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Sample records for repeated-dose toxicity studies

  1. Biokinetics in repeated-dosing in vitro drug toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nynke I; Di Consiglio, Emma; Blaauboer, Bas J; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The aim of the EU FP7 Predict-IV project was to improve the predictivity of in vitro assays for unwanted effects of drugs after repeated dosing. The project assessed the added benefit of integrating long-lived in vitro organotypic cell systems with 'omics' technologies and in silico modelling, including systems biology and pharmacokinetic assessments. RPTEC/TERT1 kidney cells, primary rat and human hepatocytes, HepaRG liver cells and 2D and 3D primary brain cultures were dosed daily or every other day for 14 days to a selection of drugs varying in their mechanism of pharmacological action. Since concentration-effect relationships not only depend on the activity of the drug or the sensitivity of the target, but also on the distribution of compounds in the in vitro system, the concentration of a selection of drugs in cells, microtitre plate plastic and medium was measured over time. Results, reviewed in this paper, indicate that lipophilic drugs bind significantly to plastic labware. A few drugs, including less lipophilic drugs, bind to cell-attachment matrices. Chemicals that reach high concentrations in cells, including cyclosporin A and amiodarone, significantly accumulate over time after repeated dosing, partly explaining their increased toxicity after repeated dosing, compared to a single dose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute toxicity, 28-day repeated-dose toxicity and toxicokinetic study of timosaponin BII in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ni; Liu, Baofeng; Zhang, Jie; Long, Yongpeng; Dong, Guoming; Jin, Hongtao; Ma, Baiping

    2017-09-22

    Timosaponin BII (TBII), a major steroidal saponin isolated from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bge., displays a variety of promising pharmacological activities, such as neuroprotection, enhancement of learning and memory, vascular protection and inhibition of platelet aggregation; therefore, it has been developed as a pharmaceutical for prevention or treatment of dementia. Given the safety concerns surrounding timosaponins and the absence of studies on the safety of TBII, the potential toxicity of TBII was evaluated in toxicity and toxicokinetic studies in rats. In the acute oral toxicity study, loose stools were observed in rats receiving 4000 mg/kg, and the symptoms recovered within 1 day. In the 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity and toxicokinetic study, rats receiving 540 mg/kg showed loose stools and a slight deceleration of body weight growth in both sexes, and the females also showed a slight decrease in food consumption. Moreover, urinalysis indicated reversible treatment-related toxicity in rats receiving 540 mg/kg. The toxicokinetic study demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in systematic exposure to TBII after 28 successive days of oral treatment with TBII. The accumulation coefficients of TBII were 4.35, 1.70 and 1.81, respectively, in rats that received 60, 180 and 540 mg/kg. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) is proposed to be 180 mg/kg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of statistical tools used in short-term repeated dose administration toxicity studies with rodents.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Pillai, K Sadasivan; Sakuratani, Yuki; Abe, Takemaru; Kamata, Eiichi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    In order to know the different statistical tools used to analyze the data obtained from twenty-eight-day repeated dose oral toxicity studies with rodents and the impact of these statistical tools on interpretation of data obtained from the studies, study reports of 122 numbers of twenty-eight-day repeated dose oral toxicity studies conducted in rats were examined. It was found that both complex and easy routes of decision trees were followed for the analysis of the quantitative data. These tools include Scheffe's test, non-parametric type Dunnett's and Scheffe's tests with very low power. Few studies used the non-parametric Dunnett type test and Mann-Whitney's U test. Though Chi-square and Fisher's tests are widely used for analysis of qualitative data, their sensitivity to detect a treatment-related effect is questionable. Mann-Whitney's U test has better sensitivity to analyze qualitative data than the chi-square and Fisher's tests. We propose Dunnett's test for analysis of quantitative data obtained from twenty-eight-day repeated dose oral toxicity tests and for qualitative data, Mann-Whitney's U test. For both tests, one-sided test with p=0.05 may be applied.

  4. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of different β-cyclodextrin-based nanosponge formulations.

    PubMed

    Shende, Pravin; Kulkarni, Yogesh A; Gaud, R S; Deshmukh, Kiran; Cavalli, Roberta; Trotta, Francesco; Caldera, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    Nanosponges (NS) show promising results in different fields such as medicine, agriculture, water purification, fire engineering and so on. The present study was designed to evaluate toxicity of different NS formulations (namely, S1-S6) synthesized with different cross-linking agents such as carbonyl diimidazole, pyromellitic dianhydride and hexamethylene diisocynate; and preparation methods in experimental animals. Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies of formulations were carried out as per OECD guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. For acute toxicity study, formulations were administered to female rats at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg orally. The general behaviour of the rats was continuously monitored for 1 h after dosing, periodically during the first 24 h and daily thereafter for a total of 14 days. On day 14, animals were fasted overnight, weighed, and sacrificed. After sacrification, animals were subjected to necropsy. For repeated dose toxicity study, rats of either sex were orally administered with formulations at the dose of 300 mg/kg per day for a period of 28 days. The maximally tolerated dose of all formulations was found to be 2000 mg/kg. Repeated administration of formulations for 28 days did not show any significant changes in haematological and biochemical parameters in experimental animals. These results indicate that the formulations are safe, when tested in experimental animals. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  5. A repeated-dose dermal toxicity study of hydrophobically modified hydroxypropyl methylcellulose in rats.

    PubMed

    Obara, S; Muto, H; Ichikawa, N; Tanaka, O; Otsuka, M; Kawanabe, M; Ishii, H; Niikura, Y; Komatsu, M

    1997-08-01

    A six-month repeated-dose dermal toxicity study followed by a 30-day recovery test of hydrophobically modified hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HM-HPMC), a new cellulose derivative used as a thickener for topical pharmaceuticals, was conducted using rats. Aqueous paste of HM-HPMC was applied to the skin of rats once daily at dose levels up to 60 mg/kg/day, which was the highest dose that could be administered. Items checked included general signs, urinalysis, hematology, ophthalmology, and histopathology. One rat died during the administration period owing to a malignant tumor in the hemopoietic system, which was not attributed to the test substance. Statistically significant differences were found in some test results, but those were not dose-dependent and were considered to be incidental or spontaneous. It was concluded that the test substance was not toxic upon chronic dermal administration at dose levels up to 60 mg/kg/day.

  6. [Repeated dose toxicity studies of taltirelin tetrahydrate(TA-0910) by oral administration to rats].

    PubMed

    Inui, T; Fujiwara, T; Susami, M; Hishida, N; Kuwamura, Y; Kuse, H; Kawai, Y; Kudow, S

    1997-11-01

    Four-, 13- and 52-week repeated dose toxicity studies of taltirelin tetrahydrate(TA-0910), a thyrotropin-releasing hormone(TRH) analogue, were carried out in rats. Through the three studies, TA-0910 solution was administered orally at doses of 3, 30 and 300 mg/kg/day. The animals receiving TA-0910 showed hyperlocomotion, grooming and wet dog shaking which were attributable to the central effects similar to those of TRH, but there was no death nor obvious deterioration of health caused by the treatment. Body weights decreased in males of 300 mg/kg group, and food consumption was on the upward trend in females in 300 mg/kg group. In 13- and 52-week studies, females receiving 300 mg/kg showed elongated estrous cycle, although it was not an evident change. Blood examinations revealed increases in erythrocyte count, hemoglobin and hematocrit in 300 mg/kg group. Reductions in serum(plasma) proteins and lipids, and drug-metabolizing enzyme activity of the liver were regarded as non-specific changes, as they were sporadic and slight in 300 mg/kg group. Salivary gland and adrenal weights increased in 300 mg/kg group. For the thyroid, weights increased in 300 mg/kg group in the 4- and 13-week studies, and increases of microfollicles and cell debris were observed microscopically in each treated group in the 52-week study. These changes seemed to be related with hormonal action of TA-0910, but the effects on animals were judged slight from plasma TSH and thyroid hormone levels after 4 weeks of dosing. The non-toxic dose was estimated to be 30 mg/kg/day, through the rat repeated dose toxicity studies. All the above changes were alleviated or abolished by 4-week recovery period.

  7. Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility.

    PubMed

    Dent, M P

    2007-08-01

    The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low NOAELs and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert

  8. Neurobehavioral tests in single- and repeated-dose toxicity studies in small rodents.

    PubMed

    Alder, S; Zbinden, G

    1983-09-01

    The discovery of neurobehavioral hazards is an important goal of the majority of the toxicological studies. Quite often it is possible to detect signs of neurobehavioral toxicity through non-instrumental observations and from the response of the animals to simple manipulations. Psychopharmacologists have long used these techniques to identify new drugs with potential usefulness as psychotropic agents. Their approach may also be applicable for the detection of neurotoxic chemicals. Based on a review of the literature and personal experience a neurobehavioral check-list is proposed which can easily be incorporated into the animal care and treatment routine used in single- and repeated-dose toxicity studies with small rodents. The instrumental tests which measure motor activity, neuromuscular functions, muscle strength, emotionality and social behavior are also discussed. The usefulness of these procedures in toxicology is not yet established. Their introduction into the testing routine creates considerable logistic difficulties and might not be compatible with good laboratory practices. Therefore, it is suggested to explore the procedures developed by psychopharmalogists and behavioral scientists and to validate them with a variety of neurobehavioral toxins. Tests which produce relevant and reproducible data may then be added to the toxicological protocols, preferably within the framework of safety pharmacology.

  9. Validation study of the combined repeated-dose toxicity and genotoxicity assay using gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Jun-Ichi; Toyoda, Takeshi; Cho, Young-Man; Mizuta, Yasuko; Nohmi, Takehiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2015-05-01

    Transgenic rodents carrying reporter genes to detect organ-specific in vivo genetic alterations are useful for risk assessment of genotoxicity that causes cancer. Thus, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has established the guideline for genotoxicity tests using transgenic animals, which may be combined with repeated-dose toxicity studies. Here, we provide evidence to support equivalence of gpt delta and wild type (WT) rats in terms of toxicological responses to a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN), and a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). gpt delta rats treated with DEHP showed similar increases in liver and kidney weights, serum albumin, albumin/globulin ratios, and incidence of diffuse hepatocyte hypertrophy compared to WT F344 and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. DEN-treated gpt delta rats showed equivalent increases in the number and area of precancerous GST-P-positive foci in the liver compared to WT rats. The livers of DEN-treated gpt delta rats also showed increased frequencies of gpt and Spi(-) mutations; such changes were not observed in DEHP-treated gpt delta rats. These results indicated that gpt delta rats (both F344 and SD backgrounds) showed comparable DEHP-induced toxicity and DEN-induced genotoxicity to those observed in WT rats. With regard to the administration period, the general toxicity of 1.2% DEHP was evident throughout the experimental period, and the genotoxicity of 10 p.p.m. DEN could be detected after 2 weeks of administration and further increased at 4 weeks. These results suggested that combined assays using gpt delta rats could detect both general toxicity and genotoxicity by the canonical 4-week administration protocol. Therefore, this assay using gpt delta rats would be applicable for risk assessment including early detection of genotoxic carcinogens and ultimately serve to reduce cancer risks in humans from environmental chemicals.

  10. A repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study of cyflumetofen,a novel acaricide, in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshinori; Ikemi, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Ebino, Koichi; Kojima, Sayuri; Chiba, Yuko; Nakashima, Nobuaki; Kawakatsu, Hisao; Saka, Machiko; Harada, Takanori

    2012-02-01

    Cyflumetofen is a novel acaricide which is highly active against phytophagous mites. As a part of safety assessment, a repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study of cyflumetofen was conducted in Fischer (F344/DuCrj) rats of both sexes. Technical grade cyflumetofen was administered in feed to groups of 10 males and 10 females at dose levels of 0, 100, 300, 1,000, and 3,000 ppm. Prothrombin time was prolonged in males at 3,000 ppm and plasma globulin levels were decreased in females at 1,000 and 3,000 ppm. At necropsy, enlarged and whitish adrenals were observed in females at 3,000 ppm. There were statistically significant increases in relative liver weight (ratio to body weight) in males and relative adrenal weight in females in the 1,000 ppm group; increased relative liver and kidney weights in both sexes at 3,000 ppm, and increased absolute and relative weights of adrenals in females at 3,000 ppm. Increased absolute liver weight was also noted in males at 3,000 ppm. Histopathologically, at 1,000 and 3,000 ppm males had diffuse vacuolation and females had diffuse hypertrophy of adrenal cortical cells. In addition, vacuolation of ovarian interstitial gland cells was noted in females at 1,000 and 3,000 ppm. There were no treatment-related changes in any parameters for either sex in other dose groups. Based on these results, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of cyflumetofen was judged to be 300 ppm for both sexes (16.5 mg/kg/day for males and 19.0 mg/kg/day for females).

  11. Repeated-Doses Toxicity Study of the Essential Oil of Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) in Swiss Mice

    PubMed Central

    Freire Rocha Caldas, Germana; Araújo, Alice Valença; Albuquerque, Giwellington Silva; Silva-Neto, Jacinto da Costa; Costa-Silva, João Henrique; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Wanderley, Almir Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    Hyptis martiusii Benth. (Lamiaceae) is found in abundance in Northeastern Brazil where it is used in traditional medicine to treat gastric disorders. Since there are no studies reporting the toxicity and safety profile of this species, we investigated repeated-doses toxicity of the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii (EOHM). Swiss mice of both sexes were orally treated with EOHM (100 and 500 mg/kg) for 30 days, and biochemical, hematological, and morphological parameters were determined. No toxicity signs or deaths were recorded during the treatment with EOHM. The body weight gain was not affected, but there was an occasional variation in water and food consumption among mice of both sexes treated with both doses. The hematological and biochemical profiles did not show significant differences except for a decrease in the MCV and an increase in albumin, but these variations are within the limits described for the species. The microscopic analysis showed changes in liver, kidneys, lungs, and spleen; however, these changes do not have clinical relevance since they varied among the groups, including the control group. The results indicate that the treatment of repeated-doses with the essential oil of Hyptis martiusii showed low toxicity in mice. PMID:24151521

  12. Acute toxicity and the 28-day repeated dose study of a Siddha medicine Nuna Kadugu in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nuna Kadugu (NK), a Siddha medicine prepared from leaves and fruits of Morinda Pubescens, used for the treatment of various skin diseases. Though NK has been widely used for several decades, no scientific report was available on its safety. Present study was undertaken to demonstrate the oral toxicity of NK in Sprague Dawley rats. Methods Acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively, with minor modifications. In acute oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 2000mg/kg b.wt., p.o and animals were observed for toxic signs at 0, 0.5, 1, 4, 24 h and for next 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose, the 28- day oral toxicity study, NK was administered at 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg b.wt./p.o/day. Two satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of NK. Animals were observed for mortality, morbidity, body weight changes, feed and water intake. Haematology, clinical biochemistry, electrolytes, gross pathology, relative organ weight and histopathological examination were performed. Results In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed with NK administration. In the repeated dose study, no significant differences in body weight changes, food / water intake, haematology, clinical biochemistry and electrolytes content were observed between control and NK groups. No gross pathological findings and difference in relative organ weights were observed between control and NK treated rats. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities with NK treatment. Conclusion Acute study reveals that the LD50 of NK is greater than 2000mg/kg, b.wt. in fasted female rats and can be classified as Category 5. 28-day repeated oral toxicity demonstrates that the No Observed Adverse Effect Level of NK is greater than 900 mg/kg b.wt./day, p.o in rats. There were no delayed effects

  13. Toxicity evaluation of zinc aluminium levodopa nanocomposite via oral route in repeated dose study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, through nanomedicine, allowed drugs to be manipulated into nanoscale sizes for delivery to the different parts of the body, at the same time, retaining the valuable pharmacological properties of the drugs. However, efficient drug delivery and excellent release potential of these delivery systems may be hindered by possible untoward side effects. In this study, the sub-acute toxicity of oral zinc aluminium nanocomposite with and without levodopa was assessed using the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines. No sign or symptom of toxicity was observed in orally treated rats with the nanocomposite at 5 and 500 mg/kg concentrations. Body weight gain, feeding, water intake, general survival and organosomatic index were not significantly different between control and treatment groups. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (169 ± 30 U/L), 5 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (172 ± 49 U/L), and 500 mg/kg layered double hydroxides (LDH) nanocomposite (175 ± 25 U/L) were notably elevated compared to controls (143 ± 05 U/L); but the difference were not significant (p > 0.05). However, the differences in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio of 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (0.32 ± 0.12) and 500 mg/kg LDH nanocomposite (0.34 ± 0.12) were statistically significant (p < 0.05) compared to the control (0.51 ± 0.07). Histology of the liver, spleen and brain was found to be of similar morphology in both control and experimental groups. The kidneys of 500-mg/kg-treated rats with levodopa nanocomposite and LDH nanocomposite were found to have slight inflammatory changes, notably leukocyte infiltration around the glomeruli. The ultra-structure of the neurons from the substantia nigra of nanocomposite-exposed group was similar to those receiving only normal saline. The observed result has suggested possible liver and renal toxicity in

  14. Toxicity evaluation of zinc aluminium levodopa nanocomposite via oral route in repeated dose study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Hassan, Zurina; Tengku Azmi, Tengku Ibrahim; Hussein, Nor Fuzina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology, through nanomedicine, allowed drugs to be manipulated into nanoscale sizes for delivery to the different parts of the body, at the same time, retaining the valuable pharmacological properties of the drugs. However, efficient drug delivery and excellent release potential of these delivery systems may be hindered by possible untoward side effects. In this study, the sub-acute toxicity of oral zinc aluminium nanocomposite with and without levodopa was assessed using the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines. No sign or symptom of toxicity was observed in orally treated rats with the nanocomposite at 5 and 500 mg/kg concentrations. Body weight gain, feeding, water intake, general survival and organosomatic index were not significantly different between control and treatment groups. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (169 ± 30 U/L), 5 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (172 ± 49 U/L), and 500 mg/kg layered double hydroxides (LDH) nanocomposite (175 ± 25 U/L) were notably elevated compared to controls (143 ± 05 U/L); but the difference were not significant ( p > 0.05). However, the differences in aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase (AST/ALT) ratio of 500 mg/kg levodopa nanocomposite (0.32 ± 0.12) and 500 mg/kg LDH nanocomposite (0.34 ± 0.12) were statistically significant ( p < 0.05) compared to the control (0.51 ± 0.07). Histology of the liver, spleen and brain was found to be of similar morphology in both control and experimental groups. The kidneys of 500-mg/kg-treated rats with levodopa nanocomposite and LDH nanocomposite were found to have slight inflammatory changes, notably leukocyte infiltration around the glomeruli. The ultra-structure of the neurons from the substantia nigra of nanocomposite-exposed group was similar to those receiving only normal saline. The observed result has suggested possible liver and renal toxicity in orally administered levodopa intercalated

  15. Preclinical safety evaluation of IQG-607 in rats: Acute and repeated dose toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Junior, Valnês S; Machado, Pablo; Calixto, João B; Siqueira, Jarbas M; Andrade, Edinéia; Bento, Allisson; Campos, Maria M; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2017-02-20

    In the present study, we evaluated the safety and the possible toxic effects of IQG-607 after acute and 90-day repeated administrations in rats. Single oral administration of IQG-607 (300 or 2000 mg/kg) on female rats did not result in any mortality. No gross lesions were observed in the animals at necropsy. Ninety-day administration test resulted in 20% of deaths, in both male and female rats administered with the highest dose of IQG-607, 300 mg/kg. Repeated administration of the IQG 607 (25, 100 and 300 mg/kg) did not result in any significant body mass alteration, or changes in food and water consumption. The most important clinical sign observed was salivation in both sexes. Importantly, long-term treatment with IQG-607 did not induce alterations in any hematological (for both sex) and serum biochemical (for female) parameters evaluated, even at the highest dose tested. Treatment of male rats with 100 or 300 mg/kg of IQG-607 decreased total cholesterol levels, while animals treated with 100 mg/kg also presented reduction on triglyceride levels. Of note, no treatment induced significant histopathological alterations in tissues of all organs and glands analyzed, even in that group that received the highest dose of IQG-607.

  16. 28-Day repeated dose toxicity study of dried microorganism in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitano, M; Hosoe, K; Fukutomi, N; Hidaka, T; Imai, N; Kawabe, M

    2004-11-01

    Ubidecarenone, also known as CoQ(10), is currently sold as a dietary supplement in the United States, with a majority of these products derived from the fermentation of carbohydrates or tobacco leaf extracts. In addition to its availability in dietary supplements, CoQ(10) is now being considered for use in foods. Accordingly, as part of the process for attaining "Generally Recognized as Safe" status, and to supplement information already available regarding the safety of CoQ(10) per se, a 28-day oral toxicity study in rats was conducted to evaluate the subacute safety of a microorganism biomass used as a new source in CoQ(10) production. Groups of Crj:CD(SD) rats (SPF) (6 males or females per group, 4 groups per sex) received dried microorganism at doses of 0, 500, 1000 or 2000 mg/kg/day via intragastric intubation. Clinical observations were recorded, and body weight, and food and water consumptions measured throughout the study. At the end of the study, aortic blood samples were collected from all animals for analysis of hematological and clinical chemistry parameters, and gross pathologic examination was performed. Histopathologic examination was performed on select tissues from the control and high-dose groups. There were no treatment-related changes that were considered to be of toxicological significance. Since rats treated with 2000 mg/kg of dried microorganism did not demonstrate any treatment-related changes, the no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for dried microorganism was estimated to be greater than 2000 mg/kg/day under the present study conditions.

  17. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally.

  18. Zinc oxide nanoparticles: a 90-day repeated-dose dermal toxicity study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hwa Jung; Seo, Mu Yeb; Jung, Sung Kyu; Maeng, Eun Ho; Lee, Seung-Young; Jang, Dong-Hyouk; Lee, Taek-Jin; Jo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yu-Ri; Cho, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Lee, Beom Jun; Son, Sang Wook

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) works as a long-lasting, broad-spectrum physical sunblock, and can prevent skin cancer, sunburn, and photoaging. Nanosized ZnO particles are used often in sunscreens due to consumer preference over larger sizes, which appear opaque when dermally applied. Although the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens in 1999, there are ongoing safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the subchronic toxicity of ZnO NPs after dermal application according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Test Guidelines 411 using Good Laboratory Practice. Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight (one control, one vehicle control, three experimental, and three recovery) groups. Different concentrations of ZnO NPs were dermally applied to the rats in the experimental groups for 90 days. Clinical observations as well as weight and food consumption were measured and recorded daily. Hematology and biochemistry parameters were determined. Gross pathologic and histopathologic examinations were performed on selected tissues from all animals. Analyses of tissue were undertaken to determine target organ tissue distribution. There was no increased mortality in the experimental group. Although there was dose-dependent irritation at the site of application, there were no abnormal findings related to ZnO NPs in other organs. Increased concentrations of ZnO in the liver, small intestine, large intestine, and feces were thought to result from oral ingestion of ZnO NPs via licking. Penetration of ZnO NPs through the skin seemed to be limited via the dermal route. This study demonstrates that there was no observed adverse effect of ZnO NPs up to 1,000 mg/kg body weight when they are applied dermally. PMID:25565832

  19. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (9) Pathology—(i)Gross necropsy. (A...) Hematological tests with relevant base-line values. (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with relevant base-line...

  20. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (9) Pathology—(i)Gross necropsy. (A...) Hematological tests with relevant base-line values. (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with relevant base-line...

  1. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (9) Pathology—(i)Gross necropsy. (A...) Hematological tests with relevant base-line values. (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with relevant base-line...

  2. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (9) Pathology—(i)Gross necropsy. (A...) Hematological tests with relevant base-line values. (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with relevant base-line...

  3. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (9) Pathology—(i)Gross necropsy. (A...) Hematological tests with relevant base-line values. (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with relevant base-line...

  4. Estimation of acute oral toxicity using the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) from the 28 day repeated dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, Anna; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Prieto, Pilar

    2009-02-01

    Acute systemic toxicity is one of the areas of particular concern due to the 2009 deadline set by the 7th Amendment of the Cosmetics Directive (76/768/EEC), which introduces a testing and marketing ban of cosmetic products with ingredients tested on animals. The scientific community is putting considerable effort into developing and validating non-animal alternatives in this area. However, it is unlikely that validated and regulatory accepted alternative methods and/or strategies will be available in March 2009. Following the initiatives undertaken in the pharmaceutical industry to waive the acute oral toxicity testing before going to clinical studies by using information from other in vivo studies, we proposed an approach to identify non-toxic compounds (LD50>2000mg/kg) using information from 28 days repeated dose toxicity studies. Taking into account the high prevalence of non-toxic substances (87%) in the New Chemicals Database, it was possible to set a NOAEL threshold of 200mg/kg that allowed the correct identification of 63% of non-toxic compounds, while <1% of harmful compounds were misclassified as non-toxic. Since repeated dose toxicity studies can be performed in vivo until 2013, the proposed approach could have an immediate impact for the testing of cosmetic ingredients.

  5. A fourteen-day repeated dose oral toxicity study of APFO in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Kotaro

    2006-01-01

    Ammonium perfluoroocanoate (APFO) was repeatedly administered orally to male Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats for 14 days. Doses of APFO were 0, 0.5, 5, and 50 mg/kg. Significant increases and increasing tendencies in absolute/relative weight of the liver and no change in weight of the spleen were observed in all groups. Although inductions of mitochondrion- and peroxisome-specific enzymes were increased, no decrease was seen in any hematological parameter of lipid metabolism. Red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit or these tendencies showed a significant decrease or a tendency to decrease, but no influence on lymphocyte subsets was noted. Secondary inhibition of immunocompetent cells, previously reported for mice, was not seen in this study of rats.

  6. Recommended tissue list for histopathologic examination in repeat-dose toxicity and carcinogenicity studies: a proposal of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP).

    PubMed

    Bregman, Carla L; Adler, Rick R; Morton, Daniel G; Regan, Karen S; Yano, Barry L

    2003-01-01

    The Executive Committee of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) appointed an ad hoc task force to devise and recommend a standard list of tissues to be evaluated histopathologically in repeat-dose toxicity and carcinogenicity studies that are used to support the registration of new pharmaceutical products. The recommended tissue list is intended to be a minimum core list that can be used for all types of repeat-dose toxicity and carcinogenicity studies, regardless of route of administration, species or strain of mammalian laboratory animal, duration, or class of drug to be tested. The resulting recommendations of the task force, presented here, were subsequently reviewed by the STP membership and endorsed by the STP Executive Committee.

  7. Collaborative work on evaluation of ovarian toxicity. 2) Two- or four-week repeated dose studies and fertility study of mifepristone in female rats.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Toru; Yokoi, Ryohei; Okuhara, Yuji; Harada, Chiho; Terashima, Yukari; Hayashi, Morimichi; Nagasawa, Tatsuya; Onozato, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Kuroda, Junji; Kusama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess ovarian pathological changes and their relationship to changes in female fertility parameters, mifepristone, a progesterone receptor antagonist, was selected as the test article and was administered orally to female rats at dose levels of 0, 0.8, 4, 20 and 100 mg/kg for 2 or 4 weeks in repeated dose-toxicity studies and in a female fertility study at dose levels of 0, 0.8, 4 and 20 mg/kg from > 2 weeks before copulation to postcoital day 7. In the repeated dose toxicity studies, persistent estrus was seen in the vaginal smears, and multiple cysts in the ovaries at necropsy, increases in luteinized cysts and hypertrophy of previously formed corpora lutea were observed in the histopathological examination of ovaries in rats receiving 20 mg/kg or more for 2 or 4 weeks. In female fertility studies, persistent vaginal cornification was also observed at 20 mg/kg and the precoital interval was significantly shortened. All of the animals were completely infertile when dosed with 20 mg/kg during the post-coital period. An increase in pre-implantation losses was observed in the animals treated with 20 mg/kg during the pre-coital phase, while treatment with 4 mg/kg mifepristone during the post-coital phase induced an increase in post-implantation losses. These results suggested that a 2-week administration period would be sufficient to detect the ovarian toxicity of mifepristone in repeated dose toxicity study and the pathological findings in the ovaries would reflect the alterations in female reproductive endpoints in the female fertility study.

  8. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (11) Pathology—(i) Gross necropsy. (A... assessments. (F) Hematological tests with relevant baseline values, (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with...

  9. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (11) Pathology—(i) Gross necropsy. (A... assessments. (F) Hematological tests with relevant baseline values, (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with...

  10. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... biochemistry. (i) Clinical biochemistry determinations to investigate major toxic effects in tissues and... hematological and clinical biochemistry variables before dosing commences. (11) Pathology—(i) Gross necropsy. (A... assessments. (F) Hematological tests with relevant baseline values, (G) Clinical biochemistry tests with...

  11. [Toxicity studies of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101) (3). 4-week repeated dose intravenous toxicity study in dogs with 4-week recovery test].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yanagi, H; Shichino, Y; Shimizu, K; Ueda, H; Oida, H; Tanaka, M; Suzuki, Y; Yonezawa, H; Fujita, T

    1997-12-01

    4-week repeated dose toxicity study with 4-week recovery test of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101), a novel ultra short acting beta-blocker, was conducted in beagle dogs. ONO-1101 was administered intravenously to dogs of both sexes at a dose level of 0 (control), 12.5, 25 or 50 mg/kg/day. No deaths occurred throughout the treatment period. Transitory licking chops, vomiting, nausea, diarrhea and soft feces were observed occasionally in both sexes dosed 25 and 50 mg/kg/day and the incidence seemed dose-dependent. However, those incidence declined in the course of the treatment period. Hematology showed a decrease in red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin value in both sexes receiving 25 and 50 mg/kg/day. ONO-1101 did not effect on body weight, food consumption, respiratory rate, pulse, rectal temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, electrocardiography, renal or hepatic function, ophthalmology, urinalysis, occult blood in feces, blood chemistry, organ weights, necropsy and microscopic findings at any doses. These results indicate that the no-adverse-effect level of ONO-1101 in dogs is 12.5 mg/kg/day for both sexes in this study.

  12. [Toxicity studies of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101) (2). 4-week repeated dose intravenous toxicity study in rats with 4-week recovery test].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Yanagi, H; Shimizu, K; Sakai, M; Nishibata, K; Oida, H; Shinomiya, K; Suzuki, Y; Yonezawa, H; Fujita, T

    1997-12-01

    4-week repeated dose toxicity study with 4-week recovery test of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101), a novel ultra short acting beta-blocker, was conducted in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. ONO-1101 was administered intravenously to rats of both sexes at a dose level of 0 (control), 12.5, 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. In the 100 mg/kg/day group, bradypnea or dyspnea was seen in all animals, pale in ear, eye and foot, tremor, reddish lacrimation and loss of righting reflex were also observed in some animals right after administration, and then those signs disappeared within 1 min after administration. During the treatment period, 3/20 animals of each sex in the 100 mg/kg/day showed clonic convulsion and died within 2 min after administration. No clinical changes were seen in the 50 mg/kg/day group or lower. Histopathological findings showed atrophy of the submaxillary gland in females and vessel-wall thickening and perivascular fibrosis of the injection site (tail) in both sexes at 100 mg/kg/day, however those changes were reversible. ONO-1101 did not effect on body weight, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, blood chemistry, organ weights or necropsy at any doses. These results indicate that the no-adverse-effect level of ONO-1101 in rats is 50 mg/kg/day for both sexes in this study.

  13. A 4-week Repeated dose Oral Toxicity Study of Mecasin in Sprague-Dawley Rats to Determine the Appropriate Doses for a 13-week, Repeated Toxicity Test

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eunhye; Lee, Jongchul; Lee, Seongjin; Park, Manyong; Song, Inja; Son, Ilhong; Song, Bong-Keun; Kim, Dongwoung; Lee, Jongdeok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In this study, we investigated the 4-week repeated-dose oral toxicity of gami-jakyak gamcho buja decoction (Mecasin) to develop safe treatments. Methods: In order to investigate the 4-week oral toxicity of Mecasin, we administered Mecasin orally to rats. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups of five male and five female animals per group: group 1 being the control group and groups 2, 3, and 4 being the experimental groups. Doses of Mecasin of 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups, and a dose of normal saline solution of 10 mL/kg was administered to the control group. We examined the survival rate, weight, clinical signs, and gross findings for four weeks. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: No deaths occurred in any of the four groups. No significant changes in weights or food consumption between the control group and the experimental groups were observed. Serum biochemistry revealed that some groups showed significant decrease in inorganic phosphorus (IP) (P < 0.05). During necropsy on the rats, one abnormal macroscopic feature, a slight loss of fur, was observed in the mid dosage (1,000 mg/ kg) male group. No abnormalities were observed in any other rats. In histopathological findings, the tubular basophilia and cast of the kidney and extramedullary hematopoiesis of the spleen were found. However, those changes were minimal and had occurred naturally or sporadically. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion: During this 4-week, repeated, oral toxicity test of Mecasin in SD rats, no toxicity changes due to Mecasin were observed in any of the male or the female rats in the high dosage group. Thus, we suggest that the doses in a 13-week, repeated test should be 0, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg respectively. PMID:26998389

  14. Repeated-dose toxicity of common ragweed on rats

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Tivadar; Szabó, Andrea; Oszlánczi, Gábor; Lukács, Anita; Tímár, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László

    2017-01-01

    Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. is an invasive species with highly allergenic pollens. Ragweed originates from North America, but it also occurs and is spreading in Europe, causing seasonal allergic rhinitis for millions of people. Recently, the herb of A. artemisiifolia has gained popularity as medicinal plant and food. The effects of its long-term intake are unknown; there are no toxicological data to support the safe use of this plant. The aim of our study was to assess the repeated dose toxicity of A. artemisiifolia on animals. Ragweed puree was administered in low dose (500 mg/kg b. w.) and high dose (1000 mg/kg b. w.) to male Wistar rats according to 407 OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals. Clinical symptoms, various blood chemical parameters, body weight and organ weights of the rats were measured. Reduced liver function enzymes (AST, ALT), reduced triglyceride level in the low dose and increased carbamide level in the high dose group were observed. The weight of the liver relative to body weight was significantly reduced in both groups, while the brain weight relative to body weight was significantly elevated in both groups. According to our results, the repeated use of ragweed resulted in toxic effects in rats and these results question the safety of long-term human consumption of common ragweed. PMID:28472131

  15. Repeated-dose toxicity of common ragweed on rats.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Tivadar; Szabó, Andrea; Oszlánczi, Gábor; Lukács, Anita; Tímár, Zoltán; Tiszlavicz, László; Csupor, Dezső

    2017-01-01

    Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. is an invasive species with highly allergenic pollens. Ragweed originates from North America, but it also occurs and is spreading in Europe, causing seasonal allergic rhinitis for millions of people. Recently, the herb of A. artemisiifolia has gained popularity as medicinal plant and food. The effects of its long-term intake are unknown; there are no toxicological data to support the safe use of this plant. The aim of our study was to assess the repeated dose toxicity of A. artemisiifolia on animals. Ragweed puree was administered in low dose (500 mg/kg b. w.) and high dose (1000 mg/kg b. w.) to male Wistar rats according to 407 OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals. Clinical symptoms, various blood chemical parameters, body weight and organ weights of the rats were measured. Reduced liver function enzymes (AST, ALT), reduced triglyceride level in the low dose and increased carbamide level in the high dose group were observed. The weight of the liver relative to body weight was significantly reduced in both groups, while the brain weight relative to body weight was significantly elevated in both groups. According to our results, the repeated use of ragweed resulted in toxic effects in rats and these results question the safety of long-term human consumption of common ragweed.

  16. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics study on repeat dose toxicity of fine particulate matter in rats after intratracheal instillation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yannan; Hu, Hejing; Shi, Yanfeng; Yang, Xiaozhe; Cao, Lige; Wu, Jing; Asweto, Collins Otieno; Feng, Lin; Duan, Junchao; Sun, Zhiwei

    2017-07-01

    Systemic metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) remain uncertain. In order to investigate the mechanisms in PM2.5 toxicity, we explored the endogenous metabolic changes and possible influenced metabolic pathways in rats after intratracheal instillation of PM2.5 by using a (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach. Liver and kidney histopathology examinations were also performed. Chemical characterization demonstrated that PM2.5 was a complex mixture of elements. Histopathology showed cellular edema in liver and glomerulus atrophy of the PM2.5 treated rats. We systematically analyzed the metabolites changes of serum and urine in rats using (1)H NMR techniques in combination with multivariate statistical analysis. Significantly reduced levels of lactate, alanine, dimethylglycine, creatine, glycine and histidine in serum, together with increased levels of citrate, arginine, hippurate, allantoin and decreased levels of allthreonine, lactate, alanine, acetate, succinate, trimethylamine, formate in urine were observed of PM2.5 treated rats. The mainly affected metabolic pathways by PM2.5 were glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, citrate cycle (TCA cycle), nitrogen metabolism and methane metabolism. Our study provided important information on assessing the toxicity of PM2.5 and demonstrated that metabolomics approach can be employed as a tool to understand the toxicity mechanism of complicated environmental pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Repeated dose 28-days oral toxicity study of Carica papaya L. leaf extract in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Afzan, Adlin; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Halim, Siti Zaleha; Rashid, Badrul Amini; Semail, Raja Hazlini Raja; Abdullah, Noordini; Jantan, Ibrahim; Muhammad, Hussin; Ismail, Zakiah

    2012-04-10

    Carica papaya L. leaves have been used in ethnomedicine for the treatment of fevers and cancers. Despite its benefits, very few studies on their potential toxicity have been described. The aim of the present study was to characterize the chemical composition of the leaf extract from 'Sekaki' C. papaya cultivar by UPLC-TripleTOF-ESI-MS and to investigate the sub-acute oral toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats at doses of 0.01, 0.14 and 2 g/kg by examining the general behavior, clinical signs, hematological parameters, serum biochemistry and histopathology changes. A total of twelve compounds consisting of one piperidine alkaloid, two organic acids, six malic acid derivatives, and four flavonol glycosides were characterized or tentatively identified in the C. papaya leaf extract. In the sub-acute study, the C. papaya extract did not cause mortality nor were treatment-related changes in body weight, food intake, water level, and hematological parameters observed between treatment and control groups. Some biochemical parameters such as the total protein, HDL-cholesterol, AST, ALT and ALP were elevated in a non-dose dependent manner. Histopathological examination of all organs including liver did not reveal morphological alteration. Other parameters showed non-significant differences between treatment and control groups. The present results suggest that C. papaya leaf extract at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in practical use in traditional medicine in Malaysia could be considered safe as a medicinal agent.

  18. A comparative study of the repeat dose toxicity of grepafloxacin and a number of other fluoroquinolones in rats.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T; Hasimoto, K; Itoh, N; Yamashita, S; Owen, K

    1999-01-01

    Grepafloxacin is a new oral fluoroquinolone with potent activity against community acquired respiratory pathogens, including Streptococcuspneumoniae, and pharmacokinetic properties which allow once daily dosing. As part of its safety evaluation a study of 4 weeks duration was performed to compare the toxicity of grepafloxacin with that of a number of commercially available quinolones in the rat. Groups of eight male Sprague-Dawley rats received either control material or grepafloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin, ofloxacin or ciprofloxacin at an oral dosage of 300 mg/kg/day for 4 consecutive weeks. Effects related to the antibacterial activity of the drugs were seen as increased caecal weight, decreased urinary excretion of sodium, increased water consumption, decreased urine volume, increased urine osmolality, soft stools and suppressed body weight gain. It is well documented that fluoroquinolones can cause lesions in the cartilage of the major diarthrodial joints, and blister formation or erosion on the joint surface was observed in all quinolone-treated groups other than the grepafloxacin group. Some quinolones, have been found to cause crystalluria, which is often associated with secondary nephropathy in laboratory animals due to the poor solubility of quinolones under the alkaline conditions of the urine. In the present study, needle-like crystals in the urinary sediment were observed in enoxacin and ciprofloxacin treated groups only. In conclusion, grepafloxacin was well tolerated and showed a low potential for joint toxicity and crystalluria compared to other quinolones.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance- and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics to study maleic acid toxicity from repeated dose exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Charlene; Chen, Chi-Hung; Chen, Hsin-Chang; Liang, Hao-Jan; Chen, Shu-Ting; Lin, Wan-Yu; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Ching-Yu

    2017-07-10

    Maleic acid (MA), a chemical intermediate used in many consumer and industrial products, was intentionally adulterated in a variety of starch-based foods and instigated food safety incidents in Asia. We aim to elucidate possible mechanisms of MA toxicity after repeated exposure by (1) determining the changes of metabolic profile using (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and multivariate analysis, and (2) investigating the occurrence of oxidative stress using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry by using Sprague-Dawley rat urine samples. Adult male rats were subjected to a 28 day subchronic study (0, 6, 20 and 60 mg kg(-1) ) via oral gavage. Urine was collected twice a day on days 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28; organs underwent histopathological examination. Changes in body weight and relative kidney weights in medium- and high-dose groups were significantly different compared to controls. Morphological alterations were evident in the kidneys and liver. Metabolomic results demonstrated that MA exposure increases the urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-nitroguanine and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α ; levels of acetoacetate, hippurate, alanine and acetate demonstrated time- and dose-dependent variations in the treatment groups. Findings suggest that MA consumption escalates oxidative damage, membrane lipid destruction and disrupt energy metabolism. These aforementioned changes in biomarkers and endogenous metabolites elucidate and assist in characterizing the possible mechanisms by which MA induces nephro- and hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of a repeated dose liver micronucleus assay in rats treated with two genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, dimethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene: the possibility of integrating micronucleus tests with multiple tissues into a repeated dose general toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Rie; Takasawa, Hironao; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Ohyama, Wakako; Okada, Emiko; Narumi, Kazunori; Fujiishi, Yohei; Wako, Yumi; Yasunaga, Katsuaki; Hattori, Akiko; Kawabata, Masayoshi; Nakadate, Kiyoko; Nakagawa, Munehiro; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    As part of a collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for Micronucleus Test (CSGMT) of the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS) in the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS), the present study evaluated the effectiveness of the repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay. Two genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), were administered orally to male rats (6 weeks old at the initial dosing) once daily for 14 and 28 days to evaluate the micronucleus (MN) inducibility in the liver. In addition, these chemicals were evaluated for MN inducibility in the bone marrow (BM) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, i.e. glandular stomach and colon of the same animals used in the RDLMN assay. As a result, both chemicals produced positive results in the liver, although a weak positive response was given by 2-AAF. DMN gave negative results in the tissues other than the liver. 2-AAF produced positive responses in the BM and glandular stomach, and a prominent response was particularly observed in the glandular stomach, which is directly exposed to the test chemicals by gavage. The present results suggest that the RDLMN assay is a useful method for detecting genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, and that it is especially effective for evaluating test chemicals, such as DMN, undetectable by the BM and GI tract MN assay. Moreover, the results in this investigation indicate that the use of multiple tissues in the study integrating the MN tests is more effective than using a single tissue, for detection of the MN induction produced by chemical exposure to rats, and helps to determine the characteristics of the test chemicals.

  1. Influence of coefficient of variation in determining significant difference of quantitative values obtained from 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Sakuratani, Yuki; Abe, Takemaru; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Jun; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of coefficient of variation (CV) in determining significant difference of quantitative values of 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies, we examined 59 parameters of 153 studies conducted in accordance with Chemical Substance Control Law in 12 test facilities. Sex difference was observed in 12 parameters and 10 parameters showed large CV in females. The minimum CV was 0.74% for sodium. CV of electrolytes was comparatively small, whereas enzymes had large CV. Large differences in CV were observed for major parameters among 7-8 test facilities. The changes in CV were grossly classified into 11. Our study revealed that a statistical significant difference is usually detected if there is a difference of 7% in mean values between the groups and the groups have a CV of about 7%. A parameter with a CV as high as 30% may be significantly different, if the difference of the mean between the groups is 30%. It would be ideal to use median value to assess the treatment-related effect, rather than mean, when the CV is very high. We recommend using CV of the body weight as a standard to judge the adverse effect level.

  2. Liver and kidney damage induced by 4-aminopyridine in a repeated dose (28 days) oral toxicity study in rats: gene expression profile of hybrid cell death.

    PubMed

    Frejo, María Teresa; Del Pino, Javier; Lobo, Margarita; García, Jimena; Capo, Miguel Andrés; Díaz, María Jesús

    2014-03-03

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) is an orphan drug indicated for the treatment of neuromuscular disorders. There is a great controversy around the use of this drug because of its narrow safety index and because a large number of adverse effects have been reported. Moreover, it was shown to induce cell death in different cell lines, being reported mainly apoptosis and necrosis as the principal pathways of cell death mediated by blockage of K channels or the Na, K-ATPase, but until now it was not described in vivo cell death induced by 4-aminipyridine. To provide new subchronic toxicity data and specifically, evaluate if 4-AP is able to induce in vivo cell death process and the main pathways related to it, a repeated dose (28 days) oral toxicity study, at therapeutic range of doses, was conducted in rats. The anatomical pathology, the biochemical and hematological parameters were analyzed and a real-time PCR array analysis was developed with an Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). The leucocytes number, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzymatic activity were increased at all dose but the erythrocytes number, the hemoglobin concentration, the alkaline phosphatase (FAL) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzymatic activity were increased only at highest dose studied. However, glucose levels decreased at all doses. The biochemical results are indicative of hepatic damage. The anatomy pathology studies showed cell death only on liver and kidney, and the real-time PCR array on liver tissue expressed a gene expression profile of necrotic and apoptotic induced cell death. The present work shows for the first time in vivo cell death on liver and kidney with features of apoptosis and necrosis induced by 4-AP and the gene expression profile shows that the cell death is mediated by necrotic and apoptotic pathways that support this finding.

  3. Acute and repeated dose (28 days) toxicity studies in rats and dogs of recombinant batroxobin, a snake venom thrombin-like enzyme expressed from Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok Hwan; Cho, Kil-Sang; Seomun, Young; Kim, Jong-Tak; Chung, Kwang-Hoe

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant batroxobin is a thrombin-like enzyme of Bothrops atrox moojeni venom. To evaluate its toxicological effect, it was highly expressed in Pichia pastorisand successfully purified to homogeneity from culture broth supernatant following Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). The maximum tolerated dose of the recombinant batroxobin was examined in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat and Beagle dogs following Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. The approximate lethal dose of recombinant batroxobin was 10 National Institute of Health (NIH) u/kg in male and female rats. Slight test substance-related effects were clearly in male and female dogs at more than 10 NIH u/kg. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was considered to be greater than 30 NIH u/kg in dogs. To investigate the repeated dose toxicity of batroxobin, the test item was intravenously administered to groups of SD rat and Beagle dog every day for 4 weeks. We observed that all animals survived the duration of the study without any effects on their mortality. There were no effects in both rats and dogs regarding their clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmological examination, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weightand gross post mortem examinations. The no adverse effect level (NOAEL) of recombinant batroxobin for both males and females is considered to be greater than 2.5 NIH u/kgin rats and 1 NIH u/kg in dogs, respectively. No toxic effects were noted in target organs. In conclusion, these results show a favorable preclinical profile and may contribute clinical development of recombinant batroxobin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute toxicity, twenty-eight days repeated dose toxicity and genotoxicity of vanadyl trehalose in kunming mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pingzhe; Ni, Zaizhong; Wang, Bin; Ma, Baicheng; Duan, Huikun; Li, Xiaodan; Ma, Xiaofeng; Wei, Qian; Ji, Xiangzhen; Liu, Qiqi; Xing, Shuguang; Li, Minggang

    2017-04-01

    A new trend has been developed using vanadium and organic ligands to form novel compounds in order to improve the beneficial actions and reduce the toxicity of vanadium compounds. In present study, vanadyl trehalose was explored the oral acute toxicity, 28 days repeated dose toxicity and genotoxicity in Kunming mice. The Median Lethal Dose (LD50) of vanadyl trehalose was revealed to be 1000 mg/kg body weight in fasted Kunming mice. Stomach and intestine were demonstrated to be the main target organs of vanadyl trehalose through 28 days repeated dose toxicity study. And vanadyl trehalose also showed particular genotoxicity through mouse bone marrow micronucleus and mouse sperm malformation assay. In brief, vanadyl trehalose presented certain, but finite toxicity, which may provide experimental basis for the clinical application.

  5. A 28-day repeated dose toxicity study of ultraviolet absorber 2-(2'-hydroxy-3',5'-di-tert-butylphenyl) benzotriazole in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Watari, Nobuaki; Mukai, Daisuke; Imai, Toshio; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi; Ema, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    To examine the possible repeated-dose toxicity of an ultraviolet absorber, 2-(2'-hydroxy-3',5'-di-tert-butylphenyl)benzotriazole (HDBB), CD(SD)IGS rats were administered HDBB by gavage at a dose of 0 (vehicle: corn oil), 0.5, 2.5, 12.5, or 62.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for 28 days. At the completion of the administration period, a decrease in red blood cells, hemoglobin, and hematocrit was noted only in males at 2.5 mg/kg and more. Blood biochemical changes were noted at 0.5 mg/kg and more in males and at 62.5 mg/kg in females. Histopathologic changes were observed principally in the liver (vacuolar degeneration and hypertrophy of hepatocytes, bile duct proliferation, etc.) and in the heart (degeneration and hypertrophy of myocardium and cell infiltration). These changes were noted at 0.5 mg/kg and more in males and at 12.5 mg/kg and more in females. At higher doses, hypertrophy of tubular epithelium in the kidneys and diffuse follicular cell hyperplasia in the thyroids in both sexes and increased severity of basophilic tubules in the kidneys and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen in males were also detected. After the 14-day recovery period, these changes mostly recovered in females but not in males. Based on these findings, no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) was concluded to be less than 0.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) in male rats and 2.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) in female rats.

  6. [Perspective of predictive toxicity assessment of in vivo repeated dose toxicity using structural activity relationship].

    PubMed

    Ono, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Tens of thousands of existing chemicals have been widely used for manufacture, agriculture, household and other purposes in worldwide. Only approximately 10% of chemicals have been assessed for human health hazard. The health hazard assessment of residual large number of chemicals for which little or no information of their toxicity is available is urgently needed for public health. However, the conduct of traditional toxicity tests which involves using animals for all of these chemicals would be economically impractical and ethically unacceptable. (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationships [(Q)SARs] are expected as method to have the potential to estimate hazards of chemicals from their structure, while reducing time, cost and animal testing currently needed. Therefore, our studies have been focused on evaluation of available (Q)SAR systems for estimating in vivo repeated toxicity on the liver. The results from our preliminary analysis showed the distribution for LogP of the chemicals which have potential to induce liver toxicity was bell-shape and indicating the possibility to estimate liver toxicity of chemicals from their physicochemical property. We have developed (Q)SAR models to in vivo liver toxicity using three commercially available systems (DEREK, ADMEWorks and MultiCASE) as well as combinatorial use of publically available chemoinformatic tools (CDK, MOSS and WEKA). Distinct data-sets of the 28-day repeated dose toxicity test of new and existing chemicals evaluated in Japan were used for model development and performance test. The results that concordances of commercial systems and public tools were almost same which below 70% may suggest currently attainable knowledge of in silico estimation of complex biological process, though it possible to obtain complementary and enhanced performance by combining predictions from different programs. In future, the combinatorial application of in silico and in vitro tests might provide more accurate

  7. Repeated-dose gavage studies on polychlorotrifluoroethylene acids.

    PubMed

    Kinkead, E R; Bunger, S K; Wolfe, R E; Flemming, C D; Whitmire, R E; Wall, H G

    1991-07-01

    C8 polychlorotrifluoroethylene (pCTFE) oligomers accumulate preferentially in the liver during long-term oral exposure and appear to be more hepatotoxic than C6 oligomers. A repeated-dose gavage study was initiated to determine the relative contributions of the corresponding C6 (trimer) and C8 (tetramer) acid metabolites to the toxicity of pCTFE in the male Fischer 344 rat. Test animals were dosed once per week for various time periods up to one year. A depression (p less than 0.05) in mean body weight occurred in the highest dose tetramer acid (2.16 mg/kg) group. An increase in hepatic peroxisomal beta-oxidation activity was found in the 2.16 mg pCTFE tetramer acid/kg dose group at the 3-, 6-, and 9-month sacrifice periods. An increase in relative liver weight was seen at all sacrifice periods in this dose group. Hepatocellular cytomegaly was a common finding in the higher dose tetramer acid groups but not in the trimer-treated rat groups.

  8. [Twenty-eight days repeated dose toxicity test of N-(fluorodichloromethylthio)phthalimide in rats].

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Y; Tsuda, M; Naito, K; Saitoh, M; Isama, K; Ikarashi, Y; Kawasaki, Y; Momma, J; Kitajima, S; Kaniwa, M

    1995-01-01

    N-(Fluorodichloromethylthio)phthalimide (Fluor-folpet) has been widely used as an anti-mold and anti-bacterial agent. In this study, 28 days repeated-dose oral toxicity study of fluor-folpet was carried out in Slc:Wistar rats. An oral toxicity study for fluor-folpet, the twenty-eight days test, repeated-dose, oral administration, was performed as follows: Five week-old rats, male and female, 10 rats, each/group, were treated with intragastric administration of fluor-folpet with a dose of 0 (1% Sodium CMC, control), 20, 80 and 320 mg/kg, body weight. Recovery test, for 14 days after the last treatment, was examined for the control and the 320 mg/kg groups. The 320 mg/kg groups, both males and females, showed significantly reduced their body-weight gain compared with the control group. In the 320 mg/kg group, five out of 20 male rats and four out of 20 female rats died from dyspnea during the treatment period. In the female rats in the 320 mg/kg group, serum ChE level was decreased to 50% of control level and gamma-GT was increased in a dose-dependent manner, but these serum levels recovered after 14 days non-treatment period. No histopathological change, relating to the treatment, in liver was observed. Increased weight of the kidney and vacuolation in renal tubules were found in both sexes of 320 mg/kg group. Hyperkeratosis and hyperplasia of the stomach epithelium were observed at the dose more than 80 mg/kg in male, and more than 20 mg/kg in female. A supplemental study, repeated-dose, oral administration in rats carried out to examine the dyspnea revealed that severe acute toxic damages in epithelium of nasal cavity and meatus nasopharyngeus were induced by intragastric administration of fluor-folpet. Fluor-folpet is shown to be cytotoxic. In conclusion, the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) for fluor-folpet was not found under the experimental conditions employed in this repeated-dose toxicity study.

  9. Comparison of the repeated dose toxicity of isomers of dinitrotoluene.

    PubMed

    Lent, Emily May; Crouse, Lee C B; Quinn, Michael J; Wallace, Shannon M

    2012-03-01

    Dinitrotoluene (DNT) is a nitroaromatic explosive used in propellant mixtures and in the production of plastics. Isomers of DNT were administered daily via oral gavage to male Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days to determine the subacute toxicity of individual isomers of DNT. The 3,5-DNT isomer was the most toxic isomer, inducing weight loss and mortality within 3 days. Cyanosis and anemia were observed for all isomers. Exposure to 2,4-, 2,6-, and 3,5-DNT resulted in decreased testes mass and degenerative histopathological changes. Increased splenic mass was observed for 2,4-, 2,6-, and 2,5-DNT. Extramedullary hematopoiesis of the spleen was noted for all isomers, while lymphoid hyperplasia of the spleen was noted for all isomers except 2,5-DNT. Increased liver mass was observed for 2,3-DNT and 3,4-DNT. Hepatocellular lesions were observed for 2,6-DNT and 2,4-DNT. Neurotoxic effects were noted for 3,4-DNT, 2,4-DNT, and 3,5-DNT.

  10. A 28-day repeat dose toxicity study of steroidal glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine in the Syrian Golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, Søren; Mandimika, Tafadzwa; Schrøder, Malene; Meyer, Otto; Slob, Wout; Peijnenburg, Ad; Poulsen, Morten

    2009-06-01

    Glycoalkaloids alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine are naturally present toxicants in the potato plant (Solanumtuberosum). Human intake of high doses of glycoalkaloids has led to acute intoxication, in severe cases coma and death. Previous studies have indicated that the ratio of alpha-solanine to alpha-chaconine may determine the degree and nature of the glycoalkaloid toxicity in potatoes, as the toxicity of the two alkaloids act synergistically. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an altered ratio of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine would reduce the toxicity of the glycoalkaloids. The Syrian Golden hamster was given daily doses of alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine by gavage for 28 days. Doses of up to 33.3 mg total glycoalkaloids/kg body weight were applied in ratios of 1:3.7 and 1:70 (alpha-solanine:alpha-chaconine). Administration of the highest doses of both ratios resulted in distended and fluid filled small intestines and stomach. Animals receiving the ratio with the reduced content of alpha-solanine were less affected compared to those receiving the other ratio. Gene expression profiling experiments were conducted using RNA from epithelial scrapings from the small intestines of the hamsters administered the highest doses of the glycoalkaloid treatments. In general, more differential gene expression was observed in the epithelial scrapings of the hamsters fed the ratio of 1:3.7. Mostly, pathways involved in lipid and energy metabolism were affected by the ratio of 1:3.7.

  11. An abbreviated repeat dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity test for high production volume chemicals.

    PubMed

    Scala, R A; Bevan, C; Beyer, B K

    1992-08-01

    A novel protocol is described for obtaining preliminary data on repeated dose systemic effects and reproductive/developmental toxicity. The test protocol was developed by a group of experts at the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use as part of a Screening Information Data Set on high production volume chemicals. Interest in this protocol is shared by several regulatory agencies, including the Organization for Economic Cooperation, the European Community, and the EPA. To validate the study protocol, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) was used. After a dosing period of approximately 6 weeks, EGME showed both systemic and reproductive/developmental effects similar to those previously reported using standard protocols. Thus, this test protocol may be used as a screening tool for high production volume chemicals.

  12. Statistical tools for analysing the data obtained from repeated dose toxicity studies with rodents: a comparison of the statistical tools used in Japan with that of used in other countries.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Pillai, K Sadasivan; Guhatakurta, Soma; Cherian, K M; Ohnishi, Mariko

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to compare the statistical tools used for analysing the data of repeated dose toxicity studies with rodents conducted in 45 countries, with that of Japan. The study revealed that there was no congruence among the countries in the use of statistical tools for analysing the data obtained from the above studies. For example, to analyse the data obtained from repeated dose toxicity studies with rodents, Scheffé's multiple range and Dunnett type (joint type Dunnett) tests are commonly used in Japan, but in other countries use of these statistical tools is not so common. However, statistical techniques used for testing the above data for homogeneity of variance and inter-group comparisons do not differ much between Japan and other countries. In Japan, the data are generally not tested for normality and the same is true with the most of the countries investigated. In the present investigation, out of 127 studies examined, data of only 6 studies were analysed for both homogeneity of variance and normal distribution. For examining homogeneity of variance, we propose Levene's test, since the commonly used Bartlett's test may show heterogeneity in variance in all the groups, if a slight heterogeneity in variance is seen any one of the groups. We suggest the data may be examined for both homogeneity of variance and normal distribution. For the data of the groups that do not show heterogeneity of variance, to find the significant difference among the groups, we recommend Dunnett's test, and for those show heterogeneity of variance, we recommend Steel's test.

  13. Repeated dose oral toxicity of Trivanga Bhasma in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Jamadagni, Pallavi S; Jamadagni, Shrirang B; Singh, Rajendrakumar; Gaidhani, Sudesh N; Upadhyay, Sachchidanand; Hazra, Jayram

    2013-01-01

    Trivanga Bhasma, a metallic preparation containing Bhasmas of Naga (lead), Vanga (tin) and Yashada (zinc), was studied for repeated dose toxicity in Swiss albino mice to estimate No Observed Effect Level (NOEL) or No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL). A total of 80 Swiss albino mice of either sex with an average body weight of 28-30 g were equally divided into four groups (Group I, II, III, and IV). Group I served as control and was given vehicle (honey: water in 2:3 ratio) Group II, III, and IV received Trivanga Bhasma @ 7.8, 39.5,and 78 mg/kg body weight for 90 consecutive days. The effect of drug was assessed on body weight, feed and water consumption changes, hematological, and histopathological parameters. At the end of the study, all animals were sacrificed and examined for gross pathological changes. Histopathological evaluation was performed for control and high dose group. Trivanga Bhasma was found to be safe. No significant clinical signs were noted in all groups studied. No major alterations were observed during histopathological evaluation. Hence, dose rate of 78 mg/kg body weight was established as NOAEL. It is suggested to carry out a toxicity study at possible higher doses and in a different species so as to establish target organ of toxicity.

  14. Toxicological assessment of refined naphthenic acids in a repeated dose/developmental toxicity screening test.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; North, Colin M; Podhasky, Paula; Charlap, Jeffrey H; Kuhl, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are primarily cycloaliphatic carboxylic acids with 10 to 16 carbons. To characterize the potential of refined NAs (>70% purity) to cause reproductive and/or developmental effects, Sprague-Dawley rats (12/group) were given oral doses of 100, 300, or 900 mg/kg/d, beginning 14 days prior to mating, then an additional 14 days for males or through lactation day 3 for females (up to 53 days) in a repeated dose/reproductive toxicity test (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] 422). Potential mutagenic effects were assessed using Salmonella (OECD 471) and in in vivo micronucleus tests (OECD 474) using bone marrow taken from treated animals in the screening study described previously. Systemic effects included reduced terminal body weights, increased liver weights, and changes in a number of blood cell parameters. The overall no effect level for all target organ effects was 100 mg/kg/d. In the reproductive/developmental toxicity assessment, there were significant reductions in numbers of live born offspring in groups exposed to 300 and 900 mg/kg/d. The overall no effect level for developmental effects was 100 mg/kg/d. The data from the Salmonella and micronucleus tests provide evidence that refined NAs are not genotoxic.

  15. Systemic and immunotoxicity of pristine and PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in an intravenous 28 days repeated dose toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Shanshan; Hu, Yuanyuan; Li, Han; Zhang, Tao; Xue, Yuying; Pu, Yuepu

    2017-01-01

    The numerous increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) derived from nanotechnology has raised concerns about their biosafety and potential toxicity. CNTs cause immunologic dysfunction and limit the application of CNTs in biomedicine. The immunological responses induced by pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs) and PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-PEG) on BALB/c mice via an intravenous administration were investigated. The results reflect that the p-MWCNTs induced significant increases in spleen, thymus, and lung weight. Mice treated with p-MWCNTs showed altered lymphocyte populations (CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), and CD19(+)) in peripheral blood and increased serum IgM and IgG levels, and splenic macrophage ultrastructure indicated mitochondria swelling. p-MWCNTs inhibited humoral and cellular immunity function and were associated with decreased immune responses against sheep erythrocytes and serum hemolysis level. Natural killer (NK) activity was not modified by two types of MWCNTs. In comparison with two types of MWCNTs, for a same dose, p-MWCNTs caused higher levels of inflammation and immunosuppression than MWCNTs-PEG. The results of immunological function suggested that after intravenous administration with p-MWCNTs caused more damage to systemic immunity than MWCNTs-PEG. Here, we demonstrated that a surface functional modification on MWCNTs reduces their immune perturbations in vivo. The chemistry-modified MWCNTs change their preferred immune response in vivo and reduce the immunotoxicity of p-MWCNTs.

  16. Systemic and immunotoxicity of pristine and PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes in an intravenous 28 days repeated dose toxicity study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Tang, Meng; Zhang, Shanshan; Hu, Yuanyuan; Li, Han; Zhang, Tao; Xue, Yuying; Pu, Yuepu

    2017-01-01

    The numerous increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) derived from nanotechnology has raised concerns about their biosafety and potential toxicity. CNTs cause immunologic dysfunction and limit the application of CNTs in biomedicine. The immunological responses induced by pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNTs) and PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs-PEG) on BALB/c mice via an intravenous administration were investigated. The results reflect that the p-MWCNTs induced significant increases in spleen, thymus, and lung weight. Mice treated with p-MWCNTs showed altered lymphocyte populations (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+) in peripheral blood and increased serum IgM and IgG levels, and splenic macrophage ultrastructure indicated mitochondria swelling. p-MWCNTs inhibited humoral and cellular immunity function and were associated with decreased immune responses against sheep erythrocytes and serum hemolysis level. Natural killer (NK) activity was not modified by two types of MWCNTs. In comparison with two types of MWCNTs, for a same dose, p-MWCNTs caused higher levels of inflammation and immunosuppression than MWCNTs-PEG. The results of immunological function suggested that after intravenous administration with p-MWCNTs caused more damage to systemic immunity than MWCNTs-PEG. Here, we demonstrated that a surface functional modification on MWCNTs reduces their immune perturbations in vivo. The chemistry-modified MWCNTs change their preferred immune response in vivo and reduce the immunotoxicity of p-MWCNTs. PMID:28280324

  17. A 90-day repeated dose oral (gavage) toxicity study of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) in rats (with functional observational battery and motor activity determinations).

    PubMed

    Chengelis, Christopher P; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie B; Radovsky, Ann; Shinohara, Motoki

    2009-06-01

    Possible toxic effects of perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) were evaluated when administered orally by gavage to rats at levels up to 200mg/kg/day for 90 days. Lower body weight gains were noted in the 10, 50 and 200mg/kg/day group males (not dose-responsive) throughout dosing. Other changes included lower red blood cell parameters, higher reticulocyte counts and lower globulin in the 200mg/kg/day group males and females, higher liver enzymes in males at 50 and 200mg/kg/day, lower total protein and higher albumin/globulin ratio, and lower cholesterol, calcium in males at 200mg/kg/day. Minimal centrilobular hepatocellular hypertrophy was present in 200mg/kg/day group males and correlated with higher liver weights and slightly higher peroxisome beta oxidation activity at the end of the dosing period. Based on liver histopathology and liver weight changes, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for oral administration was 50mg/kg/day for males and 200mg/kg/day for females.

  18. Single- and repeated-dose oral toxicity studies of citicoline free-base (choline cytidine 5'-pyrophosphate) in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Schauss, A G; Somfai-Relle, S; Financsek, I; Glavits, R; Parent, S C; Endres, J R; Varga, T; Szücs, Z; Clewell, A

    2009-01-01

    The dietary supplement Citicoline free-base (choline cytidine 5'-pyrophosphate) was toxicologically evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats using oral gavage. In an acute 14-day study, 2000 mg/kg was well tolerated. In a 90-day study, 100, 350, and 1000 mg/kg/day doses resulted in no mortality. In males, slight significant increases in serum creatinine (350 and 1000 mg/kg/day), and decreases in urine volume (all treated groups) were observed. In females, slight significant increases in total white blood cell and absolute lymphocyte counts (1000 mg/kg/day), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (100 and 350, but not 1000 mg/kg/day) were noted. A dose-related increase in renal tubular mineralization, without degenerative or inflammatory reaction, was found in females (all treated groups) and two males (1000 mg/kg/day). Renal mineralization in rats (especially females) is influenced by calcium:phosphorus ratios in the diet. A high level of citicoline consumption resulted in increased phosphorus intake in the rats, and likely explains this result.

  19. Repeated dose study of sucralose tolerance in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Baird, I M; Shephard, N W; Merritt, R J; Hildick-Smith, G

    2000-01-01

    Two tolerance studies were conducted in healthy human adult volunteers. The first study was an ascending dose study conducted in eight subjects, in which sucralose was administered at doses of 1, 2. 5, 5 and 10mg/kg at 48-hour intervals and followed by daily dosing at 2mg/kg for 3 days and 5mg/kg for 4 days. In the second study, subjects consumed either sucralose (n=77) or fructose (50g/day) (n=31) twice daily in single blind fashion. Sucralose dosage levels were 125mg/day for weeks 1-3, 250mg/day during weeks 4-7, and 500mg/day during weeks 8-12. No adverse experiences or clinically detectable effects were attributable to sucralose in either study. Similarly, haematology, serum biochemistry, urinalysis and EKG tracings were unaffected by sucralose administration. In the 13-week study, serial slit lamp ophthalmologic examination performed in a random subset of the study groups revealed no changes. Fasting and 2-hour post-dosing blood sucralose concentrations obtained daily during week 12 of the study revealed no rising trend for blood sucralose. Sucralose was well tolerated by human volunteers in single doses up to 10mg/kg/day and repeated doses increasing to 5mg/kg/day for 13 weeks. Based on these studies and the extensive animal safety database, there is no indication that adverse effects on human health would occur from frequent or long-term exposure to sucralose at the maximum anticipated levels of intake.

  20. The OSIRIS Weight of Evidence approach: ITS for the endpoints repeated-dose toxicity (RepDose ITS).

    PubMed

    Tluczkiewicz, Inga; Batke, Monika; Kroese, Dinant; Buist, Harrie; Aldenberg, Tom; Pauné, Eduard; Grimm, Helvi; Kühne, Ralph; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Escher, Sylvia E

    2013-11-01

    In the FP6 European project OSIRIS, Integrated Testing Strategies (ITSs) for relevant toxicological endpoints were developed to avoid new animal testing and thus to reduce time and costs. The present paper describes the development of an ITS for repeated-dose toxicity called RepDose ITS which evaluates the conditions under which in vivo non-guideline studies are reliable. In a tiered approach three aspects of these "non-guideline" studies are assessed: the documentation of the study (reliability), the quality of the study design (adequacy) and the scope of examination (validity). The reliability is addressed by the method "Knock-out criteria", which consists of four essential criteria for repeated-dose toxicity studies. A second tool, termed QUANTOS (Quality Assessment of Non-guideline Toxicity Studies), evaluates and weights the adequacy of the study by using intra-criterion and inter-criteria weighting. Finally, the Coverage approach calculates a probability that the detected Lowest-Observed-Effect-Level (LOEL) is similar to the LOEL of a guideline study dependent on the examined targets and organs of the non-guideline study. If the validity and adequacy of the non-guideline study are insufficient for risk assessment, the ITS proposes to apply category approach or the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) concept, and only as a last resort new animal-testing.

  1. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: Assessment of causality and dose in reported cases

    PubMed Central

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L.; Bond, G. Randall; Clark, Richard F.; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S.; Dart, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study is to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years of age following repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. Methods We reviewed United States (US) Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US FDA Adverse event reports and US Manufacturer safety reports describing adverse effects following acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death following administration to children younger than 6 years of age were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen, and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supra-therapeutic. Results Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Conclusions While we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death following repeated doses of acetaminophen, all of the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses greater than 75 mg/kg/day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg/day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years of age. PMID:22407198

  2. Toxicity from repeated doses of acetaminophen in children: assessment of causality and dose in reported cases.

    PubMed

    Heard, Kennon; Bui, Alison; Mlynarchek, Sara L; Green, Jody L; Bond, G Randall; Clark, Richard F; Kozer, Eran; Koff, Raymond S; Dart, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Liver injury has been reported in children treated with repeated doses of acetaminophen. The objective of this study was to identify and validate reports of liver injury or death in children younger than 6 years who were administered repeated therapeutic doses of acetaminophen. We reviewed US Poison Center data, peer-reviewed literature, US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reports, and US Manufacturer Safety Reports describing adverse effects after acetaminophen administration. Reports that described hepatic abnormalities (description of liver injury or abnormal laboratory testing) or death after acetaminophen administration to children younger than 6 years were included. The identified reports were double abstracted and then reviewed by an expert panel to determine if the hepatic injury was related to acetaminophen and whether the dose of acetaminophen was therapeutic (≤75 mg/kg) or supratherapeutic. Our search yielded 2531 reports of adverse events associated with acetaminophen use. From these cases, we identified 76 cases of hepatic injury and 26 deaths associated with repeated acetaminophen administration. There were 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities and no deaths associated with what our panel determined to be therapeutic doses. A large proportion of cases could not be fully evaluated due to incomplete case reporting. Although we identified numerous examples of liver injury and death after repeated doses of acetaminophen, all the deaths and all but 6 cases of hepatic abnormalities involved doses more than 75 mg/kg per day. This study suggests that the doses of less than 75 mg/kg per day of acetaminophen are safe for children younger than 6 years.

  3. Inhalation threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) - Structural alerts discriminate high from low repeated-dose inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schüürmann, Gerrit; Ebert, Ralf-Uwe; Tluczkiewicz, Inga; Escher, Sylvia E; Kühne, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    The threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) of a compound represents an exposure value below which the associated human health risk is considered negligible. As such, this approach offers assessing the risk of potential toxicants when little or no toxicological information is available. For the inhalation repeated-dose TTC, the goal was to derive structural alerts that discriminate between high- and low-toxic compounds. A further aim was to identify physicochemical parameters related to the inhalation-specific bioavailability of the compounds, and to explore their use as predictors of high vs low toxicity. 296 compounds with subacute, subchronic and chronic inhalation toxicity NOEC (no-observed effect concentration) values were subdivided into three almost equal-sized high-, medium- and low-toxic (HTox, MTox, LTox) potency classes. Whereas the derived 14 HTox and 7 LTox structural alerts yield an only moderate discrimination between these three groups, the high-toxic vs low-toxic mis-classification is very low: LTox-predicted compounds are not HTox to 97.5%, and HTox-predicted compounds not LTox to 88.6%. The probability of a compound being HTox vs LTox is triggered further by physicochemical properties encoding the tendency to evaporate from blood. The new structural alerts may aid in the predictive inhalation toxicity assessment of compounds as well as in designing low-toxicity chemicals, and provide a rationale for the chemistry underlying the toxicological outcome that can also be used for scoping targeted experimental studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Screening of repeated dose toxicity data present in SCC(NF)P/SCCS safety evaluations of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Vinken, Mathieu; Pauwels, Marleen; Ates, Gamze; Vivier, Manon; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2012-03-01

    Alternative methods, replacing animal testing, are urgently needed in view of the European regulatory changes in the field of cosmetic products and their ingredients. In this context, a joint research initiative called SEURAT was recently raised by the European Commission and COLIPA, representing the European cosmetics industry, with the overall goal of developing an animal-free repeated dose toxicity testing strategy for human safety assessment purposes. Although cosmetic ingredients are usually harmless for the consumer, one of the initial tasks of this research consortium included the identification of organs that could potentially be affected by cosmetic ingredients upon systemic exposure. The strategy that was followed hereof is described in the present paper and relies on the systematic evaluation, by using a self-generated electronic databank, of published reports issued by the scientific committee of DG SANCO responsible for the safety of cosmetic ingredients. By screening of the repeated dose toxicity studies present in these reports, it was found that the liver is potentially the most frequently targeted organ by cosmetic ingredients when orally administered to experimental animals, followed by the kidney and the spleen. Combined listing of altered morphological, histopathological, and biochemical parameters subsequently indicated the possible occurrence of hepatotoxicity, including steatosis and cholestasis, triggered by a limited number of cosmetic compounds. These findings are not only of relevance for the in vitro modeling efforts and choice of compounds to be tested in the SEURAT project cluster, but also demonstrate the importance of using previously generated toxicological data through an electronic databank for addressing specific questions regarding the safety evaluation of cosmetic ingredients.

  5. A 13-week dermal repeat-dose neurotoxicity study of hydrodesulfurized kerosene in rats.

    PubMed

    Breglia, Rudolph; Bui, Quang; Burnett, Donald; Koschier, Francis; Lapadula, Elizabeth; Podhasky, Paula; Schreiner, Ceinwen; White, Russell

    2014-01-01

    A 13-week dermal repeat-dose toxicity study was conducted with hydrodesulfurized (HDS) kerosene, a test material that also met the commercial specifications for aviation turbine fuel (jet A). The objectives were to assess the potential for target organ toxicity and neurotoxicity. The HDS kerosene was applied to the shaved backs of Sprague-Dawley CD rats, 12/sex/group, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk in doses of 0 (vehicle control), 165 mg/kg (20% HDS kerosene), 330 mg/kg (40% HDS kerosene), or 495 mg/kg (60% HDS kerosene). Additional rats (12/sex) from the control and the high-dose groups were held without treatment for 4 weeks to assess recovery. Standard parameters of toxicity were investigated during the in-life phase. At necropsy, organs were weighed and selected tissues were processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurobehavioral evaluations included tests of motor activity and functional observations that were conducted pretest, at intervals during the exposure period and after recovery. No test substance-related effects on mortality, clinical observations (except dermal irritation), body weight, or clinical chemistry values were observed. A dose-related increase in skin irritation, confirmed histologically as minimal, was evident at the dosing site. The only statistically significant change considered potentially treatment related was an increase in the neutrophil count in females at 13 weeks. No test article-related effects were observed in the neurobehavioral assessments or gross or microscopic findings in the peripheral or central nervous system tissues in any of the dose groups. Excluding skin irritation, the no observed adverse effect level value for all effects was considered 495 mg/kg/d.

  6. Toxicological assessment of heavy straight run naphtha in a repeated dose/reproductive toxicity screening test.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Steup, David; Schreiner, Ceinwen; Podhasky, Paula; Malley, Linda A; Roberts, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Gasoline blending stocks (naphthas) are comprised of normal, iso- and cycloparaffins and aromatic hydrocarbons with carbon numbers ranging from C4 to C12. Heavy straight run naphtha (HSRN, CAS number 64741-41-9) was selected for toxicity screening because substances of this type contain relatively high levels (28%) of cycloparaffins by comparison to other naphtha streams and the data complement toxicity information on other gasoline blending streams. Rats were exposed by inhalation to wholly vaporized material at levels of approximately 100, 500, or 3000 parts per million (ppm) daily to screen the potential for systemic toxicity, neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and developmental effects to postnatal day 4. All animals survived the treatment period. Principal effects of repeated exposure included increased liver weights in males and females, increased kidney weights in males, and histological changes in the thyroid, secondary to liver enzyme induction. These changes were not considered to be toxicologically meaningful and are not relevant to humans. There were no treatment-related effects in functional observation tests or motor activity; no significant reductions in fertility or changes in other reproductive parameters; and no evidence of developmental toxicity in offspring. The overall no observed adverse effect concentration was 3000 ppm (approximately 13, 600 mg/m(3)). In conclusion the HSRN effects on liver and kidney are consistent with the results of other studies of volatile fractions or other naphthas or formulated gasoline, and there were no HSRN effects on neurological developmental or reproductive parameters.

  7. The ToxBank Data Warehouse: Supporting the Replacement of In Vivo Repeated Dose Systemic Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Kohonen, Pekka; Benfenati, Emilio; Bower, David; Ceder, Rebecca; Crump, Michael; Cross, Kevin; Grafström, Roland C; Healy, Lyn; Helma, Christoph; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Maggioni, Silvia; Miller, Scott; Myatt, Glenn; Rautenberg, Michael; Stacey, Glyn; Willighagen, Egon; Wiseman, Jeff; Hardy, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the SEURAT-1 (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-1) research cluster, comprised of seven EU FP7 Health projects co-financed by Cosmetics Europe, is to generate a proof-of-concept to show how the latest technologies, systems toxicology and toxicogenomics can be combined to deliver a test replacement for repeated dose systemic toxicity testing on animals. The SEURAT-1 strategy is to adopt a mode-of-action framework to describe repeated dose toxicity, combining in vitro and in silico methods to derive predictions of in vivo toxicity responses. ToxBank is the cross-cluster infrastructure project whose activities include the development of a data warehouse to provide a web-accessible shared repository of research data and protocols, a physical compounds repository, reference or "gold compounds" for use across the cluster (available via wiki.toxbank.net), and a reference resource for biomaterials. Core technologies used in the data warehouse include the ISA-Tab universal data exchange format, REpresentational State Transfer (REST) web services, the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the OpenTox standards. We describe the design of the data warehouse based on cluster requirements, the implementation based on open standards, and finally the underlying concepts and initial results of a data analysis utilizing public data related to the gold compounds.

  8. Studies of the toxicological potential of tripeptides (L-valyl-L-prolyl-L-proline and L-isoleucyl-L-prolyl-L-proline): III. Single- and/or repeated-dose toxicity of tripeptides-containing Lactobacillus helveticus-fermented milk powder and casein hydrolysate in rats.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yasunori; Mennear, John H; Bernard, Bruce K

    2005-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to assess the toxicological potential of orally administered tripeptides in rats. The studies employed powdered L-valyl-L-prolyl-L-proline (VPP)- and L-isoleucyl-L-prolyl-L-proline (IPP)-containing test articles, including (1) powdered Lactobacillus helveticus-fermented milk (FM), (2) pasteurized casein hydrolysate (CH) generated by Aspergillus oryzae protease, and (3) synthesized VPP. All test articles were administered by oral gavage to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Specific goals of the single-dose and repeated-dose studies were to (1) identify doses that produce evidence of systemic and/or local (i.e., gastrointestinal) toxicity (e.g., lowest-observable-effect level [LOEL]); (2) estimate the maximally tolerated oral dose (MTD); and (3) identify specific target organs for toxicity of these tripeptides. Single doses of CH (2000 mg/kg), powdered FM (2000 or 4000 mg/kg), or VPP (40, 200, or 400 mg/kg) were administered 14 days prior to study termination. No treatment regimen caused either antemortem (gross observations, body weight, and food consumption parameters) or postmortem (necropsy) evidence of either systemic or local toxicity. In the repeated-dose study, powdered FM (0, 500, 1000, or 2000 mg/kg body weight [BW]/day) was administered by gastric gavage to male and female rats for 28 consecutive days. Antemortem evaluative parameters included gross observations, ophthalmic examinations, and clinical pathology (clinical chemistry, hematology, and urinalysis). Post mortem parameters included necropsy, determination of organ weights, and microscopic examination of major organs. There was neither in-life nor postmortem evidence that powdered FM administration caused physiological or toxicological changes. Under the conditions of these experiments, the single-dose LOEL of powdered FM, CH, and VPP were found to be greater than 4000, 2000, and 400 mg/kg, respectively. The results of the repeated-dose study do not support

  9. A 13-week repeated-dose oral toxicity and bioaccumulation of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Sim, Jaehoon; Kim, Younghun; Han, Beom Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Lee, Somin; Cho, Myung-Haing; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Because of an increase in the commercial applications of manufactured nanoparticles, the issue of potential adverse health effects of nanoparticles following intended or unintended exposure is rapidly gaining attention. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (AlNPs, rod-type, 1.5, 3, and 6 mg/kg) after oral administration to mice for 13 weeks. Compared with the control group, the consumption of diet and drinking water and body weight gain decreased in the group treated with AlNPs. The group treated with 6 mg/kg AlNPs also showed a marked elevation in the count of white blood cells that associated with a significant decrease and increase to the proportion of eosinophils and lymphocytes, respectively. In addition, the secretion of IL-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 increased in a dose-dependent manner in the treated groups. Furthermore, AlNPs showed the highest accumulation in the liver and kidneys compared with the control group, increased the lactate dehydrogenase level in the blood, and induced the development of a pathological lesion in the liver and kidneys. Taken together, we suggest that the target organs of rod-type AlNPs may be the liver, kidneys and the immune system, and the not-observed adverse effect level may be lower than 6 mg/kg.

  10. Single- and repeat-dose toxicity of IDX14184, a nucleotide prodrug with antiviral activity for hepatitis C viral infection, in mice, rats, and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Luo, S; Rush, R; Standring, D

    2016-05-01

    The single- and repeat-dose toxicity profile of IDX14184, a novel guanosine nucleotide prodrug with antiviral activity against hepatitis C viral infection, was characterized following once daily oral administration for durations up to 13, 26, and 32 weeks in mouse, rat, and cynomolgus monkey, respectively. The heart, liver, kidney, skeletal muscles, and lower gastrointestinal tract (cecum, colon, and/or rectum) were identified as the primary toxicity targets in these nonclinical species. The mouse was relatively insensitive to IDX14184-induced cardiac toxicity and hepatotoxicity. The rat was very sensitive to IDX14184-induced skeletal muscle, liver, heart, and lower gastrointestinal tract toxicity but relatively insensitive to kidney toxicity. The monkey is a good animal species to detect IDX14184-induced toxicity in the cardiac and skeletal muscles, and in the liver and kidney, but not lower gastrointestinal tract toxicity. The toxicity profile of IDX14184 was most appropriately characterized in rats and monkeys. The conduct of a series of cardiac size and function assessments during a non-rodent toxicology study using echocardiography proved great utility in this work. IDX14184 clinical development was eventually terminated due to suboptimal efficacy and regulatory concerns on potential heart and kidney injury in patients, as seen with a different guanosine nucleotide prodrug, BMS-986094.

  11. [Twenty-eight-day repeated dose toxicity test for tetrachlorvinphos in Wistar rat].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Suzuki, S; Takada, K; Sai, K; Kamata, E; Umemura, T; Kaneko, T; Kurokawa, Y

    1990-01-01

    A 28-day oral toxicity test of tetrachlorvinphos (TCV) was conducted in male and female Slc: Wistar rats by gavage at dose levels of 0, 10, 100 or 1000 mg/kg/day. The male and female rats showed dose-related inhibition of serum cholinesterase activity and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase activity. At a dose of 1000 mg/kg, body weight gain was decreased in males, and there were 6 deaths in females. Adrenal gland, liver, kidney and thyroid gland weights were increased. The adrenal lesions were characterized by vacuolization and swelling of the cortex cells. The hepatic lesions consisted of vacuolization and necrosis of the hepatocytes. The renal lesions consisted of regeneration and necrosis of the tubular epithelial cells. These lesions were mostly observed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg. After a 14-day recovery period in the 1000 mg/kg group, the changes of cholinesterase, total cholesterol, gamma-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase and blood urea nitrogen in serum were restored or showed a tendency toward recovery. However, the lesions in the kidney and adrenal remained. More than 14 days are therefore considered to be needed for recovery. At doses of more than 10 mg/kg, significant inhibition of the serum cholinesterase activity in both sexes, erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase activity in males, and lesions of the adrenal gland in females were observed. Target organs for TCV-treated rats were the adrenal, liver and kidney. It was concluded that the NOEL under this experimental condition is less than 10 mg/kg/day.

  12. Evaluation of 90 day repeated dose oral toxicity and reproductive/developmental toxicity of 3'-hydroxypterostilbene in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Muhammed; Bani, Sarang; Natarajan, Sankaran; Pandey, Anjali; S, Naveed

    2017-01-01

    3'-Hydroxypterostilbene (3'-HPT) is one of the active constituents of Sphaerophysa salsula and Pterocarpus marsupium. Despite many proposed therapeutic applications, the safety profile of 3'-HPT has not been established. The present work investigated 90 day repeated oral dose and reproductive (developmental) toxicity of 3'-HPT as a test substance in rats as per OECD guidelines. 90 day toxicity was conducted in sixty Sprague Dawley rats of each sex (120 rats), grouped into six dosage groups of 0 (control), 0 (control recovery), 20 (low dose), 80 (mid dose), 200 (high dose) and 200 (high dose recovery) mg/kg bwt/day (body weight/day) respectively. For the reproductive toxicity study forty Wistar rats of each sex (80 rats) divided into four dosage groups received 0 (vehicle control), 20 (low dose), 100 (mid dose) and 200 (high dose) mg/kg bwt/day of 3'-HPT respectively for a period of two weeks while pre-mating, mating, on the day before sacrifice, in females during pregnancy and four days of lactation period. Results showed no significant differences in body weight, food intake, absolute organ weight, haematology, with no adverse effects (toxicity) on biochemical values nor any abnormal clinical signs or behavioural changes were observed in any of the control/treatment groups, including reproductive and developmental parameters, gross and histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested a No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Level (NOAEL) of 200 mg/kg bwt/day in rats after oral administration, implying 3'-HPT did not exhibit any toxicity under the study conditions employed.

  13. Evaluation of 90 day repeated dose oral toxicity and reproductive/developmental toxicity of 3'-hydroxypterostilbene in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Muhammed; Bani, Sarang; Natarajan, Sankaran; Pandey, Anjali; S, Naveed

    2017-01-01

    3'-Hydroxypterostilbene (3'-HPT) is one of the active constituents of Sphaerophysa salsula and Pterocarpus marsupium. Despite many proposed therapeutic applications, the safety profile of 3'-HPT has not been established. The present work investigated 90 day repeated oral dose and reproductive (developmental) toxicity of 3'-HPT as a test substance in rats as per OECD guidelines. 90 day toxicity was conducted in sixty Sprague Dawley rats of each sex (120 rats), grouped into six dosage groups of 0 (control), 0 (control recovery), 20 (low dose), 80 (mid dose), 200 (high dose) and 200 (high dose recovery) mg/kg bwt/day (body weight/day) respectively. For the reproductive toxicity study forty Wistar rats of each sex (80 rats) divided into four dosage groups received 0 (vehicle control), 20 (low dose), 100 (mid dose) and 200 (high dose) mg/kg bwt/day of 3'-HPT respectively for a period of two weeks while pre-mating, mating, on the day before sacrifice, in females during pregnancy and four days of lactation period. Results showed no significant differences in body weight, food intake, absolute organ weight, haematology, with no adverse effects (toxicity) on biochemical values nor any abnormal clinical signs or behavioural changes were observed in any of the control/treatment groups, including reproductive and developmental parameters, gross and histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested a No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Level (NOAEL) of 200 mg/kg bwt/day in rats after oral administration, implying 3'-HPT did not exhibit any toxicity under the study conditions employed. PMID:28257483

  14. Toxicity profile of repeated doses of PEG-asparaginase incorporated into a pediatric-type regimen for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aldoss, Ibrahim; Douer, Dan; Behrendt, Carolyn E; Chaudhary, Preeti; Mohrbacher, Ann; Vrona, Janice; Pullarkat, Vinod

    2016-04-01

    Despite having been long regarded as too toxic for adult patients, pediatric-like regimens containing L-asparaginase have resulted in improved outcomes for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To characterize the spectrum of toxicity of repeated doses of polyethylene glycolated-asparaginase (PEG-asp) in adults, we reviewed all doses (2000 IU/m(2) ) administered as part of a pediatric-inspired regimen in adult ALL at our center. Subjects aged 18-60 yr with ALL (n = 152, 69.1% male) contributed 522 dose cycles to the study. Hepatotoxicity was the most common adverse event: grades 3-4 transaminitis and hyperbilirubinemia occurred in 53.9% and 23.7% of subjects, respectively. Hepatotoxicity was reversible; no cases of fulminate hepatic failure were observed. Other toxicities affecting at least 5% of subjects were grades 3-4 triglyceridemia in 50.9%, hypofibrinogenemia (<100 mg/dL) in 47.9%, clinical pancreatitis in 12.6%, venous thromboembolism in 11.2%, allergic reaction in 7.2%, and any grade bleeding in 5.3%. PEG-asp was always discontinued after grades 3-4 pancreatitis or allergic reaction. Otherwise, toxicities did not preclude administration of additional cycles of the drug. Our results suggest that repeated PEG-asp dosing is safe in adults aged 18-60 yr, even after occurrence of a drug-related toxicity.

  15. Development of QSAR models using artificial neural network analysis for risk assessment of repeated-dose, reproductive, and developmental toxicities of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Aiba Née Kaneko, Maki; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Sasa, Hitoshi; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    Use of laboratory animals for systemic toxicity testing is subject to strong ethical and regulatory constraints, but few alternatives are yet available. One possible approach to predict systemic toxicity of chemicals in the absence of experimental data is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis. Here, we present QSAR models for prediction of maximum "no observed effect level" (NOEL) for repeated-dose, developmental and reproductive toxicities. NOEL values of 421 chemicals for repeated-dose toxicity, 315 for reproductive toxicity, and 156 for developmental toxicity were collected from Japan Existing Chemical Data Base (JECDB). Descriptors to predict toxicity were selected based on molecular orbital (MO) calculations, and QSAR models employing multiple independent descriptors as the input layer of an artificial neural network (ANN) were constructed to predict NOEL values. Robustness of the models was indicated by the root-mean-square (RMS) errors after 10-fold cross-validation (0.529 for repeated-dose, 0.508 for reproductive, and 0.558 for developmental toxicity). Evaluation of the models in terms of the percentages of predicted NOELs falling within factors of 2, 5 and 10 of the in-vivo-determined NOELs suggested that the model is applicable to both general chemicals and the subset of chemicals listed in International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI). Our results indicate that ANN models using in silico parameters have useful predictive performance, and should contribute to integrated risk assessment of systemic toxicity using a weight-of-evidence approach. Availability of predicted NOELs will allow calculation of the margin of safety, as recommended by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS).

  16. Prospective evaluation of potential toxicity of repeated doses of Thymus vulgaris L. extracts in rats by means of clinical chemistry, histopathology and NMR-based metabonomic approach.

    PubMed

    Benourad, Fouzia; Kahvecioglu, Zehra; Youcef-Benkada, Mokhtar; Colet, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-01

    In the field of natural extracts, research generally focuses on the study of their biological activities for food, cosmetic, or pharmacological purposes. The evaluation of their adverse effects is often overlooked. In this study, the extracts of Thymus vulgaris L. were obtained by two different extraction methods. Intraperitoneal injections of both extracts were given daily for four days to male Wistar Han rats, at two different doses for each extract. The evaluation of the potential toxic effects included histopathological examination of liver, kidney, and lung tissues, as well as serum biochemistry of liver and kidney parameters, and (1)H-NMR-based metabonomic profiles of urine. The results showed that no histopathological changes were observed in the liver and kidney in rats treated with both extracts of thyme. Serum biochemical investigations revealed significant increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and uric acid in animals treated with polyphenolic extract at both doses. In these latter groups, metabonomic analysis revealed alterations in a number of urine metabolites involved in the energy metabolism in liver mitochondria. Indeed, the results showed alterations of glycolysis, Krebs cycle, and β-oxidative pathways as evidenced by increases in lactate and ketone bodies, and decreases in citrate, α-ketoglutarate, creatinine, hippurate, dimethylglycine, and dimethyalanine. In conclusion, this work showed that i.p. injection of repeated doses of thyme extracts causes some disturbances of intermediary metabolism in rats. The metabonomic study revealed interesting data which could be further used to determine the cellular pathways affected by such treatments.

  17. Combined repeated dose and reproductive/developmental toxicity screening test of the nitrophenolic herbicide dinoseb, 2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol, in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mariko; Furuhashi, Tadakazu; Poncipe, Carlo; Ema, Makoto

    2008-04-01

    In a combined repeated dose toxicity study with reproduction/developmental toxicity screening test, Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats were dosed with dinoseb, 2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenol, by gavage at 0 (vehicle), 0.78, 2.33, or 7.0 mg/kg bw/day. Six males per group were dosed for a total of 42 days beginning 14 days before mating. Twelve females per group were dosed for a total of 44-48 days beginning 14 days before mating to day 6 of lactation throughout the mating and gestation period. Recovery groups of six males per group and nonpregnant six females per group were dosed for 42 days followed by a 14-day recovery period. No deaths were observed in males of any dose group or in females of the recovery groups. At 7.0 mg/kg bw/day, eight females died and two animals were moribund during late pregnancy, and a significant decrease in body weight gain was found in both sexes. Hematocrit was significantly higher at 0.78 mg/kg bw/day and above in the main group males at the end of administration period. Reduction in extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen was significant at 2.33 mg/kg bw/day in the main group females. Sperm analysis revealed a decrease in sperm motility and an increase in the rates of abnormal sperm, abnormal tail, and abnormal head at 7.0 mg/kg bw/day. A number of dams delivered their pups and of dams with live pups at delivery was significantly lowered in the 7.0 mg/kg bw/day group. Based on these findings, the LOAEL for males and NOAEL for females were 0.78 mg/kg bw/day, and the NOAEL for reproductive/developmental toxicity was considered to be 2.33 mg/kg bw/day.

  18. Construction of the Database of Rat Repeated-dose Toxicity Tests of Pesticides for the Toxicological Characterization of Hepatocyte Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akane; Masuda, Miyabi; Kawano, Takuya; Kitsunai, Yoko; Nakayama, Haruka; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Uramaru, Naoto; Hosaka, Takuomi; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2017-01-01

     Liver and hepatocyte hypertrophy can be induced by exposure to chemical compounds, but the mechanisms and toxicological characteristics of these phenomena have not yet been investigated extensively. In particular, it remains unclear whether the hepatocyte hypertrophy induced by chemical compounds should be judged as an adaptive response or an adverse effect. Thus, understanding of the toxicological characteristics of hepatocyte hypertrophy is of great importance to the safety evaluation of pesticides and other chemical compounds. To this end, we have constructed a database of potentially toxic pesticides. Using risk assessment reports of pesticides that are publicly available from the Food Safety Commission of Japan, we extracted all observations/findings that were based on 90-day subacute toxicity tests and 2-year chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity tests in rats. Analysis of the database revealed that hepatocyte hypertrophy was observed for 37-47% of the pesticides investigated (varying depending on sex and testing period), and that centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy was the most frequent among the various types of hepatocyte hypertrophy in both the 90-day and 2-year studies. The database constructed in this study enables us to investigate the relationships between hepatocyte hypertrophy and other toxicological observations/findings, and thus will be useful for characterizing hepatocyte hypertrophy.

  19. 28-day repeated dose response study of diglycolic acid: Renal and hepatic effects.

    PubMed

    Sprando, Robert L; Mossoba, Miriam E; Black, Thomas; Keltner, Zachary; Vohra, Sanah; Olejnik, Nicholas; Toomer, Howard; Stine, Cynthia; Evans, Eric; Sprando, Jessica L; Ferguson, Martine

    2017-03-25

    The acute oral toxicity of diglycolic acid (DGA) was evaluated. Groups of female rats (n = 8 rats/group) received 28 consecutive daily single doses of 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10.0, 30.0, 100.0 or 300.0 mg DGA/kg body weight by gastric intubation. One group of animals served as vehicle control. Tissues and blood serum were collected at necropsy on day 29. Select organs were weighed and fixed in formalin for histopathological analysis. Animals from the 300 mg/kg bw dose group were removed from the study after 5 consecutive days of treatment as a consequence of adverse treatment related effects. The animals in the remaining treatment groups survived the exposure period. No adverse clinical signs were observed throughout the exposure period in the surviving animals. No significant differences from controls were observed for feed and fluid consumption or body weight gain in the surviving animals. Lesions were observed in the kidneys, liver, stomach, intestine, thymus, spleen and bone marrow in animals from the 300 mg/kg dose group and signs of renal tubular regeneration were observed only in the 100 mg/kg dose group. These results suggest that high levels of pure DGA would need to be consumed before renal and other forms of organ toxicity are observed.

  20. Application of RPTEC/TERT1 cells for investigation of repeat dose nephrotoxicity: A transcriptomic study.

    PubMed

    Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Wilmes, Anja; Stanzel, Sven; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Hewitt, Philip; Lukas, Arno; Leonard, Martin O; Pfaller, Walter; Jennings, Paul

    2015-12-25

    The kidney is a major target organ for toxicity. Incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing at an alarming rate due to factors such as increasing population age and increased prevalence of heart disease and diabetes. There is a major effort ongoing to develop superior predictive models of renal injury and early renal biomarkers that can predict onset of CKD. In the EU FP7 funded project, Predict-IV, we investigated the human renal proximal tubule cells line, RPTEC/TERT1 for their applicability to long term nephrotoxic mechanistic studies. To this end, we used a tiered strategy to optimise dosing regimes for 9 nephrotoxins. Our final testing protocol utilised differentiated RPTEC/TERT1 cells cultured on filter inserts treated with compounds at both the apical and basolateral side, at concentrations not exceeding IC10, for 14 days in a 24 h repeat application. Transepithelial electrical resistance and supernatant lactate were measured over the duration of the experiments and genome wide transcriptomic profiles were assayed at day 1, 3 and 14. The effect of hypoxia was investigated for a subset of compounds. The transcriptomic data were analysed to investigate compound-specific effects, global responses and mechanistically informative signatures. In addition, several potential clinically useful renal injury biomarkers were identified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of the Carcinogenic Potential of Human Pharmaceuticals Using Repeated Dose Toxicity Data and Their Pharmacological Properties

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Buitenhuis, Wenny H. W.; Wagenaar, Laura; Soffers, Ans E. M. F.; van Someren, Eugene P.; Krul, Cyrille A. M.; Woutersen, Ruud A.

    2016-01-01

    In an exercise designed to reduce animal use, we analyzed the results of rat subchronic toxicity studies from 289 pharmaceutical compounds with the aim to predict the tumor outcome of carcinogenicity studies in this species. The results were obtained from the assessment reports available at the Medicines Evaluation Board of the Netherlands for 289 pharmaceutical compounds that had been shown to be non-genotoxic. One hundred forty-three of the 239 compounds not inducing putative preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study did not induce tumors in the carcinogenicity study [true negatives (TNs)], whereas 96 compounds were categorized as false negatives (FNs) because tumors were observed in the carcinogenicity study. Of the remaining 50 compounds, 31 showed preneoplastic lesions in the subchronic study and tumors in the carcinogenicity study [true positives (TPs)], and 19 only showed preneoplastic lesions in subchronic studies but no tumors in the carcinogenicity study [false positives (FPs)]. In addition, we then re-assessed the prediction of the tumor outcome by integrating the pharmacological properties of these compounds. These pharmacological properties were evaluated with respect to the presence or absence of a direct or indirect proliferative action. We found support for the absence of cellular proliferation for 204 compounds (TN). For 67 compounds, the presence of cellular hyperplasia as evidence for proliferative action could be found (TP). Therefore, this approach resulted in an ability to predict non-carcinogens at a success rate of 92% and the ability to detect carcinogens at 98%. The combined evaluation of pharmacological and histopathological endpoints eventually led to only 18 unknown outcomes (17 categorized as FN and 1 as FP), thereby enhancing both the negative and positive predictivity of an evaluation based upon histopathological evaluation only. The data show the added value of a consideration of the pharmacological properties of compounds in

  2. Metabolite profiles of rats in repeated dose toxicological studies after oral and inhalative exposure.

    PubMed

    Fabian, E; Bordag, N; Herold, M; Kamp, H; Krennrich, G; Looser, R; Ma-Hock, L; Mellert, W; Montoya, G; Peter, E; Prokudin, A; Spitzer, M; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Zbranek, R; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2016-07-25

    The MetaMap(®)-Tox database contains plasma-metabolome and toxicity data of rats obtained from oral administration of 550 reference compounds following a standardized adapted OECD 407 protocol. Here, metabolic profiles for aniline (A), chloroform (CL), ethylbenzene (EB), 2-methoxyethanol (ME), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and tetrahydrofurane (THF), dosed inhalatively for six hours/day, five days a week for 4 weeks were compared to oral dosing performed daily for 4 weeks. To investigate if the oral and inhalative metabolome would be comparable statistical analyses were performed. Best correlations for metabolome changes via both routes of exposure were observed for toxicants that induced profound metabolome changes. e.g. CL and ME. Liver and testes were correctly identified as target organs. In contrast, route of exposure dependent differences in metabolic profiles were noted for low profile strength e.g. female rats dosed inhalatively with A or THF. Taken together, the current investigations demonstrate that plasma metabolome changes are generally comparable for systemic effects after oral and inhalation exposure. Differences may result from kinetics and first pass effects. For compounds inducing only weak changes, the differences between both routes of exposure are visible in the metabolome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 28-day repeated dose oral toxicity of human copper-zinc superoxide dismutase from recombinant Pichia pastori in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Tian, Ying-Juan; Zhu, Si-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Human copper/zinc superoxide dismutase from recombinant Pichia pastori (RH-Cu/Zn-SOD) was orally administered, via gavage, to Sprague-Dawley rats at 500, 1,000, and 2,000 mg/kg body weight/day for 28 days. During the 28-day period, animals were examined for evidence of toxicity; there were no deaths, and in-life physical signs were normal. On day 29, the animals were exsanguinated, examined for gross pathology, and tissues were preserved for histopathology. Although statistical differences were noted in some hematology and clinical chemistry, they were of questionable biological significance. The results of the 28-day oral administration demonstrated a lack of toxicity of RH-Cu/Zn-SOD in rats. There were no treatment-related, toxicologically relevant changes in clinical signs, growth, food consumption, hematology, clinical chemistry, organ weights, or pathology. The no observed adverse effect level was greater than 2,000 mg/kg/day for RH-Cu/Zn-SOD in rats.

  4. Preliminary pharmacokinetic study of repeated doses of rifampin and rifapentine in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Noton K; Alsultan, Abdullah; Peloquin, Charles A; Karakousis, Petros C

    2013-03-01

    Substitution of rifapentine (RFP) for rifampin (RIF) in the standard antituberculous regimen reduces the time required to cure chronic tuberculosis (TB) infection in mice, but not in guinea pigs. In order to gain insight into these discrepant findings, we conducted a steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) study in healthy guinea pigs to study the metabolism and autoinduction of RIF and RFP. Both RFP and RIF 25-desacetyl metabolites (desRFP and desRIF, respectively), were detected at low concentrations in the serum of guinea pigs. The metabolite concentrations in guinea pigs are much lower than those seen in humans at steady state.

  5. Preliminary Pharmacokinetic Study of Repeated Doses of Rifampin and Rifapentine in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Noton K.; Alsultan, Abdullah; Peloquin, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Substitution of rifapentine (RFP) for rifampin (RIF) in the standard antituberculous regimen reduces the time required to cure chronic tuberculosis (TB) infection in mice, but not in guinea pigs. In order to gain insight into these discrepant findings, we conducted a steady-state pharmacokinetic (PK) study in healthy guinea pigs to study the metabolism and autoinduction of RIF and RFP. Both RFP and RIF 25-desacetyl metabolites (desRFP and desRIF, respectively), were detected at low concentrations in the serum of guinea pigs. The metabolite concentrations in guinea pigs are much lower than those seen in humans at steady state. PMID:23295923

  6. Repeated dose titration versus age-based method in electroconvulsive therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aten, Jan Jaap; Oudega, Mardien; van Exel, Eric; Stek, Max L; van Waarde, Jeroen A

    2015-06-01

    In electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), a dose titration method (DTM) was suggested to be more individualized and therefore more accurate than formula-based dosing methods. A repeated DTM (every sixth session and dose adjustment accordingly) was compared to an age-based method (ABM) regarding treatment characteristics, clinical outcome, and cognitive functioning after ECT. Thirty-nine unipolar depressed patients dosed using repeated DTM and 40 matched patients treated with ABM were compared. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were assessed at baseline and at the end of the index course, as well as the total number of ECT sessions. Both groups were similar regarding age, sex, psychotic features, mean baseline MADRS, and median baseline MMSE. At the end of the index course, the two methods showed equal outcome (mean end MADRS, 11.6 ± 8.3 in DTM and 9.5 ± 7.6 in ABM (P = 0.26); median end MMSE, 28 (25-29) and 28 (25-29.8), respectively (P = 0.81). However, the median number of all ECT sessions differed 16 (11-22) in DTM versus 12 (10-14.8) in ABM; P = 0.02]. Using regression analysis, dosing method and age were independently associated with the total number of ECT sessions, with less sessions needed in ABM (P = 0.02) and in older patients (P = 0.001). In this comparative cohort study, ABM and DTM showed equal outcome for depression and cognition. However, the median ECT course duration in repeated DTM appeared longer. Additionally, higher age was associated with shorter ECT courses regardless of the dosing method. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  7. Lactate is an ideal non-invasive marker for evaluating temporal alterations in cell stress and toxicity in repeat dose testing regimes.

    PubMed

    Limonciel, Alice; Aschauer, Lydia; Wilmes, Anja; Prajczer, Sinikka; Leonard, Martin O; Pfaller, Walter; Jennings, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Technological developments are driving in vitro methods towards integrated "omic" strategies. However, there is still an over reliance on classical viability assays for dose range finding. Such assays are not readily suited to the investigation of subtle alterations in cell function and most require termination of the experiment, which makes it difficult to monitor temporal alterations in repeat-dose long term exposure experiments. To this end, we investigated the use of lactate production as a marker of cell stress in long term repeat dose experiments. We conducted daily exposures to eight compounds at five concentrations for 14 days on human renal proximal tubular cells (RPTEC/TERT1), human hepatoma cells (HepaRG) and mouse fibroblasts (BALB-3T3) cells. Compounds were chosen from a training set used in the 7th EU Framework project Predict-IV and consisted of amiodarone, diclofenac, troglitazone, cadmium chloride, cephaloridine, cidofovir, cyclosporine A and buflomedil. At days 1, 3, 7 and 14, lactate was measured in the supernatant medium. At day 14, cells were assayed for resazurin reduction capability and subsequently lysed in methanol for ATP determination. Compound-induced loss of viability was comparable across all cell lines. For all cell types, when cell viability was compromised at day 14, lactate production was induced during the treatment period. In some situations, lactate also fell below control values, indicating cell death. Thus, temporal alterations in supernatant lactate provides information on the time and concentration of stress induction and the time and concentration where cell death becomes the dominant factor. Supernatant lactate production is a simple, cheap and non-invasive parameter. Since many molecular pathways converge on the glycolytic pathway, enhanced lactate production may be considered as a global marker of sub-lethal injury and thus an ideal marker for investigating temporal alterations in long term repeat dose testing in vitro

  8. Evaluation of 90-day Repeated Dose Oral Toxicity, Glycometabolism, Learning and Memory Ability, and Related Enzyme of Chromium Malate Supplementation in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Weiwei; Wu, Huiyu; Li, Qian; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Chen, Yao; Zhao, Ting; Feng, Yun; Mao, Guanghua; Li, Fang; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2015-11-01

    Our previous study showed that chromium malate improved the regulation of blood glucose in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the 90-day oral toxicity of chromium malate in Sprague-Dawley rats. The present study inspected the effect of chromium malate on glycometabolism, glycometabolism-related enzymes, lipid metabolism, and learning and memory ability in metabolically healthy Sprague-Dawley rats. The results showed that all rats survived and pathological, toxic, feces, and urine changes were not observed. Chromium malate did not cause measurable damage on liver, brain, and kidney. The fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, insulin resistance index, C-peptide, hepatic glycogen, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucokinase, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels of normal rats in chromium malate groups had no significant change when compared with control group and chromium picolinate group under physiologically relevant conditions. The serum and organ content of Cr in chromium malate groups had no significant change compared with control group. No significant changes were found in morris water maze test and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and true choline esterase (TChE) activity. The results indicated that supplementation with chromium malate did not cause measurable toxicity and has no obvious effect on glycometabolism and related enzymes, learning and memory ability, and related enzymes and lipid metabolism of female and male rats. The results of this study suggest that chromium malate is safe for human consumption.

  9. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus test of 4,4'-methylenedianiline using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Hisakazu; Koyama, Naomi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    Liver micronucleus (MN) tests using partial hepatectomized rats or juvenile rats have been shown to be useful for the detection of hepatic carcinogens. Moreover, Narumi et al. established the repeated-dose liver MN test using young adult rats for integration into general toxicity. In the present study, in order to examine the usefulness of the repeated-dose liver MN test, we investigated MN induction with a 14 or 28 day treatment protocol using young adult rats treated with 4,4′-methylenedianiline (MDA), a known hepatic carcinogen. MDA dose-dependently induced micronuclei in hepatocytes in 14- and 28-day repeated-dose tests. However, although statistically significant increases in micronuclei were observed in bone marrow cells at two dose levels in the 14-day study, there was no dose response and no increases in micronuclei in the 28-day study. These results indicate that the evaluation of genotoxic effects using hepatocytes is effective in cases where chromosomal aberrations are not clearly detectable in bone marrow cells. Moreover, the repeated-dose liver MN test allows evaluation at a dose below the maximum tolerable dose, which is required for the conventional MN test because micronucleated hepatocytes accumulate. The repeated-dose liver MN test employed in the present study can be integrated into the spectrum of general toxicity tests without further procedural modifications.

  10. Safety of sucrose esters from Physalis peruviana L. in a 28-day repeated-dose study in mice.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Yanet C; Caro, Daneiva C; Rivera, David E; Franco, Luis A

    2017-06-01

    Although extracts and consumed foods from Physalis species contain sucrose esters from their glandular trichomes, there is no experimental data available on their toxicological effects. As peruvioses A and B isolated from Physalis peruviana L. calyces have proved to be effective anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory compounds, this work aimed to investigate their sub-acute toxicity study and genotoxicity. For this, CD-1(ICR) mice were treated intraperitoneally with peruvioses at doses of 2.5, 5, and 10mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days, to simulate therapeutic and over-therapeutic dosage levels. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and their organs weighted, and blood and tissue samples were collected. Toxicological endpoints included clinical signs; food consumption; body and organ weights; hematological and biochemical parameters; as well as macroscopic and microscopic examination of tissues. The results showed no significant differences between treated animals and control group at macroscopic, histological, molecular, and biochemical levels. In addition, a combination of mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus test, comet assay in peripheral blood cells, and Ames test, did not reveal genotoxic effects induced by peruvioses. Taken together, our data suggests that peruvioses A and B can be safely employed to treat inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay: an investigation with 2-nitropropane, a hepatocarcinogen.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Satoru; Araki, Tetsuro; Nakajima, Mikio; Kusuoka, Osamu; Uchida, Keisuke; Sato, Norihiro; Tanabe, Yoko; Takahashi, Kaori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Tsurui, Kazuyuki

    2015-03-01

    The utility of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay in the detection of a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen was evaluated. In this paper, a rat hepatocarcinogen, 2-nitropropane (2-NP), was administered orally to young adult rats for 14 and 28 days without a partial hepatectomy or a mitogen, and the micronucleus induction in liver was examined using a simple method to isolate hepatocytes. In addition, a bone marrow micronucleus assay was conducted concomitantly. The frequency of micronucleated hepatocytes induced by 2-NP increased significantly in both the 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies, while the bone marrow micronucleus assays were negative in each study. These results indicate that the RDLMN assay is useful for detecting a genotoxic hepatocarcinogen that is negative in bone marrow micronucleus assays and is a suitable in vivo genotoxicity test method for integration into a repeated-dose general toxicity study.

  12. Safety assessment of heat-sterilized green tea catechin preparation: a 6-month repeat-dose study in rats.

    PubMed

    Morita, Osamu; Kirkpatrick, Jeannie B; Tamaki, Yasushi; Chengelis, Christopher P; Beck, Melissa J; Bruner, Richard H

    2009-08-01

    Evidence suggests that the purported health benefits associated with green tea consumption are related to tea catechins. In the present study, potential adverse effects of a standardized heat-sterilized green tea catechin (GTC-H) preparation was investigated following gavage administration to rats at doses of 0, 120, 400, 1200 mg/kg/day for 6 months. A decaffeinated high-dose group (1200 mg/kg/day) (GTC-HDC), was included for comparison. A possibly test article-related clinical finding of intermittent increased activity was noted in the 400 and 1200 mg/kg/day GTC-H groups, but was not considered to be adverse. Lower body weight gains without any decrease in food consumption were noted in the high-dose (1200 mg/kg/day)-treated GTC-H and GTC-HDC females. In the high-dose male GTC-H group, a lower total motor activity count for the 60-min session was noted prior to dosing at the study week 25 evaluations compared to the control group. Similar changes were not observed in the GTC-HDC group. Based on the results of this study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for GTC-H was 1200 mg/kg/day for males, the highest dose tested, and 400mg/kg/day for females based on reduced body weight gains. The NOAEL for GTC-HDC was 1200 mg/kg/day for males and could not be determined in females.

  13. A randomized, placebo-controlled repeat-dose thorough QT study of inhaled loxapine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cassella, James V.; Spyker, Daniel A.; Yeung, Paul P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This randomized, double-blind, active- and placebo-controlled, crossover, thorough QT study assessed the effect of two inhaled loxapine doses on cardiac repolarization as measured by corrected QT (QTc) interval in healthy subjects (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01854710). Methods: Subjects received two doses of inhaled loxapine (10 mg) 2 hours apart + oral placebo, two doses of inhaled placebo + oral placebo, or two doses of inhaled placebo + oral moxifloxacin (400 mg; positive control), with ≥ 3 days washout between treatments. Two-sided 90% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated around least-squares mean predose placebo-subtracted individually corrected QT durations (ΔΔQTcIs) at 12 time points throughout 24 hours after dosing. A ΔΔQTcI 95% upper CI exceeding 10 msec was the threshold indicating QTc prolongation (primary endpoint). Secondary endpoints included Fridericia- and Bazett-corrected QT duration and QTcI outliers. Pharmacokinetics and adverse events (AEs) were also assessed. Results: Of 60 subjects enrolled (mean age, 33.8 years; 52% male), 44 completed the study. Post loxapine dosing, no ΔΔQTcI 95% upper CI exceeded 10 msec; the largest was 6.31 msec 5 minutes post dose 2. Methodology was validated by ΔΔQTcI 95% lower CIs exceeding 5 msec at 9 of 12 time points after moxifloxacin dosing. Loxapine plasma concentrations increased rapidly (mean Cmax, 177 ng/mL; median tmax 2 minutes after dose 2, 2.03 hours after dose 1). There were no deaths, serious AEs, or AEs leading to discontinuation, and one severe AE. Conclusions: Primary and secondary endpoints indicated two therapeutic doses of inhaled loxapine did not cause threshold QTc prolongation in this study. PMID:26501204

  14. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) The temperature in the experimental animal room should be 22 °C (±3°). The relative humidity should be... differences in sensitivity between pregnant and non-pregnant animals. The highest dose level should be chosen... weight/day or, for dietary administration, an equivalent percentage in the diet, or drinking water...

  15. 40 CFR 799.9365 - TSCA combined repeated dose toxicity study with the reproduction/developmental toxicity screening...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The temperature in the experimental animal room should be 22 °C (±3°). The relative humidity should be... differences in sensitivity between pregnant and non-pregnant animals. The highest dose level should be chosen... weight/day or, for dietary administration, an equivalent percentage in the diet, or drinking water...

  16. The added value of the 90-day repeated dose oral toxicity test for industrial chemicals with a low (sub)acute toxicity profile in a high quality dataset: An update.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Katy; Andrew, David J

    2017-09-15

    A previous retrospective analysis of substances in the ECHA CHEM database concluded that, for industrial chemicals with a 'low (sub)acute toxicity profile', further testing in the 90-day study is unlikely to change this profile (Taylor et al., 2014). We have further tested this hypothesis by assessing the outcome of substances with testing proposals for which a prediction was made in that paper that the NOAEL based on the 90-day study would be 1000 mg/kg bw/d. Indeed, for seven out of ten substances for which data was available, the profile was shown to be held. For three substances, the reduced NOAEL was explained by renal effects in the rats, two of which had been seen in the 28-day study but had been dismissed by the study submitter. We conclude that the low toxicity profile will be even more protective if the NOEL is used from the 28-day study and an independent expert view is taken of the human relevance of any effects reported in the 28-day study. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A 13-week repeated dose study of three 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol fatty acid esters in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Onami, Saeko; Cho, Young-Man; Toyoda, Takeshi; Mizuta, Yasuko; Yoshida, Midori; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2014-04-01

    3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD), a rat renal and testicular carcinogen, has been reported to occur in various foods and food ingredients as free or esterified forms. Since reports about toxicity of 3-MCPD esters are limited, we conducted a 13-week rat subchronic toxicity study of 3-MCPD esters (palmitate diester: CDP, palmitate monoester: CMP, oleate diester: CDO). We administered a carcinogenic dose (3.6 × 10(-4) mol/kg B.W./day) of 3-MCPD or these esters at equimolar concentrations and two 1/4 lower doses by gavage with olive oil as a vehicle five times a week for 13 weeks to F344 male and female rats. As a result, five out of ten 3-MCPD-treated females died from acute renal tubular necrosis, but none of the ester-treated rats. Decreased HGB was observed in all high-dose 3-MCPD fatty acid ester-treated rats, except CDO-treated males. The absolute and relative kidney weights were significantly increased in the ester-treated rats at medium and high doses. Relative liver weights were significantly increased in the esters-treated rat at high dose, except for CMP females. Significant increase in apoptotic epithelial cells in the initial segment of the epididymis of high-dose ester-treated males was also observed. The results suggested that although acute renal toxicity was lower than 3-MCPD, these three 3-MCPD fatty acid esters have the potential to exert subchronic toxicity to the rat kidneys and epididymis, to a similar degree as 3-MCPD under the present conditions. NOAELs (no-observed-adverse-effect levels) of CDP, CMP and CDO were suggested to be 14, 8 and 15 mg/kg B.W./day, respectively.

  18. Rupatadine does not potentiate the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam: randomized, double-blind, crossover, repeated dose, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    García-Gea, Consuelo; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Martínez, Juan; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Donado, Esther; Izquierdo, Iñaki; Barbanoj, Manuel-José

    2010-06-01

    The main objective was to assess whether benzodiazepine intake when rupatadine plasma concentrations were at steady-state would increase the CNS depressant effects. Rupatadine is a new H(1)-antihistamine which also inhibits platelet activating factor (PAF) release and has been shown to be clinically effective at doses of 10 mg. Sixteen healthy young volunteers took part in a crossover, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial comprising two experimental periods (repeated administration for 7 days of rupatadine 10 mg or placebo as single oral daily doses, separated by a washout of 14 days). On days 5 and 7, according to a fully balanced design, a single oral dose of lorazepam 2 mg or placebo was added. CNS effects were evaluated on these days by seven objective tests of psychomotor performance and eight subjective visual analogue scales (VAS) at pre-dose and several times after drug intake. Four treatment conditions were evaluated: placebo, rupatadine 10 mg, lorazepam 2 mg and rupatadine 10 mg + lorazepam 2 mg. Significant CNS effects, either impairment of psychomotor performance or subjective sedation, were observed when lorazepam was administered, either alone or in combination with steady state concentrations of rupatadine. No significant differences were found between these two conditions. In addition, rupatadine was not different from placebo. All treatments were well tolerated. Repeated doses of rupatadine (10 mg orally) did not enhance the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam (2 mg orally, single dose) either in objective psychomotor tasks or in subjective evaluations.

  19. Rupatadine does not potentiate the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam: randomized, double-blind, crossover, repeated dose, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    García-Gea, Consuelo; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Martínez, Juan; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Donado, Esther; Izquierdo, Iñaki; Barbanoj, Manuel-José

    2010-01-01

    AIM The main objective was to assess whether benzodiazepine intake when rupatadine plasma concentrations were at steady-state would increase the CNS depressant effects. Rupatadine is a new H1-antihistamine which also inhibits platelet activating factor (PAF) release and has been shown to be clinically effective at doses of 10 mg. METHODS Sixteen healthy young volunteers took part in a crossover, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial comprising two experimental periods (repeated administration for 7 days of rupatadine 10 mg or placebo as single oral daily doses, separated by a washout of 14 days). On days 5 and 7, according to a fully balanced design, a single oral dose of lorazepam 2 mg or placebo was added. CNS effects were evaluated on these days by seven objective tests of psychomotor performance and eight subjective visual analogue scales (VAS) at pre-dose and several times after drug intake. Four treatment conditions were evaluated: placebo, rupatadine 10 mg, lorazepam 2 mg and rupatadine 10 mg + lorazepam 2 mg. RESULTS Significant CNS effects, either impairment of psychomotor performance or subjective sedation, were observed when lorazepam was administered, either alone or in combination with steady state concentrations of rupatadine. No significant differences were found between these two conditions. In addition, rupatadine was not different from placebo. All treatments were well tolerated. CONCLUSION Repeated doses of rupatadine (10 mg orally) did not enhance the CNS depressant effects of lorazepam (2 mg orally, single dose) either in objective psychomotor tasks or in subjective evaluations. PMID:20565458

  20. Safety evaluation of AB-LIFE(®) (Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 7527, 7528 and 7529): Antibiotic resistance and 90-day repeated-dose study in rats.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Pushkor; Roper, Jason M; Stahl, Buffy; Smith, Amy B; Burns, Frank; Rae, Jessica Caverly; Yeung, Nicolas; Lyra, Anna; Svärd, Laura; Saarinen, Markku T; Alhoniemi, Esa; Ibarra, Alvin; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2016-06-01

    AB-LIFE(®) is a probiotic product consisting of equal parts of three strains of Lactobacillus plantarum (CECT 7527, 7528, and 7529) blended with inert excipients. Whole genome sequencing was performed on each of the three strains. Antibiotic resistance was evaluated by genomic mining for resistance genes, and assessment for transferability. No risk of transfer potential was identified for any antibiotic resistance genes in the three strains. AB-LIFE(®) was evaluated for potential subchronic oral toxicity in rats, with dosages of 300 and 1000 mg/kg BW/day (equivalent to 5.55 × 10(10) and 1.85 × 10(11) CFU/kg BW/day). Survival of the three test strains through the gastrointestinal tract was supported by fecal analysis. No adverse effects were identified with respect to in-life parameters, clinical or anatomic pathology, translocation, or fecal chemical analyses. The no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for AB-LIFE(®) in male and female rats was 1000 mg/kg BW/day (1.85 × 10(11) CFU of AB-LIFE(®)/kg BW/day), the highest dose level evaluated. These results, in conjunction with a previous acute toxicity study in rats, support the conclusion that AB-LIFE(®) is safe for human consumption.

  1. Single versus repeated doses of ivermectin and diethylcarbamazine for the treatment of Wuchereria bancrofti var. pacifica microfilaremia. Results at 12 months of a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Cartel, J L; Spiegel, A; Nguyen Ngnoc, L; Cardines, R; Plichart, R; Martin, P M; Roux, J F

    1991-12-01

    In October 1989, 58 apparently healthy Polynesian Wuchereria bancrofti carriers in whom microfilarial (mf) density was greater than or equal to 100 mf/ml were randomly allocated to treatment groups receiving single doses of either ivermectin at 100 mcg/kg or diethylcarbamazine (DEC) at 3 and 6 mg/kg. Six months later, half of the carriers initially treated with ivermectin 100 mcg/kg or DEC 3 mg/kg were given a second similar dose while the rest were given a placebo. By day 360 (6 months after retreatment), comparison of adjusted geometric mean mf counts per group indicated that (i) among the 3 treatments given once a year the DEC 6 mg/kg dose resulted in the highest efficacy, (ii) nevertheless, regarding either ivermectin 100 mcg/kg or DEC 3 mg/kg, 2 successive doses resulted in higher efficacy than one annual dose and (iii) though no significant difference could be evidenced between efficacy of ivermectin 100 mcg/kg and DEC 3 mg/kg given twice a year, DEC seemed to sustain the mf reduction for a longer period of time. During the 3 days following retreatment, adverse reactions (mild to moderate) were observed in 46% of carriers treated with microfilaricidal drugs and in 20% of those treated with placebo. These results suggest that single dose therapy with either DEC or ivermectin is safe and effective for prevention of lymphatic filariasis due to Wuchereria bancrofti in French Polynesia. The real impact on transmission by the vector, Aedes polynesiensis, of the complete negativation of microfilaremia observed during the previous part of the trial in carriers treated with ivermectin should be evaluated in a community-based trial including entomological study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Studying toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkus, A.; LeBlanc, L.; Kim, C.; Van Beneden, R.; Mayer, G.

    2006-01-01

    With funding from the George Mitchell Center for the Environment at the University of Maine, a team of scientists used a simple laboratory-based sediment resuspension design, and two well-established aquatic toxicology models, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), to evaluate if resuspension of Penobscot river sediment significantly elevates the toxicity of river water and to provide preliminary information on the types of chemicals likely to desorb during resuspension. The group collected sediments from two sites with known chemical contamination downstream of the Great Works and Veazie dams. The sediments were examined to determine the dynamics of PAH desorption and degradation under different resuspension frequencies. The scientists used clarified water from resuspension experiments for toxicity tests with the water-flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and other aquatic test organisms to infer toxicity from sediments from northern California rivers. Data from the study will help ascertain whether metals and/or xenoestrogens are present in the desorption water and give insight into possible avenues of sediment remediation.

  3. The 14-day repeated dose liver micronucleus test with methapyrilene hydrochloride using young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kenji; Ochi, Akimu; Koda, Akira; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Doi, Takaaki

    2015-03-01

    The repeated dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect genotoxic hepatocarcinogens that can be integrated into a general toxicity study. The assay methods were thoroughly validated by 19 Japanese facilities. Methapyrilene hydrochloride (MP), known to be a non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, was examined in the present study. MP was dosed orally at 10, 30 and 100mg/kg/day to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats daily for 14 days. Treatment with MP resulted in an increase in micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) with a dosage of only 100mg/kg/day. At this dose level, cytotoxicity followed by regenerative cell growth was noted in the liver. These findings suggest that MP may induce clastogenic effects indirectly on the liver or hepatotoxicity of MP followed by regeneration may cause increase in spontaneous incidence of MNHEPs.

  4. Efficacy and safety of guaifenesin for upper back, neck, and shoulder pain: a Phase II proof-of-concept, multicenter, placebo-controlled, repeat-dose, parallel-group study

    PubMed Central

    Collaku, Agron; Yue, Yong; Reed, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Background/objective Guaifenesin, an over-the-counter (OTC) expectorant, has exhibited muscle relaxant effects preclinically and clinically. This proof-of-principle study explored whether OTC doses of guaifenesin can provide relief from acute upper back, neck, or shoulder muscle spasm and pain. Methods This multicenter, placebo-controlled, repeat-dose, parallel study randomly assigned adults experiencing acute pain and muscle spasm in their upper back, neck, or shoulder to guaifenesin 600 or 1200 mg or matched placebo twice daily (BID) in a 2:2:1:1 ratio for 7 days. The primary end point was the change from baseline in muscle spasm relief, measured using an 11-point numeric rating scale (0=not present to 10=unbearable) recorded twice daily and averaged over the 7-day treatment period. Analyses were performed using a linear mixed model that included treatment as a fixed effect and site as a random effect. Results A total of 77 subjects were included in the 4 treatment groups. Least squares mean muscle spasm score over 7 days was 1.77 with guaifenesin 1200 mg, 1.42 with its matched placebo, 1.53 with guaifenesin 600 mg, and 1.74 with its matched placebo. Treatment with guaifenesin 1200 mg BID provided 25% greater reduction in mean muscle spasm over its matched placebo and 16% greater reduction than guaifenesin 600 mg BID. These differences were not statistically significant. Based on comparisons of absolute mean values, a consistent directional change in effect was observed, suggesting some benefit from placebo to lower-to-upper doses of guaifenesin with regard to muscle spasm, tension, pain, discomfort, and relaxation. No severe or serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Results suggest the potential for OTC dose of guaifenesin 1200 mg BID to provide symptomatic relief of upper back musculoskeletal pain and spasm. Confirmation of this preliminary result in a larger, adequately powered study is needed. PMID:28356767

  5. Efficacy and safety of guaifenesin for upper back, neck, and shoulder pain: a Phase II proof-of-concept, multicenter, placebo-controlled, repeat-dose, parallel-group study.

    PubMed

    Collaku, Agron; Yue, Yong; Reed, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Guaifenesin, an over-the-counter (OTC) expectorant, has exhibited muscle relaxant effects preclinically and clinically. This proof-of-principle study explored whether OTC doses of guaifenesin can provide relief from acute upper back, neck, or shoulder muscle spasm and pain. This multicenter, placebo-controlled, repeat-dose, parallel study randomly assigned adults experiencing acute pain and muscle spasm in their upper back, neck, or shoulder to guaifenesin 600 or 1200 mg or matched placebo twice daily (BID) in a 2:2:1:1 ratio for 7 days. The primary end point was the change from baseline in muscle spasm relief, measured using an 11-point numeric rating scale (0=not present to 10=unbearable) recorded twice daily and averaged over the 7-day treatment period. Analyses were performed using a linear mixed model that included treatment as a fixed effect and site as a random effect. A total of 77 subjects were included in the 4 treatment groups. Least squares mean muscle spasm score over 7 days was 1.77 with guaifenesin 1200 mg, 1.42 with its matched placebo, 1.53 with guaifenesin 600 mg, and 1.74 with its matched placebo. Treatment with guaifenesin 1200 mg BID provided 25% greater reduction in mean muscle spasm over its matched placebo and 16% greater reduction than guaifenesin 600 mg BID. These differences were not statistically significant. Based on comparisons of absolute mean values, a consistent directional change in effect was observed, suggesting some benefit from placebo to lower-to-upper doses of guaifenesin with regard to muscle spasm, tension, pain, discomfort, and relaxation. No severe or serious adverse events were reported. Results suggest the potential for OTC dose of guaifenesin 1200 mg BID to provide symptomatic relief of upper back musculoskeletal pain and spasm. Confirmation of this preliminary result in a larger, adequately powered study is needed.

  6. Ketoprofen versus paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen in the management of fever: results of two randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, parallel-group, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies in children.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Hannu; Kokki, Merja

    2010-01-01

    Fever is a common symptom in children and one of the major concerns of parents of younger and preschool-age children. To compare the efficacy and safety of ketoprofen with that of paracetamol (acetaminophen) and ibuprofen in the treatment of febrile conditions in children. Two prospective, randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, repeated-dose, multicentre, phase III studies with two parallel groups in each study were conducted in primary-care outpatient clinics. Children aged 6 months to 6 years presenting with a febrile condition and an oral body temperature of > or =38.8 degrees C or rectal temperature of > or =39 degrees C were eligible for inclusion. Patients were randomized to receive either ketoprofen syrup 0.5 mg/kg, ibuprofen suspension 5 mg/kg or paracetamol suspension 15 mg/kg every 6 hours by the oral route. The primary outcome measure was the change in temperature at 3 hours (H3), compared with baseline (H0). All three treatments provided similar mean maximum decreases of 1.4-1.5 degrees C in body temperature at H3 compared with H0. Use of ketoprofen was not associated with any increased risk of adverse events compared with the two reference compounds. Ketoprofen 0.5 mg/kg appeared to be equivalent to the standard antipyretic doses of the reference products ibuprofen 5 mg/kg and paracetamol 15 mg/kg. Ketoprofen at the 0.5 mg/kg dose should be an effective and safe option for symptomatic management of fever in children.

  7. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using N-nitrosomorpholine in young adult rats: report on collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS)-Mammalian Mutagenicity Study (MMS) Group.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Aya; Kosaka, Mizuki; Kimura, Aoi; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Hamada, Shuichi

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of a repeated-dose liver micronucleus (LMN) assay in young adult rats as a collaborative study by the Mammalian mutagenicity study (MMS) group. All procedures were performed in accordance with the standard protocols of the MMS Group. Six-week-old male Crl:CD(SD) rats (5 animals/group) received oral doses of the hepatocarcinogen N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) at 0 (control), 5, 10, and 30mg/kg/day (10mL/kg) for 14 days. Control animals received vehicle (water). Hepatocytes were collected from the liver 24h after the last dose, and the number of micronucleated hepatocytes (MNHEPs) was determined by microscopy. The number of micronucleated immature erythrocytes (MNIMEs) in the femoral bone marrow was also determined. The liver was examined using histopathologic methods after formalin fixation. The results showed statistically significant and dose-dependent increases in the number of MNHEPs in the liver at doses of 10mg/kg and greater when compared with the vehicle control. However, no significant increase was noted in the number of MNIMEs in the bone marrow at doses of up to 30mg/kg. Histopathology of the liver revealed hypertrophy and single cell necrosis of hepatocytes at doses of 5mg/kg and above. These results showed that the induction of micronuclei by NMOR was detected by the repeated-dose LMN assay, but not by the repeated-dose bone marrow micronucleus assay.

  8. Repeated dose pharmacokinetics of pancopride in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Salva, P; Costa, J; Pérez-Campos, A; Martínez-Tobed, A

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of pancopride after repeated oral dose administration of 20 mg pancopride in tablet form once a day for 5 d in 12 healthy male volunteers. Plasma levels were measured by HPLC using a solid phase extraction method and automated injection. The minimum quantification limit of pancopride in plasma was 2 ng mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) after the first dose was 92.5 +/- 41.5 ng ML-1 and tmax was 1.7 +/- 0.9 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 14.3 +/- 6.9 h. The area under the concentration-time curve from zero to infinity (AUC) was 997 +/- 396 ng h mL-1. The maximum plasma concentration (mean +/- SD) at steady state (day 5) was 101.8 +/- 36.9 ng mL-1 and tmax was 2.2 +/- 1.2 h. The elimination half-life (t1/2) was 16.3 +/- 2.7 h and the minimum plasma concentration (Cssmin) was 16.6 +/- 6.9 ng mL-1. The area under the concentration-time curve during the dosing interval (AUCss tau) was 995 +/- 389 ng h mL-1. The average plasma concentration at steady state (Cssav) was 43.3 +/- 16.1 ng mL-1 and the experimental accumulation ratio (RAUC) was 1.34 +/- 0.19, whereas the mean theoretical value (R) was 1.40 +/- 0.29. The results obtained showed a good correlation between the experimental plasma levels and the expected values calculated using a repeated dose two-compartment model assessed by means of the Akaike value. It is concluded that the pharmacokinetics of pancopride are not modified after repeated dose administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Evaluation of the repeated-dose liver and gastrointestinal tract micronucleus assays with 22 chemicals using young adult rats: summary of the collaborative study by the Collaborative Study Group for the Micronucleus Test (CSGMT)/The Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society (JEMS) - Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group (MMS).

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shuichi; Ohyama, Wakako; Takashima, Rie; Shimada, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Kazumi; Kawakami, Satoru; Uno, Fuyumi; Sui, Hajime; Shimada, Yasushi; Imamura, Tadashi; Matsumura, Shoji; Sanada, Hisakazu; Inoue, Kenji; Muto, Shigeharu; Ogawa, Izumi; Hayashi, Aya; Takayanagi, Tomomi; Ogiwara, Yosuke; Maeda, Akihisa; Okada, Emiko; Terashima, Yukari; Takasawa, Hironao; Narumi, Kazunori; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi; Sano, Masaki; Ohashi, Nobuyuki; Morita, Takeshi; Kojima, Hajime; Honma, Masamitsu; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay using young adult rats has the potential to detect hepatocarcinogens. We conducted a collaborative study to assess the performance of this assay and to evaluate the possibility of integrating it into general toxicological studies. Twenty-four testing laboratories belonging to the Mammalian Mutagenicity Study Group, a subgroup of the Japanese Environmental Mutagen Society, participated in this trial. Twenty-two model chemicals, including some hepatocarcinogens, were tested in 14- and/or 28-day RDLMN assays. As a result, 14 out of the 16 hepatocarcinogens were positive, including 9 genotoxic hepatocarcinogens, which were reported negative in the bone marrow/peripheral blood micronucleus (MN) assay by a single treatment. These outcomes show the high sensitivity of the RDLMN assay to hepatocarcinogens. Regarding the specificity, 4 out of the 6 non-liver targeted genotoxic carcinogens gave negative responses. This shows the high organ specificity of the RDLMN assay. In addition to the RDLMN assay, we simultaneously conducted gastrointestinal tract MN assays using 6 of the above carcinogens as an optional trial of the collaborative study. The MN assay using the glandular stomach, which is the first contact site of the test chemical when administered by oral gavage, was able to detect chromosomal aberrations with 3 test chemicals including a stomach-targeted carcinogen. The treatment regime was the 14- and/or 28-day repeated-dose, and the regime is sufficiently promising to incorporate these methods into repeated-dose toxicological studies. The outcomes of our collaborative study indicated that the new techniques to detect chromosomal aberrations in vivo in several tissues worked successfully.

  10. Evaluating the male and female reproductive toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Murray, F Jay; Gray, Thomas M; Roberts, Linda G; Roth, Randy N; Nicolich, Mark J; Simpson, Barry J

    2013-11-01

    To meet the EPA HPV Chemical Challenge Program requirement for reproductive toxicity data on sponsored high-boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), an analysis was conducted using the results of 39 repeat-dose and 59 developmental rat dermal toxicity studies on HBPS samples spanning the boiling range of the sponsored substances, and the results of three one-generation reproductive toxicity studies on two samples spanning the concentration range of polycyclic aromatic compounds of sponsored substances. The analysis found little evidence of male or female reproductive tract toxicity based on histopathology, reproductive organ weight, and sperm parameters, and no evidence of effects on fertility, while significant developmental toxicity and/or systemic repeat-dose toxicity were frequently observed. Among 14 samples of HBPS tested in both repeat-dose toxicity and developmental toxicity studies, there were no studies in which an adverse reproductive tract finding occurred at a dose lower than that producing developmental toxicity or other adverse effects in repeat-dose toxicity studies. The current analysis supports the hypothesis that effects in developmental and/or repeat-dose toxicity studies of HBPS occur at doses lower than those that might affect fertility in rat one-generation reproductive studies. When adequate developmental and repeat-dose toxicity studies are available, a reproductive toxicity study of HBPS appears unnecessary.

  11. Repeated Dosing of 23.4% Hypertonic Saline for Refractory Intracranial Hypertension. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Alden K; Nau, Karen M; Miller, David A; Hanel, Ricardo A; Freeman, WD

    2008-01-01

    Background: Hypertonic saline (HTS) at a concentration of 23.4% is an emerging therapy for intracranial hypertension. Compared to mannitol which can be given as a single bolus or as repeated bolus dosing, little data exists regarding safety or efficacy of repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS. We report the first case of 16 doses of 23.4% HTS over a 5 day period in a patient with refractory intracranial hypertension. Case Report: A 43-year-old woman with Fisher 3 subarachnoid hemorrhage and hydrocephalus requiring an external ventricular drain developed global cerebral edema on computed tomography. Medically refractory intracranial hypertension ensued which required repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS. Reductions in intracranial pressure (ICP) occurred after each dose of 23.4% HTS. No central nervous system complications occurred. Anasarca was the only observed complication, which responded to furosemide diuresis. Conclusion: Repeated dosing of 23.4% HTS was effective in reducing ICP in a case of medically refractory intracranial hypertension without major systemic complications. Prospective studies should address the safety and efficacy of repeat dose 23.4% HTS on serum sodium, intracranial pressure, and complications. PMID:22518235

  12. Toxicological evaluation of peroxy sulfonated oleic acid (PSOA) in subacute and developmental toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Pechacek, Nathan; Laidlaw, Karen; Clubb, Stephanie; Aulmann, Walter; Osorio, Magdalena; Caudill, Jeff

    2013-12-01

    Peroxy sulfonated oleic acid (PSOA) is a new coupler used in sanitizing solutions primarily for the food and beverage industry. The toxicity of PSOA was evaluated in a 28-day repeat dose study according to OECD 407 guidelines with a 14-day recovery period and a developmental toxicity study according to OECD 414 guidelines. In both studies, PSOA was administered once daily via gavage at 0, 5, 15 and 50 mg/kg/day to Sprague-Dawley rats. Due to its corrosive properties, the highest test concentration was restricted to 0.5%. No findings related to PSOA administration were observed for the 28-day repeat-dose study and the NOEL is 50 mg/kg/day. Additionally, no impairment of the mucous membranes of the gastrointestinal tract was observed up to 0.5%, which is considered the NOEC in terms of local toxicity. For the developmental study, an embryo-fetal NOEL of 50 mg/kg/day was identified and the maternal NOEL is considered to be 15 mg/kg/day, based on slight reductions in maternal body weight and food consumption, as well as a modest increase in the incidence of clinical observations at the high dose. These findings demonstrate that PSOA appears to have minimal potential to induce toxicity associated with repeat-dose or developmental exposures.

  13. Mid-Childhood Bone Mass After Exposure to Repeat Doses of Antenatal Glucocorticoids: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of women at risk for preterm birth with repeat doses of glucocorticoids reduces neonatal morbidity, but could have adverse effects on skeletal development. We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone alters bone mass in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial of Repeat Doses of Corticosteroids. Women were randomized to a single dose of betamethasone or placebo, ≥7 days after an initial course of glucocorticoids, repeated each week that they remained at risk for preterm birth at <32 weeks' gestation. In this follow-up study, children underwent whole-body dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry at 6 to 8 years' corrected age. Of 212 eligible childhood survivors, 185 were studied (87%; 91 repeat betamethasone group; 94 placebo [single course] group). Children exposed to repeat antenatal betamethasone and those exposed to placebo had similar whole-body bone mineral content (median repeat betamethasone: 553 g, interquartile range: 442-712 g; placebo: 567 g, interquartile range: 447-750 g; geometric mean ratio: 0.99; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.03, P = .55) and bone area (median repeat betamethasone 832 cm(2), interquartile range: 693-963 cm(2); placebo: 822 cm(2), interquartile range: 710-1020 cm(2); geometric mean ratio: 0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.92-1.07, P = .75). Exposure to repeat doses of antenatal betamethasone compared with a single course of glucocorticoids does not alter bone mass in mid-childhood. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. 14C-NaVP and 14C-PEV repeated dose study in rat. Pharmacokinetic study in rats after repeated oral administrations of 14C-valproic acid sodium salt and 14C-valproic acid pivaloyl oxymethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, M; Acerbi, D; Canali, S; Giachetti, C; Poli, G; Ventura, P; Zanolo, G

    1998-01-01

    The absorption, excretion and tissue distribution of radioactivity after repeated oral equimolar doses of 14C-valproic acid sodium salt (NaVP) or 14C-valproic acid pivaloyl oxymethyl ester (PEV) was investigated in male rats treated once a day for 14 consecutive days. The 14th day plasma time-course of radioactivity after PEV administrations was characterised by a slow absorption rate with a delayed peak (tmax 2 h, Cmax 7.52 +/- 1.35 microg eq./ml), followed by a plateau lasting up to 8 h. After NaVP treatment, the main peak of radioactivity was observed 0.5 h after administration (Cmax 8.30 +/- 1.26 microg eq./ml) followed by a secondary peak due to biliary enterohepatic recycling. Starting from 4 h onwards, radioactivity levels after PEV treatment were higher than those after NaVP (AUCtau = 113.3 h.microg eq./ml after PEV vs 71.9 h.microg eq./ml after NaVP), but concentrations declined with similar terminal half-lives (52.8 h for PEV and 49.7 h for NaVP). Radioactivity recovered (0-432 h interval) in urine accounted for 79.3% (PEV) and 56.1% (NaVP) while, in faeces accounted for 9.1% (PEV) and 26.1% (NaVP) of total administered dose (14 days). The difference is attributable to a higher excretion of radioactivity in the bile for NaVP. The missing fraction in the total radioactivity balance is probably excreted in expired air, as observed in single dose studies. Radioactivity excreted in bile (0-8 h interval of the last 14th day) accounted for 5.1% (NaVP) and 0.23% (PEV) of the total administered dose (14 days). A possible explanation of this difference may be a different metabolism pattern for the two compounds. The negligible biliary excretion observed after PEV administration is probably due to an inhibition of the glucuronation of valproic acid (or other metabolites) caused by the pivalic acid. Due to the presence of the enterohepatic recycle, the radioactivity levels in intestine, 0.5 and 2 h after administration, were higher after NaVP administration

  15. Cardiovascular risk factors in children after repeat doses of antenatal glucocorticoids: an RCT.

    PubMed

    McKinlay, Christopher J D; Cutfield, Wayne S; Battin, Malcolm R; Dalziel, Stuart R; Crowther, Caroline A; Harding, Jane E

    2015-02-01

    Treatment of women at risk for preterm birth with repeat doses of glucocorticoids reduces neonatal morbidity but could have adverse long-term effects on cardiometabolic health in offspring. We assessed whether exposure to repeat antenatal betamethasone increased risk factors for later cardiometabolic disease in children whose mothers participated in the Australasian Collaborative Trial of Repeat Doses of Corticosteroids. Women were randomized to betamethasone or placebo treatment, ≥ 7 days after an initial course of glucocorticoids, repeated each week that they remained at risk for preterm birth at <32 weeks' gestation. In this follow-up study, children were assessed at 6 to 8 years' corrected age for body composition, insulin sensitivity, ambulatory blood pressure, and renal function. Of 320 eligible childhood survivors, 258 were studied (81%; 123 repeat betamethasone group; 135 placebo [single course] group). Children exposed to repeat antenatal betamethasone and those exposed to placebo had similar total fat mass (geometric mean ratio 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78 to 1.23), minimal model insulin sensitivity (geometric mean ratio 0.89, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.08), 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (mean difference systolic 0 mm Hg, 95% CI -2 to 2; diastolic 0 mm Hg, 95% CI -1 to 1), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (mean difference 1.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2), 95% CI -3.2 to 5.6). Exposure to repeat doses of antenatal betamethasone compared with a single course of glucocorticoids does not increase risk factors for cardiometabolic disease at early school age. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Pharmacology of ayahuasca administered in two repeated doses.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Rafael G; Grasa, Eva; Valle, Marta; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Bouso, José Carlos; Nomdedéu, Josep F; Homs, Rosa; Barbanoj, Manel J; Riba, Jordi

    2012-02-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian tea containing the natural psychedelic 5-HT(2A/2C/1A) agonist N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). It is used in ceremonial contexts for its visionary properties. The human pharmacology of ayahuasca has been well characterized following its administration in single doses. To evaluate the human pharmacology of ayahuasca in repeated doses and assess the potential occurrence of acute tolerance or sensitization. In a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial, nine experienced psychedelic drug users received PO the two following treatment combinations at least 1 week apart: (a) a lactose placebo and then, 4 h later, an ayahuasca dose; and (b) two ayahuasca doses 4 h apart. All ayahuasca doses were freeze-dried Amazonian-sourced tea encapsulated to a standardized 0.75 mg DMT/kg bodyweight. Subjective, neurophysiological, cardiovascular, autonomic, neuroendocrine, and cell immunity measures were obtained before and at regular time intervals until 12 h after first dose administration. DMT plasma concentrations, scores in subjective and neurophysiological variables, and serum prolactin and cortisol were significantly higher after two consecutive doses. When effects were standardized by plasma DMT concentrations, no differences were observed for subjective, neurophysiological, autonomic, or immunological effects. However, we observed a trend to reduced systolic blood pressure and heart rate, and a significant decrease for growth hormone (GH) after the second ayahuasca dose. Whereas there was no clear-cut tolerance or sensitization in the psychological sphere or most physiological variables, a trend to lower cardiovascular activation was observed, together with significant tolerance to GH secretion.

  17. Evaluation of Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Sodium 2,2 Dimethylbutyrate, a Novel Short Chain Fatty Acid Derivative, in a Phase 1, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Single- and Repeat-Dose Studies in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Susan P.; Wargin, William A.; Boosalis, Michael S.; Wallis, Wayne J.; Case, Sally; Keefer, Jeffrey R.; Faller, Douglas V.; Welch, William C.; Berenson, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacologic induction of fetal globin synthesis is an accepted therapeutic strategy for treatment of the beta hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias, as even small increases in hemoglobin F (HbF) levels reduce clinical severity in sickle cell disease and reduce anemia in beta thalassemia. Prior generation short chain fatty acid therapeutics, arginine butyrate and phenylbutyrate, increased fetal and total hemoglobin levels in patients, but were limited by high doses or intravenous infusion. A fetal globin-inducing therapeutic with convenient oral dosing would be an advance for these classic molecular diseases. Healthy adult human subjects were treated with a novel SCFA derivative, sodium 2,2 dimethylbutyrate (SDMB), or placebo, with one of four single dose levels (2, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) or daily doses (5, 10, or 15 mg/kg) over 14 days, and monitored for adverse clinical and laboratory events, drug levels, reticulocytes, and HbF assays. SDMB was well-tolerated with no clinically significant adverse events related to study medication. The terminal half-life ranged from 9–15 hours. Increases in mean absolute reticulocytes were observed at all dose levels in the 14-day study. The favorable PK profiles and safety findings indicate that SDMB warrants further investigation for treatment of anemic subjects with beta hemoglobinopathies. PMID:21422239

  18. Bioequivalence and Safety of Twice-Daily Sustained-Release Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) Compared With 3- and 4-Times-Daily Paracetamol: A Repeat-Dose, Crossover Pharmacokinetic Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongzhou J; Collaku, Agron

    2017-08-16

    Twice-daily sustained-release (SR) paracetamol (acetaminophen) offers convenient administration to chronic users. This study investigated at steady state (during the last 24 hours of a 3-day dosing period) the pharmacokinetics, bioequivalence, and safety of twice-daily SR paracetamol compared with extended-release (ER) and immediate-release (IR) paracetamol. In this open-label, randomized, multidose, 3-way crossover study, 28 healthy subjects received paracetamol SR (2 × 1000 mg twice daily), ER (2 × 665 mg 3 times daily), and IR (2 × 500 mg 4 times daily). At steady state, twice-daily SR paracetamol was bioequivalent to ER and IR paracetamol. The 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric means were within the acceptance interval for SR/ER paracetamol (AUC0-t , 0.973-1.033; AUC0-24 , 0.974-1.034; AUC0-∞ , 0.948-1.011; Cmax , 1.082-1.212; Cav , 1.011-1.106) and SR/IR paracetamol (AUC0-t , 0.969-1.029; AUC0-24 , 0.968-1.027; AUC0-∞ , 0.963-1.026; Cmax , 0.902-1.010; Cav , 1.004-1.098). Given twice daily, the SR formulation demonstrated SR properties as expected. Mean time at or above a 4 μg/mL plasma concentration of paracetamol from 2 daily doses of the SR formulation was significantly longer than that from 4 daily doses of IR paracetamol. SR formulation also had a greater Tmax , a longer half-life, and lower Cmin compared with ER and IR paracetamol. All formulations were well tolerated. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  19. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  20. Pathology and Neurotoxicity in Dogs after Repeat Dose Exposure to a Serotonin 5-HT1B Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jane C.F.; Ciaccio, Paul; Schroeder, Patricia; Wright, Lindsay; Westwood, Russell; Berg, Anna-Lena

    2014-01-01

    AZD3783, a cationic amphiphilic drug and a potent inhibitor of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1B) receptor, was explored as a potential treatment for depression. To support clinical trials, repeat dose toxicity studies in rats and dogs were conducted. Here we report toxicity findings in dogs after dosing from 1 to 3 months. In the 1-month study, there were minimal neuronal vacuolation in the brain, a marked increase in liver enzymes accompanied by hepatocellular degeneration/necrosis and phospholipidosis (PLD), and PLD/cholecystitis in the gallbladder of animals dosed at 47 mg/kg/day. In the 3-month study, neurotoxicity resulted in euthanasia of one animal dosed at 30 mg/kg/day after 86 days. Extensive pathologic changes were seen in all animals in retina epithelium (inclusion bodies), brain (neuronal vacuolation, degeneration, or necrosis and nerve fiber degeneration), spinal ganglia (vacuolation, degeneration, or necrosis), as well as sciatic and optic nerves (degeneration). Pigment-laden macrophages were observed in the lung, kidney, liver, gallbladder, bone marrow, gastrointestinal tract, and lymphoid tissues. Also seen were vitrel and retinal hemorrhage in the eyes. A brain concentration and pathology study showed that the concentration of AZD3783 in the brain was approximately 4 times higher than in the plasma after 4 weeks of dosing, however, they were similar in all regions examined, and did not correlate with areas with pathologic findings. Our findings with AZD3783 in dogs have not been reported previously with other CNS compounds that effect through serotonergic pharmacology. PMID:24791065

  1. Acute and environmental toxicity studies with hexazinone.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, G L

    1984-08-01

    The acute toxicity of hexazinone, a herbicide intended for general noncropland areas and selected crop uses (alfalfa and sugarcane), has been evaluated to establish proper handling guidelines and to measure its potential impact on the environment. The material is slightly to moderately toxic when given as a single oral dose; its LD50 in male rats is 1690 mg/kg, in male guinea pigs 860 mg/kg, and in male dogs greater than 3400 mg/kg although in the dog emesis prevented accurate quantitation. When the material is administered intraperitoneally, the LD50 in rats is 530 mg/kg. Repeated doses (five oral doses per week for 2 weeks) of 300 mg/kg to rats produced slight weight loss in one of two replicate experiments. In both studies, no gross or histologic alterations were apparent. Hexazinone is a moderate to severe eye irritant in the rabbit and produced only mild erythema in rabbit skin at 5278 mg/kg, a dose which did not produce lethality or other clinical signs. Subchronic dermal exposures (10 consecutive doses) to rabbits produced increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase at the highest levels tested (680 and 770 mg/kg in two separate experiments) with no effects seen at 150 mg/kg. There were no alterations in livers from treated rabbits examined by light microscopy. No dermal sensitization was produced when concentrations of up to 50% were tested in guinea pigs. One-hour inhalation exposure of up to 7.48 mg/liter did not produce mortality in rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Repeated dose toxicity and relative potency of 1,2,3,4,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 66) 1,2,3,5,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 67) compared to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for induction of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and thymic atrophy in female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Hooth, Michelle J.; Nyska, Abraham; Fomby, Laurene M.; Vasconcelos, Daphne Y.; Vallant, Molly; DeVito, Michael J.; Walker, Nigel J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we assessed the relative toxicity and potency of the chlorinated naphthalenes 1,2,3,4,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 66) and 1,2,3,5,6,7-hexachloronaphthalene (PCN 67) relative to that of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Chemicals were administered in corn oil:acetone (99:1) by gavage to female Harlan Sprague-Dawley rats at dosages of 0 (vehicle), 500, 1500, 5000, 50000 and 500000 ng/kg (PCN 66 and PCN 67) and 1, 3, 10, 100, and 300 ng/kg (TCDD) for 2 weeks. Histopathologic changes were observed in the thymus, liver and lung of TCDD treated animals and in the liver and thymus of PCN treated animals. Significant increases in CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 associated enzyme activity were observed in all animals exposed to TCDD, PCN 66 and PCN 67. Dose response modeling of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and thymic atrophy gave ranges of estimated relative potencies, as compared to TCDD, of 0.0015-0.0072, for PCN 66 and 0.00029-0.00067 for PCN 67. Given that PCN 66 and PCN 67 exposure resulted in biochemical and histopathologic changes similar to that seen with TCDD, this suggests that they should be included in the WHO Toxic Equivalency Factor (TEF) scheme, although the estimated relative potencies indicate that these hexachlorinated naphthalenes should not contribute greatly to the overall human body burden of dioxin-like activity. PMID:22813907

  3. Inhibitory effect of single and repeated doses of nilotinib on the pharmacokinetics of CYP3A substrate midazolam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Sheng, Jennifer; Ko, Jin H; Zheng, Cheng; Zhou, Wei; Priess, Petra; Lin, Wen; Novick, Steven

    2015-04-01

    Effects of single and repeated doses of nilotinib on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) substrate, were assessed in 2 separate studies. In the single-dose nilotinib study, 18 healthy subjects were randomized to 6 treatment sequences to receive single dose of nilotinib 600 mg, midazolam 4 mg, and coadministration of both in a crossover manner. In the repeated-dose nilotinib study, 19 chronic myeloid leukemia patients took a single dose of midazolam 2 mg on days 1 and 13, and nilotinib 400 mg twice daily from days 2-13. In the single-dose study, the geometric mean ratio of the area under the plasma concentration time curve extrapolated to infinity (AUC(inf)) of midazolam plus nilotinib vs. midazolam was 1.3 (90%CI, 1.2-1.5) and the maximum observed serum concentration (C(max)) was 1.2 (90%CI, 1.0-1.4). In the repeated-dose study, the values for AUC(inf) and C(max) were 2.6 (90%CI, 2.1-3.3) and 2.0 (90%CI, 1.7-2.4), respectively. These results indicate that single-dose and repeated-dose administration of nilotinib results in weak and moderate inhibition of CYP3A, respectively. Therefore, appropriate monitoring and dose adjustment may be needed for drugs that are mainly metabolized by CYP3A, and have narrow therapeutic index, when coadministered with nilotinib. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  4. Influence of two depuration periods on the activity and transcription of antioxidant enzymes in tilapia exposed to repeated doses of cylindrospermopsin under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Victoria; Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Moreno, Isabel M; Prieto, Ana I; Puerto, María; Jos, Angeles; Cameán, Ana M

    2014-03-13

    The cyanobacterial toxin Cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a potent protein synthesis inhibitor, is increasingly being found in freshwater bodies infested by cyanobacterial blooms worldwide. Moreover, it has been reported to be implicated in human intoxications and animal mortality. Recently, the alteration of the activity and gene expression of some glutathione related enzymes in tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus) exposed to a single dose of CYN has been reported. However, little is known about the effects induced by repeated doses of this toxin in tilapias exposed by immersion and the potential reversion of these biochemical alterations after two different depuration periods (3 or 7 days). In the present study, tilapias were exposed by immersion to repeated doses of a CYN-containing culture of Aphanizomenon ovalisporum during 14 days, and then were subjected to depuration periods (3 or 7 days) in clean water in order to examine the potential reversion of the effects observed. The activity and relative mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and soluble glutathione-S-transferases (sGST), and also the sGST protein abundance by Western blot analysis were evaluated in liver and kidney of fish. Results showed significant alterations in most of the parameters evaluated and their recovery after 3 days (GPx activity, sGST relative abundance) or 7 days (GPx gene expression, sGST activity). These findings not only confirm the oxidative stress effects produced in fish by cyanobacterial cells containing CYN, but also show the effectiveness of depuration processes in mitigating the CYN-containing culture toxic effects.

  5. Influence of Two Depuration Periods on the Activity and Transcription of Antioxidant Enzymes in Tilapia Exposed to Repeated Doses of Cylindrospermopsin under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Victoria; Guzmán-Guillén, Remedios; Moreno, Isabel M.; Prieto, Ana I.; Puerto, María; Jos, Angeles; Cameán, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterial toxin Cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a potent protein synthesis inhibitor, is increasingly being found in freshwater bodies infested by cyanobacterial blooms worldwide. Moreover, it has been reported to be implicated in human intoxications and animal mortality. Recently, the alteration of the activity and gene expression of some glutathione related enzymes in tilapias (Oreochromis niloticus) exposed to a single dose of CYN has been reported. However, little is known about the effects induced by repeated doses of this toxin in tilapias exposed by immersion and the potential reversion of these biochemical alterations after two different depuration periods (3 or 7 days). In the present study, tilapias were exposed by immersion to repeated doses of a CYN-containing culture of Aphanizomenon ovalisporum during 14 days, and then were subjected to depuration periods (3 or 7 days) in clean water in order to examine the potential reversion of the effects observed. The activity and relative mRNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and soluble glutathione-S-transferases (sGST), and also the sGST protein abundance by Western blot analysis were evaluated in liver and kidney of fish. Results showed significant alterations in most of the parameters evaluated and their recovery after 3 days (GPx activity, sGST relative abundance) or 7 days (GPx gene expression, sGST activity). These findings not only confirm the oxidative stress effects produced in fish by cyanobacterial cells containing CYN, but also show the effectiveness of depuration processes in mitigating the CYN-containing culture toxic effects. PMID:24632554

  6. Repeated dose liver micronucleus assay using adult mice with multiple genotoxicity assays concurrently performed as a combination test.

    PubMed

    Hagio, Soichiro; Furukawa, Satoshi; Abe, Masayoshi; Kuroda, Yusuke; Hayashi, Seigo; Ogawa, Izumi

    2014-06-01

    Recently, the liver micronucleus (MN) assay using young adult rats with repeated administrations has been investigated by employing a new method without partial hepatectomy or in situcollagenase perfusion as the repeated dose liver MN (RDLMN) assay by Narumi et al. (2012). In our study, in order to investigate the possibility of the RDLMN assay using young adult mice instead of rats and the feasibility of employing some genotoxicity assays along with the RDLMN assay as a combination test, two genotoxic carcinogens (N,N-diethylnitrosoamine (DEN) and cisplatin (CIS)) and a nongenotoxic carcinogen (phenobarbital sodium (PHE)) were administered to mice for 15 or 29 days. Then, the liver MN assay, peripheral blood (PB) MN assay and comet assay using the liver and kidney were concurrently performed as a combination test. DEN showed positive responses to all endpoints except MN induction in PB after 15 days of repeat administration. A cross-linking agent, CIS, showed MN induction in liver after 29 days of repeat administration, and in PB after 15 and 29 days of repeat administration, although the comet assay yielded negative responses for both organs at both sampling times. PHE yielded negative responses for all endpoints. In conclusion, it is suggested that the RDLMN assay using mice is a feasible method to be integrated into the general repeated toxicity test along with the combination assays, i.e., comet assay or PB MN assay, which would help in risk assessment for carcinogenicity by comparing the results of combination assays with each other.

  7. Repeat doses of prenatal corticosteroids for women at risk of preterm birth for improving neonatal health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Caroline A; McKinlay, Christopher JD; Middleton, Philippa; Harding, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been unclear whether repeat dose(s) of prenatal corticosteroids are beneficial. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of repeat dose(s) of prenatal corticosteroids. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (31 March 2011), searched reference lists of retrieved studies and contacted authors for further data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of women who had already received a single course of corticosteroids seven or more days previously and considered still at risk of preterm birth. Data collection and analysis We assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. Main results We included 10 trials (more than 4730 women and 5650 babies) with low to moderate risk of bias. Treatment of women who remain at risk of preterm birth seven or more days after an initial course of prenatal corticosteroids with repeat dose(s), compared with no repeat corticosteroid treatment, reduced the risk of their infants experiencing the primary outcomes respiratory distress syndrome (risk ratio (RR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75 to 0.91, eight trials, 3206 infants, numbers needed to treat (NNT) 17, 95% CI 11 to 32) and serious infant outcome (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.94, seven trials, 5094 infants, NNT 30, 95% CI 19 to 79). Treatment with repeat dose(s) of corticosteroid was associated with a reduction in mean birthweight (mean difference (MD) −75.79 g, 95% CI −117.63 to −33.96, nine trials, 5626 infants). However, outcomes that adjusted birthweight for gestational age (birthweight Z scores, birthweight multiples of the median and small-for-gestational age) did not differ between treatment groups. At early childhood follow-up no statistically significant differences were seen for infants exposed to repeat prenatal corticosteroids compared with unexposed infants for the primary outcomes (total deaths; survival free of any disability or major disability; disability; or

  8. A retrospective analysis of the added value of the rat two-generation reproductive toxicity study versus the rat subchronic toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Janer, Gemma; Hakkert, Betty C; Piersma, Aldert H; Vermeire, Theo; Slob, Wout

    2007-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the added value of the two-generation reproductive toxicity study when a subchronic study (90-day repeated dose toxicity study) is available. The analysis includes a total of 47 reproductive toxic and 75 non-reproductive toxic substances, for which a two-generation study was available. For each of these compounds the outcomes of both study types were compared, in view of the question what the impact would have been both for the derived NOAEL and for classification regarding toxicity to fertility. On average, only a small difference (less than twofold) in overall NOAELs was found between the rat two-generation study and the rat subchronic study. For individual compounds the differences could be larger (up to around a factor of 10), but differences of this magnitude equally occur between NOAELs of subchronic studies (testing the same substance). The two generation study did have an impact on classification for toxicity to fertility: about one-third of the substances shown to be toxic to fertility in the two-generation study did not show any sign of that in the 90-day study. If the subchronic study did show toxicity to reproductive organs this often occurred at (much) higher doses than other toxic effects in the same study. Therefore, apart from including more fertility endpoints, a larger dose spacing (or more dose groups) in the subchronic study might increase its detection rate of fertility toxic substances. The consequences that these findings may have for risk assessment and risk management are discussed, especially in the context of REACH.

  9. Melatonin prevents the development of hyperplastic urothelium induced by repeated doses of cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Dasa; Vidmar, Gaj; Jezernik, Kristijan

    2009-06-01

    Repeated cyclophosphamide (CP) chemotherapy increases the risk of developing bladder cancer, which could be due to the extremely rapid proliferation of urothelial cells observed in hyperplastic urothelium induced by CP treatment. We investigated the effect of melatonin on the development of urothelial hyperplasia induced by repeated CP treatment. Male ICR mice were injected with CP (150 mg/kg) or melatonin (10 mg/kg) with CP once a week for 3, 4 and 5 weeks. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were used to study the ultrastructure, apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation of urothelial cells. Repeated doses of CP caused the development of hyperplastic urothelium with up to ten cell layers and increased proliferation and apoptotic indices regarding Ki-67 and active caspase-3 immunohistochemistry, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy observations, cytokeratin and asymmetrical unit membrane immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis showed a lower differentiation state of superficial urothelial cells. Melatonin co-treatment prevented the development of hyperplastic urothelium, statistically significantly decreased proliferation and apoptotic indices after four and five doses of CP and caused higher differentiation state of superficial urothelial cells.

  10. Effect of Repeat Dosing of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus on Preclinical Models of Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Stafman, Laura L; Garner, Evan F; Mruthyunjayappa, Smitha; Stewart, Jerry E; Friedman, Gregory K; Coleman, Jennifer M; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a tumor of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common sarcoma of childhood. Despite multidrug chemotherapy regimens, surgical intervention, and radiation treatment, outcomes remain poor, especially in advanced disease, and novel therapies are needed for the treatment of these aggressive malignancies. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses, such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV), are currently being explored as treatments for pediatric tumors. M002, an oncolytic HSV, has both copies of the γ134.5 gene deleted, enabling replication in tumor cells but thwarting infection of normal, postmitotic cells. We hypothesized that M002 would infect human RMS tumor cells and lead to decreased tumor cell survival in vitro and impede tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrated that M002 could infect, replicate in, and decrease cell survival in both embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) cells. Additionally, M002 reduced xenograft tumor growth and increased animal survival in both ARMS and ERMS. Most importantly, we showed for the first time that repeated dosing of oncolytic virus coupled with low-dose radiation provided improved tumor response in RMS. These findings provide support for the clinical investigation of oncolytic HSV in pediatric RMS.

  11. Repeated dosing with oral cocaine in humans: assessment of direct effects, withdrawal, and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Sharon L; Stoops, William W; Moody, David E; Lin, Shen-Nan; Bigelow, George E

    2009-08-01

    Cocaine withdrawal symptoms are thought to play a role in relapse; studies characterizing the symptomatology have yielded mixed findings. This study sought to examine the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic profile of repeated high dose exposure to oral cocaine and characterize acute and protracted withdrawal in cocaine abusers. This study employed a repeated-dosing, single-blind design in which subjects (n = 9), resided for 40 days on a closed ward. They were maintained for two 4-day cocaine exposure periods (Days 1-4 & Days 9-12, cocaine 175 mg, p.o.; 5 hourly doses; 875 mg/day) separated by a 4-day matched placebo exposure period (Days 5-8). After these 12 days, an additional period of 28 days of placebo maintenance followed (Days 13-40). Test sessions were conducted during each phase; measures of mood, drug effects, sleep, pharmacokinetics, and prolactin were collected throughout the study. The dosing regimen produced cocaine plasma concentrations (Cmax of 680 ng/mL) two to threefold higher than typically seen in acute dose studies. Prototypic psychostimulant effects, including subjective ratings of euphoric effects (liking, high, good effects) and significant cardiopressor effects, were sustained during the active dosing periods, corresponding to the rise and fall of plasma cocaine. Withdrawal-like symptoms (i.e., disruptions of sleep, increased ratings of anxiety, irritability, crashing) were observed within 24-hr after cessation of dosing. Cocaine reduced prolactin acutely, but no sustained alterations were observed for this measure or for other signs or symptoms during the 28-day abstinence period. These findings indicate that exposure to controlled high doses of cocaine produces modest symptoms consistent with cocaine withdrawal within hours of cessation of dosing but provide no evidence of symptoms persisting beyond 24 hours.

  12. Simulation for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuya; Kayano, Yuichiro; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2007-11-01

    We performed a simulation for the clinical pharmacokinetic study, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral drug administration to subjects. We estimated the approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)) as 2.D/(C(peak).tau+C(trough).tau), where D is the dose, and tau is the dosing interval. The CL/F(approx) value was accurate for drugs with a long-elimination half-life, and the estimation error of the CL/F value was slightly increased for drugs with a shorter elimination half-life. The accuracy of CL/F(approx) in each subject was not affected by the magnitude of the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability, but was significantly decreased by the larger measurement error of drug concentrations (or intraindividual pharmacokinetic variability). We further performed several computer simulations to mimic statistical hypothesis testing following the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials. The statistical power to detect the difference of oral clearance between two groups was marginally dependent on the measurement error of drug concentration, but was highly dependent on the interindividual pharmacokinetic variability. These findings suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate the CL/F(approx) value is useful for clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials, and that the study design and protocol should be evaluated carefully by computer simulation prior to a real clinical trial.

  13. Corn rootworm-active RNA DvSnf7: Repeat dose oral toxicology assessment in support of human and mammalian safety.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Jay S; Frierdich, Gregory E; Carleton, Stephanie M; Kessenich, Colton R; Silvanovich, Andre; Zhang, Yuanji; Koch, Michael S

    2016-11-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have been developed and commercialized that utilize double stranded RNAs (dsRNA) to suppress a target gene(s), producing virus resistance, nutritional and quality traits. MON 87411 is a GM maize variety that leverages dsRNAs to selectively control corn rootworm through production of a 240 base pair (bp) dsRNA fragment targeting for suppression the western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) Snf7 gene (DvSnf7). A bioinformatics assessment found that endogenous corn small RNAs matched ∼450 to 2300 unique RNA transcripts that likely code for proteins in rat, mouse, and human, demonstrating safe dsRNA consumption by mammals. Mice were administered DvSnf7 RNA (968 nucleotides, including the 240 bp DvSnf7 dsRNA) at 1, 10, or 100 mg/kg by oral gavage in a 28-day repeat dose toxicity study. No treatment-related effects were observed in body weights, food consumption, clinical observations, clinical chemistry, hematology, gross pathology, or histopathology endpoints. Therefore, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) for DvSnf7 RNA was 100 mg/kg, the highest dose tested. These results demonstrate that dsRNA for insect control does not produce adverse health effects in mammals at oral doses millions to billions of times higher than anticipated human exposures and therefore poses negligible risk to mammals.

  14. Effects of repeated doses of ivermectin on ocular onchocerciasis: community-based trial in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, J A; Gilbert, C E; Mabey, D M; Maude, G H; Morgan, D; Taylor, D W

    1991-11-02

    Ivermectin seems to be a safe and effective treatment for onchocerciasis when given in a single dose, but less is known about the effects of repeated doses. Also, there seem to be differences in its effectiveness in anterior and posterior segment ocular disease. The ocular effects of ivermectin were studied in 586 villagers who were taking part in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised trial in Sierra Leone. Only those who had received four doses, with 6-month intervals, of ivermectin or placebo were eligible. The 296 ivermectin-treated subjects and the 272 who received placebo were comparable with respect to age, sex, Onchocerca infection, blindness, and visual impairment before treatment. After treatment, the ivermectin group had less anterior segment disease than the placebo group, with significantly lower prevalences of microfilariae in the anterior chamber and cornea, and punctate keratitis (all p less than 0.001), and iritis (p less than 0.05). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of sclerosing keratitis, optic atrophy, or chorioretinitis between the groups. Visual acuities tended to be better in the ivermectin group, but the difference was not significant. There was a small but significant (p less than 0.01) excess of vascular sheathing in the ivermectin group. These differences persisted when subjects who were blind or visually impaired at baseline were excluded from analysis. The long-term effects of ivermectin, particularly on posterior segment disease, need further evaluation. In the mean time, the mass distribution of ivermectin should be promoted for all communities with hyperendemic onchocerciasis at risk of anterior segment disease.

  15. Repeat doses of prenatal corticosteroids for women at risk of preterm birth for improving neonatal health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Caroline A; McKinlay, Christopher J D; Middleton, Philippa; Harding, Jane E

    2015-07-05

    It has been unclear whether repeat dose(s) of prenatal corticosteroids are beneficial. To assess the effectiveness and safety of repeat dose(s) of prenatal corticosteroids. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (20 January 2015), searched reference lists of retrieved studies and contacted authors for further data. Randomised controlled trials of women who had already received a single course of corticosteroids seven or more days previously and considered still at risk of preterm birth. We assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. We included 10 trials (a total of 4733 women and 5700 babies) with low to moderate risk of bias. Treatment of women who remain at risk of preterm birth seven or more days after an initial course of prenatal corticosteroids with repeat dose(s), compared with no repeat corticosteroid treatment, reduced the risk of their infants experiencing the primary outcomes respiratory distress syndrome (risk ratio (RR) 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75 to 0.91, eight trials, 3206 infants, number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) 17, 95% CI 11 to 32) and serious infant outcome (RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.94, seven trials, 5094 infants, NNTB 30, 95% CI 19 to 79).Treatment with repeat dose(s) of corticosteroid was associated with a reduction in mean birthweight (mean difference (MD) -75.79 g, 95% CI -117.63 to -33.96, nine trials, 5626 infants). However, outcomes that adjusted birthweight for gestational age (birthweight Z scores, birthweight multiples of the median and small-for-gestational age) did not differ between treatment groups.At early childhood follow-up, no statistically significant differences were seen for infants exposed to repeat prenatal corticosteroids compared with unexposed infants for the primary outcomes (total deaths; survival free of any disability or major disability; disability; or serious outcome) or in the secondary outcome growth assessments. In women, for the two primary

  16. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity Study of Euphorbia hirta L. Methanol Extract in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuet Ping, Kwan; Darah, Ibrahim; Chen, Yeng; Sreeramanan, Subramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Despite Euphorbia hirta L. ethnomedicinal benefits, very few studies have described the potential toxicity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo toxicity of methanolic extracts of E. hirta. The acute and subchronic oral toxicity of E. hirta was evaluated in Sprague Dawley rats. The extract at a single dose of 5000 mg/kg did not produce treatment related signs of toxicity or mortality in any of the animals tested during the 14-day observation period. Therefore, the LD 50 of this plant was estimated to be more than 5000 mg/kg. In the repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity study, the administration of 50 mg/kg, 250 mg/kg, and 1000 mg/kg/day of E. hirta extract per body weight revealed no significant difference (P > 0.05) in food and water consumptions, body weight change, haematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and gross findings compared to the control group. Macropathology and histopathology examinations of all organs including the liver did not reveal morphological alteration. Analyses of these results with the information of signs, behaviour, and health monitoring could lead to the conclusion that the long-term oral administration of E. hirta extract for 90 days does not cause sub-chronic toxicity. PMID:24386634

  17. Safety Evaluation of Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. Rhizome Extract: Acute and Chronic Toxicity Studies in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Poachanukoon, Orapan; Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Dechatiwongse Na Ayudhya, Thaweephol; Khonsung, Parirat; Jaijoy, Kanjana; Soawakontha, Ruedee; Chanchai, Monraudee

    2014-01-01

    Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. has been used for traditional medicine, but few studies have described its potential toxicity. In this study, the acute and chronic oral toxicity of Z. cassumunar extract granules were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The extract at a single dose of 5000 mg/kg body weight did not produce treatment related signs of toxicity or mortality in any of the animals tested during the 14-day observation period. However, a decrease in body weights was observed in treated males (P < 0.05). The weights of lung and kidney of treated females were increased (P < 0.05). Treated males were increased in spleen and epididymis weights (P < 0.05). In repeated dose 270-day oral toxicity study, the administration of the extracts at concentrations of 0.3, 3, 30, 11.25, 112.5, and 1,125 mg/kg body weight/day revealed no-treatment toxicity. Although certain endpoints among those monitored (i.e., organ weight, hematological parameters, and clinical chemistry) exhibited statistically significant effects, none was adverse. Gross and histological observations revealed no toxicity. Our findings suggest that the Z. cassumunar extract granules are well tolerated for both single and chronic administration. The oral no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for the extract was 1,125 mg/kg body weight/day for males and females. PMID:27379341

  18. Safety Evaluation of Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. Rhizome Extract: Acute and Chronic Toxicity Studies in Rats.

    PubMed

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Poachanukoon, Orapan; Sireeratawong, Seewaboon; Dechatiwongse Na Ayudhya, Thaweephol; Khonsung, Parirat; Jaijoy, Kanjana; Soawakontha, Ruedee; Chanchai, Monraudee

    2014-01-01

    Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. has been used for traditional medicine, but few studies have described its potential toxicity. In this study, the acute and chronic oral toxicity of Z. cassumunar extract granules were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The extract at a single dose of 5000 mg/kg body weight did not produce treatment related signs of toxicity or mortality in any of the animals tested during the 14-day observation period. However, a decrease in body weights was observed in treated males (P < 0.05). The weights of lung and kidney of treated females were increased (P < 0.05). Treated males were increased in spleen and epididymis weights (P < 0.05). In repeated dose 270-day oral toxicity study, the administration of the extracts at concentrations of 0.3, 3, 30, 11.25, 112.5, and 1,125 mg/kg body weight/day revealed no-treatment toxicity. Although certain endpoints among those monitored (i.e., organ weight, hematological parameters, and clinical chemistry) exhibited statistically significant effects, none was adverse. Gross and histological observations revealed no toxicity. Our findings suggest that the Z. cassumunar extract granules are well tolerated for both single and chronic administration. The oral no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for the extract was 1,125 mg/kg body weight/day for males and females.

  19. Pyridostigmine Synergistic Toxicity Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-05-31

    study was separated into two phases. The first (Phase I) determined the acute oral lethal dose - response relationship of each compound with the vehicle...propylene glycol. The second (Phase II) was divided into two portions. One portion (positive control) was a dose - response study using probit units

  20. Comparative study of toxicity of 4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol in newborn and young rats.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, M; Yamamoto, Y; Ito, Y; Takano, M; Enami, T; Kamata, E; Hasegawa, R

    2001-12-01

    The toxicities of 4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol in newborn and young rats was examined and the susceptibility of newborn rats was analyzed in terms of presumed unequivocally toxic and no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs). In the 18-day repeated dose newborn rat study, 4-nitrophenol was orally given from Day 4 to Day 21 after birth but did not induce any toxicity up to 160 mg/kg in the main study, although it induced death in one of six males at 160 mg/kg, and three of six males and one of six females at 230 mg/kg in a prior dose-finding study. In the 28-day repeated dose oral toxicity study starting at 6 weeks of age, 4-nitrophenol caused the death of most males and females at 1,000 mg/kg but was not toxic at 400 mg/kg except for male rat-specific renal toxicity. As unequivocally toxic levels were considered to be 230 mg/kg/day in newborn rats and 600 to 800 mg/kg/day in young rats, and NOAELs were 110 mg/kg/day in newborn rats and 400 mg/kg/day in young rats, the susceptibility of the newborn to 4-nitrophenol appears to be 2.5 to 4 times higher than that of young animals. In the newborn rat study of 2,4-dinitrophenol, animals died at 30 mg/kg in the dose-finding study and significant lowering of body and organ weights was observed at 20 mg/kg in the main study. In the 28-day young rat study, clear toxic signs followed by death occurred at 80 mg/kg but there was no definitive toxicity at 20 mg/kg. As unequivocally toxic levels and NOAELs were considered to be 30 and 10 mg/kg/day in newborn rats and 80 and 20 mg/kg/day in young rats, respectively, the toxicity of 2,4-dinitrophenol in newborns again seems to be 2 to 3 times stronger than in young rats. Abnormalities of external development and reflex ontogeny in the newborn were not observed with either chemical. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the toxic response in newborn rats is at most 4 times higher than that in young rats, at least in the cases of 4-nitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol.

  1. How toxic is coal ash? A laboratory toxicity case study

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrard, Rick M.; Carriker, Neil; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-08

    Under a consent agreement among the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and proponents both for and against stricter regulation, EPA is to issue a new coal ash disposal rule by the end of 2014. Laboratory toxicity investigations often yield conservative estimates of toxicity because many standard test species are more sensitive than resident species, thus could provide information useful to the rule-making. However, few laboratory studies of coal ash toxicity are available; most studies reported in the literature are based solely on field investigations. In this paper, we describe a broad range of toxicity studies conducted for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston ash spill, results of which help provide additional perspective on the toxicity of coal ash.

  2. How toxic is coal ash? A laboratory toxicity case study

    DOE PAGES

    Sherrard, Rick M.; Carriker, Neil; Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen

    2014-12-08

    Under a consent agreement among the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and proponents both for and against stricter regulation, EPA is to issue a new coal ash disposal rule by the end of 2014. Laboratory toxicity investigations often yield conservative estimates of toxicity because many standard test species are more sensitive than resident species, thus could provide information useful to the rule-making. However, few laboratory studies of coal ash toxicity are available; most studies reported in the literature are based solely on field investigations. In this paper, we describe a broad range of toxicity studies conducted for the Tennessee Valley Authoritymore » (TVA) Kingston ash spill, results of which help provide additional perspective on the toxicity of coal ash.« less

  3. Effect of repeated doses of sucrose during heel stick procedure in preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C C; Stremler, R; Horton, L; Friedman, A

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to test the efficacy of repeated versus single dose sucrose to decrease pain from routine heel stick procedures in preterm neonates. Infants (n = 48) in the first week of life with a mean gestational age of 31 weeks received 0.05 ml of 24% sucrose solution or sterile water by mouth (1) 2 min prior to actual lancing of the heel; (2) just prior to lancing, and (3) 2 min after lancing. The single-dose group received sucrose for the first dose and water for the second and third dose; the repeated-dose group received sucrose three times, and the placebo group received only water. The Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were obtained for five 30-second blocks from lancing. Both sucrose groups had lower PIPP scores (single sucrose pain scores, 6.8-8.2, p = 0.07; repeated sucrose pain scores, 5.3-6. 2, p < 0.01) than water (pain scores 7.9-9.1), and in the last block, the repeated dose had lower scores than the single dose (6.2 vs. 8. 2, p < 0.05).

  4. Study on a 4-Week Recovery Test of Sweet Bee Venom after a 13-Week, Repeated, Intramuscular Dose Toxicity Test in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyunmin; Lim, Chungsan; Lee, Seungbae; Kim, Byoungwoo; Kwon, Kirok; Lee, Kwangho

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to check for reversibility in the changes induced by a 13-week, repeated, dose toxicity test of Sweet Bee Venom (SBV) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Methods: Fifteen male and 15 female SD rats were treated with 0.28 mg/kg of SBV (high-dosage group) and the same numbers of male and female SD rats were treated with 0.2 mL/kg of normal saline (control group) for 13 weeks. We selected five male and five female SD rats from the high-dosage group and the same numbers of male and female SD rats from the control group, and we observed these rats for four weeks. We conducted body-weight measurements, ophthalmic examinations, urinalyses and hematology, biochemistry, histology tests. Results: (1) Hyperemia and movement disorder were observed in the 13-week, repeated, dose toxicity test, but these symptoms were not observed during the recovery period. (2) The rats in the high-dose group showed no significant changes in weight compared to the control group. (3) No significant differences in the ophthalmic parameters, urine analyses, complete blood cell counts (CBCs), and biochemistry were observed among the recovery groups. (4) No changes in organ weights were observed during the recovery period. (5) Histological examination of the thigh muscle indicated cell infiltration, inflammation, degeneration, necrosis of muscle fiber, and fibrosis during the treatment period, but these changes were not observed during the recovery period. The fatty liver change that was observed during the toxicity test was not observed during the recovery period. No other organ abnormalities were observed. Conclusion: The changes that occurred during the 13-week, repeated, dose toxicity test are reversible, and SBV can be safely used as a treatment modality. PMID:25780695

  5. Inhalation exposure system used for acute and repeated-dose methyl isocyanate exposures of laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Adkins, B; O'Connor, R W; Dement, J M

    1987-06-01

    Laboratory animals were exposed by inhalation for 2 hr/day (acute) or 6 hr/day (four consecutive days, repeated dose) to methyl isocyanate (MIC). Exposures were conducted in stainless steel and glass inhalation exposure chambers placed in stainless steel, wire mesh cages. MIC was delivered with nitrogen via stainless steel and Teflon supply lines. Chamber concentrations ranged from 0 to 60 ppm and were monitored continuously with infrared spectrophotometers to 1 ppm and at 2-hr intervals to 20 ppb with a high performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a fluorescence detector. Other operational parameters monitored on a continuous basis included chamber temperature (20-27 degrees C), relative humidity (31-64%), static (transmural) pressure (-0.3 in.), and flow (300-500 L/min). The computer-assistance system interfaced with the inhalation exposure laboratory is described in detail, including the analytical instrumentation calibration system used throughout this investigation.

  6. Toxicity study of food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose synthesized from maize husk in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Md Ibrahim H; Yeasmin, Mst Sarmina

    2016-11-01

    Food-grade carboxymethyl cellulose was prepared from maize husk agro-waste and was evaluated sub-chronic oral toxicity in Swiss albino mice. 40 male mice were divided into 4 groups and fed diets with 0 (control) - 10% CMC for a period of 3 months. Daily oral doses were 5 - 20mg/g body weight to the mice/day. Animal care and handling were conformed according to internationally accepted standard guidelines. Haematological and biochemical parameters were monitored during this period. At the end of the study, tissues and organs were studied for histopathological changes. Repeat-dose oral toxicity study was carried out according to OECD guideline 408. The result did not show any treatment related abnormalities in terms of haematological and biochemical parameters. However, water intake, urine production and urinary sodium excretion increased with increasing doses of CMC. The weekly body weight showed no significant differences between control and mice treated with different doses of CMC. In mice of the treated groups, no abnormalities in the histopathology of liver, heart, lung and kidney were detected. This indicated the prepared CMC has no toxic effect at different doses on cellular structure, and support the safety use of CMC as food additives and an excipient for pharmaceuticals.

  7. Preliminary toxicity study of dichloromethane extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Obici, Simoni; Otobone, Fernanda Jacques; da Silva Sela, Vânia Ramos; Ishida, Kelly; da Silva, José Carlos; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Garcia Cortez, Diógenes Aparício; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida

    2008-01-04

    Kielmeyera coriacea Mart. (Clusiaceae), known as "Pau Santo" or "Saco de Boi" in the central Brazilian plateau region, is used to treat several tropical diseases. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of dichloromethane (DcM) extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems, administered to rodents. In the acute toxicity tests, mice receiving doses of this extract by the oral and intraperitoneal routes, showed reversible effects, with LD50 values of 1503.0 and 538.8 mg/kg, respectively. In the repeated-dose oral (90 days) toxicity tests, male and female Wistar rats were treated by gavage with different doses of DcM extract (5, 25 or 125 mg/kg). In biochemical and haematological evaluations, the results varied widely in respect to dose and sex, with no linear profile, and did not show clinical correlations. In the histopathological examinations, the groups exhibited some changes, but there were no significant differences between the groups compared to the controls. In conclusion, these investigations appeared to indicate the safety of acute and repeated oral administration of the DcM extract of Kielmeyera coriacea stems, which can therefore be continuously used with safety.

  8. [Preclinical study of noopept toxicity].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, L P; Smol'nikova, N M; Alekseeva, S V; Nemova, E P; Sorokina, A V; Miramedova, M G; Kurapova, S P; Sidorina, E I; Kulakova, A V; Daugel'-Dauge, N O

    2002-01-01

    Within the framework of a preclinical investigation, the new nootrope drug noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-propyl-glycine ethylate) was tested for chronic toxicity upon peroral administration in a dose of 10 or 100 mg/kg over 6 months in both male and female rabbits. The results of observations showed that noopept administered in this dose range induced no irreversible pathologic changes in the organs and systems studied and exhibited no allergenic, immunotoxic, and mutagen activity. The drug affected neither the generative function nor the antenatal or postnatal progeny development. Noopept produced a dose-dependent suppression of inflammation reaction to concanavalin A and stimulated the cellular and humoral immune response in mice.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin after oral administration of single and repeat doses in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Efthymiopoulos, C; Bramer, S L; Maroli, A

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of grepafloxacin in healthy male subjects following single oral administration of doses ranging from 200 to 1200 mg, and following repeated oral administration of 400 and 800 mg doses are reported. Plasma levels of grepafloxacin reached a peak within 2 hours (on average) following drug administration and then declined bi-exponentially with concentrations being detectable (> 5 micrograms/L) in the plasma for at least up to 72 hours postdose. The high values for the apparent volume of distribution (5 to 8 L/kg) suggested extensive distribution of grepafloxacin in the tissues. Only a small percentage of the administered dose (ranging from 6% to 9.5%) was recovered in the urine as unchanged grepafloxacin, suggesting that metabolism, rather than urinary excretion, is the major elimination route. The half-life of grepafloxacin was about 12 hours after single doses and about 15 hours after repeat doses. The trough levels increased significantly over the first 3 days of repeat administration; thereafter, the changes were small, with steady-state being reached by the fifth day. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24 h) values observed on days 7 and 14 of repeat administration, at each dose level, were similar, suggesting that steady-state is maintained. The area values increased more than proportionally after administration of increasing single and repeat doses, suggesting nonlinear kinetics. The elimination half-life and renal clearance did not change with increasing doses. Saturation in the metabolism of grepafloxacin and possibly in the distribution into a peripheral compartment, as suggested by a decrease in the total plasma clearance and in the apparent volume of distribution, could be the origin of the nonlinear kinetics. However, this deviation from linearity is unlikely to be of clinical significance, since it was very small over the recommended range of therapeutic doses (400 to 600 mg once daily). Compared with other quinolones

  10. Effect of Single Compared to Repeated Doses of Intravenous S(+) Ketamine on the Release of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines in Patients Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hassan Mohamed; Mokhtar, Ali M

    2017-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is a major surgical procedure that is associated with marked inflammatory response and impairment of the immune system which may affect the postoperative outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of preincision single or multiple doses of S(+) ketamine on the pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). This is a randomized controlled trial including 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy under combined general-epidural anesthesia in Cairo university Teaching Hospital. Patients were randomly divided into three groups each of twenty patients: Group I received no S(+) ketamine (control group), Group II received S(+) ketamine as a single preincision dose, and Group III received preincision and repeated doses of S(+) ketamine. S(+) ketamine was injected as a single intravenous dose of 0.5 mg/kg in Group II and III, repeated as 0.2 mg/kg at 20 min interval until 30 min before the end of surgery. The three groups were comparable in age, weight, and duration of the operation. The study also revealed that a single preincision dose of S(+) ketamine decreased TNF-α to reach 1027.04 ± 50.13 μ/ml and IL-6 to reach 506.89 ± 25.35 pg/ml whereas the repeated doses of S(+) ketamine decreased TNF-α to reach 905.64 ± 35065 μ/ml and IL-6 to reach 412.79 ± 16.5 pg/ml (P < 0.05). S(+) ketamine suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine production, especially when given in repeated doses.

  11. Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity studies of erythritol in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Alex K; de Cock, Peter; Crincoli, Christine M; Means, Charlotte; Wismer, Tina; Pappas, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Polyols, also known as sugar alcohols, are widely used in the formulation of tooth-friendly and reduced-calorie foods. Considering the significant health benefits of polyols in products formulated for human use, there is increased interest in evaluating potential uses in companion animal applications. Erythritol and xylitol are two polyols which are currently widely used in products ranging from reduced-sugar foods to personal care and cosmetics. Published studies have shown that both of these compounds are well-tolerated in rodents. Their toxicity profiles differ when comparing canine safety data. Doses of xylitol as low as 0.15 g/kg-BW in dogs can result in life-threatening hypoglycemia and acute liver failure, whereas erythritol is well-tolerated in dogs with reported No Adverse Effect Levels upwards of 5 g/kg-BW/day in repeat-dose studies. While pivotal studies substantiating the safe use of erythritol in humans have been published, there are limited published studies to support the safe use of erythritol in dogs. Here we present the results of an acute oral and a sub-chronic oral toxicity study in Beagle dogs. Given the potential health benefits of oral products formulated with erythritol and the data presented herein substantiating the safe use in dogs, erythritol can be safely used in products for canines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [A 4-week intravenous toxicity study of the active metabolite (NM394) of prulifloxacin (NM441) in rats followed by a 4-week recovery test].

    PubMed

    Ishida, S; Iketani, M; Yamazaki, S; Tamura, K; Shindo, Y; Iwakura, K; Sumi, N

    1996-06-01

    A repeated dose toxicity study of ( +/- )-6- fluoro-1-methyl-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-4H- [1,3]thiazeto[3,2-a]quinoline-3-carboxylic acid (NM394), the active metabolite of a new antibacterial agent, prulifloxacin, was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male and female rats were given the test material intravenously for 4 weeks at doses of 0 (control), 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg. After discontinuation of the treatment, a 4-week recovery test was also conducted. There were no treatment-related effects on survival, clinical signs, body weight and food consumption. Ophthalmoscopic and hematologic examinations failed to show any abnormalities related to the treatment. Increased water consumption was observed in the 10 and 30 mg/kg groups. In these dose groups, increased urine volume and lowered urine specific gravity, and crystalline substance and small epithelial cells in urinary sediments were seen. Cloudy urine was also seen in the 30 mg/kg group. Blood chemical examination showed decreased gamma-globulin in the 10 and 30 mg/kg groups and increased BUN and creatinine in the 30 mg/kg group. Pathological changes caused by the treatment were as follows. In kidney, tubular nephrosis with crystalline substance was observed in the 10 and 30 mg/kg groups and its organ weight was increased in the 30 mg/kg group. Cecal weight was increased in the 30 mg/kg group. The above-mentioned changes were reversible except for decreased gamma-globulin. Plasma levels and urinary concentrations of the test material were increased in all dose groups with dose-related manner, whereby no sex differences were observed. No effects caused by the repeated dosing were seen in the plasma concentrations. Toxicological findings were not observed in the 3 mg/kg group. The results show that the NOAEL of NM394 is 3 mg/kg for 4-week repeated dose toxicity in rats.

  13. In vivo flow cytometric Pig-a and micronucleus assays: highly sensitive discrimination of the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene and pyrene using acute and repeated-dose designs.

    PubMed

    Torous, Dorothea K; Phonethepswath, Souk; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Mereness, Jared; Bryce, Steven M; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Weller, Pamela; Bell, Sara; Gleason, Carol; Custer, Laura L; MacGregor, James T; Dertinger, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Combining multiple genetic toxicology endpoints into a single in vivo study, and/or integrating one or more genotoxicity assays into general toxicology studies, is attractive because it reduces animal use and enables comprehensive comparative analysis using toxicity, metabolism, and pharmacokinetic information from the same animal. This laboratory has developed flow cytometric scoring techniques for monitoring two blood-based genotoxicity endpoints-micronucleated reticulocyte frequency and gene mutation at the Pig-a locus-thereby making combination and integration studies practical. The ability to effectively monitor these endpoints in short-term and repeated dosing schedules was investigated with the carcinogen/noncarcinogen pair benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and pyrene (Pyr). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated via oral gavage for 3 or 28 consecutive days with several dose levels of Pyr, including maximum tolerated doses. BP exposure was administered by the same route but at one dose level, 250 or 125 mg/kg/day for 3-day and 28-day studies, respectively. Serial blood samples were collected up to Day 45, and were analyzed for Pig-a mutation with a dual labeling method (SYTO 13 in combination with anti-CD59-PE) that facilitated mutant cell frequency measurements in both total erythrocytes and the reticulocyte subpopulation. A mutant cell enrichment step based on immunomagnetic column separation was used to increase the statistical power of the assay. BP induced robust mutant reticulocyte responses by Day 15, and elevated frequencies persisted until study termination. Mutant erythrocyte responses lagged mutant reticulocyte responses, with peak incidences observed on Day 30 of the 3-day study (43-fold increase) and on Day 42 of the 28-day study (171-fold increase). No mutagenic effects were apparent for Pyr. Blood samples collected on Day 4, and Day 29 for the 28-day study, were evaluated for micronucleated reticulocyte frequency. Significant increases in micronucleus

  14. Toxicity study of lead naphthenate

    PubMed Central

    Peteghem, Th. Van; Devos, H.

    1974-01-01

    van Peteghem, Th., and de Vos, H. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 233-238. Toxicity study of lead naphthenate. Lead naphthenate is added to oils and greases in order to increase their resistance to high pressures. Experiments on animals and humans showed the possibility of a small amount of percutaneous absorption. An investigation was performed on technicians regularly dealing with these lubricants in order to explore to what extent they had absorbed the lead naphthenate. The degree of absorption was evaluated by measuring the lead content of the blood and the δ-aminolevulinic acid concentration in the urine. Individual results did not permit clearcut conclusions whether an increase in lead absorption had occured or not. Therefore the group of technicians was compared with a group without any occupational contact with lead-containing lubricants but otherwise comparable in occupational and general exposure to lead. To test the significance of the difference between the means of the samples a one-sided t test not assuming equal standard deviations for both populations was used. For any of two compared populations the t test was repeated after rejection of the larger values which were 2·5 standard deviations from the mean value in the exposed population. It appeared that the lead concentration in the blood and the δ-aminolevulinic acid concentration in the urine of people exposed to lead naphthenate-containing lubricants were significantly higher than those concentrations observed in non-exposed persons. PMID:4416678

  15. [Gymnema sylvestre leaf extract: a 52-week dietary toxicity study in Wistar rats].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yukio; Sekita, Kiyoshi; Umemura, Takashi; Saito, Minoru; Ono, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Yasushi; Uchida, Osayuki; Matsushima, Yuko; Inoue, Tohru; Kanno, Jun

    2004-02-01

    A 52-week study of oral-repeated-dose toxicity for the extraction powder of Gymnema sylvestre (GS), Indian-native genus, Metaplexis japonica, was conducted in both genders of Wistar rats. The rats were administered a graded dose of GS at 0.01, 0.10 and 1.00% of basal powder diet, along with a group fed solely with the basal powder diet without GS, for 52 weeks. General conditions were recorded daily. Body weights and food consumptions were recorded weekly up to 12 weeks, and thereafter at longer intervals. At 26 weeks, for an intermediate examination, and 52 weeks, for the final examination, animals were subjected to hematology, serum chemistry, and pathological examination. None of the animals died in the period up to 52 weeks. No exposure-related changes in body-weight, in the food consumption, in the hematological examinations, or in the serum biochemical examinations were recognized. No histopathological alterations were seen. Thus, it was concluded that there was no toxic effect in rats treated with GS at up to 1.00% in the diet for 52 weeks. The no-observable-effect level from this study is 1.00% GS, i.e., 504 mg/kg/day for male and 563 mg/kg/day for female as mean daily intake, for 52 weeks.

  16. Toxicity and Safety Profiles of Methanolic Extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sharwan, Gotmi; Jain, Parag; Pandey, Ravindra; Shukla, Shiv Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goals of this research were to evaluate acute (single-dose) and sub-acute (repeated-dose) toxicity profiles of methanolic extract of Pistacia integerrima J. L. Stewart ex Brandis (PI) for Wistar rats and to assess the safety profile of PI by observing physiological changes, mortality, changes in body weight, the histopathology of body organs, the hematology and the biochemistry of the animals. Methods: The toxicity profile of PI was evaluated using Wistar rats of both sexes. Animals were divided into four groups: Group 1; control group (normal saline), Group 2; PI-1 (250 mg/kg), Group 3; PI-2 (500 mg/kg), Group 4; PL-3 (1,000 mg/kg). An acute-toxicity study in which animals received a single dose of PI extract (2,000 mg/ kg) and were then observed for 14 days for changes in skin, fur, eye color, mucous membrane secretions and excretions, gait, posture, and tonic or clonic movements was performed according to guideline 425 of the Organization of Economic and Corporation Development (OECD). In the repeated-dose toxicity study (OECD – 407) animals received a daily dose of PI extract for 28 days (4 weeks). The parameters observed in this study include body weight, hematology and biochemistry of the animals. Results: In the acute toxicity study, no mortalities or changes in behavior were noted in the animals. The repeated-dose toxicity study was also devoid of any toxicity in the animals during the 28 days of testing with PI extract. The extract did not alter- the body weight, hematology or biochemistry of the animals. The methanolic extract of PI was to be found safe to the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for the single- dose and repeated-dose toxicity tests in rats. Conclusion: The methanolic extract of PI was devoid of toxicity; hence, it can be used for various ayurvedic preparations and treatments of diseases. PMID:27695635

  17. Clinical and pathological effects of short-term cyanide repeated dosing to goats.

    PubMed

    Soto-Blanco, B; Stegelmeier, B L; Górniak, S L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine and describe the effects of subacute cyanide toxicity to goats. Eight female goats were divided into two groups. The first group of five animals was treated with 8.0 mg KCN kg(-1) body weight day(-1) for seven consecutive days. The second group of three animals was treated with water as controls. Complete physical examination, including observation for behavior changes, was conducted before and after dosing. One treated animal was euthanized immediately after dosing. Later, two of the remaining treated animals and a control goat were euthanized after a 30-day recovery period. Euthanized animals were necropsied and tissues were collected and prepared for histologic studies. Clinical signs in treated goats were transient and included depression and lethargy, mild hyperpnea and hyperthermia, arrhythmias, abundant salivation, vocalizations, expiratory dyspnea, jerky movements and head pressing. Two goats developed convulsions after day 3 of treatment. One animal developed more permanent behavioral changes as she became less dominant and aggressive. Histologic changes included mild hepatocellular vacuolation and degeneration, mild vacuolation and swelling of the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidneys and spongiosis of the white matter (status spongiosis) of the cerebral white tracts, internal capsule, cerebellar peduncles, spinal cord and peripheral nerves. In summary, sub-lethal cyanide intoxication in goats resulted in behavioral changes, and during the treatment period animals showed delayed signs of toxicity. Significant histologic lesions in goats were observed and need to be characterized further.

  18. [A 4-week oral toxicity study of prulifloxacin (NM441) in rats followed by a 4-week recovery test].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Fukuda, K; Yamazaki, S; Tamura, K; Shindo, Y; Iwakura, K; Sumi, N

    1996-06-01

    A repeated dose toxicity study of prulifloxacin, a new antibacterial agent, was conducted in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male and female rats were given the test material orally for 4 weeks at doses of 0 (control), 30, 300 and 3000 mg/kg. After discontinuation of the treatment, a 4-week recovery test was also conducted. There was one case of death in the 3000 mg/kg group. Grayish green and soft feces, unkempt fur, transient deep respiration and decreased body weight gain were observed in the 3000 mg/kg group. Decreased food consumption and increased water intake were seen in the 300 and 3000 mg/kg groups. Ophthalmoscopic examination failed to show any abnormalities related to the treatment. In urinalysis, crystalline substance in the urinary sediments, cloudy urine and decreased Na+ excretion were observed in the 300 and 3000 mg/kg groups. Increased urine volume, lowered urine specific gravity and decreased K+ and Cl- excretions were seen in the 3000 mg/kg group. Hematologic examination showed decreased Hb, Ht, MCV and MCH and increased WBC in the 3000 mg/kg group. Blood chemical examination revealed increased BUN and decreased K+ and Cl- in the 3000 mg/kg group, and decreased K+ and gamma-globulin in the 300 mg/kg group. Pathological changes caused by the treatment were as follows. Cecal weight was increased in all dose groups. Cecal distention and swelling of its absorptive cells were seen in the 300 and 3000 mg/kg groups. In kidney, tubular nephrosis with crystalline substance was observed in the 300 and 3000 mg/kg groups, and its organ weight was increased in the 3000 mg/kg group. The above-mentioned changes were reversible except for decreased gamma-globulin, increased BUN and urine volume, and lowered urine specific gravity. Ulcer and small cavities associated with proliferation of fibrous tissue in the femoral articular cartilage were observed in the 3000 mg/kg group at the end of recovery period of 4 weeks. Plasma levels and urinary concentrations of active

  19. Pharmacokinetics of epimeric budesonide and fluticasone propionate after repeat dose inhalation – intersubject variability in systemic absorption from the lung

    PubMed Central

    Minto, Charles; Li, Benny; Tattam, Bruce; Brown, Ken; Seale, J Paul; Donnelly, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Aims Pharmacokinetic variability is likely to be a significant factor contributing to the interindividual differences in dose requirements, anti-inflammatory response and side-effects with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), but there is limited information about the disposition of ICS during regular dosing with a pressurized metered dose inhaler (pMDI). This study uses a mixed effects modelling approach to quantify and compare the interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics of epimeric budesonide (BUD) and fluticasone propionate (FP) after repeat-dose inhalation. Methods This pharmacokinetic substudy was part of a previously published open-label, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-period crossover study to evaluate the short-term effects on plasma cortisol levels of inhaled BUD (400, 800, 1600 µg twice daily) and FP (375, 750, 1000 µg twice daily) via pMDI in a group of healthy male volunteers. On the fifth day of each high-dose treatment period (BUD 1600 µg twice daily and FP 1000 µg twice daily), venous blood samples were collected in nine subjects prior to the last dose and at 15 min, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h postdose for measurement of plasma drug concentrations to determine the pharmacokinetics of epimeric BUD and FP following inhalation. Non-compartmental analysis and a mixed effects model were used to characterize the disposition profiles. Results Both drugs had a rapid absorption half-life (BUD 10 min vs FP 11.3 min), but quite different elimination half-lives (BUD 2.4 h vs FP 7.8 h). Although there were intraindividual differences in the handling of the 22R-and 22S-epimers of BUD, there were no consistent pharmacokinetic differences between the two enantiomers in the group as a whole. Consistent with previous reports of FP’s higher volume of distribution (V) and lower systemic bioavailability (F), the V/F ratio was lower for BUD than FP (498 l vs 8100 l). The parameter with the greatest interindividual variability for both BUD and FP was the rate of

  20. Biological effects of magnetic fluids: toxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, Z. G. M.; Azevedo, R. B.; Martins, E. V.; Lacava, L. M.; Freitas, M. L. L.; Garcia, V. A. P.; Rébula, C. A.; Lemos, A. P. C.; Sousa, M. H.; Tourinho, F. A.; Da Silva, M. F.; Morais, P. C.

    1999-07-01

    Toxicity of ionic and citrate-based magnetic fluids administrated intraperitoneally to mice was investigated through cytogenetic analysis, evaluation of mitotic index and morphological and cytometric alterations. Both magnetic fluid samples cause severe inflammatory reactions, being very toxic and thus not biocompatible. Peritoneal cells and tissues studies may provide a useful strategy to investigate the in vivo biological effects of magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Acute and subchronic toxicity studies of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) disodium salt (BioPQQ™) in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Masahiko; Takahashi, Hisaaki; Koura, Seiko; Chung, Catherine; Tafazoli, Shahrzad; Roberts, Ashley

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium salt (BioPQQ™), as a supplemental food ingredient, was evaluated in a range of oral toxicity studies in rats including an acute study, a 14-day preliminary and a 28-day repeated-dose study, and a 13-week subchronic study. The median lethal dose of BioPQQ™ was shown to be 1000-2000mg/kg body weight (bw) in male and 500-1000mg/kgbw in female rats. In the 14-day study, high doses of BioPQQ™ resulted in increases in relative kidney weights with associated histopathology in female rats only, while a follow-up 28-day study in female animals resulted in increases in urinary protein and crystals. These findings were reversible, and resolved during the recovery period. In the 13-week study, a number of clinical chemistry findings and histopathological changes were noted, which were deemed to be of no toxicological significance, as the levels were within the historical control range, were not dose-dependent, occurred at a similar frequency in control groups, or only occurred in the control group. Based on these findings, a no-observed-adverse-effect level of 100mg/kgbw/day was determined for BioPQQ™ in rats, the highest dose tested in the 13-week study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of toxicity studies of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Norihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Morimoto, Yasuo

    2017-09-28

    We reviewed studies on pulmonary, reproductive, and developmental toxicity caused by carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In paricular, we analyzed how CNT exposure affects the several processes of pulmonary toxicity, including inflammation, injury, fibrosis, and pulmonary tumors. In pulmonary toxicity, there are various processes, including inflammation, injury, fibrosis, respiratory tumor in the lungs, and biopersistence of CNTs and genotoxicity as tumor-related factors, to develop the respiratory tumor. We evaluated the evidence for the carcinogenicity of CNTs in each process. In the fields of reproductive and developmental toxicity, studies of CNTs have been conducted mainly with mice. We summarized the findings of reproductive and developmental toxicity studies of CNTs. In animal studies, exposure to CNTs induced sustained inflammation, fibrosis, lung cancer following long-term inhalation, and gene damage in the lung. CNTs also showed high biopersistence in animal studies. Fetal malformations after intravenous and intraperitoneal injections and intratracheal instillation, fetal loss after intravenous injection, behavioral changes in offsprings after intraperitoneal injection, and a delay in the delivery of the first litter after intratracheal instillation were reported in mice-administered multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) appeared to be embryolethal and teratogenic in mice when given by intravenous injection; moreover, the tubes induced death and growth retardation in chicken embryos. CNTs are considered to have carcinogenicity and can cause lung tumors. However, the carcinogenicity of CNTs may attenuate if the fiber length is shorter. The available data provide initial information on the potential reproductive and developmental toxicity of CNTs.

  3. Svarna - vanga - a short duration toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Sharma; Gyaneshwar; Joshi, D; Aryya, N C; Pandey, V B

    1985-10-01

    Swarna - Vanga, an Ayurvedic preparation, is used in the treatment mainly of Pramehas (genitor urinary and metabolic disorders), Sveta Pradara (Leucorrhoea), Kasa - Swasa (Respiratory disorders), etc. The drug contains tin and sulphur as major components along with traces of mercury, iron and aluminum. According to modern point of view certain metals have been claimed toxic to both human and animal. Since Svarna - Vanga contains these metals, it is essential to screen out its toxic effect, if any, although it is claimed in Ayurveda that when a metal is processed as prescribed, it become non - toxic or the least toxic. Considering the above facts, an animal experiment was carried out for short duration (14 days) to screen the toxic effects of Svarna - Vanga (SV) in increasing doses of the drug starting from the maximum therapeutic dose (12.5 mg / 100 gm b.wt / day). The drug was found to have no toxic effects in tissues of the animal at doses of 12.5 mg and 25 mg / 100 gm b.wt. / day. Fine fatty vacuolization in liver and focal superficial mucosal degeneration and necrosis of small intestine confined to one animal each at dose of 50 mg / 100gm b.wt. and 100 mg/ 100 gm. b.wt. / day were observed. Our study indicates that the drug has no toxic effect on tissues at therapeutic dose.

  4. A subchronic 90-day oral toxicity study of Origanum vulgare essential oil in rats.

    PubMed

    Llana-Ruiz-Cabello, M; Maisanaba, S; Puerto, M; Pichardo, S; Jos, A; Moyano, R; Cameán, A M

    2017-03-01

    Oregano essential oil (Origanum vulgare L. virens) (OEO) is being used in the food industry due to its useful properties to develop new active packaging systems. In this concern, the safety assessment of this natural extract is of great interest before being commercialized. The European Food Safety Authority requests different in vivo assays to ensure the safety of food contact materials. One of these studies is a 90 days repeated-dose oral assay in rodents. In the present work, 40 male and 40 female Wistar rats were orally exposed to 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) OEO during 90 days following the OECD guideline 408. Data revealed no mortality and no treatment-related adverse effects of the OEO in food/water consumption, body weight, haematology, biochemistry, necropsy, organ weight and histopathology. These findings suggest that the oral no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of this OEO is 200 mg/kg b.w. in Wistar rats, the highest dose tested. In conclusion, the use of this OEO in food packaging appears to be safe based on the lack of toxicity during the subchronic study at doses 330-fold higher than those expected to be in contact consumers in the worst scenario of exposure.

  5. Differential effects of acute and repeat dosing with the H3 antagonist GSK189254 on the sleep–wake cycle and narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Guo, RX; Anaclet, C; Roberts, JC; Parmentier, R; Zhang, M; Guidon, G; Buda, C; Sastre, JP; Feng, JQ; Franco, P; Brown, SH; Upton, N; Medhurst, AD; Lin, JS

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Histamine H3 receptor antagonists are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for a number of central nervous system disorders including narcolepsy. These agents can increase wakefulness (W) in cats and rodents following acute administration, but their effects after repeat dosing have not been reported previously. Experimental approach: EEG and EMG recordings were used to investigate the effects of acute and repeat administration of the novel H3 antagonist GSK189254 on the sleep–wake cycle in wild-type (Ox+/+) and orexin knockout (Ox−/−) mice, the latter being genetically susceptible to narcoleptic episodes. In addition, we investigated H3 and H1 receptor expression in this model using radioligand binding and autoradiography. Key results: In Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice, acute administration of GSK189254 (3 and 10 mg·kg−1 p.o.) increased W and decreased slow wave and paradoxical sleep to a similar degree to modafinil (64 mg·kg−1), while it reduced narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice. After twice daily dosing for 8 days, the effect of GSK189254 (10 mg·kg−1) on W in both Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice was significantly reduced, while the effect on narcoleptic episodes in Ox−/− mice was significantly increased. Binding studies revealed no significant differences in H3 or H1 receptor expression between Ox+/+ and Ox−/− mice. Conclusions and implications: These studies provide further evidence to support the potential use of H3 antagonists in the treatment of narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness. Moreover, the differential effects observed on W and narcoleptic episodes following repeat dosing could have important implications in clinical studies. PMID:19413575

  6. The juvenile toxicity study as a tool for a science-based risk assessment in the children population group.

    PubMed

    Narciso, Laura; Catone, Tiziana; Aquilina, Gabriele; Attias, Leonello; De Angelis, Isabella; Iuliano, Maria Grazia; Tassinari, Roberta; Mantovani, Alberto; Maranghi, Francesca

    2017-09-01

    Children show unique features concerning chemical hazards and risks, due to different exposure scenarios, age-related metabolic capacity and biological susceptibility linked to post-natal development. Chemical Regulatory frameworks state the need of children risk characterization. Current testing guidelines covering post-natal development are not routinely required by regulatory applications other than pesticides and biocides. Juvenile toxicity studies are foreseen for paediatric drugs: the toxicological repeated-dose tests don't allow accurate evaluations of effects upon direct exposure of immature organism. The paper discusses a testing approach aimed to address regulatory requirements of chemical hazard identification/characterization in a children-specific perspective. Juvenile toxicity test could be performed primarily on chemicals that may have relevant modes of action and/or age-related toxicokinetic differences and/or lead to important children exposure. This could be pursued by updating existing guidelines/test protocols with triggers for endpoints relevant to juvenile toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A subchronic 90-day oral rat toxicity study and in vitro genotoxicity studies with a conjugated linoleic acid product.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, S; Menzel, A

    2003-12-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is the term given to a group of positional and geometric isomers of the essential fatty acid linoleic acid. CLA is found naturally in foods such as dairy and meat products. CLA is reported to have a number of beneficial effects including anticarcinogenic activity. However, safety data are limited. Clarinol G80 is a commercial preparation containing equal amounts of the 9cis,11trans and 10trans,12cis CLA isomers in the form of glycerides. In order to support the safety-in-use of Clarinol G80 as an ingredient in food, the preparation was tested in two in vitro mutagenicity assays, an Ames test and an in vitro cytogenetics assay, and a 90-day repeat-dose oral toxicity rat study. Clarinol G80 was non-mutagenic in both in vitro assays. In the 90-day study, Clarinol G80 produced hepatocellular hypertrophy in female rats at the highest dose level (15% w/w). This effect was an adaptive effect in response to feeding high levels of Clarinol G80 in the diet and was reversible upon withdrawal of test material. An increase in plasma insulin levels was also observed female rats fed 15% w/w Clarinol G80 but there was no effect on plasma glucose levels. A No Observed Adverse Effect Level of 2433 mg/kg bw/day for male and 2728 mg/kg bw/day female rats was identified in the study.

  8. Study finds damage from toxics is heavy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-23

    According to a recent study by the US Library of Congress, toxic-chemical damage in the US is ''substantial and enduring''. Among the findings were 128 incidents of groundwater pollution, which lead to the closing of 1363 wells and in which the most frequently found contaminant was trichloroethylene, often from an unknown source; that 90% of Adirondack lakes above 2000 ft elevation are barren because of acid-rain contamination; and that cultivation of 18 different crops has become unprofitable in various parts of California as a result of air pollution. The study was mainly a literature survey in which known incidents of damage to natural resources by toxic contamination were catalogued.

  9. TOXICITY STUDIES OF COOLANOL 15

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Coolanol 15* (formerly designated MCS 198), a synthetic heat transfer fluid, is currently being used in the heat transfer systems of manned... Coolanol 15 is relatively nontoxic. The LD50 for mice was found to be greater than 20.0 gm (22,2 ml) per kg at 24 hours and 5.9 gm (6.6ml) per kg at 7...hyperkeratosis and cellular infiltration. These studies failed to confirm the previously reported lesions in the central nervous system attributed to Coolanol 15. (*Trade mark.)

  10. Profiling the reproductive toxicity of chemicals from multigeneration studies in the toxicity reference database

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multigeneration reproduction studies are used to characterize parental and offspring systemic toxicity, as well as reproductive toxicity of pesticides, industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Results from 329 multigeneration studies on 316 chemicals have been digitized into sta...

  11. Profiling the reproductive toxicity of chemicals from multigeneration studies in the toxicity reference database

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multigeneration reproduction studies are used to characterize parental and offspring systemic toxicity, as well as reproductive toxicity of pesticides, industrial chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Results from 329 multigeneration studies on 316 chemicals have been digitized into sta...

  12. CDP-choline: acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Grau, T; Romero, A; Sacristán, A; Ortiz, J A

    1983-01-01

    The acute toxicity of a single dose of cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline, citicoline, Somazina) by different administration routes in mice and rats has been studied. LD50 values were determined according to the cumulative method by Reed-Muench for mortality rate, and Pizzi's method for calculation of standard error.

  13. Safety evaluation of ABELCET, an amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC): toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Diener, Robert M; Lipman, Jack M

    2006-01-01

    ABELCET (ABLC) is a widely used amphotericin B lipid complex formulation that is approved for use in the treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients who are refractory or intolerant of conventional amphotericin B (AmB). The safety profile of ABLC has been characterized in two acute and two repeat-dose toxicity studies in rats. The acute toxicity studies indicated that single intravenous doses of ABLC are at least 20 times less toxic than conventional amphotericin B doses without the lipid formulation, Fungizone. Intravenous doses of 0, 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg/day to groups of rats (10 to 15 rats/sex/group) for 31 days elicited no mortality or overt clinical signs of toxicity, whereas alternate intravenous/intraperitoneal doses (three each per week) for 6 months, produced one death in the control group, one in the intermediate-dose group, and two in the high-dose group. Clinical signs (predominantly piloerection and hunched posture at 10 mg/kg/day) were attributed to granulomatous inflammatory lesions in the abdominal wall, mesentery, and omentum, which were produced by the intraperitoneal injections of ABLC. Feed consumption and body weight gains decreased in high-dose male rats in the one-month study and were significantly lower in male rats at 3 and 10 mg/kg/day in the 6-month study. In contrast, water consumption increased in male and female rats in both studies. Trends of minimal to moderate, dose-related increases in relative kidney, liver and spleen weights, and histological evidence of hypertrophy and hyperplasia of reticuloendothelial cells in the liver and spleen and mild, dose-related impairment of renal function occurred in both the 1- and 6-month studies. Examination of high-dose rats following a recovery period of 28 days after completion of 31 days of dosing suggested that treatment-related changes were reversible. The observed changes for ABLC are similar to those for other amphotericin B lipid formulations, such as AmBisome (LAmB), except for the

  14. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of

  15. Classification of baseline toxicants for QSAR predictions to replace fish acute toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Nendza, Monika; Müller, Martin; Wenzel, Andrea

    2017-03-22

    Fish acute toxicity studies are required for environmental hazard and risk assessment of chemicals by national and international legislations such as REACH, the regulations of plant protection products and biocidal products, or the GHS (globally harmonised system) for classification and labelling of chemicals. Alternative methods like QSARs (quantitative structure-activity relationships) can replace many ecotoxicity tests. However, complete substitution of in vivo animal tests by in silico methods may not be realistic. For the so-called baseline toxicants, it is possible to predict the fish acute toxicity with sufficient accuracy from log Kow and, hence, valid QSARs can replace in vivo testing. In contrast, excess toxicants and chemicals not reliably classified as baseline toxicants require further in silico, in vitro or in vivo assessments. Thus, the critical task is to discriminate between baseline and excess toxicants. For fish acute toxicity, we derived a scheme based on structural alerts and physicochemical property thresholds to classify chemicals as either baseline toxicants (=predictable by QSARs) or as potential excess toxicants (=not predictable by baseline QSARs). The step-wise approach identifies baseline toxicants (true negatives) in a precautionary way to avoid false negative predictions. Therefore, a certain fraction of false positives can be tolerated, i.e. baseline toxicants without specific effects that may be tested instead of predicted. Application of the classification scheme to a new heterogeneous dataset for diverse fish species results in 40% baseline toxicants, 24% excess toxicants and 36% compounds not classified. Thus, we can conclude that replacing about half of the fish acute toxicity tests by QSAR predictions is realistic to be achieved in the short-term. The long-term goals are classification criteria also for further groups of toxicants and to replace as many in vivo fish acute toxicity tests as possible with valid QSAR predictions.

  16. No effect of adjunctive, repeated dose intranasal insulin treatment on body metabolism in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Li, Xue; Liu, Emily; Copeland, Paul; Freudenreich, Oliver; Goff, Donald C.; Henderson, David C.; Song, Xueqin; Fan, Xiaoduo

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effect of adjunctive intranasal insulin therapy on body metabolism in patients with schizophrenia. Method Each subject had a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and had been on stable dose of antipsychotic agent for at least one month. In an 8-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, subjects received either intranasal insulin (40IU 4 times per day) or placebo. The whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to assess body composition. Lipid particles were assessed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. All assessments were conducted at baseline, and repeated at week 8. Results A total number of 39 subjects completed the study (18 in the insulin group, 21 in the placebo group). There were no significant differences between the two groups in week 8 changes for body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, as well as various measures of lipid particles (p′s > 0.100). The DXA assessment showed no significant differences between the two groups in week 8 changes for fat mass, lean mass or total mass (p's > 0.100). Conclusion In the present study, adjunctive therapy of intranasal insulin did not seem to improve body metabolism in patients with schizophrenia. The implications for future studies were discussed. PMID:23434504

  17. Modeling Single and Repeated Dose Pharmacokinetics of PFOA in Mice (J)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) displays complicated pharmacokinetics in that serum concentrations indicate long half-lives despite which steady state appears to be achieved rapidly. In this study, serum and tissue concentration time-courses were obtained for male and female CD1 m...

  18. Evaluation of in vivo genotoxicity by thioacetamide in a 28-day repeated-dose liver micronucleus assay using male young adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hajime; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Wako, Yumi; Kawasako, Kazufumi

    2015-03-01

    The repeated-dose liver micronucleus (RDLMN) assay has the potential to detect liver carcinogens and can be integrated into general toxicological studies. In this study, thioacetamide (TAA) was tested in 14- and 28-day RDLMN assays to assess the performance of the assay. The test substance, TAA, was administered orally to 6-week-old male Crl:CD (SD) rats once daily for 14 or 28 days at a dosage of 5, 10 or 20mg/kg/day. Hepatocytes were collected approximately 24h after the last TAA administration, and the incidence of micronuclei was assessed. In this study, bone marrow micronucleus assays were also conducted in the same animals. The 14- and 28-day RDLMN assays indicated that none of the TAA dosages significantly increased the proportion of micronucleated hepatocytes. Bone marrow micronucleus assays with TAA also provided negative results. It is known that TAA is a liver carcinogen in mice and rats. In the previous genotoxic studies, the Ames test and the chromosomal aberration test using CHL/IU cells have yielded negative results [1-4]. The liver micronucleus assay using young adult rats singly dosed with TAA (75 and 150mg/kg) also produced negative results [5]. TAA gave positive results only in the mouse bone marrow micronucleus assays [6,7].

  19. Additional notes on clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trials applying a peak-and-trough sampling design to estimate oral clearance.

    PubMed

    Takaai, Mari; Kayano, Yuichiro; Shimizu, Takako; Taguchi, Masato; Hashimoto, Yukiya

    2008-01-01

    In the previous study, we performed a simulation of a clinical pharmacokinetic trial, in which blood was sampled at two time points corresponding to the peak concentration (C(peak)) and trough concentration (C(trough)) following repetitive oral administration at the dose, D, and dosing interval, tau. The approximate oral clearance (CL/F(approx)), estimated as 2 x D/(C(peak) x tau+C(trough) x tau), is accurate for drugs with an elimination half-life comparative to or longer than tau; however, it was suggested that we might not use CL/F(approx) for drugs with a considerably short elimination half-life relative to tau. In the present study, we evaluated the accuracy of the alternative oral clearance (CL/F(exp)) estimated by the simple monoexponential model. In contrast to CL/F(approx), CL/F(exp) was accurate for drugs with a short elimination half-life relative to tau. The present finding in conjunction with our previous study suggested that the peak-and-trough sampling design is promising for the clinical repeated-dose pharmacokinetic trial for drugs with not only slow but also rapid elimination from the body. We think that the accuracy and precision of the two analysis methods to estimate oral clearance (CL/F(approx) and CL/F(exp)) for a target drug should be evaluated carefully before and after a real clinical trial.

  20. [Repeat doses of prenatal corticosteroids for women at risk of preterm birth: a difficult consensus].

    PubMed

    Guilherme, R; Renaud, C; Dommergues, M; Mitanchez, D

    2009-10-01

    A single course of antenatal corticosteroids in women at risk of preterm delivery reduces the risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Recent experimental and clinical studies have stated early, medium and long term consequences of single or repeated courses of antenatal corticosteroids. Betamethasone and dexamethasone are the two molecules usually used. Benefits are observed until the first 24 hours after the first injection. Single-course corticosteroids are not effective in babies born more than 7 days after initial treatment. Benefits of corticosteroids were evaluated between 22 and 35 weeks of gestation. Antenatal exposure to single-course betamethasone might result in disruption on glucose metabolism in adult offspring. Weekly courses of prenatal corticosteroids therapy are not recommended. Repeat prenatal corticosteroids given to women at continuing risk of preterm birth 7 or more days after an initial course reduced the inherent respiratory complications of prematurity and improved health outcomes of preterm infants. However, adverse outcomes have been reported concerning cognitive development. Although repeat course may have short term benefits, whether there are effects on health into childhood and beyond must await later assessment. Long term data are needed to recommend repeated courses.

  1. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Repeat-Dose Micafungin in Young Infants

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Daniel K; Smith, P Brian; Arrieta, Antonio; Castro, Lisa; Sánchez, Pablo J; Kaufman, David; Arnold, Leah J; Kovanda, Laura L; Sawamoto, Taiji; Buell, Donald N; Hope, William W; Walsh, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Due to the risk of central nervous system infection, relatively high weight-based echinocandin dosages may be required for successful treatment of invasive candidiasis and candidemia in young infants. This open-label study assessed safety and pharmacokinetics of micafungin in 13 young infants (> 48 hours of age and < 120 days of life) with suspected candidemia or invasive candidiasis. Infants weighing ≥ 1,000 g and < 1,000 g received 7 and 10 mg/kg/day, respectively, for a minimum of 4 to 5 days. Mean baseline weight and gestational age were 2101 g and 688 g, and 30 weeks and 25 weeks, in the 7 and 10 mg/kg/day groups, respectively. Median pharmacokinetic values for the 7 and 10 mg/kg/day groups, respectively, were: AUC0–24, 258.1 and 291.2 μg•h/ml; Clss/wt, 0.45 and 0.57 ml/min/kg; Cmax, 23.3 and 24.9 μg/ml; and Vdss/wt, 341.4 and 542.8 ml/kg. No deaths or discontinuations from treatment occurred. These data suggest that micafungin dosages of 7 and 10 mg/kg/day were well tolerated and provided exposure that was demonstrated in animal model to be adequate for central nervous system coverage. PMID:19890251

  2. The effect of repeated doses of ivermectin on adult female Onchocerca volvulus in Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Chavasse, D C; Post, R J; Lemoh, P A; Whitworth, J A

    1992-12-01

    The effects of single and multiple doses of ivermectin on mortality and morphology were assessed in over 700 female Onchocerca volvulus worms and the effects on embryogenesis were assessed in 490. Nodules were surgically removed from Sierra Leoneans recruited from a double-blind placebo controlled study of ivermectin given at six-monthly intervals. Nodules were digested in collagenase to isolate whole adult worms. After four or five doses of ivermectin there were significant increases in the numbers of discoloured and calcified worms and possibly a trend towards increased mortality, but this was not seen consistently. There was no evidence of a prophylactic effect of the drug. Worms were then homogenised and embryograms constructed. A single dose of ivermectin produced large numbers of degenerating intrauterine microfilariae, but embryonic development occurred normally. After multiple doses we observed almost complete cessation of embryogenesis, with a highly significant decrease in the numbers of viable multicellular embryonic stages, while oocytes appeared to be produced normally. Development is probably impeded at the single cell stage, possibly because of reduced fertilization. In planning the future role of ivermectin as a control measure for onchocerciasis it is crucial to determine if these effects on embryogenesis are reversible.

  3. Effect of experimental hyperlipidaemia on the electrocardiographic effects of repeated doses of halofantrine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jigar P; Brocks, Dion R

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Halofantrine can cause a prolongation of the cardiac QT interval, leading to serious ventricular arrhythmias. Hyperlipidaemia elevates plasma concentration of halofantrine and may influence its tissue uptake. The present study examined the effect of experimental hyperlipidaemia on QT interval prolongation induced by halofantrine in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Normolipidaemic and hyperlipidaemic rats (induced with poloxamer 407) were given 4 doses of halofantrine (i.v., 4–40 mg·kg−1·d−1) or vehicle every 12 h. Under brief anaesthesia, ECGs were recorded before administration of the vehicle or drug and 12 h after the first and last doses. Blood samples were taken at the same time after the first and last dose of halofantrine. Hearts were also collected 12 h after the last dose. Plasma and heart samples were assayed for drug and desbutylhalofantrine using a stereospecific method. KEY RESULTS In the vehicle group, hyperlipidaemia by itself did not affect the ECG. Compared to baseline, QT intervals were significantly higher in both normolipidaemic and hyperlipidaemic rats after halofantrine. In hyperlipidaemic rats, plasma but not heart concentrations of the halofantrine enantiomers were significantly higher compared to those in normolipidaemic rats. Despite the lack of difference in the concentrations of halofantrine in heart, QT intervals were significantly higher in hyperlipidaemic compared to those in normolipidaemic rats. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The unbound fraction of halofantrine appeared to be the controlling factor for drug uptake by the heart. Our data suggested a greater vulnerability to halofantrine-induced QT interval prolongation in the hyperlipidaemic state. PMID:20698852

  4. Bioavailability of gallic acid and catechins from grape seed polyphenol extract is improved by repeated dosing in rats: implications for treatment in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferruzzi, Mario G; Lobo, Jessica K; Janle, Elsa M; Cooper, Bruce; Simon, James E; Wu, Qing-Li; Welch, Cara; Ho, Lap; Weaver, Connie; Pasinetti, Giulio M

    2009-01-01

    The present study explored the bioavailability and brain deposition of a grape seed polyphenolic extract (GSPE) previously found to attenuate cognitive deterioration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plasma pharmacokinetic response of major GSPE phenolic components was measured following intragastric gavage of 50, 100, and 150 mg GSPE per kg body weight. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis identified gallic acid (GA), catechin (C), and epicatechin (EC) in plasma of rats gavaged acutely with GSPE. Additionally, 4-methylgallic acid (4-OMeGA), 3'-methylcatechin (3'-OMeC), and 3'-methylepicatechin (3'-OMeEC) were identified as circulating metabolites of GSPE phenolic constituents. Cmax for individual GSPE constituents and their metabolites increased in a dose-dependent fashion (with increasing GSPE oral dose). Repeated daily exposure to GSPE was found to significantly increase bioavailability (defined as plasma AUC0-8h) of GA, C, and EC by 198, 253, and 282% relative to animals receiving only a single acute GSPE dose. EC and C were not detectable in brain tissues of rats receiving a single GSPE dose but reached levels of 290.7 +/-45.9 and 576.7 +/- 227.7 pg/g in brain tissues from rats administered GSPE for 10 days. This study suggests that brain deposition of GA, C, and EC is affected by repeated dosing of GSPE.

  5. Subchronic toxicity study of GH transgenic carp.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ling; Liu, Yu-Mei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Li, Ning; Zhang, Wen-Zhong

    2012-11-01

    A subchronic toxicity study of GH (growth hormone) transgenic carp was carried out with 60 SD rats aged 4 weeks, weight 115∼125 g. Ten male and 10 female rats were allotted into each group. Animals of the three groups (transgenic carp group (GH-TC), parental carp group (PC) and control group) were fed soy- and alfalfa-free diet (SAFD) with 10% GH transgenic carp powder, 10% parental carp powder or 10% common carp powder for 90 consecutive days, respectively. In the end of study, animals were killed by exsanguination via the carotid artery under diethyl ether anesthesia, then weights of heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, thymus, brain, ovaries and uterus/testis were measured. Pathological examination of organs was determined. Endocrine hormones of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroid hormone (T4), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), 17β-estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and testosterone (T) levels were detected by specific ELISA kit. Parameters of blood routine and blood biochemical were measured. The weights of the body and organs of the rats, food intake, blood routine, blood biochemical test and serum hormones showed no significant differences among the GH transgenic carp-treated, parental carp-treated and control groups (P>0.05). Thus, it was concluded that at the dose level of this study, GH transgenic carp showed no subchronic toxicity and endocrine disruption to SD rats.

  6. Transcriptomic studies on liver toxicity of acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Toska, Endrit; Zagorsky, Robert; Figler, Bryan; Cheng, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen is widely used as a pain reliever and to reduce fever. At high doses, it can cause severe hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen overdose has become the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. The mechanisms for acetaminophen-induced liver injury are unclear. Transcriptomic studies can identify the changes in expression of thousands of genes when exposed to supratherapeutic doses of acetaminophen. These studies elucidated the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity and also provide insight into future development of diagnosis and treatment options for acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure. The following is a brief overview of some recent transcriptomic studies and gene-expression-based prediction models on liver toxicity induced by acetaminophen.

  7. Acute and environmental toxicity studies with hexazinone

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, G.L. Jr.

    1984-08-01

    The acute toxicity of hexazinone, a herbicide intended for general noncropland areas and selected crop uses (alfalfa and sugarcane), has been evaluated to establish proper handling guidelines and to measure its potential impact on the environment. The material is slightly to moderately toxic when given as a single oral dose; its LD50 in male rats is 1690 mg/kg, in male guinea pigs 860 mg/kg, and in male dogs greater than 3400 mg/kg although in the dog emesis prevented accurate quantitation. When the material is administered intraperitoneally, the LD50 in rats is 530 mg/kg. In both studies, no gross or histologic alterations were apparent. Hexazinone is a moderate to severe eye irritant in the rabbit and produced only mild erythema in rabbit skin at 5278 mg/kg, a dose which did not produce lethality or other clinical signs. Subchronic dermal exposures (10 consecutive doses) to rabbits produced increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase at the highest levels tested (680 and 770 mg/kg in two separate experiments) with no effects seen at 150 mg/kg. One-hour inhalation exposure of up to 7.48 mg/liter did not produce mortality in rats.

  8. Acute Toxicity-Supported Chronic Toxicity Prediction: A k-Nearest Neighbor Coupled Read-Across Strategy.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Swapnil; Friedman, Ran; Nicholls, Ian A

    2015-05-21

    A k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification model was constructed for 118 RDT NEDO (Repeated Dose Toxicity New Energy and industrial technology Development Organization; currently known as the Hazard Evaluation Support System (HESS)) database chemicals, employing two acute toxicity (LD50)-based classes as a response and using a series of eight PaDEL software-derived fingerprints as predictor variables. A model developed using Estate type fingerprints correctly predicted the LD50 classes for 70 of 94 training set chemicals and 19 of 24 test set chemicals. An individual category was formed for each of the chemicals by extracting its corresponding k-analogs that were identified by k-NN classification. These categories were used to perform the read-across study for prediction of the chronic toxicity, i.e., Lowest Observed Effect Levels (LOEL). We have successfully predicted the LOELs of 54 of 70 training set chemicals (77%) and 14 of 19 test set chemicals (74%) to within an order of magnitude from their experimental LOEL values. Given the success thus far, we conclude that if the k-NN model predicts LD50 classes correctly for a certain chemical, then the k-analogs of such a chemical can be successfully used for data gap filling for the LOEL. This model should support the in silico prediction of repeated dose toxicity.

  9. Acute Toxicity-Supported Chronic Toxicity Prediction: A k-Nearest Neighbor Coupled Read-Across Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Swapnil; Friedman, Ran; Nicholls, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    A k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification model was constructed for 118 RDT NEDO (Repeated Dose Toxicity New Energy and industrial technology Development Organization; currently known as the Hazard Evaluation Support System (HESS)) database chemicals, employing two acute toxicity (LD50)-based classes as a response and using a series of eight PaDEL software-derived fingerprints as predictor variables. A model developed using Estate type fingerprints correctly predicted the LD50 classes for 70 of 94 training set chemicals and 19 of 24 test set chemicals. An individual category was formed for each of the chemicals by extracting its corresponding k-analogs that were identified by k-NN classification. These categories were used to perform the read-across study for prediction of the chronic toxicity, i.e., Lowest Observed Effect Levels (LOEL). We have successfully predicted the LOELs of 54 of 70 training set chemicals (77%) and 14 of 19 test set chemicals (74%) to within an order of magnitude from their experimental LOEL values. Given the success thus far, we conclude that if the k-NN model predicts LD50 classes correctly for a certain chemical, then the k-analogs of such a chemical can be successfully used for data gap filling for the LOEL. This model should support the in silico prediction of repeated dose toxicity. PMID:26006240

  10. Studies on the toxicity of RSU-1069.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, G F; Gulyas, S

    1986-07-01

    RSU-1069 combines an aziridine function with a 2-nitroimidazole and has been reported to exhibit extraordinary radiosensitization both in vitro and in vivo. Such sensitization appears to be at variance with the electron affinity of the compound. In addition, recent experiments suggest that the compound is highly toxic to hypoxic tumor cells in vivo. On the assumption that the observed radiosensitizing ability may be a manifestation of toxicity and because of the high in vivo toxicity, we have investigated aerobic and hypoxic toxicity, both in wild type CHO cells and in mutants sensitive to a variety of DNA damaging agents. With wild type cells under aerobic conditions, the compound is approximately 50 times as toxic as misonidazole and under hypoxic conditions, approximately 250 times as toxic. The ratio of hypoxic to aerobic toxicity is approximately 80 times. Under aerobic conditions, repair-deficient mutants are 10 times as sensitive to RSU-1069 as wild type cells and approximately 100 times as sensitive under hypoxic conditions. The ratio of hypoxic to aerobic toxicity for the mutant cells is approximately 900. Based on these observations, we suggest that under aerobic conditions the aziridine function is primarily responsible for toxicity, whereas, under hypoxic conditions, the aziridine moiety combined with a reduced 2-nitroimidazole moiety produces a bifunctional agent.

  11. Studies on the mammalian toxicity of fenthion*

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jean I.; Barnes, J. M.

    1963-01-01

    This paper constitutes a report on mammalian toxicological investigations of fen hion, carried out as part of the WHO malaria eradication programme, and on the conclusions drawn from them. Fenthion is found to be of intermediate toxicity to the four rodent species studied. In rats the signs of poisoning develop rather slowly but persist for several days, male rats being more susceptible than females, whereas for most phosphorothionates the converse is true. The results suggest that fenthion is not simply oxidized from the P=S compound to the P=O. It has been stated that the sulfoxide and sulfone are produced before the P=S→P=O oxidation takes place, but experiments suggest that further changes are involved. The findings are discussed in relation to the possible health hazard that might be encountered by those who have to apply fenthion as a residual spray. PMID:14056272

  12. Meta-analysis of toxicity and teratogenicity of 133 chemicals from zebrafish developmental toxicity studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish developmental toxicity testing is an emerging field, which faces considerable challenges regarding data meta-analysis and the establishment of standardized test protocols. Here, we present an initial correlation study on toxicity of 133 chemicals based on data in the li...

  13. Meta-analysis of toxicity and teratogenicity of 133 chemicals from zebrafish developmental toxicity studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zebrafish developmental toxicity testing is an emerging field, which faces considerable challenges regarding data meta-analysis and the establishment of standardized test protocols. Here, we present an initial correlation study on toxicity of 133 chemicals based on data in the li...

  14. Toxicity Evaluation of Pũrṇa Cantirotaya Centũram, a Siddha Medicine in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, B.; Ramaswamy, R. S.; Suba, V.

    2015-01-01

    Pũrṇa Cantirotaya Centũram (PCC), a herbometallic formulation of Siddha medicine, consists of mercury, sulphur, and gold, processed with red cotton flower and plantain stem pith juices. To evaluate its safety, acute and 28-day repeated oral toxicity studies were performed following OECD test guidelines 423 and 407, respectively. In acute study, PCC was administered orally at 5, 50, 300, and 2000 mg/kg body weight. Animals were observed for toxic signs for 14 days. Gross pathology was performed at the end of the study. In repeated dose toxicity study, PCC was administered at 2.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg body weight daily for 28 days. Satellite groups (control and high dose) were also maintained to determine the delayed onset toxicity of PCC. In acute toxicity study, no treatment related death or toxic signs were observed. It revealed that the LD50 cut-off value of PCC is between 2000 and 5000 mg/kg body weight. The repeated dose study did not show evidence of any treatment related changes in all observations up to the high dose level, when compared with the control. Histopathological examination revealed no abnormalities except mild hyperplasia of stomach in high dose group. This study provides scientific validation for the safety of PCC. PMID:27347522

  15. In vivo toxicity study of Lantana camara

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Badakhshan Mahdi; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the toxicity of methanol extract of various parts (Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower and Fruit) of Lantana camara (L. Camara) in Artemia salina. Methods The methanol extracts of L. camara were tested for in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay. Results All the tested extract exhibited very low toxicity on brine shrimp larva. The results showed that the root extract was the most toxic part of L. camara and may have potential as anticancer agent. Conclusions Methanolic extract of L. camara is relatively safe on short-term exposure. PMID:23569765

  16. [An acute toxicity study of bromantane].

    PubMed

    Bugaeva, L I; Verovskiĭ, V E; Iezhitsa, I N; Spasov, A A

    2000-01-01

    The toxicity of bromantan was evaluated by conventional acute tests (according to Belen'kiĭ) and by the behavioral activity data (according to Irvin). A method of integral graphical representation of the behavioral activity data is suggested, according to which the results are plotted as a "dose trajectory." Using the dose trajectory constructed for bromantan, the levels of therapeutic, toxic, and lethal doses were calculated. It was established that catecholaminergic effects account for the mechanism of therapeutic action of bromantan, while cholinergic effects determine the drug action in toxic doses.

  17. Assessing the mammalian toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances under the rubric of the HPV program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Verstuyft, Allen W; Roth, Randy N; McKee, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In 1998, the US EPA announced the HPV Challenge Program, a voluntary chemical data collection effort. The Petroleum HPV Testing Group (PHPVTG(1)) volunteered to provide data on approximately 110 high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), i.e. substances with final boiling points ≥ approximately 650°F (343°C). These HBPS are substances of unknown and variable composition (UVCBs) that are composed of numerous individual constituents. Toxicity studies have shown that some HBPS can produce systemic (repeat-dose) and developmental effects, and some are mutagenic under in vitro conditions. The papers in this supplement show that these effects are related to the profiles of aromatic constituents in these substances. Further, it is shown that the effects on selected repeat-dose and developmental toxicity endpoints and mutagenic activity in bacterial assays can be predicted from compositional information using models based on the aromatic-ring class profile, "ARC profile" as defined by gas chromatographic separation of the DMSO-soluble fraction of the starting materials. This chromatographic method and the predictive models provide an efficient means of characterizing for screening purposes the potential for repeat-dose, developmental effects and bacterial mutagenicity of HBPS and can reduce the number of animal tests that would be required if these tests were conducted on all 110 HBPS.

  18. Toxicity studies of a polyurethane rigid foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Relative toxicity tests were performed on a polyurethane foam containing a trimethylopropane-based polyol and an organophosphate flame retardant. The routine screening procedure involved the exposure of four Swiss albino male mice in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber to the products generated by pyrolyzing a 1.00 g sample at a heating rate of 40 deg C/min from 200 to 800 C in the absence of air flow. In addition to the routine screening, experiments were performed with a very rapid rise to 800 C, with nominal 16 and 48 ml/sec air flow and with varying sample rates. No unusual toxicity was observed with either gradual or rapid pyrolysis to 800 C. Convulsions and seizures similar to those previously reported were observed when the materials were essentially flash pyrolyzed at 800 C in the presence of air flow, and the toxicity appeared unusual because of low sample weights required to produce death.

  19. Toxicity studies of a polyurethane rigid foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Schneider, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Relative toxicity tests were performed on a polyurethane foam containing a trimethylopropane-based polyol and an organophosphate flame retardant. The routine screening procedure involved the exposure of four Swiss albino male mice in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber to the products generated by pyrolyzing a 1.00 g sample at a heating rate of 40 deg C/min from 200 to 800 C in the absence of air flow. In addition to the routine screening, experiments were performed with a very rapid rise to 800 C, with nominal 16 and 48 ml/sec air flow and with varying sample rates. No unusual toxicity was observed with either gradual or rapid pyrolysis to 800 C. Convulsions and seizures similar to those previously reported were observed when the materials were essentially flash pyrolyzed at 800 C in the presence of air flow, and the toxicity appeared unusual because of low sample weights required to produce death.

  20. Biochemical and haematological evaluation of repeated dose exposure of male Wistar rats to an ethanolic extract of Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Eteng, Mbeh U; Abolaji, Amos O; Ebong, Patrick E; Brisibe, Ebiamadon Andi; Dar, Ahsana; Kabir, Nurul; Iqbal Choudhary, M

    2013-04-01

    Artemisia annua is widely used for the treatment of malaria and other disorders. In a previous study, the artemisinin concentration in the dry leaves of A. annua grown under humid tropical conditions was determined to be 1.098% using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. In the current study, biochemical and haematological evaluations of ethanolic leaf extracts derived from such plants (EAA) were carried out in 20 male Wistar rats. Rats were divided into four study groups of saline-treated (control) and test groups exposed orally to graded doses of EAA for 28 days. The results showed that the liver function and haematological indices, and testosterone levels were not adversely affected. High density lipoprotein -cholesterol was reduced at 100 mg/kg of EAA, atherogenic index as well as low density lipoprotein -cholesterol was raised, and glucose concentration was reduced significantly at the 100 and 200 mg/kg of EAA (p < 0.05). In addition to serving as a possible antidiabetic agent, EAA may not predispose users to hepatotoxicity, haematotoxicity and testicular toxicity. However, due to the possible risk of atherosclerosis, we advise that the plant extract should be taken with caution in people with atherosclerotic condition. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Drinking water toxicity study of the environmental contaminant--Bromate.

    PubMed

    Dongmei, Liu; Zhiwei, Wang; Qi, Zhu; Fuyi, Cui; Yujuan, Shan; Xiaodong, Liu

    2015-12-01

    Bromate is a byproduct of water disinfection that is produced when waters contain bromide treated with ozone. To investigate the level of the toxicity of bromate and find the most sensitive indicators in a short time, a series of toxicological assessments were conducted including the acute toxicity, cumulative toxicity, genetic toxicity and subacute toxicity of bromate (using Potassium Bromate to represent bromate). The LD50 of orally administered Potassium Bromate was 215 mg/kg in Wistar rats and 464 mg/kg in ICR mice. The cumulative toxicity of Potassium Bromate was not obvious. The Ames test, mouse bone marrow cell micronucleus test and mouse sperm abnormality test did not indicate mutagenicity. The results of the subacute study did not exhibit significant differences in most of the parameters, except the white blood cell count, which was significantly decreased in male rats. In addition, Potassium Bromate influenced the albumin, creatinine, total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in male rats to various extents. A thorough analysis of the above tests clearly demonstrates that bromate has toxicity, not obvious cumulative toxicity and the white blood cell count can be used as an indicator to reflect the toxicity of bromate and investigate bromate's toxic mechanism.

  2. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL[number sign]830331, MG-122IBP-420[degree]F, MG-122 420--720[degree]F, and MG-122 720[degree]F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC[number sign]11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC[number sign]11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  3. Toxicity studies of mild gasification products

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Whong, W.Z.; Ma, J.; Zhong, B.Z.; Bryant, D.

    1992-11-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to perform mutagenicity studies with the Ames Salmonella/microsomal assay system on coal liquids produced by mild gasification from different coals and/or processing conditions, (2) to determine whether coal liquids which are mutagenic to bacteria are also genotoxic to mammalian cells, (3) to establish correlations between mutagenicity, aromaticity, and boiling point range of coal liquids, and (4) to identify the chemical classes which are likely to be responsible for the mutagenic activity of gasification products. Four of the seven samples tested so far failed to demonstrate any mutagenic activity under any conditions tested. Those samples were SHELL{number_sign}830331, MG-122IBP-420{degree}F, MG-122 420--720{degree}F, and MG-122 720{degree}F+. Table 1 summarizes the results from all samples tested in DMSO and Tween 80. When solvated in DMSO, MG-119 and MG-120 composite materials displayed slight, but ultimately insignificant, genotoxic activity on TA98 and TA1OO in the presence of S9. When Tween 80 was used as the solvent, MG-119 and MG-120 displayed slight, but significant, geno-toxic activity on TA98 with S9 (Figure 4). CTC{number_sign}11 in DMSO displayed significant genotoxic activity on both TA98 and TA1OO with and without S9. The activity was higher on TA98 than TA100, and higher with S9 than without, primarily indicating the presence of indirect-acting frameshift mutagen. The results of the testing on CTC{number_sign}11 were similar for both solvents, DMSO and Tween 80 (Table 2).

  4. Relative parameter sensitivity in prenatal toxicity studies with substances classified as developmental toxicants.

    PubMed

    Rorije, E; van Hienen, F J W; Dang, Z C; Hakkert, B H; Vermeire, T; Piersma, A H

    2012-09-01

    Developmental toxicity testing according to the globally standardized OECD 414 protocol is an important basis for decisions on classification and labeling of developmental toxicants in the European Union (EU). This test requires relatively large animal numbers, given that parental and offspring generations are involved. In vitro assay designs and systems biology paradigms are being developed to reduce animal use and to improve prediction of human hazard. Such approaches could benefit from the long-term experience with animal protocols and more specifically from information on the relevance of effects observed in these tests for developmental toxicity. Therefore, we have analyzed relative parameter sensitivity in 22 publicly available developmental toxicity studies, representing about one third of all classified developmental toxicants under European legislation. Maternal and fetal weight effects and fetal survival were most often affected parameters at the developmental Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (dLOAEL), followed by skeletal malformations. Specific end points such as cleft palate were observed in fewer studies at dLOAEL, but if observed may have been crucial in classification and labeling decisions. These results are similar to earlier studies using different selections of chemicals, indicating that in general classified developmental toxicants have a similar pattern of effects at the dLOAEL as chemicals in general. These findings are discussed within the perspective of the development of innovative alternative approaches to developmental hazard assessment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Technical Report Series No. 364. (Geneva: World Health Organization, (1967). ... toxicity study should provide a satisfactory estimation of a no-effect level. (3) Test report. In addition... information shall be reported: (i) Toxic response data by concentration. (ii) Species and strain. (iii)...

  6. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Technical Report Series No. 364. (Geneva: World Health Organization, (1967). ... toxicity study should provide a satisfactory estimation of a no-effect level. (3) Test report. In addition... information shall be reported: (i) Toxic response data by concentration. (ii) Species and strain. (iii)...

  7. 40 CFR 798.4900 - Developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Technical Report Series No. 364. (Geneva: World Health Organization, (1967). ... toxicity study should provide a satisfactory estimation of a no-effect level. (3) Test report. In addition... information shall be reported: (i) Toxic response data by concentration. (ii) Species and strain. (iii)...

  8. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.; Taylor, Larry

    2008-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. NASA established the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, LADTAG has recommended investigating its toxicity in the lungs of laboratory animals. After receiving this recommendation, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust in exposed rodents. The rodent pulmonary toxicity studies proposed here are the same as those proposed by the LADTAG. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal instillation (ITI). This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. We succeeded in completing an ITI study on JSC-1 lunar dust simulant in mice (Lam et al., Inhalation Toxicology 14:901-916, 2002, and Inhalation Toxicology 14: 917-928, 2002), and have conducted a pilot ITI study to examine the acute toxicity of an Apollo lunar (highland) dust sample. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies have been planned to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The ITI results will also be

  9. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  10. Acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies of honokiol microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jianguo; Zhang, Wei; An, Quan; Wen, Jianhua; Wang, Aiping; Jin, Hongtao; Chen, Shizhong

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute and sub-chronic toxicity of honokiol microemulsion. In the acute toxicity tests, the mice were intravenously injected graded doses of honokiol microemulsion and were observed for toxic symptoms and mortality daily for 14 days. In the sub-chronic toxicity study, rats were injected honokiol microemulsion at doses of 100, 500, 2500 μg/kg body weight (BW) for 30 days. After 30 days treatment and 14 days recovery, the rats were sacrificed for hematological, biochemical and histological examination. In the acute toxicity tests, the estimated median lethal dosage (LD50) was 50.5mg/kg body weight in mice. In the sub-chronic toxicity tests, the non-toxic reaction dose was 500 μg/kg body weight. In each treatment group, degeneration or/and necrosis in vascular endothelial cells and structure change of vessel wall can be observed in the injection site (cauda vein) of a few animals while there were no changes in the vessels of other organs. The overall findings of this study indicate that the honokiol microemulsion is non-toxic up to 500 μg/kg body weight, and it has irritation to the vascular of the injection site which should be paid attention to in clinical medication. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Juvenile animal toxicity study designs to support pediatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Gregg D; Bailey, Graham P; Buschmann, Jochen; Feuston, Maureen H; Fisher, J Edward; Hew, Kok Wah; Hoberman, Alan M; Ooshima, Yojiro; Stump, Donald G; Hurtt, Mark E

    2009-12-01

    The objective of juvenile animal toxicity studies of pharmaceuticals is to obtain safety data, including information on the potential for adverse effects on postnatal growth and development. Studies in juvenile animals may assist in identifying postnatal developmental toxicities or other adverse effects that are not adequately assessed in the routine toxicity evaluations and that cannot be safely or adequately measured in pediatric clinical trials. Unlike the traditional reproductive and developmental toxicology studies that have been discussed in the accompanying reports, the design requirements for toxicity studies in juvenile animals are not explicitly defined in regulatory guidance. However, studies in juvenile animals can be useful in providing safety information necessary to enable pediatric clinical trials in pediatric patients or when there are special concerns for toxicities that cannot be safely or adequately measured in clinical trials. These juvenile animal toxicity studies are designed on a case-by-case basis. General design considerations and examples of study designs for assessment of juvenile animal toxicity are discussed.

  12. A Phase I randomized clinical trial testing the safety, tolerability and preliminary pharmacokinetics of the mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator GET 73 following single and repeated doses in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Haass-Koffler, Carolina L; Goodyear, Kimberly; Long, Victoria M; Tran, Harrison H; Loche, Antonella; Cacciaglia, Roberto; Swift, Robert M; Leggio, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    Preclinical work suggests that the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) may represent a novel target to treat neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcohol use disorder and obesity. The goal of this first-in-man study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of GET 73 (PubChem SID: 329974174), a novel mGluR5 negative allosteric modulator. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending dose, Phase I study conducted in healthy male volunteers in two experiments. GET 73 was administered as single ascending doses (N=48; Experiment 1; 10, 30, 100, 300, 450, 600-mg) or multiple ascending doses (N=32; Experiment 2; 100, 300, 450, 450-mg twice a day). Primary endpoints were the incidence of adverse events (AEs) among drug conditions and drug tolerability. The secondary endpoints were the PK parameters of GET 73 and its metabolite MET 2. Single GET 73 doses of up to 600-mg and repeated ascending doses of up to 450-mg twice/day were safe and well-tolerated. There were no serious or severe AEs. All AEs were mild or moderate in severity. Total GET 73 exposure increased with each increased GET 73 dose. A dose-related increase in mean maximum plasma drug concentration was observed after repeated dosing. Maximum plasma drug concentrations occurred between 0.5 and 2.05h after administration in all groups for both single and repeated doses. This first-in-human study indicates that GET 73, as single or multiple ascending doses, is safe and well-tolerated when administered to healthy male volunteers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Acute and chronic toxicity studies with monochlorobenzene in rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dahlich, G.M.; Larson, R.E.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicity of monochlorobenzene (CB) was investigated in rainbow trout following acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration and chronic exposure via the water in a continuously flowing system for 15 or 30 days. In the acute study overt toxicity and hepatotoxicity were monitored over a 96-h time period. Variables measured to assess toxicity included weight changes, liver weight to body weight ratios, behavioral changes, alanine aminotransferase activity (GPT), sulfobromophthalein (BSP) retention, total plasma protein concentration and liver histopathology. In the chronic study the same measures of toxicity were followed as well as food consumption and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity. Upon acute i.p. exposure the toxicant (9.8 mmol/kg) caused behavioral changes in the fish which were consistent with the known anesthetic properties of CB in mammals. Elevations in BSP retention and GPT activity, and histopathology indicated that CB was hepatotoxic in fish. The LC50 of CB in trout exposed via the water for 96 h was 4.7 mg/l. Chronic exposure of trout to 2 or 3 mg/l CB resulted in similar behavioral changes as seen in the acute study. Liver toxicity was evident from elevations in GPT activity. BSP retention and AP activity appeared to be affected by the nutritional status of the trout as much as by the CB treatment. After 30 days of exposure to 3 mg/l CB, trout appeared to have developed some tolerance to the toxic effects.

  14. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the lunar surface for long-duration human habitation and research. The surface of the Moon is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust, and the living quarters in the lunar outpost are expected to be contaminated by lunar dust. Because the toxicity of lunar dust is not known, NASA has tasked its toxicology laboratory to evaluate the risk of exposure to the dust and to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts working in the lunar habitat. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally done first in rodents by intratracheal/intrapharyngeal instillation. This toxicity screening test is then followed by an inhalation study, which requires much more of the test dust and is labor intensive. Preliminary results obtained by examining lung lavage fluid from dust-treated mice show that lunar dust was somewhat toxic (more toxic than TiO2, but less than quartz dust). More extensive studies are in progress to further examine lung lavage fluid for biomarkers of toxicity and lung tissues for histopathological lesions in rodents exposed to aged and activated (ground) lunar dust samples. In these studies, reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) of known toxicities and have industrial exposure limits will be studied in parallel so the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. The results from the instillation studies will be useful for choosing exposure concentrations for the animal inhalation study. The animal inhalation exposure will be conducted with lunar dust simulant prior to the study with the lunar dust. The experiment with the simulate will ensure that the study techniques used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of instillation and inhalation studies will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and are essential for setting exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  15. Degradation and acute toxicity studies of degradable implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michelle Suzette

    The present study investigated the acute toxicities of the degradation product components of six degradable polymers, the acute toxicities of nine metallic ions and accelerated degradation of one degradable polymer. Prior to these studies, the effect of the anticipated test conditions on the Microtox acute toxicity assay was determined. It was shown that the Microtox is unaffected by pH of water within the range of 5 to 10 and that the test is unaffected by tris buffer at physiologic pH and concentration. The toxicity and rates of degradation of poly(glycolic acid), PGA; two samples of poly(L-lactic acid), PLLA; samples of different molecular weights, poly(caprolactone), PCL; poly(ortho ester), POE; and poly(hydroxybutyrate-cohydroxyvalerate), PHBV, were compared, along with the toxicity of their degradation product components. The toxic concentrations ranged from 100 muM (lactic acid) to 125,000 muM (pentaerythritol). The degradation product components in order of most toxic to least toxic are lactic acid, caproic acid, glycolic acid, cyclohexanedimethanol, propionic acid, hydroxybutyric acid, 1,6-hexanediol, pentaerythritol dipropionate, pentaerythritol and hydroxyvaleric acid. Acute toxicity was determined for metallic ions in water and buffer. The toxic concentrations ranged from 33 muM (Tisp{4+} in water) to 3,580 muM (Wsp{6+} in buffer). The four most toxic ions in water (Tisp{4+}, Mosp{5+}, Fesp{3+}, Crsp{3+}) caused solution pH to decrease markedly. The six other ions (Vasp{3+}, Cosp{3+}, Alsp{3+,} Tisp{4+} adjusted to pH 6.1, Nisp{2+} and Wsp{6+}) markedly. The six other ions (Vasp{3+}, Cosp{3+}, Alsp{3+}, Tisp{4+} adjusted to pH 6.1, Nisp{2+} and Wsp{6+}) did not appreciably affect pH. In buffer, Alsp{3+}, Nisp{2+}, Wsp{6+} and Vsp{3+} became much less toxic, suggesting formation of complexes. In general the least toxic ions do not create an acid environment and/or do form protective complexes. PHBV has good mechanical properties and, compared with the

  16. Sub-acute toxicity evaluation of an aqueous extract of Labisia pumila, a Malaysian herb.

    PubMed

    Singh, G D; Ganjoo, M; Youssouf, M S; Koul, A; Sharma, R; Singh, S; Sangwan, P L; Koul, S; Ahamad, D B; Johri, R K

    2009-10-01

    Labisia pumila (Myrsinaceae), is a popular herb among the women in Malaysia known locally as "Kacip Fatimah". Recently many nutraceutical products containing the powdered or extracted parts of the plant have become available for women's health care. However no evaluation of the effect of the repeated dosing of any herbal product of this plant had been undertaken prior to a 28-day sub-acute study presented in this report. The results showed that a dose of 50mg/kg of an aqueous extract of L. pumila corresponded to no-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL), whereas higher doses were associated with some toxicity concerns.

  17. The Use of Fluorescein Angiography to Study Oxygen Toxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-02-28

    NAVAL RESEA DICAL ÄTORY SUBMARINE BASE, GROTON, CONN. REPORT NUMBER 833 THE USE OF FLUORESCEIN ANGIOGRAPHY TO STUDY OXYGEN TOXICITY by...distribution unlimited PROBLEM To test whether fluorescein angiography can be used as a technique for monitoring an individual’s response to... Angiography to Study Oxygen Toxicity* Reprinted from Annals of Ophthalmology, Volume 9, Number 8, August 1977. Copyright 1977 by Annals of

  18. Thirty-day rat toxicity study reveals reversible liver toxicity of mifepristone (RU486) and metapristone.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yingying; Zhu, Yewei; Yu, Suhong; Yan, Cuicui; Ho, Rodney J Y; Liu, Jian; Li, Tao; Wang, Jie; Wan, Liyuan; Yang, Xingtian; Xu, Huo; Wang, Jichuang; Tu, Xiaohuang; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Mifepristone (RU486) is an oral first-line contraceptive used by hundreds of millions of women, and recently it was tested for anticancer activity in both genders worldwide. We are developing metapristone (the N-monodemethyl RU486) as a potential metastasis chemopreventive. The present acute and 30-d subacute toxicity study aimed at examining and compared in parallel the potential toxicity of the two drugs. The single-dose acute toxicity and 30-d subacute toxicity studies were conducted in mice and rats, respectively, by gavaging metapristone or mifepristone at various doses. Blood samples and organs were collected for blood chemistry, hematology and histology analyses. Oral mifepristone (3000 mg/kg) caused 30% and 40% death in female and male mice, respectively, within 15 h post-dosing. In comparison, the same dose of metapristone produced 30% acute death in males only. Thirty-day oral administration of the two drugs to rats (12.5, 50 and 200 mg/kg/day) caused reversible hepatotoxicity that only occurred at 200 mg/kg/day group, evidenced by the elevated liver enzyme activity and liver organ weight. The present study, for the first time, reveals reversible hepatotoxicity in rats caused by the 30-d consecutive administration at the high dose, and warns the potential hepatotoxicity caused by long-term administrations of high doses of mifepristone or metapristone in clinical trials but not by the acute single abortion doses.

  19. Genotoxicity and sub-chronic toxicity of MYOLUTION(®) (branched chain keto acids).

    PubMed

    Hall, Caroline; Grayson, Ian

    2017-09-06

    MYOLUTION(®), which consists of a mixture of the branched chain keto acids, keto-leucine, keto-isoleucine and keto-valine, as their calcium salts, may potentially be used as a food ingredient based on the reported contributions of these compounds to muscle health and exercise performance. Tests on genotoxicity and sub-chronic toxicity were performed to evaluate the safety of branched chain keto acids. No genotoxic effects were observed in the bacterial mutation assay or the in vitro micronucleus assay in human lymphocytes. In the 28 day and 90 day repeated dose toxicity studies no test item related mortality or toxicological effects on clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, urine parameters, hematology, clinical biochemistry parameters, organ weight, gross pathological findings and histopathology were observed. Based on the studies described here, MYOLUTION(®) does not exert a genotoxic effect, and a no-observed-adverse-effect-level of 3318.38 mg/kg bw/day in males and 3733.28 mg/kg bw/day in females was determined in the 90 day repeated dose toxicity study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase I study to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicities of orally administered idarubicin in dogs with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vail, D M; Husbands, B D; Kamerling, S G; Simpson, H; Kurzman, I D; McDonnell, A

    2012-01-01

    Idarubicin, a PO bioavailable anthracycline antibiotic-class chemotherapeutic, could have substantial convenience advantages over currently available similar class agents in use that require IV delivery. The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and basic pharmacokinetic parameters of oral idarubicin exposure in dogs with lymphoma after a single oral dose. A secondary objective was to document preliminary antitumor efficacy in an expanded treatment cohort using the established MTD. Client-owned dogs with measurable lymphoma. Dogs (n = 31) were enrolled in a prospective open label phase I study of oral idarubicin. By means of a 3 + 3 cohort design, dose escalations were made with 3 dogs per dose level, and the MTD was established based on the number of patients experiencing a DLT. Plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol were determined by postdose sampling. Assessment of antitumor efficacy focused on evaluation of accessible, measurable lymph nodes and skin lesions by modified RECIST guidelines. The MTD in dogs > 15 kg body weight was 22 mg/m(2) . Adverse hematologic events (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia) were the predominant DLT and generally correlated with higher plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol. PO administered idarubicin was generally well-tolerated and had preliminary antitumor activity in dogs with lymphoma. Furthermore, the potential clinical advantage of a safe and efficacious oral anthracycline alternative supports further investigations of this agent in repeated-dose, randomized clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Speciation studies and toxicity assessment of complex heavy metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, K.J.; Mowat, F.

    1996-12-31

    The Microtox{trademark} bioassay and polarographic techniques were used together to identify specific oxidation states and toxicity of metals. The bioassay is based on light reduction by bioluminescent bacteria upon exposure to toxicants. In polarography, a mercury drop substrate`s potential is changed, and the substance of interest is electrochemically reduced. Reduction current is proportional to its concentration. The toxicity of solutions containing heavy metal pollutants was measured. Mercury was found to be most toxic with an acute one minute EC{sub 50} of 0.0162 mg/l. Cu(I) was least toxic. Speciation effects were observed; e.g., Cr(III) was less toxic than Cr(VI); Cu(II) was more toxic than Cu(I). Polarography (which is usually not used for multielement analysis) has been extended to Pb(II) and Cd(II) solution mixtures. Various mixtures were tested to determine if toxicity was predictable from that of individual components, or whether synergistic/antagonistic reactions occur. The resultant EC{sub 50} for a 50-50 As(V)/Cd(II) mixture was consistent with additive behavior; Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Cu(I) mixtures exhibited antagonistic and synergistic interactions, respectively. Sediments soaked with Pb(II) and Cr(III) have been studied to determine the toxicity. For competitive sorption, the EC{sub 50} value is twice that for Cr(III) alone, presumably because preferential Cr(III) adsorption occurs, blocking Pb(II) adsorption to kaolin.

  2. Repeated-Dose and Reproductive/Developmental Toxicity of NTO (3-Nitro-1,2,4-Triazol-5-One) in the Rat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-21

    pregnancy is over. In addition , elevated progesterone levels during pregnancy negatively impact thymic mass whereas elevated prolactin levels during... progesterone during pregnancy have a negative effect on thymic weight, whereas increased prolactin occurring during lactation has a stimulatory effect on... pregnancy , and up to and including postpartum day four. Dose was determined by the most recent weekly body mass measurement. In addition to the main

  3. Placental toxicity of cadmium in the rat: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Di Sant'Agnese, P A; Jensen, K D; Levin, A; Miller, R K

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant rats on day 18 of gestation were injected s.c. with 40 mumol/kg CdCl2 which caused fetal death and placental necrosis. The placental changes were studied by electron microscopy and indicate that there is a direct placental toxic effect of cadmium which appears targeted at the trophoblast and, in particular, trophoblast cell layer II. Findings in cell layer II which suggest a toxic effect were lysosomal vesiculation, 'buckshot' nuclear chromatin clumping, nucleolar changes and apparent mitochondrial calcification. Furthermore, the selectivity of the effect on cell layer II and the rapidity of the necrosis are also consistent with a toxic effect. Trophoblast cell layer II first undergoes necrosis, but is rapidly followed by the rest of the trophoblast. Many of the changes at this necrotic stage suggest a secondary ischaemic effect or a combined ischaemic and toxic effect. Therefore it appears that cadmium induces placental necrosis via a direct effect on the trophoblast, especially on layer II.

  4. Quantitative study of natural antioxidant systems for cellular nitrofurantoin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Michiels, C; Remacle, J

    1988-12-15

    The toxicity of nitrofurantoin was studied on human WI-38 fibroblasts: this chemical was lethal when added at concentrations higher than 5.10(-5) M in the culture medium. The protection afforded by antioxidants was then tested: alpha-tocopherol gave at 10(-4) M a light protection in contrast to ascorbic acid which even became toxic at high concentrations. We also tested catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase introduced intracellularly by the microinjection technique. On a molecular basis, glutathione peroxidase was 23-times more efficient than catalase and 3000-times more than superoxide dismutase. The results also showed that a similar range of enzyme concentrations was found for the protection against high oxygen pressure. This suggests that, in the case of both oxygen and nitrofurantoin toxicity, the peroxide derivatives are the most toxic intermediates of the free radical attacks.

  5. Subchronic (13-week) toxicity and prenatal developmental toxicity studies of dietary astaxanthin in rats.

    PubMed

    Vega, Katherine; Edwards, James; Beilstein, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Two studies examined the effects of dietary astaxanthin on Hanlbm Wistar (SPF) rats. Male and female rats receiving astaxanthin concentrations up to 1.52% of the feed for 13 weeks showed no evidence of toxicity; no effects were noted in the offspring of female rats exposed to astaxanthin at up to 1.39% of the feed during the period of organogenesis (GD 7-16). Discoloration of the feces and yellow pigmentation of adipose tissue was seen in the 13-week study, an intrinsic property of the substance, and not a sign of toxicity. Differences between the control and astaxanthin groups, some of which reached statistical significance, were generally sporadic (i.e., transient and/or not related to astaxanthin concentration) and not considered of biological or toxicological significance. Blood cholesterol levels, for example, were greater in animals receiving astaxanthin for 13 weeks, but remained within the normal range. The highest dietary concentration of astaxanthin in each of the studies is proposed as a no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). Specifically, 1.52% for the 13-week study, corresponding to a mean intake of 1033 mg/kg bw/day (range: 880-1240 mg/kg bw/day), and 1.39% for the developmental toxicity study, corresponding to a mean intake of approximately 830 mg/kg bw/day (range: 457-957 mg/kg bw/day). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Literature Review - Problem Definition Studies on Selected Toxic Chemicals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-16

    toxicity . . . . . . . . . 27 3. Acute gastrointestinal and pulmonary toxicity . . . 28 4. Chronic cutaneous toxicity . . . . . . . . .. . 29 5. Other...cancer . . . . . . . 37 d. gastrointestinal toxicity and cancer . . ... 42 e. general mortality . . . . . . . . . . 42 f. other effects... gastrointestinal toxicity . . . . . . . . .. 45 c. pulmonary toxicity and lung cancer . . . - 46 d. carcinogenicity . . . ........ . 49 IV. ANIMAL TOXICITY

  7. [Toxicity studies of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101) (1). Single intravenous toxicity study in rats and dogs].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, K; Kasahara, T; Yanagisawa, Y; Nanba, T; Aze, Y; Shinomiya, K; Yonezawa, H; Fujita, T

    1997-12-01

    Single dose toxicity studies of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101), a novel ultra short acting beta-blocker, were conducted in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and beagle dogs. ONO-1101 was administered intravenously at a dose level of 37.5, 75, 150 or 300 mg/kg to rats of both sexes and 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg to male dogs. In the rat study, 5/6 males in the 150 mg/kg group and all animals in the 300 mg/kg group died during or right after administration. Survivors in the 150 mg/kg group showed temporal hypoactivity, bradypnea, dyspnea, tremor, loss of righting reflex and reddish lacrimation up to 5 min after injection. One male in the 150 mg/kg group had a tendency of suppression on body weight gain. No effects on clinical signs and body weight gain were seen in the 75 mg/kg group or lower. Necropsy findings showed only red tear in the majority of the decedents. In the dog study, all animals died within 6 min after administration in the 100 mg/kg group, showed ataxic gait, rolling and tachypnea followed by bradypnea and gasping/apnea. Incontinence of urine, defecation and vocalization were also seen in each one of two animals before death. Temporal hypoactivity was seen 1 min after administration in the 50 mg/kg group. No clinical signs were seen in the 25 mg/kg group. ONO-1101 did not affect bodyweight or food consumption. Necropsy findings of the decedents showed no abnormalities. It is indicated that the minimum lethal doses are 150 mg/kg in rats and 100 mg/kg in dogs.

  8. Toxic Hazards Research Unit annual report, 1990. Annual report No. 27 (Final), 1 Oct 89-15 Nov 90

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, H.G.; Vinegar, A.; Kinkead, E.R.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents a review of the activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit for the period of 1 October 1989 through 15 November 1990. Research activities focused on toxicity evaluations of aerospace and naval chemicals to include aircraft fuels and rocket fuels, hydraulic fluids, ground water contaminants, and chemical defense simulants. There was increased utilization of multidisciplinary efforts for quantitative toxicology studies and the development and validation of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for predicting toxicity responses. The General Toxicology Laboratory conducted acute studies, toxicokinetic studies, repeated-dose studies, and subchronic inhalation studies to include a 90-day continuous inhalation study using the Thomas Domes. The development and characterization of a unique high pressure aerosol generator was a significant adjunct benefitting the study conducted in the Thomas Domes.

  9. Suggested Format for Acute Toxicity Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document suggests the format for final reports on pesticide studies (right column of the tables in the document) and provides instructions for the creation of PDF Version 1.3 electronic submission documents (left column of the tables).

  10. Review of Ammonium Dinitramide Toxicity Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Dean, K. W., Pace, D. M ., and Carmichael, A. J . Effects of ammonium dinitramide in human liver slices: An EPR/spin trapping study. Armstrong...Steel-Goodwin, L., Kuhlmann, K. J ., Miller, C., Pace, M . D., and Carmichael, A. J . Effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species induced by...Biotechnology Branch Teresa R. Sterner Henry M . Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine Wright-Patterson AFB, OH

  11. Chip-based human liver-intestine and liver-skin co-cultures--A first step toward systemic repeated dose substance testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Ilka; Hasenberg, Tobias; Jaenicke, Annika; Lindner, Marcus; Lorenz, Alexandra Katharina; Zech, Julie; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Sonntag, Frank; Hayden, Patrick; Ayehunie, Seyoum; Lauster, Roland; Marx, Uwe; Materne, Eva-Maria

    2015-09-01

    Systemic repeated dose safety assessment and systemic efficacy evaluation of substances are currently carried out on laboratory animals and in humans due to the lack of predictive alternatives. Relevant international regulations, such as OECD and ICH guidelines, demand long-term testing and oral, dermal, inhalation, and systemic exposure routes for such evaluations. So-called "human-on-a-chip" concepts are aiming to replace respective animals and humans in substance evaluation with miniaturized functional human organisms. The major technical hurdle toward success in this field is the life-like combination of human barrier organ models, such as intestine, lung or skin, with parenchymal organ equivalents, such as liver, at the smallest biologically acceptable scale. Here, we report on a reproducible homeostatic long-term co-culture of human liver equivalents with either a reconstructed human intestinal barrier model or a human skin biopsy applying a microphysiological system. We used a multi-organ chip (MOC) platform, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-tissue ratios. The MOC supports submerse cultivation of an intact intestinal barrier model and an air-liquid interface for the skin model during their co-culture with the liver equivalents respectively at (1)/100.000 the scale of their human counterparts in vivo. To increase the degree of organismal emulation, microfluidic channels of the liver-skin co-culture could be successfully covered with human endothelial cells, thus mimicking human vasculature, for the first time. Finally, exposure routes emulating oral and systemic administration in humans have been qualified by applying a repeated dose administration of a model substance - troglitazone - to the chip-based co-cultures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Development of safety profile evaluating pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity of a combination of pioglitazone and olmesartan medoxomil in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pinaki; Nandi, Utpal; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2012-02-01

    Pioglitazone (PIO), an antidiabetic drug and olmesartan medoxomil (OLM), an antihypertensive drug were administered orally alone and in combination to Wistar albino rats for evaluation of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity of individual drugs and their combination. Pharmacokinetic study was performed by orally administering PIO and OLM at single dose of 3 and 2mg/kg, respectively alone and in combination analyzing the plasma samples using LC-MS/MS. Antidiabetic activity evaluation was done in type-2 diabetes mellitus induced animals at same dose level as in pharmacokinetic study daily for 30 days. PIO and/or OLM were administered orally to animals at daily doses of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg for 28 days for toxicity study. There was no significant alteration in the pharmacokinetic parameters of either drug indicating absence of any pharmacokinetic interaction when co-administered. Positive pharmacodynamic interaction between PIO and OLM was established in this study. Two drugs in combination showed no evidence of potentiation of 28-day repeated dose toxicity in animals. Again, drugs, alone and in combination, caused only minor changes in clinical-laboratory tests and histopathological change was not found in the experiment performed. In conclusion, PIO and OLM combination can primarily be stated as safe in terms of present toxicity and pharmacokinetics findings.

  13. The determination of toxicities of sulphonylurea and phenylurea herbicides with quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) studies.

    PubMed

    Can, Alper; Yildiz, Ilkay; Guvendik, Gulin

    2013-05-01

    Sulphonylurea and phenylurea herbicides are two groups of herbicides that are most commonly used worldwide. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship models were derived for estimating the acute oral toxicity of these herbicides to male rats. The 20 chemicals of the training set and the seven compounds of external testing set were described by means of using descriptors for lipophilicity, polarity and molecular geometry, as well as the calculation of quantum chemical descriptors for energy. Model development to predict the toxicity of sulphonylurea and phenylurea herbicides in different matrices was carried out using multiple-linear regression. The model was validated internally and externally. In the present study, QSTR model was used for the first time to understand the inherent relationships between the sulphonyl and phenylurea-type herbicide molecules and their toxic behaviour. Such studies provide mechanistic insight about structure-toxicity relationships and assist in the design of less toxic herbicides.

  14. Identification of phase-I metabolites and chronic toxicity study of the Kv1.3 blocker PAP-1 (5-(4-phenoxybutoxy)psoralen) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hao, B; Chen, Z-W; Zhou, X-J; Zimin, P I; Miljanich, G P; Wulff, H; Wang, Y-X

    2011-03-01

    1. PAP-1 (5-(4-phenoxybutoxy)psoralen), a potent small-molecule blocker of the voltage-gated potassium Kv1.3 channel, is currently in preclinical development for psoriasis. This study was undertaken to identify the major phase I metabolites of PAP-1 in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. 2. Five phase I metabolites, that is 5-(oxybutyric-acid)psoralen (M1), 5-[4-(4-hydroxybutoxy)]psoralen (M2), 5-[4-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)butoxy]psoralen (M3), 5-[4-(3-hydroxyphenoxy)butoxy]psoralen (M4), and 8-hydroxyl-5-(4-phenoxybutoxy)psoralen (M5), were isolated from the bile of rats and identified by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. The last four metabolites are new compounds. 3. Incubation of PAP-1 with SD rat liver microsomes rendered the same five major metabolites in a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent manner suggesting that cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are involved in PAP-1 metabolism. Inhibitors of rat CYP1A1/2 (alpha-naphthoflavone) and CYP3A (ketoconazole) but not CYP2D6 (quinidine), CYP2E (diethyldithiocarbamate), or CYP2C9 (sulphaphenazole) blocked the metabolism of PAP-1 in rat microsomes. 4. Of the five metabolites M3, M4, and M5 were found to inhibit Kv1.3 currents with nanomolar IC50s, while M1 and M2 were inactive. Our results identified the Kv1.3-inactive M1 as the major phase I metabolite, and suggest that hydroxylation and O-dealkylation are the major pathways of PAP-1 metabolism. 5. We further conducted a 6-month repeat-dose toxicity study with PAP-1 at 50 mg/kg in both male and female Lewis rats and did not observe any toxic effects.

  15. [Study on the toxicity of horseshoe crabs in mice].

    PubMed

    Liao, Y; Li, X

    2000-05-30

    In order to study the toxicity of horseshoe crabs(tachypleus tridentatus and carcinoscorpius rotundicauda) in the sea of China, the extracts of tissues from tachypleus tridentatus and carcinoscorpius rotundicauda were injected into the abdominal cavity of mice for testing their poisoning effects. The results showed that the toxicity of carcinoscorpius rotundicauda was much higher than that of tachypleus tridentatus. The length of time from the injection to the death was much shorter for Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda than that for tachypleus tridentatus. The signs before death for Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda poisoning were restless, jumping and spasm but that for Tachypleus tridentatus was lethargy. The toxicity of adult horseshoe crabs was much higher than that of young horseshoe crabs.

  16. Aqueous extract of Senecio candicans DC induce liver and kidney damage in a sub-chronic oral toxicity study in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Hariprasath; Raman, Jegadeesh; Pandian, Arjun; Kuppamuthu, Kumaresan; Nanjian, Raaman; Sabaratam, Vikineswary; Naidu, Murali

    2016-08-01

    Senecio candicans DC. (Asteraceae) is used as a remedy for gastric ulcer and stomach pain in the Nilgiris, district, Tamil Nadu. The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the sub-chronic toxicity of an aqueous extract of Senecio candicans (AESC) plant in Wistar albino rats. The study was conducted in consideration of the OECD 408 study design (Repeated Dose 90-Day Oral Toxicity Study in Rodents) and the extract was administered via gavage at doses of 250, 500 or 750 mg/kg body weight per day for 90-days. Hematological, biochemical parameters were determined on days 0, 30, 60 and 90 of administration. Animals were euthanized after 90 d treatment and its liver and kidney sections were taken for histological study. The results of sub-chronic study showed significant increase (P < 0.05) in serum uric acid, creatinine, aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALP) levels. Histological examination of liver showed mild mononuclear infiltration in the portal trait, enlarged nucleus around the central vein and mild loss of hepatocyte architecture in rats treated with 750 mg/kg of AESC. Histological examination of kidney showed focal interstitial fibrosis, crowding of glomeruli and mild hydropic change with hypercellular glomeruli in rats treated with 750 mg/kg of AESC. However, no remarkable histoarchitectural change in hepatocytes and glomeruli were observed in rats treated with lower concentrations (250 and 500 mg/kg b.w.) of AESC compared to control group animals. The no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of AESC in the present study was 500 mg/kg b.w. Signs of toxic effects are evident from the current study. Although AESC contains low concentrations of PA, findings from this study suggest that regular consumers of herbal remedies derived from this plant may develop kidney and liver toxicity. Further studies on the isolation and characterization of PAs are necessary to determine the safe dose level of the extract for therapeutic use

  17. Chronic arsenic toxicity: studies in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Guha Mazumder, Debendranath; Dasgupta, U B

    2011-09-01

    Chronic arsenic toxicity (arsenicosis) as a result of drinking arsenic-contaminated groundwater is a major environmental health hazard throughout the world, including India. A lot of research on health effects, including genotoxic effect of chronic arsenic toxicity in humans, have been carried out in West Bengal during the last 2 decades. A review of literature including information available from West Bengal has been made to characterize the problem. Scientific journals, monographs, and proceedings of conferences with regard to human health effects, including genotoxicity, of chronic arsenic toxicity have been reviewed. Pigmentation and keratosis are the specific skin diseases characteristic of chronic arsenic toxicity. However, in West Bengal, it was found to produce various systemic manifestations, such as chronic lung disease, characterized by chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive and/or restrictive pulmonary disease, and bronchiectasis; liver diseases, such as non cirrhotic portal fibrosis; polyneuropathy; peripheral vascular disease; hypertension; nonpitting edema of feet/hands; conjunctival congestion; weakness; and anemia. High concentrations of arsenic, greater than or equal to 200 μg/L, during pregnancy were found to be associated with a sixfold increased risk for stillbirth. Cancers of skin, lung, and urinary bladder are the important cancers associated with this toxicity. Of the various genotoxic effects of arsenic in humans, chromosomal aberration and increased frequency of micronuclei in different cell types have been found to be significant. Various probable mechanisms have been incriminated to cause DNA damage because of chronic arsenic toxicity. The results of the study in West Bengal suggest that deficiency in DNA repair capacity, perturbation of methylation of promoter region of p53 and p16 genes, and genomic methylation alteration may be involved in arsenic-induced disease manifestation in humans. P53 polymorphism has been found to be

  18. PROSPECTIVE PREGNANCY STUDY DESIGNS FOR ASSESSING REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective Pregnancy Study Designs for Assessing Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants
    Germaine M. Buck,1 Courtney D. Johnson,1 Joseph Stanford,2 Anne Sweeney,3 Laura Schieve,4 John Rockett,5 Sherry G. Selevan,6 Steve Schrader 7

    Abstract
    The origin of successfu...

  19. PROSPECTIVE PREGNANCY STUDY DESIGNS FOR ASSESSING REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prospective Pregnancy Study Designs for Assessing Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants
    Germaine M. Buck,1 Courtney D. Johnson,1 Joseph Stanford,2 Anne Sweeney,3 Laura Schieve,4 John Rockett,5 Sherry G. Selevan,6 Steve Schrader 7

    Abstract
    The origin of successfu...

  20. The margin of internal exposure (MOIE) concept for dermal risk assessment based on oral toxicity data - A case study with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Bessems, Jos G M; Paini, Alicia; Gajewska, Monika; Worth, Andrew

    2017-03-10

    Route-to-route extrapolation is a common part of human risk assessment. Data from oral animal toxicity studies are commonly used to assess the safety of various but specific human dermal exposure scenarios. Using theoretical examples of various user scenarios, it was concluded that delineation of a generally applicable human dermal limit value is not a practicable approach, due to the wide variety of possible human exposure scenarios, including its consequences for internal exposure. This paper uses physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling approaches to predict animal as well as human internal exposure dose metrics and for the first time, introduces the concept of Margin of Internal Exposure (MOIE) based on these internal dose metrics. Caffeine was chosen to illustrate this approach. It is a substance that is often found in cosmetics and for which oral repeated dose toxicity data were available. A rat PBK model was constructed in order to convert the oral NOAEL to rat internal exposure dose metrics, i.e. the area under the curve (AUC) and the maximum concentration (Cmax), both in plasma. A human oral PBK model was constructed and calibrated using human volunteer data and adapted to accommodate dermal absorption following human dermal exposure. Use of the MOIE approach based on internal dose metrics predictions provides excellent opportunities to investigate the consequences of variations in human dermal exposure scenarios. It can accommodate within-day variation in plasma concentrations and is scientifically more robust than assuming just an exposure in mg/kg bw/day. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  2. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dusts in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Taylor, L.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.

    2009-01-01

    NASA will build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Astronauts on the Moon will go in and out of the base for various activities, and will inevitably bring some dust into the living quarters. Depressurizing the airlock so that astronauts can exit for outdoor activities could also bring dust inside the airlock to the habitable area. Concerned about the potential health effects on astronauts exposed to airborne lunar dust, NASA directed the JSC Toxicology Laboratory to determine the pulmonary toxicity of lunar dust. The toxicity data also will be needed by toxicologists to establish safe exposure limits for astronauts residing in the lunar habitat and by environmental engineers to design an appropriate dust mitigation strategy. We conducted a study to examine biomarkers of toxicity (inflammation and cytotoxicity) in lung lavage fluids from mice intrapharyngeally instilled with lunar dust samples; we also collected lung tissue from the mice for histopathological examination 3 months after the dust instillation. Reference dusts (TiO2 and quartz) having known toxicities and industrial exposure limits were studied in parallel with lunar dust so that the relative toxicity of lunar dust can be determined. A 6-month histopathology study has been planned. These instillation experiments will be followed by inhalation studies, which are more labor intensive and technologically difficult. The animal inhalation studies will be conducted first with an appropriate lunar dust simulant to ensure that the exposure techniques to be used with actual lunar dust will be successful. The results of these studies collectively will reveal the toxicological risk of exposures and enable us to establish exposure limits on lunar dust for astronauts living in the lunar habitat.

  3. ILSI/HESI Maternal Toxicity Workshop Summary: Maternal Toxicity and its Impact on Study Design and Data Interpretation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Workshops on maternal toxicity were held at the annual meetings of the Society of Toxicology, Teratology Society, and European Teratology Society in 2009. Prior to a general discussion of the issues involved with maternal toxicity and its impact on study design and data interpret...

  4. ILSI/HESI Maternal Toxicity Workshop Summary: Maternal Toxicity and its Impact on Study Design and Data Interpretation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Workshops on maternal toxicity were held at the annual meetings of the Society of Toxicology, Teratology Society, and European Teratology Society in 2009. Prior to a general discussion of the issues involved with maternal toxicity and its impact on study design and data interpret...

  5. Antithrombotic effect of repeated doses of the ethanolic extract of local olive (Olea europaea L.) leaves in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Dub, Abdallah M; Dugani, Aisha M

    2013-05-22

    The incidence of thromboembolic diseases is increasing, and they are a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Mediterranean diet is known for its high content of olive products, especially olive oil, which has known cardiovascular health benefits, including those on blood pressure, cholesterol level, and thrombogenesis. All previous animal and clinical studies investigating the beneficial antithrombotic effects of olives have focused on olive oil and a few on olive leaves (OLEs). In this study, the ethanolic extract of OLE was evaluated for its antithrombotic activity in the rabbit model of thrombosis induced by ligature of the vena cava and intravenous administration of tissue thromboplastin. Pre-treatment with 100 or 200 mg/kg per day of the ethanolic extract for 8 weeks significantly prolonged the prothrombin time (PT) in comparison to the control group (12.10 ± 0.35 sec and 14.38 ± 0.29 sec vs. 10.8 ± 0.32 sec, p < 0.05 and 0.001, respectively). In comparison to the control group, the same doses had no statistically significant effect on thrombus weight (16.85 ± 0.67 mg, 16.32 ± 0.35 mg, and 17.81 ± 0.75 mg; p = 0.18 and 0.06) or on activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) (19.17 ± 0.33 sec, 19.12 ± 0.73 sec, and 18.97 ± 0.41 sec; p = 0.36 and 0.43, respectively). One important finding in this study concerns thrombus morphology. In the extract treatment groups, the thrombus was filament-like and did not adhere to blood vessel walls, whereas in the control group the thrombus was thick and almost completely occluded the vein. Therefore, these results suggest that OLE ethanolic extract can modify the extrinsic coagulation pathway as evidenced by the prolongation of PT and changes in thrombus morphology, enough to justify further research to evaluate its possible antithrombotic effects.

  6. Adhesion of leukocytes to dermal endothelial cells is induced after single-dose, but reduced after repeated doses of UVA.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, M; Pirthauer, M; Plewig, G

    1997-12-01

    Approximately 20-50% of ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation delivered to the skin surface may reach the human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) that play a pivotal role in cellular inflammatory tissue; however, the pathophysiologic role of HDMEC in UVA-induced skin changes is largely unknown. Based on previous in vivo and in vitro studies revealing UVA-induced expression of endothelial adhesion molecules, we studied isolated HDMEC under various conditions in order to further delineate the impact of UVA on these cells. The expression of cell adhesion molecules was determined by flow cytometry and the resulting changes of stable adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells were quantitated for granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes using a newly developed multicellular adhesion assay. Additionally, antibody blocking experiments were performed to delineate the role of individual cell adhesion molecules in UVA-induced leukocyte adherence. High-dose polychromatic UVA (25 J per cm2, maximal emission at 375 nm) induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin with different kinetics but correlating the adhesion of leukocyte subsets. This effect subsided, however, in the course of 3-6 daily applied UVA doses. Moreover, pro-inflammatory cytokine challenge by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-alpha resulted in significantly weaker induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin in repeatedly UVA-exposed HDMEC. Differential quantitation of peripheral blood derived granulocytes, lymphocytes, and monocytes revealed reduced adhesion particularly of lymphocytes followed by monocytes and granulocytes compared with leukocyte adhesion to nonirradiated but cytokine-stimulated HDMEC. It is concluded that UVA substantially influences endothelial cell adhesion molecules expression and thus directly interferes with leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. Divergent UVA-induced effects in this respect can be attributed to the mode of UV exposure

  7. Preclinical toxicity profile of oral bilastine.

    PubMed

    Lucero, María Luisa; Arteche, Joseba K; Sommer, E W; Casadesus, Agustín

    2012-06-01

    As part of the bilastine development program, and as mandated by regulatory authorities, several studies were performed with oral bilastine in different animal species to evaluate its toxicity profile. Toxicokinetic analyses conducted in tandem to evaluate systemic exposure, gender differences, and dose proportionality in the different animal species indicated that animals were systemically exposed to bilastine during treatment. Repeated-dose toxicity studies in beagle dogs (52 weeks) and in rats and mice (13 weeks) showed that bilastine at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg/day was not associated with any mortality, ocular effects, or nodules/masses. Likewise, no bilastine-associated neoplastic lesions were observed in rats and mice after 104 weeks of treatment with bilastine at doses up to 2,000 mg/kg/day. In general, bilastine-related clinical signs, body-weight changes, food consumption, clinical chemistry, haematology, and macro- and microscopic findings were of low order and reversible, with effects present only at the highest doses administered. Bilastine (up to 1,000 mg/kg/day) was well tolerated in pregnant/lactating rats and in their offspring and subsequent generations. With respect to effects on embryofoetal development in rabbits, bilastine at 400 mg/kg/day (the highest dose evaluated) was assessed to be the no observed adverse effects level. Overall, bilastine demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile in all animal models investigated and at higher doses than the corresponding recommended daily human dosage.

  8. Sex differences in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolism and in vivo pharmacology following acute and repeated dosing in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Jenny L; Burston, James J

    2014-07-25

    Mechanisms that may underlie age and sex differences in the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids are relatively unexplored. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether sex differences in metabolism of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), similar to those observed previously in adult rats, also occurred in adolescent rats and might contribute to age and sex differences in its in vivo pharmacology. Male and female adolescent rats were exposed to THC acutely or repeatedly for 10 days. Subsequently, some of the rats were sacrificed and blood and brain levels of THC and one of its metabolites, 11-hydroxy-Δ(9)-THC (11-OH-THC), were measured. Other rats were evaluated in a battery of in vivo tests that are sensitive to cannabinoids. Concentrations of 11-OH-THC in the brains of female adult and adolescent rats exceeded those observed in male conspecifics, particularly after repeated THC administration. In contrast, brain levels of THC did not differ between the sexes. In vivo, acute THC produced dose-related hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotion in adolescent rats of both sexes, with tolerance developing after repeated administration. With a minor exception, sex differences in THC's effects in the in vivo assays were not apparent. Together with previous findings, the present results suggest that sex differences in pharmacokinetics cannot fully explain the patterns of sex differences (and lack of sex differences) in cannabinoid effects across behaviors. Hormonal and/or pharmacodynamic factors are also likely to play a role.

  9. Comparison of prorenoate potassium and spironolactone after repeated doses and steady state plasma levels of active metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, G T; Shelton, J R; Harrison, I R; Perkins, R M; Palmer, R F

    1982-01-01

    1 After repeated single daily doses, the aldosterone antagonists prorenoate potassium and spironolactone were compared with regard to renal antimineralocorticoid activity, plasma potassium concentration and steady state plasma levels of their active metabolites, prorenone and canrenone respectively, in a balanced crossover study of twelve healthy subjects. 2 Following challenge with the mineralocorticoid, fludrocortisone, best estimates of the potency of prorenoate potassium relative to spironolactone were 3.6 (95% confidence limits 1.6-10.4) for urinary sodium excretion and 3.4 (95% confidence limits 2.0-6.5) for urinary log10 10Na/K. Estimates with respect to urinary potassium excretion and plasma potassium concentration were imprecise, confirming the limitations of the fludrocortisone model in the evaluation of aldosterone antagonists at steady state. 3 Both compounds exhibited directly proportional relationships between daily dose and steady state plasma levels of active metabolites. The approximate mean terminal elimination half-life of prorenone at steady state was 32.6 h (range 18-80 h). PMID:7059416

  10. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-10-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu{sup III}(OH){sub 3}] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  11. Persistent anxiogenic effects of a single or repeated doses of cocaine and methamphetamine: interactions with endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Hayase, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yamamoto, K

    2005-09-01

    As persistent behavioural changes, such as increased anxiety-related behaviours, can be predicted based on the phenomenon of psychostimulant-induced neuronal plasticity, the time course (3-, 5- and 10-day time points) of the effects of both a single and repeated (daily for 7 days) i.p. administrations of cocaine (COC) and methamphetamine (MA) on anxiety-related behavioural symptoms in the elevated plus-maze test were examined in mice. Furthermore, based on the reported interactions between brain dopamine versus cannabinoid (CB) receptors and the contribution of CB receptors to the occurrence of persistent anxiety-related behavioural symptoms, the interactions of the agonist CP 55940 (CP) and the endogenous ligands anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide: AEA), 2-arachidonylglycerol (ARA), N-arachidonyldopamine (NADA), noladin ether (NL), and virodhamine (VA) with the COC- or MA-induced anxiety-related behaviours were also studied. In both an acute experiment using a single COC (30 mg/kg) or MA (4 mg/kg) dose and a chronic experiment using repeated COC (15 mg/kg) or MA (2 mg/kg) doses, anxiety-related behavioural symptoms were observed similarly at 3- and 5-day time points, but disappeared at the 10-day time point. Among the CB ligands, the agonists CP, AEA, ARA, NADA, and NL provided strong protective effects against each parameter at 3- and 5-day time points. Therefore, it was concluded that both COC and MA caused persistent anxiety-related behavioural symptoms following both a single and repeated treatments. Since these anxiogenic effects were attenuated by the endogenous CB agonists, the involvement of brain CB receptors was suspected.

  12. INO-4995 Therapeutic Efficacy Is Enhanced with Repeat Dosing in Cystic Fibrosis Knockout Mice and Human Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Traynor-Kaplan, Alexis E.; Moody, Mark; Nur, Magda; Gabriel, Sherif; Majerus, Philip W.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Langton-Webster, Beatrice

    2010-01-01

    Progressive lung damage in cystic fibrosis (CF) has been linked to inadequate airway mucosal hydration. We previously demonstrated that an inositol tetrakisphosphate analog, 1-O-octyl-2-O-butyryl-myo-inositol 3,4,5,6-tetrakisphosphate octakis(propionoxymethyl)ester (INO-4995), regulates airway secretory and absorptive processes, affecting mucosal hydration by prolonged (24 h) inhibition of Na+ and fluid absorption in CF human nasal epithelia (CFHNE). The objectives of this study were to further assess clinical potential of INO-4995 in CF through ascertaining in vivo activity in mice with CF, determining the effects of repeated administration on potency and determining cytoplasmic half-life. Uptake and metabolism of [3H]INO-4995 was monitored with HPLC to calculate intracellular half-life. INO-4995 was administered in vitro repeatedly over 4 to 8 days to CFHNE. Fluid absorption was assessed by blue dextran exclusion, and basal short-circuit current was measured in Ussing chambers. INO-4995 (1–100 μg/kg) was dosed intranasally either as a single dose or once per day over 4 days to gut-corrected CF mice. [3H]INO-4995 was rapidly taken up by epithelial cultures and converted to the active drug, which had a half-life of 40 hours. Repeated daily application of INO-4995 to CFHNE lowered the effective concentration for inhibition of fluid absorption and amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current in cultured CFHNE, and reduced nasal potential difference to nearly control levels in gut-corrected CF mice. Ca2+-activated Cl− channel activity was also boosted in cultures. Mouse nasal levels fell from abnormal levels to within 2 μA of normal with repeated exposure to 0.8 μg/kg over 4 days. These data support further development of INO-4995 for the treatment of CF. PMID:19346319

  13. Bile Salt Homeostasis in Normal and Bsep Gene Knockout Rats with Single and Repeated Doses of Troglitazone.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Chen, Shenjue; Freeden, Chris; Chen, Weiqi; Zhang, Yueping; Abraham, Pamela; Nelson, David M; Humphreys, W Griffith; Gan, Jinping; Lai, Yurong

    2017-09-01

    The interference of bile acid secretion through bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibition is one of the mechanisms for troglitazone (TGZ)-induced hepatotoxicity. Here, we investigated the impact of single or repeated oral doses of TGZ (200 mg/kg/day, 7 days) on bile acid homoeostasis in wild-type (WT) and Bsep knockout (KO) rats. Following oral doses, plasma exposures of TGZ were not different between WT and KO rats, and were similar on day 1 and day 7. However, plasma exposures of the major metabolite, troglitazone sulfate (TS), in KO rats were 7.6- and 9.3-fold lower than in WT on day 1 and day 7, respectively, due to increased TS biliary excretion. With Bsep KO, the mRNA levels of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), Mrp3, Mrp4, Mdr1, breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide, small heterodimer partner, and Sult2A1 were significantly altered in KO rats. Following seven daily TGZ treatments, Cyp7A1 was significantly increased in both WT and KO rats. In the vehicle groups, plasma exposures of individual bile acids demonstrated variable changes in KO rats as compared with WT. WT rats dosed with TGZ showed an increase of many bile acid species in plasma on day 1, suggesting the inhibition of Bsep. Conversely, these changes returned to base levels on day 7. In KO rats, alterations of most bile acids were observed after seven doses of TGZ. Collectively, bile acid homeostasis in rats was regulated through bile acid synthesis and transport in response to Bsep deficiency and TGZ inhibition. Additionally, our study is the first to demonstrate that repeated TGZ doses can upregulate Cyp7A1 in rats. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Repeated doses of cardiac mesenchymal cells are therapeutically superior to a single dose in mice with old myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yiru; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Nong, Yibing; Tomlin, Alex; Zhu, Xiaoping; Gumpert, Anna M; Nasr, Marjan; Muthusamy, Senthikumar; Li, Hong; Book, Michael; Khan, Abdur; Hong, Kyung U; Li, Qianhong; Bolli, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that repeated administrations of c-kit(POS) cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) have cumulative beneficial effects in rats with old myocardial infarction (MI), resulting in markedly greater improvement in left ventricular (LV) function compared with a single administration. To determine whether this paradigm applies to other species and cell types, mice with a 3-week-old MI received one or three doses of cardiac mesenchymal cells (CMCs), a novel cell type that we have recently described. CMCs or vehicle were infused percutaneously into the LV cavity, 14 days apart. Compared with vehicle-treated mice, the single-dose group exhibited improved LV ejection fraction (EF) after the 1st infusion (consisting of CMCs) but not after the 2nd and 3rd (vehicle). In contrast, in the multiple-dose group, LV EF improved after each CMC infusion, so that at the end of the study, LV EF averaged 35.5 ± 0.7% vs. 32.7 ± 0.6% in the single-dose group (P < 0.05). The multiple-dose group also exhibited less collagen in the non-infarcted region vs. the single-dose group. Engraftment and differentiation of CMCs were negligible in both groups, indicating paracrine effects. These results demonstrate that, in mice with ischemic cardiomyopathy, the beneficial effects of three doses of CMCs are significantly greater than those of one dose, supporting the concept that multiple treatments are necessary to properly evaluate the full therapeutic potential of cell therapy. Thus, the repeated-treatment paradigm is not limited to c-kit (POS) CPCs or to rats, but applies to other cell types and species. The generalizability of this concept dramatically augments its significance.

  15. Variability within Systemic In Vivo Toxicity Studies (ASCCT) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In vivo studies have long been considered the gold standard for toxicology screening. Often time models developed in silico and/or using in vitro data to estimate points of departures (POD) are compared to the in vivo data to benchmark and evaluate quality and goodness of fit. However, it is not certain what a good model is and how well is well before it turns into overfitting. Here we estimate the amount of variance that can be expected within systemic in vivo data. The present study was done using the US EPA’s Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB). The database incorporates over 5,000 in vivo toxicity studies from the Office of Pesticide Programs (registrant-submitted studies), National Toxicology Program, pharmaceutical industries, and publically available literature covering over 1,000 chemicals. Using multilinear regression to calculate the residual sum or squares, we accounted for known variability in study conditions to quantify the unexplained variance of the log10(POD) to be about 0.35. The leave one out method was used to assess the amount of variance explained by each study condition and chemicals were found to be the biggest contributor. Stratifying the dataset by species and administration methods showed similar results, indicating stability of the unexplained variance. Considering and quantifying the unexplained variance will provide a benchmark and lower bounds on the mean-square-error for predictive toxicity model development. Poster p

  16. Evaluation of sedative effects of single and repeated doses of 50 mg and 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride. Results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dulin, J; Kovács, L; Ramm, S; Horvath, F; Ebeling, L; Kohnen, R

    1998-07-01

    Sedative effects of single and repeated doses of 50 mg and 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm), a centrally active muscle-relaxing agent, were evaluated in a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial. A total of 72 healthy young adults balanced by sex were randomized to receive 50 mg or 150 mg tolperisone hydrochloride or placebo t.i.d. for a period of 8 days. Control examinations were performed in the mornings of days 1 and 8 before intake of the morning dose and at 1.5, 4 and 6 hours postdose. The psychomotoric test battery used in this trial revealed no sedative effects of tolperisone hydrochloride in the given doses at any control examination. Subjective mood ratings quantified by the Welzel Colored Scales were not impaired either. The lack of differences in sedative potentials of tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo was confirmed by tests on differences and by tests on equivalence using 95% CI. The present study substantiates clinical experience and previous clinical trials demonstrating that tolperisone hydrochloride, though being a centrally active muscle relaxant, does not cause any sedation and does not impair reaction times.

  17. Artificial streams for ecosystem toxicity studies: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, C.E.; Liss, W.J.; Wevers, M.J.; Burnett, K.M.; Corrarino, C.A.; Curtis, L.R.; Frissell, C.A.; Hoffman, R.L.; Hurley, M.D.; Melton, L.A.

    1987-02-01

    Watershed and stream ecosystem theory, classification and empirical approaches were employed to evaluate the usefulness of laboratory stream ecosystems (microcosms) to study the transport, fate, and effects of toxic substances in natural stream ecosystems. Based upon field studies and classification of natural streams, laboratory streams were designed to model different classes and states of natural streams. Communities in the laboratory streams were exposed to dieldrin, a chlorinated hydrocarbon and fenvalerate, an organophosphate pesticide. Different classes of laboratory streams responded differently to similar exposures. Toxicant dynamics were related to community dynamics through the use of mathematical models and studies of simple laboratory communities in aquaria. These results, along with studies of individual organisms, showed that bioaccumulation coefficients could not be treated as constants. Well-designed laboratory streams and other microcosms are complex dynamic systems that can be used to gain understanding of toxic substance behavior and effects in streams and other ecosystems. But such systems are far too complex and dynamic to be used for bioassays, monitoring, or as predictive tools.

  18. Toxicity study of cerium oxide nanoparticles in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Monika; Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Chinde, Srinivas; Rahman, Mohammed Fazlur; Mahboob, Mohammed; Grover, Paramjit

    2014-01-01

    The present study consisted of cytotoxic, genotoxic, and oxidative stress responses of human neuroblastoma cell line (IMR32) following exposure to different doses of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs; nanoceria) and its microparticles (MPs) for 24 hours. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays whereas genotoxicity was assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus and comet assays. A battery of assays including lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase were performed to test the hypothesis that ROS was responsible for the toxicity of nanoceria. The results showed that nanosized CeO2 was more toxic than cerium oxide MPs. Hence, further study on safety evaluation of CeO2 NPs on other models is recommended.

  19. Absence of in vivo genotoxicity of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol and associated fatty acid esters in a 4-week comprehensive toxicity study using F344 gpt delta rats.

    PubMed

    Onami, Saeko; Cho, Young-Man; Toyoda, Takeshi; Horibata, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Yuji; Umemura, Takashi; Honma, Masamitsu; Nohmi, Takehiko; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko

    2014-07-01

    3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) is regarded as a rat renal and testicular carcinogen and has been classified as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B) by International Agency for Research on Cancer. This is potentially of great importance given that esters of this compound have recently found to be generated in many foods and food ingredients as a result of food processing. There have been a few reports about their toxicity, although we have recently found that the toxicity profile of 3-MCPD esters was similar to that of 3-MCPD in a rat 13-week repeated dose study, except for the acute renal toxicity seen in 3-MCPD-treated females. In the present study, to examine in vivo genotoxicity we administered equimolar doses of 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD fatty acid esters (palmitate diester, palmitate monoester and oleate diester) to 6-week-old male F344 gpt delta rats carrying a reporter transgene for 4 weeks by intragastric administration. In vivo micronucleus, Pig-a mutation and gpt assays were performed, as well as investigations of major toxicological parameters including histopathological features. As one result, the relative kidney weights of the 3-MCPD and all three ester groups were significantly increased compared with the vehicle control group. However, the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes and Pig-a mutant red blood cells did not differ among groups. Moreover, no changes were observed in mutant frequencies of gpt and red/gam (Spi(-)) genes in the kidney and the testis of 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD-fatty-acid-esters-treated rats. In histopathological analyses, no treatment related changes were observed, except for decrease of eosinophilic bodies in the kidneys of all treated groups. These results suggest that 3-MCPD and its fatty acid esters are not in vivo genotoxins, although they may exert renal toxicity.

  20. Ninety day toxicity study of chloroacetic acids in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhat, H K; Kanz, M F; Campbell, G A; Ansari, G A

    1991-08-01

    Chloroacetic acids are produced in drinking water as a result of disinfection processes. Chloroacetic acids are also metabolites of widely used and toxic halogenated hydrocarbons. Thus, chronic human exposure to these chemicals is likely to occur. The objective of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in a 90-day subchronic study in rats via oral exposure by drinking water. Chloroacetic acid solutions were prepared at concentrations which provided an approximate intake of 1/4 the LD50 dose per day: MCA, 1.9 mM; DCA, 80.5 mM; TCA, 45.8 mM. Control rats received distilled water only. After 90 days, major organs were removed, fixed, paraffin embedded, and stained. Light microscopic examination of the major organs revealed variable degrees of alterations in the lung and liver of all three treated groups. In the liver, morphological changes were predominantly localized to the portal triads, which were mildly to moderately enlarged with random bile duct proliferation, extension of portal veins, fibrosis, edema, and occasional foci of inflammation. In the lungs, minimal alterations were observed as foci of perivascular inflammation on small pulmonary veins. Morphological changes in the testes and brain were seen only in the DCA treated group. Testes were atrophic with few spermatocytes and no mature spermatozoa. Focal vacuolation and gliosis were present in the forebrain and brainstem. The results of these studies indicate that, relative to their respective LD50 values, DCA given at 80.5 mM is more toxic than TCA given at 45.8 mM and MCA at 1.9 mM is least toxic.

  1. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

  2. SAR STUDY OF NASAL TOXICITY: LESSONS FOR MODELING SMALL TOXICITY DATASETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most toxicity data, particularly from whole animal bioassays, are generated without the needs or capabilities of structure-activity relationship (SAR) modeling in mind. Some toxicity endpoints have been of sufficient regulatory concern to warrant large scale testing efforts (e.g....

  3. SAR STUDY OF NASAL TOXICITY: LESSONS FOR MODELING SMALL TOXICITY DATASETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most toxicity data, particularly from whole animal bioassays, are generated without the needs or capabilities of structure-activity relationship (SAR) modeling in mind. Some toxicity endpoints have been of sufficient regulatory concern to warrant large scale testing efforts (e.g....

  4. Misonidazole with dexamethasone rescue: an escalating dose toxicity study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanasichuk, H.; Urtasun, R.C.; Fulton, D.S.; Raleigh, J.

    1984-09-01

    Neurotoxicity induced by misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has become the dose limiting factor in clinical work. In 1981, the authors reported a preliminary study suggestive that Dexamethasone (DEXA) does have a protective effect against peripheral neuropathies (PN) resulting from toxicity of misonidazole. The authors are presently investigating the use of DEXA, with escalating doses of MISO in an attempt to modify its neurotoxicity. To date, 16 patients have been registered to receive total doses of MISO given in 9 equally divided doses over 3 weeks. DEXA is given 3 days prior to the first dose and continues for the duration of therapy. All patients receive palliative radiation. No toxicity was seen at the total dose of 13.5 gm/M/sub 2/. One grade I PN occurred in the first four patients receiving 15.5 gm/M/sub 2/. Six additional patients were entered at this dose level and no further incidence of PN was observed.

  5. Developmental toxicity study of pentachlorophenol in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Bernard, B K; Ranpuria, A K; Hoberman, A M

    2001-01-01

    The potential for developmental toxicity of pentachlorophenol (penta) was studied in New Zealand white rabbits at doses of 0 (corn oil), 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg/day administered by gavage on days 6 to 18 of gestation. The rabbits were sacrificed on day 29 of presumed gestation and necropsied. Measurements included number of corpora lutea, pregnancy, number and distribution of implantations, early and late resorptions, live and dead fetuses, fetal weight, gender, and gross external, soft tissue, and skeletal alterations. The mid and high doses reduced maternal body weight gain; the high dose caused transient weight loss and reduced feed consumption. There were no effects on embryofetal development at any of the doses evaluated. Based on these data, the maternal no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) is 7.5 mg/kg/day, while the developmental NOAEL is 30 mg/kg/day. Penta is not a developmental toxicant in a nonrodent animal model.

  6. 13-Week oral toxicity study with isomaltulose (Palatinose) in rats.

    PubMed

    Jonker, D; Lina, B A R; Kozianowski, G

    2002-10-01

    The potential subchronic oral toxicity of isomaltulose (Palatinose) was examined by administering this substance in the diet to groups of 20 male and 20 female Wistar rats at levels of 0, 2.5, 5 and 10% for 13 consecutive weeks. Daily clinical observations, body weight, food conversion efficiency, food and water consumption were not affected at any stage of the study. Ophthalmoscopy, haematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, gross and histopathological examination, neurobehavioural observations, motor activity assessment and the results of an immunotoxicity screen did not reveal any abnormalities related to the ingestion of the test substance. In conclusion, the administration of isomaltulose at dietary levels up to 10% for 13 consecutive weeks was well tolerated without any signs of toxicity. The overall intake at this level corresponded to 7.0 and 8.1 g/kg body weight/day in male and female rats, respectively.

  7. Subchronic toxicity study in mice fed Spirulina maxima.

    PubMed

    Salazar, M; Martínez, E; Madrigal, E; Ruiz, L E; Chamorro, G A

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of Spirulina maxima, a blue-green alga used as food supplement and food coloring, after 13 weeks of treatment. Groups of ten mice of each sex were given S. maxima in the diet at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, 20 or 30% (w/w) for 13 weeks. The alga ingestion had no effect on behavior, food and water intake, growth or survival. Terminal values in hematology and clinical chemistry did not reveal differences between treated and control groups. However, male and female mice showed significant changes in serum cholesterol levels at 20 and 30% algal concentrations, but a toxic effect of S. maxima was excluded. Post-mortem examination revealed no differences in gross or microscopic findings. Our results show that S. maxima up to high feeding levels did not produce adverse effects in mice after subchronic treatment.

  8. Histopathology of Incidental Findings in Beagles Used in Toxicity Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Junko; Doi, Takuya; Wako, Yumi; Hamamura, Masao; Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Narama, Isao

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our publication is to widely communicate the pictures of spontaneous findings occurring in beagles. Spontaneous arteritis occurs commonly in beagles. Frequent sites of arteritis are the heart, spleen, pancreas, epididymis and spinal cord. Morphological similarities between spontaneous and drug-induced arterial lesions may cause confusion when evaluating vascular toxicity of chemicals such as vasodilating agents. Focal and minimal inflammatory lesions are occasionally seen in the lung and may be associated with aspiration of food particles or of unknown causes. A cystic change with copious mucin production occurs occasionally in the mucosal epithelium of the gall bladder. Nesidioblastosis is seen rarely in the pancreas of beagles. C-cell complex and lymphocytic thyroiditis are common thyroid lesions. Spontaneous focal hypospermatogenesis and lobular Sertoli-cell-only seminiferous tubules occurring frequently in beagles must be distinguished from drug-induced damage of the seminiferous tubules in toxicity studies. The morphological differences of the female genital system in each cycle need to be understood; therefore, we present the normal features of the cyclic changes of the female genital organs. Further, we provide more information on spontaneous findings in beagles for exact diagnoses in toxicity studies. PMID:22481862

  9. Further study of the genetic toxicity of gentian violet.

    PubMed

    Au, W; Butler, M A; Bloom, S E; Matney, T S

    1979-02-01

    The genetic toxicity of gentian violet was studied with the Ames and the Rosenkranz bacterial assays as well as the cytogenetic assays (Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro in the presence of rat-liver S-9 fractions, the chicken-embryo and mouse-bone-marrow cells in vivo). Gentian violet was found to be toxic but not mutagenic in the Ames assay. However, it was active in the Rosenkranz assay causing reparable DNA damage. The presence of S-9 in the in vitro cytogenetic assay and in the bacterial assays showed that the activity of gentian violet could be reduced or eliminated. In the in vivo assays, gentian violet was not clastogenic and failed to induce sister-chromatid exchanges. However, gentian violet proved to be highly toxic to growing chick embryos at high dosage and depressed mitotic activities in mouse bone marrow after prolonged treatment. Our study suggested that gentian violet can be inactivated by the liver detoxification system. However, it is potentially hazardous to cells that are exposed to the dye directly (e.g. skin epithelium and cell lining of the gastrointestinal tract).

  10. Subacute (90 days) oral toxicity studies of Kombucha tea.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Singh, M; Rao, P V; Bhattacharya, R; Kumar, P; Sugendran, K; Kumar, O; Pant, S C; Singh, R

    2000-12-01

    Kombucha tea (KT) is a popular health beverage and is used as an alternative therapy. KT is prepared by placing the kombucha culture in solution of tea and sugar and allowing to ferment. The inoculum is a fungus consisting of symbiotic colony of yeast and bacteria. KT is consumed in several countries and is believed to have prophylactic and therapeutic benefits in a wide variety of ailments, viz., intestinal disorders, arthritis, ageing and stimulation of immunological system. Though KT is used in several parts of the world its beneficial effects and adverse effects have not been scientifically evaluated. Since there are no animal toxicological data on KT, subacute oral toxicity study was carried out. Five groups of rats were maintained: (a) control group given tap water orally, (b) KT given 2 ml/kg orally, (c) plain tea (PT) given 2 ml/kg orally, (d) KT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v) and (e) PT given in drinking water, 1% (v/v). The rats were given this treatment daily for a period of 90 days. Weekly records of weight, feed intake, water intake and general behaviour were monitored. There was no significant difference in the growth of the animals as evidenced by the progressive body weight change. The organ to body weight ratio and histological evaluation did not show any toxic signs. The haematological and biochemical variables were within the clinical limits. The study indicates that rats fed KT for 90 days showed no toxic effects.

  11. Relationship between coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity and mitochondrial function in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Fujii, Wataru; Hori, Hisako; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Kiyokazu

    2016-04-01

    The manifestation of coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity may differ and depends on the frequency of administration to rats. A single coumarin dose induces hepatocellular necrosis while repeated doses induce only hepatocyte degeneration. However, the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Therefore, we investigated the mechanism of coumarin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Coumarin was administered to male rats as a single dose or for 4 consecutive days, and samples were obtained 4 or 24 h after a single dose or 24 h after the repeated doses. A single coumarin dose significantly induced hepatocellular necrosis in rats; however, toxicity was attenuated after repeated dosing. With a single dose, hepatocellular necrosis was preceded by increased mitochondrial number and size and decreased mitochondrial function. An increased expression of granular cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 protein was observed in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of coumarin-treated rats compared to the expression in the untreated controls. Nevertheless, repeated dosing showed mitochondrial function that was equivalent to that of the control while enlarged CYP2E1 protein droplets were distributed outside the mitochondria. These results suggest that mitochondrial function and CYP2E1 expression might be involved in coumarin-induced hepatocellular toxicity in rats. A reduction in mitochondrial CYP2E1 might be implicated in the acquisition of coumarin resistance after repeated doses.

  12. Review of toxicity studies performed on an underground coal gasification condensate water

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, F.P.

    1987-09-01

    Three studies related to the toxicity of underground coal gasification (UCG) waters have bee conducted: (1) toxicity study of UCG water and its fractions as determined by the Microtox test, (2) toxicity study of biotreated UCG water as determined by the Microtox test, and (3) toxicity study of UCG water to macroinvertebrates. The results of these studies are summarized herein. The gas condensate water from the UCG process is extremely toxic as determined by assays with photoluminescent bacteria (Microtox), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates (mayflies), and Daphnia magna (water flea). Microtox bioassays reveal that the toxic components of the water reside in both the organophilic and hydrophilic fractions, although the organophilic fraction is notably more toxic. A sequential treatment process reduced the toxicity of the UCG water, as measured by the Microtox test. Solvent extraction (to remove phenols) followed by ammonia stripping yielded a less toxic water. Additional treatment by activated sludge further reduced toxicity. Finally, the addition of powdered activated carbon to the activated sludge yielded the least toxic water. A bioassay technique was developed for lotic (running water) macroinvertebrates (Drunella doddsi and Iron longimanus). The toxicity results were compared with results from the traditional test animal, Daphnia magna. Short-term exposures to the UCG waters were more toxic to Daphnia magna than to Drunella doddsi or Iron longimanus, although the toxicity values begin to merge with longer test exposure. The greater toxicity seems to be related to a thinner exoskeleton. 26 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Translational research into species differences of endocrine toxicity via steroidogenesis inhibition by SMP-028 — For human safety in clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizato, Yohei; Imai, Satoki; Okahashi, Noriko; Yabunaka, Atsushi; Kunimatsu, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Yabuki, Masashi

    2014-05-01

    SMP-028 is a drug candidate developed for the treatment of asthma. In a 13-week repeated dose toxicity study of SMP-028 in rats and monkeys, differences of endocrine toxicological events between rats and monkeys were observed. In rats, these toxicological events mainly consisted of pathological changes in the adrenal, testis, ovary, and the other endocrine-related organs. On the other hand, in monkeys, no toxicological events were observed. The goal of this study is to try to understand the reason why only rats, but not monkeys, showed toxicological events following treatment with SMP-028 and to eventually predict the possible toxicological effect of this compound on human endocrine organs. Our results show that SMP-028 inhibits neutral cholesterol esterase more strongly than other steroidogenic enzymes in rats. Although SMP-028 also inhibits monkeys and human neutral cholesterol esterase, this inhibition is much weaker than that of rat neutral cholesterol esterase. These results indicate (1) that the difference in endocrine toxicological events between rats and monkeys is mainly due to inhibition of steroidogenesis by SMP-028 in rats, not in monkeys, and (2) that SMP-028 may not affect steroidogenesis in humans and therefore might cause no endocrine toxicological events in clinical studies. - Highlights: • SMP-028 inhibits neutral CEase more strongly than other steroidogenic enzymes in rats. • Inhibition of neutral CEase in rats by SMP-028 suppresses steroidogenesis in vivo. • SMP-028 does not inhibit neutral CEase in monkeys in vivo. • Steroidogenesis pathway in monkeys treated with SMP-028 was not suppressed. • SMP-028 may not inhibit LIPE in humans in vivo.

  14. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm).

    PubMed

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2014-06-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus test. To assess the repeated dose toxicity, the powder was administered once daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The parameters which were applied to the study were mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings and histopathologic examination. The freezedried powder of T. molitor larvae was not mutagenic or clastogenic based on results of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Furthermore, no treatment-related changes or findings were observed in any parameters in rats after 28 days oral administration. In conclusion, the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae was considered to be non-genotoxic and the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) was determined to be 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of SD rats under our experimental conditions.

  15. Evaluation of Genotoxicity and 28-day Oral Dose Toxicity on Freeze-dried Powder of Tenebrio molitor Larvae (Yellow Mealworm)

    PubMed Central

    Han, So-Ri; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae Sam; Jeong, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The larval form of Tenebrio molitor (T. molitor) has been eaten in many countries and provides benefits as a new food source of protein for humans. However, no information exists regarding its safety for humans. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxicity and repeated dose oral toxicity of the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae. The genotoxic potential was evaluated by a standard battery testing: bacterial reverse mutation test, in vitro chromosome aberration test, and in vivo micronucleus test. To assess the repeated dose toxicity, the powder was administered once daily by oral gavage to Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats at dose levels of 0, 300, 1000 and 3000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. The parameters which were applied to the study were mortality, clinical signs, body and organ weights, food consumption, ophthalmology, urinalysis, hematology, serum chemistry, gross findings and histopathologic examination. The freezedried powder of T. molitor larvae was not mutagenic or clastogenic based on results of in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assays. Furthermore, no treatment-related changes or findings were observed in any parameters in rats after 28 days oral administration. In conclusion, the freeze-dried powder of T. molitor larvae was considered to be non-genotoxic and the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) was determined to be 3000 mg/kg/day in both sexes of SD rats under our experimental conditions. PMID:25071922

  16. Pulmonary Toxicity Studies of Lunar Dust in Rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Chiu-Wing; James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    NASA has been contemplating returning astronauts to the moon for long-duration habitation and research and using it as a stepping-stone to Mars. Other spacefaring nations are planning to send humans to the moon for the first time. The surface of the moon is covered by a layer of fine dust. Fine terrestrial dusts, if inhaled, are known to pose a health risk to humans. Some Apollo crews briefly exposed to moon dust that adhered to spacesuits and became airborne in the Lunar Module reported eye and throat irritation. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle or outpost would inevitably become contaminated with lunar dust. To assess the health risks of exposure of humans to airborne lunar dust, we evaluated the toxicity of Apollo 14 moon dust in animal lungs. Studies of the pulmonary toxicity of a dust are generally first done by intratracheal instillation (ITI) of aqueous suspensions of the test dust into the lungs of rodents. If a test dust is irritating or cytotoxic to the lungs, the alveolar macrophages, after phagocytizing the dust particles, will release cellular messengers to recruit white blood cells (WBCs) and to induce dilation of blood capillary walls to make them porous, allowing the WBCs to gain access to the alveolar space. The dilation of capillary walls also allows serum proteins and water entering the lung. Besides altering capillary integrity, a toxic dust can also directly kill the cells that come into contact with it or ingest it, after which the dead cells would release their contents, including lactate dehydrogenase (a common enzyme marker of cell death or tissue damage). In the treated animals, we lavaged the lungs 1 and 4 weeks after the dust instillation and measured the concentrations of these biomarkers of toxicity in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluids to determine the toxicity of the dust. To assess whether the inflammation and cellular injury observed in the biomarker study would lead to persistent or progressive histopathological

  17. Toxicity study of Lauha Bhasma (calcined iron) in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Namrata; Dash, Manoj Kumar; Dwivedi, Laxmikant; Khilnani, G D

    2016-01-01

    Lauha Bhasma (LB) is a complex herbomineral preparation widely used as an Ayurvedic hematinic agent. It is an effective remedy for chronic fever (jīrṇa jvara), phthisis (kṣaya), Breathlessness (śvāsa) etc., and possesses vitality enhancing (vājīkara), strength promoting and anti aging (rasāyana) properties. The present work was conducted to establish the safety aspects of the use of Lauha bhasma. LB was prepared by Ayurvedic procedures of purification (śodhana), sun drying (bhānupāka), sthālīpāka, followed by repeated calcination (māraṇa) and "nectarization" (amṛtīkaraṇa). The resultant product was subjected to acute and sub acute toxicity studies. Acute and subacute toxicity study of LB was conducted in albino rats. Criteria for assessment included ponderal changes, change in biochemical parameters viz., LFT and KFT and hematological parameters. Histopathological studies of different organs including liver, kidney, spleen, testis etc., were also conducted to observe pathological changes if any. In the acute toxicity study, the animal group did not manifest any signs of toxicity and no mortality was observed up to 100 times the therapeutic dose (TD). Significant increase in blood urea (27.83%, P < 0.01), serum creatinine (30.92%, P < 0.05), Aspartate aminotransferase (15.09%, P < 0.05), and serum alkaline phosphatase (27.5%, P < 0.01) was evident in group IV (10 TD). A significant increase in serum total protein (6.04%, P < 0.05) level was observed in group III (5 TD). Histopathological examination of livers in group IV (10 TD) showed mild inflammation in terms of bile stasis, peri-portal hepatic inflammation and sinusoidal congestion; lymphocyte infiltration in kidney and intracellular deposits in the splenic tissue. Lauha Bhasma was found to be safe at the therapeutic dose and also at five times the therapeutic dose levels. However, alteration in some of the biochemical and haematological parameters along with histopathological findings

  18. Toxicity study of Lauha Bhasma (calcined iron) in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Namrata; Dash, Manoj Kumar; Dwivedi, Laxmikant; Khilnani, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lauha Bhasma (LB) is a complex herbomineral preparation widely used as an Ayurvedic hematinic agent. It is an effective remedy for chronic fever (jīrṇa jvara), phthisis (kṣaya), Breathlessness (śvāsa) etc., and possesses vitality enhancing (vājīkara), strength promoting and anti aging (rasāyana) properties. Objectives: The present work was conducted to establish the safety aspects of the use of Lauha bhasma. Setting and Design: LB was prepared by Ayurvedic procedures of purification (śodhana), sun drying (bhānupāka), sthālīpāka, followed by repeated calcination (māraṇa) and “nectarization” (amṛtīkaraṇa). The resultant product was subjected to acute and sub acute toxicity studies. Materials and Methods: Acute and subacute toxicity study of LB was conducted in albino rats. Criteria for assessment included ponderal changes, change in biochemical parameters viz., LFT and KFT and hematological parameters. Histopathological studies of different organs including liver, kidney, spleen, testis etc., were also conducted to observe pathological changes if any. Results: In the acute toxicity study, the animal group did not manifest any signs of toxicity and no mortality was observed up to 100 times the therapeutic dose (TD). Significant increase in blood urea (27.83%, P < 0.01), serum creatinine (30.92%, P < 0.05), Aspartate aminotransferase (15.09%, P < 0.05), and serum alkaline phosphatase (27.5%, P < 0.01) was evident in group IV (10 TD). A significant increase in serum total protein (6.04%, P < 0.05) level was observed in group III (5 TD). Histopathological examination of livers in group IV (10 TD) showed mild inflammation in terms of bile stasis, peri-portal hepatic inflammation and sinusoidal congestion; lymphocyte infiltration in kidney and intracellular deposits in the splenic tissue. Conclusion: Lauha Bhasma was found to be safe at the therapeutic dose and also at five times the therapeutic dose levels. However, alteration in

  19. Toxicity Studies of Ethyl Maltol and Iron Complexes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Jieli; Wu, Chonghui; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nan, Ruipeng; Du, Ruochen; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl maltol and iron complexes are products of ethyl maltol and the iron found in the cooking pots used to prepare the Chinese dish, hot-pot. Because their safety is undocumented, the toxicity study of ethyl maltol and iron complexes was conducted in male and female Kunming (KM) mice. The animal study was designed based on the preliminary study conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD50). The doses used in the study were 0, 1/81, 1/27, 1/9, and 1/3 of the LD50 (mg kg body weight (BW)−1 day−1) dissolved in the water. The oral LD50 of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 743.88 mg kg BW−1 in mice. The ethyl maltol and iron complexes targeted the endocrine organs including the liver and kidneys following the 90 D oral exposure. Based on the haematological data, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 1/81 LD50 (9.18 mg kg BW−1 day−1) in both male and female mice. Therefore, we suggest that alternative strategies for preparing the hot-pot, including the use of non-Fe-based cookware, need to be developed and encouraged to avoid the formation of the potentially toxic complexes. PMID:28197411

  20. Toxicity Studies of Ethyl Maltol and Iron Complexes in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Lu, Jieli; Wu, Chonghui; Pang, Quanhai; Zhu, Zhiwei; Nan, Ruipeng; Du, Ruochen; Chen, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Ethyl maltol and iron complexes are products of ethyl maltol and the iron found in the cooking pots used to prepare the Chinese dish, hot-pot. Because their safety is undocumented, the toxicity study of ethyl maltol and iron complexes was conducted in male and female Kunming (KM) mice. The animal study was designed based on the preliminary study conducted to determine the median lethal dose (LD50). The doses used in the study were 0, 1/81, 1/27, 1/9, and 1/3 of the LD50 (mg kg body weight (BW)(-1) day(-1)) dissolved in the water. The oral LD50 of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 743.88 mg kg BW(-1) in mice. The ethyl maltol and iron complexes targeted the endocrine organs including the liver and kidneys following the 90 D oral exposure. Based on the haematological data, the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of the ethyl maltol and iron complexes was determined to be 1/81 LD50 (9.18 mg kg BW(-1) day(-1)) in both male and female mice. Therefore, we suggest that alternative strategies for preparing the hot-pot, including the use of non-Fe-based cookware, need to be developed and encouraged to avoid the formation of the potentially toxic complexes.

  1. GENE INDUCTION STUDIES AND TOXICITY OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its mixtures program the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) supports in vitro and limited in vivo toxicity testing to further our understanding of the toxicity and health effects of chemical mixtures. There are increasing concerns that environment...

  2. GENE INDUCTION STUDIES AND TOXICITY OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its mixtures program the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) supports in vitro and limited in vivo toxicity testing to further our understanding of the toxicity and health effects of chemical mixtures. There are increasing concerns that environment...

  3. Acute oral toxicity testing: Scientific evidence and practicability should govern Three Rs activities.

    PubMed

    Buesen, Roland; Oberholz, Uwe; Sauer, Ursula G; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Acute oral toxicity is determined for regulatory hazard classification or non-classification. The European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM) recommends the following modules for acute oral toxicity testing: a) the use of the in vitro 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) test to identify substances not requiring classification and to estimate starting doses for in vivo acute oral toxicity studies; and b) the use of data from sub-acute toxicity studies to identify substances not requiring classification. However, the application of these modules in a regulatory context would require a predefined, validated and formally accepted testing strategy and data interpretation procedure, which are not available. Furthermore, the application of the 3T3 NRU assay for starting dose estimations could in fact increase the number of animals used. Finally, only very few substances exist for which data from sub-acute or other repeated dose studies are available, but data from acute studies are not. Therefore, in practice, the prediction of acute toxicity by using sub-acute toxicity data is generally irrelevant. It could even lead to a risk of overdosing in the range-finding study, which may result in the death of many or all of the animals used. 2016 FRAME.

  4. Acute toxicity studies of aqueous leaf extract of Phyllanthus niruri

    PubMed Central

    Asare, George Awuku; Addo, Phyllis; Bugyei, Kwasi; Gyan, Ben; Adjei, Samuel; Otu-Nyarko, Lydia Serwaa; Wiredu, Edwin Kwame; Nyarko, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Phyllanthus niruri is a plant with medicinal properties. It is often used to treat mild malaria and the elimination of renal stones. However, studies on its toxicity are scarce. The study was carried out to determine if the aqueous leaf extract of P. niruri administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats would illicit evidence of toxicity. Fifteen female rats weighing 150–200 g were divided into 3 groups. Rats in Group 1 were given a single low dose (LD) of 2000 mg/kg b.w. of the extract by oral gavage within 24 hrs. Rats in Group 2 were given a single high dose (HD) of 5000 mg/kg b.w. of the extract by oral gavage within 24 hrs. Rats in Group 3 were not given any extract but drinking water and served as the control group (C). All the rats were observed for signs of toxidromes for 14 days. On the 15th day, all the rats were sacrificed. Body organs were harvested for macroscopic examination. Urine and blood samples were drawn and analyzed. Hematological tests performed included full blood count and hemoglobin. Biochemical examinations included bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, albumin, globulin, alkaline phosphatse (ALP), γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), urea, and creatinine. The results of the three groups were not significantly different. Examination of the various body organs did not show any abnormality. Thus no toxicity was observed at the levels administered. The LD50 of the aqueous extract is>5000 mg/kg. b.w. PMID:22319255

  5. Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity Study of n-pentane in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Kyu; Cho, Hae-Won; Han, Jeong-Hee; Lee, Sung-Bae; Chung, Yong-Hyun; Rim, Kyung-Taek; Yang, Jeong-Sun

    2012-09-01

    This study was conducted in order to obtain information concerning the health hazards that may result from a 13 week inhalation exposure of n-pentane in Sprague-Dawley rats. This study was conducted in accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines for the testing of chemicals No. 413 'Subchronic inhalation toxicity: 90-day study (as revised in 2009)'. The rats were divided into 4 groups (10 male and 10 female rats in each group), and were exposed to 0, 340, 1,530, and 6,885 ppm n-pentane in each exposure chamber for 6 hour/day, 5 days/week, for 13 weeks. All of the rats were sacrificed at the end of the treatment period. During the test period, clinical signs, mortality, body weights, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, locomotion activity, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, organ weights, and histopathology were assessed. During the period of testing, there were no treatment related effects on the clinical findings, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, relative organ weight, and histopathological findings. The no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of n-pentane is evaluated as being more than 6,885 ppm (20.3 mg/L) in both male and female rats. n-pentane was not a classified specific target organ toxicity in the globally harmonized classification system (GHS).

  6. Subchronic Inhalation Toxicity Study of n-pentane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hae-Won; Han, Jeong-Hee; Lee, Sung-Bae; Chung, Yong-Hyun; Rim, Kyung-Taek; Yang, Jeong-Sun

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted in order to obtain information concerning the health hazards that may result from a 13 week inhalation exposure of n-pentane in Sprague-Dawley rats. Methods This study was conducted in accordance with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines for the testing of chemicals No. 413 'Subchronic inhalation toxicity: 90-day study (as revised in 2009)'. The rats were divided into 4 groups (10 male and 10 female rats in each group), and were exposed to 0, 340, 1,530, and 6,885 ppm n-pentane in each exposure chamber for 6 hour/day, 5 days/week, for 13 weeks. All of the rats were sacrificed at the end of the treatment period. During the test period, clinical signs, mortality, body weights, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, locomotion activity, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, organ weights, and histopathology were assessed. Results During the period of testing, there were no treatment related effects on the clinical findings, body weight, food consumption, ophthalmoscopy, urinalysis, hematology, serum biochemistry, gross findings, relative organ weight, and histopathological findings. Conclusion The no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of n-pentane is evaluated as being more than 6,885 ppm (20.3 mg/L) in both male and female rats. n-pentane was not a classified specific target organ toxicity in the globally harmonized classification system (GHS). PMID:23019535

  7. Phase I study of the combination of two hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, Ro 03-8799 and SR-2508: toxicity and pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, H.F.; Bleehen, N.M.; Workman, P.

    1986-07-01

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizer Ro 03-8799 produces acute central nervous system toxicity which limits repeated doses of the drug to 0.75 g/m/sup 2/, but peripheral neuropathy does not occur. SR-2508 causes no acute effects at doses greater than 3.0 g/m/sup 2/, but causes peripheral neuropathy at cumulative doses of 30 g/m/sup 2/. By combining maximum tolerated doses of each agent, it may be possible to increase efficacy, but not toxicity. Escalating single doses of Ro 03-8799 and SR-2508 were administered to 10 patients. The drugs were infused together in 50 ml of 0.9% saline over 10 min, beginning at 0.5 g/m/sup 2/ of each agent, and proceeding to a fixed dose of 0.75 g/m/sup 2/ Ro 03-8799 with 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 g/m/sup 2/ SR-2508. Four patients experienced the expected acute syndrome related to Ro 03-8799, but the incidence was not increased by escalating doses of SR-2508, and no peripheral neuropathy was seen. Plasma and urine pharmacokinetic studies showed that no drug interaction occurred. Six patients have been given a 9-dose regime over a 3 week period, using 0.75 g/m/sup 2/ Ro 03-8799 and escalating doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 g/m2 SR-2508. All exhibited the expected acute side effects related to Ro 03-8799, but with no increase at the higher doses of SR-2508. No other toxicity was seen. Plasma pharmacokinetics performed at the beginning and end of the schedule were similar. Biopsies were taken from six superficial tumors following combined radiosensitizer administration. Mean tumor concentrations over the 30 min following the end of infusion were 30 and 72 micrograms/g for Ro 03-8799 and SR-2508, respectively. These values would be expected to translate into an approximate single dose sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.5 to 1.6, offering a significant gain over the enhancement possible with the drugs given alone.

  8. Oral toxicological studies of pueraria flower extract: acute toxicity study in mice and subchronic toxicity study in rats.

    PubMed

    Takano, Akira; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Tsubata, Masahito; Ikeguchi, Motoya; Takagaki, Kinya; Kinjo, Junei

    2013-11-01

    Kudzu has been widely used as an herbal medicine in China. The root of the kudzu is also well known as an antipyretic and analgesic in treatment of the common cold, while its flower has been used to treat alcohol intoxication, alcohol abuse, and dysentery. Pueraria flower extract (PFE) is a hot water extract derived from the flower of the kudzu, Pueraria thomsonii Benth. (Fabaceae), oral intake of which exhibits anti-obesity properties in mice and humans. In this study, we conducted acute and subchronic toxicity studies for an evaluation of safety. In the acute study, PFE (5 g/kg body weight) was orally administered to ddY mice. For 14 d after administration, no deaths or abnormal changes were observed in general signs, body weight (BW), or food consumption, and no abnormal findings were observed in the major organs and tissues of either males or females at necropsy. The oral LD50 of PFE was therefore estimated to be higher than 5 g/kg BW. In the subchronic study, PFE was mixed into the diet in place of powdered CRF-1 and administered at concentrations of 0% (control), 0.5%, 1.5%, and 5.0% to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats for 90 d. No mortality or toxicological changes were observed during the experimental period. Blood biochemical, hematological, and urinary parameters revealed no toxicologically significant changes. Furthermore, no anatomical or histopathological changes due to PFE were observed. The no-observed adverse-effect-level of PFE was thus estimated to be 5.0% in the diet (male: 3.0 g/kg BW/d; female: 3.5 g/kg BW/d).

  9. Studies of the toxic interactions of disinfection by-products.

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, R D; Bercz, J P; Wessendarp, T K; Condie, L W

    1986-01-01

    A large number and variety of compounds are formed in the process of chlorinating drinking water. The classes of compounds formed include trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, halophenols, and halopropanones. Many of the compounds have been shown to be toxic and are currently being further evaluated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). One group of the halopropanones found in chlorinated drinking water is the dichloropropanones. The toxicological properties of this group have not been well characterized. In addition, a number of investigators have shown that ketones potentiate the hepatotoxicity of haloalkanes. We conducted a series of studies to explore both the toxicity of the dichloropropanones and their potential interactions with a well-characterized haloalkane, carbon tetrachloride. A variety of toxicological and biochemical endpoints were used to evaluate the toxicity of the dichloropropanones and their interaction with CCl4, including cytochrome P-450 concentration, reduced glutathione levels, pentane generation, serum enzyme activities, and histopathology. Administration of 1,1-dichloropropanone (DCP) resulted in elevated serum enzymes associated with periportal necrosis. Glutathione levels were reduced by the administration of 1,1-DCP; pentane generation was not increased. When 1,1-DCP was given prior to CCl4, the data were consistent with additivity. Administration of 1,3-DCP did not result in elevated serum enzymes, nor was there histopathologic evidence of necrosis. Glutathione levels and pentane generation in the 1,3-DCP-treated groups were the same as those of controls. Inhibition of the toxicologic effects of CCl4 in a dose-related manner was observed when 1,3-DCP was administered prior to CCl4. PMID:3816723

  10. Subchronic toxicity study of corn silk with rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuina; Zhang, Tiehua; Liu, Jun; Lu, Shuang; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Erlei; Wang, Zuozhao; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Jingbo

    2011-09-01

    Corn silk is a traditional herbal medicine in China, which has been used in many parts of the world for the treatment of edema as well as for cystitis, gout, kidney stones, nephritis, prostatitis and similar ailments. However, there is little scientific evidence about its safety. As a part of its safety assessment, a subchronic toxicity was performed in this paper. The subchronic toxicity was investigated in male and female Wistar rats by dietary administration at concentrations of 0.5%, 2.0% and 8.0% (w/w) for 90 days. Overall health, body weight, food consumption, hematology, blood chemistry, organ weights, gross and microscopic appearance of tissues were compared between test and control groups. A number of significant differences were seen between groups, but none of them was considered to be adverse. Based on the present study, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of corn silk is at least 8.0% which corresponds to a mean daily corn silk intake of approximately 9.354 and 10.308 g/day/kg body weight for males and females, respectively. The results obtained in the present study suggest that consumption of corn silk has no adverse effects and support the safety of corn silk for humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of chronic toxicology studies in revealing new toxicities.

    PubMed

    Galijatovic-Idrizbegovic, Alema; Miller, Judith E; Cornell, Wendy D; Butler, James A; Wollenberg, Gordon K; Sistare, Frank D; DeGeorge, Joseph J

    2016-12-01

    Chronic (>3 months) preclinical toxicology studies are conducted to support the safe conduct of clinical trials exceeding 3 months in duration. We have conducted a review of 32 chronic toxicology studies in non-rodents (22 studies in dogs and 10 in non-human primates) and 27 chronic toxicology studies in rats dosed with Merck compounds to determine the frequency at which additional target organ toxicities are observed in chronic toxicology studies as compared to subchronic studies of 3 months in duration. Our review shows that majority of the findings are observed in the subchronic studies since additional target organs were not observed in 24 chronic non rodent studies and in 21 chronic rodent studies. However, 6 studies in non rodents and 6 studies in rodents yielded new findings that were not seen in studies of 3-month or shorter duration. For 3 compounds the new safety findings did contribute to termination of clinical development plans. Although the incidence of compound termination associated with chronic toxicology study observations is low (∼10%), the observations made in these studies can be important for evaluating human safety risk.

  12. Biochemical studies on the toxicity of slate mine dust.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M F; Jaffery, F N; Ali, S; Rahman, Q

    1983-01-01

    As part of a detailed experimental study of the pathogenicity of disease of slate dust workers, the early biochemical changes in rat lung from 1 to 90 days after intratracheal inoculation of slate dust of particle size below 5 micron were investigated. A severalfold increase in free cell population (initially macrophages) was elicited by the dust. The free activity of acid phosphatase tended to increase along with a break of lysosomal latency with increasing exposure period. However, actual release of enzyme activity into the acellular fraction was low. The phospholipid content varied both in cellular and acellular fractions, indicating altered turnover of membrane lipids and surfactants. At advanced periods of the study, sialic was found to be released into the acellular fraction, indicating membrane damage. Considerable decrease in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and free sulfhydryl content and enhanced osmotic fragility of erythrocytes were also recorded. These results indicate the potential toxicity of slate mine dust. PMID:6641660

  13. Study designs for the nonclinical safety testing of new vaccine products.

    PubMed

    Forster, Roy

    2012-07-01

    During the development of a new vaccine, the purpose of nonclinical studies is to provide safety information to support the clinical development and licensure of the product. In this article the study designs currently accepted for the nonclinical safety testing of new vaccines are described for single dose, local tolerance, repeat dose toxicity and safety pharmacology studies; these studies together form the basis of a typical nonclinical safety evaluation dossier. The detailed design of the preclinical package must take account of the intended clinical use, patient population, route of administration, formulation, dose level and immunisation schedule. The test item that is used for these studies must be adequately representative of the intended clinical formulation. The animal model used for these studies must be selected on criteria of relevance. Single dose toxicity studies provide information on acute actions or the potential effect of accidental overdose, but this information is often available from the repeat dose toxicity study, obviating the need for the acute study. Local tolerance studies provide information on tissue reactions at the site of administration. Evaluation of the findings must distinguish between normal tissue responses to injected material and findings indicative of undesirable pathological changes. The repeated dose toxicity studies are the principal studies that support the safety profile of the vaccines. The design of these studies must take full account of the features of the vaccine in the choice of treatment regime, dose levels, pharmacodynamic monitoring and timing of investigations and sacrifice. Safety pharmacology studies are performed to evaluate the potential for undesirable secondary pharmacological actions of vaccines if there is data to suggest that such studies are needed; this evaluation is made on a case by case basis. In the absence of specific guidance the design of studies for therapeutic vaccines follows the same

  14. Toxicity and toxicokinetics of metformin in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Quaile, Michael P.; Melich, David H.; Jordan, Holly L.; Nold, James B.; Chism, Jack P.; Polli, Joseph W.; Smith, Glenn A.; Rhodes, Melissa C.

    2010-03-15

    Metformin is a first-line drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is often prescribed in combination with other drugs to control a patient's blood glucose level and achieve their HbA1c goal. New treatment options for T2D will likely include fixed dose combinations with metformin, which may require preclinical combination toxicology studies. To date, there are few published reports evaluating the toxicity of metformin alone to aid in the design of these studies. Therefore, to understand the toxicity of metformin alone, Crl:CD(SD) rats were administered metformin at 0, 200, 600, 900 or 1200 mg/kg/day by oral gavage for 13 weeks. Administration of >= 900 mg/kg/day resulted in moribundity/mortality and clinical signs of toxicity. Other adverse findings included increased incidence of minimal necrosis with minimal to slight inflammation of the parotid salivary gland for males given 1200 mg/kg/day, body weight loss and clinical signs in rats given >= 600 mg/kg/day. Metformin was also associated with evidence of minimal metabolic acidosis (increased serum lactate and beta-hydroxybutyric acid and decreased serum bicarbonate and urine pH) at doses >= 600 mg/kg/day. There were no significant sex differences in mean AUC{sub 0-24} or C{sub max} nor were there significant differences in mean AUC{sub 0-24} or C{sub max} following repeated dosing compared to a single dose. The no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) was 200 mg/kg/day (mean AUC{sub 0-24} = 41.1 mug h/mL; mean C{sub max} = 10.3 mug/mL based on gender average week 13 values). These effects should be taken into consideration when assessing potential toxicities of metformin in fixed dose combinations.

  15. Immunochemical and proton magnetic resonance studies of toxic venom proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Immunochemical responses of a number of pit viper venoms to antibodies derived separately from the acidic and basic subunits of Mojave toxin isolated from the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus were investigated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Ouchterlony immunodiffusion. The three-dimensional solution structure of myotoxin a isolated from the venom of Crotalus viridis viridis was studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Assignment of many resonance lines to their corresponding protons enabled detection of several residue specific interactions implicating existence of a three-dimensional structural feature of the molecule which is probably important to toxic activity. Finally, a computer program is presented that calculates the three-dimensional structure of a protein from dihedral angles and allows viewing of projections of the calculated structures on a standard display. This program is unique in that it is designed to operate on the microcomputers of the IBM PC family.

  16. A study of the toxicity of imidocarb dipropionate in cattle.

    PubMed

    Adams, L G; Corrier, D E; Williams, J D

    1980-03-01

    The toxic effects of imidocarb dipropionate (3,3'-bis[2-imidazolin-2-yl] carbanilide dipropionate) were studied in calves injected twice intramuscularly with 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg dosages. Transient, dosage dependent signs of toxicosis consisted of excessive salivation, serous nasal discharge, diarrhoea and dyspnoea. Elevations in blood urea nitrogen concentrations and serum glutamic oxalacetic transaminase activities were related to dosage and markedly increased at the high dosage. Renal hyperaemia, hepatomegaly, pulmonary congestion and oedema, hydrothorax, hydroperitoneum, hydropericardium and mortality occurred at the 20 mg/kg dosage. Microscopic lesions observed at the high dosage included acute severe renal tubular necrosis and focal hepatocellular necrosis. Injection site reactions varied from microscopic areas of necrotising myositis at the 5 mg/kg dosage to focal grossly visible areas of necrosis, encapsulated by granulation tissue and surrounded by fascial oedema at the 20 mg/kg dosage.

  17. Maternal and developmental toxicity study of sodium azide in rats.

    PubMed

    Faqi, Ali S; Richards, Douglas; Hauswirth, Judith W; Schroeder, Raymond

    2008-11-01

    Sodium azide (NaN(3)) is being proposed for use as an active ingredient to control a broad spectrum of soil borne pathogens including insects, weeds, nematodes, fungi, and bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the maternal and developmental toxicity of NaN(3) in rats. Sperm-positive Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with NaN(3) via oral gavage once daily from Gestation Day (GD) 6 through 19 at respective dose levels of 0, 1, 5, and 17.5mg/kg/day. From GD 10-12, the high-dose was reduced to 10mg/kg/day due to maternal mortality. Cesarean section was performed on GD 20 and implantation and resorptions sites, live and dead fetuses were counted. Fetuses were weighed, sexed externally and processed for gross external, visceral and skeletal examinations. A high rate of maternal mortality; reduced gestation body weight, gestation body weight changes and food consumption; decreased corrected body weight and corrected weight gain were observed at 17.5/10mg/kg/day. Fetal weight was also reduced at 17.5/10mg/kg/day. There were no maternal deaths, clinical signs or body weight effects that were considered related to NaN(3) at 1 and 5mg/kg/day. No increase in the incidence of malformations and variations were observed at any of the doses evaluated. Based on the results of this study, the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) and the Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) for maternal and developmental toxicity of NaN(3) in rats were considered to be 5 and 17.5/10mg/kg/day, respectively.

  18. Metabolism and toxicity studies supporting the safety of rebaudioside D.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Andrey I; Rihner, Marisa O; Eapen, Alex K; Thomas, Jennifer A

    2013-07-01

    Rebaudioside D (Reb D) is one of the several glycosides found in the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni (Compositae) which has been identified as a potential sweetener. The metabolism of Reb A and Reb D was evaluated in various in vitro matrices (simulated gastrointestinal fluids, rat liver microsomes, and rat cecal contents) and through analysis of plasma collected from rats in a dietary toxicity study. Reb A and Reb D showed similar stability when exposed to simulated stomach and small intestine fluids, with susceptibility to hydrolytic degradation by enteric bacteria collected from the cecum. Incubations with rat liver microsomes indicated that neither compound is expected to be metabolized by the liver enzymes. Plasma concentrations of Reb D, Reb A, and/or the final hydrolysis product of each compound, free/conjugated steviol, were consistent between animals administered either Reb D or Reb A in the diet. A repeated exposure dietary toxicity study was conducted to compare the safety of Reb D, when administered at target exposure levels of 500, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw)/d to Sprague-Dawley rats for 28 days, to that of Reb A administered at a target exposure level of 2000 mg/kg bw/d. There were no treatment-related effects on the general condition and behavior of the animals and no toxicologically relevant, treatment-related effects on hematology, serum chemistry, or urinalysis. Macroscopic and microscopic findings revealed no treatment-related effects on any organ evaluated. Results were comparable between the group administered 2000 mg/kg/d Reb D and the group administered 2000 mg/kg/d Reb A.

  19. Historical control data in reproductive and developmental toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Mylchreest, Eve; Harris, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies in laboratory animals are conducted as part of the process of evaluating the risk of pharmaceuticals and chemicals to human reproduction and development. In these studies, comparison of data from groups dosed with the test article to a concurrent control group is considered the most relevant approach for the interpretation of adverse effects. However, differences between the concurrent control and treated groups may arise by chance alone, and in some instances may even appear to be dose-related. These limitations of the concurrent control group are of particular concern when interpreting fetal malformation data because malformations are rare events that can be better characterized when incidences in both concurrent control and treated groups are compared to a larger set of control values. Historical control data can be useful not only to understand the range of normal for a given endpoint but also to monitor the biological variability over time due to various external factors (e.g., genetic changes in a strain, changes at the breeding facility). It can also serve to track the performance of the laboratory and identify any changes in the data that may be the result of internal factors at the performing laboratory due to modification in animal diet, seasonal changes, or even the proficiency of the technicians in handling animals and recording fetal and offspring observations. This chapter will provide the reader with guidance on building a laboratory historical control database and applying it to the scientific interpretation of reproductive and developmental toxicity data. Information on sources of external historical control data will be provided and some perspective given on the utility of this data. A discussion of the presentation of historical control data with descriptive statistics will be accompanied by examples of tabulation of the data. Supernumerary rib will be used as an example of how historical control

  20. 40 CFR 798.4350 - Inhalation developmental toxicity study.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the potential developmental toxicity of the test substance. (2) Control group. A concurrent control... different results, both vehicle and air exposed control groups are recommended. (3) Concentration levels and...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Specific Organ/Tissue...

  1. A Study on the D. magna and V. fischeri Toxicity Relationship of Industrial Wastewater from Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, S.; Lee, S.; Chun Sang, H.; Park, T. J.; Kim, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that high concentration of TDS (total dissolved solid) in industrial effluent gives rise to the toxicity to the Daphnia magna toxicity test. D. magna is vulnerable to relatively low TDS concentration showing the 24-hr EC50 of Salinity 0.6% (as the sea salt concentration). Recently, standard mandatory toxicity testing using Daphnia magna has been used to monitor industrial effluent toxicity according to Korea standard method (Acute Toxicity Test Method of the Daphnia magna Straus (Cladocera, Crustacea), ES 04704. 1a) under regulation. Since only one acute toxicity testing is applied in the present, we are trying to introduce microbial battery for more complete toxicity assessment. In this study, the acute toxicities between daphnids and microbes were compared. The results of D. magna and Vibrio fischeri toxicity test from 165 industrial wastewater effluents showed high positive correlation. In addition, the possibility of predicting daphnia toxicity from the bacterial toxicity data amounts to 92.6% if we consider salinity effect (>5ppt) together. From this study, we found that the V. fischeri toxicity test is a powerful battery tool to assess the industrial wastewater toxicity. Here, we suggest that luminescent bacteria toxicity test be useful not only for complete toxicity assessment which can't be obtained by daphnia toxicity testing only but also for the reduction cost, time, and labor in the Korean society. Keywords : D. magna, V. fischeri, Industrial waste water, battery test Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant (15IFIP-B089908-02) from Plant Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government

  2. Safety evaluation of Se-methylselenocysteine as nutritional selenium supplement: acute toxicity, genotoxicity and subchronic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Jia, Xudong

    2014-12-01

    The significant toxicity of selenium emphasizes the need to assess the health risk of various selenocompounds as nutritional supplements. Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMC) was recently reported to be more bioactive but the toxicological effects have not been sufficiently characterized. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of SeMC and provide the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for its use in human diet. Our results demonstrated that SeMC, with the Median Lethal Dose (LD50) of 12.6 and 9.26mg/kg BW in female and male mice, was of high potent of health hazard under acute oral exposure, but a battery of tests including Ames test, micronucleus assay and mouse sperm malformation assay suggested that SeMC was not genotoxic. The repeated dose study indicated little systemic toxicity of SeMC at supernutritional levels (0.5, 0.7, 0.9mg/kg BW/day) after 90-day oral exposure. Importantly, the 95% lower confidence value of Benchmark Dose (BMDL) was estimated as 0.34mg/kg BW/day according to the elevated relative liver weight. The ADI for human was established at 3.4μg/kg BW/day. The results suggested greater safety of SeMC as a nutritional selenium supplement, but health risk needs to be further evaluated when SeMC is applied beyond this level to achieve cancer chemoprevention.

  3. Comparative culture and toxicity studies between the toxic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida and a morphologically similar cryptoperidiniopsoid dinoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Marshall; Gordon; Seaborn; Dyer; Dunstan; Seaborn

    2000-12-01

    A series of fish bioassays using cultures of the toxic dinoflagellate, Pfiesteria piscicida and a cryptoperidiniopsoid dinoflagellate indicated various degrees of toxicity for Pfiesteria piscicida and no toxicity by the cryptoperidiniopsoid. P. piscicida maintained toxicity in the presence of live fish, and this toxicity was perpetuated following a series of inoculations to other culture vessels. Differences in the onset and magnitude of the fish deaths occurred, requiring 16 days for the initial fish death when using P. piscicida from a culture that had previously been maintained on algal cells, to kills within hours when using a culture that had recently (previous day) killed fish. Autopsies of moribund fish from the test and control fish bioassays indicated a general lack of bacterial infection, which ensued following death of other autopsied fish. Moreover, bacterial comparisons of waters in the fish bioassay and control fish cultures indicated that similar bacterial concentrations were present. Neither oxygen or ammonia levels were determined to be factors in the fish death. Life stages of a cryptoperidiniopsoid dinoflagellate from Virginia estuaries were also identified, including motile zoospore, gametes, planozygote, amoebae, and cyst stages. The cryptoperidiniopsioid did not initiate fish deaths in bioassays conducted over a 14-week period at zoospore concentrations of ca. 700-800 cells ml(-1). Elemental X-ray analysis of the scales from cysts of this dinoflagellate and P. piscicida indicate that they both contain silicon. Overall, the data from this study demonstrate that the cryptoperidiniopsoid possesses several similar life stages and feeding patterns as P. piscicida, but was not toxic to fish.

  4. 78 FR 66700 - Toxic Substances Control Act Chemical Testing; Receipt of Test Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... Mammals; Bacterial Reverse Mutation Assay; Chromosomal Aberrations; Combined Repeated Dose Toxicity with... (Pseudokirchneriella of rare earth elements subcapitata); In Vitro from ore; bleaching Mammalian Chromosome leather and... Mutagenic 0592 monosodium salt (CAS No. 149-44-0). agent for textiles; Potential (Bacterial bleaching agent...

  5. Repeat-dose toxicology evaluation in cynomolgus monkeys of AVI-4658, a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug for the treatment of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sazani, Peter; Ness, Kirk P Van; Weller, Doreen L; Poage, Duane W; Palyada, Kiran; Shrewsbury, Stephen B

    2011-05-01

    AVI-4658 is a phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) drug designed to restore dystrophin expression in a subset of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Previous reports demonstrated this clinical proof-of-principle in patients with DMD following intramuscular injection of AVI-4658. This preclinical study evaluated the toxicity and toxicokinetic profile of AVI-4658 when administered either intravenously (IV) or subcutaneously (SC) to cynomolgus monkeys once weekly over 12 weeks, at doses up to the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg per injection. No drug-related effects were noted on survival, clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, opthalmoscopic or electrocardiographic evaluations, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, and macroscopic evaluations. Drug-related microscopic renal effects were dose-dependent, apparently reversible, and included basophilic granules (minimal), basophilic tubules (minimal to moderate), and tubular vacuolation (minimal to mild). These data establish the tolerability of AVI-4658 at doses up to and including the maximum feasible dose of 320 mg/kg by IV bolus or SC injection.

  6. Chronic toxicity, reproductive, and teratogenic studies of hexazinone.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, G L; Kaplan, A M

    1984-12-01

    Hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine 2,4(1H,3H)-dione; CAS 51235-04-2] was tested for oral toxicity in rats (both 90-day and 2-year feeding studies), mice (8-week and 2-year feeding studies), and dogs (90-day feeding study). The teratogenic potential was evaluated in rabbits and rats and functional reproductive capacity was studied in rats. Ninety-day feeding of up to 1000 ppm produced no signs of a toxic response in rats. Rats fed 5000 ppm had growth curves slightly inferior to those of the controls as the only detectable difference. Extending the feeding period to 2 years produced decreased body weights in males fed 2500 ppm (top level tested) and in females fed either 1000 or 2500 ppm. All other indices of response, including the type and distribution of tumors, were similar in the test and control rats with the no-effect level being 200 ppm. Eight-week feeding of up to 10,000 ppm in mice produced increased liver weight only at the highest level without any other changes. Two-year feeding of either 200, 2500, or 10,000 ppm resulted in sloughing of the distal tip of the tail and increased liver weights among mice fed 10,000 ppm. Hypertrophy of centrilobular hepatocytes and hyperplasic nodules were increased in mice fed either 2500 or 10,000 ppm. No evidence of a tumorigenic response was evident. The no-effect level was 200 ppm. Dogs fed 5000 ppm for 90 days had decreased rate of body weight gain with clinical enzyme changes suggestive of liver damage. Microscopic examination of the liver failed to reveal any alterations and dogs fed either 200 or 1000 ppm were indistinguishable from controls. The no-effect level in the dog was 1000 ppm. No evidence of a teratogenic response was seen in either rats or rabbits and reproduction capacity in rats fed up to 2500 ppm for three generations was unaffected.

  7. A brief study of toxic effects of some medicinal herbs on kidney

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Increased use of complementary and alternative herbal medicines in the treatment of various diseases.Some herbal therapies may be causes of potential toxicity that may be renal toxicity caused by the ingestion of herbs. The goal of this study is the toxic and beneficial effects of medicinal herbs on renal health by which evidence for benefit or toxicity has been found. Included are nephrotoxicity from aristolochic acid and other components within herbs, herb-drug interactions, heavy metal toxicity in herbs and adulterants during careless preparation of herbal medicine, resulting in adverse renal effects and renal toxicity from contaminants within the extracts. The review aims to provide knowledge and guide to encourage future toxicity studies on the kidney by medicinal herbs. PMID:23326775

  8. Weight-of-the-evidence review of acrylonitrile reproductive and developmental toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Neal, Barbara H; Collins, James J; Strother, Dale E; Lamb, James C

    2009-01-01

    Risk assessment of acrylonitrile (AN) toxicity to humans has focused on potential carcinogenicity and acute toxicity. Epidemiological studies from China reported reproductive and developmental effects in AN workers, including infertility, birth defects, and spontaneous abortions. A weight-of-the-evidence (WoE) evaluation of the AN database assessed study strength, characterized toxicity, and identified no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs). The epidemiological studies do not demonstrate causality and are not sufficiently robust to be used for risk assessment. Rodent developmental studies showed fetotoxicity and malformations at maternally toxic levels; there was no unique developmental susceptibility. NOAELs for oral and inhalation exposures were 10 mg/kg/day and 12 ppm (6 h/day), respectively. Drinking-water and inhalation reproductive toxicity studies showed no clear effects on reproductive performance or fertility. Maternally toxic concentrations caused decreased pup growth. The drinking-water reproductive NOAEL was 100 ppm (moderate confidence due to study limitations). The inhalation exposure reproductive and neonatal toxicity high confidence NOAEL was 45 ppm (first generation 90 ppm) (6 h/day). The inhalation reproductive toxicity study provides the most robust data for risk assessment. Based on the WoE evaluation, AN is not expected to be a developmental or reproductive toxicant in the absence of significant maternal toxicity.

  9. STUDIES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF TOXICITY IN INTESTINAL SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Davis, David M.; Stone, Harvey B.

    1917-01-01

    1. Intestinal secretion, collected by the method described in this paper, is non-toxic when fresh. 2. This secretion, when heated immediately to 90–95°C. and kept sterile, remains non-toxic. 3. This secretion, when not heated, remains non-toxic when kept under chloroform and toluene, even if incubated at 37°C. 4. This secretion, when not heated, but collected in a sterile flask, becomes toxic upon incubating 18 hours, producing symptoms like those of closed loop fluid. 5. The secretion, when treated with chloroform and toluene, and later incubated for 18 hours, after these preservatives have been removed by distillation at 60°C., does not produce lesions typical of closed loop fluid. PMID:19868174

  10. Developmental Toxicity (Segment II) Study of WR242511 in Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-02

    premature delivery (GD29) in the high dose. No other toxic effects were seen in either the pregnant females or in the fetuses. In a previous- dose range...gavage. The results are summarized in Table 1. One female in the high dose prematurely delivered on GD29 and one female in the mid dose aborted on GD27...visceral and skeletal malformations. With the exception of one abortion and one premature delivery in test article-treated animals, toxicity was

  11. [Advance in study on zearalenone's toxicity and determination].

    PubMed

    He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang

    2005-07-01

    The article is intended to introduce the zearalenone's toxicity, determination methods and prevention. Zearalenone is one of the most widely distributed mycotoxins produces by Fusarium Species, it is harm to animals and human. And it can induce human liver cancer,carcinoma of tesis esophagus cancer. Now we use high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography, non-toxicity determinations to detect it.

  12. Acute and subchronic (13-week) toxicity of fermented Acanthopanax koreanum extracts in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Cho, MyoungLae; Shin, Gi-Hae; Kim, Jae-Min; Lee, Jin-Ha; Park, Sun-Ok; Lee, Sang-Jong; Shin, HyunMu; Lee, Boo-Yong; Kang, Il-Jun; Lee, Ok-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The biological fermentation of plants is usually used to improve their product properties, including their biological activity. Acanthopanax koreanum is a plant indigenous to Jeju, Korea; however, fermented A. koreanum (FAK) has not been guaranteed to be safe. Therefore, in this study, a safety evaluation of aqueous extracts of FAK was performed using Sprague Dawley rats. The acute toxicity of FAK did not influence animal mortality, body weight changes or the animals' clinical appearance at a concentration of 5000 mg/kg body weight. Using doses of 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day in a subchronic (13-week) toxicity study, the administration of FAK in male rats increased their body weight, food consumption, absolute liver weight, liver-associated enzymes and total cholesterol content. However, these effects of FAK were not considered toxic because the changes were not accompanied by any evidence of clinical signs or any change in the histopathological examination. On the other hand, the FAK-treated female rats did not exhibit significant changes in their body weight, food consumption, absolute and relative organ weights or liver enzymes. These results suggest that the acute oral administration of FAK is non-toxic to rats, and 13 weeks of repeated dosing demonstrated no FAK-related toxicity at a concentration of 2000 mg/kg. Therefore, the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of FAK was determined to be 2000 mg/kg/day for both male and female rats.

  13. Histopathological Study of Cyclosporine Pulmonary Toxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshama, Said Said; EL-Kenawy, Ayman El-Meghawry; Osman, Hosam-Eldin Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine is considered one of the common worldwide immunosuppressive drugs that are used for allograft rejection prevention. However, articles that address adverse effects of cyclosporine use on the vital organs such as lung are still few. This study aims to investigate pulmonary toxic effect of cyclosporine in rats by assessment of pulmonary histopathological changes using light and electron microscope examination. Sixty male adult albino rats were divided into three groups; each group consists of twenty rats. The first received physiological saline while the second and third groups received 25 and 40 mg/kg/day of cyclosporine, respectively, by gastric gavage for forty-five days. Cyclosporine reduced the lung and body weight with shrinkage or pyknotic nucleus of pneumocyte type II, degeneration of alveoli and interalveolar septum beside microvilli on the alveolar surface, emphysema, inflammatory cellular infiltration, pulmonary blood vessels congestion, and increase of fibrous tissues in the interstitial tissues and around alveoli with negative Periodic Acid-Schiff staining. Prolonged use of cyclosporine induced pulmonary ultrastructural and histopathological changes with the lung and body weight reduction depending on its dose. PMID:26941796

  14. Experimental studies on the toxicity of lithographic developer solution.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takeichi, S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the toxicity of a lithographic developer solution which contains hydroquinone is caused by hydroquinone or the alkaline lithographic developer solution. Male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups. In four groups, rats were dosed orally with 3% hydroquinone or 3% hydroquinone in 3% lithographic developer solution. Hydroquinone levels were measured after one and 24 hours. In two groups, rats were dosed orally with 6% hydroquinone or 6% hydroquinone in lithographic developer solution. In the seventh group, rats received the alkaline solution only. Hydroquinone measurement was made using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hydroquinone was rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and subsequently distributed throughout the body. Nearly all hydroquinone was excreted in the urine as either a glucuronide or a sulfate (78-82%) within 24 hours. All rats administered 6% hydroquinone in non-alkaline vehicle died, but the mortality rate of rats administered 6% hydroquinone in lithographic developer solution was 60%. Tissue hydroquinone was lower at one hour and 24 hours after administration in lithographic developer solution than in equal dose of hydroquinone in non-alkaline vehicle suggesting decreased absorption in an alkaline pH. Hydroquinone was not associated with gross pathologic changes of the intestine but all animals treated with lithographic developer solution or alkaline solution had congestion, hemorrhagic petechiae and purple-brown discoloration throughout the small intestine. The combination of alkaline/formaldehyde diluent with hydroquinone may delay hydroquinone absorption but increase the risk of intestinal necrosis.

  15. Short-term toxicity studies of loline alkaloids in mice.

    PubMed

    Finch, S C; Munday, J S; Munday, R; Kerby, J W F

    2016-08-01

    Epichloë endophytes have been used successfully in pastoral systems to reduce the impact of insect pests through the expression of secondary metabolites. The use of endophytes could be extended to other plant species, such as cereal crops, where the production of bioactive secondary metabolites would reduce the reliance on pesticides for insect control. The success of this approach is dependent on the selection of an appropriate secondary metabolite target which must not only be effective against insect pests but also be safe for grazing and monogastric animals. The loline alkaloids have been identified as possible target metabolites as they are associated with potent effects on insects and low toxicity to grazing animals. The purpose of the current study was to generate toxicological data on the loline alkaloids in a monogastric system using mice. Male and female mice were fed 415 mg/kg/day total lolines for a 3-week period. The loline treatment caused no statistically significant effect on gross pathology, histology, haematology, blood chemistry, heart rate, blood pressure or motor coordination. Reduced weight gain and food consumption were noted in the loline groups during the initial stages of the experiment. This experiment raises no food safety concerns for the loline alkaloids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to alveolar macrophages: comparative study revealing differences in their mechanism of toxic action

    SciTech Connect

    Rietjens, I.M.; Poelen, M.C.; Hempenius, R.A.; Gijbels, M.J.; Alink, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    In this study the toxic mechanisms of action of ozone and nitrogen dioxide were compared using an intact cell model. Rat alveolar macrophages were exposed by means of gas diffusion through a Teflon film. In this in vitro system, ozone appeared to be 10 times more toxic than nitrogen dioxide. alpha-Tocopherol protected equally well against ozone and nitrogen dioxide. It was demonstrated that alpha-tocopherol provided its protection by its action as a radical scavenger and not by its stabilizing structural membrane effect, as (1) concentrations of alpha-tocopherol that already provided optimal protection against ozone and nitrogen dioxide did not influence the membrane fluidity of alveolar macrophages and (2) neither one of the structural alpha-tocopherol analogs tested (phytol and the methyl ether of alpha-tocopherol) could provide a protection against ozone or nitrogen dioxide comparable to the one provided by alpha-tocopherol. It was concluded that reactive intermediates scavenged by alpha-tocopherol are important in the toxic mechanism of both ozone and nitrogen dioxide induced cell damage. However, further results presented strongly confirmed that the kind of radicals and/or reactive intermediates, and thus the toxic reaction mechanism involved, must be different in ozone- and nitrogen dioxide-induced cell damage. This was concluded from the observations that showed that (1) vitamin C provided significantly better protection against nitrogen dioxide than against an equally toxic dose of ozone, (2) glutathione depletion affected the cellular sensitivity toward ozone to a significantly greater extent than the sensitivity towards nitrogen dioxide, and (3) the scavenging action of alpha-tocopherol was accompanied by a significantly greater reduction in its cellular level during nitrogen dioxide exposure than during exposure to ozone.

  17. Is Boric Acid Toxic to Reproduction in Humans? Assessment of the Animal Reproductive Toxicity Data and Epidemiological Study Results.

    PubMed

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Ustündağ, Aylin; Aydın, Sevtap; Undeğer, Ulkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Brita Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates are classified as toxic to reproduction in the CLP Regulation under "Category 1B" with the hazard statement of "H360FD". This classification is based on the reprotoxic effects of boric acid and sodium borates in animal experiments at high doses. However, boron mediated reprotoxic effects have not been proven in epidemiological studies so far. The epidemiological study performed in Bandırma boric acid production plant is the most comprehensive published study in this field with 204 voluntarily participated male workers. Sperm quality parameters (sperm morphology, concentration and motility parameters), FSH, LH and testosterone levels were determined in all participated employees as the reproductive toxicity biomarkers of males. However, boron mediated unfavorable effects on reproduction in male workers have not been determined even in the workers under very high daily boron exposure (0.21 mg B/kg-bw/day) conditions. The NOAEL for rat reproductive toxicity is equivalent to a blood boron level of 2020 ng/g. This level is higher than the mean blood boron concentration (223.89 ± 69.49 ng/g) of the high exposure group workers in Bandırma boric acid production plant (Turkey) by a factor of 9. Accordingly, classifying boric acid and sodium borates under "Category 1B" as "presumed reproductive human toxicant in the CLP regulation seems scientifically not reasonable. The results of the epidemiological studies (including the study performed in China) support for a down-classification of boric acid from the category 1B, H360FD to category 2, H361d, (suspected of damaging the unborn child).

  18. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) studies on the organophosphate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Can, Alper

    2014-11-04

    Organophosphate insecticides are the most commonly used pesticides in the world. In this study, quantitative structure-toxicity relationship (QSTR) models were derived for estimating the acute oral toxicity of organophosphate insecticides to male rats. The 20 chemicals of the training set and the seven compounds of the external testing set were described by means of using descriptors. Descriptors for lipophilicity, polarity and molecular geometry, as well as quantum chemical descriptors for energy were calculated. Model development to predict toxicity of organophosphate insecticides in different matrices was carried out using multiple linear regression. The model was validated internally and externally. In the present study, QSTR model was used for the first time to understand the inherent relationships between the organophosphate insecticide molecules and their toxicity behavior. Such studies provide mechanistic insight about structure-toxicity relationship and help in the design of less toxic insecticides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Subchronic toxicity study on soy isoflavones in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Zhong; Cui, Wen-Ming; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Wei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Li, Ning

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the subchronic toxicity of soy isoflavones (SIF) in male rats. Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, 10 rats per group. SIF were given to rats in different groups by gavage at dose of 0, 0.2, 0.5, 1.5, and 4.5 g/kg bw, respectively for 13 weeks. Clinical manifestations, body weight, and food consumption were observed weekly. At the end of the study, urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, total testosterone, and follicle-stimulating hormone were tested, and histopathological examinations were performed. No mortality, ophthalmic abnormalities or treatment-related clinical signs were identified during the study. As compared with the control group, significantly lower body weights and food consumption were observed in 1.5 and 4.5 g/kg bw groups. In clinical chemistry tests, triglyceride was significantly decreased and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly increased in all SIF-treated groups. Total testosterone levels were significantly lower in 0.50, 1.50, and 4.5 g/kg bw dose groups than in the control group. Microscopic examination showed that the mammary glands exhibited hyperplasia and excreted latex in rats of the 4.5 g/kg bw group. No changes attributable to treatment of SIF in other parameters were found. SIF at high dosages caused significant endocrine disruption in male rats. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of SIF to male rats in this study is considered to be 0.20 g/kg bw.

  20. Laboratory studies on antimycin A as a fish toxicant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, Bernard L.; Lennon, Robert E.; Hogan, James W.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid and sand formulations of antimycin A were tested in laboratory waters of various temperature, hardness, pH, and turbidity against 31 species of fresh-water fish of various sizes and life stages. Each formulation of toxicant was lethal under all water conditions to fish eggs, fry, fingerlings, and adult fish. Trouts are the most sensitive and catfishes the least sensitive. Of the 31 species, 24 succumb to 5 p.p.b. or less of the toxicant; only certain catfishes survive 25 p.p.b, The order of toxicity to various species of fish suggests that antimycin has possibilities for selective or partial control of certain unwanted fish. Although toxic to fish under ice, antimycin is more active in warm water than in cold. It is slightly more active in soft water than in hard; it is more active and persists far longer in water at pH 5 to 8 than at pH 9 or 10. It is active on fish in either clear and turbid waters, and it can be detoxified by potassium permanganate, The results contributed to registration of antimycin A in Fintrol-5 formulation as a fish toxicant.

  1. Lead Toxicity

    MedlinePlus

    Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Case Studies in Environmental Medicine (CSEM) Patient Information Sheet Lead Toxicity What is lead? How are people exposed to lead? • Lead is a soft, blue- ...

  2. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  3. Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview the developmental toxicity resulting from exposure to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). The majority of studies of PFAA-induced developmental toxicity have examined effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) or perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) a...

  4. Prenatal development toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong-Sup; Park, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Min-Seok; Lim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Gil-Jong; Maeng, Eun-Ho; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Jeong, Jayoung; Park, Jin-A; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential adverse effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles ([ZnOSM20(+) NPs] zinc oxide nanoparticles, positively charged, 20 nm) on pregnant dams and embryo–fetal development after maternal exposure over the period of gestational days 5–19 with Sprague-Dawley rats. ZnOSM20(+) NPs were administered to pregnant rats by gavage at 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day. All dams were subjected to a cesarean section on gestational day 20, and all of the fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal alterations. Toxicity in the dams manifested as significantly decreased body weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs; reduced food consumption after administration of 200 and 400 mg/kg/day NPs; and decreased liver weight and increased adrenal glands weight after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. However, no treatment-related difference in: number of corpora lutea; number of implantation sites; implantation rate (%); resorption; dead fetuses; litter size; fetal deaths and placental weights; and sex ratio were observed between the groups. On the other hand, significant decreases between treatment groups and controls were seen for fetal weights after administration of 400 mg/kg/day NPs. Morphological examinations of the fetuses demonstrated significant differences in incidences of abnormalities in the group administered 400mg/kg/day. Meanwhile, no significant difference was found in the Zn content of fetal tissue between the control and high-dose groups. These results showed that oral doses for the study with 15-days repeated of ZnOSM20(+) NPs were maternotoxic in the 200 mg/kg/day group, and embryotoxic in the 400 mg/kg/day group. PMID:25565834

  5. Evaluation and interpretation of maternal toxicity in Segment II studies: Issues, some answers, and data needs

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, John M. . E-mail: rogers.john@epa.gov; Chernoff, Neil; Keen, Carl L.; Daston, George P.

    2005-09-01

    Biologically rational regulatory policies with regards to developmental toxicity are often based on the extrapolation of standard laboratory rodent bioassay results to the human population. Significantly contributing to the difficulty of this task is the possibility that general toxic effects on the maternal organism may affect the developing conceptus. This review examines maternal factors which may bear directly or indirectly upon developmental outcome, with emphasis on those of greatest relevance to the hazard assessment process. Standard teratology testing protocols call for top dosage levels that induce overt maternal toxicity, and the developmental effects of this toxicity (both alone, and with concurrent embryo/fetal insult) continue to present regulators with considerable interpretive difficulties. In response to these problems, there have been both research and literature review efforts dealing with the relationship of maternal and developmental toxicity. Maternally mediated developmental toxicity occurs with a number of agents, and toxicant-induced alterations in maternal physiology may affect the conceptus at dosages not causing overt maternal toxicity. Relevant studies are reviewed here, and suggestions for avenues of future research are offered including the identification of any syndromes of developmental effects occurring at maternally toxic levels irrespective of the causative agent, and experimental approaches for the characterization of maternal toxicity.

  6. Cyanide toxicity in juvenile pigs and its reversal by a new prodrug, sulfanegen sodium.

    PubMed

    Belani, Kumar G; Singh, Harpreet; Beebe, David S; George, Preeta; Patterson, Steven E; Nagasawa, Herbert T; Vince, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Cyanide (CN) toxicity is a serious clinical problem and can occur with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) administration, accidental smoke inhalation, industrial mishaps, and bio-terrorism. In this study, we induced severe CN toxicity independently with SNP or sodium cyanide (NaCN) in a juvenile pig model to demonstrate reversal of severe CN toxicity with a new antidote, sulfanegen sodium, a prodrug of 3-mercaptopyruvate. SNP study: A pilot study in 11 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated juvenile pigs allowed us to determine the dose of SNP to induce CN toxicity. Blood CN, serum lactates, and blood gases were monitored. CN toxicity was defined as the occurrence of severe lactic acidosis accompanied by significant elevation in blood CN levels. Based on this pilot study, 8 anesthetized pigs received a high-dose i.v. infusion of SNP (100 mg/h) for 2 hours to induce CN toxicity. They were then randomized to receive either sulfanegen sodium or placebo. Four pigs received 3 doses of sulfanegen sodium (2.5 g i.v.) every hour after induction of severe CN toxicity, and 4 pigs received placebo. NaCN study: A pilot study was conducted in 4 spontaneously ventilating pigs sedated with propofol plus ketamine to demonstrate hemodynamic and metabolic stability for several hours. After this, 6 pigs were similarly sedated and given NaCN in bolus aliquots to produce CN toxicity ultimately resulting in death. Hemodynamics and metabolic variables were followed to define peak CN toxicity. In another group of 6 pigs, severe CN toxicity was induced by this method, and at peak toxicity, the animals were given sulfanegen sodium (2.5 g i.v.) followed by a repeat dose 60 minutes later in surviving animals. SNP study: The pilot study demonstrated the occurrence of a significant increase in blood CN levels (P < 0.05) accompanied by severe lactic acidemia (P < 0.05) in all pigs receiving a high dose of SNP. Administration of the sulfanegen antidote resulted in progressive significant reduction in

  7. DOSE-DEPENDENT TRANSITIONS IN MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY: CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experience with dose response and mechanisms of toxicity has shown that multiple mechanisms may exist for a single agent along the continuum of the full dose-response curve. It is highly likely that critical, limiting steps in any given mechanistic pathway may become overwhelmed ...

  8. The National Near-Road Mobile Source Air Toxics Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, much attention has been directed at understanding the impact of mobile sources on near-road air quality, especially PM and its components, NOx and CO, but little information exists for mobile source air toxics (MSATs). MSATs of interest to this project are 1,3-butadiene...

  9. The National Near-Road Mobile Source Air Toxics Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, much attention has been directed at understanding the impact of mobile sources on near-road air quality, especially PM and its components, NOx and CO, but little information exists for mobile source air toxics (MSATs). MSATs of interest to this project are 1,3-butadiene...

  10. AQUATIC TOXICITY MODE OF ACTION STUDIES APPLIED TO QSAR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of QSAR models for predicting fish acute lethality were developed using systematically collected data on more than 600 chemicals. These models were developed based on the assumption that chemicals producing toxicity through a common mechanism will have commonality in the...

  11. AQUATIC TOXICITY MODE OF ACTION STUDIES APPLIED TO QSAR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of QSAR models for predicting fish acute lethality were developed using systematically collected data on more than 600 chemicals. These models were developed based on the assumption that chemicals producing toxicity through a common mechanism will have commonality in the...

  12. DOSE-DEPENDENT TRANSITIONS IN MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY: CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experience with dose response and mechanisms of toxicity has shown that multiple mechanisms may exist for a single agent along the continuum of the full dose-response curve. It is highly likely that critical, limiting steps in any given mechanistic pathway may become overwhelmed ...

  13. Acute toxicity and toxicokinetics of dipfluzine hydrochloride, a novel calcium channel blocker.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Yongli; Pei, Tingmei; Dong, Lei; Xu, Yanfang

    2009-06-01

    Dipfluzine hydrochloride, diphenylpiperazine calcium channel blocker, is a promising candidate to treat ischemic stroke. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the acute toxicity and toxicokinetics of dipfluzine hydrochloride after single intravenous doses in rats. Acute toxicity study was performed in rats at doses of 5, 6, 10, 15, 25, 30, 35, and 40mg/kg. Concentrations of dipfluzine in plasma and tissues were determined with a reverse-phase HPLC method after single doses of 5, 15 and 30mg/kg. The results demonstrated that no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL), lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL), maximal tolerance dose (MTD), and minimal lethal dose (MLD) were respectively 5, 6, 30, 35mg/kg for i.v. administration of dipfluzine hydrochloride. The toxicokinetic study revealed that the severity of toxicity was linear with the level of systemic exposure. The highest tissue exposure was detected in lung tissue and it may primarily contribute to the pulmonary congestion in dead rats. Longer elimination half-lives of dipfluzine in kidney, brain, liver, and pancreas imply a possible accumulation of dipfluzine in these tissues for long-term exposure. In addition, a temporary impairment in liver and heart was observed for clinical chemistry in 30mg/kg dose group. The findings will help to design further studies to characterize the repeat-dose toxicity of dipfluzine hydrochloride.

  14. Sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) studies at marine sites suspected of ordnance contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, R.S.; Nipper, M.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Hooten, R.L.; Miller, K.; Saepoff, S.

    2001-01-01

    A sediment quality assessment survey and subsequent toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) study was conducted at several sites in Puget Sound, Washington. The sites were previously suspected of contamination with ordnance compounds. The initial survey employed sea urchin porewater toxicity tests to locate the most toxic stations. Sediments from the most toxic stations were selected for comprehensive chemical analyses. Based on the combined information from the toxicity and chemical data, three adjacent stations in Ostrich Bay were selected for the TIE study. The results of the phase I TIE suggested that organics and metals were primarily responsible for the observed toxicity in the sea urchin fertilization test. In addition to these contaminants, ammonia was also contributing to the toxicity for the sea urchin embryological development test. The phase II TIE study isolated the majority of the toxicity in the fraction containing nonpolar organics with high log Kow, but chemical analyses failed to identify a compound present at a concentration high enough to be responsible for the observed toxicity. The data suggest that some organic or organometallic contaminant(s) that were not included in the comprehensive suite of chemical analyses caused the observed toxicological responses.

  15. A comprehensive toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles versus their bulk in Wistar rats: Toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Anurag Kumar; Kumar, Mahadeo; Ansari, Nasreen Ghazi; Jain, Abhishek Kumar; Shankar, Jai; Arjaria, Nidhi; Jagdale, Pankaj; Singh, Dhirendra

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and their bulk counterpart in suspensions and to access the impact of their acute oral toxicity at doses of 300 and 2000 mg/kg in healthy female Wistar rats. The hematological, biochemical, and urine parameters were accessed at 24 and 48 h and 14 days posttreatment. The histopathological evaluations of tissues were also performed. The distribution of zinc content in liver, kidney, spleen, plasma, and excretory materials (feces and urine) at 24 and 48 h and 14 days posttreatment were accessed after a single exposure at dose of 2000 mg/kg body weight. The elevated level of alanine amino transferase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatinine were observed in ZnO-NPs at a dose of 2000 mg/kg at all time points. There was a decrease in iron levels in all the treated groups at 24 h posttreatment as compared to control groups but returned to their normal level at 14 days posttreatment. The hematological parameters red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets, and haptoglobin were reduced at 48 h posttreatment at a dose of 2000 mg/kg ZnO-NPs and showed hemolytic condition. All the treated groups were comparable to control group at the end of 14 days posttreatment. The zinc concentration in the kidney, liver, plasma, feces, and urine showed a significant increase in both groups as compared to control. This study explained that ZnO-NPs produced more toxicological effect as compared to their bulk particles as evidenced through alteration in some hemato-biochemical parameters and with few histopathological lesions in liver and kidney tissues. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Renal toxicity caused by oral use of medicinal plants: the yacon example.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rejane Barbosa; de Paula, Daniela Aparecida Chagas; Rocha, Bruno Alves; Franco, João José; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo; Uyemura, Sérgio Akira; dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira; Da Costa, Fernando Batista

    2011-01-27

    Yacon [Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. & Endl.) H. Robinson, Asteraceae] is an Andean species that has traditionally been used as an anti-diabetic herb in several countries around the world, including Brazil. Its hypoglycaemic action has recently been demonstrated in normal and diabetic rats. However, studies about the safety of prolonged oral consumption of yacon leaf extracts are lacking. Thus, this work was undertaken to evaluate the repeated-dose toxicity of three extracts from yacon leaves: the aqueous extract (AE) prepared as a tea infusion; the leaf-rinse extract (LRE), which is rich in sesquiterpene lactones (STLs); and a polar extract from leaves without trichomes, or polar extract (PE), which lacks STLs but is rich in chlorogenic acids (CGAs). The major classes of the compounds were confirmed in each extract by IR spectra and HPLC-UV-DAD profiling as well as comparison to standard compounds. The toxicity of each extract was evaluated in a repeated-dose toxicity study in Wistar rats for 90 days. The PE was rich in CGAs, but we did not detect any STLs. The AE and LRE showed the presence of STLs. The polar extract caused alterations in some biochemical parameters, but the animals did not show signs of behavioural toxicity or serious lesions in organs. Alterations of specific biochemical parameters in the blood (creatinine 7.0 mg/dL, glucose 212.0 mg/dL, albumin 2.8 g/dL) of rats treated with AE (10, 50 and 100 mg/kg) and LRE (10 and 100 mg/kg) pointed to renal damage, which was confirmed by histological analysis of the kidneys. The renal damage was associated with increased blood glucose levels after prolonged oral administration of the AE. This observation suggested that the hypoglycaemic effect observed after treatment for 30 days in an earlier study is reversible and was likely the result of renal injury caused by the toxicity of yacon. Because STLs were detected in both AE and LRE, there is strong evidence that these terpenoids are the main toxic

  17. A study on the toxicity of spontaneously molded bread.

    PubMed

    Tyllinen, H; Raevuori, M; Karppanen, E; Garry-Andersson, A S

    1977-12-01

    Molds of geni Penicillium, Aspergillus and Paecilomyces were found in spontaneously molded Finnish bread. Patulin was detected in 91% of 23 samples analysed in concentrations ranging from 27 to 138 microgram/kg. The toxin was found in dark bread in higher amounts than in white. Neither aflatoxins (12 samples) nor ochratoxin A (10 samples) were detected. Penicillic acid was found in one of five samples. No significant changes were found in the haemoglobin or leucocyte counts of rats kept on feed containing extracts of the molded bread. Extracts from bread contaminated with A niger were more toxic and less palatable than extracts from the other samples. The feeding test indicated a relatively low toxicity of molded bread.

  18. Toxicologic evaluations of DHA-rich algal oil in rats: developmental toxicity study and 3-month dietary toxicity study with an in utero exposure phase.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D; Tran, N; Peach, J; Edwards, T; Greeley, M

    2012-11-01

    DHA-rich algal oil ONC-T18, tested for subchronic, reproductive, and developmental toxicity in the rat, did not produce any significant toxicologic manifestations. Based on the absence of maternal or developmental toxicity at any dosage level, a dosage level of 2000 mg/kg/day was considered to be the no observed adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for maternal toxicity and embryo/fetal development when DHA-rich algal oil was administered orally by gavage to pregnant Crl:CD(SD) rats during gestation days 6-19. In a dietary combined one-generation/90-day reproductive toxicity study in rats, the NOAEL for F0 male and female and F1 male systemic toxicity was considered to be 50,000 ppm (highest concentration administered) and 25,000 ppm for F1 female systemic toxicity (higher mean body weight, body weight gain, and food consumption). F0 reproductive performance values, estrous cycle length, gestation length, or the process of parturition, and the numbers of former implantation sites and unaccounted-for sites were unaffected by algal oil exposure. Postnatal survival and developmental parameters in the F1 generation were unaffected by algal oil exposure at all dietary concentrations. There were no neurotoxic effects noted at any algal oil exposure level. The results support the safety of DHA-rich algal oil for its proposed use in food. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. EFFECT OF NITRATE-BASED BIOREMEDIATION ON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION AND SEDIMENT TOXICITY-COLUMN STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory column study was set up to evaluate changes in contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity following nitrate-based bioremediation and to correlate toxicity reduction with loss of fuel components. Glass columns were packed with sediment from an aquifer that had be...

  20. EFFECT OF NITRATE-BASED BIOREMEDIATION ON CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION AND SEDIMENT TOXICITY-COLUMN STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory column study was set up to evaluate changes in contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity following nitrate-based bioremediation and to correlate toxicity reduction with loss of fuel components. Glass columns were packed with sediment from an aquifer that had be...

  1. Feasibility study of a web application for self-report of anticancer treatment toxicities.

    PubMed

    Della Mea, Vincenzo; De Momi, Ivan; Aprile, Giuseppe; Puglisi, Fabio; Menis, Jessica; Casetta, Anica; Bolzonello, Silvia; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2009-01-01

    Collection of collateral effects related to toxicities suffered by patients being exposed to anticancer treatments is of crucial importance in clinical practice but also in oncological research. The present paper describes a web application called PaTOS for self-report of anticancer therapy toxicities, and its evaluation in a preliminary interface analysis and then in a feasibility study.

  2. E-Cigarettes May Be Less Toxic Than Tobacco, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163433.html E-Cigarettes May Be Less Toxic Than Tobacco, Study Suggests ... 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers who switch to e-cigarettes can substantially reduce their intake of toxic chemicals ...

  3. Assessing acute toxicities of pre- and post-treatment industrial wastewaters with Hydra attenuata: A comparative study of acute toxicity with the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.J.; Staples, R.E.; Stahl, R.G. Jr. . Haskell Lab. for Toxicology and Industrial Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    This study was undertaken to (a) determine wastewater treatment effectiveness using two freshwater organisms, (b) compare acute toxicity results from the two species exposed to the wastewaters, and (c) link acute and potential developmental toxicity of wastewaters in one organism. The acute toxicities of several pretreatment and post-treatment industrial waste-water samples wee evaluated with adult Hydra attenuata and fathead minnows. The acute LC50s agreed closely when results in Hydra attenuata were compared with those from fathead minnow tests. Acute LC50s ranged from 3 to >100% of samples with hydra, and from 1.0 to >100% of sample with fathead minnows. The results provided strong evidence of treatment effectiveness because toxicity decreased with progressive stages of treatment. Previously the Hydra Developmental Toxicity Assay was used as a prescreen mainly for in vitro assessment of developmental toxicity with pure compounds and to prioritized toxicants according to selective toxicity to the developing embryo. Recently the authors modified the assay for testing natural waters and wastewaters; hence, some of the wastewater samples also were tested for their developmental toxicity. In this case, the relative selective toxicity of these wastewater samples ranged from 0.7 to 2.1, indicating that no sample was uniquely toxic to the developing embryo, although acute toxicity was manifested. Overall, their results indicate the Hydra Assay functions appropriately in assessments of acute and developmental toxicity of industrial wastewaters and may be a simple and useful tool in a battery of tests for broader scale detection of environmental hazards.

  4. Toxicity study of reclaimed water on human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianghao; Kou, Ying-Ying; Kim, Taeeung; Chae, Kyu-Jung; Ng, How Yong

    2017-08-28

    The importance of evaluating the toxic effects associated with the use of reclaimed water has been increasing. The purpose of this research was to investigate the cytotoxicity and molecular toxicity of reclaimed water on the human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. The culture medium was synthesized using the reclaimed water samples. Wastewater treatment plant influent (WTI) and effluent (WTE), containing micropollutants at the nanogram per liter level, decreased cell proliferation (93.4-98.9% and 91.5-96.6% of the control, respectively) and increased cell damage (103.6-117.5% and 100.7-109% of the control, respectively) at all exposure times, except for a decrease in cell damage observed after an 8-h exposure to WTE. Membrane bioreactor permeate (MBRP) increased cell proliferation (102.1-106.7% of the control) and decreased cell damage at 8 and 12 h (92.4 and 98.4% of the control, respectively), but slightly increased cell damage at 24 h and later time points (101.1-104.9% of the control). All three water samples induced cell apoptosis (120.9-123.4% of the control). They also affected the expression of cell-cycle regulatory proteins (p16(INK4a), p27(Kip1), cyclin-dependent kinases 2 and 4, cyclin D1, and cyclin E) and apoptosis-related regulatory proteins (p-JNK, Bcl-2, caspase-9, and caspase-3). In conclusion, all three water samples showed cytotoxicity and molecular toxicity in the HEK293 cells, and the results of the cell-cycle and apoptosis regulatory protein expression after WTI and WTE treatments were consistent with the results of the cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Toxicity of 3'3-ditrifluormethyldiphenyl diselenide administered during intra-uterine development of rats.

    PubMed

    Weis, S N; Roman, S S; Nogueira, C W

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the organoselenium compound, 3'3-ditrifluormethyldiphenyl diselenide [(F(3)CPhSe)(2)], during the intra-uterine development of Wistar rats. Dams were given repeated doses of 1, 5 or 10mg/kg (F(3)CPhSe)(2) by intragastric route on gestation days 6-15, and cesarean sections were performed on day 20 of pregnancy. The numbers of implantation sites, living and dead fetuses and resorptions were recorded. Fetuses were weighed and stained with Alizarin red S for skeletal evaluation. The placental morphology was also evaluated. In 1mg/kg (F(3)CPhSe)(2) group, neither maternal toxicity nor prenatal growth retardation was observed. Conversely, in 5 and 10mg/kg groups, there was a decrease in maternal weight gain during pregnancy indicating that (F(3)CPhSe)(2) was maternally toxic, without affecting fetuses weight and length. (F(3)CPhSe)(2) caused some morphological alterations in placenta of 5 and 10mg/kg-exposed dams. Results also showed that skeletal variations were produced by (F(3)CPhSe)(2) only at doses (10mg/kg) in which a marked embryolethality was found. We conclude that (F(3)CPhSe)(2) was toxic to the dams and induced embryofeto-toxicity at doses equal to 10mg/kg.

  6. A Mechanistic Study on the Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shammari, Bader; Khalifa, Mohamed; Bakheet, Saleh A.; Yasser, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    Amiodarone- (AM-) induced pulmonary toxicity (AIPT) is still a matter of research and is poorly understood. In attempting to resolve this issue, we treated Sprague-Dawley rats with AM doses of 80 mg/kg/day/i.p. for one, two, three, and four weeks. The rats were weighed at days 7, 14, 21, and 28 and bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were obtained to determine total leukocyte count (TLC). For each group, lung weighing, histopathology, and homogenization were performed. Fresh homogenates were used for determination of ATP content, lipid peroxides, GSH, catalase, SOD, GPx, GR activities, NO, and hydroxyproline levels. The results showed a significant decrease in body weight and GSH depletion together with an increase in both lung weight and lung/body weight coefficient in the first week. Considerable increases in lung hydroxyproline level with some histopathological alterations were apparent. Treatment for two weeks produced a significant increase in BAL fluid, TLC, GR activity, and NO level in lung homogenate. The loss of cellular ATP and inhibition of most antioxidative protective enzymatic system appeared along with alteration in SOD activity following daily treatment for three weeks, while, in rats treated with AM for four weeks, more severe toxicity was apparent. Histopathological diagnosis was mostly granulomatous inflammation and interstitial pneumonitis in rats treated for three and four weeks, respectively. As shown, it is obvious that slow oedema formation is the only initiating factor of AIPT; all other mechanisms may occur as a consequence. PMID:26933474

  7. The rabbit as a model for reproductive and developmental toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Foote, R H; Carney, E W

    2000-01-01

    The rabbit has many advantages as a nonrodent and second model for assessing the effects of toxic agents on semen quality, fertility, developmental toxicity, and teratology. The male and female reproductive systems of the rabbit are described, and data on growth, sexual development and reproduction are compared with mice, rats, and humans. Techniques for semen collection and evaluation in the male, and artificial insemination, superovulation, embryo culture, and embryo transfer in the female are included as useful procedures in toxicity testing. Examples of the use of rabbits and experimental replication for toxicity testing are given. Special features of the visceral yolk sac and development of the chorioallantoic placenta of the rabbit are compared with rodents. The rabbit extraembryonic membranes more closely resemble the human than do the rodents, in some respects. The use of the rabbit in developmental toxicity and teratology studies is discussed.

  8. Safety Evaluation of Oral Toxicity of Carica papaya Linn. Leaves: A Subchronic Toxicity Study in Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zakiah; Halim, Siti Zaleha; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Afzan, Adlin; Abdul Rashid, Badrul Amini; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    The subchronic toxicity effect of the leaf extract of Carica papaya Linn. in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats was investigated in this study. The extract was prepared by dissolving the freeze dried extract of the leaves in distilled water and was administered orally to SD rats (consisted of 10 rats/sex/group) at 0 (control), 0.01, 0.14, and 2 g/kg body weight (BW) for 13 weeks. General observation, mortality, and food and water intake were monitored throughout the experimental period. Hematological and biochemical parameters, relative organ weights, and histopathological changes were evaluated. The study showed that leaf extract when administered for 13 weeks did not cause any mortality and abnormalities of behavior or changes in body weight as well as food and water intake. There were no significant differences observed in hematology parameters between treatment and control groups; however significant differences were seen in biochemistry values, for example, LDH, creatinine, total protein, and albumin. However, these changes were not associated with histopathological changes. In conclusion, the results suggested that daily oral administration of rats with C. papaya leaf extract for 13 weeks at a dose up to fourteen times the levels employed in traditional medicine practice did not cause any significant toxic effect.

  9. Toxicity of leachate from weathering plastics: An exploratory screening study with Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Bejgarn, Sofia; MacLeod, Matthew; Bogdal, Christian; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Between 60% and 80% of all marine litter is plastic. Leachate from plastics has previously been shown to cause acute toxicity in the freshwater species Daphnia magna. Here, we present an initial screening of the marine environmental hazard properties of leachates from weathering plastics to the marine harpacticoid copepod [Crustacea] Nitocra spinipes. Twenty-one plastic products made of different polymeric materials were leached and irradiated with artificial sunlight. Eight of the twenty-one plastics (38%) produced leachates that caused acute toxicity. Differences in toxicity were seen for different plastic products, and depending on the duration of irradiation. There was no consistent trend in how toxicity of leachate from plastics changed as a function of irradiation time. Leachate from four plastics became significantly more toxic after irradiation, two became significantly less toxic and two did not change significantly. Analysis of leachates from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by liquid chromatography coupled to a full-scan high-resolution mass spectrometer showed that the leachates were a mixture of substances, but did not show evidence of degradation of the polymer backbone. This screening study demonstrates that leachates from different plastics differ in toxicity to N. spinipes and that the toxicity varies under simulated weathering. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of characteristics of substituents on toxicity of the nitroaromatics: HiT QSAR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuz'min, Victor E.; Muratov, Eugene N.; Artemenko, Anatoly G.; Gorb, Leonid; Qasim, Mohammad; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-10-01

    The present study applies the Hierarchical Technology for Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (HiT QSAR) for (i) evaluation of the influence of the characteristics of 28 nitroaromatic compounds (some of which belong to a widely known class of explosives) as to their toxicity; (ii) prediction of toxicity for new nitroaromatic derivatives; (iii) analysis of the effects of substituents in nitroaromatic compounds on their toxicity in vivo. The 50% lethal dose concentration for rats (LD50) was used to develop the QSAR models based on simplex representation of molecular structure. The preliminary 1D QSAR results show that even the information on the composition of molecules reveals the main tendencies of changes in toxicity. The statistic characteristics for partial least squares 2D QSAR models are quite satisfactory ( R 2 = 0.96-0.98; Q 2 = 0.91-0.93; R 2 test = 0.89-0.92), which allows us to carry out the prediction of activity for 41 novel compounds designed by the application of new combinations of substituents represented in the training set. The comprehensive analysis of toxicity changes as a function of substituent position and nature was carried out. Molecular fragments that promote and interfere with toxicity were defined on the basis of the obtained models. It was shown that the mutual influence of substituents in the benzene ring plays a crucial role regarding toxicity. The influence of different substituents on toxicity can be mediated via different C-H fragments of the aromatic ring.

  11. Towards Global QSAR Model Building for Acute Toxicity: Munro Database Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Swapnil; Nicholls, Ian A.; Karlsson, Björn C. G.; Rosengren, Annika M.; Ballabio, Davide; Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    A series of 436 Munro database chemicals were studied with respect to their corresponding experimental LD50 values to investigate the possibility of establishing a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. Dragon molecular descriptors were used for the QSAR model development and genetic algorithms were used to select descriptors better correlated with toxicity data. Toxic values were discretized in a qualitative class on the basis of the Globally Harmonized Scheme: the 436 chemicals were divided into 3 classes based on their experimental LD50 values: highly toxic, intermediate toxic and low to non-toxic. The k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method was calibrated on 25 molecular descriptors and gave a non-error rate (NER) equal to 0.66 and 0.57 for internal and external prediction sets, respectively. Even if the classification performances are not optimal, the subsequent analysis of the selected descriptors and their relationship with toxicity levels constitute a step towards the development of a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. PMID:25302621

  12. Towards global QSAR model building for acute toxicity: Munro database case study.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Swapnil; Nicholls, Ian A; Karlsson, Björn C G; Rosengren, Annika M; Ballabio, Davide; Consonni, Viviana; Todeschini, Roberto

    2014-10-09

    A series of 436 Munro database chemicals were studied with respect to their corresponding experimental LD50 values to investigate the possibility of establishing a global QSAR model for acute toxicity. Dragon molecular descriptors were used for the QSAR model development and genetic algorithms were used to select descriptors better correlated with toxicity data. Toxic values were discretized in a qualitative class on the basis of the Globally Harmonized Scheme: the 436 chemicals were divided into 3 classes based on their experimental LD50 values: highly toxic, intermediate toxic and low to non-toxic. The k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) classification method was calibrated on 25 molecular descriptors and gave a non-error rate (NER) equal to 0.66 and 0.57 for internal and external prediction sets, respectively. Even if the classification performances are not optimal, the subsequent analysis of the selected descriptors and their relationship with toxicity levels constitute a step towards the development of a global QSAR model for acute toxicity.

  13. Systematic and comprehensive investigation of the toxicity of curcuminoid-essential oil complex: A bioavailable turmeric formulation

    PubMed Central

    AGGARWAL, MADAN L.; CHACKO, KARAMPENDETHU M.; KURUVILLA, BINU T.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, the active component present in Curcuma longa of the family Zingiberaceae, has a number of pharmacological effects, including potential anti-inflammatory activity. One of the major limitations of curcumin/turmeric extract is its poor absorption through the gastrointestinal tract. Several approaches have been adopted to increase the bioavailability of curcumin, including loading curcumin into liposomes or nanoparticles, complexation with phospholipids, addition of essential oils and synthesizing structural analogues of curcumin. In the present study, the toxicity and safety of one such bioavailable turmeric formulation, curcuminoid-essential oil complex (CEC), the toxicity profile of which has not been reported, were examined using in vivo and in vitro models, as per the guidelines of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Investigations of acute toxicity study were performed in rats and mice, and the results revealed no signs and symptoms or toxicity or mortality in any of the animals at the maximum recommended dose level of 5,000 mg/kg body weight. The repeated administration of CEC for 90 days in Wistar rats at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg body weight did not induce any observable toxic effects, compared with corresponding control animals. Mutagenicity/genotoxicity investigations were also performed using a bacterial reverse mutation assay (Ames test), a mammalian bone marrow chromosome aberration test and a mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus test in mice. CEC was found to be non-mutagenic in all three mutagenic investigations. Consequently, the present study indicated that CEC elicited no toxic effects in animals or in vitro. Therefore, following investigations of acute toxicity, repeated dose toxicity and mutagenicity, CEC was deemed a safe, non-toxic pharmacological formulation. PMID:26648561

  14. Evaluation of carcinogenicity studies of medicinal products for human use authorised via the European centralised procedure (1995-2009).

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Anita; Olejniczak, Klaus

    2011-07-01

    Carcinogenicity data of medicinal products for human use that have been authorised via the European centralised procedure (CP) between 1995 and 2009 were evaluated. Carcinogenicity data, either from long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies, transgenic mouse studies or repeat-dose toxicity studies were available for 144 active substances contained in 159 medicinal products. Out of these compounds, 94 (65%) were positive in at least one long-term carcinogenicity study or in repeat-dose toxicity studies. Fifty compounds (35%) showed no evidence of a carcinogenic potential. Out of the 94 compounds with positive findings in either carcinogenicity or repeat-dose toxicity studies, 33 were positive in both mice and rats, 40 were positive in rats only, and 21 were positive exclusively in mice. Long-term carcinogenicity studies in two rodent species were available for 116 compounds. Data from one long-term carcinogenicity study in rats and a transgenic mouse model were available for eight compounds. For 13 compounds, carcinogenicity data were generated in only one rodent species. One compound was exclusively tested in a transgenic mouse model. Six compounds were tumourigenic in repeat-dose toxicity studies in rats. The majority of tumour findings observed in rodent carcinogenicity studies were considered not to be relevant for humans, either due to a rodent-specific mechanism of carcinogenicity, a high safety margin between exposures at the NOAEL (No Observed Adverse Effect Level) in rodents and recommended therapeutic doses in humans, or based on historical control data, a small effect size and lack of dose-response relationship and tumours typically observed in rodent strains used, or were considered not to be relevant for humans based on literature and clinical data or likely differences in metabolism/local concentrations between rodents and humans. Due to the high number of rodent tumour findings with unlikely relevance for humans, the value of the currently used testing

  15. Studies of the developmental toxicity of polycarboxylate dispersing agents.

    PubMed

    Nolen, G A; Monroe, A; Hassall, C D; Iavicoli, J; Jamieson, R A; Daston, G P

    1989-06-01

    Three linear polycarboxylate compounds, two linear polyacrylates (90,000 MW and 4,500 MW) and one linear polyacrylate-maleate copolymer (12,000 MW), were tested for their teratogenic potential in female Sprague Dawley rats. These polymers, which were tested as sodium salts, are used as dispersing agents in detergent formulations at levels of 1-5%. All compounds were administered by gavage during organogenesis (days 6-15 of pregnancy). No adverse effects on development were seen with any of the three compounds at any of the doses tested. The highest dose, and therefore the minimum no-effect dose, for the three linear polymers was 1125 mg/kg/day for the 90,000 MW polyacrylate, 3000 mg/kg/day for the 4,500 MW polyacrylate, and 6670 mg/kg/day for the polyacrylate-maleate copolymer. Based on these data, these compounds are not developmentally toxic, even at very high dose levels.

  16. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  17. Compilation of International Regulatory Guidance Documents for Neuropathology Assessment during Nonclinical Toxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuropathology analysis as an endpoint during nonclinical efficacy and toxicity studies is a challenging prospect that requires trained personnel and particular equipment to achieve optimal results. Accordingly, many regulatory agencies have produced explicit guidelines for desig...

  18. Compilation of International Regulatory Guidance Documents for Neuropathology Assessment during Nonclinical Toxicity Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuropathology analysis as an endpoint during nonclinical efficacy and toxicity studies is a challenging prospect that requires trained personnel and particular equipment to achieve optimal results. Accordingly, many regulatory agencies have produced explicit guidelines for desig...

  19. Webinar Presentation: Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation, Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment.

  20. 76 FR 59142 - Guidance for Industry on Reproductive and Developmental Toxicities-Integrating Study Results To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Reproductive and Developmental... a guidance for industry entitled ``Reproductive and Developmental Toxicities--Integrating Study... developmental or reproductive risks associated with drug or biological product exposure when a...

  1. A review of toxicity studies on graphene-based nanomaterials in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2017-04-01

    We summarized the findings of toxicity studies on graphene-based nanomaterials (GNMs) in laboratory mammals. The inhalation of graphene (GP) and graphene oxide (GO) induced only minimal pulmonary toxicity. Bolus airway exposure to GP and GO caused acute and subacute pulmonary inflammation. Large-sized GO (L-GO) was more toxic than small-sized GO (S-GO). Intratracheally administered GP passed through the air-blood barrier into the blood and intravenous GO distributed mainly in the lungs, liver, and spleen. S-GO and L-GO mainly accumulated in the liver and lungs, respectively. Limited information showed the potential behavioral, reproductive, and developmental toxicity and genotoxicity of GNMs. There are indications that oxidative stress and inflammation may be involved in the toxicity of GNMs. The surface reactivity, size, and dispersion status of GNMs play an important role in the induction of toxicity and biodistribution of GNMs. Although this review paper provides initial information on the potential toxicity of GNMs, data are still very limited, especially when taking into account the many different types of GNMs and their potential modifications. To fill the data gap, further studies should be performed using laboratory mammals exposed using the route and dose anticipated for human exposure scenarios.

  2. Phytochemical Screening and Toxicity Studies on the Leaves of Capparis sepiaria Linn. (Capparidaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, P.; Latha, S.; Selvamani, P.; Kannan, V. Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Capparis sepiaria Linn. (Family: Capparidaceae) is a rare indigenous in South India but has widespread distribution in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. The present study intended with various phytochemical screening and toxicity studies were carried out on the leaves of the Capparis sepiaria. Preliminary phytochemical evaluation of the ethanolic extract of revealed that the presence of reducing sugar, flavonoids, steroids, tannins, glycosides, alkaloids, gums, resins, amino acids, proteins and anthraquinones. The toxicity studies were performed as acute, sub-acute and chronic toxicity determined the LD50 value of 300-5000 mg/kg body weight 4-6 weeks. The results of the various phytochemical tests indicated that the plant to be rich in various biologically active compounds which could serve as potential source of the crude drugs and in addition the plant is not toxic to the experimental model. PMID:25206253

  3. Preclinical Evaluation of the Short-Term Toxicity of 4-(N)-Docosahexaenoyl 2´, 2´- Difluorodeoxycytidine (DHA-dFdC).

    PubMed

    Valdes, Solange; Naguib, Youssef W; Finch, Rick A; Baze, Wallace B; Jolly, Christopher A; Cui, Zhengrong

    2017-06-01

    This study was designed to test the short-term toxicity of DHA-dFdC in a mouse model and its efficacy in a mouse model of leukemia at or below its repeat-dose maximum tolerated dose (RD-MTD). A repeat-dose dose-ranging toxicity study was designed to determine the tolerability of DHA-dFdC when administered to DBA/2 mice by intravenous (i.v.) injection on a repeat-dose schedule (i.e. injections on days 0, 3, 7, 10, and 13). In order to determine the effect of a lethal dose of DHA-dFdC, mice were injected i.v. with three doses of DHA-dFdC at 100 mg/kg on days 0, 3, and 5 (i.e. a lethal-RD). The body weight of mice was recorded two or three times a week. At the end of the study, major organs (i.e. heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, lung, and pancreas) of mice that received the lethal-RD or RD-MTD were weighed, and blood samples were collected for analyses. Finally, DHA-dFdC was i.v. injected into DBA/2 mice with syngeneic L1210 mouse leukemia cells to evaluate its efficacy at or below RD-MTD. The RD-MTD of DHA-dFdC is 50 mg/kg. At 100 mg/kg, a lethal-RD, DHA-dFdC decreases the weights of mouse spleen and liver and significantly affected certain blood parameters (i.e. white blood cells, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophil segmented). At or below its RD-MTD, DHA-dFdC significantly prolonged the survival of L1210 leukemia-bearing mice. DHA-dFdC has dose-dependent toxicity, affecting mainly spleen at a lethal-RD. At or below its RD-MTD, DHA-dFdC is effective against leukemia in a mouse model.

  4. Pilot study for ambient toxicity testing in Chesapeake bay. Year two report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W.; Ziegenfuss, M.C.; Fischer, S.A.; Anderson, R.D.; Killen, W.D.

    1992-11-01

    The primary goal of the ambient toxicity testing pilot study was to identify toxic areas in living resource habitats of the Chesapeake Bay watershed by using a battery of standardized, directly modified or recently developed water column, sediment and suborganismal toxicity tests. Tests were conducted twice at the following stations: Potomac River-Morgantown, Potomac River-Dahlgren, Patapsco River and Wye River. A suite of inorganic and organic contaminants was evaluated in the water column and sediment during these tests. Standard water quality conditions were also evaluated in water and sediment from all stations.

  5. Toxicity evaluation of petroleum blending streams: inhalation subchronic toxicity/neurotoxicity study of a light alkylate naphtha distillate in rats.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, C; Lapadula, E; Breglia, R; Bui, Q; Burnett, D; Koschier, F; Podhasky, P; White, R; Mandella, R; Hoffman, G

    1998-10-23

    A 13-wk inhalation study was conducted with Sprague-Dawley CD rats (12/sex/group) were exposed by inhalation for 13 weeks to a light alkylate naphtha distillate (LAND-2, C4-C10; average molecular weight 89.2) at actual average concentrations of 0 (room air), 668, 2220, or 6646 ppm, 6 h/d, 5 d/wk; 12 additional rats/sex in the control and high dose groups were held after final exposure for a 4-wk recovery period. The highest exposure concentration was 75% of the lower explosive limit. Standard parameters of subchronic toxicity were measured throughout the study; at necropsy, organs were weighed and tissues processed for microscopic evaluation. Neurotoxicity evaluations consisted of motor activity (MA) and a functional operational battery (FOB) measured pretest, during 5, 9, and 14 wk of the study, and after the 4-wk recovery period. Whole-body perfusion and microscopic examination of selected organs and nervous tissue from the control and high dose rats were conducted at the end of exposure. No test-related mortality or effects on physical signs, body weight, or food consumption were observed. Statistically significant increases in absolute and relative kidney weights in high-exposure males correlated with microscopically observed hyaline droplet formation and renal nephropathy, effects in male rats that are not toxicologically significant for humans. Increased liver weights in both sexes at the highest dose had no microscopic correlate and appeared reversible after the 4-wk recovery period. Exposure to LAND-2 at any dose did not produce neurotoxicity measured by MA, FOB, or neuropathology. The no-observed-effects level (NOEL) for LAND-2 was 2220 ppm for subchronic toxicity and > or =26646 ppm for neurotoxicity.

  6. Developmental toxicity study of D-tagatose in rats.

    PubMed

    Kruger, C L; Whittaker, M H; Frankos, V H; Schroeder, R E

    1999-04-01

    D-tagatose is a low-calorie sweetener that tastes like sucrose. The developmental toxicity of D-tagatose was investigated in Crl:CD(SD)BR rats administered D-tagatose at three dose levels (4000, 12,000, and 20,000 mg/kg body wt/day) via gastric intubation on days 6-15 of gestation. No compound-related toxicity was seen among any of the maternal groups. No treatment-related clinical effects were seen in the maternal animals at the 4000 mg/kg/day dose level. At the mid- and high-dose levels, most maternal animals had unformed or watery stools; this effect was most prominent early in the treatment period (Gestation Days 6-8). This effect was attributed to the osmotic effect of the large amount of D-tagatose given to the animals at these doses. Since D-tagatose is not digested or absorbed to a large extent, most of the sugar passes into the colon where it absorbs water and is fermented by colonic bacteria. Mean weight gain for the low- and mid-dose animals was comparable to the control; however, the high-dose group experienced a mean weight loss over the Gestation Day 6-9 interval. Over the entire treatment interval, however, mean weight gain for the high-dose animals was comparable to control. The decreased weight gain in the high-dose animals during the Gestation Day 6-9 interval was considered to be a direct result of laxation. In addition to the effect of laxation on body weight, reduced food consumption also contributed to the decreased weight gain. In the low-dose animals, no effect on food consumption was seen; however, both mid- and high-dose animals had food consumption values that were statistically significantly lower than the control. Food consumption was lowest during the Gestation Day 6-9 interval, the period when laxation was most prominent. Food consumption rebounded and was statistically significantly higher than the control for the mid- and high-dose animals during the posttreatment interval. Maternal liver weight for the low-dose animals was

  7. A review of toxicity studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-02-01

    We summarized the findings of in vivo toxicity studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in laboratory animals. The large majority addressed the pulmonary toxicity of SWCNTs in rodents. Inhalation, pharyngeal aspiration, and intratracheal instillation studies revealed that SWCNTs caused acute and chronic inflammation, granuloma formation, collagen deposition, fibrosis, and genotoxic effects in the lungs. Pulmonary toxicity of well-dispersed SWCNTs was more potent than less dispersed ones. Airway exposure to SWCNTs also induced cardiovascular diseases in mice. Oxidative stress was caused by the administration of SWCNTs. Injected SWCNTs were distributed throughout most of the organs including the brain, mainly retained in the lungs, liver, and spleen, and eliminated through the kidney and bile duct. Orally administered SWCNTs are suggested to be absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract to the blood circulation in mice and rats. Although no definitive study on the carcinogenicity of SWCNTs is available at present, evidence of carcinogenicity has not been reported in toxicity studies cited in this review. Overall, the available data provides initial information on SWCNT toxicity. To further clarify their toxicity and risk assessment, studies should be conducted using well-characterized SWCNTs, standard protocols, and the relevant route and doses of human exposure.

  8. Toxicity evaluation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl and other compounds involved in studies of fossil fuels biodesulphurisation.

    PubMed

    Alves, L; Paixão, S M

    2011-10-01

    The acute toxicity of some compounds used in fossil fuels biodesulphurisation studies, on the respiration activity, was evaluated by Gordonia alkanivorans and Rhodococcus erythropolis. Moreover, the effect of 2-hydroxybiphenyl on cell growth of both strains was also determined, using batch (chronic bioassays) and continuous cultures. The IC₅₀ values obtained showed the toxicity of all the compounds tested to both strains, specially the high toxicity of 2-HBP. These results were confirmed by the chronic toxicity data. The toxicity data sets highlight for a higher sensitivity to the toxicant by the strain presenting a lower growth rate, due to a lower cells number in contact with the toxicant. Thus, microorganisms exhibiting faster generation times could be more resistant to 2-HBP accumulation during a BDS process. The physiological response of both strains to 2-HBP pulse in a steady-state continuous culture shows their potential to be used in a future fossil fuel BDS process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. In silico quantitative structure toxicity relationship of chemical compounds: some case studies.

    PubMed

    Deeb, Omar; Goodarzi, Mohammad

    2012-09-01

    Undesirable toxicity is still a major block in the drug discovery process. Obviously, capable techniques that identify poor effects at a very early stage of product development and provide reasonable toxicity estimates for the huge number of untested compounds are needed. In silico techniques are very useful for this purpose, because of their advantage in reducing time and cost. These case studies give the description of in silico validation techniques and applied modeling methods for the prediction of toxicity of chemical compounds. In silico toxicity prediction techniques can be classified into two categories: Molecular Modeling and methods that derive predictions from experimental data. Molecular modeling is a computational approach to mimic the behavior of molecules, from small molecules (e.g. in conformational analysis) to biomolecules. But the same approaches can also be applied for toxicological purposes, if the mechanism is receptor mediated. Quantitative Structure-Toxicity Relationships (QSTRs) models are typical examples for the prediction of toxicity which relates variations in the molecular structures to toxicity. There are many applied modeling techniques in QSTR such as Partial Least Squares, Artificial Neural Networks, and Principal Component Regression (PCR). The applicability of these techniques in predictive toxicology will be discussed with different examples of sets of chemical compounds.

  10. Modified toxicity identification evaluation studies for achieving mining sector MISA compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, K.; Sferrazza, J.; Shriner, G.

    1995-12-31

    Results of initial MISA toxicity compliance monitoring for a multiple effluent stream mining operation indicated the presence of sporadic acute toxicity. Traditionally, only small scale acute and sub-lethal species (i.e. D. magna, C. dubia, P. promelas, Microtox) have been utilized during Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) studies. These methods had proven to be very expensive and of limit value in planning the future direction of mining effluent treatment. A more direct and economical approach to toxicity investigations was needed to prepare for the 1997 compliance deadline for non-lethality and water chemistry objectives. A modified EPA-TIE investigation was initiated on the problem effluent streams. Phase 1 modifications were made to include both MISA compliance organisms, D. magna and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). Phases 2 and 3 were replaced with effluent treatability assays derived from toxicity reduction/elimination information obtained during Phase 1 procedures. Information on potential toxicant speciation under the various treatment conditions was also collected. Preliminary results indicate that variations in the applied treatment, as well as the degree of treatment will be required for the different effluent streams to obtain non-acutely toxic effluent. Ongoing laboratory tests are being conducted to achieve consistency and confidence in the results, allowing plant operators to make informed decisions regarding the (expensive) changes to be made in their effluent treatment facilities over the next few years.

  11. Toxicity Studies of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on European Amphipods.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Lázaro, Carlos; Marin, Arnaldo; Borredat, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene in dimethyl sulfoxide on the amphipods Gammarus aequicauda, Gammarus locusta, and Corophium multisetosum was tested in a static exposure in sea water. The 48-h lethal concentration (LC(50)) of phenanthrene was 173.85 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 147.64 mug/L for G. locusta, and 215.20 mug/L for C. multisetosum. The 48-h LC(50) of fluoranthene was 49.99 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 42.71 mug/L for G. locusta, and 2.85 mug/L for C. multisetosum. The 48-h LC(50) of pyrene was 73.49 mug/L for G. aequicauda, 60.78 mug/L for G. locusta, and 25.29 mug/L for C. multisetosum. Together with their wide distribution along European coasts, the evidence of toxicity on the tested PAH compounds in these amphipods make these species appropriate candidates for evaluating oil-contaminated sediments in Europe.

  12. Brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity studies on Swietenia mahagoni (Linn.) Jacq. seed methanolic extract

    PubMed Central

    Sahgal, Geethaa; Ramanathan, Surash; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Mordi, Mohd. Nizam; Ismail, Sabariah; Mansor, Sharif Mahsufi

    2010-01-01

    Background: The seeds of Swietenia mahagoni have been applied in folk medicine for the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, malaria, amoebiasis, cough, chest pain, and intestinal parasitism. Here we are the first to report on the toxicity of the Swietenia mahagoni crude methanolic (SMCM) seed extract. Methods: SMCM seed extract has been studied for its brine shrimp lethality and acute oral toxicity, in mice. Results: The brine shrimp lethality bioassay shows a moderate cytotoxicity at high concentration. The LC50 for the extract is 0.68 mg/ml at 24 hours of exposure. The LD50 of the SMCM seed extract for acute oral toxicity in mice is greater than 5000 mg/kg. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that Swietenia mahagoni crude methanolic seed extract may contain bioactive compounds of potential therapeutic significance which are relatively safe from toxic effects, and can compromise the medicinal use of this plant in folk medicine. PMID:21808570

  13. Insights on in vitro models for safety and toxicity assessment of cosmetic ingredients.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Andreia; Sarmento, Bruno; Rodrigues, Francisca

    2017-03-15

    According to the current European legislation, the safety assessment of each individual cosmetic ingredient of any formulation is the basis for the safety evaluation of a cosmetic product. Also, animal testing in the European Union is prohibited for cosmetic ingredients and products since 2004 and 2009, respectively. Additionally, the commercialization of any cosmetic products containing ingredients tested on animal models was forbidden in 2009. In consequence of these boundaries, the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) proposes a list of validated cell-based in vitro models for predicting the safety and toxicity of cosmetic ingredients. These models have been demonstrated as valuable and effective tools to overcome the limitations of animal in vivo studies. Although the use of in vitro cell-based models for the evaluation of absorption and permeability of cosmetic ingredients is widespread, a detailed study on the properties of these platforms and the in vitro-in vivo correlation compared with human data are required. Moreover, additional efforts must be taken to develop in vitro models to predict carcinogenicity, repeat dose toxicity and reproductive toxicity, for which no alternative in vitro methods are currently available. This review paper summarizes and characterizes the most relevant in vitro models validated by ECVAM employed to predict the safety and toxicology of cosmetic ingredients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Toxicity assessment of nanosilver wound dressing in Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Bidgoli, Sepideh Arbabi; Mahdavi, Moujan; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Korani, Mitra; Amani, Amir; Ziarati, Parisa

    2013-05-07

    Antibiotic resistance to microorganisms is one of the major problems faced in the field of wound care in burns patients. Silver nanoparticles have come up as potent antimicrobial agent and are being evaluated in diverse medical applications ranging from silver based dressings to silver coated medical devices. We aimed in present study to test the release of nanosilver from nanosilver wound dressing and compare the dermal and systemic toxicity of nanosilver dressings in a repeated dose (21 days) model. Under general anesthesia, a limited standard 2nd degree burns were provided on the back of each rat in all treatment, negative control (simple dressing) and 5% silver nitrate groups, each contained 5 male wistar rats. According to the analysis made by atomic absorption spectrometry, the wound dressings released 0.599 ± 0.083 ppm of nanosilver during first 24 hrs of study. Daily observations were recoded and wounds were covered with new dressings each 24 hrs. Burn healing was observed in nanosilver wound dressing group in shorter time periods than the control groups. In toxicity assessment, this dressing didn't cause any hematological and histopathological abnormalities in treatment group but biochemical studies showed significant rise of plasma transaminase (ALT) at the endpoint (21 days) of the study (P=0.027). Portal mononuclear lymphoid and polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltrations in three to four adjacent foci were recognized around the central hepatic vein in treatment group. Mild hepatotoxic effects of nanosilver wound dressing in wistar rat emphasize the necessity of more studies on toxicity potentials of low dose nanosilver by dermal applications.

  15. Cumulative bioluminescence; A potential rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity: development study

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V. )

    1992-03-01

    A new rapid test of drilling fluid toxicity is based on the spontaneous bioluminescence of Pyrocystis lunula, an easy-to-culture alga that vigorously responds to shear stress (mixing) by emitting a sharp burst of light. In contrast to other bioluminescence methods, a cumulative flux of light is measured with a photomultiplier that eliminates the effect of exposure time on test results. Light quenching, caused by the presence of a toxicant, results in the dose/response relationship (DSR) typical for the enzymatic reaction kinetics. The Michaelis-Menten (dissociation) constant is used as a direct measure of toxicity. The evaluation study involved multiple experiments with 60 samples of drilling fluids from the U.S. gulf coast, as well as such typical toxicants as diesel oil, mineral oil, and chrome lignosulfonate (CLS). In this paper, the results of the test error analysis and comparisons with the Microtox and Mysid shrimp assays are reported.

  16. U.S./Mexico Border environmental study toxics release inventory data, 1988--1992

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.F.; LoPresti, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    This is a report on industrial toxic chemical releases and transfers based on information reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), a database maintained by the USEPA. This document discusses patterns of toxic chemical releases to the atmosphere, to water, to the land, and to underground injection; and transfers of toxic chemicals to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW), and for disposal, treatment and other off-site transfers during the TRI reporting years 1988--1992. Geographic coverage is limited to the US side of the ``Border Area``, the geographic area situated within 100 km of the US/Mexico international boundary. A primary purpose of this study is to provide background information that can be used in the future development of potential ``indicator variables`` for tracking environmental and public health status in the Border Area in conjunction with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

  17. Effect of nitrate-based bioremediation on contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity-column study

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Bantle, J.A.; Schrock, E.J.

    1998-03-01

    A laboratory column study was set up to evaluate changes in contaminant distribution and sediment toxicity following nitrate-based bioremediation and to correlate toxicity reduction with loss of fuel components. Glass columns were packed with sediment from an aquifer that had been contaminated with JP-4 jet fuel and were remediated using feed solution containing 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}-N. Column influents and effluents were monitored for BTEXTMB (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, trimethylbenzenes), electron acceptors, nutrients, and dissolved gases. Duplicate columns were sacrificed after 1, 4, and 7 months, and core material was analyzed for chemical constituents. In addition, core material was evaluated for toxicity using FETAX, a developmental toxicity test employing frog embryos.

  18. In vivo toxicity studies of fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade: a review.

    PubMed

    Escrivá, L; Font, G; Manyes, L

    2015-04-01

    This review summarizes the information regarding the in vivo studies of Fusarium mycotoxins in the last decade. The most common studies are classified as subacute toxicity, subchronic toxicity, acute toxicity, toxicokinetic studies and teratogenicity in order of importance. The most used animals in in vivo studies are pigs, rats, chickens and mice. Fumonisin B1, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, nivalenol and T-2 toxin are the most studied fusarotoxins. Studies with combinations of mycotoxins are also frequent, deoxynivalenol generally being one of them. The predominant route of administration is oral, administered mostly in the form of naturally contaminated feed. Other administration routes also used are intraperitoneal, intravenous and subcutaneous. In vivo research on Fusarium mycotoxins has increased since 2010 highlighting the need for such studies in the field of food and feed safety.

  19. Transgenic mice and metabolomics for study of hepatic xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Frank J.; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Ma, Xiaochao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The study of xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity has been greatly aided by the use of genetically-modified mouse models and metabolomics. Areas covered Gene knockout mice can be used to determine the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of xenobiotics in vivo and to examine the mechanisms of xenobiotic-induced toxicity. Humanized mouse models are especially important since there exist marked species differences in the xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and the nuclear receptors that regulate these enzymes. Humanized mice expressing cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and nuclear receptors including the pregnane X receptor (PXR), the major regulator of xenobiotic metabolism and transport were produced. With genetically-modified mouse models, metabolomics can determine the molecular map of many xenobiotics with a level of sensitivity that allows the discovery of even minor metabolites. This technology can be used for determining the mechanism of xenobiotic toxicity and to find early biomarkers for toxicity. Expert opinion Metabolomics and genetically-modified mouse models can be used for the study of xenobiotic metabolism and toxicity by: 1) Comparison of the metabolomics profiles between wild-type and genetically-modified mice, and searching for genotype-dependent endogenous metabolites; 2) Searching for and elucidating metabolites derived from xenobiotics; 3) Discovery of specific alteration of endogenous compounds induced by xenobiotics-induced toxicity. PMID:25836352

  20. Standardized Total Average Toxicity Score: A Scale- and Grade-Independent Measure of Late Radiotherapy Toxicity to Facilitate Pooling of Data From Different Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Gillian C.; West, Catharine M.L.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Talbot, Christopher J.; Elliott, Rebecca M.; Tanteles, George A.; Symonds, R. Paul; Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Dunning, Alison M.; Burnet, Neil G.; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The search for clinical and biologic biomarkers associated with late radiotherapy toxicity is hindered by the use of multiple and different endpoints from a variety of scoring systems, hampering comparisons across studies and pooling of data. We propose a novel metric, the Standardized Total Average Toxicity (STAT) score, to try to overcome these difficulties. Methods and Materials: STAT scores were derived for 1010 patients from the Cambridge breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy trial and 493 women from University Hospitals of Leicester. The sensitivity of the STAT score to detect differences between patient groups, stratified by factors known to influence late toxicity, was compared with that of individual endpoints. Analysis of residuals was used to quantify the effect of these covariates. Results: In the Cambridge cohort, STAT scores detected differences (p < 0.00005) between patients attributable to breast volume, surgical specimen weight, dosimetry, acute toxicity, radiation boost to tumor bed, postoperative infection, and smoking (p < 0.0002), with no loss of sensitivity over individual toxicity endpoints. Diabetes (p = 0.017), poor postoperative surgical cosmesis (p = 0.0036), use of chemotherapy (p = 0.0054), and increasing age (p = 0.041) were also associated with increased STAT score. When the Cambridge and Leicester datasets were combined, STAT was associated with smoking status (p < 0.00005), diabetes (p = 0.041), chemotherapy (p = 0.0008), and radiotherapy boost (p = 0.0001). STAT was independent of the toxicity scale used and was able to deal with missing data. There were correlations between residuals of the STAT score obtained using different toxicity scales (r > 0.86, p < 0.00005 for both datasets). Conclusions: The STAT score may be used to facilitate the analysis of overall late radiation toxicity, from multiple trials or centers, in studies of possible genetic and nongenetic determinants of radiotherapy toxicity.

  1. Comparative toxicity study of Ag, Au, and Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles on Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Albee, Brian; Alemayehu, Matti; Diaz, Rocio; Ingham, Leigha; Kamal, Shawn; Rodriguez, Maritza; Bishnoi, Sandra Whaley

    2010-09-01

    A comparative assessment of the 48-h acute toxicity of aqueous nanoparticles synthesized using the same methodology, including Au, Ag, and Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles, was conducted to determine their ecological effect in freshwater environments through the use of Daphnia magna, using their mortality as a toxicological endpoint. D. magna are one of the standard organisms used for ecotoxicity studies due to their sensitivity to chemical toxicants. Particle suspensions used in toxicity testing were well-characterized through a combination of absorbance measurements, atomic force or electron microscopy, flame atomic absorption spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering to determine composition, aggregation state, and particle size. The toxicity of all nanoparticles tested was found to be dose and composition dependent. The concentration of Au nanoparticles that killed 50% of the test organisms (LC(50)) ranged from 65-75 mg/L. In addition, three different sized Ag nanoparticles (diameters = 36, 52, and 66 nm) were studied to analyze the toxicological effects of particle size on D. magna; however, it was found that toxicity was not a function of size and ranged from 3-4 μg/L for all three sets of Ag nanoparticles tested. This was possibly due to the large degree of aggregation when these nanoparticles were suspended in standard synthetic freshwater. Moreover, the LC(50) values for Ag-Au bimetallic nanoparticles were found to be between that of Ag and Au but much closer to that of Ag. The bimetallic particles containing 80% Ag and 20% Au were found to have a significantly lower toxicity to Daphnia (LC(50) of 15 μg/L) compared to Ag nanoparticles, while the toxicity of the nanoparticles containing 20% Ag and 80% Au was greater than expected at 12 μg/L. The comparison results confirm that Ag nanoparticles were much more toxic than Au nanoparticles, and that the introduction of gold into silver nanoparticles may lower their environmental impact by lowering the amount

  2. Changes in exposure temperature lead to changes in pesticide toxicity to earthworms: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    The occurring climate changes will have direct consequences to all ecosystems, including the soil ecosystems. The effects of climate change include, among other, the changes in temperature and greater frequency and intensity of extreme weather conditions. Temperature is an important factor in ecotoxicological investigations since it can act as a stressor and influence the physiological status of organisms, as well as affect the fate and transport of pollutants present in the environment. However, most of so far conducted (eco)toxicological investigations neglected the possible effects of temperature and focused solely on the effects of toxicants on organisms. Considering that temperature can contribute to the toxicity of pollutants, it is of immense importance to investigate whether the change in the exposure temperature will impact the strength of the toxic effects of pollutants present in soil ecosystems. Therefore, in the present study the toxicity of several commonly used pesticides to earthworms was assessed under different exposure temperatures (15, 20 and 25°C). The results showed that changes in exposure temperature lead to changes in susceptibility of earthworms to particular pesticides. Namely, exposures to the same pesticide concentration at different temperatures lead to different toxicity responses. Increase in exposure temperature in most cases caused increase in toxicity, whereas decrease in temperature mostly caused decrease in toxicity. This preliminary study points to need for an in-depth investigation of mechanisms by which temperature affects the toxicity of pesticides and also provides important data for future research on the effects of temperature change on the soil ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Retinal Toxicity in Patients Treated With Hydroxychloroquine: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Espandar, Goldis; Moghimi, Jamileh; Ghorbani, Raheb; Pourazizi, Mohsen; Seiri, Mohammad-Ali; Khosravi, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an antimalarial medication that can also be used to treat autoimmune diseases. However, it can produce irreversible changes to the retina that lead to visual impairment. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients treated with HCQ who develop retinal toxicity and the risk factors for the development of HCQ-induced retinal toxicity among Iranian patients. The is a cross-sectional clinical study of 59 patients who were treated with HCQ during 2014-2015. A questionnaire was used to collect data on the following demographic and clinical factors: age, gender, type of rheumatic disease, history of cataract surgery, daily and cumulative HCQ dose, and duration of HCQ use. Retinal toxicity was diagnosed on the basis of the automated perimetry results of the central 10° of vision and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The associations between the demographic and clinical factors and retinal toxicity were assessed, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Retinal toxicity was detected in 18 (30.5%) of the patients, and 5 (8.5 %) developed color vision impairments. There was no association between retinal toxicity and sex (P = 0.514), history of cataract surgery (P = 0.479), type of rheumatic disease (P = 0.539), or daily HCQ dose (P = 0.062). However, there was a significant positive association between retinal toxicity and age (P = 0.006), cumulative HCQ dose (P = 0.002), and duration of HCQ use (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the risk factors for retinal toxicity after HCQ treatment were advanced age, use of a higher cumulative HCQ dose, and a longer duration of treatment.

  4. Retinal Toxicity in Patients Treated With Hydroxychloroquine: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    ESPANDAR, Goldis; MOGHIMI, Jamileh; GHORBANI, Raheb; POURAZIZI, Mohsen; SEIRI, Mohammad-Ali; KHOSRAVI, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is an antimalarial medication that can also be used to treat autoimmune diseases. However, it can produce irreversible changes to the retina that lead to visual impairment. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of patients treated with HCQ who develop retinal toxicity and the risk factors for the development of HCQ-induced retinal toxicity among Iranian patients. The is a cross-sectional clinical study of 59 patients who were treated with HCQ during 2014–2015. A questionnaire was used to collect data on the following demographic and clinical factors: age, gender, type of rheumatic disease, history of cataract surgery, daily and cumulative HCQ dose, and duration of HCQ use. Retinal toxicity was diagnosed on the basis of the automated perimetry results of the central 10° of vision and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The associations between the demographic and clinical factors and retinal toxicity were assessed, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Retinal toxicity was detected in 18 (30.5%) of the patients, and 5 (8.5 %) developed color vision impairments. There was no association between retinal toxicity and sex (P = 0.514), history of cataract surgery (P = 0.479), type of rheumatic disease (P = 0.539), or daily HCQ dose (P = 0.062). However, there was a significant positive association between retinal toxicity and age (P = 0.006), cumulative HCQ dose (P = 0.002), and duration of HCQ use (P < 0.001). In conclusion, the risk factors for retinal toxicity after HCQ treatment were advanced age, use of a higher cumulative HCQ dose, and a longer duration of treatment. PMID:28293646

  5. Are quantum dots toxic? Exploring the discrepancy between cell culture and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Kim M; Dai, Qin; Alman, Benjamin A; Chan, Warren C W

    2013-03-19

    Despite significant interest in developing quantum dots (QDs) for biomedical applications, many researchers are convinced that QDs will never be used for treating patients because of their potential toxicity. The perception that QDs are toxic is rooted in two assumptions. Cadmium-containing QDs can kill cells in culture. Many researchers then assume that because QDs are toxic to cells, they must be toxic to humans. In addition, many researchers classify QDs as a homogeneous group of materials. Therefore, if CdSe QDs are harmful, they extrapolate this result to all QDs. Though unsubstantiated, these assumptions continue to drive QD research. When dosing is physiologically appropriate, QD toxicity has not been demonstrated in animal models. In addition, QDs are not uniform: each design is a unique combination of physicochemical properties that influence biological activity and toxicity. In this Account, we summarize key findings from in vitro and in vivo studies, explore the causes of the discrepancy in QD toxicological data, and provide our view of the future direction of the field. In vitro and in vivo QD studies have advanced our knowledge of cellular transport kinetics, mechanisms of QD toxicity, and biodistribution following animal injection. Cell culture experiments have shown that QDs undergo design-dependent intracellular localization and they can cause cytotoxicity by releasing free cadmium into solution and by generating free radical species. In animal experiments, QDs preferentially enter the liver and spleen following intravascular injection, undergo minimal excretion if larger than 6 nm, and appear to be safe to the animal. In vitro and in vivo studies show an apparent discrepancy with regard to toxicity. Dosing provides one explanation for these findings. Under culture conditions, a cell experiences a constant QD dose, but the in vivo QD concentration can vary, and the organ-specific dose may not be high enough to induce detectable toxicity. Because QDs

  6. Local and systemic toxicity of intraoral submucosal injections of phentolamine mesylate (OraVerse).

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Bruce; Zeller, Jillynne R; Thake, Daryl

    2009-01-01

    OraVerse, an injectable formulation of phentolamine mesylate (PM), was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for reversal of anesthesia of the lip and tongue and associated functional deficits resulting from an intraoral submucosal injection of a local anesthetic containing a vasoconstrictor. Because PM had not been approved previously for submucosal administration, 2 Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) studies in dogs designed to investigate systemic toxicity and the local effects of single and repeated dosing of OraVerse on the inferior alveolar nerve and branches of the superior alveolar nerve and adjacent soft tissues after local administration were conducted. Systemic toxicity was measured by preinjection and postinjection clinical examinations, clinical chemistry, and gross and microscopic examinations of major organs after necropsy. No evidence of systemic toxicity was detected. Local nerve and adjacent tissue damage was assessed by conventional histopathology. Nerve degeneration was evident in 1 animal. Mild perineural inflammation adjacent to the inferior alveolar nerve and inflammatory exudates were observed in submucosal tissues in several animals. No changes were observed in the nerves at injection sites of dogs from any dose group that were considered directly related to the test articles. These data reveal that single and repeated intraoral administrations of OraVerse are well tolerated in beagle dogs.

  7. Proteomic analysis of 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD dipalmitate toxicity in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Stefanie; Oberemm, Axel; Buhrke, Thorsten; Meckert, Christine; Rozycki, Christel; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Thermal treatment of foodstuff containing fats and salt promotes the formation of 3-chloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) and its fatty acid esters. 3-MCPD-exposed rats develop testicular lesions and Leydig cell tumors. 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD ester toxicity is thought to be caused by 3-MCPD and its metabolites, since 3-MCPD esters are hydrolyzed in the gut. Inhibition of glycolysis is one of the few known molecular mechanisms of 3-MCPD toxicity. To obtain deeper insight into this process, a comparative proteomic approach was chosen, based on a 28-days repeated-dose feeding study with male Wistar rats. Animals received equimolar doses of 3-MCPD or 3-MCPD dipalmitate. A lower dose of 3-MCPD dipalmitate was also administered. Absence of histopathological changes supported an analysis of early cellular disturbance. Testes were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometric protein identification. Data provide a comprehensive overview of proteomic changes induced by 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD dipalmitate in rat testis in an early phase of organ impairment. Results are compatible with known 3-MCPD effects on reproductive function, substantially extend our knowledge about cellular responses to 3-MCPD and support the hypothesis that toxicity of 3-MCPD and 3-MCPD esters is mediated via common effectors. DJ-1 was identified as a candidate marker for 3-MCPD exposure.

  8. A multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The booming nanotech industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At the organism level, our automated system analyzes hundreds of individual animals for body length, locomotion speed, and lifespan. To demonstrate the utility of our system, we applied this technology to test the toxicity of 20 nanomaterials under four concentrations. Only fullerene nanoparticles (nC60), fullerol, TiO2, and CeO2 showed little or no toxicity. Various degrees of toxicity were detected from different forms of carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon black, Ag, and fumed SiO2 nanoparticles. Aminofullerene and UV irradiated nC60 also showed small but significant toxicity. We further investigated the effects of nanomaterial size, shape, surface chemistry, and exposure conditions on toxicity. Our data are publicly available at the open-access nanotoxicity database www.QuantWorm.org/nano. PMID:25611253

  9. Isoniazid Toxicity among an Older Veteran Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Vinnard, Christopher; Gopal, Anand; Linkin, Darren R.; Maslow, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background: our objective was to determine the incidence of toxicity among veterans initiating isoniazid therapy for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and determine whether advancing age was a risk factor for toxicity. Methods: we performed a retrospective cohort study among all adults initiating isoniazid treatment for LTBI at a Veterans Medical Center from 1999 to 2005. We collected data on patient demographics, co-morbidities, site of initiation, and treatment outcome. Results: 219 patients initiated isoniazid therapy for LTBI during the period of observation, and the completion of therapy was confirmed in 100 patients (46%). Among 18/219 patients (8%) that discontinued therapy due to a documented suspected toxicity, the median time to onset was 3 months (IQR 1–5 months). In an adjusted Cox regression model, there was no association between discontinuation due to suspected toxicity and advancing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99, 1.07). In contrast, hepatitis C infection was a significant predictor of cessation due to toxicity in the adjusted analysis (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.08, 8.52). Conclusions: cessation of isoniazid therapy due to suspected toxicity was infrequently observed among a veteran population and was not associated with advancing age. Alternative LTBI treatment approaches should be further examined in the veteran population. PMID:23365735

  10. Isoniazid Toxicity among an Older Veteran Population: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vinnard, Christopher; Gopal, Anand; Linkin, Darren R; Maslow, Joel

    2013-01-01

    our objective was to determine the incidence of toxicity among veterans initiating isoniazid therapy for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and determine whether advancing age was a risk factor for toxicity. we performed a retrospective cohort study among all adults initiating isoniazid treatment for LTBI at a Veterans Medical Center from 1999 to 2005. We collected data on patient demographics, co-morbidities, site of initiation, and treatment outcome. 219 patients initiated isoniazid therapy for LTBI during the period of observation, and the completion of therapy was confirmed in 100 patients (46%). Among 18/219 patients (8%) that discontinued therapy due to a documented suspected toxicity, the median time to onset was 3 months (IQR 1-5 months). In an adjusted Cox regression model, there was no association between discontinuation due to suspected toxicity and advancing age (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99, 1.07). In contrast, hepatitis C infection was a significant predictor of cessation due to toxicity in the adjusted analysis (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.08, 8.52). cessation of isoniazid therapy due to suspected toxicity was infrequently observed among a veteran population and was not associated with advancing age. Alternative LTBI treatment approaches should be further examined in the veteran population.

  11. Multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-02-17

    The booming nanotechnology industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At the organism level, our automated system analyzes hundreds of individual animals for body length, locomotion speed, and lifespan. To demonstrate the utility of our system, we applied this technology to test the toxicity of 20 nanomaterials at four concentrations. Only fullerene nanoparticles (nC60), fullerol, TiO2, and CeO2 showed little or no toxicity. Various degrees of toxicity were detected from different forms of carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon black, Ag, and fumed SiO2 nanoparticles. Aminofullerene and ultraviolet-irradiated nC60 also showed small but significant toxicity. We further investigated the effects of nanomaterial size, shape, surface chemistry, and exposure conditions on toxicity. Our data are publicly available at the open-access nanotoxicity database www.QuantWorm.org/nano.

  12. Study on the developmental toxicity of combined artesunate and mefloquine antimalarial drugs on rats.

    PubMed

    Boareto, Ana Cláudia; Müller, Juliane Centeno; de Araujo, Samanta Luiza; Lourenço, Ana Carolina; Lourenço, Emerson Luiz Botelho; Gomes, Caroline; Minatovicz, Bruna; Lombardi, Natália; Paumgartten, Francisco Roma; Dalsenter, Paulo Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Antimalarial drug combinations containing artemisinins (ACTs) have become first choice therapies for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Data on safety of ACTs in pregnancy are limited and no previous study has been conducted on the developmental toxicity of artesunate-mefloquine combinations on the first trimester of gestation. To evaluate the developmental toxicity of an artesunate/mefloquine combination, pregnant rats were treated orally with artesunate (15 and 40 mg/kg bwt/day), mefloquine (30 and 80 mg/kg bwt/day) and artesunate/mefloquine (15/30 and 40/80 mg/kg bwt/day) on gestation days 9-11. Dams were C-sectioned on day 20, and their uteri and fetuses removed and examined for soft tissue and skeleton abnormalities. Artesunate increased embryolethality and the incidence of limb long bone malformations on the absence of overt maternal toxicity. Mefloquine (80 mg/kg bwt/day) was maternally toxic and enhanced fetal variations. Combination of artesunate and mefloquine did not enhance their toxicity compared to the toxicity observed after its separate administration. Embryotoxicity of artesunate was apparently attenuated when it is co-administered with mefloquine.

  13. Carboplatin/taxane-induced gastrointestinal toxicity: a pharmacogenomics study on the SCOTROC1 trial.

    PubMed

    He, Y J; Winham, S J; Hoskins, J M; Glass, S; Paul, J; Brown, R; Motsinger-Reif, A; McLeod, H L

    2016-06-01

    Carboplatin/taxane combination is first-line therapy for ovarian cancer. However, patients can encounter treatment delays, impaired quality of life, even death because of chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. A candidate gene study was conducted to assess potential association of genetic variants with GI toxicity in 808 patients who received carboplatin/taxane in the Scottish Randomized Trial in Ovarian Cancer 1 (SCOTROC1). Patients were randomized into discovery and validation cohorts consisting of 404 patients each. Clinical covariates and genetic variants associated with grade III/IV GI toxicity in discovery cohort were evaluated in replication cohort. Chemotherapy-induced GI toxicity was significantly associated with seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the ATP7B, GSR, VEGFA and SCN10A genes. Patients with risk genotypes were at 1.53 to 18.01 higher odds to develop carboplatin/taxane-induced GI toxicity (P<0.01). Variants in the VEGF gene were marginally associated with survival time. Our data provide potential targets for modulation/inhibition of GI toxicity in ovarian cancer patients.

  14. Evaluation of developmental toxicity studies of glyphosate with attention to cardiovascular development

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Gary L.; Kimmel, Carole A.; Williams, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate has undergone multiple safety tests for developmental toxicity in rats and rabbits. The European Commission’s 2002 review of available glyphosate data discusses specific heart defects observed in several individual rabbit developmental toxicity studies, but describes the evidence for a potential causal relationship as equivocal. The present assessment was undertaken to analyze the current body of information generated from seven unpublished rabbit studies in order to determine if glyphosate poses a risk for cardiovascular malformations. In addition, the results of six unpublished developmental toxicity studies in rats were considered. Five of the seven rabbit studies (dose range: 10–500 mg/kg/day) were GLP- and testing guideline-compliant for the era in which the studies were performed; a sixth study predated testing and GLP guidelines, but generally adhered to these principles. The seventh study was judged inadequate. In each of the adequate studies, offspring effects occurred only at doses that also caused maternal toxicity. An integrated evaluation of the six adequate studies, using conservative assumptions, demonstrated that neither the overall malformation rate nor the incidence of cardiovascular malformations increased with dose up to the point where severe maternal toxicity was observed (generally ≥150 mg/kg/day). Random occurrences of cardiovascular malformations were observed across all dose groups (including controls) and did not exhibit a dose–response relationship. In the six rat studies (dose range: 30–3500 mg/kg/day), a low incidence of sporadic cardiovascular malformations was reported that was clearly not related to treatment. In summary, assessment of the entire body of the developmental toxicity data reviewed fails to support a potential risk for increased cardiovascular defects as a result of glyphosate exposure during pregnancy. PMID:23286529

  15. Safety and PK/PD correlation of TV-1106, a recombinant fused human albumin-growth hormone, following repeat dose administration to monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, Nurit; Rosenstock, Moti; Hallak, Hussein; Bassan, Merav; Rasamoelisolo, Michele; Leuschner, Jost; Shinar, Doron

    TV-1106 is a recombinant human albumin genetically fused to growth hormone which is intended to reduce the frequency of injections for GH therapy users. We report the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of repeated subcutaneous injections of TV-1106 in Cynomolgus monkeys. Cynomolgus monkeys received four weekly subcutaneous injections of 0, 5, 10 or 20mg/kg TV-1106 and were monitored for safety signals throughout the study. Serum levels of TV-1106 and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were assayed. Treated animals showed no adverse effects or histopathological changes. TV-1106 serum concentrations showed sustained exposure to the drug. Exposure increased in a dose-dependent manner with peak concentrations at approximately 24h post-dosing and elimination half-lives in the range of 12 to 24h. IGF-1 serum concentrations were elevated throughout the entire study duration, indicative of the pharmacological response. There was a clear correlation between change in IGF-1 levels and dose or exposure to TV-1106. The safety, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic findings support the further development of TV-1106 as a once-weekly administered treatment for patients with GHD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactions between toxic chemicals and natural environmental factors--a meta-analysis and case studies.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Ryszard; Bednarska, Agnieszka J; Kramarz, Paulina E; Loureiro, Susana; Scheil, Volker; Kudłek, Joanna; Holmstrup, Martin

    2010-08-15

    The paper addresses problems arising from effects of natural environmental factors on toxicity of pollutants to organisms. Most studies on interactions between toxicants and natural factors, including those completed in the EU project NoMiracle (Novel Methods for Integrated Risk Assessment of Cumulative Stressors in Europe) described herein, showed that effects of toxic chemicals on organisms can differ vastly depending purely on external conditions. We compiled data from 61 studies on effects of temperature, moisture and dissolved oxygen on toxicity of a range of chemicals representing pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, plant protection products of bacterial origin and trace metals. In 62.3% cases significant interactions (p< or =0.05 or less) between natural factors and chemicals were found, reaching 100% for the effect of dissolved oxygen on toxicity of waterborne chemicals. The meta-analysis of the 61 studies showed that the null hypothesis assuming no interactions between toxic chemicals and natural environmental factors should be rejected at p=2.7 x 10(-82) (truncated product method probability). In a few cases of more complex experimental designs, also second-order interactions were found, indicating that natural factors can modify interactions among chemicals. Such data emphasize the necessity of including information on natural factors and their variation in time and across geographic regions in ecological risk assessment. This can be done only if appropriate ecotoxicological test designs are used, in which test organisms are exposed to toxicants at a range of environmental conditions. We advocate designing such tests for the second-tier ecological risk assessment procedures.

  17. Antioxidant and Toxicity Studies of 50% Methanolic Extract of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chung Pin; Fung Ang, Lee; Por, Lip Yee; Wong, Siew Tung; Asmawi, Mohd. Zaini

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity and potential toxicity of 50% methanolic extract of Orthosiphon stamineus (Lamiaceae) leaves (MEOS) after acute and subchronic administration in rats. Superoxide radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging, and ferrous ion chelating methods were used to evaluate the antioxidant properties of the extract. In acute toxicity study, single dose of MEOS, 5000 mg/kg, was administered to rats by oral gavage, and the treated rats were monitored for 14 days. While in the subchronic toxicity study, MEOS was administered orally, at doses of 1250, 2500, and 5000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. From the results, MEOS showed good superoxide radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging, ferrous ion chelating, and antilipid peroxidation activities. There was no mortality detected or any signs of toxicity in acute and subchronic toxicity studies. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in bodyweight, relative organ weight, and haematological and biochemical parameters between both male and female treated rats in any doses tested. No abnormality of internal organs was observed between treatment and control groups. The oral lethal dose determined was more than 5000 mg/kg and the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of MEOS for both male and female rats is considered to be 5000 mg/kg per day. PMID:24490155

  18. Safety assessment of methanol extract of red dragon fruit (Hylocereus polyrhizus): acute and subchronic toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Hor, Sook Yee; Ahmad, Mariam; Farsi, Elham; Yam, Mun Fei; Hashim, Mohd Akmal; Lim, Chung Pin; Sadikun, Amirin; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini

    2012-06-01

    Recently, the fruits of Hylocereus polyrhizus, known as red dragon fruit, have received much attention from growers worldwide. However, there is little toxicological information regarding the safety of repeated exposure to these fruits. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of a methanol extract of H. polyrhizus fruit after acute and subchronic administration in rats. In the acute toxicity study, single doses of fruit extract (1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg) were administered to rats by oral gavage, and the rats were then monitored for 14 days. In the subchronic toxicity study, the fruit extract was administered orally to rats at doses of 1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg/day for 28 days. There was no mortality or signs of acute or subchronic toxicity. There was no significant difference in body weight, relative organ weight or hematological parameters in the subchronic toxicity study. Biochemical analysis showed some significant changes, including creatinine, globulin, total protein and urea levels. No abnormality of internal organs was observed between treatment and control groups. The lethal oral dose of the fruit extract is more than 5000 mg/kg and the no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of the extract for both male and female rats is considered to be 5000 mg/kg per day for 28 days.

  19. Central nervous system effects of the interaction between risperidone (single dose) and the 5-HT6 antagonist SB742457 (repeated doses) in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke; Rad, Mandana; Zamuner, Stefano; Cohen, Adam F; Lemme, Francesca; Franson, Kari L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Pich, Emilio Merlo

    2011-06-01

    • Several lines of evidence suggest a possible role of 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists in dementia or cognitive dysfunction of schizophrenia. SB-742457 is a potent 5-HT(6) antagonist and has shown efficacy in different animal models of cognitive impairment. It is currently in development as a cognitive enhancer. Risperidone, commonly used to control agitation and psychotic features in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, is a D(2)/5-HT(2A ) antagonist with low affinity for 5-HT(6) receptors and limited effects on cognitive parameters. • As the combination of risperidone and SB-742457 may constitute a reasonable combination in cognitively impaired patients, pharmacodynamic interaction effects were investigated in this study. The only significant drug-drug interaction was a small increase of electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha and beta bands, which might suggest mild arousing activity of SB-742457 on the central nervous system-depressant effects of risperidone. The clinical relevance of these findings in patients remains to be established. Additionally, this study provided an extensive multidimensional pharmacodynamic profile of risperidone in healthy volunteers, showing that this antipsychotic suppresses motor performance (eye-hand coordination, finger tapping and postural stability), alertness, memory and neurophysiological functions (saccadic eye movements and EEG power spectrum). Several lines of evidence suggest a possible role of 5-HT(6 ) receptor antagonists in cognitive dysfunction of schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, are currently used in these disorders. Therefore, the pharmacological interactions between the 5-HT(6) antagonist SB-742457 and risperidone were investigated in the light of possible co-medication. A randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover design was used to study the interaction between multiple doses SB-742457 50 mg and a single dose risperidone 2 mg in 18 healthy subjects. Treatment was well tolerated. The

  20. Central nervous system effects of the interaction between risperidone (single dose) and the 5-HT6 antagonist SB742457 (repeated doses) in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke; Rad, Mandana; Zamuner, Stefano; Cohen, Adam F; Lemme, Francesca; Franson, Kari L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Pich, Emilio Merlo

    2011-01-01

    AIM Several lines of evidence suggest a possible role of 5-HT6receptor antagonists in cognitive dysfunction of schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, are currently used in these disorders. Therefore, the pharmacological interactions between the 5-HT6 antagonist SB-742457 and risperidone were investigated in the light of possible co-medication. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover design was used to study the interaction between multiple doses SB-742457 50 mg and a single dose risperidone 2 mg in 18 healthy subjects. RESULTS Treatment was well tolerated. The most common adverse event was somnolence in 83% during the combination vs. 50% of subjects after risperidone, 32% after placebo and 11% after SB-742457. Combination treatment produced a statistically significant increase in the maximum plasma concentration of risperidone and had no effect on SB-742457 pharmacokinetics. Risperidone decreased saccadic peak velocity, finger tapping, adaptive tracking, subjective alertness, delayed word recognition and body sway and increased electroencephalogram (EEG) theta power and prolactin. The only pharmacodynamic interaction of risperidone and SB-742457 was an increase of absolute EEG alpha (ratio = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.40, P = 0.0004) and beta power (ratio = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.27, P = 0.016). No significant effects of SB-742457 alone were found. CONCLUSION The pharmacokinetic interactions between SB-742457 and risperidone detected in this study were not clinically relevant. The increase in EEG alpha and beta power is incompatible with enhanced risperidone activity, but could point to mild arousing effects of the combination. Most pharmacodynamic changes of risperidone are consistent with previously reported data. The potential cognitive effects of SB-742457 remain to be established. PMID:21223356

  1. Usefulness of Intratracheal Instillation Studies for Estimating Nanoparticle-Induced Pulmonary Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Izumi, Hiroto; Yoshiura, Yukiko; Fujishima, Kei; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation studies are the gold standard for the estimation of the harmful effects of respirable chemical substances, while there is limited evidence of the harmful effects of chemical substances by intratracheal instillation. We reviewed the effectiveness of intratracheal instillation studies for estimating the hazards of nanoparticles, mainly using papers in which both inhalation and intratracheal instillation studies were performed using the same nanoparticles. Compared to inhalation studies, there is a tendency in intratracheal instillation studies that pulmonary inflammation lasted longer in the lungs. A difference in pulmonary inflammation between high and low toxicity nanoparticles was observed in the intratracheal instillation studies, as in the inhalation studies. Among the endpoints of pulmonary toxicity, the kinetics of neutrophil counts, percentage of neutrophils, and chemokines for neutrophils and macrophages, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), reflected pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that these markers may be considered the predictive markers of pulmonary toxicity in both types of study. When comparing pulmonary inflammation between intratracheal instillation and inhalation studies under the same initial lung burden, there is a tendency that the inflammatory response following the intratracheal instillation of nanoparticles is greater than or equal to that following the inhalation of nanoparticles. If the difference in clearance in both studies is not large, the estimations of pulmonary toxicity are close. We suggest that intratracheal instillation studies can be useful for ranking the hazard of nanoparticles through pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26828483

  2. Evaluation of the Pharmacokinetic Interaction between Repeated Doses of Rifapentine or Rifampin and a Single Dose of Bedaquiline in Healthy Adult Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Helen; Egizi, Erica; Erondu, Ngozi; Ginsberg, Ann; Rouse, Doris J.; Severynse-Stevens, Diana; Pauli, Elliott

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of rifapentine or rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of bedaquiline and its M2 metabolite in healthy subjects using a two-period single-sequence design. In period 1, subjects received a single dose of bedaquiline (400 mg), followed by a 28-day washout. In period 2, subjects received either rifapentine (600 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) from day 20 to day 41, as well as a single bedaquiline dose (400 mg) on day 29. The pharmacokinetic profiles of bedaquiline and M2 were compared over 336 h after the administration of bedaquiline alone and in combination with steady-state rifapentine or rifampin. Coadministration of bedaquiline with rifapentine or rifampin resulted in lower bedaquiline exposures. The geometric mean ratios (GMRs) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the maximum observed concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve to the last available concentration time point (AUC0–t), and AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUC0–inf) of bedaquiline were 62.19% (53.37 to 72.47), 42.79% (37.77 to 48.49), and 44.52% (40.12 to 49.39), respectively, when coadministered with rifapentine. Similarly, the GMRs and 90% CIs for the Cmax, AUC0–t, and AUC0–inf of bedaquiline were 60.24% (51.96 to 69.84), 41.36% (37.70 to 45.36), and 47.32% (41.49 to 53.97), respectively, when coadministered with rifampin. The Cmax, AUC0–t, and AUC0–inf of M2 were also altered when bedaquiline was coadministered with rifapentine or rifampin. Single doses of bedaquiline, administered alone or with multiple doses of rifapentine or rifampin, were well tolerated, with no safety concerns related to coadministration. Daily administration of rifapentine to patients with tuberculosis presents the same drug interaction challenges as rifampin and other rifamycins. Strong inducers of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 should be avoided when considering the use of bedaquiline. (This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier

  3. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetic interaction between repeated doses of rifapentine or rifampin and a single dose of bedaquiline in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Winter, Helen; Egizi, Erica; Murray, Stephen; Erondu, Ngozi; Ginsberg, Ann; Rouse, Doris J; Severynse-Stevens, Diana; Pauli, Elliott

    2015-02-01

    This study assessed the effects of rifapentine or rifampin on the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of bedaquiline and its M2 metabolite in healthy subjects using a two-period single-sequence design. In period 1, subjects received a single dose of bedaquiline (400 mg), followed by a 28-day washout. In period 2, subjects received either rifapentine (600 mg) or rifampin (600 mg) from day 20 to day 41, as well as a single bedaquiline dose (400 mg) on day 29. The pharmacokinetic profiles of bedaquiline and M2 were compared over 336 h after the administration of bedaquiline alone and in combination with steady-state rifapentine or rifampin. Coadministration of bedaquiline with rifapentine or rifampin resulted in lower bedaquiline exposures. The geometric mean ratios (GMRs) and 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the maximum observed concentration (Cmax), area under the concentration-time curve to the last available concentration time point (AUC0-t), and AUC extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-inf) of bedaquiline were 62.19% (53.37 to 72.47), 42.79% (37.77 to 48.49), and 44.52% (40.12 to 49.39), respectively, when coadministered with rifapentine. Similarly, the GMRs and 90% CIs for the Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of bedaquiline were 60.24% (51.96 to 69.84), 41.36% (37.70 to 45.36), and 47.32% (41.49 to 53.97), respectively, when coadministered with rifampin. The Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-inf of M2 were also altered when bedaquiline was coadministered with rifapentine or rifampin. Single doses of bedaquiline, administered alone or with multiple doses of rifapentine or rifampin, were well tolerated, with no safety concerns related to coadministration. Daily administration of rifapentine to patients with tuberculosis presents the same drug interaction challenges as rifampin and other rifamycins. Strong inducers of the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4 should be avoided when considering the use of bedaquiline. (This study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under identifier NCT02216331.).

  4. Hemoglobin induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contributes to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeat dose haptoglobin administration

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan with indications for trauma, burns and massive transfusion related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia mediated PH. Approach and results Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb-infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for five weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated non-heme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right ventricular hypertrophy, which suggest a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Conclusions By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia; and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis associated PH. PMID:25656991

  5. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies.

  6. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH.

  7. Interactions between cannabidiol and Δ(9)-THC following acute and repeated dosing: Rebound hyperactivity, sensorimotor gating and epigenetic and neuroadaptive changes in the mesolimbic pathway.

    PubMed

    Todd, Stephanie M; Zhou, Cilla; Clarke, David J; Chohan, Tariq W; Bahceci, Dilara; Arnold, Jonathon C

    2017-02-01

    The evidence base for the use of medical cannabis preparations containing specific ratios of cannabidiol (CBD) and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is limited. While there is abundant data on acute interactions between CBD and THC, few studies have assessed the impact of their repeated co-administration. We previously reported that CBD inhibited or potentiated the acute effects of THC dependent on the measure being examined at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio. Further, CBD decreased THC effects on brain regions involved in memory, anxiety and body temperature regulation. Here we extend on these finding by examining over 15 days of treatment whether CBD modulated the repeated effects of THC on behaviour and neuroadaption markers in the mesolimbic dopamine pathway. After acute locomotor suppression, repeated THC caused rebound locomotor hyperactivity that was modestly inhibited by CBD. CBD also slightly reduced the acute effects of THC on sensorimotor gating. These subtle effects were found at a 1:1 CBD:THC dose ratio but were not accentuated by a 5:1 dose ratio. CBD did not alter the trajectory of enduring THC-induced anxiety nor tolerance to the pharmacological effects of THC. There was no evidence of CBD potentiating the behavioural effects of THC. However we demonstrated for the first time that repeated co-administration of CBD and THC increased histone 3 acetylation (H3K9/14ac) in the VTA and ΔFosB expression in the nucleus accumbens. These changes suggest that while CBD may have protective effects acutely, its long-term molecular actions on the brain are more complex and may be supradditive.

  8. Randomized, controlled, assessor-blind clinical trial to assess the efficacy of single- versus repeated-dose albendazole to treat ascaris lumbricoides, trichuris trichiura, and hookworm infection.

    PubMed

    Adegnika, Ayola A; Zinsou, Jeannot F; Issifou, Saadou; Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Kassa, Roland F; Feugap, Eliane N; Honkpehedji, Yabo J; Dejon Agobe, Jean-Claude; Kenguele, Hilaire M; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Agnandji, Selidji T; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Ramharter, Michael; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G; Lell, Bertrand

    2014-05-01

    In many regions where soil-transmitted helminth infections are endemic, single-dose albendazole is used in mass drug administration programs to control infections. There are little data on the efficacy of the standard single-dose administration compared to that of alternative regimens. We conducted a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to determine the efficacies of standard and extended albendazole treatment against soil-transmitted helminth infection in Gabon. A total of 175 children were included. Adequate cure rates and egg reduction rates above 85% were found with a single dose of albendazole for Ascaris infection, 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73, 96) and 93.8% (CI, 87.6, 100), respectively, while two doses were necessary for hookworm infestation (92% [CI, 78, 100] and 92% [CI, 78, 100], respectively). However, while a 3-day regimen was not sufficient to cure Trichuris (cure rate, 83% [CI, 73, 93]), this regimen reduced the number of eggs up to 90.6% (CI, 83.1, 100). The rate ratios of two- and three-dose regimens compared to a single-dose treatment were 1.7 (CI, 1.1, 2.5) and 2.1 (CI, 1.5, 2.9) for Trichuris and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) for hookworm. Albendazole was safe and well tolerated in all regimens. A single-dose albendazole treatment considerably reduces Ascaris infection but has only a moderate effect on hookworm and Trichuris infections. The single-dose option may still be the preferred regimen because it balances efficacy, safety, and compliance during mass drug administration, keeping in mind that asymptomatic low-level helminth carriage may also have beneficial effects. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01192802.).

  9. Randomized, Controlled, Assessor-Blind Clinical Trial To Assess the Efficacy of Single- versus Repeated-Dose Albendazole To Treat Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Hookworm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zinsou, Jeannot F.; Issifou, Saadou; Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Kassa, Roland F.; Feugap, Eliane N.; Honkpehedji, Yabo J.; Dejon Agobe, Jean-Claude; Kenguele, Hilaire M.; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Ramharter, Michael; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G.; Lell, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    In many regions where soil-transmitted helminth infections are endemic, single-dose albendazole is used in mass drug administration programs to control infections. There are little data on the efficacy of the standard single-dose administration compared to that of alternative regimens. We conducted a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded clinical trial to determine the efficacies of standard and extended albendazole treatment against soil-transmitted helminth infection in Gabon. A total of 175 children were included. Adequate cure rates and egg reduction rates above 85% were found with a single dose of albendazole for Ascaris infection, 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 73, 96) and 93.8% (CI, 87.6, 100), respectively, while two doses were necessary for hookworm infestation (92% [CI, 78, 100] and 92% [CI, 78, 100], respectively). However, while a 3-day regimen was not sufficient to cure Trichuris (cure rate, 83% [CI, 73, 93]), this regimen reduced the number of eggs up to 90.6% (CI, 83.1, 100). The rate ratios of two- and three-dose regimens compared to a single-dose treatment were 1.7 (CI, 1.1, 2.5) and 2.1 (CI, 1.5, 2.9) for Trichuris and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) and 1.7 (CI, 1.0, 2.9) for hookworm. Albendazole was safe and well tolerated in all regimens. A single-dose albendazole treatment considerably reduces Ascaris infection but has only a moderate effect on hookworm and Trichuris infections. The single-dose option may still be the preferred regimen because it balances efficacy, safety, and compliance during mass drug administration, keeping in mind that asymptomatic low-level helminth carriage may also have beneficial effects. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT01192802.) PMID:24550339

  10. Amphiphilic poly-N-vynilpyrrolidone nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity and acute toxicity study.

    PubMed

    Kuskov, A N; Kulikov, P P; Shtilman, M I; Rakitskii, V N; Tsatsakis, A M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity against MCF-7 cells and acute intraperitoneal toxicity of amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles to confirm possibility of their application for creation of novel drug delivery systems. The effect of cellular uptake of polymeric nanoparticles on human cancer cell line MCF-7 cells was investigated by MTT assay. MTT analysis showed that tested amphiphilic polymers were essentially non-toxic. In acute toxicity studies, LD50 and other toxicity indexes were evaluated, under which no deaths or treatment related complications were observed even in high concentration treatment for 14 days of experiment. For histological analysis, organs of the animals were weighed and examined. No animal died during the study and no significant changes have been observed regarding body weight, feed consumption, organ weight or histological data. Obtained results show that amphiphilic poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles possessed no toxicity against cells and in animals after intraperitoneal administration. Thus, amphiphilic PVP nanoparticles demonstrate high potential as carriers for novel high-effective drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101) (1). Fertility study in rats].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Chihara, N; Oku, H; Mori, H; Shinomiya, K; Ozeki, Y; Fujita, T

    1997-12-01

    A fertility study of landiolol hydrochloride (ONO-1101), a novel ultra short acting beta-blocker, was conducted in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. ONO-1101 was administered intravenously to males from the 64th day before mating until necropsy, and to females from 15th day before mating until day 7 of gestation, at a dose level of 0 (control), 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. On day 20 of gestation, all dams were sacrificed and their fetuses were examined. In the 100 mg/kg/day group, hypoactivity, clonic convulsion, bradypnea/apnea and redish lacrimation were observed after administration in both sexes, and 3 males and 2 females died. Reddish lacrimation was occasionally seen in males at late stage of the treatment period in 50 mg/kg/day group. In the 100 mg/kg/day group, body weight gain suppressed in females from the premating through the gestation period, and food consumption decreased in females during the premating period, and mean thymus weight decreased in males. ONO-1101 did not affect estrous cycle, copulatory or fertility in both sexes or external, skeletal or visceral features of the fetuses. From the above results, it is estimated that the no-toxic dose level of ONO-1101 under these experimental conditions is 50 mg/kg/day for general toxicity in parents, and 100 mg/kg/day for the reproductive performance in parents and for the development of fetuses.

  12. One Health and the Environment: Toxic Cyanobacteria, a Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants in ambient exposure situations. ...

  13. One Health and the Environment: Toxic Cyanobacteria, a Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants in ambient exposure situations. ...

  14. PRIORITIZATION OF NTP REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANTS FOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population studies evaluate human reproductive impairment are time consuming,
    expensive, logistically difficult and with limited resources must be prioritized to
    effectivelyprevent the adverse health effects in humans. Interactions among
    health scientists, unions,a...

  15. One Health and the Environment: Toxic Cyanobacteria A Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants unlike people in most ambient ex...

  16. PRIORITIZATION OF NTP REPRODUCTIVE TOXICANTS FOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Population studies evaluate human reproductive impairment are time consuming,
    expensive, logistically difficult and with limited resources must be prioritized to
    effectivelyprevent the adverse health effects in humans. Interactions among
    health scientists, unions,a...

  17. OECD validation study to assess intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility of the zebrafish embryo toxicity test for acute aquatic toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Busquet, François; Strecker, Ruben; Rawlings, Jane M; Belanger, Scott E; Braunbeck, Thomas; Carr, Gregory J; Cenijn, Peter; Fochtman, Przemyslaw; Gourmelon, Anne; Hübler, Nicole; Kleensang, André; Knöbel, Melanie; Kussatz, Carola; Legler, Juliette; Lillicrap, Adam; Martínez-Jerónimo, Fernando; Polleichtner, Christian; Rzodeczko, Helena; Salinas, Edward; Schneider, Katharina E; Scholz, Stefan; van den Brandhof, Evert-Jan; van der Ven, Leo T M; Walter-Rohde, Susanne; Weigt, Stefan; Witters, Hilda; Halder, Marlies

    2014-08-01

    The OECD validation study of the zebrafish embryo acute toxicity test (ZFET) for acute aquatic toxicity testing evaluated the ZFET reproducibility by testing 20 chemicals at 5 different concentrations in 3 independent runs in at least 3 laboratories. Stock solutions and test concentrations were analytically confirmed for 11 chemicals. Newly fertilised zebrafish eggs (20/concentration and control) were exposed for 96h to chemicals. Four apical endpoints were recorded daily as indicators of acute lethality: coagulation of the embryo, lack of somite formation, non-detachment of the tail bud from the yolk sac and lack of heartbeat. Results (LC50 values for 48/96h exposure) show that the ZFET is a robust method with a good intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility (CV<30%) for most chemicals and laboratories. The reproducibility was lower (CV>30%) for some very toxic or volatile chemicals, and chemicals tested close to their limit of solubility. The ZFET is now available as OECD Test Guideline 236. Considering the high predictive capacity of the ZFET demonstrated by Belanger et al. (2013) in their retrospective analysis of acute fish toxicity and fish embryo acute toxicity data, the ZFET is ready to be considered for acute fish toxicity for regulatory purposes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Subchronic Toxicity Study on 1,4-Dithiane.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    respectively. The left-ear clipped control male in cage 14 had malocclusion (a bite defect) and was excluded from all statistical analyses. An ANOVA on the...have the nose crystals. The time required for deposition of the nose crystals is important for a risk assessment analysis for 1,4-dithiane. 3) Studying...regression of the 1,4-dithiane-induced tissue damage is essential for a risk -assessment analysis for 1,4-dithiane. 4.) Studying the strain and species

  19. Acute and sub-chronic oral toxicity study of black tea in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Tapas Kumar; Chatterjee, Suparna; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Pradhan, Richeek; Chowdhury, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic oral toxicity study for black tea (Camellia sinensis), the most commonly consumed variety of tea, is lacking. The present study was undertaken to assess the iron load on black tea (Camellia sinensis) and its safety aspects in animals. Materials and Methods: The analysis of iron was done in six tea samples as per American Public Health Association method using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Maximum physical iron-loaded tea sample was identified on black tea sample 2 (BTS-2), and this was further studied for acute and 90-day sub-chronic toxicity following Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines. Results: Black tea sample 2 did not show any signs of toxicity or mortality at up to 2 g/kg per oral dose in Swiss albino mice. 90-day toxicity studies in Wistar rats did not reveal any evidence of toxicity at up to 250 mg/kg/day (2.5% infusion of BTS-2) oral dose as exhibited by regular observations, body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum chemistry, organ weights, and histopathology. Further, serum iron, total iron binding capacity, unsaturated iron binding capacity, and ferritin were not altered after 90 days of treatment. Masson trichrome staining and Perls’ staining did not reveal any abnormalities in hepatic tissue following 90-day treatment of high iron-loaded BTS-2. Conclusions: This safety study provides evidence that BTSs, in spite of relatively high iron content, show no significant iron-related toxicity on acute or sub-chronic oral administration in animals. PMID:25878375

  20. Oral toxicity studies of a Nigerian polyherbal health tonic tea extract in rats.

    PubMed

    Adeneye, A A; Agbaje, E O; Elias, S O; Amole, O O

    2008-03-01

    In the present study, acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies of an aqueous extract of a Nigerian Polyherbal Health Tonic (PHT) were investigated in adult Wistar rats of both sexes and weighing between 110-200 g. Acute toxicity study was conducted using limit dose test of Up and Down Procedure under computer guided statistical software program (AOT 425 StatPgm). The subchronic toxicity was evaluated in 4 groups of rats made up of six rats/group, administered single, daily oral doses of 10 ml/kg distilled water (DW), 125, 500 and 1500 mg/kg of PHT, respectively, for 90 days. On the 91st day, blood samples for haematological and biochemical assays were collected through cardiac puncture and selected vital organs harvested en bloc for histopathological examination under inhaled anaesthesia. Results showed PHT to be relatively safe on acute toxicity with an estimated LD50 value greater than 5000 mg/kg/oral route. On prolonged exposure, PHT induced initial weight gain in the 1st 6 weeks followed by significant (P < 0.05) dose related weight loss in the latter 6 weeks. The extract also caused significant (P < 0.05) dose related elevation of the full blood count parameters, dose unrelated elevation of serum urea, liver enzymes, serum proteins, albumin, total and conjugated bilirubin. On histology, PHT induced dose dependent gastric mucosal denudation, bile ductal lining distortion, diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrous proliferation and diffuse splenic lymphocytic proliferation. Thus, our results showed that PHT use may be relatively safe on acute exposure but toxic on chronic exposure to high doses, although reversibility of these toxic effects was not studied in the present study.

  1. Biocompatibility study of two diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for biomedical applications by in vitro toxicity testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe; Mariani, Valentina; Cohen, Dror; Madi, Lea; Thevenot, Julie; Oliveira, Hugo; Uboldi, Chiara; Giudetti, Guido; Coradeghini, Rosella; Garanger, Elisabeth; Rossi, François; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Oron, Miriam; Korenstein, Rafi; Lecommandoux, Sébastien; Ponti, Jessica; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Heredia, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Drugs used for chemotherapy normally carry out adverse, undesired effects. Nanotechnology brings about new horizons to tackle cancer disease with a different strategy. One of the most promising approaches is the use of nanocarriers to transport active drugs. These nanocarriers need to have special properties to avoid immune responses and toxicity, and it is critical to study these effects. Nanocarriers may have different nature, but polypeptide-based copolymers have attracted considerable attention for their biocompatibility, controlled and slow biodegradability as well as low toxicity. Little has been done regarding specific nanocarriers toxicity. In this study, we performed a thorough toxicological study of two different block copolymer nanoparticles (NPs); poly(trimethylene carbonate)- block-poly( l-glutamic acid) (PTMC- b-PGA) and poly(ethylene glycol)- block-poly( γ-benzyl- l-glutamate) (PEG- b-PBLG) with sizes between 113 and 131 nm. Low blood-serum-protein interaction was observed. Moreover, general toxicity assays and other endpoints (apoptosis or necrosis) showed good biocompatibility for both NPs. Reactive oxygen species increased in only two cell lines (HepG2 and TK6) in the presence of PTMC- b-PGA. Cytokine production study showed cytokine induction only in one cell line (A549). We also performed the same assays on human skin organ culture before and after UVB light treatment, with a moderate toxicity after treatment independent of NPs presence or absence. Interleukin 1 induction was also observed due to the combined effect of PEG- b-PBLG and UVB light irradiation. Future in vivo studies for biocompatibility and toxicity will provide more valuable information, but, so far, the findings presented here suggest the possibility of using these two NPs as nanocarriers for nanomedical applications, always taking into account the application procedure and the way in which they are implemented.

  2. Per- and polyfluoro toxicity (LC(50) inhalation) study in rat and mouse using QSAR modeling.

    PubMed

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-03-15

    Fully or partially fluorinated compounds, known as per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are widely distributed in the environment and released because of their use in different household and industrial products. Few of these long chain per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are classified as emerging pollutants, and their environmental and toxicological effects are unveiled in the literature. This has diverted the production of long chain compounds, considered as more toxic, to short chains, but concerns regarding the toxicity of both types of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals are alarming. There are few experimental data available on the environmental behavior and toxicity of these compounds, and moreover, toxicity profiles are found to be different for the types of animals and species used. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is applied to a combination of short and long chain per- and polyfluorinated chemicals, for the first time, to model and predict the toxicity on two species of rodents, rat (Rattus) and mouse (Mus), by modeling inhalation (LC(50)) data. Multiple linear regression (MLR) models using the ordinary-least-squares (OLS) method, based on theoretical molecular descriptors selected by genetic algorithm (GA), were used for QSAR studies. Training and prediction sets were prepared a priori, and these sets were used to derive statistically robust and predictive (both internally and externally) models. The structural applicability domain (AD) of the model was verified on a larger set of per- and polyfluorinated chemicals retrieved from different databases and journals. The descriptors involved, the similarities, and the differences observed between models pertaining to the toxicity related to the two species are discussed. Chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and multidimensional scaling (MDS) were used to select most toxic compounds from those within the AD of both models, which will be subjected to experimental tests

  3. [Toxicity effects of phthalate substitute plasticizers used in toys].

    PubMed

    Hirata-Koizumi, Mutsuko; Takahashi, Mika; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawamura, Tomoko; Ono, Atsushi; Hirose, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Phthalate esters are widely used as plasticizers in polyvinyl chloride products. Because of human health concerns, regulatory authorities in Japan, US, Europe and other countries control the use of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, butylbenzyl phthalate, diisodecyl phthalate and di-n-octyl phthalate for the toys that can be put directly in infants' mouths. While these regulatory actions will likely reduce the usage of phthalate esters, there is concern that other plasticizers that have not been sufficiently evaluated for safety will be used more frequently. We therefore collected and evaluated the toxicological information on di(2-ethylhexyl) terephthalate (DEHT), 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid, diisononyl ester (DINCH), diisononyl adipate (DINA), 2,2,4-trimetyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutyrate (TXIB), tri-n-butyl citrate (TBC) and acetyl tri-n-butyl citrate (ATBC) which were detected at a relatively high frequency in toys. The collected data have shown that chronic exposure to DEHT affects the eye and nasal turbinate, and DINCH exerts effects on the thyroid and kidney in rats. DINA and TXIB have been reported to have hepatic and renal effects in dogs or rats, and ATBC slightly affected the liver in rats. The NOAELs for repeated dose toxicity are relatively low for DINCH (40 mg/kg bw/day) and TXIB (30 mg/kg bw/day) compared with DEHT, DINA and ATBC. DEHT, TXIB and ATBC have been reported to have reproductive/developmental effects at relatively high doses in rats. For DINA and TBC, available data are insufficient for assessing the hazards, and therefore, adequate toxicity studies should be conducted. In the present review, the toxicity information on 6 alternatives to phthalate plasticizers is summarized, focusing on the effects after oral exposure, which is the route of most concern.

  4. Ninety-Day Subchronic Oral Toxicity Study of Pyridostigmine Bromide in Rats. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    myasthenia gravis because of its relative lack of untoward effects in comparison with other anticholinesterases (2). This relative lack of clinical...treatment of myasthenia gravis . Objecrive of Study The objective of this study was to determine the 90-day subchronic toxicity of pyridostigmine bromide in

  5. Variability within Systemic In Vivo Toxicity Studies (ASCCT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vivo studies have long been considered the gold standard for toxicology screening. Often time models developed in silico and/or using in vitro data to estimate points of departures (POD) are compared to the in vivo data to benchmark and evaluate quality and goodness of fit. ...

  6. Xenotransplantation Models to Study the Effects of Toxicants on Human Fetal Tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Spade, Daniel J.; McDonnell, Elizabeth V.; Heger, Nicholas E.; Sanders, Jennifer A.; Saffarini, Camelia M.; Gruppuso, Philip A.; De Paepe, Monique E.; Boekelheide, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Many diseases that manifest throughout the lifetime are influenced by factors affecting fetal development. Fetal exposure to xenobiotics, in particular, may influence the development of adult diseases. Established animal models provide systems for characterizing both developmental biology and developmental toxicology. However, animal model systems do not allow researchers to assess the mechanistic effects of toxicants on developing human tissue. Human fetal tissue xenotransplantation models have recently been implemented to provide human-relevant mechanistic data on the many tissue-level functions that may be affected by fetal exposure to toxicants. This review describes the development of human fetal tissue xenotransplant models for testis, prostate, lung, liver, and adipose tissue, aimed at studying the effects of xenobiotics on tissue development, including implications for testicular dysgenesis, prostate disease, lung disease, and metabolic syndrome. The mechanistic data obtained from these models can complement data from epidemiology, traditional animal models, and in vitro studies to quantify the risks of toxicant exposures during human development. PMID:25477288

  7. Characterisation of carbon nanotubes in the context of toxicity studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berhanu, D.; Dybowska, A.; Misra, S.K.; Stanley, C.J.; Ruenraroengsak, P.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Tetley, T.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Plant, J.A.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionise our futures, but has also prompted concerns about the possibility that nanomaterials may harm humans or the biosphere. The unique properties of nanoparticles, that give them novel size dependent functionalities, may also have the potential to cause harm. Discrepancies in existing human health and environmental studies have shown the importance of good quality, well-characterized reference nanomaterials for toxicological studies. Here we make a case for the importance of the detailed characterization of nanoparticles, using several methods, particularly to allow the recognition of impurities and the presence of chemically identical but structurally distinct phases. Methods to characterise fully, commercially available multi-wall carbon nanotubes at different scales, are presented. ?? 2009 Berhanu et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. Characterisation of carbon nanotubes in the context of toxicity studies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionise our futures, but has also prompted concerns about the possibility that nanomaterials may harm humans or the biosphere. The unique properties of nanoparticles, that give them novel size dependent functionalities, may also have the potential to cause harm. Discrepancies in existing human health and environmental studies have shown the importance of good quality, well-characterized reference nanomaterials for toxicological studies. Here we make a case for the importance of the detailed characterization of nanoparticles, using several methods, particularly to allow the recognition of impurities and the presence of chemically identical but structurally distinct phases. Methods to characterise fully, commercially available multi-wall carbon nanotubes at different scales, are presented. PMID:20102588

  9. 90-Day Inhalation Toxicity Study of FT Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    conducted when animals were weighed. The observations that could be related to the exposure regimen included pelage alopecia and nasal discharge in...the study. In the male rats, the clinical observations noted were pelage alopecia in 9 of 10 rats after 4 weeks of exposure, and 1 rat after 5...procedure (Section 4.16), alopecia was noted in some males (2/10) around the forelimbs in the control group, and alopecia was observed around the nose

  10. Acute oral toxicity and biodistribution study of zinc-aluminium-levodopa nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Saifullah, Bullo; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Azmi, Norazrina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) is an inorganic-organic nano-layered material that harbours drug between its two-layered sheets, forming a sandwich-like structure. It is attracting a great deal of attention as an alternative drug delivery (nanodelivery) system in the field of pharmacology due to their relative low toxic potential. The production of these nanodelivery systems, aimed at improving human health through decrease toxicity, targeted delivery of the active compound to areas of interest with sustained release ability. In this study, we administered zinc-aluminium-LDH-levodopa nanocomposite (ZAL) and zinc-aluminium nanocomposite (ZA) to Sprague Dawley rats to evaluate for acute oral toxicity following OECD guidelines. The oral administration of ZAL and ZA at a limit dose of 2,000 mg/kg produced neither mortality nor acute toxic signs throughout 14 days of the observation. The percentage of body weight gain of the animals showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. Animal from the two treated groups gained weight continuously over the study period, which was shown to be significantly higher than the weight at the beginning of the study (P < 0.05). Biochemical analysis of animal serum showed no significant difference between rats treated with ZAL, ZA and controls. There was no gross lesion or histopathological changes observed in vital organs of the rats. The results suggested that ZAL and ZA at 2,000 mg/kg body weight in rats do not induce acute toxicity in the animals. Elemental analysis of tissues of treated animals demonstrated the wider distribution of the nanocomposite including the brain. In summary, findings of acute toxicity tests in this study suggest that zinc-aluminium nanocomposite intercalated with and the un-intercalated were safe when administered orally in animal models for short periods of time. It also highlighted the potential distribution ability of Tween-80 coated nanocomposite after oral administration.

  11. Acute oral toxicity and biodistribution study of zinc-aluminium-levodopa nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Aminu Umar; Saifullah, Bullo; Cheah, Pike-See; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Azmi, Norazrina; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-03-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) is an inorganic-organic nano-layered material that harbours drug between its two-layered sheets, forming a sandwich-like structure. It is attracting a great deal of attention as an alternative drug delivery (nanodelivery) system in the field of pharmacology due to their relative low toxic potential. The production of these nanodelivery systems, aimed at improving human health through decrease toxicity, targeted delivery of the active compound to areas of interest with sustained release ability. In this study, we administered zinc-aluminium-LDH-levodopa nanocomposite (ZAL) and zinc-aluminium nanocomposite (ZA) to Sprague Dawley rats to evaluate for acute oral toxicity following OECD guidelines. The oral administration of ZAL and ZA at a limit dose of 2,000 mg/kg produced neither mortality nor acute toxic signs throughout 14 days of the observation. The percentage of body weight gain of the animals showed no significant difference between control and treatment groups. Animal from the two treated groups gained weight continuously over the study period, which was shown to be significantly higher than the weight at the beginning of the study ( P < 0.05). Biochemical analysis of animal serum showed no significant difference between rats treated with ZAL, ZA and controls. There was no gross lesion or histopathological changes observed in vital organs of the rats. The results suggested that ZAL and ZA at 2,000 mg/kg body weight in rats do not induce acute toxicity in the animals. Elemental analysis of tissues of treated animals demonstrated the wider distribution of the nanocomposite including the brain. In summary, findings of acute toxicity tests in this study suggest that zinc-aluminium nanocomposite intercalated with and the un-intercalated were safe when administered orally in animal models for short periods of time. It also highlighted the potential distribution ability of Tween-80 coated nanocomposite after oral administration.

  12. Recent evidence from epidemiological studies on methylmercury toxicity.

    PubMed

    Murata, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Minoru; Sakamoto, Mineshi; Iwai-Shimada, Miyuki; Yaginuma-Sakurai, Kozue; Tatsuta, Nozomi; Iwata, Toyoto; Karita, Kanae; Nakai, Kunihiko

    2011-09-01

    More than fifty years have passed since the outbreak of Minamata disease, and large-scale methylmercury poisoning due to industrial effluents or methylmercury-containing fungicide intoxication has scarcely happened in developed countries. On the other hand, widespread environmental mercury contamination has occurred in gold and mercury mining areas of developing countries. In this article, we provided an overview of recent studies addressing human health effects of methylmercury, which we searched using the PubMed of the US National Library of Medicine. The following suggestions were obtained for low-level methylmercury exposure: (1) In recent years, the proportion of human studies addressing methylmercury has tended to decrease. (2) Prenatal exposure to methylmercury through fish intake, even at low levels, adversely affects child development after adjusting for polychlorinated biphenyls and maternal fish intake during pregnancy, whereas maternal seafood intake has some benefits. (3) Long-term methylmercury exposure through consumption of fish such as bigeye tuna and swordfish may pose a potential risk of cardiac events involving sympathovagal imbalance. (4) In measuring methylmercury levels in preserved umbilical cord collected from inhabitants born in Minamata areas between 1945 and 1989, the elevated concentrations (≥1 mg/g) were observed mainly in inhabitants born between 1947 and 1968, and the peak coincided with the peak of acetaldehyde production in Minamata. (5) Since some developing countries appear to be in similar situations to Japan in the past, attention should be directed toward early recognition of a risky agent and precautions should be taken against it.

  13. QSAR study of the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to river bacteria and photobacterium phosphoreum

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, X.; Lu, G.; Lang, P.

    1997-01-01

    Since nitrobenzenes constitute a class of industrial chemicals that are present in Songhua River and probably in many other industrialized countries as well, it is useful to gain insight into their potential hazard to aquatic organisms. For this reason, it was decided to determine data on the toxicity for bacteria in the Songhua River. Furthermore, the toxicity to Ph. phosphoreum was determined in the Microtox assay, in order to further evaluate the usefulness of this assay for hazard assessment. Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have been developed for aromatic nitro compound toxicity to aquatic species, but no data on the toxicity of nitrobenzenes to environmental bacteria were used. In this study, the toxicity of various substituted nitrobenzenes to bacteria in Songhua River and to Ph. phosphoreum has been investigated, establishing quantitative structure-activity relationships with n-octanol-water partition coefficient (log P), the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E{sub LUMO}) and the sum of substituent constant ({Sigma}{sigma}-). 12 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Toxics Use Reduction in the Home: Lessons Learned from Household Exposure Studies.

    PubMed

    Dunagan, Sarah C; Dodson, Robin E; Rudel, Ruthann A; Brody, Julia G

    2011-03-01

    Workers and fence-line communities have been the first to benefit from the substantial reductions in toxic chemical use and byproducts in industrial production resulting from the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA). As TURA motivates reformulation of products as well as retooling of production processes, benefits could extend more broadly to large-scale reductions in everyday exposures for the general population. Household exposure studies, including those conducted by Silent Spring Institute, show that people are exposed to complex mixtures of indoor toxics from building materials and a myriad of consumer products. Pollutants in homes are likely to have multiple health effects because many are classified as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), with the ability to interfere with the body's hormone system. Product-related EDCs measured in homes include phthalates, halogenated flame retardants, and alkylphenols. Silent Spring Institute's chemical analysis of personal care and cleaning products confirms many are potential sources of EDCs, highlighting the need for a more comprehensive toxics use reduction (TUR) approach to reduce those exposures. Toxics use reduction targeted at EDCs in consumer products has the potential to substantially reduce occupational and residential exposures. The lessons that have emerged from household exposure research can inform improved chemicals management policies at the state and national levels, leading to safer products and widespread health and environmental benefits.

  15. Acute toxicity when concentration varies with time: A case study with carbon monoxide inhalation by rats.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Lisa M; Sommerville, Douglas R; Goodwin, Michelle R; James, R Arden; Channel, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to time-varying concentrations of toxic compounds is the norm in both occupational settings and daily human life, but little has been done to investigate the impact of variations in concentration on toxic outcomes; this case study with carbon monoxide helps fill that gap. Median acute lethality of 10-, 20-, 40-, and 60-min continuous exposures of rats to carbon monoxide was well described by the toxic load model (k = C(n) × t; k is constant, C = test concentration, n = toxic load exponent, and t = exposure duration) with n = 1.74. Dose response-relationships for 1-h exposures including a recovery period between 10- or 20-min pulses showed greater similarity (in both median lethality and steepness of dose-response curve) to continuous exposures with equivalent pulse duration and concentration, rather than a 60-min exposure with equivalent time-weighted average concentrations or toxic load. When pulses were of unequal concentration (3:1 ratio), only the high concentration pulse contributed to lethality. These findings show that fluctuations or interruptions in exposure over a short time scale (60 min or less) can have a substantial impact on outcomes (when n > 1), and thus high-resolution monitoring data are needed to aid interpretation of resulting outcomes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Toxics Use Reduction in the Home: Lessons Learned from Household Exposure Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dunagan, Sarah C.; Dodson, Robin E.; Rudel, Ruthann A.; Brody, Julia G.

    2010-01-01

    Workers and fence-line communities have been the first to benefit from the substantial reductions in toxic chemical use and byproducts in industrial production resulting from the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA). As TURA motivates reformulation of products as well as retooling of production processes, benefits could extend more broadly to large-scale reductions in everyday exposures for the general population. Household exposure studies, including those conducted by Silent Spring Institute, show that people are exposed to complex mixtures of indoor toxics from building materials and a myriad of consumer products. Pollutants in homes are likely to have multiple health effects because many are classified as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), with the ability to interfere with the body's hormone system. Product-related EDCs measured in homes include phthalates, halogenated flame retardants, and alkylphenols. Silent Spring Institute's chemical analysis of personal care and cleaning products confirms many are potential sources of EDCs, highlighting the need for a more comprehensive toxics use reduction (TUR) approach to reduce those exposures. Toxics use reduction targeted at EDCs in consumer products has the potential to substantially reduce occupational and residential exposures. The lessons that have emerged from household exposure research can inform improved chemicals management policies at the state and national levels, leading to safer products and widespread health and environmental benefits. PMID:21516227

  17. Evaluations of the trans-sulfuration pathway in multiple liver toxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schnackenberg, Laura K. Chen Minjun; Sun, Jinchun; Holland, Ricky D.; Dragan, Yvonne; Tong Weida; Welsh, William; Beger, Richard D.

    2009-02-15

    Drug-induced liver injury has been associated with the generation of reactive metabolites, which are primarily detoxified via glutathione conjugation. In this study, it was hypothesized that molecules involved in the synthesis of glutathione would be diminished to replenish the glutathione depleted through conjugation reactions. Since S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe) is the primary source of the sulfur atom in glutathione, UPLC/MS and NMR were used to evaluate metabolites involved with the transulfuration pathway in urine samples collected during studies of eight liver toxic compounds in Sprague-Dawley rats. Urinary levels of creatine were increased on day 1 or day 2 in 8 high dose liver toxicity studies. Taurine concentration in urine was increased in only 3 of 8 liver toxicity studies while SAMe was found to be reduced in 4 of 5 liver toxicity studies. To further validate the results from the metabonomic studies, microarray data from rat liver samples following treatment with acetaminophen was obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. Some genes involved in the trans-sulfuration pathway, including guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase, glycine N-methyltransferase, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and cysteine dioxygenase were found to be significantly decreased while methionine adenosyl transferase II, alpha increased at 24 h post-dosing, which is consistent with the SAMe and creatine findings. The metabolic and transcriptomic results show that the trans-sulfuration pathway from SAMe to glutathione was disturbed due to the administration of heptatotoxicants.

  18. Plant toxicity studies made publicly available by EPA and the TSCA Interagency Testing Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this presentation is to briefly describe the ITC, describe the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Test Submissions (TSCATS) database and how the EPA makes unpublished health and safety studies publicly available through TSCATS as a result of ITC testing recommendations and other activities and to describe some of the unpublished plant toxicity studies that are available tin TSCATS. In 1976, under section 4(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the US Congress created the ITC to implement the initial phases of testing TSCA-regulable chemicals. Congress directed the ITC to: (1) make testing decisions on about 70,000 chemicals, (2) develop the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List, (3) coordinate chemical testing and (4) revise the List at least every six months. The creation, structure, functions and contributions of the ITC from 1977 to 1992 have been previously described. TSCATS is an EPA database. It is an online pointer file that identifies all the unpublished studies that have been submitted to EPA under TSCA sections 4 and 8 and as For Your Information studies. Most of the studies in TSCATS were submitted by manufacturers of chemicals that ITC has added to the Priority Testing List because EPA has published Federal Register notices requesting that manufacturers of ITC chemicals submit unpublished data under TSCA section 8 or conduct testing and submit the data that were developed under TSCA section 4. Data from plant toxicity studies indexed in TSCATS will be presented.

  19. Pulmonary toxicity of cyclophosphamide: a 1-year study

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, C.C.; Sigler, C.; Lock, S.; Hakkinen, P.J.; Haschek, W.M.; Witschi, H.P.

    1985-01-01

    The development of cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary lesions over a 1-year period was studied in mice. Male BALB/c mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Within 3 weeks there were scattered foci of intraalveolar foamy macrophages. With time, these foci increased in size and, 1 year later, occupied large areas in all lung lobes. There was also diffuse interstitial fibrosis. Chemical determination done 3, 12, 24, and 52 weeks after cyclophosphamide showed that lungs of animals treated with cyclophosphamide had significantly more hydroxyproline per lung than controls. One year after cyclophosphamide pressure - volume curves measured in vivo were shifted down and to the right and total lung volumes were decreased. A single injection of cyclophosphamide produced an irreversible and progressive pulmonary lesion. 16 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Bioremediation potential of spirulina: toxicity and biosorption studies of lead.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Pan, Shan-Shan

    2005-03-01

    This study examines the possibility of using live spirulina to biologically remove aqueous lead of low concentration (below 50 mg/L) from wastewater. The spirulina cells were first immersed for seven days in five wastewater samples containing lead of different concentrations, and the growth rate was determined by light at wavelength of 560 nm. The 72 h-EC50 (72 h medium effective concentration) was estimated to be 11.46 mg/L (lead). Afterwards, the lead adsorption by live spirulina cells was conducted. It was observed that at the initial stage (0-12 min) the adsorption rate was so rapid that 74% of the metal was biologically adsorbed. The maximum biosorption capacity of live spirulina was estimated to be 0.62 mg lead per 10(5) alga cells.

  1. Protective effect of riboflavin on cisplatin induced toxicities: a gender-dependent study.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Imrana; Hassan, Iftekhar; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Chibber, Sandesh

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity exerted by the anticancer drug, cisplatin in vivo is functional to many factors such as dose, duration, gender and age etc. The present study is aimed to investigate if ameliorative potential of riboflavin on cisplatin induced toxicity is gender dependent. Eighty four adult mice from male and female sex were divided into seven groups (n=6) for both sexes. They were treated with riboflavin (2mg/kg), cisplatin (2mg/kg) and their two different combinations (cisplatin at 2mg/kg with 1mg/kg and 2mg/kg of riboflavin) under photoillumination with their respective controls for the combination groups without photoillumination. After treatment, all groups were sacrificed and their kidney, liver and serum were collected for biochemical estimations, comet assay and histopathology. In the present investigation, it was evident from antioxidant and detoxification studies (SOD, CAT, GSH, GST, MDA and carbonyl level) that the female mice exhibited better tolerance towards cisplatin inducted toxicity and the ameliorative effect of riboflavin against cisplatin toxicity was found stronger in their combination groups as compared to the male groups as the activity of all antioxidant enzymes were found better concomitant with lower level of MDA and carbonyl contents in the female combination groups than their male counterparts. Furthermore, single cell gel electrophoresis and histopathological examination confirmed that restoration of normal nuclear and cellular integrity was more prominent in female with respect to the males after treatment in the combination groups in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, this study reveals that cisplatin is more toxic in male mice and the ameliorative effect of riboflavin against cisplatin toxicity is stronger in female mice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Mercury sensing and toxicity studies of novel latex fabricated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Borase, Hemant P; Patil, Chandrashekhar D; Salunkhe, Rahul B; Suryawanshi, Rahul K; Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Patil, Satish V

    2014-11-01

    Safe and eco-friendly alternatives to currently used hazardous chemico-physical methods of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesis are need of time. Rapid, low cost, selective detection of toxic metals in environmental sample is important to take safety action. Toxicity assessment of engineered AgNPs is essential to avoid its side effects on human and non-target organisms. In the present study, biologically active latex from Euphorbia heterophylla (Poinsettia) was utilized for synthesis of AgNPs. AgNPs was of spherical shape and narrow size range (20-50 nm). Occurrence of elemental silver and crystalline nature of AgNPs was analyzed. Role of latex metabolites in reduction and stabilization of AgNPs was analyzed by FT-IR, protein coagulation test and phytochemical analysis. Latex-synthesized AgNPs showed potential in selective and sensitive detection of toxic mercury ions (Hg(2+)) with limit of detection around 100 ppb. Addition of Hg(2+) showed marked deviation in color and surface plasmon resonance spectra of AgNPs. Toxicity studies on aquatic non-target species Daphnia magna showed that latex-synthesized AgNPs (20.66 ± 1.52% immobilization) were comparatively very less toxic than chemically synthesized AgNPs (51.66 ± 1.52% immobilization). Similarly, comparative toxicity study on human red blood cells showed lower hemolysis (4.46 ± 0.01%) by latex-synthesized AgNPs as compared to chemically synthesized AgNPs causing 6.14 ± 0.01% hemolysis.

  3. Interlaboratory study of the bioluminescence inhibition tests for rapid wastewater toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Farré, Marinella; Arranz, Francesc; Ribó, Joan; Barceló, Damià

    2004-02-27

    Several toxicity procedures are currently being used for the wastewater toxicity assessment. We have undertaken an interlaboratory comparison of the use of different bioluminescence inhibition toxicity tests based on Vibrio fischeri, in order to evaluate their reproducibility for the rapid wastewater toxicity assessment. Twenty-two laboratories took part in this study organized by the Institut Català de Tecnologia (ICT) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC). During the exercise, six series of six samples were analyzed along 5 months. Every batch of samples was composed by three real samples and three standard solutions. The real samples were: an untreated effluent of a paper industry, a sample from a first settlement of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and the final effluent of the WWTP. The goals of the interlaboratory study were to evaluate the repeatability (r) and reproducibility (R) when different laboratories conduct the test, the influence of different matrix samples, the variability between different tests based on the same principle: the bioluminescence inhibition of V. fischeri, but involving different commercial devices and to determine the rate at which participating laboratories successfully completed tests initiated. The maximum number of outlier values was corresponding to a non-treated effluent from a paper industry. This also was the most complex and toxic sample analyzed. An increase on the non-convergent values obtained for the participants was observed at higher matrix complexity and at lower toxicity level. In comparison with other editions of this interlaboratory study the matrixes of real samples analyzed were more complex, nevertheless the final variability coefficient for the exercise was nearby to the average value for the past editions. Due to the high complexity of some samples involved in this intercalibration the stability of real samples were also followed during the test. On the other hand, no relation

  4. Acute Toxicity and Gastroprotection Studies with a Newly Synthesized Steroid

    PubMed Central

    A. Ketuly, Kamal; A. Hadi, A. Hamid; Golbabapour, Shahram; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Majid, Nazia Abdul; Abdulla, Mahmood A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Synthetic steroids, such as 9α-bromobeclomethasonedipropionate, have shown gastroprotective activity. For example, the potent glucocorticoid steroid, beclomethasone dipropionate, has been used for treatment of bowel ulcerations. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a synthetic steroid, (20S)-22-acetoxymethyl-6β-methoxy-3α,5-dihydro-3′H-cyclopropa[3α,5]-5α-pregnane (AMDCP), on ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injuries in rats. Methodology/Principal Finding Rats were divided into 8 groups. The negative control and ethanol control groups were administered Tween 20 (10%v/v) orally. The reference control group, 20 mg/kg omeprazole (10% Tween 20, 5 mL/kg), was administrated orally. The experimental groups received 1, 5, 10, 15 or 20 mg/kg of the AMDCP compound (10% Tween 20, 5 mL/kg). After 60 min, Tween 20 and absolute ethanol was given orally (5 mL/kg) to the negative control group and to the rest of the groups, and the rats were sacrificed an hour later. The acidity of gastric content, gastric wall mucus and areas of mucosal lesions were assessed. In addition, histology and immunohistochemistry of the gastric wall were assessed. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were also measured. The ethanol control group exhibited severe mucosal lesion compared with the experimental groups with fewer mucosal lesions along with a reduction of edema and leukocyte infiltration. Immunohistochemical staining of Hsp70 and Bax proteins showed over-expression and under-expression, respectively, in the experimental groups. The experimental groups also exhibited high levels of PGE2 as well as a reduced amount of MDA. AMDCP decreased the acidity and lipid peroxidation and increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes. Conclusion/Significance The current investigation evaluated the gastroprotective effects of AMDCP on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. This study also suggests that AMDCP might be useful as a

  5. Difference in aggregation between functional and toxic amyloids studied by atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carballo Pacheco, Martin; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloids are highly structured protein aggregates, normally associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, a number of nontoxic amyloids with physiologically normal functions, called functional amyloids, have been found. It is known that soluble small oligomers are more toxic than large fibrils. Thus, we study with atomistic explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations the oligomer formation of the amyloid- β peptide Aβ25 - 35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Our simulations show that monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. In addition, we observe faster aggregation by functional amyloids than toxic amyloids, which could explain their lack of toxicity.

  6. Acute and subacute toxicity study of the ethanol extract from Lonicera japonica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Thanabhorn, S; Jaijoy, K; Thamaree, S; Ingkaninan, K; Panthong, A

    2006-10-11

    The ethanol extract from the leaves of Lonicera japonica Thunb. was evaluated for acute and subacute toxicity. The single oral dose of the ethanol extract at 5,000 mg/kg did not produce mortality or significant changes in the general behaviour and gross appearance of the internal organs of rats. In subacute toxicity study, the ethanol extract was administered orally at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg/day for a period of 14 days. The satellite group was treated with the ethanol extract at the same dose and the same period and kept for another 14 days after treatment. There were no significant differences in the body and organ weights between the control and the treated group of both sexes. Hematological analysis and clinical blood chemistry revealed no toxicity effects of the extract. Pathologically, neither gross abnormalities nor histopathological changes were observed.

  7. [Medicoecological studies in the assessment of biogeochemical province in the area of a toxic waste ground].

    PubMed

    Nagornyĭ, S V; Maĭmulov, V G; Tsybul'skaia, E A; Tigden, V P; Gorbanev, S A

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the results of complex sanitary-and-epidemiological, toxicological-and-hygienic, and medical diagnostic studies of health and the environment, by taking into account the activity of a toxic industrial waste ground. Toxic waste burning on primitive unfiltered apparatuses was shown to lead to the formation of a biogeochemical province that is characterized by pollution of soil, bottom sediment, subsoil well water and snow with heavy metals, the components of toxic waste. Burning of waste and its storage in the open trenches resulted in ambient air pollution with organic solvents, nitric oxide and sulfur oxide had a negative impact on the health of children living at a distance of 3 km from the ground.

  8. Study on subchronic toxicity of chlorine dioxide and by-products in water.

    PubMed

    Qingdong, Xia; Guangming, Zhang; Li, Wang

    2006-01-01

    Subchronic toxicity of the mixture of ClO2, ClO2- and ClO3- in water on rat was studied through feeding test for 90 days. Statistical analyses of variance on weight gained, food utilization efficiency, indexes of blood and serum, liver/bodyweight and kidney/bodyweight ratios, and histopathological examination on liver and kidney were carried out. The results showed that solution of ClO2 and its by-products ClO2- and ClO3- at a concentration of 553 mg/L was not toxic.

  9. Group housing of male CD1 mice: reflections from toxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Annas, A; Bengtsson, C; Törnqvist, E

    2013-04-01

    Owing to their naturally aggressive behaviour, male mice are often housed individually in toxicity studies. However, several publications advocate group-housing of mice to enable normal social behaviour and interactions between the animals. This refinement project aimed at facilitate group-housing in toxicity studies. A handling procedure, including key factors such as allocation into groups before sexual maturation, transfer of used nesting material into clean cages and avoidance of external changes, that makes group-housing of male CD-1 mice possible in long-term toxicity studies has been developed at Safety Assessment within AstraZeneca, Sweden. Observations on the effect on aggression/fighting in group-housed male mice following different procedures performed in toxicity studies have shown that temporary removal of animals from the group for blood or urine sampling does not affect the group dynamics. However, temporary removal of animals for mating leads to fighting if the animals are taken back to the original group. Treatment with test compound might affect the general condition of the animals and the social hierarchy could be changed. In such cases aggression/fighting might occur and the animals have to be separated. Our experience clearly indicates that group housing of male mice in long-term studies leads to more easily handled animals, as compared with individually housed mice.

  10. Development of Marine Sediment Toxicity Data for Ordnance Compounds and Toxicity Identification Evaluation Studies at Select Naval Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    macro-alga Ulva fasciata; survival and reproductive success of the polychaete Dinophilus gyrociliatus; larvae survival with the redfish Sciaenops ... ocellatus ; and survival of juveniles of the opossum shrimp Mysidopsis bahia. The overall