Straus (Cladocera, Crustacea), ES 04704. 1a) under regulation. Since only one acute toxicity testing is applied in the present, we are trying to introduce microbial battery for more complete toxicity assessment. In this study, the acute toxicities between daphnids and microbes were compared. The results of D. magna and Vibrio fischeri toxicity test from 165 industrial wastewater effluents showed high positive correlation. In addition, the possibility of predicting daphnia toxicity from the bacterial toxicity data amounts to 92.6% if we consider salinity effect (>5ppt) together. From this study, we found that the V. fischeri toxicity test is a powerful battery tool to assess the industrial wastewater toxicity. Here, we suggest that luminescent bacteria toxicity test be useful not only for complete toxicity assessment which can't be obtained by daphnia toxicity testing only but also for the reduction cost, time, and labor in the Korean society. Keywords : D. magna, V. fischeri, Industrial waste water, battery test Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (15IFIP-B089908-02) from Plant Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government

  20. Detection of the effects of repeated dose combined propoxur and heavy metal exposure by measurement of certain toxicological, haematological and immune function parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Institóris, L; Siroki, O; Undeger, U; Basaran, N; Banerjee, B D; Dési, I

    2001-06-21

    In the present study, an immunotoxicity test system, containing general toxicological (body weight gain, organ weights), haematological (WBC,RBC, Ht, mean cell volume of the RBCs, cell content of the femoral bone marrow), and immune function (PFC assay, DTH reaction) investigations, was used for detection the effects of a 4 weeks repeated low dose combined oral exposure of male Wistar rats with propoxur and the heavy metals arsenic or mercury. Two doses of the compounds were used: a higher one (the lowest dose which resulted in significant change of at least one parameter examined in previous dose-effect experiments), and a lower one (the highest dose which proved to be non-effective). The applied doses were: 8.51 and 0.851 mg kg(-1) of propoxur, 13.3 and 3.33 mg kg(-1) of NaAsO(2), and 3.20 and 0.40 mg kg(-1) of HgCl(2). In the combination treatment, the high dose of propoxur was combined with the low dose of arsenic or mercury, and the high doses of each heavy metals were combined with the low dose of propoxur. The main finding of this study was that some of the combinations significantly altered the relative weight of liver, adrenals and kidneys, related to both the untreated and the high dose internal control. Among the immune functions examined, only the PFC content of the spleen showed a trend of changes in certain combinations versus the corresponding high dose control. According to the present results, combined exposure with propoxur and the heavy metals examined can modify the detection limit of the single compounds and/or may alter their toxic effects.

  1. A brief study of toxic effects of some medicinal herbs on kidney

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Increased use of complementary and alternative herbal medicines in the treatment of various diseases.Some herbal therapies may be causes of potential toxicity that may be renal toxicity caused by the ingestion of herbs. The goal of this study is the toxic and beneficial effects of medicinal herbs on renal health by which evidence for benefit or toxicity has been found. Included are nephrotoxicity from aristolochic acid and other components within herbs, herb-drug interactions, heavy metal toxicity in herbs and adulterants during careless preparation of herbal medicine, resulting in adverse renal effects and renal toxicity from contaminants within the extracts. The review aims to provide knowledge and guide to encourage future toxicity studies on the kidney by medicinal herbs. PMID:23326775

  2. Broccoli seed extract: Genotoxicity and subchronic toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Yang, Hui; Li, Yongning; Lynch, B; Jia, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    Potential health benefits have been attributed to broccoli consumption. Hence, there is potential for use of broccoli seed extract (BSE) in food or for use as a dietary supplement. To assess the potential safety of a BSE product, three genotoxicity experiments, including an Ames, in vivo mouse micronucleus, and in vivo mouse sperm abnormality assay, were carried out. BSE was subject to an acute oral toxicity test and was evaluated in a 30-day feeding study in rats. BSE showed no mutagenic activity in the Ames assay and no evidence of genotoxic potential in the in vivo assays at doses up to 10 g/kg body weight (bw). The LD50 of BSE in rats was >10 g/kg bw/d. In the 30-day feeding study, in which BSE was administered in the diet to provide doses of 0, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 g/kg bw/d, no toxicological significant effects were noted on body weight, body weight gain, organ weights, or on the results of hematological, clinical chemistry and histopathological evaluations. The no-observed-adverse-effect level was considered to be 3.0 g/kg bw/d, the highest dose tested. Collectively, these results support the safe use of BSE as a food ingredient or product. PMID:26271574

  3. [Advance in study on zearalenone's toxicity and determination].

    PubMed

    He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang

    2005-07-01

    The article is intended to introduce the zearalenone's toxicity, determination methods and prevention. Zearalenone is one of the most widely distributed mycotoxins produces by Fusarium Species, it is harm to animals and human. And it can induce human liver cancer,carcinoma of tesis esophagus cancer. Now we use high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography, non-toxicity determinations to detect it.

  4. Preclinical toxicity and teratogenicity studies with the narcotic antagonist analgesic drug TR5379M.

    PubMed

    Porter, M C; Hartnagel, R E; Clemens, G R; Kowalski, R L; Bare, J J; Halliwell, W E; Kitchen, D N

    1983-01-01

    The narcotic antagonist TR5379M had po LD50 values of 365 and 750 mg/kg and iv LD50 values of 35.0 and 22.3 mg/kg in the mouse and rat, respectively. Subchronic (one month) po administration to rats at 40, 120, or 400 mg/kg/day and to cynomolgus monkeys at 20, 45, or 100 mg/kg/day showed the compound to be well tolerated at doses of 40 and 45 mg/kg, respectively. Deaths during the subchronic studies included one monkey following a single dose of 100 mg/kg and six rats following repeated doses of 400 mg/kg. Signs of toxicosis in rats included clonic convulsions (high-dose animals only) and mild dose-related salivation and hyperactivity. Signs of toxicosis in monkeys were limited to sporadic emesis and transiently decreased food consumption at all three dose levels. Emesis was not observed at doses of 20 or 45 mg/kg after the first week. Slightly increased weights (not significant at 40 mg/kg) for thyroid and adrenal glands occurred in male rats. Gross, microscopic, and clinical pathologic examinations revealed no treatment-related adverse effects at any dose level for either species. Administration of TR5379M to pregnant rats (20, 70, or 250 mg/kg/day on Days 6-15 of gestation) caused no teratogenicity or embryotoxicity and did not adversely affect any of the reproductive parameters examined. Dams given TR5379M at doses of 70 and 250 mg/kg salivated and had reduced weight gain. It was concluded from these studies that TR5379M has an adequate margin of safety to begin clinical investigations.

  5. Toxicity evaluation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl and other compounds involved in studies of fossil fuels biodesulphurisation.

    PubMed

    Alves, L; Paixão, S M

    2011-10-01

    The acute toxicity of some compounds used in fossil fuels biodesulphurisation studies, on the respiration activity, was evaluated by Gordonia alkanivorans and Rhodococcus erythropolis. Moreover, the effect of 2-hydroxybiphenyl on cell growth of both strains was also determined, using batch (chronic bioassays) and continuous cultures. The IC₅₀ values obtained showed the toxicity of all the compounds tested to both strains, specially the high toxicity of 2-HBP. These results were confirmed by the chronic toxicity data. The toxicity data sets highlight for a higher sensitivity to the toxicant by the strain presenting a lower growth rate, due to a lower cells number in contact with the toxicant. Thus, microorganisms exhibiting faster generation times could be more resistant to 2-HBP accumulation during a BDS process. The physiological response of both strains to 2-HBP pulse in a steady-state continuous culture shows their potential to be used in a future fossil fuel BDS process.

  6. Experimental studies on the toxicity of lithographic developer solution.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takeichi, S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the toxicity of a lithographic developer solution which contains hydroquinone is caused by hydroquinone or the alkaline lithographic developer solution. Male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups. In four groups, rats were dosed orally with 3% hydroquinone or 3% hydroquinone in 3% lithographic developer solution. Hydroquinone levels were measured after one and 24 hours. In two groups, rats were dosed orally with 6% hydroquinone or 6% hydroquinone in lithographic developer solution. In the seventh group, rats received the alkaline solution only. Hydroquinone measurement was made using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hydroquinone was rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and subsequently distributed throughout the body. Nearly all hydroquinone was excreted in the urine as either a glucuronide or a sulfate (78-82%) within 24 hours. All rats administered 6% hydroquinone in non-alkaline vehicle died, but the mortality rate of rats administered 6% hydroquinone in lithographic developer solution was 60%. Tissue hydroquinone was lower at one hour and 24 hours after administration in lithographic developer solution than in equal dose of hydroquinone in non-alkaline vehicle suggesting decreased absorption in an alkaline pH. Hydroquinone was not associated with gross pathologic changes of the intestine but all animals treated with lithographic developer solution or alkaline solution had congestion, hemorrhagic petechiae and purple-brown discoloration throughout the small intestine. The combination of alkaline/formaldehyde diluent with hydroquinone may delay hydroquinone absorption but increase the risk of intestinal necrosis.

  7. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  8. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Elshama, Said Said; El-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  9. Studies of toxic aerosols via elastic and inelastic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, W.; Li, W.; Allen, T.M.; Blair, D.S.; Davis, E.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Evaporation rates and chemical characteristics of potentially toxic aerosols have been determined by elastic and inelastic light-scattering measurements. The aerosol systems examined were a commercial catalyst consisting of a mixture of stannous octanoate (SNO) and 2-ethylhexanoic acid (EHA) and droplets emitted from open tanks of chromic acid solutions used for anodizing aluminum. The heavy metals contained in these aerosols represent a danger to the workplace if such materials are inhaled. Nanogram amounts of the solutions were studied by suspending single microdroplets in electrodynamic balances in a flow of air to measure evaporation rates and to obtain Raman spectra. Elastic scattering data include phase functions and morphological resonance spectra from which droplet sizes are determined. The inelastic light-scattering data or Raman spectra provide molecular vibrational bond information. It was found that EHA spectra agree with bulk data in the literature, and that SNO Raman spectra, which are not available in the literature, are consistent with infrared spectra for bulk SNO. At room temperature the vapor pressure of SNO is on the order of 0.01 Pa while that of EHA is on the order of 0.1 Pa. Raman data for the residue of evaporated chromic acid solutions show the presence of chromium oxides (Cr[sup 6+] compounds), surfactants, and bound (nonvolatile) water. 31 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Clinical toxicity study of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. f.

    PubMed

    Murty, G K

    1974-09-01

    Semecarpus anacardium was administered to 266 cases in 3 formulations: Amrit Bhallatak (186 cases), RB 3 (48 cases), and Garsin (32 cases). The Amrit Bhallatak is a compound formulation containing extract of both the cotyledons and the pericarp of the fruit of Semecarpus anacardium. RB3 is composed of the whole cotyledon (300 mg); the daily dose of cotyledons was 3.6 g. Garsin contained 200 g of cotyledons. The extract is derived by separating the oil by a physical process. The daily dosage of Amrit Bhallatak was 10 g/day, that of Garsin, 2.4 g/day. No toxicity or side effects were observed. The therapeutic value of Semecarpus anacardium in arthropathies, atopic dermatitis, leucoderma, leprosy, hypothyroidism, oligospermia, and azoospermia and its value as an oral contraceptive have been studied. The most significant effect was on the ovaries and testes. The drug probably acts via the hypophysics. Out of 266 patients, 189 were men, 77 women between 30-45 years of age. The treatment was restricted to internal medication by mouth. No external contact or application of the drug was applied. Of the 77 women treated with the drug, 41 were followed up after treatment. 12 had become pregnant and none showed any teratogenecity.

  11. 13-week oral toxicity study of vinyl laurate in rats.

    PubMed

    Lina, Ben A R; Messinger, Horst; Bär, Albert

    2015-02-01

    Vinyl laurate (VL) is used as a monomer in the production of polyvinyl acetate vinyl laurate copolymer, a component of chewing gum base. The safety of VL was examined in a 13-week oral toxicity study in Wistar rats. VL was administered in corn coil by daily gavage (5 ml/kg bw/d) to four main groups (10 rats/sex) at doses of 0 (vehicle only), 50, 250 and 1000 mg/kg bw/d, respectively. The control and high-dose group comprised an additional 5 rats/sex which were kept untreated for a further 4 weeks until sacrifice (recovery groups). In addition to standard parameters, male and female fertility parameters were determined as well. There were no mortalities and treatment-related clinical signs. Neurobehavioral observations and motor activity assessment, ophthalmoscopic examinations, body weights, feed and water intakes, blood cell counts, coagulation time, standard clinical chemical parameters and urinalyses, absolute and relative organ weights at the end of the treatment as well as macroscopic examination at necropsy and microscopic examination of standard organs and tissues did not show any treatment-related changes. Female and male fertility parameters (estrus cyclicity, testicular and epididymal sperm counts, sperm motility and morphology) were not affected by the treatment. Accordingly, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for VL was determined to be 1000 mg/kg bw/d, i.e. the highest dose level tested. PMID:25445296

  12. Short-term toxicity studies of loline alkaloids in mice.

    PubMed

    Finch, S C; Munday, J S; Munday, R; Kerby, J W F

    2016-08-01

    Epichloë endophytes have been used successfully in pastoral systems to reduce the impact of insect pests through the expression of secondary metabolites. The use of endophytes could be extended to other plant species, such as cereal crops, where the production of bioactive secondary metabolites would reduce the reliance on pesticides for insect control. The success of this approach is dependent on the selection of an appropriate secondary metabolite target which must not only be effective against insect pests but also be safe for grazing and monogastric animals. The loline alkaloids have been identified as possible target metabolites as they are associated with potent effects on insects and low toxicity to grazing animals. The purpose of the current study was to generate toxicological data on the loline alkaloids in a monogastric system using mice. Male and female mice were fed 415 mg/kg/day total lolines for a 3-week period. The loline treatment caused no statistically significant effect on gross pathology, histology, haematology, blood chemistry, heart rate, blood pressure or motor coordination. Reduced weight gain and food consumption were noted in the loline groups during the initial stages of the experiment. This experiment raises no food safety concerns for the loline alkaloids. PMID:27276360

  13. Study of acute toxicity of Ukrain in rats after intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    Kulik, G I; Deneka, E R; Todor, I N; Karmozina, L G

    1998-01-01

    The acute toxicity of i.v. Ukrain injection in rats was studied. The interrelation between toxicity (death of animals) and dosage was determined by nonlinear regression method. White blood count (WBC) in peripheral blood, weight of animals, and weight of major organs were determined in animals during all stages of investigation. Morphological studies of toxic changes in 40 different organs of rats were performed on macro- and microscopic levels.

  14. Toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to alveolar macrophages: comparative study revealing differences in their mechanism of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Rietjens, I.M.; Poelen, M.C.; Hempenius, R.A.; Gijbels, M.J.; Alink, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study the toxic mechanisms of action of ozone and nitrogen dioxide were compared using an intact cell model. Rat alveolar macrophages were exposed by means of gas diffusion through a Teflon film. In this in vitro system, ozone appeared to be 10 times more toxic than nitrogen dioxide. alpha-Tocopherol protected equally well against ozone and nitrogen dioxide. It was demonstrated that alpha-tocopherol provided its protection by its action as a radical scavenger and not by its stabilizing structural membrane effect, as (1) concentrations of alpha-tocopherol that already provided optimal protection against ozone and nitrogen dioxide did not influence the membrane fluidity of alveolar macrophages and (2) neither one of the structural alpha-tocopherol analogs tested (phytol and the methyl ether of alpha-tocopherol) could provide a protection against ozone or nitrogen dioxide comparable to the one provided by alpha-tocopherol. It was concluded that reactive intermediates scavenged by alpha-tocopherol are important in the toxic mechanism of both ozone and nitrogen dioxide induced cell damage. However, further results presented strongly confirmed that the kind of radicals and/or reactive intermediates, and thus the toxic reaction mechanism involved, must be different in ozone- and nitrogen dioxide-induced cell damage. This was concluded from the observations that showed that (1) vitamin C provided significantly better protection against nitrogen dioxide than against an equally toxic dose of ozone, (2) glutathione depletion affected the cellular sensitivity toward ozone to a significantly greater extent than the sensitivity towards nitrogen dioxide, and (3) the scavenging action of alpha-tocopherol was accompanied by a significantly greater reduction in its cellular level during nitrogen dioxide exposure than during exposure to ozone.

  15. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child). PMID:26511087

  16. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child).

  17. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) studies on the organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Can, Alper

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides are the most commonly used pesticides in the world. In this study, quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models were derived for estimating the acute oral toxicity of organophosphate insecticides to male rats. The 20 chemicals of the training set and the seven compounds of the external testing set were described by means of using descriptors. Descriptors for lipophilicity, polarity and molecular geometry, as well as quantum chemical descriptors for energy were calculated. Model development to predict toxicity of organophosphate insecticides in different matrices was carried out using multiple linear regression. The model was validated internally and externally. In the present study, QSTR model was used for the first time to understand the inherent relationships between the organophosphate insecticide molecules and their toxicity behavior. Such studies provide mechanistic insight about structure-toxicity relationship and help in the design of less toxic insecticides.

  18. Laboratory studies on antimycin A as a fish toxicant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Bernard L.; Lennon, Robert E.; Hogan, James W.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid and sand formulations of antimycin A were tested in laboratory waters of various temperature, hardness, pH, and turbidity against 31 species of fresh-water fish of various sizes and life stages. Each formulation of toxicant was lethal under all water conditions to fish eggs, fry, fingerlings, and adult fish. Trouts are the most sensitive and catfishes the least sensitive. Of the 31 species, 24 succumb to 5 p.p.b. or less of the toxicant; only certain catfishes survive 25 p.p.b, The order of toxicity to various species of fish suggests that antimycin has possibilities for selective or partial control of certain unwanted fish. Although toxic to fish under ice, antimycin is more active in warm water than in cold. It is slightly more active in soft water than in hard; it is more active and persists far longer in water at pH 5 to 8 than at pH 9 or 10. It is active on fish in either clear and turbid waters, and it can be detoxified by potassium permanganate, The results contributed to registration of antimycin A in Fintrol-5 formulation as a fish toxicant.

  19. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnOSM20(+) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo–fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5–19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnOSM20(+) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnOSM20(+) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  20. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo-fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5-19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnO(SM20(+)) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  1. Pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of a MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boqi; Wang, Juan; Guo, Yingying; Chen, Tanxiu; Ni, Weihua; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Nannan; Xie, Fei; Tai, Guixiang

    2016-04-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1), as an oncogene, plays a key role in the progression and tumorigenesis of many human adenocarcinomas and is an attractive target in tumor immunotherapy. Our previous study showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific Th1-dominant immune response, simulated MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte killing activity, and could significantly inhibit MUC1-expression B16 cells' growth in mice. To help move the vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial, in the current study, a pre-clinical toxicity and immunogenicity evaluation of the vaccine was conducted. The evaluation was comprised of a single-dose acute toxicity study in mice, repeat-dose chronic toxicity and immunogenicity studies in rats, and pilot toxicity and immunogenicity studies in cynomolgus monkeys. The results showed that treatment with the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine did not cause any organ toxicity, except for arthritis or local nodules induced by BCG in several rats. Furthermore, the vaccine significantly increased the levels of IFN-γ in rats, indicating that Th1 cells were activated. In addition, the results showed that the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine induced a MUC1-specific IgG antibody response both in rats and cynomolgus monkeys. Collectively, these data are beneficial to move the MUC1-MBP/BCG anti-tumor vaccine into a Phase I clinical trial.

  2. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  3. Evaluation and interpretation of maternal toxicity in Segment II studies: Issues, some answers, and data needs

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John M. . E-mail: rogers.john@epa.gov; Chernoff, Neil; Keen, Carl L.; Daston, George P.

    2005-09-01

    Biologically rational regulatory policies with regards to developmental toxicity are often based on the extrapolation of standard laboratory rodent bioassay results to the human population. Significantly contributing to the difficulty of this task is the possibility that general toxic effects on the maternal organism may affect the developing conceptus. This review examines maternal factors which may bear directly or indirectly upon developmental outcome, with emphasis on those of greatest relevance to the hazard assessment process. Standard teratology testing protocols call for top dosage levels that induce overt maternal toxicity, and the developmental effects of this toxicity (both alone, and with concurrent embryo/fetal insult) continue to present regulators with considerable interpretive difficulties. In response to these problems, there have been both research and literature review efforts dealing with the relationship of maternal and developmental toxicity. Maternally mediated developmental toxicity occurs with a number of agents, and toxicant-induced alterations in maternal physiology may affect the conceptus at dosages not causing overt maternal toxicity. Relevant studies are reviewed here, and suggestions for avenues of future research are offered including the identification of any syndromes of developmental effects occurring at maternally toxic levels irrespective of the causative agent, and experimental approaches for the characterization of maternal toxicity.

  4. Correlation of temperature and toxicity in murine studies of staphylococcal enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1.

    PubMed

    Stiles, B G; Campbell, Y G; Castle, R M; Grove, S A

    1999-03-01

    This study describes a quick (<12 h) assay for detecting temperature decreases in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice injected intraperitoneally (i.p. ) with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), SEB, or SEC3 or toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 and a potentiating dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Toxin-specific antisera effectively neutralized the temperature fluctuations in this model. Orally administered SEA or SEB (50 microg/animal), with or without LPS, did not have an effect on temperature or lethality. Versus wild-type mice, transgenic knockout mice lacking the p55 receptor for tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or gamma interferon were protected against an i.p. challenge of SEA plus LPS. The p75 receptor for TNF and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 have a negligible role in this toxic shock model.

  5. DOSE-DEPENDENT TRANSITIONS IN MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY: CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experience with dose response and mechanisms of toxicity has shown that multiple mechanisms may exist for a single agent along the continuum of the full dose-response curve. It is highly likely that critical, limiting steps in any given mechanistic pathway may become overwhelmed ...

  6. The National Near-Road Mobile Source Air Toxics Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, much attention has been directed at understanding the impact of mobile sources on near-road air quality, especially PM and its components, NOx and CO, but little information exists for mobile source air toxics (MSATs). MSATs of interest to this project are 1,3-butadiene...

  7. AQUATIC TOXICITY MODE OF ACTION STUDIES APPLIED TO QSAR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of QSAR models for predicting fish acute lethality were developed using systematically collected data on more than 600 chemicals. These models were developed based on the assumption that chemicals producing toxicity through a common mechanism will have commonality in the...

  8. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (f) Data and reporting—(1) Treatment of results. Data shall be summarized in tablular form, showing... historical developmental toxicity data on the species/strain tested. A properly conducted developmental... to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following...

  9. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... actual concentration of the test substance shall be measured in the breathing zone. During the exposure... found dead and isolation or sacrifice of weak or moribund animals). (iii) Signs of toxicity shall be... from dead animals if autolysis or where decomposition has occurred. The degree of resorption shall...

  10. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... actual concentration of the test substance shall be measured in the breathing zone. During the exposure... found dead and isolation or sacrifice of weak or moribund animals). (iii) Signs of toxicity shall be... from dead animals if autolysis or where decomposition has occurred. The degree of resorption shall...

  11. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... actual concentration of the test substance shall be measured in the breathing zone. During the exposure... found dead and isolation or sacrifice of weak or moribund animals). (iii) Signs of toxicity shall be... from dead animals if autolysis or where decomposition has occurred. The degree of resorption shall...

  12. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... actual concentration of the test substance shall be measured in the breathing zone. During the exposure... found dead and isolation or sacrifice of weak or moribund animals). (iii) Signs of toxicity shall be... from dead animals if autolysis or where decomposition has occurred. The degree of resorption shall...

  13. Sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies at marine sites suspected of ordnance contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, R.S.; Nipper, M.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Hooten, R.L.; Miller, K.; Saepoff, S.

    2001-01-01

    A sediment quality assessment survey and subsequent toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) study was conducted at several sites in Puget Sound, Washington. The sites were previously suspected of contamination with ordnance compounds. The initial survey employed sea urchin porewater toxicity tests to locate the most toxic stations. Sediments from the most toxic stations were selected for comprehensive chemical analyses. Based on the combined information from the toxicity and chemical data, three adjacent stations in Ostrich Bay were selected for the TIE study. The results of the phase I TIE suggested that organics and metals were primarily responsible for the observed toxicity in the sea urchin fertilization test. In addition to these contaminants, ammonia was also contributing to the toxicity for the sea urchin embryological development test. The phase II TIE study isolated the majority of the toxicity in the fraction containing nonpolar organics with high log Kow, but chemical analyses failed to identify a compound present at a concentration high enough to be responsible for the observed toxicity. The data suggest that some organic or organometallic contaminant(s) that were not included in the comprehensive suite of chemical analyses caused the observed toxicological responses.

  14. A comparative study of insecticide toxicity among seven cladoceran species.

    PubMed

    Mano, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Masaki; Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2010-11-01

    The sensitivities of seven cladoceran species (Ceriodaphnia reticulata, Chydorus sphaericus, Daphnia galeata, Diaphanosoma brachyurum, Moina macrocopa, Scapholeberis kingi, and Simocephalus vetulus) to carbamate insecticides (carbaryl and methomyl) were investigated by acute toxicity tests. The sensitivities to carbaryl and methomyl were highly correlated among the tested organisms, but the co-tolerance level varied markedly among species. C. reticulata showed the highest sensitivity, whereas M. macrocopa and S. kingi showed the lowest sensitivities to the two insecticides. These results indicate that the degree of chemical impacts on natural communities can vary depending on cladoceran species composition. The highly positive correlation between the EC(50) values for both insecticides indicates that the two chemicals have a shared mode of action on cladoceran species. Unlike previous reports, acute toxicity was not correlated with body size. The results are discussed in relation to community-level experiments, the functions of freshwater ecosystems, and ecological risk assessment. PMID:20862541

  15. Toxicity study of diethyl phthalate on freshwater fish Cirrhina mrigala.

    PubMed

    Ghorpade, Nivedita; Mehta, Vatsal; Khare, Madhuri; Sinkar, Pushpa; Krishnan, Smita; Rao, C Vaman

    2002-10-01

    Diethyl phthalate (DEP) is used as a plasticizer, a detergent base, in aerosol sprays, as a perfume binder in incense sticks and after-shave lotions. It is known to be a contaminant of freshwater and marine ecosystems. Therefore, a study was designed to determine the toxic effects of DEP on a freshwater fish, Cirrhina mrigala. The fish was treated with 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm (w/v) DEP dissolved in acetone to determine the LC50. Positive controls were treated with acetone only. There was 100% mortality observed within 24 h in 75 and 100 ppm, and 50% mortality in 50 ppm treated fish in 72 h. Those treated at 25 ppm showed only 10% mortality within 72 h and remaining fish continued to survive. The surviving fish were treated with 25 ppm DEP once daily for 3 days with every change of water (Group III). One group was maintained as negative control in dechlorinated water (Group I) and the other group received acetone once daily for 3 days with every change of water and was used as positive control (Group II). Fish were killed by cold narcosis on an ice block and dissected to obtain liver, muscle, and brain samples; 10% homogenates in ice-cold saline were prepared. Brain and muscle acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity was measured. Liver aspartate (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and liver and muscle succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) alkaline and acid phosphate (ALP and ACP) were measured. There was a significant increase in liver and muscle ACP and ALP in DEP-treated fish compared with positive and negative controls. There was a significant increase in muscle SDH and liver ALT (ALT) in DEP-treated fish compared with positive and negative controls. Brain AchE level was significantly decreased in DEP-treated fish compared to positive and negative controls. These results indicate that DEP brings about significant changes in the activity of certain liver and muscle enzymes. These alterations in enzyme activity may have long-term effects on that are continuously exposed

  16. EFFECT OF NITRATE-BASED BIOREMEDIATION ON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION AND SEDIMENT TOXICITY-COLUMN STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory column study was set up to evaluate changes in contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity following nitrate-based bioremediation and to correlate toxicity reduction with loss of fuel components. Glass columns were packed with sediment from an aquifer that had be...

  17. A comparative study on toxicity identification of industrial effluents using Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xianliang; Kim, Eunhee; Jo, Hun-Je; Han, Taejun; Jung, Jinho

    2011-09-01

    In this study, acute toxicity monitoring and toxicity identification evaluation procedures were applied to identify causative toxicants in industrial effluents. Effluents from a metal plating factory and a rubber products factory were acutely toxic toward Daphnia magna and the toxicity varied over different sampling events (2.9-5.9 and 1.7-7.6 TU, respectively). For the rubber products effluent, it was confirmed that zinc (5.65-13.18 mg L(-1)) was found to be a major cause of toxicity, which is likely originated from zinc 2-mercaptobenzothiazole and zinc diethyldithiocarbamate used as vulcanization accelerators. For the metal plating effluent, it appeared that the presence of high concentrations of Cl(-) and SO(4)(2-) (8,539-11,400 and 3,588-4,850 mg L(-1), respectively) caused the observed toxicity. These toxicants likely originated from sodium bisulfate (NaHSO(3)) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) used as reducing and oxidizing agents. Though copper was found to be present in levels much higher than the EC(50) (50% effective concentration) value, this was not attributable to the toxicity of metal plating effluent likely due to complexation with dissolved organic matter. PMID:21761172

  18. Assessing acute toxicities of pre- and post-treatment industrial wastewaters with Hydra attenuata: A comparative study of acute toxicity with the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. . Haskell Lab. for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (a) determine wastewater treatment effectiveness using two freshwater organisms, (b) compare acute toxicity results from the two species exposed to the wastewaters, and (c) link acute and potential developmental toxicity of wastewaters in one organism. The acute toxicities of several pretreatment and post-treatment industrial waste-water samples wee evaluated with adult Hydra attenuata and fathead minnows. The acute LC50s agreed closely when results in Hydra attenuata were compared with those from fathead minnow tests. Acute LC50s ranged from 3 to >100% of samples with hydra, and from 1.0 to >100% of sample with fathead minnows. The results provided strong evidence of treatment effectiveness because toxicity decreased with progressive stages of treatment. Previously the Hydra Developmental Toxicity Assay was used as a prescreen mainly for in vitro assessment of developmental toxicity with pure compounds and to prioritized toxicants according to selective toxicity to the developing embryo. Recently the authors modified the assay for testing natural waters and wastewaters; hence, some of the wastewater samples also were tested for their developmental toxicity. In this case, the relative selective toxicity of these wastewater samples ranged from 0.7 to 2.1, indicating that no sample was uniquely toxic to the developing embryo, although acute toxicity was manifested. Overall, their results indicate the Hydra Assay functions appropriately in assessments of acute and developmental toxicity of industrial wastewaters and may be a simple and useful tool in a battery of tests for broader scale detection of environmental hazards.

  19. Toxicity-directed approach of polyester manufacturing industry wastewater provides useful information for conducting treatability studies.

    PubMed

    Caffaro-Filho, Roberto A; Morita, Dione M; Wagner, Roger; Durrant, Lucia R

    2009-04-15

    A broader characterization of industrial wastewaters, especially in respect to hazardous compounds and their potential toxicity, is often necessary in order to determine the best practical treatment (or pretreatment) technology available to reduce the discharge of harmful pollutants to the environment or publicly owned treatment works. Using a toxicity-directed approach, this paper sets the base for a rational treatability study of polyester resin manufacturing. Relevant physical and chemical characteristics were determined. Respirometry was used for toxicity reduction evaluation after physical and chemical effluent fractionation. Of all the procedures investigated, only air stripping was significantly effective in reducing wastewater toxicity. Air stripping in pH 7 reduced toxicity in 18.2%, while in pH 11 a toxicity reduction of 62.5% was observed. Results indicated that toxicants responsible for the most significant fraction of the effluent's instantaneous toxic effect to unadapted activated sludge were organic compounds poorly or not volatilized in acid conditions. These results led to useful directions for conducting treatability studies which will be grounded on actual effluent properties rather than empirical or based on the rare specific data on this kind of industrial wastewater.

  20. Linking waterlogging tolerance with Mn²⁺ toxicity: a case study for barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Shabala, S; Shabala, L; Rengel, Z; Wu, X; Zhang, G; Zhou, M

    2015-01-01

    Vast agricultural areas are affected by flooding, causing up to 80% yield reduction and resulting in multibillion dollar losses. Up to now, the focus of plant breeders was predominantly on detrimental effects of anoxia, while other (potentially equally important) traits were essentially neglected; one of these is soil elemental toxicity. Excess water triggers a progressive decrease in soil redox potential, thus increasing the concentration of Mn(2+) that can be toxic to plants if above a specific threshold. This work aimed to quantify the relative contribution of Mn(2+) toxicity to waterlogging stress tolerance, using barley as a case study. Twenty barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotypes contrasting in waterlogging stress tolerance were studied for their ability to cope with toxic (1 mm) amounts of Mn(2+) in the root rhizosphere. Under Mn(2+) toxicity, chlorophyll content of most waterlogging-tolerant genotypes (TX9425, Yerong, CPI-71284-48 and CM72) remained above 60% of the control value, whereas sensitive genotypes (Franklin and Naso Nijo) had 35% less chlorophyll than 35% of controls. Manganese concentration in leaves was not related to visual Mn(2+) toxicity symptoms, suggesting that various Mn(2+) tolerance mechanisms might operate in different tolerant genotypes, i.e. avoidance versus tissue tolerance. The overall significant (r = 0.60) correlation between tolerance to Mn(2+) toxicity and waterlogging in barley suggests that plant breeding for tolerance to waterlogging traits may be advanced by targeting mechanisms conferring tolerance to Mn(2+) toxicity, at least in this species.

  1. Changes in exposure temperature lead to changes in pesticide toxicity to earthworms: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    The occurring climate changes will have direct consequences to all ecosystems, including the soil ecosystems. The effects of climate change include, among other, the changes in temperature and greater frequency and intensity of extreme weather conditions. Temperature is an important factor in ecotoxicological investigations since it can act as a stressor and influence the physiological status of organisms, as well as affect the fate and transport of pollutants present in the environment. However, most of so far conducted (eco)toxicological investigations neglected the possible effects of temperature and focused solely on the effects of toxicants on organisms. Considering that temperature can contribute to the toxicity of pollutants, it is of immense importance to investigate whether the change in the exposure temperature will impact the strength of the toxic effects of pollutants present in soil ecosystems. Therefore, in the present study the toxicity of several commonly used pesticides to earthworms was assessed under different exposure temperatures (15, 20 and 25°C). The results showed that changes in exposure temperature lead to changes in susceptibility of earthworms to particular pesticides. Namely, exposures to the same pesticide concentration at different temperatures lead to different toxicity responses. Increase in exposure temperature in most cases caused increase in toxicity, whereas decrease in temperature mostly caused decrease in toxicity. This preliminary study points to need for an in-depth investigation of mechanisms by which temperature affects the toxicity of pesticides and also provides important data for future research on the effects of temperature change on the soil ecosystems.

  2. Systematic and comprehensive investigation of the toxicity of curcuminoid-essential oil complex: A bioavailable turmeric formulation

    PubMed Central

    AGGARWAL, MADAN L.; CHACKO, KARAMPENDETHU M.; KURUVILLA, BINU T.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, the active component present in Curcuma longa of the family Zingiberaceae, has a number of pharmacological effects, including potential anti-inflammatory activity. One of the major limitations of curcumin/turmeric extract is its poor absorption through the gastrointestinal tract. Several approaches have been adopted to increase the bioavailability of curcumin, including loading curcumin into liposomes or nanoparticles, complexation with phospholipids, addition of essential oils and synthesizing structural analogues of curcumin. In the present study, the toxicity and safety of one such bioavailable turmeric formulation, curcuminoid-essential oil complex (CEC), the toxicity profile of which has not been reported, were examined using in vivo and in vitro models, as per the guidelines of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Investigations of acute toxicity study were performed in rats and mice, and the results revealed no signs and symptoms or toxicity or mortality in any of the animals at the maximum recommended dose level of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. The repeated administration of CEC for 90 days in Wistar rats at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg body weight did not induce any observable toxic effects, compared with corresponding control animals. Mutagenicity/genotoxicity investigations were also performed using a bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), a mammalian bone marrow chromosome aberration test and a mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus test in mice. CEC was found to be non-mutagenic in all three mutagenic investigations. Consequently, the present study indicated that CEC elicited no toxic effects in animals or in vitro. Therefore, following investigations of acute toxicity, repeated dose toxicity and mutagenicity, CEC was deemed a safe, non-toxic pharmacological formulation. PMID:26648561

  3. Acute toxicity and hepatotoxicokinetic studies of Tamarindus indica extract.

    PubMed

    Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Ngene, Augustine A; Anaga, Aruh O; Chigor, Vincent N; Henrietta, Igbinosa I; Okoh, Anthony I

    2011-08-31

    Tamarindus indica is widely used as a food and beverage and in traditional medicine. The apparent lack of dose standardization in herbal medicine necessitates the evaluation of the lethality T. indica on Artemia salina nauplii and chicken embryos via in vitro and in vivo techniques. Furthermore, hepatotoxicokinetics of the crude extract and fractions on Wister rats was also assessed. At concentrations of 200, 20 and 2 µg/mL, crude extract and fractions showed brine shrimp death percentages ranging from 86.70% to 3.30% and the sub-fractions showed death percentage ranges of 46.70% to 3.30%. Calculated LD₅₀ values ranged from 832 µg/mL to 5,019 µg/mL. Dosing Wister rats with 25% and 50% concentration of LD₅₀ determined for crude extract and fractions on chicken embryos showed an elevation in the ALT and AST levels in the serum. Brine shrimps and chicken embryos showed a positive correlation, with R² values of 0.541 and 0.588 (P ≤ 0.05) for fractions and subfractions, respectively, as media for the lethality assay. Dose standardization in folk herbal medicine is imperative as T. indica used as food and medicine has been shown to be toxic at high doses. Brine shrimp and chicken embryos may be comparably used as medium for toxicity assay.

  4. Evaluation of General Toxicity and Genotoxicity of the Silkworm Extract Powder

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Hyun-Suk; Choi, Jae-Hun; Oh, Jung-Ja; Lee, Woo-Joo; Kim, Seong-Sook; Lee, Do-Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Kul; Song, Si-Whan; Kim, Kap-Ho; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Ryu, Kang-Sun

    2013-01-01

    The silkworm extract powder contain 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), a potent α-glycosidase inhibitor, has therapeutic potency against diabetes mellitus. Therefore, natural products containing DNJ from mulberry leaves and silkworm are consumed as health functional food. The present study was performed to evaluate the safety of the silkworm extract powder, a health food which containing the DNJ. The repeated toxicity studies and gentic toxicity studies of the silkworm extract powder were performed to obtain the data for new functional food approval in MFDS. The safety was evaluated by a single-dose oral toxicity study and a 90 day repeated-dose oral toxicity study in Sprague-Dawley rats. The silkworm extract powder was also evaluated for its mutagenic potential in a battery of genetic toxicity test: in vitro bacterial reverse mutation assay, in vitro chromosomal aberration test, and in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay. The results of the genetic toxicology assays were negative in all of the assays. The approximate lethal dose in single oral dose toxicity study was considered to be higher than 5000 mg/kg in rats. In the 90 day study, the dose levels were wet at 0, 500, 1000, 2000 mg/kg/day, and 10 animals/sex/dose were treated with oral gavage. The parameters that were monitored were clinical signs, body weights, food and water consumptions, ophthalmic examination, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, necropsy findings, organ weights, and histopathological examination. No adverse effects were observed after the 90 day administration of the silkworm extract powder. The No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Level (NOAEL) of silkworm extract powder in the 90 day study was 2000 mg/kg/day in both sexes, and no target organ was identified. PMID:24578797

  5. Safety Evaluation of Oral Toxicity of Carica papaya Linn. Leaves: A Subchronic Toxicity Study in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zakiah; Halim, Siti Zaleha; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Afzan, Adlin; Abdul Rashid, Badrul Amini; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    The subchronic toxicity effect of the leaf extract of Carica papaya Linn. in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats was investigated in this study. The extract was prepared by dissolving the freeze dried extract of the leaves in distilled water and was administered orally to SD rats (consisted of 10 rats/sex/group) at 0 (control), 0.01, 0.14, and 2 g/kg body weight (BW) for 13 weeks. General observation, mortality, and food and water intake were monitored throughout the experimental period. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The study showed that leaf extract when administered for 13 weeks did not cause any mortality and abnormalities of behavior or changes in body weight as well as food and water intake. There were no significant differences observed in hematology parameters between treatment and control groups; however significant differences were seen in biochemistry values, for example, LDH, creatinine, total protein, and albumin. However, these changes were not associated with histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested that daily oral administration of rats with C. papaya leaf extract for 13 weeks at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in traditional medicine practice did not cause any significant toxic effect. PMID:25530788

  6. Toxicity of leachate from weathering plastics: An exploratory screening study with Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Bejgarn, Sofia; MacLeod, Matthew; Bogdal, Christian; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Between 60% and 80% of all marine litter is plastic. Leachate from plastics has previously been shown to cause acute toxicity in the freshwater species Daphnia magna. Here, we present an initial screening of the marine environmental hazard properties of leachates from weathering plastics to the marine harpacticoid copepod [Crustacea] Nitocra spinipes. Twenty-one plastic products made of different polymeric materials were leached and irradiated with artificial sunlight. Eight of the twenty-one plastics (38%) produced leachates that caused acute toxicity. Differences in toxicity were seen for different plastic products, and depending on the duration of irradiation. There was no consistent trend in how toxicity of leachate from plastics changed as a function of irradiation time. Leachate from four plastics became significantly more toxic after irradiation, two became significantly less toxic and two did not change significantly. Analysis of leachates from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by liquid chromatography coupled to a full-scan high-resolution mass spectrometer showed that the leachates were a mixture of substances, but did not show evidence of degradation of the polymer backbone. This screening study demonstrates that leachates from different plastics differ in toxicity to N. spinipes and that the toxicity varies under simulated weathering. PMID:25828916

  7. Towards Global QSAR Model Building for Acute Toxicity: Munro Database Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Swapnil; Nicholls, Ian A.; Karlsson, Björn C. G.; Rosengren, Annika M.; Ballabio, Davide; Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A series of 436 Munro database chemicals were studied with respect to their corresponding experimental LD50 values to investigate the possibility of establishing a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. Dragon molecular descriptors were used for the QSAR model development and genetic algorithms were used to select descriptors better correlated with toxicity data. Toxic values were discretized in a qualitative class on the basis of the Globally Harmonized Scheme: the 436 chemicals were divided into 3 classes based on their experimental LD50 values: highly toxic, intermediate toxic and low to non-toxic. The k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method was calibrated on 25 molecular descriptors and gave a non-error rate (NER) equal to 0.66 and 0.57 for internal and external prediction sets, respectively. Even if the classification performances are not optimal, the subsequent analysis of the selected descriptors and their relationship with toxicity levels constitute a step towards the development of a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. PMID:25302621

  8. Toxicity of leachate from weathering plastics: An exploratory screening study with Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Bejgarn, Sofia; MacLeod, Matthew; Bogdal, Christian; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Between 60% and 80% of all marine litter is plastic. Leachate from plastics has previously been shown to cause acute toxicity in the freshwater species Daphnia magna. Here, we present an initial screening of the marine environmental hazard properties of leachates from weathering plastics to the marine harpacticoid copepod [Crustacea] Nitocra spinipes. Twenty-one plastic products made of different polymeric materials were leached and irradiated with artificial sunlight. Eight of the twenty-one plastics (38%) produced leachates that caused acute toxicity. Differences in toxicity were seen for different plastic products, and depending on the duration of irradiation. There was no consistent trend in how toxicity of leachate from plastics changed as a function of irradiation time. Leachate from four plastics became significantly more toxic after irradiation, two became significantly less toxic and two did not change significantly. Analysis of leachates from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by liquid chromatography coupled to a full-scan high-resolution mass spectrometer showed that the leachates were a mixture of substances, but did not show evidence of degradation of the polymer backbone. This screening study demonstrates that leachates from different plastics differ in toxicity to N. spinipes and that the toxicity varies under simulated weathering.

  9. Compilation of International Regulatory Guidance Documents for Neuropathology Assessment during Nonclinical Toxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuropathology analysis as an endpoint during nonclinical efficacy and toxicity studies is a challenging prospect that requires trained personnel and particular equipment to achieve optimal results. Accordingly, many regulatory agencies have produced explicit guidelines for desig...

  10. 76 FR 59142 - Guidance for Industry on Reproductive and Developmental Toxicities-Integrating Study Results To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Reproductive and Developmental... a guidance for industry entitled ``Reproductive and Developmental Toxicities--Integrating Study... developmental or reproductive risks associated with drug or biological product exposure when a...

  11. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  12. Pharmacologic Alternatives to Riboflavin Photochemical Corneal Cross-Linking: A Comparison Study of Cell Toxicity Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, MiJung; Takaoka, Anna; Hoang, Quan V.; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The efficacy of therapeutic cross-linking of the cornea using riboflavin photochemistry (commonly abbreviated as CXL) has caused its use to become widespread. Because there are known chemical agents that cross-link collagenous tissues, it may be possible to cross-link tissue pharmacologically. The present study was undertaken to compare the cell toxicity of such agents. Methods. Nine topical cross-linking agents (five nitroalcohols, glyceraldehyde [GLYC], genipin [GP], paraformaldehyde [FA], and glutaraldehyde [GLUT]) were tested with four different cell lines (immortalized human corneal epithelial cells, human skin fibroblasts, primary bovine corneal endothelial cells, and immortalized human retinal pigment epithelial cells [ARPE-19]). The cells were grown in planar culture and exposed to each agent in a range of concentrations (0.001 mM to 10 mM) for 24 hours followed by a 48-hour recovery phase. Toxicity thresholds were determined by using the trypan blue exclusion method. Results. A semiquantitative analysis using five categories of toxicity/fixation was carried out, based on plate attachment, uptake of trypan blue stain, and cellular fixation. The toxicity levels varied by a factor of 103 with the least toxic being mononitroalcohols and GLYC, intermediate toxicity for a nitrodiol and nitrotriol, and the most toxic being GLUT, FA, GP, and bronopol, a brominated nitrodiol. When comparing toxicity between different cell lines, the levels were generally in agreement. Conclusions. There are significant differences in cell toxicity among potential topical cross-linking compounds. The balance between cross-linking of tissue and cell toxicity should be borne in mind as compounds and strategies to improve mechanical tissue properties through therapeutic tissue cross-linking continue to develop. PMID:24722697

  13. Pilot study for ambient toxicity testing in Chesapeake bay. Year two report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W.; Ziegenfuss, M.C.; Fischer, S.A.; Anderson, R.D.; Killen, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    The primary goal of the ambient toxicity testing pilot study was to identify toxic areas in living resource habitats of the Chesapeake Bay watershed by using a battery of standardized, directly modified or recently developed water column, sediment and suborganismal toxicity tests. Tests were conducted twice at the following stations: Potomac River-Morgantown, Potomac River-Dahlgren, Patapsco River and Wye River. A suite of inorganic and organic contaminants was evaluated in the water column and sediment during these tests. Standard water quality conditions were also evaluated in water and sediment from all stations.

  14. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: inhalation subchronic toxicity/neurotoxicity study of a light alkylate naphtha distillate in rats.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, C; Lapadula, E; Breglia, R; Bui, Q; Burnett, D; Koschier, F; Podhasky, P; White, R; Mandella, R; Hoffman, G

    1998-10-23

    A 13-wk inhalation study was conducted with Sprague-Dawley CD rats (12/sex/group) were exposed by inhalation for 13 weeks to a light alkylate naphtha distillate (LAND-2, C4-C10; average molecular weight 89.2) at actual average concentrations of 0 (room air), 668, 2220, or 6646 ppm, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk; 12 additional rats/sex in the control and high dose groups were held after final exposure for a 4-wk recovery period. The highest exposure concentration was 75% of the lower explosive limit. Standard parameters of subchronic toxicity were measured throughout the study; at necropsy, organs were weighed and tissues processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurotoxicity evaluations consisted of motor activity (MA) and a functional operational battery (FOB) measured pretest, during 5, 9, and 14 wk of the study, and after the 4-wk recovery period. Whole-body perfusion and microscopic examination of selected organs and nervous tissue from the control and high dose rats were conducted at the end of exposure. No test-related mortality or effects on physical signs, body weight, or food consumption were observed. Statistically significant increases in absolute and relative kidney weights in high-exposure males correlated with microscopically observed hyaline droplet formation and renal nephropathy, effects in male rats that are not toxicologically significant for humans. Increased liver weights in both sexes at the highest dose had no microscopic correlate and appeared reversible after the 4-wk recovery period. Exposure to LAND-2 at any dose did not produce neurotoxicity measured by MA, FOB, or neuropathology. The no-observed-effects level (NOEL) for LAND-2 was 2220 ppm for subchronic toxicity and > or =26646 ppm for neurotoxicity.

  15. Juvenile toxicity study of faropenem medoxomil in beagle puppies.

    PubMed

    Faqi, Ali S; Lanphear, Chery; Gill, Stan; Colagiovanni, Dorothy B

    2010-12-01

    We determined the toxicity of faropenem medoxomil (FPM) in neonatal/juvenile dogs following 28 days of administration. The puppies received vehicle or FPM beginning on Postnatal Day (PND) 22 at respective dose levels of 0, 100, 300, 600, or 1400 mg/kg-d (four daily doses (QID) of 25, 75, 150, or 350 mg/kg/dose), respectively, at a dose volume of 5 mL/kg/dose. Body weight, food consumption, clinical observation, clinical pathology, urine analysis and TK were evaluated. Body weight in males and kidney findings at 1400 mg/kg-d were considered adverse. Comparison of Day 27 TK values with Day 1 parameters showed a change in FPM pharmacokinetic behavior over time with an apparent increase in the rate of clearance characterized by a decrease in AUC(0-6) and T(max) values on Day 27 with little to no change in C(max) values. Based on these results, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level was 600 mg/kg-d. PMID:20708074

  16. A 4-week toxicity study of methionine in male rats.

    PubMed

    Chin, Keigi; Toue, Sakino; Kawamata, Yasuko; Watanabe, Akiko; Miwa, Tadashi; Smriga, Miro; Sakai, Ryosei

    2015-01-01

    To examine 4-week toxicity of l-methionine (methionine), 5-week-old Fisher strain male rats were fed on diets containing 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, 2.7 (w/w) of added methionine. Although no deaths were recorded, the highest dose of methionine (2.7% [w/w] of diet) reduced food intake and significantly suppressed growth rate. Growth suppression was characterized by an increase in hemolysis, splenic, and hepatic accumulation of hemosiderin, hemolytic anemia, and promotion of hematopoiesis. Other changes observed in the highest methionine intake group were a decrease in white blood cell count, thymus atrophy, and histological abnormalities in the adrenal gland and testis. Small, but significant, growth suppression, accompanied by some minor changes in plasma biochemical parameters, was also seen in rats fed on a test diet containing 0.9% (w/w) of additional methionine. Thus, no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) and lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of diet-added methionine were determined at 0.3% and 0.9% (w/w), corresponding to 236 and 705 mg/kg/d body weight, respectively. Since the basal diet contained protein-bound methionine at 0.5% (w/w), NOAEL and LOAEL of total dietary methionine were estimated at 0.8% and 1.4% (w/w) of diet.

  17. Toxicity Studies of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on European Amphipods.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos; Marin, Arnaldo; Borredat, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene in dimethyl sulfoxide on the amphipods Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus locusta, and Corophium multisetosum was tested in a static exposure in sea water. The 48-h lethal concentration (LC(50)) of phenanthrene was 173.85 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 147.64 mug/L for G. locusta, and 215.20 mug/L for C. multisetosum. The 48-h LC(50) of fluoranthene was 49.99 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 42.71 mug/L for G. locusta, and 2.85 mug/L for C. multisetosum. The 48-h LC(50) of pyrene was 73.49 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 60.78 mug/L for G. locusta, and 25.29 mug/L for C. multisetosum. Together with their wide distribution along European coasts, the evidence of toxicity on the tested PAH compounds in these amphipods make these species appropriate candidates for evaluating oil-contaminated sediments in Europe.

  18. Raman study of lower toxicity polymer gel for radiotherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adenan, M. Z.; Ahmad, M.; Mohd Noor, N.; Deyhimihaghighi, N.; Saion, E.

    2014-11-01

    N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) monomer and N, N' - methylene-bis-acrylamide (BIS) crosslinker were used to synthesize polymer gel dosimeters for a reason that the monomer is lower toxicity which gives a significant advantage over the other polymer gel compositions. The gels were irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays at doses up to 21 Gy and the irradiated NIPAM polymer gels were used to investigate the dose response characteristics based on Raman spectroscopy analysis on the formation of the polymer gels and the consumptions of NIPAM and BIS co-monomers. From the findings, the polymerization was referred to an increment in Raman intensity at 815 cm-1, assigned for C-C stretching mode of NIPAM polymer gel, as the dose increased. The consumptions of the co-monomers were referred to a decrement in Raman intensities at 1025 cm-1 2353 cm-1 for C=C stretching modes of NIPAM and BIS respectively as the dose increased. The increment and decrement in Raman intensities of polymer and co-monomers respectively with increase of dose indicate that there is occurrence of polymerization of NIPAM polymer gels which could be applied in 3D dose distributions for radiotherapy treatment planning. The correlation factor kBIS is greater than kNIPAM showing that the reaction of BIS crosslinker is more efficient than NIPAM monomer to generate 37% of the NIPAM polymer gel.

  19. Comparison of toxicity values across zebrafish early life stages and mammalian studies: Implications for chemical testing.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Nicole A; Reif, David M; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Bondesson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    With the high cost and slow pace of toxicity testing in mammals, the vertebrate zebrafish has become a tractable model organism for high throughput toxicity testing. We present here a meta-analysis of 600 chemicals tested for toxicity in zebrafish embryos and larvae. Nineteen aggregated and 57 individual toxicity endpoints were recorded from published studies yielding 2695 unique data points. These data points were compared to lethality and reproductive toxicology endpoints analyzed in rodents and rabbits and to exposure values for humans. We show that although many zebrafish endpoints did not correlate to rodent or rabbit acute toxicity data, zebrafish could be used to accurately predict relative acute toxicity through the rat inhalation, rabbit dermal, and rat oral exposure routes. Ranking of the chemicals based on toxicity and teratogenicity in zebrafish, as well as human exposure levels, revealed that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), benzo(a)pyrene, and chlorpyrifos ranked in the top nine of all chemicals for these three categories, and as such should be considered high priority chemicals for testing in higher vertebrates. PMID:25261610

  20. Modified toxicity identification evaluation studies for achieving mining sector MISA compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, K.; Sferrazza, J.; Shriner, G.

    1995-12-31

    Results of initial MISA toxicity compliance monitoring for a multiple effluent stream mining operation indicated the presence of sporadic acute toxicity. Traditionally, only small scale acute and sub-lethal species (i.e. D. magna, C. dubia, P. promelas, Microtox) have been utilized during Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) studies. These methods had proven to be very expensive and of limit value in planning the future direction of mining effluent treatment. A more direct and economical approach to toxicity investigations was needed to prepare for the 1997 compliance deadline for non-lethality and water chemistry objectives. A modified EPA-TIE investigation was initiated on the problem effluent streams. Phase 1 modifications were made to include both MISA compliance organisms, D. magna and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). Phases 2 and 3 were replaced with effluent treatability assays derived from toxicity reduction/elimination information obtained during Phase 1 procedures. Information on potential toxicant speciation under the various treatment conditions was also collected. Preliminary results indicate that variations in the applied treatment, as well as the degree of treatment will be required for the different effluent streams to obtain non-acutely toxic effluent. Ongoing laboratory tests are being conducted to achieve consistency and confidence in the results, allowing plant operators to make informed decisions regarding the (expensive) changes to be made in their effluent treatment facilities over the next few years.

  1. Comparison of toxicity values across zebrafish early life stages and mammalian studies: Implications for chemical testing.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Nicole A; Reif, David M; Gustafsson, Jan-Ake; Bondesson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    With the high cost and slow pace of toxicity testing in mammals, the vertebrate zebrafish has become a tractable model organism for high throughput toxicity testing. We present here a meta-analysis of 600 chemicals tested for toxicity in zebrafish embryos and larvae. Nineteen aggregated and 57 individual toxicity endpoints were recorded from published studies yielding 2695 unique data points. These data points were compared to lethality and reproductive toxicology endpoints analyzed in rodents and rabbits and to exposure values for humans. We show that although many zebrafish endpoints did not correlate to rodent or rabbit acute toxicity data, zebrafish could be used to accurately predict relative acute toxicity through the rat inhalation, rabbit dermal, and rat oral exposure routes. Ranking of the chemicals based on toxicity and teratogenicity in zebrafish, as well as human exposure levels, revealed that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), benzo(a)pyrene, and chlorpyrifos ranked in the top nine of all chemicals for these three categories, and as such should be considered high priority chemicals for testing in higher vertebrates.

  2. Toxicity assessment of nanosilver wound dressing in Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi; Mahdavi, Moujan; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Korani, Mitra; Amani, Amir; Ziarati, Parisa

    2013-05-07

    Antibiotic resistance to microorganisms is one of the major problems faced in the field of wound care in burns patients. Silver nanoparticles have come up as potent antimicrobial agent and are being evaluated in diverse medical applications ranging from silver based dressings to silver coated medical devices. We aimed in present study to test the release of nanosilver from nanosilver wound dressing and compare the dermal and systemic toxicity of nanosilver dressings in a repeated dose (21 days) model. Under general anesthesia, a limited standard 2nd degree burns were provided on the back of each rat in all treatment, negative control (simple dressing) and 5% silver nitrate groups, each contained 5 male wistar rats. According to the analysis made by atomic absorption spectrometry, the wound dressings released 0.599 ± 0.083 ppm of nanosilver during first 24 hrs of study. Daily observations were recoded and wounds were covered with new dressings each 24 hrs. Burn healing was observed in nanosilver wound dressing group in shorter time periods than the control groups. In toxicity assessment, this dressing didn't cause any hematological and histopathological abnormalities in treatment group but biochemical studies showed significant rise of plasma transaminase (ALT) at the endpoint (21 days) of the study (P=0.027). Portal mononuclear lymphoid and polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltrations in three to four adjacent foci were recognized around the central hepatic vein in treatment group. Mild hepatotoxic effects of nanosilver wound dressing in wistar rat emphasize the necessity of more studies on toxicity potentials of low dose nanosilver by dermal applications.

  3. Experimental systems for mechanistic studies of toxicant induced lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Fahy, O; Tsicopoulos, A; Gosset, P; Tonnel, A B

    2000-03-15

    Human breath contains a large array of complex and poorly characterized mixtures. We can measure the potential risk of these exposures at molecular, cell, organ, organismic levels or in population. This paper emphasizes the characteristics of in vitro tests of lung cells and discusses the use of in vitro systems to determine the health effects of inhaled pollutants. Exposure to gases can be performed with roller bottles fitted with modified rotating caps with tubing connections, or by using dishes on rocker platforms, which tilt back and forth to expose the cell culture to gases. Exposure of cells may also be obtained by using very thin gas-permable membrane on which cells grow. However, it is clear that in using these systems, the culture medium constitutes a barrier between the gas and the target cells and thus does not permit a physiological approach of the toxic effects of gases. This is the reason why an experimental model, using a biphasic cell culture technique in gas phase, was developed. We report the value and the limits of this method using bronchial cells or alveolar macrophages. Exposure of lung cells to gas pollutants or particles may be responsible for either cell injury or cell activation associated with the overexpression of mRNA and the release of various bioactive mediators. In vitro assays have some limitations, particularly because the human pulmonary response to inhaled pollutants is the result of complex interactions involving many different cell types within the lungs. However, cell culture using biphasic systems in aerobiosis opens new ways for the research on the biological effects of gas pollutants.

  4. In vivo toxicity studies of fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade: a review.

    PubMed

    Escrivá, L; Font, G; Manyes, L

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes the information regarding the in vivo studies of Fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade. The most common studies are classified as subacute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, acute toxicity, toxicokinetic studies and teratogenicity in order of importance. The most used animals in in vivo studies are pigs, rats, chickens and mice. Fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, nivalenol and T-2 toxin are the most studied fusarotoxins. Studies with combinations of mycotoxins are also frequent, deoxynivalenol generally being one of them. The predominant route of administration is oral, administered mostly in the form of naturally contaminated feed. Other administration routes also used are intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous. In vivo research on Fusarium mycotoxins has increased since 2010 highlighting the need for such studies in the field of food and feed safety. PMID:25680507

  5. In vivo toxicity studies of fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade: a review.

    PubMed

    Escrivá, L; Font, G; Manyes, L

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes the information regarding the in vivo studies of Fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade. The most common studies are classified as subacute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, acute toxicity, toxicokinetic studies and teratogenicity in order of importance. The most used animals in in vivo studies are pigs, rats, chickens and mice. Fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, nivalenol and T-2 toxin are the most studied fusarotoxins. Studies with combinations of mycotoxins are also frequent, deoxynivalenol generally being one of them. The predominant route of administration is oral, administered mostly in the form of naturally contaminated feed. Other administration routes also used are intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous. In vivo research on Fusarium mycotoxins has increased since 2010 highlighting the need for such studies in the field of food and feed safety.

  6. Proteomic analysis of 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD dipalmitate toxicity in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Stefanie; Oberemm, Axel; Buhrke, Thorsten; Meckert, Christine; Rozycki, Christel; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Thermal treatment of foodstuff containing fats and salt promotes the formation of 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and its fatty acid esters. 3-MCPD-exposed rats develop testicular lesions and Leydig cell tumors. 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD ester toxicity is thought to be caused by 3-MCPD and its metabolites, since 3-MCPD esters are hydrolyzed in the gut. Inhibition of glycolysis is one of the few known molecular mechanisms of 3-MCPD toxicity. To obtain deeper insight into this process, a comparative proteomic approach was chosen, based on a 28-days repeated-dose feeding study with male Wistar rats. Animals received equimolar doses of 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD dipalmitate. A lower dose of 3-MCPD dipalmitate was also administered. Absence of histopathological changes supported an analysis of early cellular disturbance. Testes were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometric protein identification. Data provide a comprehensive overview of proteomic changes induced by 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD dipalmitate in rat testis in an early phase of organ impairment. Results are compatible with known 3-MCPD effects on reproductive function, substantially extend our knowledge about cellular responses to 3-MCPD and support the hypothesis that toxicity of 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD esters is mediated via common effectors. DJ-1 was identified as a candidate marker for 3-MCPD exposure.

  7. Bioaccumulation and Subchronic Toxicity of 14 nm Gold Nanoparticles in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rambanapasi, Clinton; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn; Buntting, Hylton; Bester, Cornelius; Kotze, Deon; Hayeshi, Rose; Grobler, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of 14 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were repeatedly administered intravenously at three dose levels (0.9, 9 and 90 µg) to male Sprague Dawley rats weekly for 7 weeks, followed by a 14-day washout period. After sacrificing, the amount of gold was quantified in the liver, lungs, spleen, skeleton and carcass using neutron activation analysis (NAA). During the study, pre- and post (24 h) administration blood samples were collected from both the test and control groups, the latter which received an equal injection volume of normal saline. General health indicators were monitored together with markers of kidney and liver damage for acute and subchronic toxicity assessment. Histopathological assessments were done on the heart, kidneys, liver, lungs and spleen to assess any morphological changes as a result of the exposure to AuNPs. The mass measurements of all the groups showed a steady increase with no signs of overt toxicity. The liver had the highest amount of gold (µg) per gram of tissue after 56 days followed by the spleen, lungs, skeleton and carcass. Markers of kidney and liver damage showed similar trends between the pre and post samples within each group and across groups. The histopathological examination also showed no hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. There was accumulation of Au in tissues after repeated dosing, albeit with no observable overt toxicity, kidney or liver damage.

  8. Effect of nitrate-based bioremediation on contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity-column study

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Bantle, J.A.; Schrock, E.J.

    1998-03-01

    A laboratory column study was set up to evaluate changes in contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity following nitrate-based bioremediation and to correlate toxicity reduction with loss of fuel components. Glass columns were packed with sediment from an aquifer that had been contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel and were remediated using feed solution containing 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N. Column influents and effluents were monitored for BTEXTMB (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes), electron acceptors, nutrients, and dissolved gases. Duplicate columns were sacrificed after 1, 4, and 7 months, and core material was analyzed for chemical constituents. In addition, core material was evaluated for toxicity using FETAX, a developmental toxicity test employing frog embryos.

  9. Cumulative bioluminescence; A potential rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity: development study

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V. )

    1992-03-01

    A new rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity is based on the spontaneous bioluminescence of Pyrocystis lunula, an easy-to-culture alga that vigorously responds to shear stress (mixing) by emitting a sharp burst of light. In contrast to other bioluminescence methods, a cumulative flux of light is measured with a photomultiplier that eliminates the effect of exposure time on test results. Light quenching, caused by the presence of a toxicant, results in the dose/response relationship (DSR) typical for the enzymatic reaction kinetics. The Michaelis-Menten (dissociation) constant is used as a direct measure of toxicity. The evaluation study involved multiple experiments with 60 samples of drilling fluids from the U.S. gulf coast, as well as such typical toxicants as diesel oil, mineral oil, and chrome lignosulfonate (CLS). In this paper, the results of the test error analysis and comparisons with the Microtox and Mysid shrimp assays are reported.

  10. [Progress in studies of the male reproductive toxicity of pyrethroid insecticides].

    PubMed

    Yao, Ke-Wen; Wang, Jie-Dong

    2008-03-01

    As a new type of pesticides and because of their high performance and low toxicity, pyrethroid insecticides are widely used in place of organochlorine insecticides both in agriculture and in the home. In the recent years, more and more evidence indicates that pyrethroid insecticides can reduce sperm count and motility, cause deformity of the sperm head, increase the count of abnormal sperm, damage sperm DNA and induce its aneuploidy rate, as well as affect sex hormone levels and produce reproductive toxicity. The present article reviews the advances in the studies of male reproductive toxicity of pyrethroid pesticides by experiment in animals and human population, discusses the mechanism of male reproductive toxicity of pesticides and raises some problems concerning the evaluation of human reproductive hazards.

  11. U.S./Mexico Border environmental study toxics release inventory data, 1988--1992

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.F.; LoPresti, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    This is a report on industrial toxic chemical releases and transfers based on information reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), a database maintained by the USEPA. This document discusses patterns of toxic chemical releases to the atmosphere, to water, to the land, and to underground injection; and transfers of toxic chemicals to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW), and for disposal, treatment and other off-site transfers during the TRI reporting years 1988--1992. Geographic coverage is limited to the US side of the ``Border Area``, the geographic area situated within 100 km of the US/Mexico international boundary. A primary purpose of this study is to provide background information that can be used in the future development of potential ``indicator variables`` for tracking environmental and public health status in the Border Area in conjunction with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

  12. Chronic toxicity study of cyclohexanone in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Lijinsky, W; Kovatch, R M

    1986-10-01

    A 2-year chronic toxicity assay of cyclohexanone (CAS: 108-94-1) was conducted in F344 rats and (C57BL/6 X C3H)F1 mice by administering a solution of cyclohexanone in drinking water. Two concentrations were given to rats, 6,500 and 3,300 ppm (wt/vol). Male mice received 13,000 and 6,500 ppm, while female mice were given three concentrations, 25,000, 13,000, and 6,500 ppm. Each treatment group consisted of 50 or 52 male and 50 or 52 female rats or mice, except 47 male mice treated with the highest dose and 41 female mice treated with the highest dose, and there was a group of untreated controls of each species. Survival and weight gain were similar to those of controls at the lowest cyclohexanone dose in both sexes of both species, but weight gain was depressed at all of the higher doses. Survival was good (greater than 80% at 90 wk) in all groups except in female mice at the 2 highest doses; at 25,000 ppm of cyclohexanone, only 50% of mice lived beyond 1 year. Most of the neoplasms in the treated groups did not differ significantly in number from those in the controls. Male rats receiving 3,300 ppm cyclohexanone had a 13% incidence of adrenal cortex adenomas (7 animals) compared with an incidence of 2% in controls; the incidence of this neoplasm did not increase in the male rats receiving 6,500 ppm or in the female rats given either dose. The mice had a statistically significant increase in incidence of lymphomas-leukemias among the females given 6,500 ppm, but not among the groups given higher doses of cyclohexanone. Male mice given 6,500 ppm cyclohexanone showed an increased incidence of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas, 50% versus 32.5% in controls, but the incidence of these neoplasms was only 37% in the male mice given 13,000 ppm cyclohexanone. The incidence of lymphomas in male mice and of hepatocellular neoplasms in female mice given cyclohexanone did not differ from that in the controls. The evidence for carcinogenic activity of cyclohexanone is

  13. Linking waterlogging tolerance with Mn²⁺ toxicity: a case study for barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Shabala, S; Shabala, L; Rengel, Z; Wu, X; Zhang, G; Zhou, M

    2015-01-01

    Vast agricultural areas are affected by flooding, causing up to 80% yield reduction and resulting in multibillion dollar losses. Up to now, the focus of plant breeders was predominantly on detrimental effects of anoxia, while other (potentially equally important) traits were essentially neglected; one of these is soil elemental toxicity. Excess water triggers a progressive decrease in soil redox potential, thus increasing the concentration of Mn(2+) that can be toxic to plants if above a specific threshold. This work aimed to quantify the relative contribution of Mn(2+) toxicity to waterlogging stress tolerance, using barley as a case study. Twenty barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotypes contrasting in waterlogging stress tolerance were studied for their ability to cope with toxic (1 mm) amounts of Mn(2+) in the root rhizosphere. Under Mn(2+) toxicity, chlorophyll content of most waterlogging-tolerant genotypes (TX9425, Yerong, CPI-71284-48 and CM72) remained above 60% of the control value, whereas sensitive genotypes (Franklin and Naso Nijo) had 35% less chlorophyll than 35% of controls. Manganese concentration in leaves was not related to visual Mn(2+) toxicity symptoms, suggesting that various Mn(2+) tolerance mechanisms might operate in different tolerant genotypes, i.e. avoidance versus tissue tolerance. The overall significant (r = 0.60) correlation between tolerance to Mn(2+) toxicity and waterlogging in barley suggests that plant breeding for tolerance to waterlogging traits may be advanced by targeting mechanisms conferring tolerance to Mn(2+) toxicity, at least in this species. PMID:24985051

  14. Randomised clinical trial: safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of repeated doses of TAK-438 (vonoprazan), a novel potassium-competitive acid blocker, in healthy male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, H; Sakurai, Y; Nishimura, A; Okamoto, H; Hibberd, M; Jenkins, R; Yoneyama, T; Ashida, K; Ogama, Y; Warrington, S

    2015-01-01

    Background TAK-438 (vonoprazan) is a potassium-competitive acid blocker that reversibly inhibits gastric H+, K+-ATPase. Aim To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of TAK-438 in healthy Japanese and non-Japanese men. Methods In two Phase I, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, healthy men (Japan N = 60; UK N = 48) received TAK-438 10–40 mg once daily at a fixed dose level for 7 consecutive days. Assessments included safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (intragastric pH). Results Plasma concentration–time profiles of TAK-438 at all dose levels showed rapid absorption (median Tmax ≤2 h). Mean elimination half-life was up to 9 h. Exposure was slightly greater than dose proportional, with no apparent time-dependent inhibition of metabolism. There was no important difference between the two studies in AUC0-tau on Day 7. TAK-438 caused dose-dependent acid suppression. On Day 7, mean 24-h intragastric pH>4 holding time ratio (HTR) with 40 mg TAK-438 was 100% (Japan) and 93.2% (UK), and mean night-time pH>4 HTR was 100% (Japan) and 90.4% (UK). TAK-438 was well tolerated. The frequency of adverse events was similar at all dose levels and there were no serious adverse events. There were no important increases in serum alanine transaminase activity. Serum gastrin and pepsinogen I and II concentrations increased with TAK-438 dose. Conclusions TAK-438 in multiple rising oral dose levels of 10–40 mg once daily for 7 days was safe and well tolerated in healthy men and caused rapid, profound and sustained suppression of gastric acid secretion throughout each 24-h dosing interval. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: NCT02123953 and NCT02141711. PMID:25707624

  15. Central nervous system effects of the interaction between risperidone (single dose) and the 5-HT6 antagonist SB742457 (repeated doses) in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke; Rad, Mandana; Zamuner, Stefano; Cohen, Adam F; Lemme, Francesca; Franson, Kari L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Pich, Emilio Merlo

    2011-01-01

    AIM Several lines of evidence suggest a possible role of 5-HT6receptor antagonists in cognitive dysfunction of schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, are currently used in these disorders. Therefore, the pharmacological interactions between the 5-HT6 antagonist SB-742457 and risperidone were investigated in the light of possible co-medication. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover design was used to study the interaction between multiple doses SB-742457 50 mg and a single dose risperidone 2 mg in 18 healthy subjects. RESULTS Treatment was well tolerated. The most common adverse event was somnolence in 83% during the combination vs. 50% of subjects after risperidone, 32% after placebo and 11% after SB-742457. Combination treatment produced a statistically significant increase in the maximum plasma concentration of risperidone and had no effect on SB-742457 pharmacokinetics. Risperidone decreased saccadic peak velocity, finger tapping, adaptive tracking, subjective alertness, delayed word recognition and body sway and increased electroencephalogram (EEG) theta power and prolactin. The only pharmacodynamic interaction of risperidone and SB-742457 was an increase of absolute EEG alpha (ratio = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.40, P = 0.0004) and beta power (ratio = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.27, P = 0.016). No significant effects of SB-742457 alone were found. CONCLUSION The pharmacokinetic interactions between SB-742457 and risperidone detected in this study were not clinically relevant. The increase in EEG alpha and beta power is incompatible with enhanced risperidone activity, but could point to mild arousing effects of the combination. Most pharmacodynamic changes of risperidone are consistent with previously reported data. The potential cognitive effects of SB-742457 remain to be established. PMID:21223356

  16. Preliminary studies on model development for rodent toxicity and its interspecies correlation with aquatic toxicities of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Das, Rudra Narayan; Sanderson, Hans; Mwambo, Andrew E; Roy, Kunal

    2013-03-01

    Environmental toxicity due to pharmaceuticals has been an issue of serious concern for long time. Development of chemometric models with reliable predictive power has been considered as an effective tool for the design of new drug agents with reduced or without ecotoxic potential. Considering a higher degree of similarity in genetic homology towards drug receptor with mammals, we have used a dataset of 194 compounds with reported rodent, fish, daphnia and algae toxicity data for extrapolation of their toxicity towards humans. Allowing for rodents as the most surrogate to human physiology, attempts have also been made to develop interspecies correlation models keeping rodent toxicity as dependent variable so that any drug without reported rodent toxicity can be predicted using fish, daphnia or algae toxicity data which can be consequently extrapolated to human toxicity. The developed models have been subjected to multiple validation strategies. Acceptable results have been obtained in both cases of direct and interspecies extrapolation quantitative structure-activity relationship models. PMID:23238824

  17. Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Gillian C.; West, Catharine M.L.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Talbot, Christopher J.; Elliott, Rebecca M.; Tanteles, George A.; Symonds, R. Paul; Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Dunning, Alison M.; Burnet, Neil G.; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

  18. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic interaction between repeated doses of rifapentine or rifampin and a single dose of bedaquiline in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Winter, Helen; Egizi, Erica; Murray, Stephen; Erondu, Ngozi; Ginsberg, Ann; Rouse, Doris J; Severynse-Stevens, Diana; Pauli, Elliott

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the effects of rifapentine or rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of bedaquiline and its M2 metabolite in healthy subjects using a two-period single-sequence design. In period 1, subjects received a single dose of bedaquiline (400 mg), followed by a 28-day washout. In period 2, subjects received either rifapentine (600 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) from day 20 to day 41, as well as a single bedaquiline dose (400 mg) on day 29. The pharmacokinetic profiles of bedaquiline and M2 were compared over 336 h after the administration of bedaquiline alone and in combination with steady-state rifapentine or rifampin. Coadministration of bedaquiline with rifapentine or rifampin resulted in lower bedaquiline exposures. The geometric mean ratios (GMRs) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the maximum observed concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve to the last available concentration time point (AUC0-t), and AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-inf) of bedaquiline were 62.19% (53.37 to 72.47), 42.79% (37.77 to 48.49), and 44.52% (40.12 to 49.39), respectively, when coadministered with rifapentine. Similarly, the GMRs and 90% CIs for the Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of bedaquiline were 60.24% (51.96 to 69.84), 41.36% (37.70 to 45.36), and 47.32% (41.49 to 53.97), respectively, when coadministered with rifampin. The Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of M2 were also altered when bedaquiline was coadministered with rifapentine or rifampin. Single doses of bedaquiline, administered alone or with multiple doses of rifapentine or rifampin, were well tolerated, with no safety concerns related to coadministration. Daily administration of rifapentine to patients with tuberculosis presents the same drug interaction challenges as rifampin and other rifamycins. Strong inducers of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 should be avoided when considering the use of bedaquiline. (This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT02216331

  19. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH. PMID:25656991

  20. Hemoglobin induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contributes to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeat dose haptoglobin administration

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan with indications for trauma, burns and massive transfusion related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia mediated PH. Approach and results Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb-infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for five weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated non-heme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right ventricular hypertrophy, which suggest a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Conclusions By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia; and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis associated PH. PMID:25656991

  1. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies.

  2. Randomized, controlled, assessor-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of single- versus repeated-dose albendazole to treat ascaris lumbricoides, trichuris trichiura, and hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Adegnika, Ayola A; Zinsou, Jeannot F; Issifou, Saadou; Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Kassa, Roland F; Feugap, Eliane N; Honkpehedji, Yabo J; Dejon Agobe, Jean-Claude; Kenguele, Hilaire M; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Agnandji, Selidji T; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Ramharter, Michael; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G; Lell, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    In many regions where soil-transmitted helminth infections are endemic, single-dose albendazole is used in mass drug administration programs to control infections. There are little data on the efficacy of the standard single-dose administration compared to that of alternative regimens. We conducted a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to determine the efficacies of standard and extended albendazole treatment against soil-transmitted helminth infection in Gabon. A total of 175 children were included. Adequate cure rates and egg reduction rates above 85% were found with a single dose of albendazole for Ascaris infection, 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73, 96) and 93.8% (CI, 87.6, 100), respectively, while two doses were necessary for hookworm infestation (92% [CI, 78, 100] and 92% [CI, 78, 100], respectively). However, while a 3-day regimen was not sufficient to cure Trichuris (cure rate, 83% [CI, 73, 93]), this regimen reduced the number of eggs up to 90.6% (CI, 83.1, 100). The rate ratios of two- and three-dose regimens compared to a single-dose treatment were 1.7 (CI, 1.1, 2.5) and 2.1 (CI, 1.5, 2.9) for Trichuris and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) for hookworm. Albendazole was safe and well tolerated in all regimens. A single-dose albendazole treatment considerably reduces Ascaris infection but has only a moderate effect on hookworm and Trichuris infections. The single-dose option may still be the preferred regimen because it balances efficacy, safety, and compliance during mass drug administration, keeping in mind that asymptomatic low-level helminth carriage may also have beneficial effects. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01192802.).

  3. Multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-02-17

    The booming nanotechnology industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At the organism level, our automated system analyzes hundreds of individual animals for body length, locomotion speed, and lifespan. To demonstrate the utility of our system, we applied this technology to test the toxicity of 20 nanomaterials at four concentrations. Only fullerene nanoparticles (nC60), fullerol, TiO2, and CeO2 showed little or no toxicity. Various degrees of toxicity were detected from different forms of carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon black, Ag, and fumed SiO2 nanoparticles. Aminofullerene and ultraviolet-irradiated nC60 also showed small but significant toxicity. We further investigated the effects of nanomaterial size, shape, surface chemistry, and exposure conditions on toxicity. Our data are publicly available at the open-access nanotoxicity database www.QuantWorm.org/nano. PMID:25611253

  4. A multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The booming nanotech industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At the organism level, our automated system analyzes hundreds of individual animals for body length, locomotion speed, and lifespan. To demonstrate the utility of our system, we applied this technology to test the toxicity of 20 nanomaterials under four concentrations. Only fullerene nanoparticles (nC60), fullerol, TiO2, and CeO2 showed little or no toxicity. Various degrees of toxicity were detected from different forms of carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon black, Ag, and fumed SiO2 nanoparticles. Aminofullerene and UV irradiated nC60 also showed small but significant toxicity. We further investigated the effects of nanomaterial size, shape, surface chemistry, and exposure conditions on toxicity. Our data are publicly available at the open-access nanotoxicity database www.QuantWorm.org/nano. PMID:25611253

  5. Safety assessment of methanol extract of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus): acute and subchronic toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Hor, Sook Yee; Ahmad, Mariam; Farsi, Elham; Yam, Mun Fei; Hashim, Mohd Akmal; Lim, Chung Pin; Sadikun, Amirin; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini

    2012-06-01

    Recently, the fruits of Hylocereus polyrhizus, known as red dragon fruit, have received much attention from growers worldwide. However, there is little toxicological information regarding the safety of repeated exposure to these fruits. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of a methanol extract of H. polyrhizus fruit after acute and subchronic administration in rats. In the acute toxicity study, single doses of fruit extract (1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg) were administered to rats by oral gavage, and the rats were then monitored for 14 days. In the subchronic toxicity study, the fruit extract was administered orally to rats at doses of 1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. There was no mortality or signs of acute or subchronic toxicity. There was no significant difference in body weight, relative organ weight or hematological parameters in the subchronic toxicity study. Biochemical analysis showed some significant changes, including creatinine, globulin, total protein and urea levels. No abnormality of internal organs was observed between treatment and control groups. The lethal oral dose of the fruit extract is more than 5000 mg/kg and the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of the extract for both male and female rats is considered to be 5000 mg/kg per day for 28 days. PMID:22440551

  6. Safety assessment of methanol extract of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus): acute and subchronic toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Hor, Sook Yee; Ahmad, Mariam; Farsi, Elham; Yam, Mun Fei; Hashim, Mohd Akmal; Lim, Chung Pin; Sadikun, Amirin; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini

    2012-06-01

    Recently, the fruits of Hylocereus polyrhizus, known as red dragon fruit, have received much attention from growers worldwide. However, there is little toxicological information regarding the safety of repeated exposure to these fruits. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of a methanol extract of H. polyrhizus fruit after acute and subchronic administration in rats. In the acute toxicity study, single doses of fruit extract (1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg) were administered to rats by oral gavage, and the rats were then monitored for 14 days. In the subchronic toxicity study, the fruit extract was administered orally to rats at doses of 1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. There was no mortality or signs of acute or subchronic toxicity. There was no significant difference in body weight, relative organ weight or hematological parameters in the subchronic toxicity study. Biochemical analysis showed some significant changes, including creatinine, globulin, total protein and urea levels. No abnormality of internal organs was observed between treatment and control groups. The lethal oral dose of the fruit extract is more than 5000 mg/kg and the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of the extract for both male and female rats is considered to be 5000 mg/kg per day for 28 days.

  7. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26828483

  8. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-27

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation.

  9. Histopathological study into side-effect toxicity of some drugs used in treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    el-Shazly, M O; Afify, M M; el-Dieb, M K

    1989-03-01

    The effect of cis-chlorodiamine platinum (cisplatin) on different tissues of rat was studied. Nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity were clearly observed both clinically and histologically. The minimising action of penicillamine as a chelating agent and/or lasix as a diuretic on the toxic side-effect of cisplatin was also studied. Both agents succeeded in reducing the toxic side-effect of cisplatin to some extent but failed to reduce mortality among the experimental animals. The study has also manifested liver and heart to be additional organs susceptible to damage, following cisplatin treatment.

  10. [Synthesis of new mandelic acid derivatives with preservative action. Synthesis and acute toxicity study].

    PubMed

    Stan, Cătălina; Năstase, V; Pavelescu, M; Vasile, Cornelia; Dumitrache, M; Gherase, Florenţa; Năstasă, Veronica

    2004-01-01

    Starting from the antiseptic action of DL mandelic acid, there were synthesized a series of esters of the mandelic acid, esters which could have preservative action. This study present the synthesis, structure validation and the acute toxicity study, for the new synthesized compounds. The esters were obtained by acylating 4-hydroxybenzoic acid propyl, ethyl, methyl esters and salicylic acid with the DL mandelic chloride (that was protected initially by the hydroxylic group). The structure of the synthesized compounds was confirmed by quantitative elemental analysis and RMN 1H spectral measurements. The acute toxicity was determined for two of the esters, who proved to had a preservative action (previously studied) and indicated that these esters have a small toxicity.

  11. PRIORITIZATION OF NTP REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANTS FOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population studies evaluate human reproductive impairment are time consuming,
    expensive, logistically difficult and with limited resources must be prioritized to
    effectivelyprevent the adverse health effects in humans. Interactions among
    health scientists, unions,a...

  12. One Health and the Environment: Toxic Cyanobacteria, a Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants in ambient exposure situations. ...

  13. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems. PMID:27539747

  14. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems.

  15. Toxicological assessment of combined lead and cadmium: acute and sub-chronic toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Guiping; Dai, Shujun; Yin, Zhongqiong; Lu, Hongke; Jia, Renyong; Xu, Jiao; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Shu, Yang; Zhao, Xinghong

    2014-03-01

    The exposure to chemical mixtures is a common and important determinant of toxicity and receives concern for their introduction by inhalation and ingestion. However, few in vivo mixture studies have been conducted to understand the health effects of chemical mixtures compared with single chemicals. In this study, the acute and 90day sub-chronic toxicity tests of combined Pb and Cd were conducted. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 value of Pb(NO3)2 and CdCl2 mixture by the oral route was 2696.54mg/kg by Bliss method. The sub-chronic treatment revealed that the low-dose combination of Pb and Cd exposures can significantly change the physiological and biochemical parameters of the blood of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with dose-response relationship and causes microcytic hypochromic anemia and the damages of liver and kidney of the SD rats to various degrees. Histopathological exams showed that the target organs of Pb and Cd were testicle, liver, and kidneys. These observations suggest that Pb and Cd are practically additive-toxic for the SD rats in oral acute toxicity studies. The lowest observed adverse-effect level in rats may be lower than a dose of 29.96mg/(kgbwday) when administered orally for 90 consecutive days.

  16. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sacrifice or death during the study, the dam shall be examined macroscopically for any structural... should be recorded for dams that are sacrificed. Gravid uterine weights should not be obtained from dead... individually, the weights recorded, and the mean fetal weight derived. (v) Following removal, each fetus...

  17. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sacrifice or death during the study, the dam shall be examined macroscopically for any structural... should be recorded for dams that are sacrificed. Gravid uterine weights should not be obtained from dead... individually, the weights recorded, and the mean fetal weight derived. (v) Following removal, each fetus...

  18. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of each abnormal sign and its subsequent course. (v) Food, body weight and uterine weight data. (vi.... (v) Measurements should be made weekly of food consumption for all animals in the study. (vi) Animals.... (f) Data and reporting—(1) Treatment of results. Data shall be summarized in tablular form,...

  19. Characterisation of carbon nanotubes in the context of toxicity studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berhanu, D.; Dybowska, A.; Misra, S.K.; Stanley, C.J.; Ruenraroengsak, P.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Tetley, T.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Plant, J.A.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionise our futures, but has also prompted concerns about the possibility that nanomaterials may harm humans or the biosphere. The unique properties of nanoparticles, that give them novel size dependent functionalities, may also have the potential to cause harm. Discrepancies in existing human health and environmental studies have shown the importance of good quality, well-characterized reference nanomaterials for toxicological studies. Here we make a case for the importance of the detailed characterization of nanoparticles, using several methods, particularly to allow the recognition of impurities and the presence of chemically identical but structurally distinct phases. Methods to characterise fully, commercially available multi-wall carbon nanotubes at different scales, are presented. ?? 2009 Berhanu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Analgesic activity, toxicity study and phytochemical screening of standardized Cinnomomum iners leaves methanolic extract

    PubMed Central

    Mustaffa, F.; Indurkar, J.; Ismail, S.; Mordi, M. N.; Ramanathan, S.; Mansor, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Cinnomomum iners standardized leaves methanolic extract (CSLE) was subjected to analgesic, toxicity and phytochemical studies. The analgesic activity of CSLE was evaluated using formalin, hot plate and tail flick tests at doses of 100, 200 and 500 mg/kg. CSLE showed significant activity (P < 0.05) in the formalin model (late phase) on the rats at doses of 200 and 500 mg/kg. However, CSLE did not show activity in the hot plate and tail flick tests. The results obtained suggest that CSLE acts peripherally to relieve pain. For the toxicity study, CSLE was orally administered to the Swiss albino mice according to the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) guideline 423. There was no lethality or toxic symptoms observed for all the tested doses throughout the 14-day period. Phytochemical screening of CSLE showed the presence of cardiac glycoside, flavonoid, polyphenol, saponin, sugar, tannin and terpenoid. PMID:21808545

  1. Developmental toxicity of diesel exhaust: a review of studies in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Naya, Masato; Horimoto, Masao; Kato, Haruhisa

    2013-12-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) is a complex mixture of combustion products of diesel fuel, including gases and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), commonly known as soot, that contains many toxic air contaminants. Studies of pre- and postnatal exposure to DE or DEPs have revealed changes in growth, sexual development, hormone levels, spermatogenesis, weights of the reproductive and accessory organs, behavior, monoaminergic system, expression of immune-related genes, histopathology of the testes and brain, susceptibility to allergies, and inflammatory and genotoxic endpoints in rodent offspring. Changes in gene expression for gonadal development were also observed after exposure to DE. As for the causative agent for the developmental toxicity of DE, DEPs and the gaseous phase, conflicting findings were reported. Although this paper provides initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of DE including the gaseous phase and DEPs, further studies using relevant concentrations closely reflecting expected levels of human exposure are needed.

  2. Xenotransplantation Models to Study the Effects of Toxicants on Human Fetal Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Spade, Daniel J.; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Heger, Nicholas E.; Sanders, Jennifer A.; Saffarini, Camelia M.; Gruppuso, Philip A.; De Paepe, Monique E.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases that manifest throughout the lifetime are influenced by factors affecting fetal development. Fetal exposure to xenobiotics, in particular, may influence the development of adult diseases. Established animal models provide systems for characterizing both developmental biology and developmental toxicology. However, animal model systems do not allow researchers to assess the mechanistic effects of toxicants on developing human tissue. Human fetal tissue xenotransplantation models have recently been implemented to provide human-relevant mechanistic data on the many tissue-level functions that may be affected by fetal exposure to toxicants. This review describes the development of human fetal tissue xenotransplant models for testis, prostate, lung, liver, and adipose tissue, aimed at studying the effects of xenobiotics on tissue development, including implications for testicular dysgenesis, prostate disease, lung disease, and metabolic syndrome. The mechanistic data obtained from these models can complement data from epidemiology, traditional animal models, and in vitro studies to quantify the risks of toxicant exposures during human development. PMID:25477288

  3. Novel approaches for studying pulmonary toxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Michaela; Knebel, J W; Ritter, D

    2003-04-11

    The in vitro study of adverse cellular effects induced by inhaled pollutants poses a special problem due to the difficulties of exposing cultured cells of the respiratory tract directly to test atmospheres that can include complex gaseous and particulate mixtures. In general, there is no widely accepted in vitro exposure system. However, in vitro methods offer the unique possibility for use of human cells, developed and validated cell culture and exposure device (CULTEX(1)) using the principle of the air/liquid exposure technique. Cells of the respiratory tract are grown on porous membranes in transwell inserts. After removal of the medium, the cells can be treated on their superficial surfaces with the test atmosphere, and at the same time they are supplied with nutrients through the membrane below. In comparison with other experimental approaches, the goal of our studies is to analyze the biological effects of test atmospheres under environmental conditions, i.e. without humidifying the atmosphere or adding additional CO(2). The system used is small and flexible enough independent of a cultivation chamber and thus offers the opportunity for onsite study of indoor and outdoor atmospheres in the field. The efficacy of the exposure device has already been demonstrated in the analysis of dose-dependent cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of exposure of epithelial lung cells to complex mixtures such as native diesel exhaust and side-stream smoke.

  4. Per- and polyfluoro toxicity (LC(50) inhalation) study in rat and mouse using QSAR modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-03-15

    Fully or partially fluorinated compounds, known as per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are widely distributed in the environment and released because of their use in different household and industrial products. Few of these long chain per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are classified as emerging pollutants, and their environmental and toxicological effects are unveiled in the literature. This has diverted the production of long chain compounds, considered as more toxic, to short chains, but concerns regarding the toxicity of both types of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are alarming. There are few experimental data available on the environmental behavior and toxicity of these compounds, and moreover, toxicity profiles are found to be different for the types of animals and species used. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is applied to a combination of short and long chain per- and polyfluorinated chemicals, for the first time, to model and predict the toxicity on two species of rodents, rat (Rattus) and mouse (Mus), by modeling inhalation (LC(50)) data. Multiple linear regression (MLR) models using the ordinary-least-squares (OLS) method, based on theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithm (GA), were used for QSAR studies. Training and prediction sets were prepared a priori, and these sets were used to derive statistically robust and predictive (both internally and externally) models. The structural applicability domain (AD) of the model was verified on a larger set of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals retrieved from different databases and journals. The descriptors involved, the similarities, and the differences observed between models pertaining to the toxicity related to the two species are discussed. Chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) were used to select most toxic compounds from those within the AD of both models, which will be subjected to experimental tests

  5. Studies on bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments: bioavailability, biodegradability, and toxicity issues.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Henry H; Lazorchak, James M; Lei, Li; Khodadoust, Amid P; Antia, Jimmy E; Bagchi, Rajesh; Suidan, Makram T

    2003-03-01

    The widespread contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes. This research studied a chronically PAH-contaminated estuarine sediment from the East River (ER; NY, USA) characterized by high concentrations of PAHs (approximately 4-190 ppm), sulfide, and metals and a marine sediment from New York/ New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH; USA) with only trace quantities of PAHs (0.1-0.6 ppm). The focus was to examine the relationship between bioavailability of PAHs and their biological removal in a slurry system. Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were conducted to measure baseline toxicity of both sediments to amphipods, aquatic worms, fathead and sheepshead minnow larvae, and a vascular plant; to determine the cause of toxicity; and to evaluate the effectiveness of the biotreatment strategies in reducing toxicity. Results showed the ER sediment was acutely toxic to all freshwater and marine organisms tested and that the toxicity was mainly caused by sulfide, PAHs, and metals present in the sediment. In spite of the high toxicity, most of the PAH compounds showed significant degradation in the aerobic sediment/water slurry system if the initial high oxygen demand due to the high sulfide content of the sediment was overcome. The removal of PAHs by biodegradation was closely related to their desorbed amount in 90% isopropanol solution during 24 h of contact, while the desorption of model PAH compounds from freshly spiked NY/NJH sediment did not describe the bioavailability of PAHs in the East River sediment well. The research improves our understanding of bioavailability as a controlling factor in bioremediation of PAHs and the potential of aerobic biodegradation for PAH removal and ecotoxicity reduction. PMID:12627632

  6. Al-toxicity studies in yeast using gallium as an aluminum analogue.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Raymond J; Raghupathi, Shyam Sundar

    2008-08-01

    Aluminum (Al) is normally present in soils as the insoluble, harmless Al2O3. The highly toxic Al3+ and AlOH2+ monomeric cations are formed in acid soils but there is little consensus on the physiological basis of Al toxicity in plants. A major factor that has retarded progress in understanding aluminum toxicity in vascular plants is the lack of a convenient radioisotope for Al. Yeast and vascular plants share similar membrane transport mechanisms and so yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) provides a convenient model system for studies of Al-toxicity. Al and gallium (Ga) have closely similar toxic effects on the yeast cells (Ki approximately 100 mmol m-3) and Ga3+ and Al3+, respond similarly to pH and are both reversible by a chelation agent (citric acid). We tested the feasibility of using 67Ga radioisotope as a tracer for Al transport with the view of using it to investigate the mechanism of Al uptake and toxicity in plants. The clinically available 67Ga citrate is unsuitable to use as an aluminum analogue because the chelated form is not toxic. Arrangements need to be made for it to be supplied as 67GaCl3. Large amounts of 67Ga rapidly bind to the cell wall of yeasts with a t 1/2 of approximately 1 s. There is a very slow net uptake of 67Ga into a second phase, presumably the cytoplasm. Uptake into the slow phase has a Vmax of only approximately 16 +/- 4 pmol m(-2) s(-1) (n = 16). The Km of 67Ga uptake could not be precisely determined but is below 100 mmol m(-3) (45 +/- 42 mmol m(-3), n = 16).

  7. Studies on bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated sediments: bioavailability, biodegradability, and toxicity issues.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Henry H; Lazorchak, James M; Lei, Li; Khodadoust, Amid P; Antia, Jimmy E; Bagchi, Rajesh; Suidan, Makram T

    2003-03-01

    The widespread contamination by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes. This research studied a chronically PAH-contaminated estuarine sediment from the East River (ER; NY, USA) characterized by high concentrations of PAHs (approximately 4-190 ppm), sulfide, and metals and a marine sediment from New York/ New Jersey Harbor (NY/NJH; USA) with only trace quantities of PAHs (0.1-0.6 ppm). The focus was to examine the relationship between bioavailability of PAHs and their biological removal in a slurry system. Freshwater and marine sediment toxicity tests were conducted to measure baseline toxicity of both sediments to amphipods, aquatic worms, fathead and sheepshead minnow larvae, and a vascular plant; to determine the cause of toxicity; and to evaluate the effectiveness of the biotreatment strategies in reducing toxicity. Results showed the ER sediment was acutely toxic to all freshwater and marine organisms tested and that the toxicity was mainly caused by sulfide, PAHs, and metals present in the sediment. In spite of the high toxicity, most of the PAH compounds showed significant degradation in the aerobic sediment/water slurry system if the initial high oxygen demand due to the high sulfide content of the sediment was overcome. The removal of PAHs by biodegradation was closely related to their desorbed amount in 90% isopropanol solution during 24 h of contact, while the desorption of model PAH compounds from freshly spiked NY/NJH sediment did not describe the bioavailability of PAHs in the East River sediment well. The research improves our understanding of bioavailability as a controlling factor in bioremediation of PAHs and the potential of aerobic biodegradation for PAH removal and ecotoxicity reduction.

  8. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Busquet, François; Strecker, Ruben; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas; Carr, Gregory J; Cenijn, Peter; Fochtman, Przemyslaw; Gourmelon, Anne; Hübler, Nicole; Kleensang, André; Knöbel, Melanie; Kussatz, Carola; Legler, Juliette; Lillicrap, Adam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Polleichtner, Christian; Rzodeczko, Helena; Salinas, Edward; Schneider, Katharina E; Scholz, Stefan; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Weigt, Stefan; Witters, Hilda; Halder, Marlies

    2014-08-01

    The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV<30%) for most chemicals and laboratories. The reproducibility was lower (CV>30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes.

  9. Acute oral toxicity and biodistribution study of zinc-aluminium-levodopa nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Saifullah, Bullo; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Azmi, Norazrina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-03-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) is an inorganic-organic nano-layered material that harbours drug between its two-layered sheets, forming a sandwich-like structure. It is attracting a great deal of attention as an alternative drug delivery (nanodelivery) system in the field of pharmacology due to their relative low toxic potential. The production of these nanodelivery systems, aimed at improving human health through decrease toxicity, targeted delivery of the active compound to areas of interest with sustained release ability. In this study, we administered zinc-aluminium-LDH-levodopa nanocomposite (ZAL) and zinc-aluminium nanocomposite (ZA) to Sprague Dawley rats to evaluate for acute oral toxicity following OECD guidelines. The oral administration of ZAL and ZA at a limit dose of 2,000 mg/kg produced neither mortality nor acute toxic signs throughout 14 days of the observation. The percentage of body weight gain of the animals showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. Animal from the two treated groups gained weight continuously over the study period, which was shown to be significantly higher than the weight at the beginning of the study ( P < 0.05). Biochemical analysis of animal serum showed no significant difference between rats treated with ZAL, ZA and controls. There was no gross lesion or histopathological changes observed in vital organs of the rats. The results suggested that ZAL and ZA at 2,000 mg/kg body weight in rats do not induce acute toxicity in the animals. Elemental analysis of tissues of treated animals demonstrated the wider distribution of the nanocomposite including the brain. In summary, findings of acute toxicity tests in this study suggest that zinc-aluminium nanocomposite intercalated with and the un-intercalated were safe when administered orally in animal models for short periods of time. It also highlighted the potential distribution ability of Tween-80 coated nanocomposite after oral administration.

  10. Recent evidence from epidemiological studies on methylmercury toxicity.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Iwata, Toyoto; Karita, Kanae; Nakai, Kunihiko

    2011-09-01

    More than fifty years have passed since the outbreak of Minamata disease, and large-scale methylmercury poisoning due to industrial effluents or methylmercury-containing fungicide intoxication has scarcely happened in developed countries. On the other hand, widespread environmental mercury contamination has occurred in gold and mercury mining areas of developing countries. In this article, we provided an overview of recent studies addressing human health effects of methylmercury, which we searched using the PubMed of the US National Library of Medicine. The following suggestions were obtained for low-level methylmercury exposure: (1) In recent years, the proportion of human studies addressing methylmercury has tended to decrease. (2) Prenatal exposure to methylmercury through fish intake, even at low levels, adversely affects child development after adjusting for polychlorinated biphenyls and maternal fish intake during pregnancy, whereas maternal seafood intake has some benefits. (3) Long-term methylmercury exposure through consumption of fish such as bigeye tuna and swordfish may pose a potential risk of cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance. (4) In measuring methylmercury levels in preserved umbilical cord collected from inhabitants born in Minamata areas between 1945 and 1989, the elevated concentrations (≥1 mg/g) were observed mainly in inhabitants born between 1947 and 1968, and the peak coincided with the peak of acetaldehyde production in Minamata. (5) Since some developing countries appear to be in similar situations to Japan in the past, attention should be directed toward early recognition of a risky agent and precautions should be taken against it.

  11. In vivo Toxicity Studies on Gall Extracts of Terminalia chebula (Gaertn.) Retz. (Combretaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Eshwarappa, Ravi Shankara Birur; Ramachandra, Y. L.; Subaramaihha, Sundara Rajan; Subbaiah, Sujan Ganapathy Pasura; Austin, Richard Surendranath; Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa

    2016-01-01

    The galls of Terminala chebula (Gaertn.) Retz. (Combretaceae) are used for the treatment of various diseases in folk medicine and has been found to posses anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-helmintic, anti-tyrosinase, and anti-aging activities. Considering the ethano-botanical and diverse pharmacological applications of galls of T. chebula, in this study, we investigate the possible toxic effects of different gall extracts of T. chebula by Brine shrimp (Artemia salina) toxicity assay. The cytotoxicity test of leaf gall extracts (petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanol, and aqueous) of T. chebula was evaluated by Brine shrimp (A. salina) toxicity assay, which is based on the ability to kill laboratory cultured Artemia nauplii (animals eggs) and also total content of polyphenols, flavonoids with other qualitative phytochemical analysis of the extract were determined. It was observed that the petroleum ether extract was virtually nontoxic on the shrimps, and exhibited very low toxicity with LC50 value of 4356.76 μg/ml. Furthermore, the chloroform extract exhibited very low toxicity, giving LC50 value of 1462.2 μg/ml. On the other hand, the ethanol extract was very toxic to brine shrimps with LC50 value of 68.64 μg/ml. The ethanol extract had the highest total phenolic and flavonoid content of 136 ± 1.5 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g d.w and 113 ± 1.6 mg of quercetin equivalent/g d.w, respectively. The higher toxicity effect was positively correlated to the high content of total polyphenols/flavonoids in the extract. This significant lethality of different extracts to brine shrimp is an indicative of the presence of potent cytotoxic components which warrants further investigation. SUMMARY The present study investigates the toxicity effect of different extracts of galls of T. chebulla, which would serve as an index for formulation of drugs for treatment of various diseases. Presumably, these activities could be attributed in part to the polyphenolic features of

  12. Pulmonary toxicity of cyclophosphamide: a 1-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, C.C.; Sigler, C.; Lock, S.; Hakkinen, P.J.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The development of cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary lesions over a 1-year period was studied in mice. Male BALB/c mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Within 3 weeks there were scattered foci of intraalveolar foamy macrophages. With time, these foci increased in size and, 1 year later, occupied large areas in all lung lobes. There was also diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Chemical determination done 3, 12, 24, and 52 weeks after cyclophosphamide showed that lungs of animals treated with cyclophosphamide had significantly more hydroxyproline per lung than controls. One year after cyclophosphamide pressure - volume curves measured in vivo were shifted down and to the right and total lung volumes were decreased. A single injection of cyclophosphamide produced an irreversible and progressive pulmonary lesion. 16 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Studies on the male reproductive toxicity of Freon 22.

    PubMed

    Lee, I P; Suzuki, K

    1981-01-01

    Freons have been used extensively as refrigerants and as propellants in household products, and yet their possible effects on male reproduction have received little attention. In the present study, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (nine weeks of age) were exposed to 50 000 ppm Freon 22, five hrs per day for eight weeks. The control group received filtered air at an identical flow rate. At the end of the eight week exposure period, body and organ weights, hematology, blood chemistry, plasma gonadotropins, and fertility parameters were not significantly different from controls, with the exception of serum cholesterol levels, which were slightly higher, and glucose and triglyceride levels which were lower. The weight of coagulating glands was also lower than those of controls, but did not interfere with fertility function.

  14. Recent evidence from epidemiological studies on methylmercury toxicity.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Iwata, Toyoto; Karita, Kanae; Nakai, Kunihiko

    2011-09-01

    More than fifty years have passed since the outbreak of Minamata disease, and large-scale methylmercury poisoning due to industrial effluents or methylmercury-containing fungicide intoxication has scarcely happened in developed countries. On the other hand, widespread environmental mercury contamination has occurred in gold and mercury mining areas of developing countries. In this article, we provided an overview of recent studies addressing human health effects of methylmercury, which we searched using the PubMed of the US National Library of Medicine. The following suggestions were obtained for low-level methylmercury exposure: (1) In recent years, the proportion of human studies addressing methylmercury has tended to decrease. (2) Prenatal exposure to methylmercury through fish intake, even at low levels, adversely affects child development after adjusting for polychlorinated biphenyls and maternal fish intake during pregnancy, whereas maternal seafood intake has some benefits. (3) Long-term methylmercury exposure through consumption of fish such as bigeye tuna and swordfish may pose a potential risk of cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance. (4) In measuring methylmercury levels in preserved umbilical cord collected from inhabitants born in Minamata areas between 1945 and 1989, the elevated concentrations (≥1 mg/g) were observed mainly in inhabitants born between 1947 and 1968, and the peak coincided with the peak of acetaldehyde production in Minamata. (5) Since some developing countries appear to be in similar situations to Japan in the past, attention should be directed toward early recognition of a risky agent and precautions should be taken against it. PMID:21996768

  15. Evaluations of the trans-sulfuration pathway in multiple liver toxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schnackenberg, Laura K. Chen Minjun; Sun, Jinchun; Holland, Ricky D.; Dragan, Yvonne; Tong Weida; Welsh, William; Beger, Richard D.

    2009-02-15

    Drug-induced liver injury has been associated with the generation of reactive metabolites, which are primarily detoxified via glutathione conjugation. In this study, it was hypothesized that molecules involved in the synthesis of glutathione would be diminished to replenish the glutathione depleted through conjugation reactions. Since S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is the primary source of the sulfur atom in glutathione, UPLC/MS and NMR were used to evaluate metabolites involved with the transulfuration pathway in urine samples collected during studies of eight liver toxic compounds in Sprague-Dawley rats. Urinary levels of creatine were increased on day 1 or day 2 in 8 high dose liver toxicity studies. Taurine concentration in urine was increased in only 3 of 8 liver toxicity studies while SAMe was found to be reduced in 4 of 5 liver toxicity studies. To further validate the results from the metabonomic studies, microarray data from rat liver samples following treatment with acetaminophen was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Some genes involved in the trans-sulfuration pathway, including guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase, glycine N-methyltransferase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and cysteine dioxygenase were found to be significantly decreased while methionine adenosyl transferase II, alpha increased at 24 h post-dosing, which is consistent with the SAMe and creatine findings. The metabolic and transcriptomic results show that the trans-sulfuration pathway from SAMe to glutathione was disturbed due to the administration of heptatotoxicants.

  16. Evaluations of the trans-sulfuration pathway in multiple liver toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Schnackenberg, Laura K; Chen, Minjun; Sun, Jinchun; Holland, Ricky D; Dragan, Yvonne; Tong, Weida; Welsh, William; Beger, Richard D

    2009-02-15

    Drug-induced liver injury has been associated with the generation of reactive metabolites, which are primarily detoxified via glutathione conjugation. In this study, it was hypothesized that molecules involved in the synthesis of glutathione would be diminished to replenish the glutathione depleted through conjugation reactions. Since S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is the primary source of the sulfur atom in glutathione, UPLC/MS and NMR were used to evaluate metabolites involved with the transulfuration pathway in urine samples collected during studies of eight liver toxic compounds in Sprague-Dawley rats. Urinary levels of creatine were increased on day 1 or day 2 in 8 high dose liver toxicity studies. Taurine concentration in urine was increased in only 3 of 8 liver toxicity studies while SAMe was found to be reduced in 4 of 5 liver toxicity studies. To further validate the results from the metabonomic studies, microarray data from rat liver samples following treatment with acetaminophen was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Some genes involved in the trans-sulfuration pathway, including guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase, glycine N-methyltransferase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and cysteine dioxygenase were found to be significantly decreased while methionine adenosyl transferase II, alpha increased at 24 h post-dosing, which is consistent with the SAMe and creatine findings. The metabolic and transcriptomic results show that the trans-sulfuration pathway from SAMe to glutathione was disturbed due to the administration of heptatotoxicants.

  17. Inhalation toxicity and carcinogenicity studies of cobalt sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bucher, J R; Hailey, J R; Roycroft, J R; Haseman, J K; Sills, R C; Grumbein, S L; Mellick, P W; Chou, B J

    1999-05-01

    Cobalt sulfate is a water-soluble cobalt salt with a variety of industrial and agricultural uses. Several cobalt compounds have induced sarcomas at injection sites in animals, and reports have suggested that exposure to cobalt-containing materials may cause lung cancer in humans. The present studies were done because no adequate rodent carcinogenicity studies had been performed with a soluble cobalt salt using a route relevant to occupational exposures. Groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to aerosols containing 0, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/m3 cobalt sulfate hexahydrate, 6 h/day, 5 days/week, for 104 weeks. Survival and body weights of exposed rats and mice were generally unaffected by the exposures. In rats, proteinosis, alveolar epithelial metaplasia, granulomatous alveolar inflammation, and interstitial fibrosis were observed in the lung in all exposed groups. Nonneoplastic lesions of the nose and larynx were also attributed to exposure to all concentrations of cobalt sulfate. In 3.0 mg/m3 male rats and in female rats exposed to 1.0 or 3.0 mg/m3, the incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms were increased over those in the control groups. Lung tumors occurred with significant positive trends in both sexes. The incidences of adrenal pheochromocytoma in 1.0 mg/m3 male rats and in 3.0 mg/m3 female rats were increased. Nonneoplastic lesions of the respiratory tract were less severe in mice than in rats. In mice, alveolar/bronchiolar neoplasms in 3.0 mg/m3 males and females were greater than those in the controls, and lung tumors occurred with significantly positive trends. Male mice had liver lesions consistent with a Helicobacter hepaticus infection. Incidences of liver hemangiosarcomas were increased in exposed groups of male mice; however, because of the infection, no conclusion could be reached concerning an association between liver hemangiosarcomas and cobalt sulfate. In summary, exposure to cobalt sulfate by inhalation

  18. Acute toxicity when concentration varies with time: A case study with carbon monoxide inhalation by rats.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lisa M; Sommerville, Douglas R; Goodwin, Michelle R; James, R Arden; Channel, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to time-varying concentrations of toxic compounds is the norm in both occupational settings and daily human life, but little has been done to investigate the impact of variations in concentration on toxic outcomes; this case study with carbon monoxide helps fill that gap. Median acute lethality of 10-, 20-, 40-, and 60-min continuous exposures of rats to carbon monoxide was well described by the toxic load model (k = C(n) × t; k is constant, C = test concentration, n = toxic load exponent, and t = exposure duration) with n = 1.74. Dose response-relationships for 1-h exposures including a recovery period between 10- or 20-min pulses showed greater similarity (in both median lethality and steepness of dose-response curve) to continuous exposures with equivalent pulse duration and concentration, rather than a 60-min exposure with equivalent time-weighted average concentrations or toxic load. When pulses were of unequal concentration (3:1 ratio), only the high concentration pulse contributed to lethality. These findings show that fluctuations or interruptions in exposure over a short time scale (60 min or less) can have a substantial impact on outcomes (when n > 1), and thus high-resolution monitoring data are needed to aid interpretation of resulting outcomes.

  19. QSAR study of the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to river bacteria and photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, X.; Lu, G.; Lang, P.

    1997-01-01

    Since nitrobenzenes constitute a class of industrial chemicals that are present in Songhua River and probably in many other industrialized countries as well, it is useful to gain insight into their potential hazard to aquatic organisms. For this reason, it was decided to determine data on the toxicity for bacteria in the Songhua River. Furthermore, the toxicity to Ph. phosphoreum was determined in the Microtox assay, in order to further evaluate the usefulness of this assay for hazard assessment. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have been developed for aromatic nitro compound toxicity to aquatic species, but no data on the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to environmental bacteria were used. In this study, the toxicity of various substituted nitrobenzenes to bacteria in Songhua River and to Ph. phosphoreum has been investigated, establishing quantitative structure-activity relationships with n-octanol-water partition coefficient (log P), the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E{sub LUMO}) and the sum of substituent constant ({Sigma}{sigma}-). 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Toxics Use Reduction in the Home: Lessons Learned from Household Exposure Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dunagan, Sarah C.; Dodson, Robin E.; Rudel, Ruthann A.; Brody, Julia G.

    2010-01-01

    Workers and fence-line communities have been the first to benefit from the substantial reductions in toxic chemical use and byproducts in industrial production resulting from the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA). As TURA motivates reformulation of products as well as retooling of production processes, benefits could extend more broadly to large-scale reductions in everyday exposures for the general population. Household exposure studies, including those conducted by Silent Spring Institute, show that people are exposed to complex mixtures of indoor toxics from building materials and a myriad of consumer products. Pollutants in homes are likely to have multiple health effects because many are classified as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), with the ability to interfere with the body's hormone system. Product-related EDCs measured in homes include phthalates, halogenated flame retardants, and alkylphenols. Silent Spring Institute's chemical analysis of personal care and cleaning products confirms many are potential sources of EDCs, highlighting the need for a more comprehensive toxics use reduction (TUR) approach to reduce those exposures. Toxics use reduction targeted at EDCs in consumer products has the potential to substantially reduce occupational and residential exposures. The lessons that have emerged from household exposure research can inform improved chemicals management policies at the state and national levels, leading to safer products and widespread health and environmental benefits. PMID:21516227

  1. Acute, mutagenicity, teratogenicity and subchronic oral toxicity studies of diaveridine in rodents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Sun, Feifei; Tang, Shusheng; Zhang, Suxia; Cao, Xingyuan

    2015-09-01

    Diaveridine (DVD) is a member of the 2,4-pyrimidinediamine class of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. It is used in combination with sulfaquinoxaline as an antiprotozoal agent in animals for the prophylaxis and treatment of coccidiosis and leucocytozoonosis. Herein, we report a complete toxicological safety assessment of DVD for clinical use. The study of toxicity, genetic toxicity (mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus assay, mice sperm abnormality test and in vivo chromosome aberration test of mammalian bone marrow), 90-day sub-chronic toxicity and teratogenicity test were performed. In the acute oral toxicity tests, median lethal dose, LD50, was more than 2378mg/kg body weight in Sprague Dawley rats (1025mg/kg body weight in ICR mice). The testing results for three terms of mutagenicity toxicity (mouse chromosome aberration, erythrocyte micronucleus and sperm abnormality) were all negative at 128-512mg/kg body weight. For 90-day feeding of DVD at the dosage of 10mg/kg body weight in both male and female SD rats, no signs of toxicological effects were detected. Meanwhile, for teratogenicity test in female SD rats at the dosage of 37mg/kg body weight, there were no toxicological signs observed. Thus, our results suggested that the DVD is safe when administered orally in rats at 10mg/kg body weight per day. PMID:26397222

  2. Proteomics study of silver nanoparticles toxicity on Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Mirzajani, Fateme; Askari, Hossein; Hamzelou, Sara; Schober, Yvonne; Römpp, Andreas; Ghassempour, Alireza; Spengler, Bernhard

    2014-10-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles, (AgNPs), will inevitably result in their release into the environment and thereby cause the exposure to plants. It was claimed that using AgNPs is a safe and efficient method to preserve and treat agents of disease in agriculture. This study tries to understand the protein populations and sub-populations and follow up environmental AgNPs stresses. To accomplish these, the action of homemade spherical AgNPs colloidal suspension against Oryza sativa L. was investigated by a proteomic approach (2-DE and NanoLC/FT-ICR MS identification). Twenty-eight responsive (decrement/increment in abundance) proteins were identified. Proteomic results revealed that an exposure of O. sativa L., root with different concentrations of AgNPs resulted in an accumulation of protein precursors, indicative of the dissipation of a proton motive force. The identified proteins are involved in oxidative stress tolerance, Ca(2+) regulation and signaling, transcription and protein degradation, cell wall and DNA/RNA/protein direct damage, cell division and apoptosis. The expression pattern of these proteins and their possible involvement in the nontoxicity mechanisms were discussed.

  3. Ethyl t-butyl ether: review of reproductive and developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    de Peyster, Ann

    2010-06-01

    Ethyl t-butyl ether (ETBE) is a motor fuel oxygenate used in reformulated gasoline. Knowledge of developmental and reproductive toxicity potential of ETBE is critical for making informed decisions about acceptance and regulations. This review discusses toxicology studies providing information about effects on reproduction and the conceptus. Seven GLP-compliant studies following widely accepted protocols have focused specifically on developmental and reproductive toxicity (DART) in rats and rabbits exposed to ETBE by gavage with doses up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight/day, the limit specified in standardized test guidelines. Other repeat-dose general toxicology studies have administered ETBE to rodents for up to 180 days, and included reproductive organ weights, histology, or other indications of reproductive system structure or function. DART potential of the main ETBE metabolite t-butyl alcohol and class-related MTBE has also been studied. More GLP-compliant studies exist for evaluating ETBE using well-established, currently recommended protocols than are available for many other chemicals used today. The database for determining ETBE DART potential is adequate, although not all study details are currently easily accessible for peer-review. ETBE does not appear to be selectively toxic to reproduction or embryofetal development in the absence of other manifestations of general toxicity. Studies using recommended methods for sample preservation and analysis have shown no targeted effect on the reproductive system. No embryofetal effects were observed in rabbits. Early postnatal rat pup deaths show no clear dose-response and have largely been attributed to total litter losses with accompanying evidence of maternal neglect or frank maternal morbidity. PMID:20544807

  4. Difference in aggregation between functional and toxic amyloids studied by atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo Pacheco, Martin; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloids are highly structured protein aggregates, normally associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, a number of nontoxic amyloids with physiologically normal functions, called functional amyloids, have been found. It is known that soluble small oligomers are more toxic than large fibrils. Thus, we study with atomistic explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations the oligomer formation of the amyloid- β peptide Aβ25 - 35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Our simulations show that monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. In addition, we observe faster aggregation by functional amyloids than toxic amyloids, which could explain their lack of toxicity.

  5. Toxicity studies of butachlor to the freshwater fish Channa punctata (Bloch).

    PubMed

    Tilak, K S; Veeraiah, K; Bhaskara Thathaji, P; Butchiram, M S

    2007-04-01

    The toxicity studies were conducted on the fish Channa punctata (Bloch) by employing static and continuous flow through systems, for the toxicant butachlor (technical grade+) and its commercial formulation+ (machete 50% EC). The LC50 values are 297.89 ppb and 247.46 ppb for 24 hr and 48 hr in static for technical and 636.45 and 546.09 for machete. In continuous flow through the values are 270.05, 233.52 to the technical and 567.85 and 481.49 respectively for machete. The tissues show qualitative accumulation and were quantitatively analysed by gas liquid chromatography (GLC).

  6. [Efficacy, toxicity and mechanism of insecticide KR-100: a preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Zhi, Guo-Zhou; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Zheng, Xue-Li; Chai, Ke-Sheng; Chen, Jin-Bo; Lin, Li-Feng; Cai, Song-Wu

    2002-04-01

    KR-100 is a newly developed long-lasting insecticide that incorporates cinerins substance, drug-release control substance and synergistic agent following certain procedures under carefully regulated conditions. Tests of the efficacy, toxicity, stability and long-term effect of KR-100 were conducted, and it was show that the insecticide possessed strong and long-lasting effect against mosquitoes, flies and cockroaches but was by no means toxic to human. Morphological study of KR-100 under scanning electron microscope revealed porous membrane form. This insecticide, therefore, can be safely applied with good pesticidal effect.

  7. Multigeneration Reproduction and Male Developmental Toxicity Studies on Atrazine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    DeSesso, John M; Scialli, Anthony R; White, Tacey E K; Breckenridge, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reproductive toxicity of Atrazine (ATR) was evaluated in two rat multigenerational studies. Development of male reproductive parameters was evaluated in separate studies after prenatal or postnatal exposure. METHODS In multigenerational studies, rats received dietary concentrations of 0, 10, 50, 100 or 500 ppm ATR. In separate studies in female rats, ATR was administered by gavage at 0, 1, 5, 25 or 125 mg/kg/day during pregnancy (GD6–21) or lactation (LD2–21). Plasma testosterone concentration, testicular and epididymal weights, and sperm counts were measured in male offspring on PND70 and 170. RESULTS In the multigenerational studies, parental systemic toxicity occurred at 500 ppm (38.7 mg/kg/day), but reproductive endpoints were unaffected. In the prenatal study, maternal toxicity and embryo-fetal mortality occurred at 125 mg/kg/day. In male offspring, testosterone levels and sperm counts were unaffected, although the percentage of abnormal sperm increased at 125 mg/kg/day (PND 70) and 25 mg/kg/day (PND170). In the postnatal study, maternal toxicity and reduced body weights of male offspring occurred at 125 mg/kg/day. Additionally, reduced testicular (PND70, PND170) and epididymal (PND70) weights and increased numbers of abnormal sperm (PND70, PND170) were seen, but no changes in plasma testosterone or sperm counts. CONCLUSIONS Dietary administration of ATR did not affect rat reproduction up to a parentally toxic dose of 38.7 mg/kg/day. Some effects on male reproductive system development occurred after high dose, bolus administration to dams, but doses were much higher than expected under normal use conditions. Thus, oral RfDs for ATR would be protective for reproductive effects PMID:24797874

  8. Uptake and toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in terrestrial springtails--studying bioconcentration kinetics and linking toxicity to chemical activity.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Smith, Kilian Eric Christopher; Holmstrup, Martin; Mayer, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    Passive dosing applies a polymer loaded with test compound(s) to establish and maintain constant exposure in laboratory experiments. Passive dosing with the silicone poly(dimethylsiloxane) was used to control exposure of the terrestrial springtail Folsomia candida to six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bioconcentration and toxicity experiments. Folsomia candida could move freely on the PAH-loaded silicone, resulting in exposure via air and direct contact. The bioconcentration kinetics indicated efficient uptake of naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene through air and (near) equilibrium partitioning of these PAHs to lipids and possibly the waxy layer of the springtail cuticle. Toxicities of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene were related to chemical activity, which quantifies the energetic level and drives spontaneous processes including diffusive biouptake. Chemical activity-response relationships yielded effective lethal chemical activities (La50s) well within the expected range for baseline toxicity (0.01-0.1). Effective lethal body burdens for naphthalene and pyrene exceeded the expected range of 2 to 8 mmol kg(-1) fresh weight, which again indicated the waxy layer to be a sorbing phase. Finally, chemical activities were converted into equilibrium partitioning concentrations in lipids yielding effective lethal concentrations for naphthalene and phenanthrene in good correspondence with the lethal membrane burden for baseline toxicity (40-160 mmol kg(-1) lipid). Passive dosing was a practical approach for tightly controlling PAH exposure, which in turn provided new experimental possibilities and findings. PMID:23147567

  9. Studies on the acute toxicity of fluoride ion to stickleback, fathead minnow, and rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.R.; Holsen, T.M.; Ibay, N.C.; Block, R.M.; De Leon, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have studied the acute toxicity of fluoride ion to Gasterosteus aculeatus, Fimephales promelas, and juvenile Salmo gairdneri. LC50 values varied with species and (due to precipitation) initial water hardness. Exposure to elevated fluoride levels in water resulted in increased blood fluoride levels in Salmo gairdneri.

  10. Use of the zebrafish larvae as a model to study cigarette smoke condensate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Lee D; Soo, Evelyn C; Achenbach, John C; Morash, Michael G; Soanes, Kelly H

    2014-01-01

    The smoking of tobacco continues to be the leading cause of premature death worldwide and is linked to the development of a number of serious illnesses including heart disease, respiratory diseases, stroke and cancer. Currently, cell line based toxicity assays are typically used to gain information on the general toxicity of cigarettes and other tobacco products. However, they provide little information regarding the complex disease-related changes that have been linked to smoking. The ethical concerns and high cost associated with mammalian studies have limited their widespread use for in vivo toxicological studies of tobacco. The zebrafish has emerged as a low-cost, high-throughput, in vivo model in the study of toxicology. In this study, smoke condensates from 2 reference cigarettes and 6 Canadian brands of cigarettes with different design features were assessed for acute, developmental, cardiac, and behavioural toxicity (neurotoxicity) in zebrafish larvae. By making use of this multifaceted approach we have developed an in vivo model with which to compare the toxicity profiles of smoke condensates from cigarettes with different design features. This model system may provide insights into the development of smoking related disease and could provide a cost-effective, high-throughput platform for the future evaluation of tobacco products. PMID:25526262

  11. Use of the Zebrafish Larvae as a Model to Study Cigarette Smoke Condensate Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Lee D.; Soo, Evelyn C.; Achenbach, John C.; Morash, Michael G.; Soanes, Kelly H.

    2014-01-01

    The smoking of tobacco continues to be the leading cause of premature death worldwide and is linked to the development of a number of serious illnesses including heart disease, respiratory diseases, stroke and cancer. Currently, cell line based toxicity assays are typically used to gain information on the general toxicity of cigarettes and other tobacco products. However, they provide little information regarding the complex disease-related changes that have been linked to smoking. The ethical concerns and high cost associated with mammalian studies have limited their widespread use for in vivo toxicological studies of tobacco. The zebrafish has emerged as a low-cost, high-throughput, in vivo model in the study of toxicology. In this study, smoke condensates from 2 reference cigarettes and 6 Canadian brands of cigarettes with different design features were assessed for acute, developmental, cardiac, and behavioural toxicity (neurotoxicity) in zebrafish larvae. By making use of this multifaceted approach we have developed an in vivo model with which to compare the toxicity profiles of smoke condensates from cigarettes with different design features. This model system may provide insights into the development of smoking related disease and could provide a cost-effective, high-throughput platform for the future evaluation of tobacco products. PMID:25526262

  12. EVALUATION AND INTERPRETATION OF MATERNAL TOXICITY IN SEGMENT II STUDIES: ISSUES, SOME ANSWERS AND DATA NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rogers, J.M., and N. Chernoff. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, U.S.A. Evaluation and interpretation of maternal toxicity in Segment II studies: Issues, s...

  13. Aliskiren toxicity in juvenile rats is determined by ontogenic regulation of intestinal P-glycoprotein expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Peter; Beckman, David; McLean, Lee Anne; Yan, Jing-He

    2014-02-15

    Juvenile rat toxicity studies with the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren were initiated to support treatment in the pediatric population. In Study 1, aliskiren was administered orally to juvenile rats at doses of 0, 30, 100 or 300 mg/kg/day with repeated dosing from postpartum day (PPD) 8 to PPD 35/36. In-life, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, and toxicokinetics evaluations were performed. In Study 2, single oral doses of aliskiren (0, 100 or 300 mg/kg) were given to 14-, 21-, 24-, 28-, 31- or 36-day-old rats; in-life data and toxicokinetics were evaluated. Study 3 was a single dose (3 mg/kg i.v.) pharmacokinetic study in juvenile rats on PPD 8, 14, 21 and 28. In Study 4, naïve rats were used to investigate ontogenic changes of the multidrug-resistant protein 1 (MDR1) and the organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) mRNA in several organs. Oral administration of aliskiren at 100 and 300 mg/kg caused unexpected mortality and severe morbidity in 8-day-old rats. Aliskiren plasma and tissue concentrations were increased in rats aged 21 days and younger. Expression of MDR1 and OATP mRNA in the intestine, liver and brain was significantly lower in very young rats. In conclusion, severe toxicity and increased exposure in very young rats after oral administration of aliskiren are considered to be the result of immature drug transporter systems. Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes appears to be the most important mechanism responsible for the high exposure. - Highlights: • Aliskiren was orally administered to juvenile rats. • Unexpected severe toxicity and acute mortality occurred in rats aged 8 days. • Toxicity was associated with increased aliskiren plasma and tissue exposure. • Developmental changes of exposure correlated with ontogeny of transporters. • Immaturity of MDR1 in enterocytes causes increased exposure in very young rats.

  14. Inhalation toxicity studies with 1,3-butadiene 3 two year toxicity/carcinogenicity study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, P.E.; Glaister, J.R.; Gaunt, I.F.; Pullinger, D.H.

    1987-05-01

    Groups of 110 male and 110 female CD (Sprague-Dawley) rats were exposed to atmospheres containing 0 (control), 1000 or 8000 ppm v/v butadiene for 6 hr/day and 5 days/week. Ten of each sex from each group were killed at 52 weeks. The study was terminated when it was predicted that survival would drop to 20% to 25%. High dose rats had wet, ruffled fur and showed slight incoordination during the first exposure each week. During the second year, mortality in both treated female groups was increased because of humanitarian sacrifice of animals with large subcutaneous masses, while increased mortality in the high dose males was accompanied by an increase of the severity of nephropathy. Body weight was slightly lower than controls in both sexes at the high dose, but statistically significant only over the first 12 weeks. There were no effects in hematological analyses or tests of neuromuscular function that definitely could be associated with treatment. Liver weights at both doses were increased in both sexes with no associated pathological change. Kidney weight was increased in males at the high dose, together with an increase in the severity of nephrosis. There were increases in the incidences of pancreatic exocrine adenoma; uterine sarcoma; Zymbal gland carcinoma; mammary tumors; thyroid follicular cell tumors; and testis Leydig-cell tumors. These data suggest the butadiene is a weak oncogen to the rat under the conditions of exposure used in this study.

  15. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-11-01

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L-1, or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L-1, there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L-1 of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L-1 of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the

  16. Genotoxicity and acute and subchronic toxicity studies of a standardized methanolic extract of Ficus deltoidea leaves

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Elham; Shafaei, Armaghan; Hor, Sook Yee; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B.; Yam, Mun Fei; Asmawi, Mohd Z.; Ismail, Zhari

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ficus deltoidea leaves have been used in traditional medicine in Southeast Asia to treat diabetes, inflammation, diarrhea, and infections. The present study was conducted to assess the genotoxicity and acute and subchronic toxicity of a standardized methanol extract of F. deltoidea leaves. METHODS: Sprague Dawley rats were orally treated with five different single doses of the extract and screened for signs of toxicity for two weeks after administration. In the subchronic study, three different doses of the extract were administered for 28 days. Mortality, clinical signs, body weight changes, hematological and biochemical parameters, gross findings, organ weights, and histological parameters were monitored during the study. Genotoxicity was assessed using the Ames test with the TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium strains. Phytochemical standardization was performed using a colorimeter and high-performance liquid chromatography. Heavy metal detection was performed using an atomic absorption spectrometer. RESULTS: The acute toxicity study showed that the LD50 of the extract was greater than 5000 mg/kg. In the subchronic toxicity study, there were no significant adverse effects on food consumption, body weight, organ weights, mortality, clinical chemistry, hematology, gross pathology, or histopathology. However, a dose-dependent increase in the serum urea level was observed. The Ames test revealed that the extract did not have any potential to induce gene mutations in S. typhimurium, either in the presence or absence of S9 activation. Phytochemical analysis of the extract revealed high contents of phenolics, flavonoids, and tannins. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed high levels of vitexin and isovitexin in the extract, and the levels of heavy metals were below the toxic levels. CONCLUSION: The no-observed adverse effect level of F. deltoidea in rats was determined to be 2500 mg/kg. PMID:23778480

  17. Predicting the Future: Opportunities and Challenges for the Chemical Industry to Apply 21st-Century Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Settivari, Raja S; Ball, Nicholas; Murphy, Lynea; Rasoulpour, Reza; Boverhof, Darrell R; Carney, Edward W

    2015-01-01

    Interest in applying 21st-century toxicity testing tools for safety assessment of industrial chemicals is growing. Whereas conventional toxicology uses mainly animal-based, descriptive methods, a paradigm shift is emerging in which computational approaches, systems biology, high-throughput in vitro toxicity assays, and high-throughput exposure assessments are beginning to be applied to mechanism-based risk assessments in a time- and resource-efficient fashion. Here we describe recent advances in predictive safety assessment, with a focus on their strategic application to meet the changing demands of the chemical industry and its stakeholders. The opportunities to apply these new approaches is extensive and include screening of new chemicals, informing the design of safer and more sustainable chemical alternatives, filling information gaps on data-poor chemicals already in commerce, strengthening read-across methodology for categories of chemicals sharing similar modes of action, and optimizing the design of reduced-risk product formulations. Finally, we discuss how these predictive approaches dovetail with in vivo integrated testing strategies within repeated-dose regulatory toxicity studies, which are in line with 3Rs principles to refine, reduce, and replace animal testing. Strategic application of these tools is the foundation for informed and efficient safety assessment testing strategies that can be applied at all stages of the product-development process. PMID:25836969

  18. Predicting the future: opportunities and challenges for the chemical industry to apply 21st-century toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Settivari, Raja S; Ball, Nicholas; Murphy, Lynea; Rasoulpour, Reza; Boverhof, Darrell R; Carney, Edward W

    2015-03-01

    Interest in applying 21st-century toxicity testing tools for safety assessment of industrial chemicals is growing. Whereas conventional toxicology uses mainly animal-based, descriptive methods, a paradigm shift is emerging in which computational approaches, systems biology, high-throughput in vitro toxicity assays, and high-throughput exposure assessments are beginning to be applied to mechanism-based risk assessments in a time- and resource-efficient fashion. Here we describe recent advances in predictive safety assessment, with a focus on their strategic application to meet the changing demands of the chemical industry and its stakeholders. The opportunities to apply these new approaches is extensive and include screening of new chemicals, informing the design of safer and more sustainable chemical alternatives, filling information gaps on data-poor chemicals already in commerce, strengthening read-across methodology for categories of chemicals sharing similar modes of action, and optimizing the design of reduced-risk product formulations. Finally, we discuss how these predictive approaches dovetail with in vivo integrated testing strategies within repeated-dose regulatory toxicity studies, which are in line with 3Rs principles to refine, reduce, and replace animal testing. Strategic application of these tools is the foundation for informed and efficient safety assessment testing strategies that can be applied at all stages of the product-development process.

  19. A meta-analysis of carbon nanotube pulmonary toxicity studies--how physical dimensions and impurities affect the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gernand, Jeremy M; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a regression-tree-based meta-analysis of rodent pulmonary toxicity studies of uncoated, nonfunctionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) exposure. The resulting analysis provides quantitative estimates of the contribution of CNT attributes (impurities, physical dimensions, and aggregation) to pulmonary toxicity indicators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: neutrophil and macrophage count, and lactate dehydrogenase and total protein concentrations. The method employs classification and regression tree (CART) models, techniques that are relatively insensitive to data defects that impair other types of regression analysis: high dimensionality, nonlinearity, correlated variables, and significant quantities of missing values. Three types of analysis are presented: the RT, the random forest (RF), and a random-forest-based dose-response model. The RT shows the best single model supported by all the data and typically contains a small number of variables. The RF shows how much variance reduction is associated with every variable in the data set. The dose-response model is used to isolate the effects of CNT attributes from the CNT dose, showing the shift in the dose-response caused by the attribute across the measured range of CNT doses. It was found that the CNT attributes that contribute the most to pulmonary toxicity were metallic impurities (cobalt significantly increased observed toxicity, while other impurities had mixed effects), CNT length (negatively correlated with most toxicity indicators), CNT diameter (significantly positively associated with toxicity), and aggregate size (negatively correlated with cell damage indicators and positively correlated with immune response indicators). Increasing CNT N2 -BET-specific surface area decreased toxicity indicators.

  20. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-12-21

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L(-1), or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L(-1), there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L(-1) of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L(-1) of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.

  1. Optimal choice of pH for toxicity and bioaccumulation studies of ionizing organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rendal, Cecilie; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    It is recognized that the pH of exposure solutions can influence the toxicity and bioaccumulation of ionizing compounds. The present study investigates whether it can be considered a general rule that an ionizable compound is more toxic and more bioaccumulative when in the neutral state. Three processes were identified to explain the behavior of ionizing compounds with changing pH: the change in lipophilicity when a neutral compound becomes ionized, electrical attraction, and the ion trap. The literature was screened for bioaccumulation and toxicity tests of ionizing organic compounds performed at multiple pH levels. Toxicity and bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were higher for acids at lower pH values, whereas the opposite was true for bases. The effect of pH was most pronounced when pH - pK(a) was in the range of -1 to 3 for acids, and -3 to 1 for bases. The factor by which toxicity and BCF changed with pH was correlated with the lipophilicity of the compound (log K(OW) of the neutral compound). For both acids and bases, the correlation was positive, but it was significant only for acids. Because experimental data in the literature were limited, results were supplemented with model simulations using a dynamic flux model based on the Fick-Nernst-Planck diffusion equation known as the cell model. The cell model predicts that bases with delocalized charges may in some cases show declining bioaccumulation with increasing pH. Little information is available for amphoteric and zwitterionic compounds; however, based on simulations with the cell model, it is expected that the highest toxicity and bioaccumulation of these compounds will be found where the compounds are most neutral, at the isoelectric point. PMID:21823161

  2. Optimal choice of pH for toxicity and bioaccumulation studies of ionizing organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Rendal, Cecilie; Kusk, Kresten Ole; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-11-01

    It is recognized that the pH of exposure solutions can influence the toxicity and bioaccumulation of ionizing compounds. The present study investigates whether it can be considered a general rule that an ionizable compound is more toxic and more bioaccumulative when in the neutral state. Three processes were identified to explain the behavior of ionizing compounds with changing pH: the change in lipophilicity when a neutral compound becomes ionized, electrical attraction, and the ion trap. The literature was screened for bioaccumulation and toxicity tests of ionizing organic compounds performed at multiple pH levels. Toxicity and bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were higher for acids at lower pH values, whereas the opposite was true for bases. The effect of pH was most pronounced when pH - pK(a) was in the range of -1 to 3 for acids, and -3 to 1 for bases. The factor by which toxicity and BCF changed with pH was correlated with the lipophilicity of the compound (log K(OW) of the neutral compound). For both acids and bases, the correlation was positive, but it was significant only for acids. Because experimental data in the literature were limited, results were supplemented with model simulations using a dynamic flux model based on the Fick-Nernst-Planck diffusion equation known as the cell model. The cell model predicts that bases with delocalized charges may in some cases show declining bioaccumulation with increasing pH. Little information is available for amphoteric and zwitterionic compounds; however, based on simulations with the cell model, it is expected that the highest toxicity and bioaccumulation of these compounds will be found where the compounds are most neutral, at the isoelectric point.

  3. Studies in regard to the classification and putative toxicity of Fridericia japurensis (Arrabidaea japurensis) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Everton F; Medeiros, Rosane Maria T; Cook, Daniel; Lee, Stephen T; Kaehler, Miriam; Santos-Barbosa, Joyce M; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2016-06-01

    Numerous plant species worldwide including Palicourea marcgravii (Rubiaceae) and Tanaecium bilabiatum (Bignoniaceae) in Brazil cause acute cardiac failure (sudden death) and are known to contain monofluoroacetate (MFA). Other Bignoniaceae species including Fridericia japurensis (Arrabidaea japurensis) are reported to cause sudden death in livestock in the Brazilian state of Roraima and are suspected to contain MFA due to the similarity of clinical signs. In this study herbarium specimens of Fridericia japurensis and field collections suspected to be F. japurensis were analyzed for MFA, and plant material from the field collections was dosed to rabbits. No MFA was detected in the herbarium specimens authoritatively identified as F. japurensis; however, MFA was detected in the field collections, which were identified as T. bilabiatum. Rabbits dosed orally with T. bilabiatum died acutely. Voucher toxic specimens initially described as F. japurensis were incorrectly identified, and the correct botanical name for this plant is T. bilabiatum (Arrabidaea bilabiata). Based on this study we conclude that there are no data to support the toxicity of F. japurensis and that the plant previously reported under this name as causing acute cardiac failure in cattle in Roraima is T. bilabiatum. This research highlights the importance of voucher specimens as part of any toxic plant investigation and corrects the literature regarding these toxic plants. PMID:26945838

  4. Studies in regard to the classification and putative toxicity of Fridericia japurensis (Arrabidaea japurensis) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lima, Everton F; Medeiros, Rosane Maria T; Cook, Daniel; Lee, Stephen T; Kaehler, Miriam; Santos-Barbosa, Joyce M; Riet-Correa, Franklin

    2016-06-01

    Numerous plant species worldwide including Palicourea marcgravii (Rubiaceae) and Tanaecium bilabiatum (Bignoniaceae) in Brazil cause acute cardiac failure (sudden death) and are known to contain monofluoroacetate (MFA). Other Bignoniaceae species including Fridericia japurensis (Arrabidaea japurensis) are reported to cause sudden death in livestock in the Brazilian state of Roraima and are suspected to contain MFA due to the similarity of clinical signs. In this study herbarium specimens of Fridericia japurensis and field collections suspected to be F. japurensis were analyzed for MFA, and plant material from the field collections was dosed to rabbits. No MFA was detected in the herbarium specimens authoritatively identified as F. japurensis; however, MFA was detected in the field collections, which were identified as T. bilabiatum. Rabbits dosed orally with T. bilabiatum died acutely. Voucher toxic specimens initially described as F. japurensis were incorrectly identified, and the correct botanical name for this plant is T. bilabiatum (Arrabidaea bilabiata). Based on this study we conclude that there are no data to support the toxicity of F. japurensis and that the plant previously reported under this name as causing acute cardiac failure in cattle in Roraima is T. bilabiatum. This research highlights the importance of voucher specimens as part of any toxic plant investigation and corrects the literature regarding these toxic plants.

  5. Toxicity studies of the water extract from the calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. in rats.

    PubMed

    Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Itharat, Arunporn; Khonsung, Parirat; Lertprasertsuke, Nirush; Jaijoy, Kanjana

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic toxicities of the water extract from calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa were studied in male and female rats. After 14 days of a single oral administration of test substance 5,000 mg/kg body weight, measurement of the body and organ weights, necropsy and health monitoring were performed. No signs and differences of the weights or behaviour compared to the control rats were observed. The results indicated that the single oral administration of H. sabdariffa extract in the amount of 5,000 mg/kg body weight does not produce acute toxicity. The chronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding both male and female rats daily with the extract at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight for 270 days. The examinations of signs, animal behaviour and health monitoring showed no defects in the test groups compared to the control groups. Both test and control groups (day 270th) and satellite group (day 298th) were analysed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining haematology, blood clinical chemistry, and microanatomy. Results showed no differences from the control groups. Overall, our study demonstrated that an oral administration of H. sabdariffa extract at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight for 270 days does not cause chronic toxicity in rat. PMID:24146512

  6. Developmental and reproductive toxicity of inorganic arsenic: animal studies and human concerns.

    PubMed

    Golub, M S; Macintosh, M S; Baumrind, N

    1998-01-01

    Information on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of inorganic arsenic is available primarily from studies in animals using arsenite and arsenate salts and arsenic trioxide. Inorganic arsenic has been extensively studied as a teratogen in animals. Data from animal studies demonstrate that arsenic can produce developmental toxicity, including malformation, death, and growth retardation, in four species (hamsters, mice, rats, rabbits). A characteristic pattern of malformations is produced, and the developmental toxicity effects are dependent on dose, route, and the day of gestation when exposure occurs. Studies with gavage and diet administration indicate that death and growth retardation are produced by oral arsenic exposure. Arsenic is readily transferred to the fetus and produces developmental toxicity in embryo culture. Animal studies have not identified an effect of arsenic on fertility in males or females. When females were dosed chronically for periods that included pregnancy, the primary effect of arsenic on reproduction was a dose-dependent increase in conceptus mortality and in postnatal growth retardation. Human data are limited to a few studies of populations exposed to arsenic from drinking water or from working at or living near smelters. Associations with spontaneous abortion and stillbirth have been reported in more than one of these studies, but interpretation of these studies is complicated because study populations were exposed to multiple chemicals. Thus, animal studies suggest that environmental arsenic exposures are primarily a risk to the developing fetus. In order to understand the implications for humans, attention must be given to comparative pharmacokinetics and metabolism, likely exposure scenarios, possible mechanisms of action, and the potential role of arsenic as an essential nutrient.

  7. Developmental toxicity studies of methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO) in rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Derelanko, Michael J; Rinehart, William E; Rodwell, Dean E

    2003-08-01

    The developmental toxicity of methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO), an industrial antioxidant used primarily as an antiskinning agent in alkyd paint, was investigated in rats and rabbits. Following preliminary dose range finding studies, groups of 25 pregnant rats or 18 pregnant rabbits were dosed by gavage with aqueous solutions of MEKO at 0, 60, 200, or 600 mg/kg (rats) or 0, 8, 14, 24, or 40 mg/kg (rabbits) on gestation days 6-15 or 6-18, respectively. In rats, dose-dependent clinical signs of maternal toxicity including reduced body weight gains were noted at 200 and 600 mg/kg. At 60 mg/kg and above enlarged spleens were observed at necropsy. The preliminary study found methemoglobin formation and reticulocytosis indicative of anemia at these dose levels. No treatment-related gestational effects, malformations or developmental variations were observed in the rats. In rabbits, 3 females aborted and 8 females were found dead at 40 mg/kg between gestation days 11 and 24. Clinical signs of maternal toxicity were present in surviving doses at this dose level. Body weight gains were reduced at 24 and 40 mg/kg. The preliminary study indicated maternal hematological effects in the rabbits similar to the rats at dose levels as low as 10 mg/kg. MEKO was not considered to have produced any treatment-related gestational effects, malformations or developmental variations in the rabbit at dose levels at or below 24 mg/kg. Because of excessive maternal mortality and abortions at the 40 mg/kg dose level, only 6 rabbits produced litters. The severe maternal toxicity and limited number of litters precluded a full assessment of developmental toxicity at 40 mg/kg. Nonetheless, MEKO did not appear to be teratogenic to the rabbit at this dose level.

  8. An integrated study of toxicant-induced inhibition of feeding and digestion activity in Daphnia magna

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, W.M. De; Janssen, C.R.; Persoone, G.

    1995-12-31

    Previous studies on D. magna exposed to xenobiotics have demonstrated that feeding inhibition can be used as a general indicator of toxic stress. In order to evaluate the consequences of the reduced food absorption on the energy balance of the organism, the effects of short-term exposure to sublethal toxicant concentrations of 8 chemicals on physiological (ingestion rate) and biochemical aspects (digestive enzyme activity) of the feeding process were investigated. The ingestion activity was assessed using a simple and sensitive method based on the use of fluorescent latex microbeads. The biochemical aspects of feeding were studied by analyzing the activity of 5 digestive enzymes, each responsible for the breakdown of one of the three major macromolecular constituents of the food (3 carbohydrases: amylase, cellulose and {beta}-galactosidase; trypsin and esterase). Using ingestion as an effect criterium, correlation analysis revealed a significant (p < 0.05) and positive (r{sup 2} = 0.89) correlation between the 1.5h EC50 value and the conventional acute toxicity endpoint (24hEC50). For 3 out of 5 enzymes studied a clear concentration-response relationship was observed. The 2h EC 10 value (inhibition) of {beta}-galactosidase activity and 2h EC5 value of trypsin and esterase activity showed a significant linear correlation (r{sup 2} respectively 0.98, 0.96 and 0.95) with the 24hEC50 value. The relationships between the physiological and biochemical effects will be discussed in the context of toxicant-induced homeostatic adjustments in the organism`s metabolism. Finally the potential use of both types of effect criteria as rapid screening tools in aquatic toxicity testing will be reviewed.

  9. A repeated 28-day oral dose toxicity study of 17alpha-methyltestosterone in rats, based on the 'enhanced OECD Test Guideline 407' for screening the endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kazushi; Imazawa, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Hideaki; Furukawa, Fumio; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Hirose, Masao

    2002-01-01

    As part of the international validation project to establish the Enhanced OECD Test Guideline 407, we performed a 28-day repeated-dose toxicity study of 17alpha-methyltestosterone, an exogenous androgen agonist. Special attention was paid to the sensitivity of additional parameters for detecting endocrine-related effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, based on the existing Test Guideline 407. Seven-week-old Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats were allocated to one of four groups, each consisting of ten males and ten females, and 17alpha-methyltestosterone was administered daily by gavage at doses of 0 (control), 5, 20 and 80 mg/kg body weight per day. Male rats were killed on the day after the 28th administration and females on the day of the diestrus stage during the 4 day period after the 28th administration. Male rats receiving 80 mg/kg 17alpha-methyltestosterone demonstrated decreases in testis and epididymis weights, atrophy of seminiferous tubules and Leydig cells, and degenerated pachytene spermatocytes in the testes and degenerated germ cells in the epididymides as major alterations. Female rats showed abnormal estrous cycles, decreases in ovary and adrenal weights, increase in immature follicles with decreased corpus lutea in the ovaries at doses of 5 mg/kg and higher, as well as atrophy of zona reticularis in the adrenals and increase in mammary gland secretion at 20 mg/kg and above. Dilatation of the lumina and apoptosis of endometrial cells in the uterus, mucinification in the vagina and increase in serum follicle-stimulating hormone were seen with 80 mg/kg. Among the parameters examined in the present experimental system, effects of 17alpha-methyltestosterone on endocrine-related organs were detected in organ weights and histopathological examination of both sexes, and in serum hormones and estrous cycle of females. Based on these results, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) in the present study was estimated to be below 5 mg/kg per day. In particular

  10. Subchronic toxicity study of standardized methanolic extract of Mitragyna speciosa Korth in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ilmie, Mohd U.; Jaafar, Hasnan; Mansor, Sharif M.; Abdullah, Jafri M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth, or better known as ketum, has long been used by traditional folk around Southeast Asia to prevent fatigue from working under hot tropical weather and as a replacement of opium, which can then cause addiction. To date, no findings have been reported of the toxic effect of ketum subchronically (28 days). Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of subchronic effect of standardized methanolic extract of ketum (SMEMS) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were orally administered with 100, 200, and 500 mg/kg of SMEMS for 28 days. Body weights were recorded daily. They were terminated at day 28 to obtain data for hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology of the brain, liver, kidney, lung, heart, sciatic nerve, and spinal cord. The SMEMS affected body weight compared to control group. Biochemistry findings showed that liver and kidney were affected with the abnormal values in AST, creatinine, globulin, glucose, total protein, and urea. However, SMEMS produced toxic effect more to liver, kidney, and lung than other organs as observed histopathologically. The results suggested subchronic exposure of ketum is toxic to the physiology of the animals. PMID:26136645

  11. Intermittent flow system for population toxicity studies demonstrated with Daphnia and copper

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, C.J.; Buechner, J.L.; van Dijk, H. )

    1988-05-01

    Until the introduction of continuous-flow procedures, the physical aspects of testing the toxicity of chemicals and aqueous effluents to aquatic organisms had been of minor consideration. Today's devices ranging from pneumatic systems to electric pumps, all have some drawback or other but many of them are reduced to a minimum by the use of the proportional diluter, which is a well-established and reliable dosing apparatus. However, the Mount-Brungs diluter cannot be used for testing volatile chemicals, nor does it allow simultaneous dosing of a constant food suspension and several toxicant concentrations, which are important conditions for population toxicity studies with small invertebrates like the crustacean Daphnia magna. These restrictions are removed by the use of electric pumps, solenoids and time relays. The system described here provides for the delivery of 250 mL every 5 min to 6 h with no perceptible current-induced effects on the test organisms; it allows the automatic supply of known concentrations of food at each dilution cycle as well as the testing of volatile chemicals. In order to illustrate its usefulness in tests with Daphnia populations, the toxicity of copper was tested.

  12. Intermittent flow system for population toxicity studies demonstrated with Daphnia and copper

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, C.J.; Buechner, J.L.; van Dijk, H.

    1988-04-01

    Until the introduction of continuous-flow procedures, the physical aspects of testing the toxicity of chemicals and aqueous effluents to aquatic organisms had been of minor consideration. Today's devices ranging from pneumatic systems to electric pumps, all have some drawback or other but many of them are reduced to a minimum by the use of the proportional diluter, which is a well-established and reliable dosing apparatus. However, the Mount-Brungs diluter cannot be used for testing volatile chemicals, nor does it allow simultaneous dosing of a constant food suspension and several toxicant concentrations, which are important conditions for population toxicity studies with small invertebrates like the crustacean Daphnia magna. These restrictions are removed by the use of electric pumps, solenoids and time relays. The system described here provides for the delivery of 250 mL every 5 min to 6 h with no perceptible current-induced effects on the test organisms; it allows the automatic supply of known concentrations of food at each dilution cycle as well as the testing of volatile chemicals. The system has operated for almost 3 years and has proven to be reliable, accurate and easy to maintain. In order to illustrate its usefulness in tests with Daphnia populations, the toxicity of copper was tested.

  13. Subchronic toxicity study of standardized methanolic extract of Mitragyna speciosa Korth in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ilmie, Mohd U; Jaafar, Hasnan; Mansor, Sharif M; Abdullah, Jafri M

    2015-01-01

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth, or better known as ketum, has long been used by traditional folk around Southeast Asia to prevent fatigue from working under hot tropical weather and as a replacement of opium, which can then cause addiction. To date, no findings have been reported of the toxic effect of ketum subchronically (28 days). Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the toxicity of subchronic effect of standardized methanolic extract of ketum (SMEMS) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were orally administered with 100, 200, and 500 mg/kg of SMEMS for 28 days. Body weights were recorded daily. They were terminated at day 28 to obtain data for hematology, biochemistry, and histopathology of the brain, liver, kidney, lung, heart, sciatic nerve, and spinal cord. The SMEMS affected body weight compared to control group. Biochemistry findings showed that liver and kidney were affected with the abnormal values in AST, creatinine, globulin, glucose, total protein, and urea. However, SMEMS produced toxic effect more to liver, kidney, and lung than other organs as observed histopathologically. The results suggested subchronic exposure of ketum is toxic to the physiology of the animals. PMID:26136645

  14. Rainwater toxicity and contamination study from São Paulo Metropolitan Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renata S L; Abessa, Denis M S; Fornaro, Adalgiza; Borrely, Sueli I

    2014-02-01

    Wet deposition is an important process that removes pollutants from the atmosphere and transfers them to waters and soil. The goal of this study was to assess the biological effects of the atmospheric contamination of rainwater in the metropolitan area of São Paulo (MASP) using Daphnia similis, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Vibrio fischeri. Experimental assays were carried out according to standard toxicity methodology. Twenty-three rainwater samples were collected from October 2007 to December 2008, at the Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN), in MASP. Major ions were determined by ionic chromatography, which showed NH4(+) and NO3(-) as prevalent ions. Ecotoxicological results confirmed toxic potential of rainwater, as all samples were toxic to D. similis and C. dubia. The V. fischeri luminescence reduction confirmed those negative effects of rainwater and percentage inhibition of relative luminescence ranged from 0.2 to 0.9 for 16 samples. Worse conditions were observed during the rainy season, suggesting convective rains are more effective in transferring contaminants and toxicity from atmosphere to surface.

  15. Application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in metabolism and in metabolism-mediated toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Mutlib, Abdul E

    2008-09-01

    Stable isotope-labeled compounds have been synthesized and utilized by scientists from various areas of biomedical research during the last several decades. Compounds labeled with stable isotopes, such as deuterium and carbon-13, have been used effectively by drug metabolism scientists and toxicologists to gain better understanding of drugs' disposition and their potential role in target organ toxicities. The combination of stable isotope-labeling techniques with mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which allows rapid acquisition and interpretation of data, has promoted greater use of these stable isotope-labeled compounds in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) studies. Examples of the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds in elucidating structures of metabolites and delineating complex metabolic pathways are presented in this review. The application of labeled compounds in mechanistic toxicity studies will be discussed by providing an example of how strategic placement of a deuterium atom in a drug molecule mitigated specific-specific renal toxicity. Other examples from the literature demonstrating the application of stable isotope-labeled compounds in understanding metabolism-mediated toxicities are presented. Furthermore, an example of how a stable isotope-labeled compound was utilized to better understand some of the gene changes in toxicogenomic studies is discussed. The interpretation of large sets of data produced from toxicogenomics studies can be a challenge. One approach that could be used to simplify interpretation of the data, especially from studies designed to link gene changes with the formation of reactive metabolites thought to be responsible for toxicities, is through the use of stable isotope-labeled compounds. This is a relatively unexplored territory and needs to be further investigated. The employment of analytical techniques, especially mass spectrometry and NMR, used in conjunction

  16. Toxicity study of dimethylethoxysilane (DMSES), the waterproofing agent for the Orbiter heat protective system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.; Dodd, Darol; Stuart, Bruce; Rothenberg, Simon; Kershaw, Mary Ann; Thilagar, A.

    1993-01-01

    DMES, a volatile liquid, is used by NASA to waterproof the Orbiter thermal protective system. During waterproofing operations at the Oribter Processing Facility at KSC, workers could be exposed to DMES vapor. To assess the toxicity of DMES, acute and subchronic (2-week and 13-week) inhalation studies were conducted with rats. Studies were also conducted to assess the potential of DMES. Inhalation exposure concentrations ranged from 40 ppm to 4000 ppm. No mortality was observed during the studies. Exposures to 2100 ppm produced narcosis and ataxia. Post-exposure recovery from these CNS effects was rapid (less than 1 hr). These effects were concentration-dependent and relatively independent of exposure length. Exposure to 3000 ppm for 2 weeks (5 h/d, 5 d/wk) produced testicular toxicity. The 13-week study yielded similar results. Results from the genotoxicity assays (in vivo/in vitro unscheduled DNA synthesis in rat primary heptaocytes, chromosomal aberrations in rat bone marrow cells; reverse gene mutation in Salmonella typhimurium; and forward mutation in Chinese hamster culture cells) were negative. These studies indicated that DMES is mildly to moderately toxic but not a multagen.

  17. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P. Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10−11, β = −0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10−14, β = −0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10−10, β = −1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10−9, β = −1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity. PMID:26025379

  18. Genome-wide association study of toxic metals and trace elements reveals novel associations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Esther; Lind, P Monica; Lindgren, Cecilia; Ingelsson, Erik; Mahajan, Anubha; Morris, Andrew; Lind, Lars

    2015-08-15

    The accumulation of toxic metals in the human body is influenced by exposure and mechanisms involved in metabolism, some of which may be under genetic control. This is the first genome-wide association study to investigate variants associated with whole blood levels of a range of toxic metals. Eleven toxic metals and trace elements (aluminium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, mercury, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, lead and zinc) were assayed in a cohort of 949 individuals using mass spectrometry. DNA samples were genotyped on the Infinium Omni Express bead microarray and imputed up to reference panels from the 1000 Genomes Project. Analyses revealed two regions associated with manganese level at genome-wide significance, mapping to 4q24 and 1q41. The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 4q24 locus was rs13107325 (P-value = 5.1 × 10(-11), β = -0.77), located in an exon of SLC39A8, which encodes a protein involved in manganese and zinc transport. The lead SNP in the 1q41 locus is rs1776029 (P-value = 2.2 × 10(-14), β = -0.46). The SNP lies within the intronic region of SLC30A10, another transporter protein. Among other metals, the loci 6q14.1 and 3q26.32 were associated with cadmium and mercury levels (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), β = -1.2 and P = 1.8 × 10(-9), β = -1.8, respectively). Whole blood measurements of toxic metals are associated with genetic variants in metal transporter genes and others. This is relevant in inferring metabolic pathways of metals and identifying subsets of individuals who may be more susceptible to metal toxicity.

  19. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  20. Oral 28-day and developmental toxicity studies of (R)-3-hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Kieran; Tchabanenko, Kirill; Pawlosky, Robert; Carter, Emma; Knight, Nicholas S.; Murray, Andrew J.; Cochlin, Lowri E.; King, M. Todd; Wong, Andrea W.; Roberts, Ashley; Robertson, Jeremy; Veech, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    (R)-3-Hydroxybutyl (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (ketone monoester) has been developed as an oral source of ketones, which may be utilized for energy. In a 28-day toxicity study, Crl:WI (Wistar) rats received diets containing, as 30% of the calories, ketone monoester (12 and 15 g/kg body weight/day for male and female rats, respectively). Control groups received either carbohydrate- or fat-based diets. Rats in the test group consumed less feed and gained less weight than control animals; similar findings have been documented in studies of ketogenic diets. Between-group differences were noted in selected hematology, coagulation, and serum chemistry parameters; however, values were within normal physiological ranges and/or were not accompanied by other changes indicative of toxicity. Upon gross and microscopic evaluation, there were no findings associated with the ketone monoester. In a developmental toxicity study, pregnant Crl:WI (Han) rats were administered 2 g/kg body weight/day ketone monoester or water (control) via gavage on days 6 through 20 of gestation. No Caesarean-sectioning or litter parameters were affected by the test article. The overall incidence of fetal alterations was higher in the test group; however, there were no specific alterations attributable to the test substance. The results of these studies support the safety of ketone monoester. PMID:22504461

  1. Challenging the requirement for chronic fish toxicity studies on formulated plant protection products.

    PubMed

    Creton, Stuart; Douglas, Mark; Wheeler, James R; Hutchinson, Thomas H

    2010-11-30

    Ecotoxicity testing of pesticide active ingredients and formulated plant protection products (PPPs) prior to their commercial use is required by authorities around the world. Such studies are important for the conduct of risk assessments to protect wildlife and the environment, but they should only be conducted when their use is scientifically justified. One test of questionable scientific merit is the chronic fish toxicity test when conducted with formulated PPPs, which is a potential requirement under European legislation: chronic exposure to the formulated product per se rarely occurs in the environment and therefore it is generally not possible to use the data from chronic formulation studies in a meaningful risk assessment. A recent survey of European crop protection companies to explore the scientific merits and regulatory drivers for chronic fish toxicity studies has shown that current practice in deciding on the need for chronic fish toxicity testing of formulated PPPs varies substantially between companies. The most commonly cited reason for conducting such studies was solely to meet regulatory requirements. We conclude that chronic formulation testing is rarely if ever scientifically justified, and recommend that the forthcoming revision of the EU Aquatic Toxicology Guidance Document takes account of this by including a requirement that justification must be provided for conducting the test, rather than the current situation where the onus is on the registrant to provide a justification for not conducting the test.

  2. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  3. Rifapentine-Proliposomes for Inhalation: In Vitro and In Vivo Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Patil-Gadhe, Arpana A.; Kyadarkunte, Abhay Y.; Pereira, Michael; Jejurikar, Gauri; Patole, Milind S.; Risbud, Arun; Pokharkar, Varsha B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oral therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) treatment suffers from the limitation of hepatic metabolism leading insufficient concentration of antitubercular (anti-TB) drugs in alveolar macrophage which harbors Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Targeted aerosol delivery of antituberculous drug to lung is efficient for treating local lung TB infection. Objective: The present study was aimed to evaluate rifapentine (RPT) loaded proliposomal dry powder for inhalation (RLDPI) for anti-TBactivity and cytotoxicity in vitro. In vivo toxicity study was also undertaken in Wistar rats to determine safe concentration of RLDPI for administration. Materials and Methods: Anti-TB activity of developed RLDPI was assessed using drug susceptibility testing (DST) on Mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT) method. In vitro cytotoxicity was performed in A549 cell lines and IC50 values were used to compare the cytotoxicity of formulation with pure RPT. In vivo repeated dose toxicity study was undertaken using Wistar rats at three different doses for 28-days by intratracheal insufflations method. Results: The results of DST study revealed sensitivity of tubercle bacteria to RLDPI at concentration equivalent to 10 μg/mL of RPT. This study confirmed anti-TB potential of RPT in spray-dried RLDPI, though the spray drying method is reported to reduce activity of drugs. Cytotoxicity study in A549 cells demonstrated that RPT when encapsulated in liposomes as RLDPI was safe to cells as compared to pure RPT. In vivo toxicity study revealed that RPT in the form of RLDPI was safe at 1 and 5 mg/kg dose. However, mortality was seen at higher dose (10 mg/kg), possibly because of liver and kidney damage. Conclusion: Thus, these studies demonstrated safety of RLDPI for the treatment of pulmonary TB. PMID:25948966

  4. Oral dietary developmental toxicity study with polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) in the rat.

    PubMed

    DeMerlis, C C; Schoneker, D R; Borzelleca, J F

    2014-10-01

    Polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) was evaluated in a developmental toxicity study with Crl:CD(SD) rats. Female rats were provided continual access to the formulated diets on days 6 through 20 of presumed gestation (DGs 6 through 20) at concentrations of 0%, 0.75%, 1.5% and 3%. All surviving rats were sacrificed and Caesarean-sectioned on DG 21. The following parameters were evaluated: viability, clinical observations, body weights, feed consumption, necropsy observations, Caesarean-sectioning and litter observations, including gravid uterine weights, fetal body weights and sex, and fetal gross external, soft tissue and skeletal alterations. There were no treatment-related adverse effects reported in the developmental toxicity study. The maternal and developmental no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of PVAP was the highest concentration administered, i.e., 3.0% (equivalent to 2324mgPVAP/kg/day). PMID:25084367

  5. Assessment of narghile (shisha, hookah) smokers' actual exposure to toxic chemicals requires further sound studies.

    PubMed

    Chaouachi, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is hazardous for health. However, not all forms of tobacco use entail the same risks and the latter should be studied and compared in a sound realistic way. Smoking machines for cigarettes (which are consumed in a few minutes) were early designed as a tool to evaluate the actual intake of toxic substances ('toxicants') by smokers. However, the yields (tar, nicotine, CO, etc.) provided by such machines poorly reflect the actual human smoking behaviour known to depend on numerous factors (anxiety, emotions, anthropological situation, etc.). In the case of narghile smoking, the problems are even more complex, particularly because of the much longer duration of a session. A recent study from the US-American University of Beirut was based on a field smoking topography and claimed consistency with a laboratory smoking machine. We offer a point by point critical analysis of such methods on which most of the 'waterpipe' antismoking literature since 2002 is based. PMID:21584212

  6. Ovarian toxicity and carcinogenicity in eight recent national toxicology program studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maronpot, R.R.

    1987-08-01

    Ovarian toxicity and/or carcinogenicity has been documented for at least eight chemicals recently tested in National Toxicity Program prechronic and chronic rodent studies. The chemicals that yielded treatment-related ovarian lesions were 1,3-butadiene, 4-vinylcyclohexene, vinylcylohexene deipoxide, nitrofurantoin, nitrofurazone, benzene, ..delta..-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and tricresylphosphate. Typical nonneoplastic ovarian changes included hypoplasia, atrophy, follicular necrosis, and tubular hyperplasia. The most commonly observed treatment-related neoplasms were granulosa cell tumors and benign mixed tumors. A relationship between antecedent ovarian hypoplasia, atrophy, and hyperplasia and subsequent ovarian neoplasia is supported by some of these National Toxicology Program studies. Pathologic changes in other tissues such as the adrenal glands and uterus were associated with the treatment-related ovarian changes.

  7. Developmental Toxicity Studies with Atrazine and its Major Metabolites in Rats and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Scialli, Anthony R; DeSesso, John M; Breckenridge, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR), hydroxyatrazine (OH-ATR), and the three chloro metabolites of ATR (deethylatrazine [DEA], deisopropylatrazine [DIA], diaminochlorotriazine [DACT]) were evaluated for developmental effects in rats and rabbits. Three developmental toxicity studies were conducted on ATR in rats (two studies) and rabbits and a developmental toxicity study was conducted in rats for each of the four ATR metabolites DEA, DIA, DACT, and OH-ATZ. ATR administration by gavage to pregnant rats and rabbits from implantation (gestation day [GD] 6 in rat, GD 7 in rabbit) through closure of the palate (GD 15 in rat and GD 19 in rabbit) did not statistically significantly alter the incidence of developmental abnormalities or malformations at dose levels up to 100 (rat) or 75 (rabbit) mg/kg bw/day. There were no effects on developmental toxicity parameters for DEA, DIA, DACT, or OH-ATR at oral dose levels up to 100, 100, 150, or 125 mg/kg bw/day, respectively, with the exception of reductions in fetal body weight by DACT and OH-ATR in the presence of decreased maternal body weight gain. ATR did not adversely affect developmental end points in a two-generation study conducted in rats exposed to dose levels up to 500 ppm (38.7 mg/kg/day) in the diet. The 500-ppm dose level resulted in significantly reduced maternal body weight gain. Overall, data show that neither ATR nor its metabolites statistically significantly affected rat or rabbit embryo-fetal development even at dose levels producing maternal toxicity. PMID:24797531

  8. In Vitro Study of Biocompatibility and Toxicity of Magnesium Nanomaterials for Biodegradable Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavi, Manishi

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) has a great potential to be used as a next generation implant material for orthopedic applications due to its mechanical and osseointegration properties. However, surface characteristics, biocompatibility and toxicity of the released corrosion products, in the form of magnesium oxide (MgO) and magnesium hydroxide (Mg (OH)2) nanoparticles (NPs), at the junction of implants, and their surrounding tissues is not completely understood. Therefore, our goal was to identify in vitro biocompatibility, and toxicity of magnesium nanomaterials in osteoblast cells to mimic the in vivo environment for biodegradable implants. We hypothesized that the release of hydroxide ion (OH-) from MgO/ Mg(OH) 2 NPs will increase the corrosion behavior of these particles in osteoblast cells, and will introduce cytotoxicity. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize MgO/ Mg(OH)2 NPs in osteoblast cells, and to develop an electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) system to measure the biocompatibility and toxicity of these particles in osteoblast cells. The corrosion behavior of the samples was analyzed through immersion test. The morphological characterization and element distribution of the surface corrosion products of the samples was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), respectively. Cell viability and cytotoxicity of the samples was studied by live-dead assay. With ECIS system, biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the samples was analyzed. Results shows that less than or equal to 1 mM concentrations of MgO/ Mg(OH) 2 NPs has negligible toxic effects on osteoblast cells. Therefore, this study provides a foundational knowledge for an acceptable range of these corrosion products that might release from the magnesium-based implants in the physiological environment, in order to understand the implant degradation for future in vivo study.

  9. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies on safety assessment of Paecilomyces tenuipes N45 extracts.

    PubMed

    Du, Linna; Liu, Yan; Liu, Chungang; Meng, Qingfan; Song, Jingjing; Wang, Di; Lu, Jiahui; Teng, Lirong; Zhou, Yulin; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    Paecilomyces tenuipes, one of the commonly used Chinese medicinal fungus, has received much attention over the world, which possesses various active compounds and biological activities. However, little toxicological information is available. Therefore, the present study evaluated the potential toxicity of aqueous and ethanol extracts of Paecilomyces tenuipes N45 via acute and subchronic administration in mouse and rat, respectively. For improving the extraction rate of aqueous extract, response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the extraction condition first in this paper. The obtained optimal extract conditions were temperature 80 °C, liquid-solid ratio 50 mL·g-1 and time 3 h. In the acute toxicity test, aqueous and ethanol extracts caused neither mortality nor toxicological signs, and the maximum tolerance dose was estimated over 15 g/kg. No mortality or adverse effects was observed in subchronic toxicity studies. No significant difference in bodyweight, relative organ weight or hematological parameters was noted during the experiment. Comparing with nontreated rats, ALT, K and BUN levels were changed in experimental group detecting via biochemical analysis. No abnormality of internal organs was noted between treatment and control groups in gross and histopathological examinations. Our present study suggested that the tolerance dose of the Paecilomyces tenuipes N45 extracts were more than 15 g/kg and no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of the extracts for both male and female rats after 90-day adminstation. Additionally, the extracts may possess renal-protective and hepato-protective effects.

  10. Studies on the anti-inflammatory and toxic effects of the stem bark of Khaya ivorensis (Meliaceae) on rats.

    PubMed

    Agbedahunsi, J M; Fakoya, F A; Adesanya, S A

    2004-09-01

    Khaya ivorensis A. Chev. (Meliaceae) is a common feature in anti-malarial recipe prescribed by African traditional medical practitioners. Investigations have proved that Khaya species possesses some level of anti-plasmodial activity. Anti-inflammatory and toxicity studies were carried out on this plant using the Ugo Basile model 7140 and routine toxicity study methods, respectively, on adult wistar rats. The brain, spleen, heart, liver and kidneys were examined for dismorphological features, following oral administration of the ethanolic extract of K. ivorensis at the daily dose levels of 1000, 500 or 125 mg/kg for 7, 14 and 7 days after cessation of drug administration. The study showed that tissue toxicity, especially neurotoxicity was dose dependent, similarly the anti-inflammatory effect. The toxicity appeared to be reversible at lower doses. The wide margin between the therapeutic and toxic dosages makes the extract a possible safe drug in the management of malaria.

  11. The underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures: A case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Dayong; Lin, Zhifen; Zhou, Xianghong; Yin, Daqiang

    2013-10-15

    Intracellular chemical reaction of chemical mixtures is one of the main reasons that cause synergistic or antagonistic effects. However, it still remains unclear what the influencing factors on the intracellular chemical reaction are, and how they influence on the toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures. To reveal this underlying toxicological mechanism of chemical mixtures, a case study on mixture toxicity of cyanogenic toxicants and aldehydes to Photobacterium phosphoreum was employed, and both their joint effects and mixture toxicity were observed. Then series of two-step linear regressions were performed to describe the relationships between joint effects, the expected additive toxicities and descriptors of individual chemicals (including concentrations, binding affinity to receptors, octanol/water partition coefficients). Based on the quantitative relationships, the underlying joint toxicological mechanisms were revealed. The result shows that, for mixtures with their joint effects resulting from intracellular chemical reaction, their underlying toxicological mechanism depends on not only their interaction with target proteins, but also their transmembrane actions and their concentrations. In addition, two generic points of toxicological mechanism were proposed including the influencing factors on intracellular chemical reaction and the difference of the toxicological mechanism between single reactive chemicals and their mixtures. This study provided an insight into the understanding of the underlying toxicological mechanism for chemical mixtures with intracellular chemical reaction. - Highlights: • Joint effects of nitriles and aldehydes at non-equitoxic ratios were determined. • A novel descriptor, ligand–receptor interaction energy (E{sub binding}), was employed. • Quantitative relationships for mixtures were developed based on a novel descriptor. • The underlying toxic mechanism was revealed based on quantitative relationships. • Two

  12. TU-F-12A-09: GLCM Texture Analysis for Normal-Tissue Toxicity: A Prospective Ultrasound Study of Acute Toxicity in Breast-Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T; Yang, X; Curran, W; Torres, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the morphologic and structural integrity of the breast glands using sonographic textural analysis, and identify potential early imaging signatures for radiation toxicity following breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Thirty-eight patients receiving breast RT participated in a prospective ultrasound imaging study. Each participant received 3 ultrasound scans: 1 week before RT (baseline), and at 6-week and 3-month follow-ups. Patients were imaged with a 10-MHz ultrasound on the four quadrant of the breast. A second order statistical method of texture analysis, called gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), was employed to assess RT-induced breast-tissue toxicity. The region of interest (ROI) was 28 mm × 10 mm in size at a 10 mm depth under the skin. Twenty GLCM sonographic features, ratios of the irradiated breast and the contralateral breast, were used to quantify breast-tissue toxicity. Clinical assessment of acute toxicity was conducted using the RTOG toxicity scheme. Results: Ninety-seven ultrasound studies (776 images) were analyzed; and 5 out of 20 sonographic features showed significant differences (p < 0.05) among the baseline scans, the acute toxicity grade 1 and 2 groups. These sonographic features quantified the degree of tissue damage through homogeneity, heterogeneity, randomness, and symmetry. Energy ratio value decreased from 108±0.05 (normal) to 0.99±0.05 (Grade 1) and 0.84±0.04 (Grade 2); Entropy ratio value increased from 1.01±0.01 to 1.02±0.01 and 1.04±0.01; Contrast ratio value increased from 1.03±0.03 to 1.07±0.06 and 1.21±0.09; Variance ratio value increased from 1.06±0.03 to 1.20±0.04 and 1.42±0.10; Cluster Prominence ratio value increased from 0.98±0.02 to 1.01±0.04 and 1.25±0.07. Conclusion: This work has demonstrated that the sonographic features may serve as imaging signatures to assess radiation-induced normal tissue damage. While these findings need to be validated in a larger cohort, they suggest

  13. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  14. Studies of acetaminophen and metabolites in urine and their correlations with toxicity using metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinchun; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D

    2009-08-01

    A LC/MS-based metabolomic assay was utilized to investigate a drug's excretion kinetic profile in urine so that the drug toxicity information could be obtained. Groups of 10 male Sprague-Dawley rats per dose were orally gavaged with a single dose of 0.2% carboxymethylcellulose, 400 mg acetaminophen (APAP)/kg body weight or 1600 mg APAP/kg. UPLC/MS and NMR were used to evaluate the excretion kinetics of major drug metabolites. N-acetyl-L-cysteine acetaminophen (APAP-NAC) had statistically significant correlations with clinical chemistry data, endogenous metabolite concentrations and histopathology data. The potential toxicity of a drug can be assessed through the study of the drug's metabolite profiles.

  15. [A 13-week toxicity study of simultaneous administration of cochineal and aluminum potassium sulfate in rats].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Y; Umemura, T; Sai, K; Hasegawa, R; Momma, J; Saitoh, M; Matsushima, Y; Nakaji, Y; Tsuda, M; Kurokawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    Cochineal (C), a scarlet material extracted from the powdered pregnant insect, Dactylopius Coceus Costa, is used as a color food additive in the form of aluminum lakes. A 13 week subchronic toxicity study was conducted to investigate the effects of simultaneous administration of C and aluminum potassium sulfate (A). Male and female Wistar rats (5-weeks-old, 15 rats/group) were given diets containing 0.75%A and 0.75%C (1.5%AC), 1.5%A and 1.5%C (3%AC), 3%C alone or 3%A alone. The following results were obtained. 1) No toxic symptoms or death occurred in any treated group. Body weight gain in male rats of the 3%A group decreased significantly. 2) Serum levels of phospholipids, triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol in male rats and TG in female rats fed 3%C, 3%A or 3%AC were significantly decreased at the 13th week. The serum level of glutamate dehydrogenase (GIDH) in male rats treated with 1.5% or 3%AC was increased at the 4th week but no difference from control was observed at the 13th week. 3) No histopathological changes attributable to A and/or C administration were observed. In this 13-week oral toxicity study, no dose-dependent synergistic effects of simultaneous administration of C and A were found except for an increase in serum GIDH.

  16. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Oral Toxicity Study of Java Tea Leaf Extracts.

    PubMed

    Pariyani, Raghunath; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Azam, Amalina Ahmad; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2015-01-01

    The term Java tea refers to the decoction of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) Benth (Lamiaceae) leaves, which are widely consumed by the people in Europe and South East Asian countries. The OS leaves are known for their use in traditional medicinal systems as a prophylactic and curative agent for urinary stone, diabetes, and hypertension and also as a diuretic agent. The present study was aimed at evaluating its possible toxicity. Herein, the major phytochemical constituents of microwave dried OS leaf, which is the common drying process for tea sachets in the market, were also identified. The acute oral toxicity test of aqueous, 50% aqueous ethanolic, and ethanolic extracts of OS was performed at a dose of 5000 mg/Kg body weight of Sprague-Dawley rats. During the 14-day study, the animals were observed for any mortality, behavioral, motor-neuronal abnormalities, body weight, and feed-water consumption pattern. The hematological and serum biochemical parameters to assess the kidney and liver functions were carried out, along with the histological analysis of these organs. It was found that all microwave dried OS leaf extracts did not cause any toxic effects or mortality at the administered dose. No abnormality was noticed in all selected parameters in rats of both sexes as compared with their respective control groups. Thus, the possible oral lethal dose for microwave dried Java tea leaves is more than 5000 mg/Kg body weight.

  17. Phytochemical screening and toxicity studies on the methanol extract of the seeds of moringa oleifera.

    PubMed

    Ajibade, Temitayo Olabisi; Arowolo, Ruben; Olayemi, Funsho Olakitike

    2013-01-01

    The seeds of Moringa oleifera were collected, air-dried, pulverized, and subjected to cold extraction with methanol. The methanol extract was screened phytochemically for its chemical components and used for acute and sub-acute toxicity studies in rats. The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, tannins, terpenes, alkaloids, flavonoids, carbohydrates, and cardiac glycosides but the absence of anthraquinones. Although signs of acute toxicity were observed at a dose of 4,000 mg kg-1 in the acute toxicity test, and mortality was recorded at 5,000 mg kg-1, no adverse effect was observed at concentrations lower than 3,000 mg kg-1. The median lethal dose of the extract in rat was 3,873 mg kg-1. Sub-acute administration of the seed extract caused significant (p<0.05) increase in the levels of alanine and aspartate transferases (ALT and AST), and significant (p<0.05) decrease in weight of experimental rats, at 1,600 mg kg-1. The study concludes that the extract of seeds of M. oleifera is safe both for medicinal and nutritional uses. PMID:23652639

  18. Ninety-Day Subchronic Oral Toxicity Study of Senecio scandens Extract in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Kun; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Ting; Yi, Yan; Li, Chun-Ying; Wang, Hong-Jie; Wang, Chang-Hong; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Ye, Zu-Guang; Liang, Ai-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The present study assessed the safety/toxicity of Senecio scandens, a well-known Chinese herb that is used as an anti-inflammatory, antibiosis, and antipyretic drug. A 90-d subchronic oral toxicity study of S. scandens was performed in Wistar rats. The extract of S. scandens was administered orally to male and female rats at a single dose of 225, 450, and 900 mg/kg/d. There was no obvious toxicity. Certain changes in hematology and coagulation parameters (red cell distribution width (RDW), platelet count (PLT), monocyte percentage (Mo%), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT)) were observed in some administration groups. In regards to the blood biochemical parameters, the levels of creatinine (CRN), potassium, and chloride were increased in a number of the treated rats. There were no significant changes in other hematology, coagulation, or biochemical parameters in rats orally administered S. scandens. S. scandens has a slight effect on rat coagulation and metabolism systems. The herb was safe at all doses tested, but caution should be taken when administering S. scandens at higher doses. PMID:26195160

  19. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Oral Toxicity Study of Java Tea Leaf Extracts.

    PubMed

    Pariyani, Raghunath; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Azam, Amalina Ahmad; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2015-01-01

    The term Java tea refers to the decoction of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) Benth (Lamiaceae) leaves, which are widely consumed by the people in Europe and South East Asian countries. The OS leaves are known for their use in traditional medicinal systems as a prophylactic and curative agent for urinary stone, diabetes, and hypertension and also as a diuretic agent. The present study was aimed at evaluating its possible toxicity. Herein, the major phytochemical constituents of microwave dried OS leaf, which is the common drying process for tea sachets in the market, were also identified. The acute oral toxicity test of aqueous, 50% aqueous ethanolic, and ethanolic extracts of OS was performed at a dose of 5000 mg/Kg body weight of Sprague-Dawley rats. During the 14-day study, the animals were observed for any mortality, behavioral, motor-neuronal abnormalities, body weight, and feed-water consumption pattern. The hematological and serum biochemical parameters to assess the kidney and liver functions were carried out, along with the histological analysis of these organs. It was found that all microwave dried OS leaf extracts did not cause any toxic effects or mortality at the administered dose. No abnormality was noticed in all selected parameters in rats of both sexes as compared with their respective control groups. Thus, the possible oral lethal dose for microwave dried Java tea leaves is more than 5000 mg/Kg body weight. PMID:26819955

  20. Study of toxicity of imidazolium ionic liquids to watercress (Lepidium sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Studzińska, Sylwia; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2009-02-01

    The sensitivity of Lepidium sativum L. germination to three imidazolium ionic liquids was investigated in solutions and soils artificially contaminated with mixtures of those compounds. In case of aquatic solutions, the toxic character of analyzed compounds is connected with their hydrophobicity. The seedling growth is increasing with the decrease in ionic liquid hydrophobicity. The novelty of those studies is the application of high-performance liquid chromatography, which was used for the determination of ionic liquid quantity absorbed by cress. There was almost linear relationship between decrease in root germination and amount of ionic liquid uptaken by cress. Furthermore, the systematic studies on the influence of total organic carbon content in soil on the toxicity of ionic liquids to cress were performed for the first time. Hazardous effects appeared to be closely connected with organic matter: with the decrease of total organic carbon quantity, the inhibition of plant growth was more significant. Visual effects of ionic liquid toxic activity to garden cress are similar as in the case of nutrient deficit in plants.

  1. [A 13-week toxicity study of simultaneous administration of cochineal and aluminum potassium sulfate in rats].

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Y; Umemura, T; Sai, K; Hasegawa, R; Momma, J; Saitoh, M; Matsushima, Y; Nakaji, Y; Tsuda, M; Kurokawa, Y

    1994-01-01

    Cochineal (C), a scarlet material extracted from the powdered pregnant insect, Dactylopius Coceus Costa, is used as a color food additive in the form of aluminum lakes. A 13 week subchronic toxicity study was conducted to investigate the effects of simultaneous administration of C and aluminum potassium sulfate (A). Male and female Wistar rats (5-weeks-old, 15 rats/group) were given diets containing 0.75%A and 0.75%C (1.5%AC), 1.5%A and 1.5%C (3%AC), 3%C alone or 3%A alone. The following results were obtained. 1) No toxic symptoms or death occurred in any treated group. Body weight gain in male rats of the 3%A group decreased significantly. 2) Serum levels of phospholipids, triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol in male rats and TG in female rats fed 3%C, 3%A or 3%AC were significantly decreased at the 13th week. The serum level of glutamate dehydrogenase (GIDH) in male rats treated with 1.5% or 3%AC was increased at the 4th week but no difference from control was observed at the 13th week. 3) No histopathological changes attributable to A and/or C administration were observed. In this 13-week oral toxicity study, no dose-dependent synergistic effects of simultaneous administration of C and A were found except for an increase in serum GIDH. PMID:8854902

  2. Thallium toxicity: The problem; an analytical approach; an antidotal study. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mulkey, J.P.

    1993-03-15

    Thallium (Tl) is a highly toxic metal that is anthropogenically concentrated in the environment. Tl toxicity and the quantitative analysis of trace levels of Tl in biologic materials by atomic absorption spectroscopy is reviewed; a study designed to evaluate the antidotal efficacy of 2 compounds in the treatment of acute Tl toxicity in rats is documented. Unithiol (2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid, DMPS) and prussian blue (potassium ferric hexacyanoferrate(II), PB), given alone and in combination, were evaluated as antidotes in the treatment of acute thallotoxicosis in male Sprauge-Dawley rats. The relative accumulation of Tl in organs was kidney>>heart>liver-brain. PB induced significant decorporation of Tl from all tissues. DMPS failed to significantly decrease the Tl content in any organ, but significantly decreased the Tl content in whole blood. PB+DMPS treatment significantly decreased the Tl content in all organs, but to no greater extent than PB alone. PB and PB+DMPS treatments significantly increased the Tl content of feces, whereas DMPS treatment alone produced little effect. This study indicates that PB is a beneficial antidote in the treatment of acute thallotoxicosis in rats. The failure of DMPS to significantly decrease the Tl content in 4 target organs suggests it would not be useful in the treatment of Tl poisoning....Thallium, Poison, Antidote, Chelator, Prussian blue, Potassium ferric hexacyanoferrate(II), Unithiol, 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid, Rat.

  3. Phytochemical Screening and Acute Oral Toxicity Study of Java Tea Leaf Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Safinar Ismail, Intan; Azam, Amalina Ahmad; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2015-01-01

    The term Java tea refers to the decoction of Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) Benth (Lamiaceae) leaves, which are widely consumed by the people in Europe and South East Asian countries. The OS leaves are known for their use in traditional medicinal systems as a prophylactic and curative agent for urinary stone, diabetes, and hypertension and also as a diuretic agent. The present study was aimed at evaluating its possible toxicity. Herein, the major phytochemical constituents of microwave dried OS leaf, which is the common drying process for tea sachets in the market, were also identified. The acute oral toxicity test of aqueous, 50% aqueous ethanolic, and ethanolic extracts of OS was performed at a dose of 5000 mg/Kg body weight of Sprague-Dawley rats. During the 14-day study, the animals were observed for any mortality, behavioral, motor-neuronal abnormalities, body weight, and feed-water consumption pattern. The hematological and serum biochemical parameters to assess the kidney and liver functions were carried out, along with the histological analysis of these organs. It was found that all microwave dried OS leaf extracts did not cause any toxic effects or mortality at the administered dose. No abnormality was noticed in all selected parameters in rats of both sexes as compared with their respective control groups. Thus, the possible oral lethal dose for microwave dried Java tea leaves is more than 5000 mg/Kg body weight. PMID:26819955

  4. Cholesterol reduction and lack of genotoxic or toxic effects in mice after repeated 21-day oral intake of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil.

    PubMed

    Costa, Celso A R A; Bidinotto, Lucas T; Takahira, Regina K; Salvadori, Daisy M F; Barbisan, Luís F; Costa, Mirtes

    2011-09-01

    Cymbopogon citratus (lemongrass) is currently used in traditional folk medicine. Although this species presents widespread use, there are no scientific data on its efficacy or safety after repeated treatments. Therefore, this work investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of this lemongrass's essential oil (EO) in male Swiss mice. The single LD(50) based on a 24h acute oral toxicity study was found to be around 3500 mg/kg. In a repeated-dose 21-day oral toxicity study, mice were randomly assigned to two control groups, saline- or Tween 80 0.01%-treated groups, or one of the three experimental groups receiving lemongrass EO (1, 10 or 100mg/kg). No significant changes in gross pathology, body weight, absolute or relative organ weights, histology (brain, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, stomach, spleen and urinary bladder), urinalysis or clinical biochemistry were observed in EO-treated mice relative to the control groups. Additionally, blood cholesterol was reduced after EO-treatment at the highest dose tested. Similarly, data from the comet assay in peripheral blood cells showed no genotoxic effect from the EO. In conclusion, our findings verified the safety of lemongrass intake at the doses used in folk medicine and indicated the beneficial effect of reducing the blood cholesterol level.

  5. Toxic megacolon

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease - toxic megacolon; Crohn disease - toxic megacolon; Ulcerative colitis - toxic megacolon ... people with an inflamed colon due to: Ulcerative colitis , or Crohn disease that is not well controlled ...

  6. Typhoid fever vaccines: a meta-analysis of studies on efficacy and toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Engels, E. A.; Falagas, M. E.; Lau, J.; Bennish, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the efficacy and toxicity of typhoid fever vaccines. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of randomised efficacy trials and both randomised and non-randomised toxicity studies of the parenteral whole cell, oral Ty21a, and parenteral Vi vaccines. SUBJECTS: 1,866,951 subjects in 17 efficacy trials; 11,204 subjects in 20 toxicity studies. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pooled estimates of three year cumulative efficacy, year specific efficacy, and incidence of adverse events. RESULTS: Three year cumulative efficacy was 73% (95% confidence interval 65% to 80%) for two doses of whole cell vaccines (based on seven trials); 51% (35% to 63%) for three doses of Ty21a vaccine (four trials); and 55% (30% to 71%) for one dose of Vi vaccine (one trial). For whole cell and Ty21a vaccines, regimens of fewer doses were less effective. Efficacy was shown to be significant for five years for whole cell vaccines, four years for Ty21a vaccine, and two years for Vi vaccine. Neither the age of vaccine recipient nor the incidence of typhoid fever in the control group (varying from 6 to 810 cases per 100,000 person years) affected the efficacy of the whole cell or Ty21a vaccines. After vaccination, fever occurred in 15.7% (11.5% to 21.2%) of whole cell vaccine recipients, 2.0% (0.7% to 5.3%) of Ty21a vaccine recipients, and 1.1% (0.1% to 12.3%) of Vi vaccine recipients. CONCLUSIONS: Whole cell vaccines are more effective than the Ty21a and Vi vaccines but are more frequently associated with adverse events. Whether the added efficacy of the whole cell vaccines outweighs their toxicity will depend on the setting in which vaccination is used. PMID:9462316

  7. Comparative study on toxicity evaluation of anaerobically treated parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater through fish bioassay.

    PubMed

    Giri, Dipti Ramesh; Singh, Ekta; Satyanarayan, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Short term aquatic bioassay has been developed into a useful tool in water quality management. These tests give information on comparative toxicity of several compounds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of raw and anaerobically treated effluents of the parboiled rice manufacturing industry. The acute toxicity test was carried out by using the fish Lebistes reticulatus under laboratory conditions. LC50 values for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours ranged between 4.6 and 7.0% for the raw parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater. Two anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactors and two different media matrices, i.e. UV stabilized Biopac media and Fugino spirals, were used for the treatment of parboiled rice mill wastewater. Effluents from these two reactors depicted LC50 values in the range of 68-88% and 62-78% for Biopac and Fugino spiral packed reactors, respectively. From the results, it is evident that anaerobically treated effluents from Biopac packed reactor is marginally better than Fugino spiral packed reactor. Results subjected to statistical evaluation depicted regression coefficient of more than 0.9 indicating good correlation between the mortality and effluent concentration.

  8. Fourteen-Week Toxicity Study of Green Tea Extract in Rats and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Po C.; Ramot, Yuval; Malarkey, David E.; Blackshear, Pamela; Kissling, Grace E.; Travlos, Greg; Nyska, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of green tea extract (GTE) was evaluated in 14-week gavage studies in male and female F344/NTac rats and B6C3F1 mice at doses up to 1,000 mg/kg. In the rats, no treatment-related mortality was noted. In the mice, treatment-related mortality occurred in male and female mice in the 1,000 mg/kg dose groups. The cause of early deaths was likely related to liver necrosis. Treatment-related histopathological changes were seen in both species in the liver, nose, mesenteric lymph nodes, and thymus. In addition, in mice, changes were seen in the Peyer’s patches, spleen, and mandibular lymph nodes. The no adverse effect level (NOAEL) for the liver in both species was 500 mg/kg. In the nose of rats, the NOAEL in males was 62.5 mg/kg, and in females no NOAEL was found. No NOAEL was found in the nose of female or male mice. The changes in the liver and nose were considered primary toxic effects of GTE, while the changes in other organs were considered to be secondary effects. The nose and liver are organs with high metabolic enzyme activity. The increased susceptibility of the nose and liver suggests a role for GTE metabolites in toxicity induction. PMID:20884815

  9. [Studies on toxicity of four kinds of heavy metals in water by synchronous-scan fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Bo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Nan-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Yin, Gao-Fang; Fang, Li; Liu, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Spectrofluorometry of chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied by three dimensional excitation-emission (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy with Delta gamma = 20 nm in the stress of Hg+, Cd2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The conclusion from two kinds of Spectrofluorometry was the same: after 96h stress by heavy metals, the maximum fluorescence values reduced obviously, chlorophyll-a and chlorophyll-b in the photosynthetic system were seriously damaged by heavy metal. Further analysis of the correlations between heavy metal concentration and fluorescence quenching efficiency I0/I can conclude that the toxicity of heavy metal and the fluorescence quenching efficiency I0/I were positively correlated, and they all increased with the heavy metal concentration and stress time. For one kind of heavy metals, synchronous scan fluorometry is a sensitive method for its toxicity assessment. Compared to 3DEEM fluorescence spectroscopy, synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy is less time consuming and of higher selectivity. It is suitable to assess the toxicity of pollutions in water.

  10. Single dose toxicity study of IRDye 800CW in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Milton V.; Draney, Daniel; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Olive, D. Michael

    2010-02-01

    Fluorophore-labeled contrast imaging agents are moving toward clinical use as aids in nodal staging and intraoperative resection of tumors. Near-infrared fluorophores with defined toxicity properties will be needed before these agents can be translated to the clinic. The near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW is frequently used in its N-hydroxysuccinamide (NHS) ester form for labeling these agents. Following conjugation or breakdown of a labeled ligand, excess NHS ester is converted to the carboxylate form. We report here the results of a preliminary toxicity study on IRDye 800CW carboxylate in preparation for its use as a labeling moiety for targeted contrast agents. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intravenous or intradermal administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate; indocyanine green was used as a comparative control. Following administration of varying doses of either the dyes or saline, animals were observed for up to fourteen days during which time, hematological, clinical chemistry, enzymological, and histological testing was performed on animal subgroups. Under the conditions tested, a single administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate intravenously at dose levels of 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg intradermally produced no pathological evidence of toxicity. A dose of 20 mg/kg was identified as the NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) following IV or ID routes of administration of IRDye 800CW.

  11. Clinicopathological Studies on Vitamin D(3) Toxicity and Therapeutic Evaluation of Aloe vera in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Sambhaji G; Brar, R S; Banga, H S; Sandhu, H S; Sodhi, S; Gadhave, P D; Kothule, V R; Kammon, A M

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the clinical signs, hematological, biochemical and histopathological changes in vitamin D(3) toxicity at a dose rate 2 mg/kg b.wt. of vitamin D(3) and to assess the protective effect of Aloe vera in vitamin D(3) toxicity. The clinical signs observed were anorexia, progressive weight loss, difficulty in movement and respiration, diarrhea, epistaxis, subnormal body temperature and nervous signs before death. Mortality was observed in treated rats between day 10 and day 19 of treatment. The gross postmortem changes observed were severe emaciation, white chalky deposits on epicardial surface of heart, pin point white deposits on cortical surface of kidneys with pale yellow discoloration and diffused white deposits on serosal surface of stomach and intestine with bloody ingesta in lumen. The hematological changes included non-significant increase in hemoglobin and total leukocyte count and significant increase in relative neutrophil count. The biochemical changes observed were significant increase in plasma concentration of calcium, phosphorus and blood urea nitrogen, whereas a significant decrease in the concentration of albumin and total plasma protein was observed. The histopathological lesions included calcification of various organs, viz., tongue, stomach, intestines, kidney, heart, aorta, larynx, trachea, lungs, spleen, choroid plexus arteries of brain and vas deferens. The Aloe vera juice (2.5% in drinking water) has no protective effect on vitamin D(3) toxicity (2 mg/kg b.wt.). PMID:21430919

  12. Comparative study on toxicity evaluation of anaerobically treated parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater through fish bioassay.

    PubMed

    Giri, Dipti Ramesh; Singh, Ekta; Satyanarayan, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Short term aquatic bioassay has been developed into a useful tool in water quality management. These tests give information on comparative toxicity of several compounds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of raw and anaerobically treated effluents of the parboiled rice manufacturing industry. The acute toxicity test was carried out by using the fish Lebistes reticulatus under laboratory conditions. LC50 values for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours ranged between 4.6 and 7.0% for the raw parboiled rice manufacturing wastewater. Two anaerobic fixed film fixed bed reactors and two different media matrices, i.e. UV stabilized Biopac media and Fugino spirals, were used for the treatment of parboiled rice mill wastewater. Effluents from these two reactors depicted LC50 values in the range of 68-88% and 62-78% for Biopac and Fugino spiral packed reactors, respectively. From the results, it is evident that anaerobically treated effluents from Biopac packed reactor is marginally better than Fugino spiral packed reactor. Results subjected to statistical evaluation depicted regression coefficient of more than 0.9 indicating good correlation between the mortality and effluent concentration. PMID:27120636

  13. Comprehensive toxicity study of safrole using a medium-term animal model with gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, M; Kijima, A; Suzuki, Y; Hibi, D; Inoue, T; Ishii, Y; Nohmi, T; Nishikawa, A; Ogawa, K; Umemura, T

    2011-12-18

    In order to investigate a medium-term animal model using reporter gene transgenic rodents in which general toxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are evaluated, F344 gpt delta rats were given a diet containing 0.1% and 0.5% (a carcinogenic dose) safrole for 13 weeks. Serum biochemistry and histopathological examinations revealed overt hepatotoxicity of safrole, in line with previous reports. In the current study, safrole treatment possibly resulted in renal toxicity in male rats. In the in vivo mutation assays, an increase or a tendency to increase of the gpt mutant frequencies (MFs) was observed in both sexes at the carcinogenic dose. The number and area of foci of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive hepatocytes, ratio of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive hepatocytes and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in liver DNA were significantly increased in both sexes of the 0.5% group. The overall data suggested that the present model might be a promising candidate for investigating comprehensive toxicities of the agents. In addition, data demonstrating the base modification and cell proliferation due to exposure to safrole could contribute to understanding safrole-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, which imply expanding in application of this model.

  14. Clinicopathological Studies on Vitamin D(3) Toxicity and Therapeutic Evaluation of Aloe vera in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chavhan, Sambhaji G; Brar, R S; Banga, H S; Sandhu, H S; Sodhi, S; Gadhave, P D; Kothule, V R; Kammon, A M

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the clinical signs, hematological, biochemical and histopathological changes in vitamin D(3) toxicity at a dose rate 2 mg/kg b.wt. of vitamin D(3) and to assess the protective effect of Aloe vera in vitamin D(3) toxicity. The clinical signs observed were anorexia, progressive weight loss, difficulty in movement and respiration, diarrhea, epistaxis, subnormal body temperature and nervous signs before death. Mortality was observed in treated rats between day 10 and day 19 of treatment. The gross postmortem changes observed were severe emaciation, white chalky deposits on epicardial surface of heart, pin point white deposits on cortical surface of kidneys with pale yellow discoloration and diffused white deposits on serosal surface of stomach and intestine with bloody ingesta in lumen. The hematological changes included non-significant increase in hemoglobin and total leukocyte count and significant increase in relative neutrophil count. The biochemical changes observed were significant increase in plasma concentration of calcium, phosphorus and blood urea nitrogen, whereas a significant decrease in the concentration of albumin and total plasma protein was observed. The histopathological lesions included calcification of various organs, viz., tongue, stomach, intestines, kidney, heart, aorta, larynx, trachea, lungs, spleen, choroid plexus arteries of brain and vas deferens. The Aloe vera juice (2.5% in drinking water) has no protective effect on vitamin D(3) toxicity (2 mg/kg b.wt.).

  15. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

  16. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of April 14-21, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Poplar Creek Mile 4.3, Poplar Creek Mile 5.1, and Poplar Creek Mile 6.0 on April 13, 15, and 18. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to daphnids in undiluted samples; however, toxicity to fathead minnows (significantly reduced survival) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Daphnid reproduction was significantly less than controls in 50 percent dilutions of samples from Poplar Creek Miles 4.3 and 6.0, while no toxicity to fathead minnows was shown in diluted (50 percent) samples.

  17. Lifetime toxicity/carcinogenicity studies of FD & C red no. 40 (allura red) in mice.

    PubMed

    Borzelleca, J F; Olson, J W; Reno, F E

    1991-05-01

    FD & C Red No. 40 (allura red) was fed to Charles River HaM/ICR (CD-1) (study A) and CD-1 outbred (study B) mice as a dietary admixture in two separate lifetime toxicity/carcinogenicity studies. Each study included an in utero exposure phase during which the colouring was fed at dietary concentrations of 0.0, 0.37, 1.39 or 5.19% throughout the mating, gestation and lactation periods. After random selection, the lifetime exposure phase was initiated using the same dietary concentrations with 50 mice/sex/group in study A and 100 mice/sex/group in study B. Exposure was for 104 wk in study A and 109 wk in study B. No compound-related adverse effects were observed. The no-observable-adverse-effect level in these studies was 5.19%; approximately 7300 and 8300 mg/kg body weight/day for male and female mice, respectively.

  18. Interaction between Ammonium Toxicity and Green Tide Development Over Seagrass Meadows: A Laboratory Study.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Marín, Francisco; Vergara, Juan J; Pérez-Llorens, J Lucas; Pedersen, Morten F; Brun, Fernando G

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication affects seagrasses negatively by increasing light attenuation through stimulation of biomass of fast-growing, bloom-forming algae and because high concentrations of ammonium in the water can be toxic to higher plants. We hypothesized nevertheless, that moderate amounts of nitrophilic macroalgae that coexists with seagrasses under eutrophic conditions, can alleviate the harmful effects of eutrophication on seagrasses by reducing ammonium concentrations in the seawater to non-toxic levels because such algae have a very large capacity to take up inorganic nutrients. We studied therefore how combinations of different ammonium concentrations (0, 25 and 50 μM) and different standing stocks of macroalgae (i.e. 0, 1 and 6 layers of Ulva sp.) affected survival, growth and net production of the seagrass Zostera noltei. In the absence of Ulva sp., increasing ammonium concentrations had a negative influence on the performance of Z. noltei. The presence of Ulva sp. without ammonium supply had a similar, but slightly smaller, negative effect on seagrass fitness due to light attenuation. When ammonium enrichment was combined with presence of Ulva sp., Ulva sp. ameliorated some of negative effects caused by high ammonium availability although Ulva sp. lowered the availability of light. Benthic microalgae, which increased in biomass during the experiment, seemed to play a similar role as Ulva sp.--they contributed to remove ammonium from the water, and thus, aided to keep the ammonium concentrations experienced by Z. noltei at relatively non-toxic levels. Our findings show that moderate amounts of drift macroalgae, eventually combined with increasing stocks of benthic microalgae, may aid seagrasses to alleviate toxic effects of ammonium under eutrophic conditions, which highlights the importance of high functional diversity for ecosystem resistance to anthropogenic disturbance.

  19. Interaction between Ammonium Toxicity and Green Tide Development Over Seagrass Meadows: A Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Marín, Francisco; Vergara, Juan J.; Pérez-Llorens, J. Lucas; Pedersen, Morten F.; Brun, Fernando G.

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication affects seagrasses negatively by increasing light attenuation through stimulation of biomass of fast-growing, bloom-forming algae and because high concentrations of ammonium in the water can be toxic to higher plants. We hypothesized nevertheless, that moderate amounts of nitrophilic macroalgae that coexists with seagrasses under eutrophic conditions, can alleviate the harmful effects of eutrophication on seagrasses by reducing ammonium concentrations in the seawater to non-toxic levels because such algae have a very large capacity to take up inorganic nutrients. We studied therefore how combinations of different ammonium concentrations (0, 25 and 50 μM) and different standing stocks of macroalgae (i.e. 0, 1 and 6 layers of Ulva sp.) affected survival, growth and net production of the seagrass Zostera noltei. In the absence of Ulva sp., increasing ammonium concentrations had a negative influence on the performance of Z. noltei. The presence of Ulva sp. without ammonium supply had a similar, but slightly smaller, negative effect on seagrass fitness due to light attenuation. When ammonium enrichment was combined with presence of Ulva sp., Ulva sp. ameliorated some of negative effects caused by high ammonium availability although Ulva sp. lowered the availability of light. Benthic microalgae, which increased in biomass during the experiment, seemed to play a similar role as Ulva sp.–they contributed to remove ammonium from the water, and thus, aided to keep the ammonium concentrations experienced by Z. noltei at relatively non-toxic levels. Our findings show that moderate amounts of drift macroalgae, eventually combined with increasing stocks of benthic microalgae, may aid seagrasses to alleviate toxic effects of ammonium under eutrophic conditions, which highlights the importance of high functional diversity for ecosystem resistance to anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27035662

  20. Interaction between Ammonium Toxicity and Green Tide Development Over Seagrass Meadows: A Laboratory Study.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Marín, Francisco; Vergara, Juan J; Pérez-Llorens, J Lucas; Pedersen, Morten F; Brun, Fernando G

    2016-01-01

    Eutrophication affects seagrasses negatively by increasing light attenuation through stimulation of biomass of fast-growing, bloom-forming algae and because high concentrations of ammonium in the water can be toxic to higher plants. We hypothesized nevertheless, that moderate amounts of nitrophilic macroalgae that coexists with seagrasses under eutrophic conditions, can alleviate the harmful effects of eutrophication on seagrasses by reducing ammonium concentrations in the seawater to non-toxic levels because such algae have a very large capacity to take up inorganic nutrients. We studied therefore how combinations of different ammonium concentrations (0, 25 and 50 μM) and different standing stocks of macroalgae (i.e. 0, 1 and 6 layers of Ulva sp.) affected survival, growth and net production of the seagrass Zostera noltei. In the absence of Ulva sp., increasing ammonium concentrations had a negative influence on the performance of Z. noltei. The presence of Ulva sp. without ammonium supply had a similar, but slightly smaller, negative effect on seagrass fitness due to light attenuation. When ammonium enrichment was combined with presence of Ulva sp., Ulva sp. ameliorated some of negative effects caused by high ammonium availability although Ulva sp. lowered the availability of light. Benthic microalgae, which increased in biomass during the experiment, seemed to play a similar role as Ulva sp.--they contributed to remove ammonium from the water, and thus, aided to keep the ammonium concentrations experienced by Z. noltei at relatively non-toxic levels. Our findings show that moderate amounts of drift macroalgae, eventually combined with increasing stocks of benthic microalgae, may aid seagrasses to alleviate toxic effects of ammonium under eutrophic conditions, which highlights the importance of high functional diversity for ecosystem resistance to anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27035662

  1. Prenatal and developmental toxicity study of meclizine and caffeine combination in female albino Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sandeep, M; Alvin, Jose M

    2014-12-01

    Meclizine and caffeine combination is used for the treatment of morning sickness. Both compounds are teratogenic and caffeine is known to possess anti-fertility activity also. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the reproductive toxic effect of meclizine and caffeine combination. Three doses were taken for the study; low dose (LD; meclizine 3.7 mg/kg and caffeine 3 mg/kg) was selected from commercially available formulation, middle dose (MD; meclizine 37 mg/kg and caffeine 30 mg/kg) and high dose (HD; meclizine 370 mg/kg and caffeine 300 mg/kg). The mixture was administered 1-7 days and 8-14 days for fertility and embryotoxic studies respectively. Laparotomy was done on 10t day of gestation period. Number of implants and corpora lutea were counted, pre and post-implantation losses were determined. In embryo toxicity study fetuses were evaluated for external, skeletal and visceral examination. High dose was removed from both fertility and embryotoxicity studies due to its severe toxicity to the dam. Significant anti-fertility activity was observed at middle dose. Embryotoxicity study showed significant reduction in fetal body weight, body length and body mass index, dam body weight gain on gestation day 14. Absolute kidney weight in MD and absolute and relative spleen weight in both LD and MD were significantly reduced. There was no increase in external or internal congenital anomalies at both LD and MD. The, results suggest that prescription of meclizine and caffeine for morning sickness in early pregnancy should be reviewed carefully. PMID:25651609

  2. Application of a novel integrated toxicity testing strategy incorporating "3R" principles of animal research to evaluate the safety of a new agrochemical sulfoxaflor.

    PubMed

    Terry, Claire; Rasoulpour, Reza J; Saghir, Shakil; Marty, Sue; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Billington, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Plant protection products (PPPs) and the active substance(s) contained within them are rigorously and comprehensively tested prior to registration to ensure that human health is not impacted by their use. In recent years, there has been a widespread drive to have more relevant testing strategies (e.g., ILSI/HESI-ACSA and new EU Directives), which also take account of animal welfare, including the 3R (replacement, refinement, and reduction) principles. The toxicity potential of one such new active substance, sulfoxaflor, a sulfoximine insecticide (CAS #946578-00-3), was evaluated utilizing innovative testing strategies comprising: (1) an integrated testing scheme to optimize information obtained from as few animals as possible (i.e., 3R principles) through modifications of standard protocols, such as enhanced palatability study design, to include molecular endpoints, additional neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity parameters in a subchronic toxicity study, and combining multiple test guidelines into one study protocol; (2) generation of toxicokinetic data across dose levels, sexes, study durations, species, strains and life stages, without using satellite animals, which was a first for PPP development, and (3) addition of prospective mode of action (MoA) endpoints within repeat dose toxicity studies as well as proactive inclusion of specific MoA studies as an integral part of the development program. These novel approaches to generate key data early in the safety evaluation program facilitated informed decision-making on the need for additional studies and contributed to a more relevant human health risk assessment. This supplement also contains papers which describe in more detail the approach taken to establish the MoA and human relevance framework related to toxicities elicited by sulfoxaflor in the mammalian toxicology studies: developmental toxicity in rats mediated via the fetal muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ( Ellis-Hutchings et al. 2014 ); liver

  3. On-site effluent toxicity studies at the Goodyear Atomic Corporation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrante, J.G.; Bean, D.J.

    1986-04-01

    Acute on-site, flow-through bioassays were conducted with effluents from outfalls 001 and 002 at the Goodyear Atomic facility in Piketon, Ohio. Data collected during this study indicate that the effluents were not toxic to the two species of fish (creek chub and fathead minnow) and one species of invertebrates (crayfish) used as test organisms. The only evidence of an adverse effect was observed in the response of Daphnia magna to effluent 001, which produced a ''ballooning'' effect in laboratory studies while dilution and laboratory water failed to elicit the same response.

  4. A chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity study of FD & C Yellow No. 5 (tartrazine) in mice.

    PubMed

    Borzelleca, J F; Hallagan, J B

    1988-03-01

    Charles River CD-1 mice were fed FD & C Yellow No. 5 in the diet at levels of 0.0, 0.0, 0.5, 1.5 or 5.0% in a long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity study. Each group consisted of 60 males and 60 females. Maximum exposure was 104 wk for both males and females. No consistent, significant compound-related adverse effects were noted. The no-observed-adverse effect level established in this study was 5.0% (8103 mg/kg/day and 9735 mg/kg/day for male and female mice, respectively.)

  5. Optimising the design of preliminary toxicity studies for pharmaceutical safety testing in the dog.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Combes, Robert; Depelchin, Olympe; Jacobsen, Soren Dyring; Hack, Ruediger; Luft, Joerg; Lammens, Lieve; von Landenberg, Friedrich; Phillips, Barry; Pfister, Rudolf; Rabemampianina, Yvon; Sparrow, Susan; Stark, Claudia; Stephan-Gueldner, Markus

    2005-03-01

    A working party, comprising two animal welfare organisations and some 12 pharmaceutical companies in Europe, was established to minimise the use of the dog in safety testing. As first step, the participants defined the major objectives of preliminary dose-range finding/MTD toxicity studies in non-rodents, defined the principles and requirements for this study type and agreed on a proposal for an optimised study design, based on collective experience of conducting such studies in industry, involving an evaluation of 100 individual study data sets. The suggested study design is explained and described, and reflects current best practice in the pharmaceutical industry in Europe. The implementation of such an optimised design is believed to result in a reduction in the overall numbers of animals used for this purpose, without jeopardising the scientific rationale and usefulness of the studies for informing the conduct of later regulatory studies.

  6. Application of short-term inhalation studies to assess the inhalation toxicity of nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A standard short-term inhalation study (STIS) was applied for hazard assessment of 13 metal oxide nanomaterials and micron-scale zinc oxide. Methods Rats were exposed to test material aerosols (ranging from 0.5 to 50 mg/m3) for five consecutive days with 14- or 21-day post-exposure observation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and histopathological sections of the entire respiratory tract were examined. Pulmonary deposition and clearance and test material translocation into extra-pulmonary organs were assessed. Results Inhaled nanomaterials were found in the lung, in alveolar macrophages, and in the draining lymph nodes. Polyacrylate-coated silica was also found in the spleen, and both zinc oxides elicited olfactory epithelium necrosis. None of the other nanomaterials was recorded in extra-pulmonary organs. Eight nanomaterials did not elicit pulmonary effects, and their no observed adverse effect concentrations (NOAECs) were at least 10 mg/m3. Five materials (coated nano-TiO2, both ZnO, both CeO2) evoked concentration-dependent transient pulmonary inflammation. Most effects were at least partially reversible during the post-exposure period. Based on the NOAECs that were derived from quantitative parameters, with BALF polymorphonuclear (PMN) neutrophil counts and total protein concentration being most sensitive, or from the severity of histopathological findings, the materials were ranked by increasing toxic potency into 3 grades: lower toxic potency: BaSO4; SiO2.acrylate (by local NOAEC); SiO2.PEG; SiO2.phosphate; SiO2.amino; nano-ZrO2; ZrO2.TODA; ZrO2.acrylate; medium toxic potency: SiO2.naked; higher toxic potency: coated nano-TiO2; nano-CeO2; Al-doped nano-CeO2; micron-scale ZnO; coated nano-ZnO (and SiO2.acrylate by systemic no observed effect concentration (NOEC)). Conclusion The STIS revealed the type of effects of 13 nanomaterials, and micron-scale ZnO, information on their toxic potency, and the location and reversibility of effects

  7. Coastal circulation and sediment dynamics in Hanalei Bay, Kaua'i, Hawaii, part III, studies of sediment toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Robert S.; Nipper, Marion; Field, Michael; Biedenbach, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Toxicity tests are commonly conducted as a measure of the bioavailability of toxic chemicals to biota in an environment. Chemical analyses alone are insufficient to determine whether contaminants pose a threat to biota. Porewater toxicity tests are extremely sensitive to a broad range of contaminants in marine environments and provide ecologically relevant data on sensitive life stages. The inclusion of porewater toxicity testing as an additional indicator of sediment quality provides a more comprehensive picture of contaminant effects in these sensitive habitats. In this study purple-spined sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development porewater toxicity tests were used to evaluate the sediments collected from the coastal environment around Hanalei Bay, Kaua’i, Hawaii. These tests have been used previously to assess the bioavailability of contaminants associated with sediments in the vicinity of coral reefs.

  8. A 13-week toxicity study of acrylamide administered in drinking water to hamsters.

    PubMed

    Imai, Toshio; Kitahashi, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is known to induce tumors in various organs/tissues in rats and mice. Epidemiological studies of oral exposure have generated controversial results but mortality studies of people who work with AA have indicated increased rates of pancreatic cancer. In the present study, for dose selection for chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity studies, 13-week toxicity of AA was evaluated in Syrian hamsters, which are sensitive to induction of pancreatic ductal carcinogenesis, at concentrations required to provide doses of 0 (control), 20, 30 and 50 mg kg(-1) body weight in drinking water. Treatment with AA caused abnormal gait advancing to hind limb paralysis in all males and females at 50 mg kg(-1). Body weights in 30 and 50 mg kg(-1) males and 50 mg kg(-1) females were lower than in the controls. At termination of the study, red blood cells (RBC) and hemoglobin (Hb) were decreased or showed a tendency for a decrease at 20 and 30 mg kg(-1) in females. Microscopically, axonal/myelin degeneration of sciatic nerves was observed in all AA-treated groups with dose dependence. No obvious changes were found in pancreatic ducts/ductules in any groups of animal. These results indicated the maximum tolerated dose for long-term studies of AA to be 20 mg kg(-1) or less in both male and female Syrian hamsters.

  9. Evaluation of acute and sub-acute toxicity of Pinus eldarica bark extract in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghadirkhomi, Akram; Safaeian, Leila; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Agha Ghazvini, Mohammad Reza; Rezaei, Parisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pinus eldarica (P. eldarica) is one of the most common pines in Iran which has various bioactive constituents and different uses in traditional medicine. Since there is no documented evidence for P. eldarica safety, the acute and sub-acute oral toxicities of hydroalcoholic extract of P. eldarica bark were investigated in male and female Wistar rats in this study. Materials and Methods: In the acute study, a single dose of extract (2000 mg/kg) was orally administered and animals were monitored for 7 days. In the sub-acute study, repeated doses (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg/day) of the extract were administered for 28 days and biochemical, hematological and histopathological parameters were evaluated. Results: Our results showed no sign of toxicity and no mortality after single or repeated administration of P. eldarica. The median lethal dose (LD50) of P. eldarica was determined to be higher than 2000 mg/kg. The mean body weight and most of the biochemical and hematological parameters showed normal levels. There were only significant decreases in serum triglyceride levels at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg of the extract in male rats (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and in monocyte counts at the highest dose of the extract in both male and female rats (p<0.05). Mild inflammation was also found in histological examination of kidney and liver tissues at the highest dose of extract. Conclusion: Oral administration of the hydroalcoholic extract of P. eldarica bark may be considered as relatively non-toxic particularly at the doses of 125 and 250 mg/kg. PMID:27761426

  10. 4-Phenylcyclohexene: 2-week inhalation toxicity and neurotoxicity studies in Swiss-Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Beekman, M J; Maurissen, J P; Johnson, K A

    1996-09-01

    4-Phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH) is a by-product formed during the polymerization of styrene-butadiene latex used in carpet backing. Limited reports suggest that exposure to very low levels of 4-PCH or other emission products following new carpet installation may result in health complaints. Significantly, it has been claimed that Swiss-Webster mice held in neck restraints and exposed head-only to approximately 0.4 ppm 4-PCH for a few hours suffered severe toxicity including death. A 2-wk inhalation and neurotoxicity study was therefore conducted in Swiss-Webster mice using standard methods of toxicity testing. Groups of 40 mice were exposed to 0, 7, 18 or 71 ppm (near-saturated atmosphere) 4-PCH vapour, 6 hr/day for 9 consecutive days. Data were collected on a wide variety of clinical, neurological and histopathological parameters including extensive neurohistopathology. All animals survived the exposures, and there were no treatment-related effects. Because of the occurrence of spontaneous lesions in two high-dose group mice, 40 additional males were exposed to 0 ppm or a near-saturated atmosphere of 4-PCH under the same exposure regimen. No treatment-related lesions were observed in the follow-up study, confirming the conclusions of the original study. These findings, consistent with the reported lack of toxicity of inhaled 4-PCH in rats, do not suggest a direct, organic, association between low-level 4-PCH exposure and human complaints. Further, the results of this study suggest that positive findings in mice may have been due to methodological problems and not to exposure to 4-PCH.

  11. Gold-magnetite nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates: Synthesis, properties and toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariti, Akshay

    This thesis study focuses on synthesizing and characterizing gold-magnetite optically active magnetic nanoparticle and its conjugation with biomolecules for biomedical applications, especially magnetic fluid hyperthermia treatment for cancerous tissue. Gold nanoparticles have already displayed their potential in the biomedical field. They exhibit excellent optical properties and possess strong surface chemistry which renders them suitable for various biomolecule attachments. Studies have showed gold nanoparticles to be a perfect biocompatible vector. However, clinical trials for gold mediated drug delivery and treatment studied in rat models identified some problems. Of these problems, the low retention time in bloodstream and inability to maneuver externally has been the consequential. To further enhance their potential applications and overcome the problems faced in using gold nanoparticles alone, many researchers have synthesized multifunctional magnetic materials with gold at one terminal. Magnetite, among the investigated magnetic materials is a promising and reliable candidate because of its high magnetic saturation moment and low toxicity. This thesis showcases a simple and facile one pot synthesis of gold-magnetite nanoparticles with an average particle size of 80 nm through hot injection method. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, TEM, Mossbauer spectroscopy, SQUID and MTS toxicity studies. The superparamagnetism of the as-synthesized nanoparticles has an interestingly high saturation magnetization moment and low toxicity than the literature values reported earlier. L-cysteine and (-)-EGCG (epigallacatechin-3-gallate) were attached to this multifunctional nanoparticles through the gold terminal and characterized to show the particles applicability through Raman, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  12. Study of toxicity and uptake of nanoparticles towards understanding biotic-abiotic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Karshak

    With the rapid growth in nanotechnology and tremendous applications the engineered nanomaterials (ENs) offer, there is increase in usage of ENs which increases their likelihood of coming in contact with biological systems which include complex beings like humans and other relatively simpler organism like bacteria and other microorganisms. The interaction between the nanomaterials (NMs) and biological systems includes the formation of protein coronas, particle wrapping, intracellular uptake and bio catalytic processes which could have biocompatible or bio adverse outcomes. Understanding these interactions allows the development of predictive relationships between structure and activity that are mainly determined by NM properties such as size, shape, surface chemistry, aggregation, and surface functionality among many others. This understanding will also provide insight towards the design and development of benign nanomaterials. The overarching goal of this dissertation is to understand the influence of the physicochemical characteristics of the NMs and their influence on their uptake and toxicity when they interact with the biological systems (cells and organs). For this purpose, thoroughly characterized NMs will be exposed to a cellular model, A549 cells (alveolar lung epithelial cells), and a mice model (CD-1 mice) through inhalational administration. The effects of NMs on the in vitro and in vivo models will be evaluated by bio- and immuno-chemical methods to understand toxicity, and a combination of analytical spectroscopic and microscopic tools to study uptake. In vivo toxicity assessment will also be performed by using electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements as a tool to study the effects of inhalation of NMs on cardiac response in mice. Through in vivo studies, a novel non-invasive method, Reserve of Refractoriness (RoR), will be introduced as a tool to study cardiotoxicity.

  13. Acute oral toxicity studies of Swietenia macrophylla seeds in Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Balijepalli, Madhu Katyayani; Suppaiah, Velan; Chin, An-me; Buru, Ayuba Sunday; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Pichika, Mallikarjuna Rao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Swietenia macrophylla King. (Meliaceae) seeds (SMS); commonly known as sky fruit and locally known in Malaysia as Tunjuk Langit; have been used in traditional Malay medicine for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension. The people eat only a tiny amount of raw seed, weighing not more than 5 mg. Aim: To evaluate the safety of Swietenia macrophylla seeds (SMS) at a single-dose oral administration of 2 g/kg body weight (bw) in sprague dawley (SD) rats. Materials and Methods: Eight-week old male and female SD rats were administered a single-oral dose of 2g/kg bw. The rats’ general behavior, and toxic signs were observed throughout the 14-day study period. The food and water intake by rats and their body weight were monitored during the study period. At the end of the study period, the relative weights of the organs (lung, liver, spleen, heart, kidney, testis, stomach); the hematological and biochemical parameters were measured; the architecture and histology of the organs (liver, kidney and lungs) were observed. Results: Oral administration of SMS to rats did not affect, either food or water intake; relative organ weight of vital organs; the hematological and biochemical parameters; did not show significant changes in the architecture and histology of vital organs. Overall, there were neither signs of toxicity nor deaths recorded during the study period. Conclusion: The rat dose of 2 g/kg bw is equivalent to the human dose of 325 mg/kg bw, which is well below the usual amount consumed by people, did not show any signs of toxicity in rats. PMID:25598633

  14. Toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2009-01-01

    Toxic neuropathies generally result in length dependent axonal neuropathy with the exception of diphtheria and a few toxic neuropathies. In spite of occurrence of diphtheria in India there is paucity of published reports on diphtheritic neuropathy. Arsenic neuropathy commonly occurs in Bengal and Bangladesh because of ground water contamination whereas in Punjab it is due to contamination of opium. Lead neuropathy is rare and has been reported in battery workers and silver refining workers. It produces motor neuropathy resulting in foot drop and wrist drop. Organophosphates are used as pesticides, industrial chemicals and food adulterant. Certain organophosphates such as triorthocresyl phosphate used for or oil adulteration inhibit neurotoxic esterase and result in a delayed type of axonal neuropathy. Alcohol related neuropathy is a controversial issue whether it is due to alcohol related toxicity or due to nutritional deficiencies. Indian studies have revealed that neuropathy occurs both in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Hexane neuropathy is reported in screen printers and these cases highlight the need for better preventive and occupational measures. Iatrogenic toxic neuropathies have been reported with cisplatin and vincristine. Because of geographical, occupational and health related conditions toxic neuropathies are likely to be more common than reported and greater awareness is needed.

  15. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity study of diaveridine in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Su, Shijia; Ihsan, Awais; Huang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Cheng, Guyue; Liu, Zhenli; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    Diaveridine, a developed dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor, has been widely used as anticoccidial drug and antibacterial synergist. However, few studies have been performed to investigate its toxicity. To provide detailed toxicity with a wide spectrum of doses for diaveridine, acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies were conducted. Calculated LD50 was 2330 mg/kg b.w. in females and 3100 mg/kg b.w. in males, and chromodacryorrhea was noted in some females before their death. In the sub-chronic study, diaveridine was fed to Wistar rats during 90 days at dietary levels of 0, 23, 230, 1150 and 2000 mg/kg, which were about 0, 2.0-2.3, 21.0-23.5, 115.2-126.9 and 212.4-217.9 mg/kg b.w., respectively. Significant decrease in body weights in both genders at 1150 and 2000 mg/kg groups and significant increases in relative weights of brain in both genders, liver in females, kidneys and testis in males, alkaline phosphatase and potassium in both genders at 2000 mg/kg diet were noted. Significant decrease in absolute weights of several organs, hemoglobin and red blood cell count in both genders, albumin and total protein in females were observed at 2000 mg/kg diet. Fibroblasts in the kidneys, cell swelling of the glomerular zone in the adrenals and inflammation in the liver were found at 2000 mg/kg group. The no-observed-adverse-effect level of diaveridine was 230 mg/kg diet (21.0-23.5 mg/kg b.w./day). PMID:26209270

  16. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity study of diaveridine in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Su, Shijia; Ihsan, Awais; Huang, Qin; Chen, Dongmei; Cheng, Guyue; Liu, Zhenli; Wang, Yulian; Yuan, Zonghui

    2015-10-01

    Diaveridine, a developed dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor, has been widely used as anticoccidial drug and antibacterial synergist. However, few studies have been performed to investigate its toxicity. To provide detailed toxicity with a wide spectrum of doses for diaveridine, acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies were conducted. Calculated LD50 was 2330 mg/kg b.w. in females and 3100 mg/kg b.w. in males, and chromodacryorrhea was noted in some females before their death. In the sub-chronic study, diaveridine was fed to Wistar rats during 90 days at dietary levels of 0, 23, 230, 1150 and 2000 mg/kg, which were about 0, 2.0-2.3, 21.0-23.5, 115.2-126.9 and 212.4-217.9 mg/kg b.w., respectively. Significant decrease in body weights in both genders at 1150 and 2000 mg/kg groups and significant increases in relative weights of brain in both genders, liver in females, kidneys and testis in males, alkaline phosphatase and potassium in both genders at 2000 mg/kg diet were noted. Significant decrease in absolute weights of several organs, hemoglobin and red blood cell count in both genders, albumin and total protein in females were observed at 2000 mg/kg diet. Fibroblasts in the kidneys, cell swelling of the glomerular zone in the adrenals and inflammation in the liver were found at 2000 mg/kg group. The no-observed-adverse-effect level of diaveridine was 230 mg/kg diet (21.0-23.5 mg/kg b.w./day).

  17. Studies with neuronal cells: From basic studies of mechanisms of neurotoxicity to the prediction of chemical toxicity.

    PubMed

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Fonfría, E; Galofré, M; García, D; Herrera, N; Iraola, S; Vendrell, I

    2008-08-01

    Neurotoxicology considers that chemicals perturb neurological functions by interfering with the structure or function of neural pathways, circuits and systems. Using in vitro methods for neurotoxicity studies should include evaluation of specific targets for the functionalism of the nervous system and general cellular targets. In this review we present the neuronal characteristics of primary cultures of cortical neurons and of cerebellar granule cells and their use in neurotoxicity studies. Primary cultures of cortical neurons are constituted by around 40% of GABAergic neurons, whereas primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells are mainly constituted by glutamatergic neurons. Both cultures express functional GABAA and ionotropic glutamate receptors. We present neurotoxicity studies performed in these cell cultures, where specific neural targets related to GABA and glutamate neurotransmission are evaluated. The effects of convulsant polychlorocycloalkane pesticides on the GABAA, glycine and NMDA receptors points to the GABAA receptor as the neural target that accounts for their in vivo acute toxicity, whereas NMDA disturbance might be relevant for long-term toxicity. Several compounds from a list of reference compounds, whose severe human poisoning result in convulsions, inhibited the GABAA receptor. We also present cell proteomic studies showing that the neurotoxic contaminant methylmercury affect mitochondrial proteins. We conclude that the in vitro assays that have been developed can be useful for their inclusion in an in vitro test battery to predict human toxicity.

  18. Safety assessment of lutein and zeaxanthin (Lutemax 2020): subchronic toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Ravikrishnan, R; Rusia, Shraddha; Ilamurugan, G; Salunkhe, Ulhas; Deshpande, Jayant; Shankaranarayanan, J; Shankaranarayana, M L; Soni, Madhu G

    2011-11-01

    Lutein and zeaxanthin, naturally occurring carotenoids, have shown to reduce the risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Lutemax 2020 is a lutein and zeaxanthin (including meso-isomer) enriched product obtained from Marigold flowers (Tagetes erecta L). The objective of the present study was to investigate adverse effects, if any, of Lutemax 2020 in acute and subchronic toxicity, and mutagenicity studies. In acute toxicity study in rats no lethality was noted at 2000 mg Lutemax 2020/kg body weight (bw). In the subchronic study, Wistar rats (10/sex/group) were administered (gavage) lutein/zeaxanthin concentrate at dose levels of 0, 4, 40 and 400mg/kg bw/day for 90-days. Compared with the control group, administration of lutein/zeaxanthin concentrate did not result in any toxicologically significant treatment-related changes in clinical observations, ophthalmic examinations, body weights, body weight gains, feed consumption, and organ weights. No toxicologically relevant findings were noted in urinalysis, hematology or clinical biochemistry parameters at the end of the treatment or recovery period. Terminal necropsy did not reveal any treatment-related gross or histopathology findings. The results of mutagenicity testing in Salmonella typhimurium did not reveal any genotoxicity. The no observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for lutein/zeaxanthin concentrate was determined as 400mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. PMID:21872637

  19. A system for reconstituting special water qualities for use in chronic toxicity studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, Steven J.; Faerber, Neil L.; Buhl, Kevin J.

    1989-01-01

    A water treatment system and procedure are described that are designed for preparing large quantities of reconstituted water with specific chemical and physical characteristics for use in chronic toxicity studies with fish and invertebrates. Water treatment units produce high-purity water in large quantities for storage in high-density cross-linked polyethylene tanks, where it is combined with various salts to reconstitute an appropriate experimental water quality that simulates potential environmental conditions for use as the test medium in an intermittent-flow proportional diluter. Several water quality characteristics for the source water and the receiving water, and respective flow rates must be considered when one calculates the chemical constituents that must be added to closely simulate the water in a potential environmental situation. The water treatment system and procedure have been used to produce four differently reconstituted experimental waters that were used in 60- to 90-day early life stage chronic toxicity studies with fish. Of the ten water quality characteristics measured in the experimental waters during the studies, eight had a coefficient of variation of <5%-indicating that the various physiochemical characteristics could be precisely reproduced throughout long-term exposure studies.

  20. The liver toxicity biomarker study: phase I design and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    McBurney, Robert N; Hines, Wade M; Von Tungeln, Linda S; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D; Moland, Carrie L; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James C; Chang, Ching-Wei; Chen, James J; Su, Zhenqiang; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Tong, Weida; Booth, Shelagh A; Balasubramanian, Raji; Courchesne, Paul L; Campbell, Jennifer M; Graber, Armin; Guo, Yu; Juhasz, Peter J; Li, Tricin Y; Lynch, Moira D; Morel, Nicole M; Plasterer, Thomas N; Takach, Edward J; Zeng, Chenhui; Beland, Frederick A

    2009-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the primary adverse event that results in withdrawal of drugs from the market and a frequent reason for the failure of drug candidates in development. The Liver Toxicity Biomarker Study (LTBS) is an innovative approach to investigate DILI because it compares molecular events produced in vivo by compound pairs that (a) are similar in structure and mechanism of action, (b) are associated with few or no signs of liver toxicity in preclinical studies, and (c) show marked differences in hepatotoxic potential. The LTBS is a collaborative preclinical research effort in molecular systems toxicology between the National Center for Toxicological Research and BG Medicine, Inc., and is supported by seven pharmaceutical companies and three technology providers. In phase I of the LTBS, entacapone and tolcapone were studied in rats to provide results and information that will form the foundation for the design and implementation of phase II. Molecular analysis of the rat liver and plasma samples combined with statistical analyses of the resulting datasets yielded marker analytes, illustrating the value of the broad-spectrum, molecular systems analysis approach to studying pharmacological or toxicological effects.

  1. Fire resistivity and toxicity studies of candidate aircraft passenger seat materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.; Trabold, E. L.; Spieth, H.

    1978-01-01

    Fire resistivity studies were conducted on a wide range of candidate nonmetallic materials being considered for the construction of improved fire resistant aircraft passenger seats. These materials were evaluated on the basis of FAA airworthiness burn and smoke generation tests, colorfastness, limiting oxygen index, and animal toxicity tests. Physical, mechanical, and aesthetic properties were also assessed. Candidate seat materials that have significantly improved thermal response to various thermal loads corresponding to reasonable fire threats as they relate to in-flight fire situations, are identified.

  2. Fire resistivity and toxicity studies of candidate aircraft passenger seat materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, L. L.; Trabold, E. L.; Spieth, H. H.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes fire resistivity studies of a wide range of candidate nonmetallic materials for the construction of improved fire resistant aircraft passenger seats. These materials were evaluated on the basis of FAA airworthiness burn and smoke generation tests, colorfastness, and animal toxicity tests. Physical, mechanical, and aesthetic properties were also included in the evaluations. Candidate seat materials that have significantly improved thermal response to various thermal loads corresponding to reasonable fire threats, as they relate to in-fight fire situations, are identified.

  3. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODEL FOR AIR TOXICS: A BENZENE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing a human exposure and dose model called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) to characterize population exposure to air toxics in support of the National Air ...

  4. In vitro studies of acute toxicity mechanisms and structure-activity relationships of nonionic surfactants in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Bodishbauah, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    In fish, gills are believed to be a primary target for a number of toxicants. Gills perform the essential systemic functions of gas exchange, waste elimination, and ion/pH balance, and are exposed to ambient environmental toxicant levels. Qualitative gill morphology changes are easily observed, but quantitative measures of impaired function are difficult. This in vitro technique utilizes the opercular epithelium of the mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, as a surrogate for gill epithelium in mechanistic toxicity and structure-activity studies. This model has long been used by electrophysiologists studying osmoregulation in marine fish. Effects on trans-epithelial potential (TEP) and/or short-circuit current (I{sub sc}) across the opercular epithelium can be made for any pollutant of interest, using an epithelial voltage clamp and Ussing chamber. The nonionic synthetic surfactant class, alkylphenol ethoxylates, were chosen as a model toxicant class to test this experimental model. Synthetic surfactants are ubiquitous waterborne pollutants, with annual North American usage approaching eight billion pounds. Surfactants are recognized as potent, acute gill toxicants in fish. The exact mechanism of toxicity has yet to be elucidated. These compounds proved to be potent inhibitors of both TEP and I{sub sc} in vitro, at dose levels comparable to those causing lethality, suggesting that impaired osmoregulation plays a role in their acute toxicity. Similar structure-activity relationships were found for the endpoints of acute lethality to F. heteroclitus and impaired in vitro epithelial transport.

  5. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van der Bij, Hendrik A; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. Firstly, PCIS were incubated with 0-200 μM diclofenac (DCF), one of the most intensively studied NSAIDs, to investigate whether they could correctly reflect the toxic mechanisms. DCF induced intestinal toxicity in PCIS was shown by morphological damage and ATP depletion. DCF induced endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial injury and oxidative stress were reflected by up-regulated HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) and BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene expression, caspase 9 activation, GSH (glutathione) depletion and HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) gene up-regulation respectively. Furthermore, DCF intestinal metabolites, which gave rise to protein adduct but not toxicity, were detected in PCIS. Secondly, PCIS were incubated with various concentrations of five NSAIDs. Typical NSAID-induced morphological changes were observed in PCIS. The ex vivo toxicity ranking (diflunisal> diclofenac = indomethacin > naproxen ≫ aspirin) showed good correlation with published in vitro and in vivo data, with diflunisal being the only exception. In conclusion, PCIS correctly reflect the various mechanisms of DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, and can serve as an ex vivo model for the prediction of NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. PMID:25014874

  6. Precision cut intestinal slices are an appropriate ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; van der Bij, Hendrik A; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2014-10-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used therapeutic agents, however, they are associated with a high prevalence of intestinal side effects. In this investigation, rat precision cut intestinal slices (PCIS) were evaluated as an ex vivo model to study NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity. Firstly, PCIS were incubated with 0-200 μM diclofenac (DCF), one of the most intensively studied NSAIDs, to investigate whether they could correctly reflect the toxic mechanisms. DCF induced intestinal toxicity in PCIS was shown by morphological damage and ATP depletion. DCF induced endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial injury and oxidative stress were reflected by up-regulated HSP-70 (heat shock protein 70) and BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene expression, caspase 9 activation, GSH (glutathione) depletion and HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) gene up-regulation respectively. Furthermore, DCF intestinal metabolites, which gave rise to protein adduct but not toxicity, were detected in PCIS. Secondly, PCIS were incubated with various concentrations of five NSAIDs. Typical NSAID-induced morphological changes were observed in PCIS. The ex vivo toxicity ranking (diflunisal> diclofenac = indomethacin > naproxen ≫ aspirin) showed good correlation with published in vitro and in vivo data, with diflunisal being the only exception. In conclusion, PCIS correctly reflect the various mechanisms of DCF-induced intestinal toxicity, and can serve as an ex vivo model for the prediction of NSAID-induced intestinal toxicity.

  7. Multigeneration reproductive and developmental toxicity study of bar gene inserted into genetically modified potato on rats.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Gyu Seek; Cho, Dae Hyun; Won, Yong Hyuck; Seok, Ji Hyun; Kim, Soon Sun; Kwack, Seung Jun; Lee, Rhee Da; Chae, Soo Yeong; Kim, Jae Woo; Lee, Byung Mu; Park, Kui Lea; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2005-12-10

    Each specific protein has an individual gene encoding it, and a foreign gene introduced to a plant can be used to synthesize a new protein. The identification of potential reproductive and developmental toxicity from novel proteins produced by genetically modified (GM) crops is a difficult task. A science-based risk assessment is needed in order to use GM crops as a conventional foodstuff. In this study, the specific characteristics of GM food and low-level chronic exposure were examined using a five-generation animal study. In each generation, rats were fed a solid pellet containing 5% GM potato and non-GM potato for 10 wk prior to mating in order to assess the potential reproductive and developmental toxic effects. In the multigeneration animal study, there were no GM potato-related changes in body weight, food consumption, reproductive performance, and organ weight. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out using extracted genomic DNA to examine the possibility of gene persistence in the organ tissues after a long-term exposure to low levels of GM feed. In each generation, the gene responsible for bar was not found in any of the reproductive organs of the GM potato-treated male and female rats, and the litter-related indexes did not show any genetically modified organism (GMO)-related changes. The results suggest that genetically modified crops have no adverse effects on the multigeneration reproductive-developmental ability.

  8. Safety of Excipients in Pediatric Formulations—A Call for Toxicity Studies in Juvenile Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The development of drug products for pediatric use often requires age-appropriate formulations which can be more complex and may involve a broader range of excipients than adult dosage forms. Excipients established for adult use are not always appropriate for use in children because they can affect children differently than adults. Therefore, a comprehensive safety assessment of the excipients in a pediatric formulation is essential before use, referring to existing safety data from adult human and animals as well as safety data from pediatric use and juvenile toxicity studies, when available. The overall risk assessment needs to consider the safety risk from the excipients and the extent to which the risk from the disease as such will be ameliorated by the drug formulation. Non-clinical safety studies in juvenile animals are used to assess for specific toxicities or sensitivities of excipients and for establishing safe exposures in pediatric age groups. As for any active ingredient, non-clinical safety studies in juvenile animals should only be performed for excipients if important for clinical risk assessment and labelling. Pharmaceutical companies should be critical of excessive demands for juvenile animal testing, particularly of excipients when critically needed for significant therapeutic benefit. PMID:27417358

  9. Novel approaches to the use of cytochrome P450 activities in wildlife toxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    VandenBerg, M.; Bosveld, A.T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Many wildlife toxicity studies, e.g. with avian species, use cytochrome P450 activities as markers for biological activities of environmental contaminants. It has been established that induction of CYP1A1 correlates with Ah-receptor mediated toxicity of dioxin-like compounds in many species. In addition, CYP1A1 plays a significant role in bioactivation of polycyclic aromatics. So far very few studies focused on the natural function of P450 isoenzymes in wildlife species. Besides classical hepatic CYP1A(1) associated activities, like EROD and AHH, several new techniques are available to study the activities of various CYP isoenzymes. Caffeine N-demethylation, testosterone and 17ss-estradiol hydroxylation patterns can provide new insights in the physiological function of P450 isoenzymes and the induction of the basal activities by chemicals. So far little interest was given to processes which occur after the DNA-receptor binding, e.g. changes in steroid hormone metabolism and pathways in environmental toxicology. This in spite of the fact that very subtle changes in steroid hormone levels may have significant physiological implications. This presentation will focus on some P450 activities, besides CYP1A(1), which might be important for development and reproduction. Some experimental approaches, limitations and techniques will be discussed which could lead to elucidation of the possible endocrine function of P450s.

  10. Multigeneration reproductive and developmental toxicity study of bar gene inserted into genetically modified potato on rats.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Gyu Seek; Cho, Dae Hyun; Won, Yong Hyuck; Seok, Ji Hyun; Kim, Soon Sun; Kwack, Seung Jun; Lee, Rhee Da; Chae, Soo Yeong; Kim, Jae Woo; Lee, Byung Mu; Park, Kui Lea; Choi, Kwang Sik

    2005-12-10

    Each specific protein has an individual gene encoding it, and a foreign gene introduced to a plant can be used to synthesize a new protein. The identification of potential reproductive and developmental toxicity from novel proteins produced by genetically modified (GM) crops is a difficult task. A science-based risk assessment is needed in order to use GM crops as a conventional foodstuff. In this study, the specific characteristics of GM food and low-level chronic exposure were examined using a five-generation animal study. In each generation, rats were fed a solid pellet containing 5% GM potato and non-GM potato for 10 wk prior to mating in order to assess the potential reproductive and developmental toxic effects. In the multigeneration animal study, there were no GM potato-related changes in body weight, food consumption, reproductive performance, and organ weight. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out using extracted genomic DNA to examine the possibility of gene persistence in the organ tissues after a long-term exposure to low levels of GM feed. In each generation, the gene responsible for bar was not found in any of the reproductive organs of the GM potato-treated male and female rats, and the litter-related indexes did not show any genetically modified organism (GMO)-related changes. The results suggest that genetically modified crops have no adverse effects on the multigeneration reproductive-developmental ability. PMID:16326439

  11. Safety assessment of dietary bamboo charcoal powder: a 90-day subchronic oral toxicity and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Zhenchao, Jia; Yuting, Zhong; Jiuming, Yan; Yedan, Lu; Yang, Song; Jinyao, Chen; Lishi, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Vegetable carbon has been used as food additive in EU (E153) and China for many years; however, no experimental data have been available on its dietary safety. This study was designed to evaluate the subchronic toxicity and genotoxicity of bamboo charcoal powder (BCP). In the study of subchronic oral toxicity, BCP was administered orally at doses of 2.81, 5.62, and 11.24 g/kg BW for 90 days to SD rats. Additional satellite groups from the control group and high dose group were observed for a 28-day recovery period. At the end of the treatment and recovery periods, animals were sacrificed, and their organs were weighed and blood samples were collected. The toxicological endpoints observed included clinical signs, food consumption, body and organ weights, hematological and biochemical parameters, macroscopic and microscopic examinations. The results showed no significant differences between the BCP treated groups and control group. The genotoxicity of BCP was assessed with the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and a combination of comet assay and mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus protocol. The results did not reveal any genotoxicity of BCP. Based on our study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for BCP is 11.24 g/kg BW/day.

  12. Brown coal derived humate inhibits contact hypersensitivity; An efficacy, toxicity and teratogenicity study in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rensburg, C.E.J.; Snyman, J.R.; Mokoele, T.; Cromarty, A.D.

    2007-10-15

    The effects of two humate products were compared to that of prednisolone on a contact hypersensitivity rat model. Rats, sensitized with dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB), were placed on a daily oral treatment of 61 mg/kg BW of humate derived from either leonardite or bituminous coal or on prednisolone at one mg/kg BW and challenged 6 days later with a topical application of DNFB to the right ear. The inflamed ears were measured daily. In a toxicity study rats were exposed to daily oral treatment of leonardite humate at 1,000 mg/kg BW for 1 month. A teratogenicity study was done where pregnant rats were treated with 500 mg/kg BW on days 5 to 17 of pregnancy. Only the leonardite humate compared favourably with prednisolone in suppressing contact hypersensitivity. No signs of toxicity were observed and weight gain was normal during the 6-day and 1 month treatments and during the teratogenicity study with the leonardite humate. However, the rats on the other two products experienced slower weight gain. The identification of a naturally occurring nontoxic compound with anti-inflammatory activity is exciting and merits further evaluation in the treatment of patients suffering from inflammatory conditions.

  13. A preliminary 13-week oral toxicity study of ginger oil in male and female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Jeena, Kottarapat; Liju, Vijayastelter B; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2011-12-01

    Zingiber officinale Roscoe, ginger, is a major spice extensively used in traditional medicine. The toxicity profile of ginger oil was studied by subchronic oral administration for 13 weeks at doses of 100, 250, and 500 mg/kg per day to 6 groups of Wistar rats (5/sex per dose). Separate groups of rats (5/sex per group) received either paraffin oil (vehicle) or were untreated and served as comparative control groups. There was no mortality and no decrease in body weight or food consumption as well as selective organ weights during the study period. Administration of ginger oil to rats did not produce any treatment-related changes in hematological parameters, hepatic, renal functions, serum electrolytes, or in histopathology of selected organs. The major component of ginger oil was found to be zingiberene (31.08%), and initial studies indicated the presence of zingiberene in the serum after oral dosing. These results confirmed that ginger oil is not toxic to male and female rats following subchronic oral administrations of up to 500 mg/kg per day (no observed adverse effect level [NOAEL]). PMID:21960667

  14. Toxicity studies in thymidine kinase-deficient herpes simplex virus therapy for malignant astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, W W; Tan, J; Redekop, G J; Goldie, J H

    1996-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that genetically engineered thymidine kinase (tk)-defective herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can effectively and selectively destroy gliomas in animal models. The consequences of viral infection and tumor regression must be characterized before this therapy can be applied in human trials. To study the potential for long-term toxicity, immunocompetent rats harboring 9L gliosarcomas were injected intratumorally with a tk-defective HSV-1, KOS-SB, at titers that previously have been demonstrated to cause tumor regression. In animals surviving 3 months or longer following viral treatment, there was no evidence of persistent infection or inflammation in peritumoral brain tissue or in remote systemic organs studied with routine histological and immunocytochemical analyses. Polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for HSV-1 detected HSV-1 DNA in peritumoral tissue only in animals sacrificed within 3 months of viral injection. There was no evidence of HSV-1 DNA in systemic tissues at any time after treatment. We conclude that stereotactic intratumoral injection of tk-deficient HSV can be attempted for the treatment of brain tumors without risk of systemic infection or significant toxicity to normal brain or remote proliferating tissues. PMID:8814171

  15. The study on long-term toxicity of d-psicose in rats.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kanako; Matsuo, Tatsuhiro

    2009-11-01

    D-Psicose is a rare sugar present in small quantities in natural products. In a previous study, we showed that D-psicose suppresses plasma glucose increases and reduces body fat accumulation in rats. Based on acute toxicity testing in rats, D-psicose is classified as an ordinary substance (LD(50) = 16 g/kg). Elucidating the effects of long term feeding of D-psicose in rats will be essential prior to its utilization as a physiologically functional food. In this study, male Wistar rats (3 weeks old) were fed diets containing 3% D-psicose or sucrose for 12-18 months. The rats actually ingested 1.28 g/kg body weight per day D-psicose or 1.22 g/kg body weight per day of sucrose. Body weight gain and intra-abdominal adipose tissue weight in rats fed the D-psicose diet for 18 months were significantly lower than those in rats fed the sucrose diet. Relative weights of liver and kidney were significantly higher in the D-psicose group than in the sucrose group. However, no gross pathological findings were evident at dietary doses of 3% D-psicose or correlated with hypertrophy of liver and kidney. No clinical chemical test value was suggestive of overt D-psicose treatment-related toxicity. Therefore, the present study found no adverse effects at 3% D-psicose in the diet.

  16. Oral two-generation reproduction toxicity study with NM-200 synthetic amorphous silica in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wolterbeek, André; Oosterwijk, Thies; Schneider, Steffen; Landsiedel, Robert; de Groot, Didima; van Ee, Renz; Wouters, Mariëlle; van de Sandt, Han

    2015-08-15

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) like NM-200 is used in a wide variety of technological applications and consumer products. Although SAS has been widely investigated the available reproductive toxicity studies are old and do not cover all requirements of current OECD Guidelines. As part of a CEFIC-LRI project, NM-200 was tested in a two-generation reproduction toxicity study according to OECD guideline 416. Male and female rats were treated by oral gavage with NM-200 at dose levels of 0, 100, 300 and 1000mg/kg bw/day for two generations. Body weight and food consumption were measured throughout the study. Reproductive and developmental parameters were measured and at sacrifice (reproductive) organs and tissues were sampled for histopathological analysis. Oral administration of NM-200 up to 1000mg/kg bw/day had no adverse effects on the reproductive performance of rats or on the growth and development of the offspring into adulthood for two consecutive generations. The NOAEL was 1000mg/kg body weight per day.

  17. Topical absorption and toxicity studies of jet fuel hydrocarbons in skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Faqir

    Kerosene-based fuels have been used for many decades. Over 2 million military and civilian personnel each year are occupationally exposed to various jet fuel mixtures. Dermatitis is one of the major health concerns associated with these exposures. In the past, separate absorption and toxicity studies have been conducted to find the etiology of such skin disorders. There was a need for integrated absorption and toxicity studies to define the causative constituents of jet fuel responsible for skin irritation. The focus of this thesis was to study the percutaneous absorption and to identify the hydrocarbons (HC) causing irritation in jet fuels so that preventive measures could be taken in the future. The initial study was conducted to understand the possible mechanism for additive interactions on hydrocarbon absorption/disposition in silastic, porcine skin and isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) models. The influence of JP-8 (100) additives (MDA, BHT, 8Q405) on the dermal kinetics of 14C-naphthalene and 14C/3H-dodecane as markers of HC absorption was evaluated. This study indicated that individual and combination of additives influenced marker disposition in different membranes. MDA was a significant suppressor while BHT was a significant enhancer of naphthalene absorption in IPPSF. The 8Q405 significantly reduced naphthalene content in dosed silastic and skin indicating a direct interaction between additive and marker HC. Similarly, the individual MDA and BHT significantly retained naphthalene in the stratum corneum of porcine skin, but the combination of both of these additives statistically decreased the marker retention in the stratum corneum suggesting a potential biological interaction. This study concluded that all components of a chemical mixture should be assessed since the effects of single components administered alone or as pairs may be confounded when all are present in the complete mixture. However, this study indicated that the marker HC

  18. Male reproductive toxicity of lead in animals and humans. ASCLEPIOS Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Apostoli, P.; Kiss, P.; Porru, S.; Bonde, J. P.; Vanhoorne, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To critically review the literature on male reproductive toxicity of lead in animals and humans. METHODS: A systematic literature search identified a total of 32 experimental studies in animals and 22 epidemiological studies, one case report on humans and five review articles or documents. The studies were evaluated by paying attention mainly to sample size, study design, exposure, and dose characterisation, analytical method standardisation, and quality assurance. RESULTS: Several studies on rats and other rodents indicated that blood lead concentrations > 30-40 micrograms/dl were associated with impairment of spermatogenesis and reduced concentrations of androgens. However, other animal studies, mainly about histopathological, spermatozoal, and hormonal end points, indicated that certain species and strains were quite resistant to the reproductive toxicity of lead and that different testicular lead concentrations could account for these differences. The human studies focused mainly on semen quality, endocrine function, and birth rates in occupationally exposed subjects, and showed that exposure to concentrations of inorganic lead > 40 micrograms/dl in blood impaired male reproductive function by reducing sperm count, volume, and density, or changing sperm motility and morphology. No relevant effects were detected on endocrine profile. CONCLUSION: Several factors make it difficult to extrapolate the animal data to the human situation. The difficulties are mainly due to differences between species in reproductive end points and to the level of exposure. Concentrations of blood lead > 40 micrograms/dl seemed to be associated with a decrease in sperm count, volume, motility, and morphological alterations and a possible modest effect on endocrine profile. Dose-response relation, in particular at a threshold level, is poorly understood, and site, mode, or mechanism of action are unknown. Also, the effects were not always the same or associated in the same on

  19. Comparative study of non-invasive methods for assessing Daphnia magna embryo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stensberg, Matthew C; Zeitchek, Michael Anthony; Inn, Kul; McLamore, Eric S; Porterfield, D Marshall; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2014-09-01

    Embryos, unlike adults, are typically sessile, which allows for an increase in the available metrics that can be used to assess chemical toxicity. We investigate Daphnia magna development rate and oxygen consumption as toxicity metrics and compare them to arrested embryo development using four different techniques with potassium cyanide (KCN) as a common toxicant. The EC50 (95 % CI) for arrested development was 2,535 (1,747-3,677) μg/L KCN. Using pixel intensity changes, recorded with difference imaging, we semi-quantitatively assessed a decrease in development rate at 200 μg/L KCN, threefold lower than the arrested development lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC). Respirometry and self-referencing (SR) microsensors were two unique techniques used to assess oxygen consumption. Using respirometry, an increase in oxygen consumption was found in the 5 μg/L KCN treatment and a decrease for 148 μg/L, but no change was found for the 78 μg/L KCN treatment. Whereas, with SR microsensors, we were able to detect significant changes in oxygen consumption for all three treatments: 5, 78, and 148 μg/L KCN. While SR offered the highest sensitivity, the respirometry platform developed for this study was much easier to use to measure the same endpoint. Oxygen consumption may be subject to change during the development process, meaning consumption assessment techniques may only be useful only for short-term experiments. Development rate was a more sensitive endpoint though was only reliable four of the six embryonic developmental stages examined. Despite being the least sensitive endpoint, arrested embryo development was the only technique capable of assessing the embryos throughout all developmental stages. In conclusion, each metric has advantages and limitations, but because all are non-invasive, it is possible to use any combination of the three. PMID:24888613

  20. Mucosal toxicity studies of a gel formulation of native pokeweed antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Osmond J; Waurzyniak, Barbara; Uckun, Fatih M

    2004-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a 29-kDa plant-derived protein isolated from Phytolacca americana, is a promising nonspermicidal broad-spectrum antiviral microbicide. This study evaluated the mucosal toxicity potential of native PAP in the in vivo rabbit vaginal irritation model as well as the in vitro reconstituted human vaginal epithelial tissue model. Twenty-two New Zealand white rabbits in 4 subgroups were exposed intravaginally to a gel with and without 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0% native PAP for 10 consecutive days. The dose of PAP used represented nearly 200- to 20,000 times its in vitro anti-HIV IC50 value. Animals were euthanized on day 11 and vaginal tissues were evaluated for histologic and immunohistochemical evidence of mucosal toxicity, cellular inflammation, and hyperplasia. Blood was analyzed for changes in hematology and clinical chemistry profiles. Reconstituted human vaginal epithelial tissue grown on membrane filters was exposed to 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0% native PAP in medium or topically via a gel for 24 hours and tissue damage was evaluated by histological assessment. In the in vivo rabbit vaginal irritation model, half of all PAP-treated rabbits (8/16) exhibited an acceptable range of vaginal mucosal irritation (total score <8 out of a possible 16), whereas nearly a third of PAP-treated rabbits (5/16) developed moderate to marked vaginal mucosal irritation (total score >11). However, no treatment-related adverse effects were seen in hematological or clinical chemistry measurements. Furthermore, in vitro exposure of a 3-dimensional human vaginal tissue grown on polycarbonate membrane filters to identical concentrations of PAP either added to culture medium or applied topically via gel formulation did not result in direct toxicity as determined by histologic evaluation. These findings indicate careful monitoring of vaginal irritation will be required in the clinical development of PAP as a nonspermicidal microbicide.

  1. Subchronic toxicity study of water pepper extract in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, Keiko; Shibutani, Makoto; Inoue, Kaoru; Lee, Kyoung-Youl; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Hirose, Masao

    2006-08-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of water pepper extract (WPE) from Polygonum hydropiper L. was conducted in groups of 10 male and 10 female F344 rats fed powdered diets containing 0, 62.5, 250, 1000 or 4000 ppm concentrations for 13 weeks. Suppression of body weight gain due to decreased food consumption was observed in both sexes at 4000 ppm, and at autopsy, increase of relative weights was observed for the brain, liver, spleen, kidneys, and testes in these animals, suggestive of the reflection of the reduced body weights. At this dose, slight increases of blood urea nitrogen in both sexes and serum alanine aminotransferase, Na and Cl in females, were observed, suggestive of weak hepatic and renal toxicity, at least in females. The same females also exhibited slight decrease of red blood cells and haematocrit, slight increase of mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular haemoglobin, and minimal increase of splenic haemosiderin deposition, providing evidence of slight haemolytic anemia. On the other hand, enhanced accumulation of mast cells was observed in the mesenteric lymph nodes at 4000 ppm in males and 1000 and 4000 ppm in females. Considering the anti-anaphylactic properties of polygodial, a major constituent of WPE, the mast cell accumulation was concluded to be an adaptive change in response to the subchronic oral administration of WPE. Based on the present toxicity data, 1000 ppm was determined to be the no-observed-adverse-effect level, translating into 57.4 and 62.9 mg/kg/day for male and female rats, respectively.

  2. Genetically Defined Strains in Drug Development and Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Festing, Michael F W

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern about the poor quality and lack of repeatability of many pre-clinical experiments involving laboratory animals. According to one estimate as much as $28 billion is wasted annually in the USA alone in such studies. A decade ago the FDA's "Critical path" white paper noted that "The traditional tools used to assess product safety-animal toxicology and outcomes from human studies-have changed little over many decades and have largely not benefited from recent gains in scientific knowledge. The inability to better assess and predict product safety leads to failures during clinical development and, occasionally, after marketing." Repeat-dose 28-days and 90-days toxicity tests in rodents have been widely used as part of a strategy to assess the safety of drugs and chemicals but their repeatability and power to detect adverse effects have not been formally evaluated.The guidelines (OECD TG 407 and 408) for these tests specify the dose levels and number of animals per dose but do not specify the strain of animals which should be used. In practice, almost all the tests are done using genetically undefined "albino" rats or mice in which the genetic variation, a major cause of inter-individual and strain variability, is unknown and uncontrolled. This chapter suggests that a better strategy would be to use small numbers of animals of several genetically defined strains of mice or rats instead of the undefined animals used at present. Inbred strains are more stable providing more repeatable data than outbred stocks. Importantly their greater phenotypic uniformity should lead to more powerful and repeatable tests. Any observed strain differences would indicate genetic variation in response to the test substance, providing key data. We suggest that the FDA and other regulators and funding organizations should support research to evaluate this alternative. PMID:27150081

  3. Preclinical Studies Evaluating Subacute Toxicity and Therapeutic Efficacy of LQB-118 in Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Júnior, Edézio Ferreira; Martins, Thiago Martino; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene Marcuzzo; Marques, Paulo Roberto; Portari, Elyzabeth Avvad; Coelho, Marsen Garcia Pinto; Netto, Chaquip Daher; Costa, Paulo Roberto Ribeiro; Sabino, Katia Costa de Carvalho; Torres-Santos, Eduardo Caio

    2016-06-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the most severe form of leishmaniasis and is the second major cause of death by parasites, after malaria. The arsenal of drugs against leishmaniasis is small, and each has a disadvantage in terms of toxicity, efficacy, price, or treatment regimen. Our group has focused on studying new drug candidates as alternatives to current treatments. The pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 was designed and synthesized based on molecular hybridization, and it exhibited antiprotozoal and anti-leukemic cell line activities. Our previous work demonstrated that LQB-118 was an effective treatment for experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis. In this study, we observed that treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight/day LQB-118 orally inhibited the development of hepatosplenomegaly with a 99% reduction in parasite load. An in vivo toxicological analysis showed no change in the clinical, biochemical, or hematological parameters. Histologically, all of the analyzed organs were normal, with the exception of the liver, where focal points of necrosis with leukocytic infiltration were observed at treatment doses 5 times higher than the therapeutic dose; however, these changes were not accompanied by an increase in transaminases. Our findings indicate that LQB-118 is effective at treating different clinical forms of leishmaniasis and presents no relevant signs of toxicity at therapeutic doses; thus, this framework is demonstrated suitable for developing promising drug candidates for the oral treatment of leishmaniasis. PMID:27067332

  4. Reproductive toxicity of commercial PCB mixtures: LOAELs and NOAELs from animal studies.

    PubMed Central

    Golub, M S; Donald, J M; Reyes, J A

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the developmental/reproductive toxicity of commercial polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures in animals and reports on the "no-observable-adverse-effect levels" (NOAELs) and "lowest-observable-adverse-effect levels" (LOAELs) from these studies. Identification of the lowest effective doses for reproductive toxicity of PCB mixtures is difficult because a variety of reproductive and developmental effects have been reported in several species using different commercial mixtures. Factors to be considered include sensitivity of the end point, sensitivity of species, study quality, biological plausibility, and relevance to humans. End points affected at the lowest doses (sensitive end points) included postnatal growth, development, and function. Among species for whom sensitive end points have been evaluated, a LOAEL of 0.25 mg/kg/day was identified for rodents on the basis of developmental delays in growth and behavioral function, and a LOAEL of 0.008 mg/kg/day was identified for nonhuman primates based on postnatal skin hyperpigmentation. NOAELs were not identifiable for these sensitive end points because effects were reported at the lowest doses tested. PMID:1954934

  5. Inhibition of nicotine-induced toxicity by curcumin and curcumin analog: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, C; Menon, Venugopal P

    2004-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of curcumin and curcumin analog on blood oxidant-antioxidant status during nicotine-induced toxicity in male Wistar rats. Lung toxicity was induced by subcutaneous injection of nicotine at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg of body weight (5 days a week, for 22 weeks). The enhanced circulatory lipid peroxides in nicotine-treated rats was accompanied by a significant decrease in the levels of ascorbic acid, vitamin E, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. There was a reduction in the levels of zinc with an elevation of copper and ferritin in nicotine-treated rats. Administration of curcumin and curcumin analog significantly lowered the lipid peroxidation and enhanced the antioxidant status with modulation in the levels of zinc, copper, and ferritin. However, the effect was more significant in curcumin analog-treated rats than in curcumin-treated rats. The results of the present study suggest that curcumin and curcumin analog exert their protective effects by modulating the extent of lipid peroxidation and enhancing the antioxidant status. PMID:15671691

  6. Assessment of Antioxidant Potential and Acute Toxicity Studies of Whole Plant Extract of Pergularia Daemia (Forsk)

    PubMed Central

    Vaithiyanathan, Veluchamy; Mirunalini, Sankaran

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pergularia daemia (Asclepiadacea) is a fetid- smelling perennial herb growing well along the river bang and road sides of India. Naturally the plant has powerful antioxidants including polyphenols, flavanoids, steroids and terpenoids. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant potential and to determine the median lethal dose (LD50) of crude ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Pergularia daemia. The plant Pergularia daemia possess effective scavenging activity against 2, 2' azino bis (3 ethylbenzothiazoline 6 sulfonic acid (ABTS), nitric oxide and reducing power radicals at different concentrations (100, 200, 300, 400 & 500 µg/mL) of both extracts. Results: From the above in vitro assay we have exposed that the methanolic extract exert higher antioxidant activity at 400 µg/mL than ethyl acetate extract. Acute toxicity study revealed that the extracts showed no signs of toxicity upto a dose level of 2500 mg/kg b.wt. Conclusion: Thus our findings provide that both extracts of Pergularia daemia possess a strong antioxidant capacity and are relatively has high margin of safety. PMID:26862261

  7. Acute Toxicity Study of Zerumbone-Loaded Nanostructured Lipid Carrier on BALB/c Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Rasedee, Abdullah; Othman, Hemn Hassan; Chartrand, Max Stanley; Namvar, Farideh; Abdul Samad, Nozlena; Andas, Reena Joys; Ng, Kuan Beng; How, Chee Wun

    2014-01-01

    Zerumbone- (ZER-) loaded nanostructure lipid carrier (NLC) (ZER-NLC) prepared for its antileukemia effect in vitro was evaluated for its toxicological effects by observing changes in the liver, kidney, spleen, lung, heart, and brain tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow stem cells. The acute toxicity study for ZER-NLC was conducted by orally treating BALB/c mice with a single dose with either water, olive oil, ZER, NLC, or ZER-NLC for 14 days. The animals were observed for clinical and behavioral abnormalities, toxicological symptoms, feed consumption, and gross appearance. The liver, kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and brain tissues were assessed histologically. Total haemogram was counted by hemocytometry and microhematocrit reader. Bone marrow examination in terms of cellular morphology was done by Wright staining with bone marrow smear. Furthermore, serum biochemical parameters were determined spectrophotometrically. Grossly all treated mice, their investigated tissues, serum biochemical parameters, total haemogram, and bone marrow were normal. At oral doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg ZER-NLC there was no sign of toxicity or mortality in BALB/c mice. This study suggests that the 50% lethal dose (LD50) of ZER-NLC is higher than 200 mg/kg, thus, safe by oral administration. PMID:25276798

  8. The liver toxicity biomarker study phase I: markers for the effects of tolcapone or entacapone.

    PubMed

    McBurney, Robert N; Hines, Wade M; VonTungeln, Linda S; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D; Moland, Carrie L; Han, Tao; Fuscoe, James C; Chang, Ching-Wei; Chen, James J; Su, Zhenqiang; Fan, Xiao-hui; Tong, Weida; Booth, Shelagh A; Balasubramanian, Raji; Courchesne, Paul L; Campbell, Jennifer M; Graber, Armin; Guo, Yu; Juhasz, Peter; Li, Tricia Y; Lynch, Moira D; Morel, Nicole M; Plasterer, Thomas N; Takach, Edward J; Zeng, Chenhui; Beland, Frederick A

    2012-08-01

    The Liver Toxicity Biomarker Study is a systems toxicology approach to discover biomarkers that are indicative of a drug's potential to cause human idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. In phase I, the molecular effects in rat liver and blood plasma induced by tolcapone (a "toxic" drug) were compared with the molecular effects in the same tissues by dosing with entacapone (a "clean" drug, similar to tolcapone in chemical structure and primary pharmacological mechanism). Two durations of drug exposure, 3 and 28 days, were employed. Comprehensive molecular analysis of rat liver and plasma samples yielded marker analytes for various drug-vehicle or drug-drug comparisons. An important finding was that the marker analytes associated with tolcapone only partially overlapped with marker analytes associated with entacapone, despite the fact that both drugs have similar chemical structures and the same primary pharmacological mechanism of action. This result indicates that the molecular analyses employed in the study are detecting substantial "off-target" markers for the two drugs. An additional interesting finding was the modest overlap of the marker data sets for 3-day exposure and 28-day exposure, indicating that the molecular changes in liver and plasma caused by short- and long-term drug treatments do not share common characteristics.

  9. Regulatory acceptance and use of the Extended One Generation Reproductive Toxicity Study within Europe.

    PubMed

    Schiffelers, Marie-Jeanne W A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Bakker, Wieger E; Hendriksen, Coenraad F M; Krul, Cyrille

    2015-02-01

    The two-generation study (OECD TG 416) is the standard requirement within REACH to test reproductive toxicity effects of chemicals with production volumes >100 tonnes. This test is criticized in terms of scientific relevance and animal welfare. The Extended One Generation Reproductive Toxicity Study (EOGRTS), incorporated into the OECD test guidelines in 2011 (OECD TG 443) has the potential to replace TG 416, while using only one generation of rats and being more informative. However, its regulatory acceptance proved challenging. This article reconstructs the process of regulatory acceptance and use of the EOGRTS and describes drivers and barriers influencing the process. The findings derive from literature research and expert interviews. A distinction is made between three sub-stages; The stage of Formal Incorporation of the EOGRTS into OECD test guidelines was stimulated by retrospective analyses on the value of the second generation (F2), strong EOGRTS advocates, animal welfare concern and changing US and EU chemicals legislation; the stage of Actual Regulatory Acceptance within REACH was challenged by legal factors and ongoing scientific disputes, while the stage of Use by Industry is influenced by uncertainty of registrants about regulatory acceptance, high costs, the risk of false positives and the manageability of the EOGRTS.

  10. Acute Oral Toxicity and Histopathological Study of Combination of Endosulfan and Cypermethrin in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Jaya; Mohineesh; Ray, Ruma; Dogra, T. D.; Raina, Anupuma

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endosulfan, a neurotoxic organochlorine insecticide and cypermethrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control pests in domestic, industrial, and agricultural situations. Materials and Methods: The present study was carried out to investigate the acute oral toxicity, behavioral and histopathological changes of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin in albino rats. According to Miller and Tainter analysis method, at 48 h, LD50 value of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin (ratio 1:1) in rats was found to be 691.83 mg/kg bw by oral gavage. Results: When combination of both these pesticides was administered orally at concentration of 103.72 mg/kg bw, 172.95 mg/kg bw and 207.50 mg/kg bw, respectively, as a single dose, no significant changes in behavior of rats was observed, neither in dosed nor in control group of rats. Combination of endosulfan- and cypermethrin-treated rats showed mild histopathological changes in liver and kidney in group IV (207.50 mg/kg BW) as compared to the control. However, no significant changes were observed in brain and small intestine at either dose of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin with respect to control. Conclusion: Thus, the present study, first of its kind in India, demonstrated the oral toxicity, behavioral, and histo-architectual alterations after induction of combination of endosulfan and cypermethrin at acute doses in Wistar rats. PMID:23833440

  11. Integrating toxicity reduction strategies for materials and components into product design: a case study on utility meters.

    PubMed

    Lam, Carl W; Lim, Seong-Rin; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Shapiro, Andrew A; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Brock, Andrew; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-04-01

    Using RIO Tronics utility meter products as an industrial case study, the numeric Fraunhofer Toxic Potential Indicator (TPI) assessment tool is used to determine high impact materials with the aim of reducing the content of inherently toxic substances in these products. However, because product redesign with alternative materials affects entire components, overall component toxicity potential must also be explored. To achieve this, material TPI scores are aggregated into component TPI scores by 2 methods: 1) the Sum-Weighted Component TPI method, which considers the mass of materials in the component to assign an overall score, and 2) the Max Component TPI method, which scores the component with the highest impact material. With consideration of uncertainties from materials' toxicity information and mass estimates, key results from both scoring methods prioritized components that contain acrylonitrile-based polymers, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and stainless steel. Furthermore, an alternative materials assessment is carried out to identify less-toxic substitutes to meet cost and technical constraints. Substitute materials such as Al alloys for stainless steel and high-density polyethylene for PVC show promise for a combination of toxicity reduction and cost-effectiveness. The new screening methodology described can help product designers systematically benchmark toxicity potential in parallel to cost and functionality.

  12. Sediment quality assessment and Toxicity Identification Evaluation studies in Lavaca Bay, Texas -- An estuarine Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.; Hooten, R.; May, L.; Teas, T.

    1995-12-31

    A sediment quality assessment survey was conducted in the Lavaca Bay system which has been designated a Superfund site because of elevated concentrations of mercury and other contaminants (e.g., PAHs) in the sediments. Twenty-four stations were sampled in the initial survey. Sediment pore water was extracted pneumatically and the toxicity of the pore water determined using the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. Based on the results of the toxicity tests, aliquots of the toxic sediments were analyzed for metals, PAHs, and pesticides. Based on these results, several of the most toxic sites were resampled and a preliminary Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed with the pore water using the sea urchin fertilization test. Preliminary results indicated that the toxic components were removed by adsorption on a C-18 column but were not affected by EDTA additions and, therefore, the primary toxicants are hydrophobic in nature.

  13. [Studies on distribution, excretion and subacute toxicity of squalane in dogs].

    PubMed

    Kamimura, H; Koga, N; Oguri, K; Yoshimura, H; Inoue, H; Sato, K; Ohkubo, M

    1989-05-01

    In the previous papers, we demonstrated, by using rats, that squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) could stimulate the fecal excretion of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, which was regarded as the most important etiologic agent of yusho among PCB and PCDF congeners found in the causal rice oil. We also reported that, in rats, squalane was not essentially absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, and did not show any appreciable side effects during the 3-month treatment. In the present paper, we have investigated the distribution, excretion and subacute toxicity of squalane in beagle dogs. The fecal excretion of squalane accounted for about 83% of dose during the initial 2 days after administration at a single oral dose of 1,200 mg/kg to male dogs. On day 3, absorbed squalane was mostly distributed to the hair and the skin, and the concentrations in these tissues were decreased on day 6. These results suggested that most of squalane administered orally was not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, but a part was absorbed and excreted through the hair. In addition, squalane distributed into the liver was found to be eliminated rather slowly. A long-term (13-week) treatments with squalane orally at doses of 400 mg/kg/day or 1,200 mg/kg/day in male and female dogs, resulted also in accumulation of squalane in the liver at a level of about 3% (400 mg/kg) or about 6% (1,200 mg/kg) of the daily dose. This accumulation of squalane in the liver was highest among all the tissues. Nevertheless, no appreciable toxic signs were observed in the serum biochemical tests and the hepatic functional test for squalane groups. Therefore, squalane accumulating in the liver, did not seem to disturb the hepatic physiological functions. It was suggested also in a long-term treatment that the skin and the hair played the most important role in the elimination of squalane. In conclusion, the present studies on subacute toxicity tests suggested that squalane did not give any

  14. Thermal stress and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Johnstone, Andrew F M; Aydin, Cenk

    2014-07-01

    Elevating ambient temperature above thermoneutrality exacerbates toxicity of most air pollutants, insecticides, and other toxic chemicals. On the other hand, safety and toxicity testing of toxicants and drugs is usually performed in mice and rats maintained at sub-thermoneutral temperatures of ~22∘C. When exposed to chemical toxicants under these relatively cool conditions, rodents typically undergo a regulated hypothermic response, characterized by preference for cooler ambient temperatures and controlled reduction in core temperature. Reducing core temperature delays the clearance of most toxicants from the body; however, a mild hypothermia also improves recovery and survival from the toxicant. Raising ambient temperature to thermoneutrality and above increases the rate of clearance of the toxicant but also exacerbates toxicity. Furthermore, heat stress combined with work or exercise is likely to worsen toxicity. Body temperature of large mammals, including humans, does not decrease as much in response to exposure to a toxicant. However, heat stress can nonetheless worsen toxic outcome in humans through a variety of mechanisms. For example, heat-induced sweating and elevation in skin blood flow accelerates uptake of some insecticides. Epidemiological studies suggest that thermal stress may exacerbate the toxicity of airborne pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter. Overall, translating results of studies in rodents to that of humans is a formidable task attributed in part to the interspecies differences in thermoregulatory response to the toxicants and to thermal stress. PMID:24944028

  15. Study on toxicity of danshensu in beagle dogs after 3-month continuous intravenous infusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Guisheng; Gao, Yonglin; Li, Shenjun; Li, Chunmei; Zhu, Xiaoyin; Li, Min; Liu, Zhifeng

    2009-09-01

    Danshensu (3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) lactic acid), a natural phenolic acid, is isolated from root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, and is widely used as a traditional Chinese medicine for treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, toxicity of danshensu was evaluated in male and female dogs after 3-month continuous intravenous infusion. Beagle dogs were treated with danshensu at doses of 17, 50, and 150 mg/kg/day, and observed for 90 days followed by recovery periods. Measurements included clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, temperature, electro-cardiography (EGC), hematology, blood chemistry, urinalysis, gross necropsy, organ weight, and histopathology. No significant adverse effects on these parameters were observed. The only treatment-related finding was a hard knot at injection site observed in the 150 mg/kg group after 2-3 weeks continuous administration, and returned to normal after 3-4 days withdrawal. From these results, it might be concluded that danshensu did not produce any significant cumulative toxicity at the doses administered, as reflected by the various parameters investigated. PMID:19778246

  16. Determination of protein markers in human serum: Analysis of protein expression in toxic oil syndrome studies.

    PubMed

    Quero, Carmen; Colomé, Nuria; Prieto, Maria Rosario; Carrascal, Montserrat; Posada, Manuel; Gelpí, Emilio; Abian, Joaquin

    2004-02-01

    Toxic oil syndrome (TOS) is a disease that appeared in Spain in 1981. It affected more than 20 000 people and produced over 300 deaths in the first 2 years. In this paper, a prospective study on the differences in gene expression in sera between a control versus a TOS-affected population, both originally exposed to the toxic oil, is presented. Differential protein expression was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Several problems related with serum analysis by 2-DE were addressed in order to improve protein detection in the gel images. Three new commercial systems for albumin depletion were tested to optimize the detection of minor proteins that can be obscured by the presence of a few families of high abundance proteins (albumin, immunoglobulins). Other factors, such as the use of nonionic reductants or the presence of thiourea in the gels, were also tested. From these optimized images, a group of 329 major gel spots was located, matched and compared in serum samples. Thirty-five of these protein spots were found to be under- or overexpressed in TOS patients (> three-fold increase or decrease). Proteins in the differential spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight peptide map fingerprinting and database search. Several haptoglobin isoforms were found to be differentially expressed, showing expression phenotypes that could be related with TOS affection. Haptoglobin phenotypes have been previously reported to have important biological and clinical consequences and have been described as risk factors for several diseases.

  17. Effects of ethylene dibromide on hydra oligactis: parent and offspring toxicity study

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.A.; Adams, J.A.

    1988-04-01

    Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) has become increasingly prevalent in the environment due to its uses as soil, fruit, and grain fumigants, lead scavengers in petrol, and industrial solvent. Because of its increasing environmental prevalence and its proposed toxic effects of EDB on Hydras, parents (P1) which have been pre-exposed to an established sublethal concentration for 14 days. The effect of nonexposed offspring (F1/P2) taken from pre-exposed parents (P1) versus their untreated offspring (F2) will also be evaluated. This mortality study revealed that the LC50 of both parents and F1's shifted from 50 mg/L, to 106.25 mg/L and 118.75 mg/L respectively, which suggest that exposed Hydras possibly become more tolerant to EDB. In the F2 generation, after 48 and 72 hrs 10% mortality was observed in the 200 mg/L group, 30% at 250 mg/L and 20% at 300 mg/L which indicated that the resistance to EDB toxicity is inheritable. There is also a strong dose-response correlation between EDB concentration and mortality.

  18. A 90-day subchronic toxicity study of neem oil, a Azadirachta indica oil, in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Cao, M; Shi, D-X; Yin, Z-Q; Jia, R-Y; Wang, K-Y; Geng, Y; Wang, Y; Yao, X-P; Yang, Z-R; Zhao, J

    2013-09-01

    To determine the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of exposure and target organs of neem oil for establishing safety criteria for human exposure, the subchronic toxicity study with neem oil in mice was evaluated. The mice (10 per sex for each dose) was orally administered with neem oil with the doses of 0 (to serve as a control), 177, 533 and 1600 mg/kg/day for 90 days. After the treatment period, observation of reversibility or persistence of any toxic effects, mice were continuously fed without treatment for the following 30 days. During the two test periods, the serum biochemistry, organ weight and histopathology were examined. The results showed that the serum biochemistry and organ coefficient in experimental groups had no statistical difference compared with those of the control group. At the 90th day, the histopathological examinations showed that the 1600 mg/kg/day dose of neem oil had varying degrees of damage on each organ except heart, uterus and ovarian. After 30-day recovery, the degree of lesions to the tissues was lessened or even restored. The NOAEL of neem oil was 177 mg/kg/day for mice and the target organs of neem oil were determined to be testicle, liver and kidneys.

  19. Acute toxicity of heavy metals to Tetrahymena in an in vitro experiment and envelope damage study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian; Li, Xi; Lu, Yang; Wu, Chunyun; Fang, Tingting; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Chaocan; Liang, Wei

    2013-07-01

    The toxicity of Cr³⁺, Cu²⁺ and Cd²⁺ to Tetrahymena growth metabolism was studied by microcalorimetry at 28°C, and the growth constant (k), peak time (T) and generation times (T(G)) were calculated. The metal ion concentrations that resulted in 50% inhibition (IC₅₀) of population growth were obtained through the dynamic parameters. The results indicated that the order of toxicity was Cd²⁺> Cr³⁺> Cu²⁺. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry results suggested that the metal ions affected the permeability of the cell membrane. Observations of the Cd-exposed organisms by scanning electron microscopy revealed damage to the cell membrane in the form of an altered surface appearance. The cells suffered serious damage after sufficient acting time. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed that amide groups and PO₂⁻ of the phospholipid phospho-diester, both located in the hydrophobic end of the outer layer of the cell membrane, were most readily affected.

  20. Genetic toxicity studies of organic chemicals found as contaminants in spacecraft cabin atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Joseph, Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Astronauts can be exposed during spaceflight to organic chemical contaminants in the spacecraft cabin atmosphere. Toxic exposures may cause lesions in the cellular DNA which are subsequently expressed as sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE). Analysis of SCE is a sensitive short term assay techinque to detect and quantitate exposures to DNA damaging (mutagenic) substances. The increase in SCE incidence over baseline (control) levels is generally proportional to the concentration of the mutagen and to the duration of exposure. The BHK-21 baby hamster kidney cell line was the in vitro test system used. Test organics were added to the culture media for 18 hrs, in concentrations ranging from one to 20 ppm. Acetaldehyde and carbon disulfide were chosen for this study since they have occurred as atmospheric contaminants in many of the STS flights, and have been reported to have toxic and mutagenic effects in various test systems. Glutaraldehyde was chosen because few data are available on the mutagenicity of this common fixative, which is carried on STS flights for use in biological experiments. Acetaldehyde was a very strong inducer of SCE at concentrations of 2 ppm and above. Glutaraldehyde and carbon disulfide failed to induce SCE.

  1. Laboratory study of the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory study was used to evaluate the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Fourteen insecticides, one degradation product, and one synergist were spiked into organic-grade water and carried through toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Concentrations of each compound were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. During Phase I, the water sample was pumped through a C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with methanol. Dimethoate was not removed by the extraction, but remained in the rinsate. In contrast, permethrin was removed by the extraction, but was not recovered by the methanol elution, and 80 percent of the permethrin remained on the cartridge, teflon tubing, and glassware. Chlorpyrifos also was not recovered completely with the methanol elution (only 62 percent was recovered). The other insecticides were extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and recovered by elution with methanol (80 percent or greater). During Phase II, a new spiked water sample was extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with varying concentrations of methanol and water into different fractions. Each methanol:water fraction was analyzed for the added compounds. Most of the insecticides eluted in two fractions, with concentrations of 10 percent or greater. The largest number of insecticides eluted in the 75 percent methanol:water fraction.

  2. Prenatal developmental toxicity studies on diundecyl and ditridecyl phthalates in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Saillenfait, Anne-Marie; Gallissot, Frédéric; Sabaté, Jean-Philippe; Remy, Aurélie

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluates the developmental toxicity of two high molecular weight dialkyl phthalate esters, diundecyl phthalate (DUDP) and ditridecyl phthalate (DTDP). Sprague-Dawley rats were administered 0, 0.25, 0.50, or 1g/kg/day of DUDP or DTDP, by gavage, on gestation days 6-20. DUDP and DTDP had no adverse effects on maternal body weight and food consumption. The number of live fetuses, percent of post-implantation loss and of resorptions, fetal sex, and fetal body weights were not affected by either phthalate. There was no evidence of teratogenicity, whatever treatment. Small decreases in the anogenital distance of male fetuses were noted at 0.5 and 1g DUDP/kg/day. The incidence of fetuses with supernumerary lumbar ribs was significantly higher than control at 0.5 and 1g DUDP/kg/day. Thus, DTDP was not developmentally toxic up to 1g/kg/day and there were signs of DUDP-induced fetal effects at 0.5 and 1g/kg/day.

  3. 90-day dietary toxicity study with esterified propoxylated glycerol (EPG) in rats.

    PubMed

    Christian, Brian J; Bechtel, David H

    2014-12-01

    The subchronic (90-day) toxicity of a "core" version of EPG was assessed in rats. Crl:CD-1®(ICR)BR rats (70/sex) received diets containing a constant level of 5% EPG (w/w) or adjusted to deliver 0 (control), 0.5, 1, or 2g/kg of body weight/day (g/kg bw/day). Subsets of animals from each group (20/sex) were evaluated after 30 days (interim sacrifice); the remainder after 90 days. EPG intake at all dose levels was associated with lower mean liver vitamin E levels; liver vitamin A and serum vitamin D were also lower, but less consistently. Animals given 5% EPG had higher fecal output (males) and cholesterol (males and females) without corresponding changes in serum cholesterol. Urinary pH was also mildly lower in males given 5% EPG. However, detailed evaluation of general health and assessment of blood, organs and tissues showed no evidence that EPG administration compromised the nutritional requirements of the animals, caused a state of fat-soluble vitamin deficiency, or caused' toxicity to any organ system. Based on the results of this study, it was not possible to establish a no-observable-effect level (NOEL). The possible effect of EPG on vitamin levels in the absence of any clinical signs of deficiency was not considered "adverse" per se. As such, the 2g/kg and 5% EPG level were considered to represent a no-observable-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs). PMID:25497991

  4. A proteomics approach to the study of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nordvarg, Helena; Flensburg, John; Rönn, Ola; Ohman, Johan; Marouga, Rita; Lundgren, Bo; Haid, Daniel; Malmport, Eva; Goscinski, Jan; Hörnsten, Lena; Scigelova, Michaela; Bourin, Stephanie; Garberg, Per; Woffendin, Gary; Fenyö, David; Bergling, Hélène; Forsberg, Erik

    2004-12-01

    A proteomics approach was used to identify liver proteins that displayed altered levels in mice following treatment with a candidate drug. Samples from livers of mice treated with candidate drug or untreated were prepared, quantified, labeled with CyDye DIGE Fluors, and subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis. Following scanning and imaging of gels from three different isoelectric focusing intervals (3-10, 7-11, 6.2-7.5), automated spot handling was performed on a large number of gel spots including those found to differ more than 20% between the treated and untreated condition. Subsequently, differentially regulated proteins were subjected to a three-step approach of mass spectrometry using (a) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting, (b) post-source decay utilizing chemically assisted fragmentation, and (c) liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Using this approach we have so far resolved 121 differentially regulated proteins following treatment of mice with the candidate drug and identified 110 of these using mass spectrometry. Such data can potentially give improved molecular insight into the metabolism of drugs as well as the proteins involved in potential toxicity following the treatment. The differentially regulated proteins could be used as targets for metabolic studies or as markers for toxicity.

  5. A 90-day subchronic toxicity study of neem oil, a Azadirachta indica oil, in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Cao, M; Shi, D-X; Yin, Z-Q; Jia, R-Y; Wang, K-Y; Geng, Y; Wang, Y; Yao, X-P; Yang, Z-R; Zhao, J

    2013-09-01

    To determine the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of exposure and target organs of neem oil for establishing safety criteria for human exposure, the subchronic toxicity study with neem oil in mice was evaluated. The mice (10 per sex for each dose) was orally administered with neem oil with the doses of 0 (to serve as a control), 177, 533 and 1600 mg/kg/day for 90 days. After the treatment period, observation of reversibility or persistence of any toxic effects, mice were continuously fed without treatment for the following 30 days. During the two test periods, the serum biochemistry, organ weight and histopathology were examined. The results showed that the serum biochemistry and organ coefficient in experimental groups had no statistical difference compared with those of the control group. At the 90th day, the histopathological examinations showed that the 1600 mg/kg/day dose of neem oil had varying degrees of damage on each organ except heart, uterus and ovarian. After 30-day recovery, the degree of lesions to the tissues was lessened or even restored. The NOAEL of neem oil was 177 mg/kg/day for mice and the target organs of neem oil were determined to be testicle, liver and kidneys. PMID:23444337

  6. Toxicity study of the main alkaloids of Datura ferox in broilers.

    PubMed

    Kovatsis, A; Flaskos, J; Nikolaidis, E; Kotsaki-Kovatsi, V P; Papaioannou, N; Tsafaris, F

    1993-11-01

    Seeds of the weed Datura ferox are frequent contaminants of raw materials used for animal feed. These seeds produce various toxic effects and contain mainly the alkaloids scopolamine and hyoscyamine. In this 3-month toxicity study, a mixture of scopolamine and hyoscyamine (98:2) was incorporated at four total alkaloid levels (1.5, 15, 75 or 150 mg/kg feed) into a control diet fed to 100 broilers. Alkaloid feeding caused significant reductions in the body weight gain of birds, especially of those fed a dose of 150 mg alkaloid/kg feed. Growth-retarding effects, however, were transient, as no changes in body weight gain were noted after 52 days of alkaloid feeding. Alkaloid-treated broilers showed no significant differences from controls with respect to the cardiac rate and breathing frequency nor in relation to plasma aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities. In contrast, plasma leucine aminopeptidase activity was significantly reduced after 3 months in all alkaloid-fed birds. Autopsy and histological examination of tissues by light and electron microscopy revealed no pathological changes associated with alkaloid feeding. Broilers appeared generally healthy and behaved normally throughout. These data should be considered in the formulation of new, improved regulations defining the maximum allowable alkaloid content of D. ferox seeds contaminating raw materials destined for use as broiler feed. PMID:8258413

  7. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: The most extreme effect of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure. For example, a very high exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  8. Dose-response fallacy in human reproductive studies of toxic exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Selevan, S.G.; Lemasters, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    The manner in which exposure is defined can affect the findings of reproductive studies of toxic exposures. The individual end points potentially examined, such as fetal loss, subfertility, and congenital malformations observed at birth, are on a continuum by severity of effect: the most extreme effects of the three being infertility because no pregnancy is possible, and the least extreme, congenital malformations recognized at birth. End points observed at birth are survivors of a long and complex process. The process yielding one of these adverse end points may result from a number of factors, including level of exposure could result in early fetal loss, whereas a lower one might result in a congenital malformation observed at birth. If the probability of a less-severe end point falls due to increasing probability of more-severe end points with increasing exposure, then a nontraditional dose-response relationship may be observed in the study of one type of outcome.

  9. Studying the General Toxicity and Cumulative Properties of a Radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, N V; Churin, A A; Fomina, T I; Ermolaeva, L A; Vetoshkina, T V; Dubskaya, T Yu; Lamzina, T Yu; Fedorova, E P; Neupokoeva, O V; Skuridin, V S; Nesterov, E A; Larionova, L A; Chernov, V I

    2016-07-01

    We studied toxicity of a new Russian radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3. Tests for acute toxicity showed that this agent belongs to a class of moderate-toxicity substances and does not have cumulative properties. The evaluation of subchronic toxicity after subcutaneous injection of this product to rats (0.04, 0.2, and 0.4 ml/kg) and rabbits (0.02 and 0.2 ml/kg) for 7 days did not reveal changes in the general state, temperature, body weight, indices of the peripheral blood and bone marrow, functions of the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system, and morphological characteristics of the internal organs in animals. The drug does not produce a local irritant effect. PMID:27502539

  10. Sediment toxicity test results for the Urban Waters Study 2010, Bellingham Bay, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biedenbach, James M.

    2011-01-01

    The Washington Department of Ecology annually determines the quality of recently deposited sediments in Puget Sound as a part of Ecology's Urban Waters Initiative. The annual sediment quality studies use the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) approach, thus relying on measures of chemical contamination, toxicity, and benthic in-faunal effects (Chapman, 1990). Since 2002, the studies followed a rotating sampling scheme, each year sampling a different region of the greater Puget Sound Basin. During the annual studies, samples are collected in locations selected with a stratified-random design, patterned after the designs previously used in baseline surveys completed during 1997-1999 (Long and others, 2003; Wilson and Partridge, 2007). Sediment samples were collected by personnel from the Washington Department of Ecology, in June of 2010 and shipped to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratory in Corpus Christi, Texas (not shown), where the tests were performed. Sediment pore water was extracted with a pneumatic apparatus and was stored frozen. Just before testing, water-quality measurements were made and salinity adjusted, if necessary. Tests were performed on a dilution series of each sample consisting of 100-, 50-, and 25-percent pore-water concentrations. The specific objectives of this study were to: * Extract sediment pore water from a total of 30 sediment samples from the Bellingham Bay, Washington area within a day of receipt of the samples. * Measure water-quality parameters (salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, sulfide, and ammonia) of thawed pore-water samples before testing and adjust salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen, if necessary, to obtain optimal ranges for the test species. * Conduct the fertilization toxicity test with pore water using sea urchin (Stronylocentrotus purpuratus) (S. purpuratus) gametes. * Perform quality control assays with reference pore water, dilution blanks and a positive control dilution series with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS

  11. A 90 day chronic toxicity study of Nigerian herbal preparation DAS-77 in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The herbal preparation DAS-77, used for the treatment of various ailments in Nigeria, contains the milled bark of Mangifera indica L. and root of Carica papaya L. Toxicological assessment of the preparation was carried out in this study. Methods In the acute toxicity study, DAS-77 was administered to mice p.o. up to 20 g/kg in divided doses and i.p. at 250–3000 mg/kg. Mortality within 24 h was recorded. In the chronic toxicity study, rats were treated p.o. for 90 days at doses of 80, 400 (therapeutic dose, TD) and 2000 mg/kg. By 90 days, animals were sacrificed and blood samples collected for hematological and biochemical analysis. Organs were harvested for weight determination, antioxidants and histopathological assessments. Results DAS-77 did not produce any lethality administered p.o. up to 20 g/kg in divided doses but the i.p. LD50 was 1122.0 mg/kg. At TD, DAS-77 produced significant (p < 0.05) reductions in body weight, food intake and K+, and increases in ovary weight, neutrophils and HDL, which were reversible. Histopathological presentations were generally normal. Effects at the other doses were comparable to those at TD except for reversible increases in antioxidants in the liver, kidney and testes, and sperm abnormality, and reductions in liver enzymes, sperm motility and count. Conclusions Findings in this study revealed that DAS-77 is relatively safe with the potential for enhancing in vivo antioxidant activity. However, possibly reversible side-effects include electrolyte imbalance and sterility in males. PMID:22892317

  12. Pulmonary Toxicity Study of Lunar and Martian Dust Simulants Intratracheally Instilled in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.; Latch, John A.; Holian, A.; McCluskey, R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is contemplating sending humans to Mars and the Moon for further exploration. The properties of Hawaiian and Californian volcanic ashes allow them to be used to simulate Martian and lunar dusts, respectively. NASA laboratories use these dust simulants to test performance of hardware destined for Martian or lunar environments. Workers in these test facilities are exposed to low levels of these dusts. The present study was conducted to investigate the toxicity of these dust simulants. Particles of respirable-size ranges of lunar simulant (LS), Martian simulant (MS), TiO2 (negative control) and quartz (positive control) were each intratracheally instilled (saline as vehicle) to groups of 4 mice (C57BL, male, 2-3 month old) at a single treatment of 1 (Hi dose) or 0.1 (Lo dose) mg/mouse. The lungs were harvested at the end of 7 days or 90 days for histopathological examination. Lungs of the LS-Lo groups had no evidence of inflammation, edema or fibrosis. The LS-Hi-7d group had mild to moderate acute inflammation, and neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration; the LS-Hi-90d group showed signs of chronic inflammation and some fibrosis. Lungs of the MS-Lo-7d group revealed mild inflammation and neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltration; the MS-Lo-90d group showed mild fibrosis and particle-laden macrophages (PLM). Lungs of the MS-Hi-7d group demonstrated mild to moderate inflammation and large foci of PLM; the MS-Hi-90d group showed chronic mild to moderate inflammation and fibrosis. To mimic the effects of the oxidative and reactive properties of Martian soil surface, groups of mice were exposed to ozone (3 hour at 0.5 ppm) prior to MS dust instillation. Lung lesions in the MS group were more severe with the pretreatment. The results for the negative and positive controls were consistent with the known pulmonary toxicity of these compounds. The overall severity of toxic insults to the lungs were TiO2study, blood samples were

  13. Cassava starch fermentation wastewater: characterization and preliminary toxicological studies.

    PubMed

    Avancini, S R P; Faccin, G L; Vieira, M A; Rovaris, A A; Podestá, R; Tramonte, R; de Souza, N M A; Amante, E R

    2007-11-01

    Cassava starch fermentation wastewater is an industrial residue composed mainly of lactic acid bacteria with predominance of the genera Lactobacillus, and organic acids. To evaluate the safety of this residue for possible production of probiotic beverages, acute in mice and sub-chronic (28-day repeated dose) toxicity studies in rats were carried. The administration of a single dose of 5 g/kg/body weight did not produce mortality in mice. Rats treated with water containing 0 (control), 25%, 50%, and 100% of the residue for 28 days, did not present alterations in behaviour or in food and water consumption. There were no treatment-related changes of toxicological significance in the relative weight of the organs neither in the haematological nor in the biochemical parameters. Histopathologic alterations observed in the small intestine did not seem to be associated with the treatment.

  14. Mechanism of the testicular toxicity of boric acid in rats: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ku, W W; Chapin, R E

    1994-01-01

    High-dose boric acid (BA) exposure produces testicular lesions in adult rats characterized by inhibited spermiation (IS) that may progress to atrophy. In vivo and in vitro studies addressed possible mechanisms. In vivo, boron tissue disposition was examined, since no detailed data existed, and relevant boron concentrations for in vitro studies needed to be set. Since BA induces riboflavinuria and also affects calcium/phosphorus homeostasis, and testis zinc appears essential for normal testis function, we examined BA effects on flavin status and testis levels of phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn). Data showed that the testicular toxicity and central nervous system (CNS) hormonal effect were not due to selective boron accumulation in testis or brain/hypothalamus, with testis boron concentrations at approximately 1 to 2 mM; that riboflavin deficiency is not involved, due to both the absence of overt signs of deficiency and effects on tissue flavin content during BA exposure; and that changes in testis P, Ca and Zn levels did not precede atrophy, and are therefore unlikely to be mechanistically relevant. In vitro studies addressed the hallmarks of the BA testicular toxicity: the mild hormone effect, the initial IS, and atrophy. No effect of BA on the steroidogenic function of isolated Leydig cells was observed, supporting the contention of a CNS-mediated rather than a direct hormone effect. Since increased testicular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) produces IS, and a role for the serine proteases plasminogen activators (PAs) in spermiation has been proposed, we examined in vitro BA effects on both Sertoli cell cAMP accumulation and PA activity, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6. A Figure 6. B PMID:7889890

  15. The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study: objectives and methods of a study investigating causality, course, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    De Win, Maartje M L; Jager, Gerry; Vervaeke, Hylke K E; Schilt, Thelma; Reneman, Liesbeth; Booij, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C; Den Heeten, Gerard J; Ramsey, Nick F; Korf, Dirk J; Van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the objectives and methods of The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study focussing on the causality, course, and clinical relevance of ecstasy neurotoxicity. Previous studies suggest that ecstasy (3,4 methylene-dioxymethamphetamine, MDMA, XTC) is toxic toward brain serotonin axons, but most of these studies have serious methodological limitations. The current study is a combination of different approaches with three substudies: (1) a crosssectional substudy among heavy ecstasy users and controls with variation in drug use, which will provide information about potential neurotoxic consequences of ecstasy in relation to other drugs; (2) a prospective cohort substudy in ecstasy-naive subjects with high risk for future ecstasy use, which will provide information on the causality and short-term course of ecstasy use and potential neurotoxicity, and (3) a retrospective cohort substudy in lifetime ecstasy users and matched controls of an existing epidemiological sample that will provide information on long-term course and outcome of ecstasy use in the general population. Neurotoxicity is studied using (a) different imaging techniques (beta-CIT SPECT, 1H-MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging), and (b) neuropsychological and psychiatric assessments of memory, depression, and personality. The combined results will lead to conclusions that can be used in prevention messages, clinical decision making, and the development of an (inter)national ecstasy policy.

  16. A 13-week subchronic intravaginal toxicity study of pokeweed antiviral protein in mice.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, O J; Waurzyniakt, B; Uckun, F M

    2004-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a 29-kDa plant-derived protein isolated from Phytolacca americana, is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent. PAP shows unique clinical potential to become the active ingredient of a non-spermicidal microbicide because of its potent in vivo anti-HIV activity, non-interference with in vivo sperm functions, and lack of cytotoxicity to genital tract epithelial cells. Over 13 weeks the subchronic and reproductive toxicity potential of an intravaginally administered gel formulation of PAP was studied in mice to support its further development as a vaginal microbicide. Female B6C3F1 and CD-1 mice in subgroups of 20, were exposed intravaginally to a gel formulation containing 0, 0.025, 0.05, or 0.1% PAP, 5 days/week for 13 consecutive weeks. On a molar basis, these concentrations are 500- to 2000-times higher than the in vitro anti-HIV IC50 value. After 13 weeks of intravaginal treatment, B6C3F1 mice were evaluated for survival, body weight gain, and absolute and relative organ weights. Blood was analyzed for hematology and clinical chemistry profiles. Microscopic examination was performed on hematoxylin and eosin-stained tissue sections from each study animal. Placebo-control and PAP-dosed female CD-1 mice were mated with untreated males in order to evaluate if PAP has any deleterious effects on reproductive performance. There were no treatment-related mortalities. Mean body weight gain was not reduced by PAP treatment during the dosing period. The hemogram and blood chemistry profiles revealed lack of systemic toxicity following daily intravaginal instillation of PAP for 13 weeks. No clinically significant changes in absolute and relative organ weights were noted in the PAP dose groups. Extensive histopathological examination of tissues showed no increase in treatment-related microscopic lesions in any of the three PAP dose groups. Repeated intravaginal exposure of CD-1 mice to increasing concentrations of PAP for 13 weeks showed no adverse

  17. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.L.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of July 22-29, 1993, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 19.0 and Mile 22.0 on July 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  18. Statistical methods and software for validation studies on new in vitro toxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Frank; Hothorn, Ludwig A

    2014-11-01

    When a new in vitro assay method is introduced, it should be validated against the best available knowledge or a reference standard assay. For assays resulting in a simple binary outcome, the data can be displayed as a 2×2 table. Based on the estimated sensitivity and specificity, and the assumed prevalence of true positives in the population of interest, the positive and negative predictive values of the new assay can be calculated. We briefly discuss the experimental design of validation experiments and previously published methods for computing confidence intervals for predictive values. The application of the methods is illustrated for two toxicological examples, by using tools available in the free software, namely, R: confidence intervals for predictive values are computed for a validation study of an in vitro test battery, and sample size calculation is illustrated for an acute toxicity assay. The R code necessary to reproduce the results is given.

  19. Overview of the Benzene and Other Toxics Exposure (BEE-TEX) Field Study.

    PubMed

    Olaguer, Eduardo P

    2015-01-01

    The Benzene and other Toxics Exposure (BEE-TEX) field study was an experimental campaign designed to demonstrate novel methods for measuring ambient concentrations of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in real time and to attribute these concentrations to quantified releases from specific emission points in industrial facilities while operating outside facility fence lines. BEE-TEX was conducted in February 2015 at three neighboring communities in the Houston Ship Channel of Texas, where a large number of petrochemical facilities are concentrated. The novel technologies deployed during BEE-TEX included: (1) tomographic remote sensing based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy; (2) real-time broadcasting of ambient air monitoring data over the World Wide Web; (3) real-time source attribution and quantification of HAP emissions based on either tomographic or mobile measurement platforms; and (4) the use of cultured human lung cells in vitro as portable indicators of HAP exposure. PMID:26549972

  20. Overview of the Benzene and Other Toxics Exposure (BEE-TEX) Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Olaguer, Eduardo P.

    2015-01-01

    The Benzene and other Toxics Exposure (BEE-TEX) field study was an experimental campaign designed to demonstrate novel methods for measuring ambient concentrations of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in real time and to attribute these concentrations to quantified releases from specific emission points in industrial facilities while operating outside facility fence lines. BEE-TEX was conducted in February 2015 at three neighboring communities in the Houston Ship Channel of Texas, where a large number of petrochemical facilities are concentrated. The novel technologies deployed during BEE-TEX included: (1) tomographic remote sensing based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy; (2) real-time broadcasting of ambient air monitoring data over the World Wide Web; (3) real-time source attribution and quantification of HAP emissions based on either tomographic or mobile measurement platforms; and (4) the use of cultured human lung cells in vitro as portable indicators of HAP exposure. PMID:26549972

  1. Comparative Cytogenetic Study on the Toxicity of Magnetite and Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles in Sunflower Root Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Capraru, Gabriela; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    In this experimental study the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of Helianthus annuus cultivated in the presence of different volume fractions of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, ranging between 20 and 100 microl/l. The aqueous magnetic colloids were prepared from chemically co-precipitated ferrites coated in sodium oleate. Tissue samples from the root meristeme of 2-3 day old germinated seeds were taken to prepare microscope slides following Squash method combined with Fuelgen techniques. Microscope investigation (cytogenetic tests) has resulted in the evaluation of mitotic index and chromosomal aberration index that appeared diminished and respectively increased following the addition of magnetic nanoparticles in the culture medium of the young seedlings. Zinc ferrite toxic influence appeared to be higher than that of magnetite, according to both cytogenetic parameters.

  2. Evaluation of the antibacterial activity and toxicity of 2 new hydrogels: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vandenbulcke, Katia; Horvat, Lada-Ivana Laenen; De Mil, Martine; Slegers, Guido; Beele, Hilde

    2006-06-01

    Wound bed preparation remains a very important issue in wound healing. To promote the production of granulation tissue, it is necessary to remove necrotic tissue and to control infection. Necrotic tissue may be removed using a hydrogel preparation. Flaminal and Flaminal Hydro (Flen Pharma, Belgium) are 2 new hydroactive colloid gel dressings with state antibacterial properties. These properties are attributed to an enzymatic complex in their formulation. In the study described in this report, the antibacterial effects of Flaminal and Flaminal Hydro were confirmed in an in vitro as well as an in vivo setting. It was also demonstrated that Flaminal and Flaminal Hydro are not toxic to keratinocytes in vitro using an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] test. PMID:16698915

  3. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22-29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase II Sampling and Analysis activities as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  4. Two new rodent models for actinide toxicity studies. [/sup 237/Pu, /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.N.; Jones, C.W.; Gardner, P.A.; Lloyd, R.D.; Mays, C.W.; Charrier, K.E.

    1981-04-01

    Two small rodent species, the grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), have tenacious and high retention in the liver and skeleton of plutonium and americium following intraperitoneal injection of Pu and Am in citrate solution. Liver retention of Pu and Am in the grasshopper mouse is higher than liver retention in the deer mouse. Both of these rodents are relatively long-lived, breed well in captivity, and adapt suitably to laboratory conditions. It is suggested that these two species of mice, in which plutonium retention is high and prolonged in both the skeleton and liver, as it is in man, may be useful animal models for actinide toxicity studies.

  5. Transplant-related toxicity and mortality: an AIEOP prospective study in 636 pediatric patients transplanted for acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Balduzzi, A; Valsecchi, M G; Silvestri, D; Locatelli, F; Manfredini, L; Busca, A; Iori, A P; Messina, C; Prete, A; Andolina, M; Porta, F; Favre, C; Ceppi, S; Giorgiani, G; Lanino, E; Rovelli, A; Fagioli, F; De Fusco, C; Rondelli, R; Uderzo, C

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can cure high-risk acute leukemia (AL), but the occurrence of non-leukemic death is still high. The AIEOP conducted a prospective study in order to assess incidence and relationships of early toxicity and transplant-related mortality (TRM) in a pediatric population. Between 1990 and 1997 toxicities reported in eight organs (central nervous system, heart, lungs, liver, gut, kidneys, bladder, mucosa) were classified into three grades (mild, moderate, severe) and prospectively registered for 636 consecutive children who underwent autologous (216) or allogeneic (420) transplantation, either from an HLA compatible related (294), or alternative (126) donor in 13 AIEOP transplant centers. Overall, 47% of the patients are alive in CR (3-year EFS: 45.2%, s.e.: 2.1), 19% died in CR at a median of 60 days (90-day TRM: 14.3%, s.e.: 1.4), 34% relapsed. Toxicity of any organ, but mucosa and gut, was positively correlated with early death; moderate and severe toxicity to heart, lungs, liver and kidneys significantly increased early TRM, with estimated relative risks of 9.1, 5.5, 2.7 and 2.8, respectively, as compared to absent or mild toxicity. Patients with grade III-IV aGVHD experienced more than double (56% vs. 19%) TRM than patients with grade 0-II aGVHD. A higher cumulative toxicity score, estimating the impact of toxicity on TRM, was significantly associated with transplantation from an alternative donor. Quantitative assessment allowed us to describe the extent to which 'grade' of toxicity and 'type' of involved organs were related to mortality and pre-transplant characteristics and yielded a prognostic score potentially useful to compare different conditioning regimens and predict probability of early death.

  6. Sediment porewater toxicity assessment studies in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Presley, B.J.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Robertson, L.; Boothe, P.; Kilada, R.; Wade, T.; Montagna, P.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary program to assess the potential long-term impacts of offshore oil and gas exploration and production activities in the Gulf of Mexico, sediment chemical analyses and porewater toxicity tests were conducted in the vicinity of five offshore platforms. Based on data from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays, toxicity was observed near four of the five platforms sampled; the majority of the toxic samples were collected within 150 m of a platform. There was excellent agreement among the results of porewater tests with three different species (sea urchin embryological development, polychaete reproduction, and copepod nauplii survival). The sediment concentrations of several metals were well in excess of sediment quality assessment guidelines at a number of stations, and good agreement was observed between predicted and observed toxicity. Porewater metal concentrations compared with EC50, LOEC, and NOEC values generated for water-only exposures indicated that the porewater concentrations for several metals were high enough to account for the observed toxicity. Results of these studies utilizing highly sensitive toxicity tests suggest that the contaminant-induced impacts from offshore platforms are limited to a localized area in the immediate vicinity of the platforms. ?? 1996 NRC.

  7. Comparative study of aluminum and copper transport and toxicity in an acid-tolerant freshwater green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, B.R.; Popescu, N.A.; Wood, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    A comparative study of the transport and toxicity of one nonessential metal (aluminum), and one essential metal (copper), has been performed with the acid-tolerant green alga Chlorella saccarophila. This organism was isolated from a naturally acidified lake and grows well in laboratory cultures at pH 3.0. Our results show that the fast-exchange ions Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Na/sup +/ offer some protection against both Al/sup 3 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity whereas K/sup +/ protects against Al/sup 3 +/ toxicity but enhances Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity. Plasma emission spectroscopy shows that complexation of Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ to cell surfaces is important in preventing toxic cytoplasmic levels of these metals, both in culture media and in acid mine water. The aqueous ion chemistry for toxic metal uptake is simplified considerably in acidic conditions, where competing hydrolysis and precipitation reactions are eliminated. Therefore, simple competitive experiments can be performed quantitatively. 12 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  8. Chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity studies of FD & C Yellow No. 5 (tartrazine) in rats.

    PubMed

    Borzelleca, J F; Hallagan, J B

    1988-03-01

    FD & C Yellow No. 5 was fed to Charles River CD rats as a dietary admixture in two long-term toxicity/carcinogenicity studies. The studies were conducted with an in utero phase in which the compound was administered to the F0 generation rats (60/sex/group) at levels of 0.0, 0.0, 0.1, 1.0 or 2.0% ('original study') and 0.0 or 5.0% ('high-dose study'). The concurrent control group