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Sample records for repetition rate stability

  1. A Simplified Method for the Repetition Rate Stabilization of Modelocked Lasers: A PDH-based Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, Luke

    High-quality ultrashort pulses of light generated by solid-state modelocked femtosecond lasers have become increasingly recognized in recent years as indispensable tools for precision spectroscopy and frequency metrology due to their ability to form optical frequency combs (OFC) over a wide spectral range. Furthermore, of particular interest to many fields is an OFC's ability to produce microwave signals with a high degree of spectral purity--ultimately limited by the phase noise of the modelocked laser used to generate the comb. As a result, several effective techniques have been developed for stabilizing modelocked lasers, but they often involve a high degree of complexity and cost. In this thesis, a simplified modelocked laser stabilization scheme based on the famous Pound, Drever, Hall continuous-wave laser stabilization technique is demonstrated, which was capable of significant phase noise suppression up to at least a 1.1 kHz offset frequency. By essentially PDH-locking the repetition rate of a solid-state Er:Yb modelocked laser to a single reference cavity, the integrated timing jitter from 100 Hz-10 MHz was reduced nearly four-fold, without the need for complex and delicate RF or CW laser references. This simplified and robust method for long-term repetition rate stabilization furthers the potential for the development of inexpensive, low-noise, field deployable solid-state modelocked laser-generated frequency combs - a market currently dominated by their fiber-based counterparts.

  2. Indirect high-bandwidth stabilization of carrier-envelope phase of a high-energy, low-repetition-rate laser.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuxi; Takahashi, Eiji J; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2016-06-13

    We demonstrate a method of stabilizing the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of low-repetition-rate, high-energy femtosecond laser systems such as TW-PW class lasers. A relatively weak high-repetition-rate (~1 kHz) reference pulse copropagates with a low-repetition-rate (10 Hz) high-energy pulse, which are s- and p-polarized, respectively. Using a Brewster angle window, the reference pulse is separated after the power amplifier and used for feedback to stabilize its CEP. The single-shot CEP of the high-energy pulse is indirectly stabilized to 550 mrad RMS, which is the highest CEP stability ever reported for a low-repetition-rate (10-Hz) high-energy laser system. In this novel method, the feedback frequency of the reference pulse from the front-end preamplifier can be almost preserved. Thus, higher CEP stability can be realized than for lower frequencies. Of course, a reference pulse with an even higher repetition rate (e.g., 10 kHz) can be easily employed to sample and feed back CEP jitter over a broader frequency bandwidth.

  3. High Repetition Rate and Frequency Stabilized Ho:YLF Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, M.; Petzar, Pau; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    High repetition rate operation of an injection seeded Ho:YLF laser has been demonstrated. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy reaches 5.8mJ and the optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W.

  4. 1.55 μm hydrogen cyanide optical frequency-stabilized and 10 GHz repetition-rate-stabilized mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masato; Yoshida, Kazuki; Kasai, Keisuke; Nakazawa, Masataka

    2016-10-17

    We describe a 1.55 μm hydrogen cyanide (HCN) optical frequency and repetition rate stabilized mode-locked fiber laser, where the optical frequency was locked to the P(10) HCN absorption line and the repetition rate was locked to 9.95328 GHz by using a microwave phase-locked loop. The optical frequency stability of the laser reached 5 x 10-11 with an integration time τ of 1 s. With a bidirectional pumping scheme, the laser output power reached 64.6 mW. To obtain a short pulse train, the average dispersion in the cavity was managed so that it was zero around 1.55 μm, resulting in a 0.95 ps pulse train. In addition, the stabilization of the optical frequency and the repetition rate, meant that the entire spectral profile remained the same for 24 hours.

  5. Optically stabilized Erbium fiber frequency comb with hybrid mode-locking and a broad tunable range of repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Honglei; Wu, Xuejian; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zhao, Shijie; Yang, Lijun; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-12-01

    We present an optically stabilized Erbium fiber frequency comb with a broad repetition rate tuning range based on a hybrid mode-locked oscillator. We lock two comb modes to narrow-linewidth reference lasers in turn to investigate the best performance of control loops. The control bandwidth of fast and slow piezoelectric transducers reaches 70 kHz, while that of pump current modulation with phase-lead compensation is extended to 32 kHz, exceeding laser intrinsic response. Eventually, simultaneous lock of both loops is realized to totally phase-stabilize the comb, which will facilitate precision dual-comb spectroscopy, laser ranging, and timing distribution. In addition, a 1.8-MHz span of the repetition rate is achieved by an automatic optical delay line that is helpful in manufacturing a secondary comb with a similar repetition rate. The oscillator is housed in a homemade temperature-controlled box with an accuracy of ±0.02  K, which not only keeps high signal-to-noise ratio of the beat notes with reference lasers, but also guarantees self-starting at the same mode-locking every time.

  6. Repetition rate stabilization of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser via opto-mechanical control of the intracavity group velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xuling; He, Boqu; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Yang; Bai, Dongbi; Wang, Chao; Liu, Geping; Luo, Daping; Liu, Fengjiang; Li, Wenxue; Zeng, Heping; Yang, Kangwen; Hao, Qiang

    2015-01-19

    We present a method for stabilizing the repetition rate of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser by inserting an electronic polarization controller (EPC) in the fiber laser cavity. The device exhibited good integration, low cost, and convenient operation. Such a repetition rate stabilization may facilitate an all-fiber laser comb system with high integration. The repetition rate was phase-locked to a Rb reference more than 72 h with a low feedback voltage applied to one channel of the EPC. The repetition rate was 74.6 MHz. The standard deviation and the repetition rate linewidth were 1.4 and 1.7 mHz, respectively.

  7. Scheme for independently stabilizing the repetition rate and optical frequency of a laser using a regenerative mode-locking technique.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Yoshida, Masato

    2008-05-15

    We have succeeded in achieving independent control of the repetition rate and optical frequency of a pulse laser by employing a regenerative mode-locking technique. By adopting a voltage-controlled microwave phase shifter or an optical delay line in a regenerative feedback loop we can control the repetition rate of the laser without directly disturbing the optical frequencies. We experimentally show how this independent control can be realized by employing a 40 GHz harmonically and regeneratively mode-locked fiber laser.

  8. C2H2 absolutely optical frequency-stabilized and 40 GHz repetition-rate-stabilized, regeneratively mode-locked picosecond erbium fiber laser at 1.53 microm.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Masataka; Kasai, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masato

    2008-11-15

    We have succeeded in the simultaneous stabilization of the optical frequency and repetition rate of a regeneratively mode-locked picosecond erbium-doped fiber ring laser. The optical frequency was locked to the molecular absorption of C2H2 in the 1.5 microm band, and the repetition rate was stabilized to a 40 GHz synthesizer by using a microwave phase-locked loop. The optical frequency stability of the pulse train reached 2x10(-11) for tau=10-100 s. The key to success is the independent control of the repetition rate without disturbing the optical cavity condition.

  9. Regeneratively mode-locked fiber laser with a repetition rate stability of 4.9x10-15 using a hydrogen maser phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masato; Hirayama, Toru; Nakazawa, Masataka; Hagimoto, Ken; Ikegami, Takeshi

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate an ultrastable regeneratively mode-locked fiber laser that employs a phase-locked loop (PLL) circuit with a hydrogen maser. The stability for an integration time of 1s was 6.2x10(-13), which is 16 times better than that of a conventional PLL laser. For an integration time of 1000s, the stability reached as high as 4.9x10(-15). The repetition-rate stability was limited by the synthesizer used for the PLL operation, and there was no additional fluctuation induced by the laser operation.

  10. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  11. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  12. The study of stability on a laser-diode-pumped high-power high-repetition-rate intracavity frequency-doubled 532-nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shi-yong; Yao, Jian-Quan; Xu, De-gang; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Bai-gang; Zhou, Jia-ning; Wang, Peng

    2005-01-01

    High power laser-diode-pumped 532nm laser sources (including continuous wave and high repetition rate operation) are directly used for precise processing of metals and plastics. Furthermore, high power green laser will be used in some fields such as ocean exploration, laser probe and underwater communication. Recently, we reported a 110W diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG intracavity frequency doubled high stability 532nm laser. In the experiment, we found that the average output power of second harmonic fluctuated acutely with the variety of pumping current. Moreover, the length of arms between the mirrors were very sensitive to this cavity. We consider that one of the reason is the focus length of thermal lens of Nd:YAG rod alter with the variational pumping current, which makes the cavity be unstable. We consider the KTP crystal as a thin lens for its short length. As thermal lensing effect of the Nd:YAG rod is quite severe, so we consider it as thermal lensing medium. By ray matrix methods, we have obtained the stable regions and beam waist radii distribution in the flat-concave cavity. In our experiment, we used a pump head consisting of 80 diode bars with pentagon pump model and employed flat-concave cavity structure in order to achieve high stability output and increase output power. The total cavity length is 505mm. By using an acousto-optic Q-switching with high diffraction loss and the KTP crystal which is type II phase matching, 110 W high stability 532nm laser is achieved. The experimental result is in good agreement with the calculation.

  13. Low-timing-jitter, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser with tunable repetition rate and high operation stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanshan; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guofu; Zhao, Wei; Bai, Jing

    2010-09-01

    We design a low-timing-jitter, repetition-rate-tunable, stretched-pulse passively mode-locked fiber laser by using a nonlinear amplifying loop mirror (NALM), a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), and a tunable optical delay line in the laser configuration. Low-timing-jitter optical pulses are stably produced when a SESAM and a 0.16 m dispersion compensation fiber are employed in the laser cavity. By inserting a tunable optical delay line between NALM and SESAM, the variable repetition-rate operation of a self-starting, passively mode-locked fiber laser is successfully demonstrated over a range from 49.65 to 50.47 MHz. The experimental results show that the newly designed fiber laser can maintain the mode locking at the pumping power of 160 mW to stably generate periodic optical pulses with width less than 170 fs and timing jitter lower than 75 fs in the 1.55 µm wavelength region, when the fundamental repetition rate of the laser is continuously tuned between 49.65 and 50.47 MHz. Moreover, this fiber laser has a feature of turn-key operation with high repeatability of its fundamental repetition rate in practice.

  14. Phosphor thermometry at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2013-09-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilizing the luminescence properties of thermographic phosphors. Typically these ceramic materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Photomultipliers and high-speed camera systems are used to transiently detect the subsequently emitted luminescence decay point wise or two-dimensionally resolved. Based on appropriate calibration measurements, the luminescence lifetime is converted to temperature. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. For the first time, the authors realized a high-speed phosphor thermometry system combining a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterized regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating in terms of heating effects has been investigated. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of one sample per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1000 rpm. This experiment has proven that high-speed phosphor thermometry is a promising diagnostic tool for the resolution of surface temperature transients.

  15. High repetition rate plasma mirror device for attosecond science

    SciTech Connect

    Borot, A.; Douillet, D.; Iaquaniello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Lopez-Martens, R.; Audebert, P.; Geindre, J.-P.

    2014-01-15

    This report describes an active solid target positioning device for driving plasma mirrors with high repetition rate ultra-high intensity lasers. The position of the solid target surface with respect to the laser focus is optically monitored and mechanically controlled on the nm scale to ensure reproducible interaction conditions for each shot at arbitrary repetition rate. We demonstrate the target capabilities by driving high-order harmonic generation from plasma mirrors produced on glass targets with a near-relativistic intensity few-cycle pulse laser system operating at 1 kHz. During experiments, residual target surface motion can be actively stabilized down to 47 nm (root mean square), which ensures sub-300-as relative temporal stability of the plasma mirror as a secondary source of coherent attosecond extreme ultraviolet radiation in pump-probe experiments.

  16. A miniature high repetition rate shock tube.

    PubMed

    Tranter, R S; Lynch, P T

    2013-09-01

    A miniature high repetition rate shock tube with excellent reproducibility has been constructed to facilitate high temperature, high pressure, gas phase experiments at facilities such as synchrotron light sources where space is limited and many experiments need to be averaged to obtain adequate signal levels. The shock tube is designed to generate reaction conditions of T > 600 K, P < 100 bars at a cycle rate of up to 4 Hz. The design of the apparatus is discussed in detail, and data are presented to demonstrate that well-formed shock waves with predictable characteristics are created, repeatably. Two synchrotron-based experiments using this apparatus are also briefly described here, demonstrating the potential of the shock tube for research at synchrotron light sources.

  17. 1-kHz-repetition-rate femtosecond Raman laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, N. V.; Konyashchenko, A. V.; Kostryukov, P. V.; Losev, L. L.; Pazyuk, V. S.; Tenyakov, S. Yu

    2016-07-01

    A femtosecond Raman laser utilising compressed hydrogen is experimentally investigated under pumping by radiation from a 1-kHz-repetition-rate Ti : sapphire laser. In the regime of double-pulse pumping, the conditions are determined, which correspond to the minimal energy dispersion of Stokes pulses. The optical scheme is realised, which is capable of ensuring the long-term stability of the average power of the first Stokes component with a variation of less than 2%. The Stokes pulses are produced with a pulse duration of 60 fs and energy of 0.26 mJ at a conversion efficiency of 14%.

  18. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  19. Soliton repetition rate in a silicon-nitride microresonator.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chengying; Xuan, Yi; Wang, Cong; Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A; Leaird, Daniel E; Qi, Minghao; Weiner, Andrew M

    2017-02-15

    The repetition rate of a Kerr comb composed of a single soliton in an anomalous group velocity dispersion silicon-nitride microcavity is measured as a function of pump frequency. By comparing operation in the soliton and non-soliton states, the contributions from the Raman soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) and the thermal effects are evaluated; the SSFS is found to dominate the changes in the repetition rate, similar to silica cavities. The relationship between the changes in the repetition rate and the pump frequency detuning is found to be independent of the nonlinearity coefficient and dispersion of the cavity. Modeling of the repetition rate change by using the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation is discussed; the Kerr shock is found to have only a minor effect on repetition rate for cavity solitons with duration down to ∼50  fs.

  20. Generation of low-timing-jitter femtosecond pulse trains with 2 GHz repetition rate via external repetition rate multiplication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Sickler, Jason W; Fendel, Peter; Ippen, Erich P; Kärtner, Franz X; Wilken, Tobias; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2008-05-01

    Generation of low-timing-jitter 150 fs pulse trains at 1560 nm with 2 GHz repetition rate is demonstrated by locking a 200 MHz fundamental polarization additive-pulse mode-locked erbium fiber laser to high-finesse external Fabry-Perot cavities. The timing jitter and relative intensity noise of the repetition-rate multiplied pulse train are investigated.

  1. The Parameterization of All Robust Stabilizing Simple Repetitive Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kou; Sakanushi, Tatsuya; Ando, Yoshinori; Hagiwara, Takaaki; Murakami, Iwanori; Takenaga, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shun

    The modified repetitive control system is a type of servomechanism for the periodic reference input. That is, the modified repetitive control system follows the periodic reference input with small steady state error, even if a periodic disturbance or an uncertainty exists in the plant. Using previously proposed modified repetitive controllers, even if the plant does not include time-delay, transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output have infinite numbers of poles. When transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output have infinite numbers of poles, it is difficult to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic. From the practical point of view, it is desirable that the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic are easily specified. In order to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic easily, transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output are desirable to have finite numbers of poles. From this viewpoint, Yamada et al. proposed the concept of simple repetitive control systems such that the controller works as a modified repetitive controller and transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output have finite numbers of poles. In addition, Yamada et al. clarified the parameterization of all stabilizing simple repetitive controllers. However, the method by Yamada et al. cannot be applied for the plant with uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to propose the parameterization of all robust stabilizing simple repetitive controllers for the plant with uncertainty.

  2. A design method for robust stabilizing simple repetitive control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kou; Takenaga, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2007-12-01

    The modified repetitive control system is a type of servomechanism for the periodic reference input. That is, the modified repetitive control system follows the periodic reference input with small steady state error, even if a periodic disturbance or uncertainty exists in the plant. Using previously proposed modified repetitive controllers, even if the plants does not includes time-delay, the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have an infinite number of poles. When the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have an infinite number of poles, it is difficult to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic. From the practical point of view, it is desirable that the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic are easily specified. In order to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic easily, the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output are desirable to have a finite number of poles. Yamada et al. proposed the concept of simple repetitive control systems such that the controller works as a modified repetitive controller and the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have a finite number of poles. In addition, Yamada et al. clarified the parametrization of all stabilizing simple repetitive controllers. However the method by Yamada et al. cannot be applied for the plant with uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to propose the parametrization of all robust stabilizing simple repetitive controllers for the plant with uncertainty.

  3. Laser nanoablation of diamond surface at high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Pashinin, V. P.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The chemical etching of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses with a high repetition rate (f ≤slant 500 {\\text{kHz}}) in air is experimentally investigated. The irradiation has been performed by the second-harmonic (515 {\\text{nm}}) radiation of a disk Yb : YAG laser. Dependences of the diamond surface etch rate on the laser energy density and pulse repetition rate are obtained.

  4. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  5. Small gain stability theory for matched basis function repetitive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunde; Longman, Richard W.; Nagashima, Masaki

    2014-02-01

    Many spacecraft suffer from jitter produced by periodic vibration sources such as momentum wheels, reaction wheels, or control moment gyros. Vibration isolation mounts are needed for fine pointing equipment. Active control methods directly addressing frequencies of interest have the potential to completely cancel the influence of these disturbances. Typical repetitive control methods initially address all frequencies of a given period. Matched basis function repetitive control individually addresses each frequency, finding error components at these frequencies using the projection algorithm, and can converge to zero error, using only frequency response knowledge at addressed frequencies. This results in linear control laws but with periodic coefficients. Frequency domain raising produces a time invariant pole/zero model of the control law. A small gain stability theory is developed, that exhibits very strong stability robustness properties to model error. For convergence to zero tracking error it needs only knowledge of the phase response at addressed frequencies, and it must be known within an accuracy of ±90°. Controllers are then designed by pole-zero placement, bypassing the complexity of original periodic coefficient equations. Compared to the usual repetitive control approaches, the approach here eliminates the need for a robustifying zero phase low pass filter, eliminates the need for interpolation in data, and handles multiple unrelated frequencies easily and naturally.

  6. Flexible high-repetition-rate ultrafast fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dong; Liu, Xueming; Sun, Zhipei; Lu, Hua; Han, Dongdong; Wang, Guoxi; Wang, Fengqiu

    2013-01-01

    High-repetition-rate pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber communications, frequency comb, and optical sensing. Here, we have demonstrated high-repetition-rate ultrashort pulses in an all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) as a comb filter. The repetition rate of the laser can be tuned flexibly from about 7 to 1100 GHz by controlling the optical path difference between the two arms of the MZI. The pulse duration can be reduced continuously from about 10.1 to 0.55 ps with the spectral width tunable from about 0.35 to 5.7 nm by manipulating the intracavity polarization controller. Numerical simulations well confirm the experimental observations and show that filter-driven four-wave mixing effect, induced by the MZI, is the main mechanism that governs the formation of the high-repetition-rate pulses. This all-fiber-based laser is a simple and low-cost source for various applications where high-repetition-rate pulses are necessary. PMID:24226153

  7. Demonstration of a high repetition rate capillary discharge waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, A. J. Pieronek, C.; Daniels, J.; Bulanov, S. S.; Waldron, W. L.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Leemans, W. P.; Liu, F.; Antipov, S.; Butler, J. E.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.

    2016-01-21

    A hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide operating at kHz repetition rates is presented for parameters relevant to laser plasma acceleration (LPA). The discharge current pulse was optimized for erosion mitigation with laser guiding experiments and MHD simulation. Heat flow simulations and measurements showed modest temperature rise at the capillary wall due to the average heat load at kHz repetition rates with water-cooled capillaries, which is promising for applications of LPAs such as high average power radiation sources.

  8. Multi-gigahertz repetition-rate-selectable passive harmonic mode locking of a fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Lecaplain, Caroline; Grelu, Philippe

    2013-05-06

    We demonstrate a passive harmonically mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser that operates at selectable harmonics spanning from the 6th to the 928th, which corresponds to repetition rates ranging from 153 MHz to 22.2 GHz. The noteworthy laser output stability is attested by supermode suppression levels as large as 41 dB. The influence of a continuous wave background on harmonics stability is tested.

  9. Response to NAS Request for Information on Chamber Repetition Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Wayne R.

    2011-08-19

    This purpose of this report is to “Provide further information on the issues of repetition rates and chamber clearing issues for dry wall and liquid wall chamber concepts for IFE; namely what are the issues, possible solutions and needed R&D?”

  10. A gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Gao, Jing-Ming; Yang, Han-Wu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Li, Ze-Xin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a gigawatt level repetitive rate adjustable magnetic pulse compressor is investigated both numerically and experimentally. The device has advantages of high power level, high repetitive rate achievability, and long lifetime reliability. Importantly, dominate parameters including the saturation time, the peak voltage, and even the compression ratio can be potentially adjusted continuously and reliably, which significantly expands the applicable area of the device and generators based on it. Specifically, a two-stage adjustable magnetic pulse compressor, utilized for charging the pulse forming network of a high power pulse generator, is designed with different compression ratios of 25 and 18 through an optimized design process. Equivalent circuit analysis shows that the modification of compression ratio can be achieved by just changing the turn number of the winding. At the same time, increasing inductance of the grounded inductor will decrease the peak voltage and delay the charging process. Based on these analyses, an adjustable compressor was built and studied experimentally in both the single shot mode and repetitive rate mode. Pulses with peak voltage of 60 kV and energy per pulse of 360 J were obtained in the experiment. The rise times of the pulses were compressed from 25 μs to 1 μs and from 18 μs to 1 μs, respectively, at repetitive rate of 20 Hz with good repeatability. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with analyses.

  11. All-pass optical structures for repetition rate multiplication.

    PubMed

    Preciado, Miguel A; Muriel, Miguel A

    2008-07-21

    We propose and analyze several simple all-pass spectrally-periodic optical structures, in terms of accuracy and robustness, for the implementation of repetition rate multipliers of periodic pulse train with uniform output train envelope, finding optimum solutions for multiplication factors of 3, 4, 6, and 12.

  12. Study on the repetition rate locking system of the femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunbo; Wu, Tengfei; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2015-04-01

    The new technique known as "The femtosecond frequency comb technology" has dramatic impact on the diverse fields of precision measurement and nonlinear optical physics. In order to acquire high-precision and high-stability femtosecond comb, it's necessary to stabilize the repetition rate fRep and the offset frequency f0. This article presents the details of stabilizing and controlling the comb parameter fRep and finally phase lock the repetition rate of femtosecond laser to a radio frequency reference, derived from an atomic clock. In practice, the narrower the bandwidth of lock system (close-loop system), the higher stability we can achieve, but it becomes easier to be unlocked for external disturb. We adopt a method in servo unit to avoid this problem in this paper. The control parameters P and I can be adjusted and optimized more flexibly. The lock steps depend on the special servo system make it easier to find the right parameters and the lock becomes more convenient and quickly. With this idea, the locked time of repetition rate can be as long as the mode-locking time of the laser. The stability of laser can be evaluated by allan deviation. In this research, the contrast of stability of fRep between the locked laser and the unlocked is given. The new lock system is proved reasonable.

  13. A Dynamic Feedback Model for High Repetition Rate LINAC-Driven FELS

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado Munoz, M.; Doolittle, L.; Emma, P.; Huang, G.; Ratti, A.; Serrano, C.; Byrd, J. M.

    2012-05-20

    One of the concepts for the next generation of linacdriven FELs is a CW superconducting linac driving an electron beam with MHz repetition rates. One of the challenges for next generation FELs is improve the stability of the xray pulses by improving the shot-to-shot stability of the energy, charge, peak current, and timing jitter of the electron beam. A high repetition rate FEL with a CW linac presents an opportunity to use a variety of broadband feedbacks to stabilize the beam parameters. To understand the performance of such a feedback system, we are developing a dynamic model of the machine with a focus on the longitudinal beam properties. The model is being developed as an extension of the LITrack code and includes the dynamics of the beam-cavity interaction, RF feedback, beam-based feedback, and multibunch effects. In this paper, we present a detailed description of this model.

  14. Femtosecond VECSEL with tunable multi-gigahertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Oliver D; Wittwer, Valentin J; Mangold, Mario; Hoffmann, Martin; Golling, Matthias; Südmeyer, Thomas; Keller, Ursula

    2011-11-07

    We present a femtosecond vertical external cavity surface emitting laser (VECSEL) that is continuously tunable in repetition rate from 6.5 GHz up to 11.3 GHz. The use of a low-saturation fluence semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) enables stable cw modelocking with a simple cavity design, for which the laser mode area on SESAM and VECSEL are similar and do not significantly change for a variation in cavity length. Without any realignment of the cavity for the full tuning range, the pulse duration remained nearly constant around 625 fs with less than 3.5% standard deviation. The center wavelength only changed ±0.2 nm around 963.8 nm, while the output power was 169 mW with less than 6% standard deviation. Such a tunable repetition rate is interesting for various metrology applications such as optical sampling by laser cavity tuning (OSCAT).

  15. Macroscopic surface cleaning using a high repetition rate ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, H. M.; Baldwin, D.; Edelson, M. C.

    The aim of the Ames Laboratory Laser Decontamination Project is to explore new decontamination methods to reduce waste volumes and achieve sufficiently high decontamination factors to permit the unrestricted release of metals for commercial use. This paper presents a discussion of recent experimental work designed to test the capabilities of ultraviolet lasers for large surface area (approximately m(sup 2)) cleaning. The potential benefits of applying laser technology to decontamination are the elimination of solvents, the potential for remote operation to reduce exposure of personnel and expensive equipment to radiation hazards, and the minimization of secondary wastes. High-repetition rate lasers can clean large surfaces (approximately m(sup 2)) in a reasonable amount of time. Proper selection of laser pulse energy, wavelength, repetition rate, and focusing lens is mandated to optimize process efficiency.

  16. High repetition rate ultrashort laser cuts a path through fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Lorena; Schubert, Elise; Mongin, Denis; Klingebiel, Sandro; Schultze, Marcel; Metzger, Thomas; Michel, Knut; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that the transmission of a 1030 nm, 1.3 ps laser beam of 100 mJ energy through fog increases when its repetition rate increases to the kHz range. Due to the efficient energy deposition by the laser filaments in the air, a shockwave ejects the fog droplets from a substantial volume of the beam, at a moderate energy cost. This process opens prospects for applications requiring the transmission of laser beams through fogs and clouds.

  17. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Fuqiang; Wang Yi; Shi Hongsheng; Lei Qingquan

    2008-06-15

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N{sub 2} as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  18. Bipolar high-repetition-rate high-voltage nanosecond pulser.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fuqiang; Wang, Yi; Shi, Hongsheng; Lei, Qingquan

    2008-06-01

    The pulser designed is mainly used for producing corona plasma in waste water treatment system. Also its application in study of dielectric electrical properties will be discussed. The pulser consists of a variable dc power source for high-voltage supply, two graded capacitors for energy storage, and the rotating spark gap switch. The key part is the multielectrode rotating spark gap switch (MER-SGS), which can ensure wider range modulation of pulse repetition rate, longer pulse width, shorter pulse rise time, remarkable electrical field distortion, and greatly favors recovery of the gap insulation strength, insulation design, the life of the switch, etc. The voltage of the output pulses switched by the MER-SGS is in the order of 3-50 kV with pulse rise time of less than 10 ns and pulse repetition rate of 1-3 kHz. An energy of 1.25-125 J per pulse and an average power of up to 10-50 kW are attainable. The highest pulse repetition rate is determined by the driver motor revolution and the electrode number of MER-SGS. Even higher voltage and energy can be switched by adjusting the gas pressure or employing N(2) as the insulation gas or enlarging the size of MER-SGS to guarantee enough insulation level.

  19. Stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Xiaohui; An, Xiaokang; Yu, Xin; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying; Sun, Rui

    2017-07-01

    Laser-induced plasma ignition has been applied in various combustion systems, however, work on flame stabilization with repetitive laser-induced plasma (LIP) is rather limited. In this paper, stabilization of a premixed methane-air flame with a high repetition nanosecond LIP is reported. The plasma energy coupling and the temporal evolution of the flame kernels generated by the LIPs are investigated with different laser repetition rates, i.e., 1 Hz, 100 Hz and 250 Hz, respectively. The plasma energy coupling is not affected in the air flow and in the premixed methane-air flow with the applied laser repetition rates. Continuous combustion flame stabilization has been achieved with LIPs of 100 Hz and 250 Hz, in terms of catch-up and merging of the consecutive flame kernels. The flame kernel formed by the last LIP does not affect the evolution of the newly formed flame kernel by the next LIP. The catch-up distance, defined as the distance from the LIP initiation site to the flame kernel catch-up position, is estimated for different laser repetition rates based on the temporal evolution of the flame kernels. A higher laser repetition rate will lead to a shorter catch-up distance which is beneficial for flame stabilization. The up limit for the laser repetition rate to realize effective flame stabilization is determined from the critical inter-pulse delay defined from the onset of the LIP to the return of the initially contraflow propagating lower front to the LIP initiation site. The up limit is 377 Hz under the flow conditions of this work (equivalence ratio of 1, flow speed of 2 m/s, and Reynolds number of 1316).

  20. High voltage high repetition rate pulse using Marx topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Kashapov, N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes Marx topology using MOSFET transistors. Marx circuit with 10 stages has been done, to obtain pulses about 5.5KV amplitude, and the width of the pulses was about 30μsec with a high repetition rate (PPS > 100), Vdc = 535VDC is the input voltage for supplying the Marx circuit. Two Ferrite ring core transformers were used to control the MOSFET transistors of the Marx circuit (the first transformer to control the charging MOSFET transistors, the second transformer to control the discharging MOSFET transistors).

  1. A Simulation of the Effects of Varying Repetition Rate and Pulse Width of Nanosecond Discharges on Premixed Lean Methane-Air Combustion

    DOE PAGES

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Two-dimensional kinetic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of repetition rate and pulse width of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on stabilizing premixed lean methane-air combustion. The repetition rate and pulse width are varied from 10 kHz to 50 kHz and from 9 ns to 2 ns while the total power is kept constant. The lower repetition rates provide larger amounts of radicals such as O, H, and OH. However, the effect on stabilization is found to be the same for all of the tested repetition rates. The shorter pulse width is found to favor the production of species in higher electronicmore » states, but the varying effects on stabilization are also found to be small. Our results indicate that the total deposited power is the critical element that determines the extent of stabilization over this range of discharge properties studied.« less

  2. Plasma-Assisted Flame Ignition and Stabilization using Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Christophe

    2007-10-01

    Ever more stringent environmental regulations are providing impetus for reducing pollutant emissions, in particular nitric oxides and soot, in internal combustion and aircraft engines. Lean or diluted combustible mixtures are of particular interest because they burn at lower flame temperatures than stoichiometric mixtures and thus produce lesser amounts of thermal nitric oxides. Over the past decade, high voltage nanosecond pulsed discharges have been demonstrated as energy efficient way to ignite such mixtures. However, the practical application of these discharges for ignition purposes is limited by the very high electric fields required, especially in high pressure combustion chambers. Moreover, stabilization requires a steady-state addition of energy that cannot be achieved with single or low repetition frequency pulses. In the present work, we investigate the applicability and effectiveness of high voltage nanosecond discharges with high pulse repetition frequencies, typically up to 100 kHz. The high repetition frequencies are chosen to exceed the recombination rate of chemically active species. In this way, the concentration of active species can build up between consecutive pulses, thus yielding significantly higher concentrations than with low frequency pulses. These discharges are investigated for two applications, the ignition of diluted air/propane mixtures at pressures up to several bars in a constant volume chamber, and the stabilization of atmospheric pressure lean premixed air/propane flames. Time-resolved electric and spectroscopic measurements are presented to analyze the discharge regimes, the energy deposition, the gas temperature evolution, the electron number density, and the production of excited species. The results show that nanosecond repetitive pulses produce ultrafast gas heating and atomic oxygen generation, both on nanosecond time scales, via excitation of molecular nitrogen followed by dissociative quenching of molecular oxygen. These

  3. A smart repetitive-rate wideband high power microwave source

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Bao-liang; Yang, Han-wu; Zhang, Zi-cheng

    2016-01-15

    A smart repetitive-rate wideband High Power Microwave (HPM) source based on the A6 Magnetron with Diffraction Output is described in this paper. The length of the HPM source is 30 cm and its weight is 35 kg. Computer simulations show that the source can produce microwave with central frequency of 1.91 GHz and bandwidth of about 11%. Experimental measurements show that the output microwave power from the source reaches in maximum 110 MW when the input electric power from the pulsed driver is ∼500 MW, which gives the power conversion efficiency 22%. Central frequency of the output HPM in the experiment is 1.94 GHz with the bandwidth ranging from 1.82 GHz to 2.02 GHz. The jitter of the output HPM power is lower than 3 dB when the source operates in the repetition mode with 50 Hz rate.

  4. Improved repetition rate mixed isotope CO2 TEA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, D. B.

    2014-09-01

    A compact CO2 TEA laser has been developed for remote chemical detection that operates at a repetition rate of 250 Hz. It emits 700 mJ/pulse at 10.6 μm in a multimode beam with the 12C16O2 isotope. With mixed 12C16O2 plus 13C16O2 isotopes it emits multiple lines in both isotope manifolds to improve detection of a broad range of chemicals. In particular, output pulse energies are 110 mJ/pulse at 9.77 μm, 250 mJ/pulse at 10 μm, and 550 mJ/pulse at 11.15 μm, useful for detection of the chemical agents Sarin, Tabun, and VX. Related work shows capability for long term sealed operation with a catalyst and an agile tuner at a wavelength shift rate of 200 Hz.

  5. Improved repetition rate mixed isotope CO₂ TEA laser.

    PubMed

    Cohn, D B

    2014-09-01

    A compact CO2 TEA laser has been developed for remote chemical detection that operates at a repetition rate of 250 Hz. It emits 700 mJ/pulse at 10.6 μm in a multimode beam with the (12)C(16)O2 isotope. With mixed (12)C(16)O2 plus (13)C(16)O2 isotopes it emits multiple lines in both isotope manifolds to improve detection of a broad range of chemicals. In particular, output pulse energies are 110 mJ/pulse at 9.77 μm, 250 mJ/pulse at 10 μm, and 550 mJ/pulse at 11.15 μm, useful for detection of the chemical agents Sarin, Tabun, and VX. Related work shows capability for long term sealed operation with a catalyst and an agile tuner at a wavelength shift rate of 200 Hz.

  6. High-repetition-rate ultranarrow-bandwidth 193-nm excimer lasers for DUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Uwe; Paetzel, Rainer; Bragin, Igor; Kleinschmidt, Juergen; Lokai, Peter; Osmanov, Rustem; Schroeder, Thomas; Sprenger, Martin; Zschocke, Wolfgang

    2000-07-01

    Results on the feasibility of highest repetition rate ArF lithography excimer lasers with narrow spectral bandwidth of less than 0.4 pm are presented. The current 193 nm lithography laser product NovaLine A2010 delivers output power of 10W at 2 kHz repetition rate with energy dose stability of +/- 0.5 percent. A novel 193 nm absolute wavelength calibration technique has ben incorporated in the laser which gives absolute wavelength accuracy better than 0.5 pm. Long-term results of optical materials, coatings and laser components give insight into estimated cost of ownership developments for the laser operation over the next years. Progress in pulse stretching approaches to achieve lower stress of the wafer scanner illumination optics and lens allow optimistic estimates of total system CoO. Initial results on the laser operation at 4 kHz in order to reach 20W output power are discussed.

  7. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-08-19

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. In conclusion, the pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  8. Adjustable high-repetition-rate pulse trains in a passively-mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Fodil, Rachid; Amrani, Foued; Yang, Changxi; Kellou, Abdelhamid; Grelu, Ph.

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally investigate multipulse regimes obtained within a passively-mode-locked fiber laser that includes a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer. By adjusting the time delay imbalance of the MZ, ultrashort pulse trains at multi-GHz repetition rates are generated. We compare the observed dynamics with high-harmonic mode locking, and show that the multi-GHz pulse trains display an inherent instability, which has been overlooked. By using a recirculation loop containing the MZ, we demonstrate a significant improvement of the pulse train stability.

  9. Development of a cryogenic hydrogen microjet for high-intensity, high-repetition rate experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. B.; Göde, S.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-11-01

    The advent of high-intensity, high-repetition-rate lasers has led to the need for replenishing targets of interest for high energy density sciences. We describe the design and characterization of a cryogenic microjet source, which can deliver a continuous stream of liquid hydrogen with a diameter of a few microns. The jet has been imaged at 1 μm resolution by shadowgraphy with a short pulse laser. The pointing stability has been measured at well below a mrad, for a stable free-standing filament of solid-density hydrogen.

  10. Compact High Repetition Rate CO2 TEA Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, David B.; Hasselbeck, Michael P.; Affleck, Wayde H.; Eldridge, Robert E.; Moser, Thomas P.; Sasaki, Gregory R.; Watson, Tom A.; Bailey, Peter J.

    1989-07-01

    CO2 TEA lasers have been extensively developed at Hughes for a number of important military applications, including chemical defense, long range rangefinders, and uplink guidance control of projectiles. The devices are characterized by highly compact geometries using hermetically sealed, closed cycle gas flow with catalysts. Repetition rates are on the order of 200 Hz and output energies range from 100 mJ to to 300 mJ per pulse. Total prototype laser package volume and weight at the higher output energies is on the order of 1.5 ft3 and 40 pounds, respectively, and includes all components, requiring only an external source of 28 VDC. shot lifetimes have been achieved in closed cycle operation with room temperature catalysts for both the normal and 13C1602 isotopes. Wavelength tunability over 60 lines in the R and P branches of the 9.4 and 10.6 μm bands has been shown with emphasis on the 9P(42) line (of interest in chemical defense) where 170 mJ was obtained in multi-mode output. Rapid switching among lines at 10 Hz was achieved and extension in this rate by at least an order of magnitude is in progress.

  11. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants is revealed. The phytoplankton or higher plants are illuminated with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes. 14 figs.

  12. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants by illuminating the phytoplankton or higher plants with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes.

  13. 2 µm femtosecond fiber laser at low repetition rate and high pulse energy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lih-Mei; Wan, Peng; Protopopov, Vladimir; Liu, Jian

    2012-02-27

    In the paper, a 2 µm high energy fs fiber laser is presented based on Tm doped fiber at a low repetition rate. The seed laser was designed to generate pulse train at 2 µm at a pulse repetition rate of 2.5 MHz. The low repetition rate seed oscillator eliminated extra devices such as AO pulse picker. Two-stage fiber amplifier was used to boost pulse energy to 0.65 µJ with chirped pulse amplification.

  14. Direct analysis of trace elements in crude oils by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation coupled to ICPMS detection.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Estelle; Pécheyran, Christophe; Sanabria Ortega, Georgia; Prinzhofer, Alain; Donard, Olivier F X

    2011-02-01

    IR-femtosecond pulses were used at high repetition rates (up to 10 kHz) to ablate viscous crude oils for the determination of trace elements by ICPMS. A special internal glass cap was fitted into the ablation cell to minimise oil splashes and remove big particles that would be otherwise spread into the cell. Laser ablation in static and dynamic conditions (i.e. the laser beam being moved rapidly at the surface of the sample) was studied together with some fundamental parameters like repetition rate and fluence. Signal sensitivity and stability were found to be strongly affected by repetition rate and fluence, though not in linear manner, and in some circumstances by the laser beam velocity. Sample transport efficiency was found to decrease with increasing repetition rate, probably due to stronger particle agglomeration when increasing the density of primary particles. ICPMS plasma atomisation/ionisation efficiency was also found to be affected to some extent at the highest repetition rates. Moderate repetition rate (1 kHz), high fluence (24 J cm(-2)) and fast scanning velocity (100 mm s(-1)) were preferred taking into account signal intensity and stability. Sample transport elemental fractionation was also evidenced, particularly as regards to carbon due to volatilisation of volatile organic species. Matrix effect occurring when comparing the ablation of transparent (base oil) and opaque (crude oil) samples could not be completely suppressed by the use of IR femtosecond pulses, requiring a matrix matching or a standard addition calibration approach. This approach provided good accuracy and very low detection limits in the crude oil, in the range of ng g(-1).

  15. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  16. Micromachining of bulk glass with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses at variable repetition rates.

    PubMed

    Gattass, Rafael R; Cerami, Loren R; Mazur, Eric

    2006-06-12

    Oscillator-only femtosecond laser micromachining enables the manufacturing of integrated optical components with circular transverse profiles in transparent materials. The circular profile is due to diffusion of heat accumulating at the focus. We control the heat diffusion by focusing bursts of femtosecond laser pulses at various repetition rates into sodalime glass. We investigate the effect the repetition rate and number of pulses on the size of the resulting structures. We identify the combinations of burst repetition rate and number of pulses within a burst for which accumulation of heat occurs. The threshold for heat accumulation depends on the number of pulses within a burst. The burst repetition rate and the number of pulses within a burst provide convenient control of the morphology of structures generated with high repetition rate femtosecond micromachining.

  17. Mode locking of fiber lasers at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usechak, Nicholas G.

    Mode-locked fiber lasers have become indispensable tools in many fields as their use is no longer relegated to the optics community. In the future, their size will decrease and their applications will become far more prevalent than they are today. At present, the field is undergoing a cardinal shift as these devices have become commercially available in the last decade. This has put an emphasis on long-term performance and reliability as these devices are beginning to be integrated into complex systems in areas as diverse as medical optics, micro-machining, forensics, and tracking as well as their obvious use as laboratory tools or sources in telecommunications. This is also resulting in a transition from research to engineering. Since the field of mode-locked lasers has been extensively studied for over forty years, one may expect that little has been overlooked. However, since the mode-locking phenomena is governed by nonlinear partial differential equations, a rich degree of effects exist and the field has not yet been exhausted. During the past two decades, the main emphasis has been on short-pulse generation; however, the main thrust of research is likely to change to producing high-power devices, which will result in limiting effects and thermal issues that are currently ignored for low-power sources. Finally, detailed studies have generally been performed numerically as analytic solutions only exist in limiting cases. In this thesis, mode-locked fiber lasers are studied experimentally, numerically, and theoretically. The experimental work focuses on high-repetition rate, mode-locked cavities, which are then modeled numerically. A semi-analytic tool, which goes beyond the prior theories and includes all of the effects experienced by steady-state, mode-locked pulses as they propagate in a laser cavity, is also derived. The only caveats to this approach are an assumption of the pulse shape and the requirement that it not change during propagation through the

  18. The effect of laser repetition rate on the LASiS synthesis of biocompatible silver nanoparticles in aqueous starch solution

    PubMed Central

    Zamiri, Reza; Zakaria, Azmi; Ahangar, Hossein Abbastabar; Darroudi, Majid; Zamiri, Golnoosh; Rizwan, Zahid; Drummen, Gregor PC

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation-based nanoparticle synthesis in solution is rapidly becoming popular, particularly for potential biomedical and life science applications. This method promises one pot synthesis and concomitant bio-functionalization, is devoid of toxic chemicals, does not require complicated apparatus, can be combined with natural stabilizers, is directly biocompatible, and has high particle size uniformity. Size control and reduction is generally determined by the laser settings; that the size and size distribution scales with laser fluence is well described. Conversely, the effect of the laser repetition rate on the final nanoparticle product in laser ablation is less well-documented, especially in the presence of stabilizers. Here, the influence of the laser repetition rate during laser ablation synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the presence of starch as a stabilizer was investigated. The increment of the repetition rate does not negatively influence the ablation efficiency, but rather shows increased productivity, causes a red-shift in the plasmon resonance peak of the silver–starch nanoparticles, an increase in mean particle size and size distribution, and a distinct lack of agglomerate formation. Optimal results were achieved at 10 Hz repetition rate, with a mean particle size of ~10 nm and a bandwidth of ~6 nm ‘full width at half maximum’ (FWHM). Stability measurements showed no significant changes in mean particle size or agglomeration or even flocculation. However, zeta potential measurements showed that optimal double layer charge is achieved at 30 Hz. Consequently, Ag–NP synthesis via the laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) method in starch solution seems to be a trade-off between small size and narrow size distributions and inherent and long-term stability. PMID:23345971

  19. Safety and efficacy of low fluence, high repetition rate versus high fluence, low repetition rate 810-nm diode laser for axillary hair removal in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhai; Liu, Chengyi; Chen, Zhou; Cai, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Qianxi; Li, Houmin; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-11-01

    High-fluence diode lasers with contact cooling have emerged as the gold standard to remove unwanted hair. Lowering the energy should result in less pain and could theoretically affect the efficacy of the therapy. To compare the safety and efficacy of a low fluence high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser to those of a high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser for permanent axillary hair removal in Chinese women. Ninety-two Chinese women received four axillae laser hair removal treatments at 4-week intervals using the low fluence, high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser in super hair removal (SHR) mode on one side and the high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser in hair removal (HR) mode on the other side. Hair counts were done at each follow-up visit and 6-month follow-up after the final laser treatment using a "Hi Quality Hair Analysis Program System"; the immediate pain score after each treatment session was recorded by a visual analog scale. The overall median reduction of hair was 90.2% with the 810-nm diode laser in SHR mode and 87% with the same laser in HR mode at 6-month follow-up. The median pain scores in SHR mode and in HR mode were 2.75 and 6.75, respectively. Low fluence, high repetition rate diode laser can efficiently remove unwanted hair but also significantly improve tolerability and reduce adverse events during the course of treatment.

  20. Repetition rate multiplication of frequency comb using all-pass fiber resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lijun; Yang, Honglei; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-09-15

    We propose a stable method for repetition rate multiplication of a 250-MHz Er-fiber frequency comb by a phase-locked all-pass fiber ring resonator, whose phase-locking configuration is simple. The optical path length of the fiber ring resonator is automatically controlled to be accurately an odd multiple of half of the original cavity length using an electronical phase-locking unit with an optical delay line. As for shorter cavity length of the comb, high-order odd multiple is preferable. Because the power loss depends only on the net-attenuation of the fiber ring resonator, the energetic efficiency of the proposed method is high. The input and output optical spectrums show that the spectral width of the frequency comb is clearly preserved. Besides, experimental results show less pulse intensity fluctuation and 35 dB suppression ratio of side-modes while providing a good long-term and short-term frequency stability. Higher-order repetition rate multiplication to several GHz can be obtained by using several fiber ring resonators in cascade configuration.

  1. Repetition rate multiplication of frequency comb using all-pass fiber resonator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijun; Yang, Honglei; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a stable method for repetition rate multiplication of a 250-MHz Er-fiber frequency comb by a phase-locked all-pass fiber ring resonator, whose phase-locking configuration is simple. The optical path length of the fiber ring resonator is automatically controlled to be accurately an odd multiple of half of the original cavity length using an electronical phase-locking unit with an optical delay line. As for shorter cavity length of the comb, high-order odd multiple is preferable. Because the power loss depends only on the net-attenuation of the fiber ring resonator, the energetic efficiency of the proposed method is high. The input and output optical spectrums show that the spectral width of the frequency comb is clearly preserved. Besides, experimental results show less pulse intensity fluctuation and 35 dB suppression ratio of side-modes while providing a good long-term and short-term frequency stability. Higher-order repetition rate multiplication to several GHz can be obtained by using several fiber ring resonators in cascade configuration.

  2. Repetition rate multiplication of frequency comb using all-pass fiber resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lijun; Yang, Honglei; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We propose a stable method for repetition rate multiplication of a 250-MHz Er-fiber frequency comb by a phase-locked all-pass fiber ring resonator, whose phase-locking configuration is simple. The optical path length of the fiber ring resonator is automatically controlled to be accurately an odd multiple of half of the original cavity length using an electronical phase-locking unit with an optical delay line. As for shorter cavity length of the comb, high-order odd multiple is preferable. Because the power loss depends only on the net-attenuation of the fiber ring resonator, the energetic efficiency of the proposed method is high. The input and output optical spectrums show that the spectral width of the frequency comb is clearly preserved. Besides, experimental results show less pulse intensity fluctuation and 35 dB suppression ratio of side-modes while providing a good long-term and short-term frequency stability. Higher-order repetition rate multiplication to several GHz can be obtained by using several fiber ring resonators in cascade configuration.

  3. The Influence on Stability Robustness of Compromising on the Zero Tracking Error Requirement in Repetitive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunde; Longman, Richard W.

    2012-06-01

    Repetitive control (RC) can be used to design active vibration isolation mounts that aim to cancel the influence of spacecraft vibrations on fine pointing equipment. It can cancel the influence of slight imbalance in momentum wheels, reaction wheels, and CMGs. Because RC aims for zero error, it requires reasonably accurate knowledge of the system dynamics all the way to Nyquist frequency. As a result, special methods are needed to establish robustness to model error. A series of publications have demonstrated a method of averaging a cost function over models to increase the robustness. A previous paper improves on this by adjusting the learning rate as a function of frequency to further improve robustness, but there is still a hard limit on phase error. This paper considers yet one more approach, and all three can be used simultaneously. Here we compromise on the zero tracking error requirement for frequencies that require extra robustness. This allows one to extend this hard limit making RC tolerate larger model errors. A quadratic cost is used that penalizes not just the rate of change of the input function, but also the size of the input function. We first establish how to do this for the sister field of iterative learning control, and then the frequency response characteristics are produced for design of repetitive control. The method can improve tracking error for a frequency interval above the frequency at which one would otherwise have to cut off the learning because of model error. Model uncertainty can be used directly in the design process to produce stable RC laws for any level of uncertainty. The design approach differs from typical earlier work that used a sharp frequency cutoff, and instead uses a minimal amount of attenuation needed to produce stability.

  4. Viscoelastic creep induced by repetitive spine flexion and its relationship to dynamic spine stability.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Samuel J; Kingston, David C; Brown, Stephen H M; Graham, Ryan B

    2013-08-01

    Repetitive trunk flexion elicits passive tissue creep, which has been hypothesized to compromise spine stability. The current investigation determined if increased spine flexion angle at the onset of flexion relaxation (FR) in the lumbar extensor musculature was associated with altered dynamic stability of spine kinematics. Twelve male participants performed 125 consecutive cycles of full forward trunk flexion. Spine kinematics and lumbar erector spinae (LES) electromyographic (EMG) activity were obtained throughout the repetitive trunk flexion trial. Dynamic stability was evaluated with maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents over five sequential blocks of 25cycles. Spine flexion angle at FR onset, and peak LES EMG activity were determined at baseline and every 25th cycle. Spine flexion angle at FR increased on average by 1.7° after baseline with significant increases of 1.7° and 2.4° at the 50th and 100th cycles. Maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents demonstrated a transient, non-statistically significant, increase between cycles 26 and 50 followed by a recovery to baseline over the remainder of the repetitive trunk flexion cycles. Recovery of dynamic stability may be the consequence of increased active spine stiffness demonstrated by the non-significant increase in peak LES EMG that occurred as the repetitive trunk flexion progressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of master oscillator stability over pulse repetition frequency on hybrid semiconductor mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Alves, D.; Abreu, Manuel; Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, J. M.

    2015-04-01

    Semiconductor mode-locked lasers are a very attractive laser pulse source for high accuracy length metrology. However, for some applications, this kind of device does not have the required frequency stability. Operating the laser in hybrid mode will increase the laser pulse repetition frequency (PRF) stability. In this study it is showed that the laser PRF is not only locked to the master oscillator but also maintains the same level of stability of the master oscillator. The device used in this work is a 10 mm long mode-locked asymmetrical cladding single section InAs/InP quantum dash diode laser emitting at 1580 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of ≈4.37 GHz. The laser nominal stability in passive mode (no external oscillator) shows direct dependence with the gain current and the stability range goes from 10-4 to 10-7. Several oscillators with different stabilities were used for the hybrid-mode operation (with external oscillator) and the resulting mode-locked laser stability compared. For low cost oscillators with low stability, the laser PRF stability achieves a value of 10-7 and for higher stable oscillation source (such as oven controlled quartz oscillators (OXCO)) the stability can reach values up to 10-12 (τ =1 s).

  6. Compact all-fiber ring femtosecond laser with high fundamental repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Xu, Shanhui; Huang, Huichang; Peng, Mingying; Yang, Zhongmin

    2012-10-22

    A 165-fs all-fiber ring laser is demonstrated with a fundamental repetition rate of 235 MHz based on a 5.7-cm-long Er(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped phosphate glass fiber and a technique of nonlinear polarization evolution. In order to further enhance the fundamental repetition rate and compact the structure of the all-fiber laser, an optical integrated module is designed. By employing this novel optical module, a much more compact 105-fs mode-locking all-fiber ring laser, operating at a 325 MHz fundamental repetition rate, is realized.

  7. Femtosecond and picosecond laser drilling of metals at high repetition rates and average powers.

    PubMed

    Ancona, A; Döring, S; Jauregui, C; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2009-11-01

    The influence of pulse duration on the laser drilling of metals at repetition rates of up to 1 MHz and average powers of up to 70 W has been experimentally investigated using an ytterbium-doped-fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with pulses from 800 fs to 19 ps. At a few hundred kilohertz particle shielding causes an increase in the number of pulses for breakthrough, depending on the pulse energy and duration. At higher repetition rates, the heat accumulation effect overbalances particle shielding, but significant melt ejection affects the hole quality. Using femtosecond pulses, heat accumulation starts at higher repetition rates, and the ablation efficiency is higher compared with picosecond pulses.

  8. Z-scan measurements using high repetition rate lasers: how to manage thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Gnoli, Andrea; Razzari, Luca; Righini, Marcofabio

    2005-10-03

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple method for using Z-scan technique with high repetition rate lasers managing cumulative thermal effects. Following Falconieri [J. Opt. A, 1 (1999) 662], time evolution of Z-scan signal is recorded. We use data time correlation to extrapolate with accuracy the instantaneous nonlinear optical response of the sample. The method employed allows us to clearly evaluate the order of the absorption process underlying the thermo-optical nonlinearities. Using a 76 MHz repetition rate laser with 120 fs pulsewidth we measure third order nonlinearities and thermal properties of CS2 and toluene in accordance with values obtained with low repetition rate light sources.

  9. High-repetition-rate ultrashort pulsed fiber ring laser using hybrid mode locking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Hu, Hongyu; Li, Wenbo; Dutta, Niloy K

    2016-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a hybrid mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser by combining the rational harmonic mode-locking technique and passive mode locking based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber. By carefully adjusting the modulation frequency and the polarization controllers in the cavity, a 30 GHz pulse train with improved stability and narrower pulse width is generated. The pulse width at 30 GHz using rational harmonic mode locking alone is 5.8 ps. This hybrid scheme narrows the pulse width to 1.9 ps at the repetition rate of 30 GHz. Numerical simulations are carried out that show good agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Compact, high-repetition-rate source for broadband sum-frequency generation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiner, Zsuzsanna; Petrov, Valentin; Mero, Mark

    2017-06-01

    We present a high-efficiency optical parametric source for broadband vibrational sum-frequency generation (BB-VSFG) for the chemically important mid-infrared spectral range at 2800-3600 cm-1 to study hydrogen bonding interactions affecting the structural organization of biomolecules at water interfaces. The source consists of a supercontinuum-seeded, dual-beam optical parametric amplifier with two broadband infrared output beams and a chirped sum-frequency mixing stage providing narrowband visible pulses with adjustable bandwidth. Utilizing a pulse energy of only 60 μJ from a turn-key, 1.03-μm pump laser operating at a repetition rate of 100 kHz, the source delivers 6-cycle infrared pulses at 1.5 and 3.2 μm with pulse energies of 4.6 and 1.8 μJ, respectively, and narrowband pulses at 0.515 μm with a pulse energy of 5.0 μJ. The 3.2-μm pulses are passively carrier envelope phase stabilized with fluctuations at the 180-mrad level over a 10-s time period. The 1.5-μm beamline can be exploited to deliver pump pulses for time-resolved studies after suitable frequency up-conversion. The high efficiency, stability, and two orders of magnitude higher repetition rate of the source compared to typically employed systems offer great potential for providing a boost in sensitivity in BB-VSFG experiments at a reduced cost.

  11. Low repetition rate SESAM modelocked VECSEL using an extendable active multipass-cavity approach.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, C A; Hoffmann, M; Pallmann, W P; Wittwer, V J; Sieber, O D; Mangold, M; Golling, M; Weingarten, K J; Tilma, B W; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U

    2012-12-03

    Ultrafast VECSELs are compact pulsed laser sources with more flexibility in the emission wavelength compared to diode-pumped solid-state lasers. Typically, the reduction of the pulse repetition rate is a straightforward method to increase both pulse energy and peak power. However, the relatively short carrier lifetime of semiconductor gain materials of a few nanoseconds sets a lower limit to the repetition rate of passively modelocked VECSELs. This fast gain recovery combined with low pulse repetition rates leads to the buildup of multiple pulses in the cavity. Therefore, we applied an active multipass approach with which demonstrate fundamental modelocking at a repetition rate of 253 MHz with 400 mW average output power in 11.3 ps pulses.

  12. Hydrodynamic size distribution of gold nanoparticles controlled by repetition rate during pulsed laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-02-01

    Most investigations on the laser generation and fragmentation of nanoparticles focus on Feret particle size, although the hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles is of great importance, for example in biotechnology for diffusion in living cells, or in engineering, for a tuned rheology of suspensions. In this sense, the formation and fragmentation of gold colloidal nanoparticles using femtosecond laser ablation at variable pulse repetition rates (100-5000 Hz) in deionized water were investigated through their plasmon resonance and hydrodynamic diameter, measured by Dynamic Light Scattering. The increment of the repetition rate does not influence the ablation efficiency, but produces a decrease of the hydrodynamic diameter and blue-shift of the plasmon resonance of the generated gold nanoparticles. Fragmentation, induced by inter-pulse irradiation of the colloids was measured online, showing to be more effective low repetition rates. The pulse repetition rate is shown to be an appropriate laser parameter for hydrodynamic size control of nanoparticles without further influence on the production efficiency.

  13. Sub-20-ps pulses from a passively Q-switched microchip laser at 1  MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Mehner, Eva; Bernard, Benjamin; Giessen, Harald; Kopf, Daniel; Braun, Bernd

    2014-05-15

    We present a 50 μm Nd3+:YVO4 microchip laser that is passively Q-switched by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. To reduce handling problems caused by the small crystal dimensions, the 50 μm Nd3+:YVO4 crystal is optically bonded to an undoped YVO4 crystal of a length of about 500 μm. By using a saturable absorber mirror with an effective modulation depth of >10% the system is able to deliver 16 ps pulses at a repetition rate of up to 1.0 MHz. The average laser power is 16 mW at 1064 nm. To our knowledge these are the shortest Q-switched pulses ever reported from a solid-state laser. The limits in terms of pulse width, repetition rate, output power, and system stability are discussed. Additionally, continuous-wave behavior is analyzed. Experimental data is compared with the simulation results of the coupled rate equations.

  14. Femtosecond Ti:sapphire cryogenic amplifier with high gain and MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Dantan, Aurélien; Laurat, Julien; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe

    2007-07-09

    We demonstrate high gain amplification of 160-femtosecond pulses in a compact double-pass cryogenic Ti:sapphire amplifier. The setup involves a negative GVD mirrors recompression stage, and operates with a repetition rate between 0.2 and 4 MHz with a continuous pump laser. Amplification factors as high as 17 and 320 nJ Fourier-limited pulses are obtained at a 800 kHz repetition rate.

  15. Coherent quasi-CW 153-nm light source at high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yutaka; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ozawa, Akira; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chuangtian; Shin, Shik; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2012-02-01

    We present a quasi-cw laser in vacuum ultraviolet region at megahertz repetition rate. The narrowband pulses generated from an ytterbium-fiber laser system at 33 MHz repetition rate at the central wavelength of 1074 nm is frequency-converted by successive stages of LBO crystals and KBBF crystals. The generated radiation at 153 nm has the shortest wavelength achieved through phase-matched frequency conversion processes in nonlinear optical crystals to our knowledge.

  16. Development of high energy, sub-15 fs OPCPA system operating at 1 kHz repetition rate for ELI-Beamlines facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakule, Pavel; Antipenkov, Roman; Green, Jonathan T.; Novák, Jakub; Batysta, František; Rus, Bedřich; Boge, Robert; Hubka, Zbyněk.; Naylon, Jack A.; Horáček, Martin; Horáček, Jakub; Strkula, Petr; Snopek, David; Indra, Lukaš; Tykalewicz, Boguslaw

    2017-05-01

    We report on the status of the high repetition rate, high energy, L1 laser beamline at the ELI-Beamlines facility. The beamline is based on picosecond optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) of pulses from a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire oscillator and has a target energy/repetition rate of 100 mJ/1 kHz with < 15fs pulse duration. The OPCPA pump lasers use thin disk technology to achieve the high energy and average power required to pump such a high energy, high repetition rate broadband amplifier. Here we report on the progress in beamline development and discuss the technical challenges involved in producing such a system and their solutions. A major focus of the laser development is reliable, robust operation and long term stability; mechanical, optical, and control system architecture design considerations to achieve our goals of long term stability are discussed.

  17. Effect of Repetition Rate on Femtosecond Laser-Induced Homogenous Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sanchari; Karthikeyan, Adya; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    We report on the effect of repetition rate on the formation and surface texture of the laser induced homogenous microstructures. Different microstructures were micromachined on copper (Cu) and titanium (Ti) using femtosecond pulses at 1 and 10 kHz. We studied the effect of the repetition rate on structure formation by comparing the threshold accumulated pulse (FΣpulse) values and the effect on the surface texture through lacunarity analysis. Machining both metals at low FΣpulse resulted in microstructures with higher lacunarity at 10 kHz compared to 1 kHz. On increasing FΣpulse, the microstructures showed higher lacunarity at 1 kHz. The effect of the repetition rate on the threshold FΣpulse values were, however, considerably different on the two metals. With an increase in repetition rate, we observed a decrease in the threshold FΣpulse on Cu, while on Ti we observed an increase. These differences were successfully allied to the respective material characteristics and the resulting melt dynamics. While machining Ti at 10 kHz, the melt layer induced by one laser pulse persists until the next pulse arrives, acting as a dielectric for the subsequent pulse, thereby increasing FΣpulse. However, on Cu, the melt layer quickly resolidifies and no such dielectric like phase is observed. Our study contributes to the current knowledge on the effect of the repetition rate as an irradiation parameter. PMID:28774143

  18. Investigation of a reacting jet injected into vitiated crossflow using CARS, high repetition rate OH-PLIF, and high repetition rate PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Mario

    The proposed PhD thesis research program will be carried out in a staged combustion test rig developed with funding from Siemens Power Generation Inc. and the United States Department of Energy. This research program will study the reacting flow field created by an injector that is axially distributed along the combustor with use the laser diagnostics methods: Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS), high repetition rate OH Planar Laser Induced Florescence (OHPLIF), and high repetition rate Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), to determine why certain conditions result in low NOx emissions. This data will be used to validated the development of more precise computer models. These laser diagnostic techniques will be applied to the reacting jet produced using an extended, premixed 10 mm injector using both natural gas (NG) and hydrogen (H2) as fuels. The objective of this thesis research is to use advance laser diagnostics to gain insight into the reacting flow field resulting form transverse injection into a vitiated cross flow. The advance laser diagnostics will also provide insight into pollution formation mechanisms and will be used for validating CFD models of the transverse jet injection. The following measurements will be performed: (1) dual pump nitrogen/hydrogen (H2/ N2) CARS at the midplane of the extended 10 mm nozzle, (2) high repetition rate OH-PLIF and emission sampling for the same extended nozzle using NG and H2 as secondary fuel, (3) and combing both high repetition OH-PLIF and high repetition rate PIV for extended 10 mm nozzle for both NG and H2 secondary fuel. The PIV measurements will be combined with OH-PLIF in a simultaneous manner, with the OH fluorescence centered between the two PIV laser pulses. The dual pump H2/N2 CARS system will be used to measure both temperature of the reacting jet and the species concentration ratio of H2/ N2. The high repetition rate OH-PLIF, conducted with a 5 kHz, dual cavity Nd:YAG laser that optically pumps a

  19. High rate PLD of diamond-like-carbon utilizing high repetition rate visible lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, W. II; Fehring, E.J.; Dragon, E.P.; Warner, B.E.

    1994-09-15

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) has been shown to be an effective method for producing a wide variety of thin films of high-value-added materials. The high average powers and high pulse repetition frequencies of lasers under development at LLNL make it possible to scale-up PLD processes that have been demonstrated in small systems in a number of university, government, and private laboratories to industrially meaningful, economically feasible technologies. A copper vapor laser system at LLNL has been utilized to demonstrate high rate PLD of high quality diamond-like-carbon (DLC) from graphite targets. The deposition rates for PLD obtained with a 100 W laser were {approx} 2000 {mu}m{center_dot}cm{sup 2}/h, or roughly 100 times larger than those reported by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD) methods. Good adhesion of thin (up to 2 pm) films has been achieved on a small number of substrates that include SiO{sub 2} and single crystal Si. Present results indicate that the best quality DLC films can be produced at optimum rates at power levels and wavelengths compatible with fiber optic delivery systems. If this is also true of other desirable coating systems, this PLD technology could become an extremely attractive industrial tool for high value added coatings.

  20. Near- infrared, mode-locked waveguide lasers with multi-GHz repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, A.; Lagatsky, A. A.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhou, K. J.; Wang, Q.; Hogg, R. A.; Pradeesh, K.; Rafailov, E. U.; Resan, B.; Oehler, A. E. H.; Weingarten, K. J.; Sibbett, W.; Brown, C. T. A.; Shepherd, D. P.

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we discuss mode-locking results obtained with low-loss, ion-exchanged waveguide lasers. With Yb3+-doped phosphate glass waveguide lasers, a repetition rate of up to 15.2 GHz was achieved at a wavelength of 1047 nm with an average power of 27 mW and pulse duration of 811 fs. The gap between the waveguide and the SESAM introduced negative group velocity dispersion via the Gires Tournois Interferometer (GTI) effect which allowed the soliton mode-locking of the device. A novel quantum dot SESAM was used to mode-lock Er3+, Yb3+-doped phosphate glass waveguide lasers around 1500 nm. Picosecond pulses were achieved at a maximum repetition rate of 6.8 GHz and an average output power of 30 mW. The repetition rate was tuned by more than 1 MHz by varying the pump power.

  1. Diode-pumped passively Q-switched high-repetition-rate Yb microchip laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kisel', V E; Yasukevich, A S; Kondratyuk, N V; Kuleshov, N V

    2009-11-30

    The system of balance equations is modified for quasi-three-level passively Q-switched lasers with a slow saturable absorber. Optimal parameters of a Yb{sup 3+}:YAG microchip laser with a passive Cr{sup 4+}:YAG Q switch are calculated at a pulse repetition rate of {approx}100 kHz. The single-mode operation of the Yb:YAG-Cr:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate above 100 kHz, the average output power 0.45 W and peak power 1.5 kW is experimentally demonstrated. In the multimode lasing regime, pulses with a peak power of 4.2 kW are obtained at an average output power of 0.8 W and a pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz. (lasers)

  2. Design of a low emittance and high repetition rate S-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jang-Hui

    2014-09-01

    As an electron beam injector of X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), photoinjectors have been developed for the past few decades. Such an injector starting with a photocathode RF gun provides high brightness beams and therefore it is being adopted as an injector of X-ray FELs. In this paper we show how to improve photoinjector performance in terms of emittance and repetition rates by means of injector components optimization, especially with the gun. Transverse emittance at the end of an injector is reduced by optimizing the gun design, gun solenoid position, and accelerating section position. The repetition rate of an injector mainly depends on the gun. It is discussed that a repetition rate of 1 kHz at a normal-conducting S-band photoinjector is feasible by adopting a coaxial RF coupler and improving cooling-water channels surrounding the gun.

  3. Ultrafast, high repetition rate, ultraviolet, fiber-laser-based source: application towards Yb+ fast quantum-logic.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mahmood Irtiza; Petrasiunas, Matthew Joseph; Bentley, Christopher D B; Taylor, Richard L; Carvalho, André R R; Hope, Joseph J; Streed, Erik W; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-07-25

    Trapped ions are one of the most promising approaches for the realization of a universal quantum computer. Faster quantum logic gates could dramatically improve the performance of trapped-ion quantum computers, and require the development of suitable high repetition rate pulsed lasers. Here we report on a robust frequency upconverted fiber laser based source, able to deliver 2.5 ps ultraviolet (UV) pulses at a stabilized repetition rate of 300.00000 MHz with an average power of 190 mW. The laser wavelength is resonant with the strong transition in Ytterbium (Yb+) at 369.53 nm and its repetition rate can be scaled up using high harmonic mode locking. We show that our source can produce arbitrary pulse patterns using a programmable pulse pattern generator and fast modulating components. Finally, simulations demonstrate that our laser is capable of performing resonant, temperature-insensitive, two-qubit quantum logic gates on trapped Yb+ ions faster than the trap period and with fidelity above 99%.

  4. Single Longitudinal Mode, High Repetition Rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF Laser for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petzar, Paul; Petros, M.; Chen, Songsheng; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Nyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ho:YLF/LuLiF lasers have specific applications for remote sensing such as wind-speed measurement and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement in the atmosphere because the operating wavelength (around 2 m) is located in the eye-safe range and can be tuned to the characteristic lines of CO2 absorption and there is strong backward scattering signal from aerosol (Mie scattering). Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ [1]. For highly precise CO2 measurements with coherent detection technique, a laser with high repetition rate is required to averaging out the speckle effect [2]. In addition, laser efficiency is critically important for the air/space borne lidar applications, because of the limited power supply. A diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser is difficult to efficiently operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. However, a Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can be operated at high repetition rates efficiently [3]. No matter whether wind-speed or carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement is the goal, a Ho:YLF/LuLiF laser as the transmitter should operate in a single longitudinal mode. Injection seeding is a valid technique for a Q-switched laser to obtain single longitudinal mode operation. In this paper, we will report the new results for a single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. In order to avoid spectral hole burning and make injection seeding easier, a four mirror ring cavity is designed for single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. The ramp-fire technique is chosen for injection seeding.

  5. High repetition rate passively Q-switched fiber and microchip lasers for optical resolution photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Utkin, Ilya; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka; Pan, Lei; Godwal, Yogesh; Kerr, Shaun; Zemp, Roger J.; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy is a novel imaging technology for visualizing optically-absorbing superficial structures in vivo with lateral spatial resolution determined by optical focusing rather than acoustic detection. Since scanning of the illumination spot is required, the imaging speed is limited by the scanning speed and the laser pulse repetition rate. Unfortunately, lasers with high-repetition rate and suitable pulse durations and energies are difficult to find. We are developing compact laser sources for this application. Passively Q-switched fiber and microchip lasers with pulse repetition rates up to 300 kHz are demonstrated. Using a diode-pumped microchip laser fiber-coupled to a large mode-area Yb-doped fiber amplifier we obtained 60μJ 1-ns pulses at the frequency-doubled 532-nm wavelength. The pulse-repetition rate was determined by the power of the microchip laser pump source at 808nm and may exceed 10 kHz. Additionally, a passively Q-switched fiber laser utilizing a Yb-doped double-cladding fiber and an external saturable absorber has shown to produce 250ns pulses at repetition rates of 100-300 KHz. A photoacoustic probe enabling flexible scanning of the focused output of these lasers consisted of a 45-degree glass prism in an optical index-matching fluid. Photoacoustic signals exiting the sample are deflected by the prism to an ultrasound transducer. Phantom studies with a 7.5-micron carbon fiber demonstrate the ability to image with optical rather than acoustic resolution. We believe that the high pulse-repetition rates and the potentially compact and fiber-coupled nature of these lasers will prove important for clinical imaging applications where realtime imaging performance is essential.

  6. Single Longitudinal Mode, High Repetition Rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF Laser for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petzar, Paul; Petros, M.; Chen, Songsheng; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Nyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ho:YLF/LuLiF lasers have specific applications for remote sensing such as wind-speed measurement and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement in the atmosphere because the operating wavelength (around 2 m) is located in the eye-safe range and can be tuned to the characteristic lines of CO2 absorption and there is strong backward scattering signal from aerosol (Mie scattering). Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ [1]. For highly precise CO2 measurements with coherent detection technique, a laser with high repetition rate is required to averaging out the speckle effect [2]. In addition, laser efficiency is critically important for the air/space borne lidar applications, because of the limited power supply. A diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser is difficult to efficiently operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. However, a Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can be operated at high repetition rates efficiently [3]. No matter whether wind-speed or carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement is the goal, a Ho:YLF/LuLiF laser as the transmitter should operate in a single longitudinal mode. Injection seeding is a valid technique for a Q-switched laser to obtain single longitudinal mode operation. In this paper, we will report the new results for a single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. In order to avoid spectral hole burning and make injection seeding easier, a four mirror ring cavity is designed for single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. The ramp-fire technique is chosen for injection seeding.

  7. High power, high repetition rate, few picosecond Nd:LuVO₄ oscillator with cavity dumping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Guo, Jie; Li, Jinfeng; Lin, Hua; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the potential use of Nd:LuVO4 in high average power, high repetition rate ultrafast lasers. Maximum mode-locked average power of 28 W is obtained at the repetition rate of 58 MHz. The shortest pulse duration is achieved at 4 ps without dispersion compensation. With a cavity dumping technique, the pulse energy is scaling up to 40.7 μJ at 300 kHz and 14.3 μJ at 1.5 MHz.

  8. Picosecond supercontinuum laser with consistent emission parameters over variable repetition rates from 1 to 40 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönau, Thomas; Siebert, Torsten; Härtel, Romano; Klemme, Dietmar; Lauritsen, Kristian; Erdmann, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    An freely triggerable picosecond visible supercontinuum laser source is presented that allows for a uniform spectral profile and equivalent pulse characteristics over variable repetition rates from 1 to 40MHz. The system features PM Yb3+-doped fiber amplification of a picosecond gain-switched seed diode at 1062 nm. The pump power in the multi-stage amplifier is actively adjusted by a microcontroller for a consistent peak power of the amplified signal in the full range of repetition rates. The length of the PCF is scaled to deliver a homogeneous spectrum and minimized distortion of the temporal pulse shape.

  9. High-order harmonic generation at a repetition rate of 100 kHz

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, F.; Stremme, W.; Schaetzel, M. G.; Grasbon, F.; Paulus, G. G.; Walther, H.; Hartmann, R.; Strueder, L.

    2003-07-01

    We report high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases using a femtosecond laser system with a very high repetition rate (100 kHz) and low pulse energy (7 {mu}J). To our knowledge, this is the highest repetition rate reported to date for HHG. The tight focusing geometry required to reach sufficiently high intensities implies low efficiency of the process. Harmonics up to the 45th order are nevertheless generated and detected. We show evidence of clear separation and selection of quantum trajectories by moving the gas jet with respect to the focus, in agreement with the theoretical predictions of the semiclassical model of HHG.

  10. Injector Beam Dynamics for a High-Repetition Rate 4th-Generation Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Papadopoulos, C. F.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Filippetto, D.; Penn, G.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.

    2013-05-20

    We report on the beam dynamics studies and optimization methods for a high repetition rate (1 MHz) photoinjector based on a VHF normal conducting electron source. The simultaneous goals of beamcompression and reservation of 6-dimensional beam brightness have to be achieved in the injector, in order to accommodate a linac driven FEL light source. For this, a parallel, multiobjective optimization algorithm is used. We discuss the relative merits of different injector design points, as well as the constraints imposed on the beam dynamics by technical considerations such as the high repetition rate.

  11. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Advances in high repetition rate, ultra-short, gigawatt laser systems for time-resolved spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this article is to emphasize the current advances in the development of high-repetition rate amplifier pumps. Although this review highlights amplifier pump development, any recent data from achieved outputs via the tunable amplifier section is also discussed. The first section describes desirable parameters attributable to the pump amplifier while the rest of the article deals with specific examples for various options. The pump amplifiers can be characterized into two distinct classes; those achieving operation in the hundred hertz regime and those performing at repetition rates {ge}1kHz. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  13. High-energy laser pulse with a submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaolong; Tang, Ming; Shum, Perry Ping; Gong, Yandong; Lin, Chinlon; Fu, Songnian; Zhang, Taishi

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate an ultralong cavity, all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion Yb-doped fiber laser that is passively mode locked by a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). Without any discrete dispersion-compensation components or conventional spectral filters, the SESAM works together with the strongly chirped pulse and the nonlinearity induced spectrum broadening to perform a filtering-equivalent function, thus stabilizing the mode locking. The laser generates 4.3 nJ stable mode-locked pulses with a 397 kHz fundamental repetition rate at a 1068 nm central wavelength.

  14. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  15. [INVITED] Laser welding of glasses at high repetition rates - Fundamentals and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Sören; Zimmermann, Felix; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We report on the welding of various glasses with ultrashort laser pulses. Femtosecond laser pulses at repetition rates in the MHz range are focused at the interface between two substrates, resulting in multiphoton absorption and heat accumulation from successive pulses. This leads to local melting and subsequent resolidification which can be used to weld the glasses. The fundamental interaction process was studied using an in-situ micro Raman setup to measure the laser induced temperature distribution and its temporal decay. The induced network changes were analyzed by Raman spectrocopy identifying an increase of three and four membered silicon rings within the laser irradiated area. In order to determine the stability of the laser welded samples a three point bending test was used. Thereby, we identified that the maximal achievable breaking strength is limited by laser induced stress surrounding the modified material. To minimize the amount of stress bursts of laser pulses or an post processing annealing step can be applied. Besides fused silica, we welded borosilicate glasses and glasses with a low thermal expansion coefficient. Even the welding of different glass combinations is possible demonstrating the versatility of ultrashort pulse induced laser welding.

  16. Postural stability with exhaustive repetitive sit-to-stand exercise in young adults.

    PubMed

    Bryanton, Megan A; Bilodeau, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Previous research has indicated that muscle fatigue due to repeated bouts of physical activity can have negative residual effects on balance; however investigations using multi-joint forms of exercise involved in everyday settings and determination of how control of posture is altered during the physical activity itself are limited. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate alterations in postural stability before, during, and after prolonged multi-joint STS exercise in healthy young adults. Center of pressure (COP) acquisitions were collected during repetitive STS exercise, while voluntary limits of stability (LOS) testing was performed before, immediately after, and 10min after STS exercise. By 50% total STS exercise time, fatigue resulted in increased anterio-posterior (y) and medio-lateral (x) COP path lengths (p=0.003 and p=0.018 respectively) and an anterior shift of COP at seat-off towards the mid-foot (p=0.010). No significant change in LOS mean amplitude was found after STS exercise; however a significant fatigue effect resulted in increased COPy sway velocity at maximal lean positions (p=0.006), but returned to PRE values after 10min of rest. Declines in postural stability during repetitive STS exercise was associated with reduced control of COP, as well as a reduced ability to stably control COP at extreme postural limits; however, 10min was adequate in young adults for recovery. These results may have important implications for monitoring fall risk due to acute bouts of exercise induced muscle fatigue from repetitive multi-joint activities such as the STS.

  17. Rapid thermal annealing in high repetition rate ultrafast laser waveguide writing in lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Nejadmalayeri, Amir H; Herman, Peter R

    2007-08-20

    For the first time to our knowledge, bulk modification of lithium niobate using high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses has been studied. A fiber based ultrafast laser has been applied in a range of 0.1 to 1.5 MHz repetition rate to directly inscribe optical waveguides in z-cut lithium niobate. Circularly polarized light with stretched 600 fs pulses produced waveguides with nearly circular mode profiles that guided in the telecom band of 1300 nm. Higher laser repetition rate of 700 kHz was found to offer smooth waveguides with low propagation loss of 0.6 dB/cm, matching the best reported value so far, with the advantage of 50 fold faster writing speed. At repetition rates of 250 kHz and higher, the tracks exhibited a cladding-like modification zone that extended outside the main laser interaction volume, yielding smoother structures, despite higher net fluence delivery, providing concrete evidence of heat accumulation and thermal annealing effects. We also present the first observation of periodic micro-structures in the bulk laser interaction volume of a non-glass material.

  18. Estimation of Promotion, Repetition and Dropout Rates for Learners in South African Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uys, Daniël Wilhelm; Alant, Edward John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A new procedure for estimating promotion, repetition and dropout rates for learners in South African schools is proposed. The procedure uses three different data sources: data from the South African General Household survey, data from the Education Management Information Systems, and data from yearly reports published by the Department of Basic…

  19. Estimation of Promotion, Repetition and Dropout Rates for Learners in South African Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uys, Daniël Wilhelm; Alant, Edward John Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A new procedure for estimating promotion, repetition and dropout rates for learners in South African schools is proposed. The procedure uses three different data sources: data from the South African General Household survey, data from the Education Management Information Systems, and data from yearly reports published by the Department of Basic…

  20. A compact, rugged, high repetition rate CO2 laser incorporating catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarzenberger, P. M.; Matzangou, X.

    1990-01-01

    The principal design features and operating characteristics of a high repetition rate CO2 laser are outlined. The laser is a compact, rugged unit, completely sealed and incorporating an unheated solid catalyst. Stable operation has been successfully demonstrated over a temperature range of -35 C to 65 C.

  1. Effect of the pulse repetition rate on fiber-assisted tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the pulse repetition rate on ablation performance was evaluated ex vivo at various fiber sweeping speeds for an effective 532-nm laser prostatectomy. Three pulse repetition rates (7.5, 15, and 30 kHz) at 100 W were delivered to bovine liver tissue at three sweeping speeds (2, 4, and 6 mm/s) to achieve bulky tissue removal. Ablation performance was quantitatively compared in terms of the ablation volume and the coagulation thickness. The lowest pulse repetition rate of 7.5 kHz attained the highest ablation volume (101.5 ± 12.0 mm3) and the thinnest coagulation (0.7 ± 0.1 mm) along with superficial carbonization. The highest pulse repetition rate of 30 kHz was associated with the least tissue removal (65.8 ± 5.0 mm3) and the deepest thermal denaturation (1.1 ± 0.2 mm). Quantitative evaluations of laser parameters can be instrumental in facilitating ablation efficiency and maintaining hemostatic coagulation during treatment of large-sized benign prostate hyperplasia.

  2. Multi-gigahertz repetition rate ultrafast waveguide lasers mode-locked with graphene saturable absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obraztsov, P. A.; Okhrimchuk, A. G.; Rybin, M. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Garnov, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of an approach to build compact waveguide lasers that operate in the stable fundamental mode-locking regime with multigigahertz repetition rates. The approach is based on the use of depressed cladding multi- or single-mode waveguides fabricated directly in the active laser crystal using the femtosecond laser inscription method and a graphene saturable absorber. Using this approach we achieve the stable self-starting mode-locking operation of a diode-pumped waveguide Nd:YAG laser that delivers picosecond pulses at a repetition rate of up to 11.5 GHz with an average power of 12 mW at a central wavelength of 1064 nm. The saturable absorbers are formed through the chemical vapor deposition of single-layer graphene on the output coupler mirror or directly on the end facet of the laser crystal. The stable self-starting mode-locking operation is achieved by controlling the group delay dispersion in the laser cavity with an intracavity interferometer. The method developed for the creation of compact ultrashort pulse laser generators with gigahertz repetition rates can be extended further and applied for the development of compact high-repetition rate lasers that operate at a wide range of IR wavelengths.

  3. High-Repetition-Rate Laser for Thomson Scattering on the MST Reversed-Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, William C.; Morton, L. A.; Parke, E.; den Hartog, D. J.; MST Team

    2013-10-01

    The MST Thomson scattering diagnostic has operated with a new, high-repetition-rate laser system, demonstrating 2 J pulses at repetition rates up to 50 kHz. The pulse repetition rate can maintain 2 J pulses for bursts of 5 kHz (sustained for 5 ms), to 50 kHz (for 10 bursts of 240 μs each). The 1064 nm laser currently employs a q-switched, diode pumped Nd:YVO4 master oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifier stages, and a Nd:glass amplifier. The future implementation of the full laser as designed, including a second Nd:glass amplifier, is expected to produce bursts of 2 J pulses at a repetition rate of at least 250 kHz. The new laser integrates with the same collection optics and detectors as used by the present MST Thomson scattering system: 21 spatial points across the MST minor radius with sensitivity over a 10 eV-5 keV range. Initial results will be presented from application of this diagnostic to parametric scans of MST plasmas, evolution of energy confinement during spontaneous enhanced confinement periods, and non-Maxwellian electron distributions. Work Supported by the U. S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  4. Repetition rate dependency of reactive oxygen species formation during femtosecond laser-based cell surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Judith; Kuetemeyer, Kai; Bintig, Willem; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    Femtosecond (fs) laser-based cell surgery is typically done in two different regimes, at kHz or MHz repetition rate. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an often predicted effect due to illumination with short laser pulses in biological tissue. We present our study on ROS formation in single cells in response to irradiation with fs laser pulses depending on the repetition rate while focusing into the cell nucleus. We observed a significant increase of ROS concentration directly after manipulation followed by a decrease in both regimes at kHz and MHz repetition rate. In addition, effects of consecutive exposures at MHz and kHz repetition rate and vice versa on ROS production were studied. Irradiation with a MHz pulse train followed by a kHz pulse train resulted in a significantly higher increase of ROS concentration than in the reversed case and often caused cell death. In the presence of the antioxidant ascorbic acid, accumulation of ROS and cell death were strongly reduced. Therefore, addition of antioxidants during fs laser-based cell surgery experiments could be advantageous in terms of suppressing photochemical damage to the cell.

  5. DFB diode seeded low repetition rate fiber laser system operating in burst mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šajn, M.; Petelin, J.; Agrež, V.; Vidmar, M.; Petkovšek, R.

    2017-02-01

    A distributed feedback (DFB) diode, gain switched to produce pulses from 60 ps at high peak power of over 0.5 W, is used in burst mode to seed a fiber amplifier chain. High seed power, spectral filtering between amplifier stages and pulsed pumping are used to mitigate amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The effect of pulse pumping synchronized with the seed on the ASE is explored for the power amplifier at low repetition. Different input and output energies at different burst repetition rates are examined and up to 85% reduction in ASE is achieved compared to continuous pumping. Finally, a numerical model is used to predict further reduction of ASE.

  6. Generation of high repetition rate femtosecond pulses from a CW laser by a time-lens loop.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yitang; Xu, Chris

    2009-04-13

    We demonstrate a novel method for femtosecond pulse generation based on a time-lens loop. Time division multiplexing in the loop is performed so that a high repetition rate can be achieved. Pulse width less than 500 fs is generated from a continuous wave (CW) laser without mode locking, and tunable repetition rate from 23 MHz to 400 MHz is demonstrated. Theoretical analysis shows that the repetition rate is ultimately limited by the in-loop interference. By using a 2 x 2 optical switch, such interference is further suppressed, and repetition rate as high as 1.1 GHz is demonstrated.

  7. Phase-stable, multi-µJ femtosecond pulses from a repetition-rate tunable Ti:Sa-oscillator-seeded Yb-fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saule, T.; Holzberger, S.; De Vries, O.; Plötner, M.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Pupeza, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present a high-power, MHz-repetition-rate, phase-stable femtosecond laser system based on a phase-stabilized Ti:Sa oscillator and a multi-stage Yb-fiber chirped-pulse power amplifier. A 10-nm band around 1030 nm is split from the 7-fs oscillator output and serves as the seed for subsequent amplification by 54 dB to 80 W of average power. The µJ-level output is spectrally broadened in a solid-core fiber and compressed to 30 fs with chirped mirrors. A pulse picker prior to power amplification allows for decreasing the repetition rate from 74 MHz by a factor of up to 4 without affecting the pulse parameters. To compensate for phase jitter added by the amplifier to the feed-forward phase-stabilized seeding pulses, a self-referencing feed-back loop is implemented at the system output. An integrated out-of-loop phase noise of less than 100 mrad was measured in the band from 0.4 Hz to 400 kHz, which to the best of our knowledge corresponds to the highest phase stability ever demonstrated for high-power, multi-MHz-repetition-rate ultrafast lasers. This system will enable experiments in attosecond physics at unprecedented repetition rates, it offers ideal prerequisites for the generation and field-resolved electro-optical sampling of high-power, broadband infrared pulses, and it is suitable for phase-stable white light generation.

  8. Longitudinally excited CO2 laser with short laser pulse operating at high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhui; Uno, Kazuyuki; Akitsu, Tetsuya; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    2016-11-01

    A short-pulse longitudinally excited CO2 laser operating at a high repetition rate was developed. The discharge tube was made of a 45 cm-long or 60 cm-long dielectric tube with an inner diameter of 16 mm and two metallic electrodes at the ends of the tube. The optical cavity was formed by a ZnSe output coupler with a reflectivity of 85% and a high-reflection mirror. Mixed gas (CO2:N2:He = 1:1:2) was flowed into the discharge tube. A high voltage of about 33 kV with a rise time of about 200 ns was applied to the discharge tube. At a repetition rate of 300 Hz and a gas pressure of 3.4 kPa, the 45 cm-long discharge tube produced a short laser pulse with a laser pulse energy of 17.5 mJ, a spike pulse energy of 0.2 mJ, a spike width of 153 ns, and a pulse tail length of 90 μs. The output power was 5.3 W. The laser pulse waveform did not depend on the repetition rate, but the laser beam profile did. At a low repetition rate of less than 50 Hz, the laser beam had a doughnut-like shape. However, at a high repetition rate of more than 150 Hz, the discharge concentrated at the center of the discharge tube, and the intensity at the center of the laser beam was higher. The laser beam profile depended on the distribution of the discharge. An output power of 7.0 W was achieved by using the 60 cm-long tube.

  9. Effect of Repetition Rate on Femtosecond Laser-Induced Homogenous Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sanchari; Karthikeyan, Adya; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2016-12-19

    We report on the effect of repetition rate on the formation and surface texture of the laser induced homogenous microstructures. Different microstructures were micromachined on copper (Cu) and titanium (Ti) using femtosecond pulses at 1 and 10 kHz. We studied the effect of the repetition rate on structure formation by comparing the threshold accumulated pulse ( F Σ p u l s e ) values and the effect on the surface texture through lacunarity analysis. Machining both metals at low F Σ p u l s e resulted in microstructures with higher lacunarity at 10 kHz compared to 1 kHz. On increasing F Σ p u l s e , the microstructures showed higher lacunarity at 1 kHz. The effect of the repetition rate on the threshold F Σ p u l s e values were, however, considerably different on the two metals. With an increase in repetition rate, we observed a decrease in the threshold F Σ p u l s e on Cu, while on Ti we observed an increase. These differences were successfully allied to the respective material characteristics and the resulting melt dynamics. While machining Ti at 10 kHz, the melt layer induced by one laser pulse persists until the next pulse arrives, acting as a dielectric for the subsequent pulse, thereby increasing F Σ p u l s e . However, on Cu, the melt layer quickly resolidifies and no such dielectric like phase is observed. Our study contributes to the current knowledge on the effect of the repetition rate as an irradiation parameter.

  10. High-energy, high-repetition-rate picosecond pulses from a quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG system.

    PubMed

    Noom, Daniel W E; Witte, Stefan; Morgenweg, Jonas; Altmann, Robert K; Eikema, Kjeld S E

    2013-08-15

    We report on a high-power quasi-CW pumped Nd:YAG laser system, producing 130 mJ, 64 ps pulses at 1064 nm wavelength with a repetition rate of 300 Hz. Pulses from a Nd:YVO(4) oscillator are first amplified by a regenerative amplifier to the millijoule level and then further amplified in quasi-CW diode-pumped Nd:YAG modules. Pulsed diode pumping enables a high gain at repetition rates of several hundred hertz, while keeping thermal effects manageable. Birefringence compensation and multiple thermal-lensing-compensated relay-imaging stages are used to maintain a top-hat beam profile. After frequency doubling, 75 mJ pulses are obtained at 532 nm. The intensity stability is better than 1.1%, which makes this laser an attractive pump source for a high-repetition-rate optical parametric amplification system.

  11. Accurate modeling of high-repetition rate ultrashort pulse amplification in optical fibers

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Robert; Zeil, Peter; Malmström, Mikael; Laurell, Fredrik; Pasiskevicius, Valdas

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model for amplification of ultrashort pulses with high repetition rates in fiber amplifiers is presented. The pulse propagation is modeled by jointly solving the steady-state rate equations and the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which allows accurate treatment of nonlinear and dispersive effects whilst considering arbitrary spatial and spectral gain dependencies. Comparison of data acquired by using the developed model and experimental results prove to be in good agreement. PMID:27713496

  12. 115 kHz tuning repetition rate ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Oh, W Y; Yun, S H; Tearney, G J; Bouma, B E

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate an ultrahigh-speed wavelength-swept semiconductor laser using a polygon-based wavelength scanning filter. With a polygon rotational speed of 900 revolutions per second, a continuous wavelength tuning rate of 9200 nm/ms and a tuning repetition rate of 115 kHz were achieved. The wavelength tuning range of the laser was 80 nm centered at 1325 nm, and the average polarized output power was 23 mW.

  13. Stability of growth rate of sodium chlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrović, M. M.; Žekić, A. A.; Baroš, Z. Z.

    2009-01-01

    The constancy of stabilized sodium chlorate crystal growth rate is investigated. After the growth rate stabilization, solution supersaturation was altered and then the initial one was restored, which resulted in fast restoring of the growth rate existing prior to the supersaturation change. It is thereby shown that stabilized growth rate is indeed very stable. The majority of crystals decrease the growth rates during the 3-4 growth hours, even if the process develops at the constant experimental conditions all the time. The new crystals introduced into the cell, continue to grow as the already growing crystals, with higher initial growth rates.

  14. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO4 laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm3/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  15. KAPTURE-2. A picosecond sampling system for individual THz pulses with high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.-S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel data acquisition system for continuous sampling of ultra-short pulses generated by terahertz (THz) detectors. Karlsruhe Pulse Taking Ultra-fast Readout Electronics (KAPTURE) is able to digitize pulse shapes with a sampling time down to 3 ps and pulse repetition rates up to 500 MHz. KAPTURE has been integrated as a permanent diagnostic device at ANKA and is used for investigating the emitted coherent synchrotron radiation in the THz range. A second version of KAPTURE has been developed to improve the performance and flexibility. The new version offers a better sampling accuracy for a pulse repetition rate up to 2 GHz. The higher data rate produced by the sampling system is processed in real-time by a heterogeneous FPGA and GPU architecture operating up to 6.5 GB/s continuously. Results in accelerator physics will be reported and the new design of KAPTURE be discussed.

  16. A four kHz repetition rate compact TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yijun; Tan, Rongqing

    2013-09-01

    A compact transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser with high repetition-rate was reported. The size of the laser is 380 mm×300 mm×200 mm, and the discharge volume is 12×103 mm3. The laser cavity has a length of 320mm and consists of a totally reflective concave mirror with a radius of curvature of 4 m (Cu metal substrate coated with Au) and a partially reflecting mirror. The ultraviolet preionization makes the discharge even and stable,the output energy can be as high as 28 mJ under the circumstance of free oscillation, and the width of the light pulse is 60ns.To acquire the high wind velocity, a turbocharger is used in the system of the fast-gas flow cycle. When the wind speed is 100m/s, the repetition rate of the transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser is up to 2 kHz. On this basis, a dual modular structure with two sets of the gas discharge unit is adopted to obtain a higher pulse repetition frequency output. The dual discharge unit composed two sets of electrodes and two sets of turbo fan. Alternate trigger technology is used to make the two sets of discharge module work in turn with repetition frequency of 2 kHz, the discharge interval of two sets of the gas discharge unit can be adjusted continuously from 20 microseconds to 250 microseconds. Under the conditions of maintaining the other parameters constant, the repetition frequency of the laser pulse is up to 4 kHz. The total size of laser with dual modular structure is 380mm×520mm×200mm, and the discharge volume is 24×103 mm3 with the cavity length of 520mm.

  17. The influence of the repetition rate on the nanosecond pulsed pin-to-pin microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bang-Dou; Takashima, Keisuke; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2014-10-01

    The effect of repetition rate on a nanosecond atmospheric pressure discharge is investigated. The discharge is generated between two pins in a mixture of Ne and Ar. The voltage, current, power waveforms and the temporally and spatially resolved electron density and an ‘effective’ electron temperature are measured, with a pulse interval between 1.5 and 200 µs. It is found that not only does the repetition rate have a strong influence on the breakdown voltage and the peak discharge power, but it can also affect the rise rate of the volume averaged electron density and its peak value. Temporally and spatially resolved measurement of the electron density and the effective electron temperature show that the spatial distributions of both quantities are also influenced by the repetition rate. In the initial discharge period of all cases, the sharp rise of the electron density correlates with the drastic drop of the effective electron temperature. It is suggested that the residual charges have a strong impact on the axial distribution of the electric field and energetic electrons between the electrodes during the breakdown period, as illustrated by a simple sheath model.

  18. Continuous high-repetition-rate operation of collisional soft-x-ray lasers with solid targets.

    PubMed

    Weith, A; Larotonda, M A; Wang, Y; Luther, B M; Alessi, D; Marconi, M C; Rocca, J J; Dunn, J

    2006-07-01

    We have generated a laser average output power of 2 microW at a wavelength of 13.9 nm by operating a tabletop laser-pumped Ni-like Ag laser at a 5 Hz repetition rate, using a solid helicoidal target that is continuously rotated and advanced to renew the target surface between shots. More than 2 x 10(4) soft-x-ray laser shots were obtained by using a single target. Similar results were obtained at 13.2 nm in Ni-like Cd with a Cd-coated target. This scheme will allow uninterrupted operation of laser-pumped tabletop collisional soft-x-ray lasers at a repetition rate of 10 Hz for a period of hours, enabling the generation of continuous high average soft-x-ray powers for applications.

  19. A simple sub-nanosecond ultraviolet light pulse generator with high repetition rate and peak power.

    PubMed

    Binh, P H; Trong, V D; Renucci, P; Marie, X

    2013-08-01

    We present a simple ultraviolet sub-nanosecond pulse generator using commercial ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with peak emission wavelengths of 290 nm, 318 nm, 338 nm, and 405 nm. The generator is based on step recovery diode, short-circuited transmission line, and current-shaping circuit. The narrowest pulses achieved have 630 ps full width at half maximum at repetition rate of 80 MHz. Optical pulse power in the range of several hundreds of microwatts depends on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage dependences of the output optical pulse width and peak power are analysed and discussed. Compared to commercial UV sub-nanosecond generators, the proposed generator can produce much higher pulse repetition rate and peak power.

  20. High Repetition Rate, LINAC-Based Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence FY 2008 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott M Watson; Mathew T Kinlaw; James L Jones; Alan W. Hunt; Glen A. Warren

    2008-12-01

    This summarizes the first year of a multi-laboratory/university, multi-year effort focusing on high repetition rate, pulsed LINAC-based nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements. Specifically, this FY2008 effort centered on experimentally assessing NRF measurements using pulsed linear electron accelerators, operated at various repetition rates, and identifying specific detection requirements to optimize such measurements. Traditionally, interest in NRF as a detection technology, which continues to receive funding from DHS and DOE/NA-22, has been driven by continuous-wave (CW), Van de Graff-based bremsstrahlung sources. However, in addition to the relatively sparse present-day use of Van de Graff sources, only limited NRF data from special nuclear materials has been presented; there is even less data available regarding shielding effects and photon source optimization for NRF measurements on selected nuclear materials.

  1. Study of nanostructure growth with nanoscale apex induced by femtosecond laser irradiation at megahertz repetition rate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Leaf-like nanostructures with nanoscale apex are induced on dielectric target surfaces by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser irradiation in ambient conditions. We have recently developed this unique technique to grow leaf-like nanostructures with such interesting geometry without the use of any catalyst. It was found to be possible only in the presence of background nitrogen gas flow. In this synthesis method, the target serves as the source for building material as well as the substrate upon which these nanostructures can grow. In our investigation, it was found that there are three possible kinds of nanotips that can grow on target surfaces. In this report, we have presented the study of the growth mechanisms of such leaf-like nanostructures under various conditions such as different laser pulse widths, pulse repetition rates, dwell times, and laser polarizations. We observed a clear transformation in the kind of nanotips that grew for the given laser conditions. PMID:23607832

  2. 503MHz repetition rate femtosecond Yb: fiber ring laser with an integrated WDM collimator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aimin; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Zhigang

    2011-12-05

    We demonstrate 503MHz fundamental high repetition rate operation in a ring cavity passively mode-locked Yb:fiber laser incorporating a novel wavelength-division-multiplexing collimator and a piece of all-solid photonic bandgap fiber. The Yb doped fiber was directly fabricated as one fiber pigtail into the functional collimator, greatly shortening the cavity length and facilitating the splicing operation. A 5cm long photonic bandgap fiber with abnormal dispersion at the lasing wavelength (centered at 1030nm) decreases the net dispersion for shorter output pulses. The spectral bandwidth of the pulse was 34nm. The direct output pulse was measured to be 156fs and the dechirped pulse was about 76fs. With this innovative Yb:fiber pigtailed WDM collimator, the ring cavity laser has the potential to work at a repetition rate up to GHz.

  3. High repetition rate gain-switched Er:YAG ceramic laser at 1645 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. H.; Zhang, J. N.; Zhao, Y. G.; Zhang, J.; Tang, D. Y.; Shen, D. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We report on a gain-switched Er:YAG ceramic laser resonantly pumped by an acousto-optically modulated Er, Yb co-doped fiber laser at 1532 nm. The laser produced stable pulse trains at 1645 nm with pulse repetition rate tunable between 13-100 kHz and corresponding pulse width of 480-450 ns under a pump power-level of 8.7 W. At the 100 kHz of repetition rate, over 2.2 W of average output power was generated for 6.5 W of incident pump power, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 40% with respect to incident pump power.

  4. High-order harmonic generation using a high-repetition-rate turnkey laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lorek, E. Larsen, E. W.; Heyl, C. M.; Carlström, S.; Mauritsson, J.; Paleček, D.; Zigmantas, D.

    2014-12-15

    We generate high-order harmonics at high pulse repetition rates using a turnkey laser. High-order harmonics at 400 kHz are observed when argon is used as target gas. In neon, we achieve generation of photons with energies exceeding 90 eV (∼13 nm) at 20 kHz. We measure a photon flux of up to 4.4 × 10{sup 10} photons per second per harmonic in argon at 100 kHz. Many experiments employing high-order harmonics would benefit from higher repetition rates, and the user-friendly operation opens up for applications of coherent extreme ultra-violet pulses in new research areas.

  5. Frequency-agile kilohertz repetition-rate optical parametric oscillator based on periodically poled lithium niobate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.T.; Velsko, S.P.

    1999-02-01

    We report kilohertz repetition-rate pulse-to-pulse wavelength tuning from 3.22 to 3.7 {mu}m in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Rapid tuning over 400thinspcm{sup {minus}1} with random wavelength accessibility is achieved by rotation of the pump beam angle by no more than 24thinspthinspmrad in the PPLN crystal by use of an acousto-optic beam deflector. Over the entire tuning range, a near-transform-limited OPO bandwidth can be obtained by means of injection seeding with a single-frequency 1.5-{mu}m laser diode. The frequency agility, high repetition rate, and narrow bandwidth of this mid-IR PPLN OPO make it well suited as a lidar transmitter source. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital Optical Society of America}

  6. Frequency-agile kilohertz repetition-rate optical parametric oscillator based on periodically poled lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Yang, S T; Velsko, S P

    1999-02-01

    We report kilohertz repetition-rate pulse-to-pulse wavelength tuning from 3.22 to 3.7 mum in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Rapid tuning over 400 cm(-1) with random wavelength accessibility is achieved by rotation of the pump beam angle by no more than 24 mrad in the PPLN crystal by use of an acousto-optic beam deflector. Over the entire tuning range, a near-transform-limited OPO bandwidth can be obtained by means of injection seeding with a single-frequency 1.5-mum laser diode. The frequency agility, high repetition rate, and narrow bandwidth of this mid-IR PPLN OPO make it well suited as a lidar transmitter source.

  7. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Höppner, H.; Tanikawa, T.; Schulz, M.; Riedel, R.; Teubner, U.; Faatz, B.; Tavella, F.

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.

  8. Moderate repetition rate ultra-intense laser targets and optics using variable thickness liquid crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, P. L.; Willis, C.; Cochran, G. E.; Hanna, R. T.; Andereck, C. D.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    Liquid crystal films are variable thickness, planar targets for ultra-intense laser matter experiments such as ion acceleration. Their target qualities also make them ideal for high-power laser optics such as plasma mirrors and waveplates. By controlling parameters of film formation, thickness can be varied on-demand from 10 nm to above 50 μm, enabling real-time optimization of laser interactions. Presented here are results using a device that draws films from a bulk liquid crystal source volume with any thickness in the aforementioned range. Films form within 2 μm of the same location each time, well within the Rayleigh range of even tight F / # systems, thus removing the necessity for realignment between shots. The repetition rate of the device exceeds 0.1 Hz for sub-100 nm films, facilitating higher repetition rate operation of modern laser facilities.

  9. High-repetition-rate PIV investigations on a generic rocket model in sub- and supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitter, Martin; Scharnowski, Sven; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J.

    2011-04-01

    High-repetition-rate PIV measurements were performed in the trisonic wind tunnel facility at the Bundeswehr University Munich in order to investigate the boundary layer parameters on a generic rocket model and the recirculation area in the wake of the model at Mach numbers up to Mach = 2.6. The data are required for the validation of unsteady flow simulations. Because of the limited run time of the blow-down wind tunnel, a high-repetition-rate PIV system was applied to obtain the flow statistics with high accuracy. The results demonstrate this method's potential to resolve small-scale flow phenomena over a wide field of view in a large Mach number range but also show its limitations for the investigations of wall-bounded flows.

  10. Comparison of two high-repetition-rate pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser discharge geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Faszer, W.; Tulip, J.; Seguin, H.

    1980-11-01

    Two discharge geometries are commonly used for pumping high-repetition-rate transversely excited atmosphere (TEA) lasers. One uses solid electrodes with preionization provided by downstream spark pins. The other uses a solid electrode and a screen electrode with preionization provided by an auxiliary discharge behind the screen. In this study the performance of the two systems was compared. The repetition rate at which arcing occurs was found to increase linearly with flow velocity but decrease with increasing energy density. It was also dependent on system geometry and the spark pin preionized system performed better than the auxiliary discharge preionized system. Data are given for discharges in N/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, He, and a CO/sub 2/ laser mixture.

  11. Moderate repetition rate ultra-intense laser targets and optics using variable thickness liquid crystal films

    DOE PAGES

    Poole, P. L.; Willis, C.; Cochran, G. E.; ...

    2016-10-10

    Liquid crystal films are variable thickness, planar targets for ultra-intense laser matter experiments such as ion acceleration. Their target qualities also make them ideal for high-power laser optics such as plasma mirrors and waveplates. By controlling parameters of film formation, thickness can be varied on-demand from 10 nm to above 50 μm, enabling real-time optimization of laser interactions. Presented here are results using a device that draws films from a bulk liquid crystal source volume with any thickness in the aforementioned range. Films form within 2 μm of the same location each time, well within the Rayleigh range of evenmore » tight F/# systems, thus removing the necessity for realignment between shots. As a result, the repetition rate of the device exceeds 0.1 Hz for sub-100nm films, facilitating higher repetition rate operation of modern laser facilities.« less

  12. Moderate repetition rate ultra-intense laser targets and optics using variable thickness liquid crystal films

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, P. L.; Willis, C.; Cochran, G. E.; Hanna, R. T.; Andereck, C. D.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-10-10

    Liquid crystal films are variable thickness, planar targets for ultra-intense laser matter experiments such as ion acceleration. Their target qualities also make them ideal for high-power laser optics such as plasma mirrors and waveplates. By controlling parameters of film formation, thickness can be varied on-demand from 10 nm to above 50 μm, enabling real-time optimization of laser interactions. Presented here are results using a device that draws films from a bulk liquid crystal source volume with any thickness in the aforementioned range. Films form within 2 μm of the same location each time, well within the Rayleigh range of even tight F/# systems, thus removing the necessity for realignment between shots. As a result, the repetition rate of the device exceeds 0.1 Hz for sub-100nm films, facilitating higher repetition rate operation of modern laser facilities.

  13. High (1 GHz) repetition rate compact femtosecond laser: A powerful multiphoton tool for nanomedicine and nanobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, A.; Riemann, I.; Martin, S.; Le Harzic, R.; Bartels, A.; Janke, C.; König, K.

    2007-07-01

    Multiphoton tomography of human skin and nanosurgery of human chromosomes have been performed with a 1GHz repetition rate laser by the use of the commercially available femtosecond multiphoton laser tomograph DermaInspect as well as a compact galvoscanning microscope. We performed the autofluorescence tomography up to 100μm in the depth of human skin. Submicron cutting lines and hole drillings have been conducted on labeled human chromosomes.

  14. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Doolittle, L.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Ryne, R.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zolotorev, M.; Zholents, A.

    2011-06-01

    We report on on-going studies of a superconducting CW linac driver intended to support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-rays spectrum. We present a pointdesign for a 1.8 GeV machine tuned for 300 pC bunches and delivering low-emittance, low-energy spread beams as needed for the SASE and seeded beamlines.

  15. Steady State Microbunching for High Brilliance and High Repetition Rate Storage Ring-Based Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex; Ratner, Daniel; Jiao, Yi; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.

    2012-09-06

    Electron-based light sources have proven to be effective sources of high brilliance, high frequency radiation. Such sources are typically either linac-Free Electron Laser (FEL) or storage ring types. The linac-FEL type has high brilliance (because the beam is microbunched) but low repetition rate. The storage ring type has high repetition rate (rapid beam circulation) but comparatively low brilliance or coherence. We propose to explore the feasibility of a microbunched beam in a storage ring that promises high repetition rate and high brilliance. The steady-state-micro-bunch (SSMB) beam in storage ring could provide CW sources for THz, EUV, or soft X-rays. Several SSMB mechanisms have been suggested recently, and in this report, we review a number of these SSMB concepts as promising directions for high brilliance, high repetition rate light sources of the future. The trick of SSMB lies in the RF system, together with the associated synchrotron beam dynamics, of the storage ring. Considering various different RF arrangements, there could be considered a number of scenarios of the SSMB. In this report, we arrange these scenarios more or less in order of the envisioned degree of technical challenge to the RF system, and not in the chronological order of their original references. Once the stored beam is steady-state microbunched in a storage ring, it passes through a radiator repeatedly every turn (or few turns). The radiator extracts a small fraction of the beam energy as coherent radiation with a wavelength corresponding to the microbunched period of the beam. In contrast to an FEL, this radiator is not needed to generate the microbunching (as required e.g. by SASE FELs or seeded FELs), so the radiator can be comparatively simple and short.

  16. The role of excitation parameters in high repetition-rate N2-TE lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhlevsky, S. V.; Kozma, L.

    1993-09-01

    We have studied the effects of decreasing the excitation duration on the pulse-repetition-rate (PRR) capabilities of a low-pressure ( P<200 Torr) N2-TE laser. It was found that maximum PRR increases with decreasing duration of the discharge current. PRR as high as 1000 Hz has been obtained in the sealed-off non-flowing regime of laser operation. These findings are adequately explained by the time dependence of the arc-discharge formation.

  17. Dual-color three-dimensional STED microscopy with a single high-repetition-rate laser

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu Young; Ha, Taekjip

    2016-01-01

    We describe a dual-color three-dimensional stimulated emission depletion (3D-STED) microscopy employing a single laser source with a repetition rate of 80 MHz. Multiple excitation pulses synchronized with a STED pulse were generated by a photonic crystal fiber and the desired wavelengths were selected by an acousto-optic tunable filter with high spectral purity. Selective excitation at different wavelengths permits simultaneous imaging of two fluorescent markers at a nanoscale resolution in three dimensions. PMID:26030581

  18. Management of thermal effects in high-repetition-rate pulsed optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Godard, Antoine; Raybaut, Myriam; Schmid, Thomas; Lefebvre, Michel; Michel, Anne-Marie; Péalat, Michel

    2010-11-01

    We report on the investigation of thermal effects in high-repetition-rate pulsed optical parametric oscillators emitting in the mid-IR. We find that the thermal load induced by the nonresonant idler absorption plays a critical role in the emergence of thermally induced bistability. We then demonstrate a significant improvement of the conversion efficiency (more than 30%) when a proper axial temperature gradient is applied to the nonlinear crystal by use of a two-zone temperature-controlled oven.

  19. Spectral-temporal encoding and decoding of the femtosecond pulses sequences with a THz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tcypkin, A. N.; Putilin, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental and numerical modeling techniques demonstrated the possibilities of the spectral-time encoding and decoding for time division multiplexing sequence of femtosecond subpulses with a repetition rate of up to 6.4 THz. The sequence was formed as a result of the interference of two phase-modulated pulses. We report the limits of the application of the developed method of controlling formed sequence at the spectral-temporal coding.

  20. Generation of picosecond laser pulses at 1030 nm with gigahertz range continuously tunable repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Adrien; Lhermite, Jérôme; Hocquet, Steve; Cormier, Eric; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2015-12-01

    We report on a watt range laser system generating picosecond pulses using electro-optical modulation of a 1030 nm single frequency low noise laser diode. Its repetition rate is continuously tunable between 11 and 18 GHz. Over this range, output spectra and pulse characteristics are measured and compared with a numerical simulation. Finally, amplitude and residual phase noise measurements of the source are also presented.

  1. Meaningful Words and Non-Words Repetitive Articulatory Rate (Oral Diadochokinesis) in Persian Speaking Children.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Peyman; Rezai, Hossein; Garmatani, Neda Tahmasebi

    2017-08-01

    Repetitive articulatory rate or Oral Diadochokinesis (oral-DDK) shows a guideline for appraisal and diagnosis of subjects with oral-motor disorder. Traditionally, meaningless words repetition has been utilized in this task and preschool children have challenges with them. Therefore, we aimed to determine some meaningful words in order to test oral-DDK in Persian speaking preschool children. Participants were 142 normally developing children, (age range 4-6 years), who were asked to produce /motæka, golabi/ as two meaningful Persian words and /pa-ta-ka/ as non-word in conventional oral-DDK task. We compared the time taken for 10-times fast repetitions of two meaningful Persian words and the tri-syllabic nonsense word /pa-ta-ka/. Praat software was used to calculate the average time that subjects took to produce the target items. In 4-5 year old children, [Formula: see text] of time taken for 10-times repetitions of /pa-ta-ka, motæka, golabi/ were [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] seconds respectively, and in 5-6 year old children were [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] seconds respectively. Findings showed that the main effect of type of words on oral diadochokinesis was significant ([Formula: see text]). Children repeated meaningful words /motæka, golabi/ faster than the non-word /pa-ta-ka/. Sex and age factors had no effect on time taken for repetition of oral-DDK test. It is suggested that Speech Therapists can use meaningful words to facilitate oral-DDK test for children.

  2. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    DOE PAGES

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; ...

    2016-02-29

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields andmore » the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. In conclusion, we benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.« less

  3. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; Wustmann, B.; Koesterke, I.; Schwarz, M.; Freitag, M.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Justus, M.; Seidel, W.; Ilgner, C.; Awari, N.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Laplace, Y.; Rajasekaran, S.; Zhang, L.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Schay, G.; Lorincz, I.; Rauscher, A. A.; Radu, I.; Mährlein, S.; Kim, T. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Wall, S.; Heberle, J.; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A.; Steiger, A.; Müller, A. S.; Helm, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T.; Michel, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Fisher, A. S.; Stojanovic, N.; Gensch, M.

    2016-02-29

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. In conclusion, we benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.

  4. High repetition rate laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using acousto-optically gated detection

    SciTech Connect

    Pořízka, Pavel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2014-07-15

    This contribution introduces a new type of setup for fast sample analysis using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The novel design combines a high repetition rate laser (up to 50 kHz) as excitation source and an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) as a fast switch for temporally gating the detection of the emitted light. The plasma radiation is led through the active medium of the AOM where it is diffracted on the transient ultrasonic Bragg grid. The diffracted radiation is detected by a compact Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with a CCD line detector. Utilizing the new combination of high repetition rate lasers and AOM gated detection, rapid measurements with total integration times of only 10 ms resulted in a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.13 wt.% for magnesium in aluminum alloys. This short integration time corresponds to 100 analyses/s. Temporal gating of LIP radiation results in improved LODs and consecutively higher sensitivity of the LIBS setup. Therefore, an AOM could be beneficially utilized to temporally detect plasmas induced by high repetition rate lasers. The AOM in combination with miniaturized Czerny-Turner spectrometers equipped with CCD line detectors and small footprint diode pumped solid state lasers results in temporally gateable compact LIBS setups.

  5. Optimal repetition rate and pulse duration studies for two photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhanov, Shamil; Quarterman, Adrian H.; Smyth, Connor J. C. P.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Appleton, Paul; Thomson, Calum; Swift, Samuel; Wilcox, Keith G.

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton imaging (MPI) is an important fluorescence microscopy technique that allows deep tissue and in-vivo imaging with high selectivity. According to theory, two-photon signal is proportional to the product of the peak power and the average power, allowing optimization of key imaging parameters of the excitation laser, such as average power, repetition rate and pulse duration. Recent progress in compact ultrafast lasers including femtosecond fiber lasers and optically pumped semiconductor lasers makes direct control of these parameters possible. In order to investigate the optimum laser parameters for two photon imaging we experimentally study the effects of repetition rate between 2.85 and 90 MHz and pulse duration between 336 fs and 3.5 ps on two photon signal in SYTOX Green labeled mouse intestine sections at 1030 nm. We found that the optimum repetition rate for this sample is in the range 20 - 40 MHz, depending on average power, and that the pulse duration has no effect on the MPI signal provided that the average power can be adjusted to keep the product of average and peak power constant.

  6. Effects of repetition rate and impulsiveness of simulated helicopter rotor noise on annoyance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Mccurdy, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Annoyance judgements were obtained for computer generated stimuli simulative of helicopter impulsive rotor noise to investigate effects of repetition rate and impulsiveness. Each of the 82 different stimuli was judged at 3 sound pressure levels by 48 subjects. Impulse repetition rates covered a range from 10 Hz to 115 Hz; crest factors covered a range from 3.2 dB to 19.3 dB. Increases in annoyance with increases in repetition rate were found which were not predicted by common loudness or annoyance metrics and which were independent of noise level. The ability to predict effects of impulsiveness varied between the noise metrics and was found to be dependent on noise level. The ability to predict the effects of impulsiveness was not generally improved by any of several proposed impulsiveness corrections. Instead, the effects of impulsiveness were found to be systematically related to the frequency content of the stimuli. A modified frequency weighting was developed which offers improved annoyance prediction.

  7. Harmonically pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillator with multi-gigahertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wenlong; Wang, Zhaohua; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Wei, Zhiyi

    2016-12-26

    We report a multi-gigahertz (GHz) repetition-rate femtosecond MgO:PPLN optical parametric oscillator (OPO) harmonically pumped by a 75.6 MHz Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KGW laser. By fractionally increasing the OPO cavity length, we obtained OPO operation up to the 493rd harmonic of the pump laser repetition rate, corresponding to a repetition rate as high as 37.3 GHz. Using a 1.5% output coupler, we are able to extract signal pulses with up to 260 mW average power at the 102nd harmonic (7.7 GHz) and 90 mW at the 493rd harmonic (37.3 GHz) under 2 W pump power. The measured relative standard deviations of the fundamental and the 102nd harmonic signal power were recorded to be 0.5% and 2.1%, respectively. The signal pulse durations at different harmonics were measured in the range of 160-230 fs.

  8. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter.

    PubMed

    Green, B; Kovalev, S; Asgekar, V; Geloni, G; Lehnert, U; Golz, T; Kuntzsch, M; Bauer, C; Hauser, J; Voigtlaender, J; Wustmann, B; Koesterke, I; Schwarz, M; Freitag, M; Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Justus, M; Seidel, W; Ilgner, C; Awari, N; Nicoletti, D; Kaiser, S; Laplace, Y; Rajasekaran, S; Zhang, L; Winnerl, S; Schneider, H; Schay, G; Lorincz, I; Rauscher, A A; Radu, I; Mährlein, S; Kim, T H; Lee, J S; Kampfrath, T; Wall, S; Heberle, J; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A; Steiger, A; Müller, A S; Helm, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T; Michel, P; Cavalleri, A; Fisher, A S; Stojanovic, N; Gensch, M

    2016-02-29

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.

  9. Repetition rate-dependent oxygen consumption modifies cytotoxicity in photodynamic therapy using pulsed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Morimoto, Yuji; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Arai, Tsunenori; Sato, Shunichi; Sakata, Isao; Takemura, Takeshi; Nakajima, Susumu; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2003-06-01

    We studied the repetition-rate dependence of PDT cytotoxicity and relation between PDT cytotoxicity and both oxygen consumption and photobleaching during PDT in vitro. Mice renal carcinoma cells were incubated wtih second-generation photosensitizier, PAD-S31, and were irradiated with 670-nm nanoseconds pulsed light from YAG-OPO system. Four repetition rates of 30, 15, 5 and 3 Hz were investigated, provided that the incident peak intensity and the total light dose adjusted to 1.2 MW/cm2 and 40 J/cm2, respectively. We found limited cytotoxicity about 40% at 30 and 15 Hz and sufficient cytotoxicity about 80% at 5 and 3 Hz. The oxygen measurement during irradiation revealed that the 5- and 30Hz irradiation caused slow oxygen consumption, while rapid oxygen consumption followed by a rapid recovery of oxygenation at 30 and 15 Hz. Interestingly, the fluorescence measurement during irradiation also demonstrated that photobleaching discontinued in the same period of oxygen recovery at 30 and 15 Hz. These discontinued oxygen consumption and photobleaching at 30 and 15 Hz might have limited effective total fluence and resulted in suppressed cytotoxicity. These results suggest that the PDT efficacy using a pulsed laser significantly depends on the pulse repetition rate probably due to different oxygen consumption process during PDT.

  10. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    PubMed Central

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; Wustmann, B.; Koesterke, I.; Schwarz, M.; Freitag, M.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Justus, M.; Seidel, W.; Ilgner, C.; Awari, N.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Laplace, Y.; Rajasekaran, S.; Zhang, L.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Schay, G.; Lorincz, I.; Rauscher, A. A.; Radu, I.; Mährlein, S.; Kim, T. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Wall, S.; Heberle, J.; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A.; Steiger, A.; Müller, A. S.; Helm, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T.; Michel, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Fisher, A. S.; Stojanovic, N.; Gensch, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution. PMID:26924651

  11. Bottle microresonator broadband and low-repetition-rate frequency comb generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoyrin, V.; Sumetsky, M.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new type of broadband and low repetition rate frequency comb generator which has the shape of an elongated and nanoscale-shallow optical bottle microresonator created at the surface of an optical fiber. The free spectral range (FSR) of the broadband azimuthal eigenfrequency series of this resonator is the exact multiple of the FSR of the dense and narrowband axial series. The effective radius variation of the microresonator is close to a parabola with a nanoscale height which is greater or equal to lambda/2pi*n0 (here lambda is the characteristic radiation wavelength and n0 is the refractive index of the microresonator material). Overall, the microresonator possesses a broadband, small FSR, and accurately equidistant spectrum convenient for the generation of a broadband and low repetition rate optical frequency comb. It is shown that this comb can be generated by pumping with a cw laser, which radiation frequency matches a single axial eigenfrequency of the microresonator, or, alternatively, by pumping with a mode-locked laser, which generates a narrowband low repetition rate comb matching a series of equidistant axial eigenfrequencies situated between adjacent azimuthal eigenfrequencies.

  12. Novel Resistance Training-Specific Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale Measuring Repetitions in Reserve.

    PubMed

    Zourdos, Michael C; Klemp, Alex; Dolan, Chad; Quiles, Justin M; Schau, Kyle A; Jo, Edward; Helms, Eric; Esgro, Ben; Duncan, Scott; Garcia Merino, Sonia; Blanco, Rocky

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to compare rating of perceived exertion (RPE) values measuring repetitions in reserve (RIR) at particular intensities of 1 repetition maximum (RM) in experienced (ES) and novice squatters (NS). Furthermore, this investigation compared average velocity between ES and NS at the same intensities. Twenty-nine individuals (24.0 ± 3.4 years) performed a 1RM squat followed by a single repetition with loads corresponding to 60, 75, and 90% of 1RM and an 8-repetition set at 70% 1RM. Average velocity was recorded at 60, 75, and 90% 1RM and on the first and last repetitions of the 8-repetition set. Subjects reported an RPE value that corresponded to an RIR value (RPE-10 = 0-RIR, RPE-9 = 1-RIR, and so forth). Subjects were assigned to one of the 2 groups: (a) ES (n = 15, training age: 5.2 ± 3.5 years) and (b) NS (n = 14, training age: 0.4 ± 0.6 years). The mean of the average velocities for ES was slower (p ≤ 0.05) than NS at 100% and 90% 1RM. However, there were no differences (p > 0.05) between groups at 60, 75%, or for the first and eighth repetitions at 70% 1RM. In addition, ES recorded greater RPE at 1RM than NS (p = 0.023). In ES, there was a strong inverse relationship between average velocity and RPE at all percentages (r = -0.88, p < 0.001), and a strong inverse correlation in NS between average velocity and RPE at all intensities (r = -0.77, p = 0.001). Our findings demonstrate an inverse relationship between average velocity and RPE/RIR. Experienced squatter group exhibited slower average velocity and higher RPE at 1RM than NS, signaling greater efficiency at high intensities. The RIR-based RPE scale is a practical method to regulate daily training load and provide feedback during a 1RM test.

  13. All-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences by employing power coupler and equalizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenchao; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Wang, Fu; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    A scheme for all-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS) is demonstrated with a precision delay feedback loop cascaded with a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD)-based power equalizer. Its feasibility has been verified by experiments, which show a multiplication for PRBS at cycle 2^7-1 from 2.5 to 10 Gb/s. This scheme can be employed for the rate multiplication of a much longer cycle PRBS at a much higher bit rate over 40 Gb/s if the time-delay, the loss, and the dispersion of an optical delay line are all precisely managed.

  14. Effects of shifts in the rate of repetitive stimulation on sustained attention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krulewitz, J. E.; Warm, J. S.; Wohl, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of shifts in the rate of presentation of repetitive neutral events (background event rate) were studied in a visual vigilance task. Four groups of subjects experienced either a high (21 events/min) or a low (6 events/min) event rate for 20 min and then experienced either the same or the alternate event rate for an additional 40 min. The temporal occurrence of critical target signals was identical for all groups, irrespective of event rate. The density of critical signals was 12 signals/20 min. By the end of the session, shifts in event rate were associated with changes in performance which resembled contrast effects found in other experimental situations in which shift paradigms were used. Relative to constant event rate control conditions, a shift from a low to a high event rate depressed the probability of signal detections, while a shift in the opposite direction enhanced the probability of signal detections.

  15. Effects of shifts in the rate of repetitive stimulation on sustained attention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krulewitz, J. E.; Warm, J. S.; Wohl, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of shifts in the rate of presentation of repetitive neutral events (background event rate) were studied in a visual vigilance task. Four groups of subjects experienced either a high (21 events/min) or a low (6 events/min) event rate for 20 min and then experienced either the same or the alternate event rate for an additional 40 min. The temporal occurrence of critical target signals was identical for all groups, irrespective of event rate. The density of critical signals was 12 signals/20 min. By the end of the session, shifts in event rate were associated with changes in performance which resembled contrast effects found in other experimental situations in which shift paradigms were used. Relative to constant event rate control conditions, a shift from a low to a high event rate depressed the probability of signal detections, while a shift in the opposite direction enhanced the probability of signal detections.

  16. Research of narrow pulse width, high repetition rate, high output power fiber lasers for deep space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-feng; Li, Hong-zuo; Wang, Yan; Hao, Zi-qiang; Xiao, Dong-Ya

    2013-08-01

    As human beings expand the research in unknown areas constantly, the deep space exploration has become a hot research topic all over the world. According to the long distance and large amount of information transmission characteristics of deep space exploration, the space laser communication is the preferred mode because it has the advantages of concentrated energy, good security, and large information capacity and interference immunity. In a variety of laser source, fibre-optical pulse laser has become an important communication source in deep space laser communication system because of its small size, light weight and large power. For fiber lasers, to solve the contradiction between the high repetition rate and the peak value power is an important scientific problem. General Q technology is difficult to obtain a shorter pulse widths, This paper presents a DFB semiconductor laser integrated with Electro-absorption modulator to realize the narrow pulse width, high repetition rate of the seed source, and then using a two-cascaded high gain fiber amplifier as amplification mean, to realize the fibre-optical pulse laser with pulse width 3ns, pulse frequency 200kHz and peak power 1kW. According to the space laser atmospheric transmission window, the wavelength selects for 1.06um. It is adopted that full fibre technology to make seed source and amplification, pumping source and amplification of free-space coupled into fiber-coupled way. It can overcome that fibre lasers are vulnerable to changes in external conditions such as vibration, temperature drift and other factors affect, improving long-term stability. The fiber lasers can be modulated by PPM mode, to realize high rate modulation, because of its peak power, high transmission rate, narrow pulse width, high frequency stability, all technical indexes meet the requirements of the exploration of deep space communication technology.

  17. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V. M.; El'tsov, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2015-08-01

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al2O3 ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse-1, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ <= 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system.

  18. Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser by sweeping the pulse repetition rate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers allow for simultaneous detection of multiple absorption lines of a specimen over a broad spectral range of infrared or visible light with a single spectroscopic measurement. Here, we present an 8-THz bandwidth, 0.5-GHz resolution scheme of Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser. A resolving power of 1.6 × 104 about a 1560-nm center wavelength is achieved by sweeping the pulse repetition rate of the light source on a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer configured to capture interferograms with a 0.02-fs temporal sampling accuracy through a well-stabilized 60-m unbalance arm length. A dual-servo mechanism is realized by combining a mechanical linear stage with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) within the fiber laser cavity, enabling stable sweeping control of the pulse repetition rate over a 1.0-MHz scan range with 0.4-Hz steps with reference to the Rb clock. Experimental results demonstrate that the P-branch lines of the H13CN reference cell can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio reaching 350 for the most intense line. PMID:26503257

  19. Fiber-laser-based, high-repetition-rate, picosecond ultraviolet source tunable across 329-348  nm.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kavita; Chaitanya Kumar, S; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2016-10-15

    We report a compact, fiber-laser-based, high-repetition-rate picosecond source for the ultraviolet (UV), providing multi-tens of milliwatt of average power across 329-348 nm. The source is based on internal sum-frequency-generation (SFG) in a singly resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 532 nm by the second harmonic of a picosecond Yb-fiber laser at 80 MHz repetition rate. Using a 30-mm-long single-grating MgO:sPPLT crystal for the OPO and a 5-mm-long BiB3O6 crystal for intracavity SFG, we generate up to 115 mW of average UV power at 339.9 nm, with >50  mW over 73% of the tuning range, for 1.6 W of input pump power. The UV output exhibits a passive rms power stability of ∼2.9% rms over 1 min and 6.5% rms over 2 h in high beam quality. Angular acceptance bandwidth and cavity detuning effects have also been studied.

  20. High-power, highly stable KrF laser with a 4-kHz pulse repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, V M; El'tsov, A V; Khristoforov, O B

    2015-08-31

    An electric-discharge KrF laser (248 nm) with an average output power of 300 W is developed and studied. A number of new design features are related to the use of a laser chamber based on an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic tube. A high power and pulse repetition rate are achieved by using a volume discharge with lateral preionisation by the UV radiation of a creeping discharge in the form of a homogeneous plasma sheet on the surface of a plane sapphire plate. Various generators for pumping the laser are studied. The maximum laser efficiency is 3.1%, the maximum laser energy is 160 mJ pulse{sup -1}, and the pulse duration at half maximum is 7.5 ns. In the case of long-term operation at a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz and an output power of 300 W, high stability of laser output energy (σ ≤ 0.7%) is achieved using an all-solid-state pump system. (lasers)

  1. Investigation of optical fibers for high-repetition-rate, ultraviolet planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Kulatilaka, Waruna D; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the fundamental transmission characteristics of nanosecond-duration, 10 kHz repetition rate, ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses through state-of-the-art, UV-grade fused-silica fibers being used for hydroxyl radical (OH) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. Studied in particular are laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs), nonlinear absorption, and optical transmission stability during long-term UV irradiation. Solarization (photodegradation) effects are significantly enhanced when the fiber is exposed to high-repetition-rate, 283 nm UV irradiation. For 10 kHz laser pulses, two-photon absorption is strong and LIDTs are low, as compared to those of laser pulses propagating at 10 Hz. The fiber characterization results are utilized to perform single-laser-shot, OH-PLIF imaging in pulsating turbulent flames with a laser that operates at 10 kHz. The nearly spatially uniform output beam that exits a long multimode fiber becomes ideal for PLIF measurements. The proof-of-concept measurements show significant promise for extending the application of a fiber-coupled, high-speed OH-PLIF system to harsh environments such as combustor test beds, and potential system improvements are suggested.

  2. Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser by sweeping the pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond lasers allow for simultaneous detection of multiple absorption lines of a specimen over a broad spectral range of infrared or visible light with a single spectroscopic measurement. Here, we present an 8-THz bandwidth, 0.5-GHz resolution scheme of Fourier-transform spectroscopy using an Er-doped fiber femtosecond laser. A resolving power of 1.6 × 104 about a 1560-nm center wavelength is achieved by sweeping the pulse repetition rate of the light source on a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer configured to capture interferograms with a 0.02-fs temporal sampling accuracy through a well-stabilized 60-m unbalance arm length. A dual-servo mechanism is realized by combining a mechanical linear stage with an electro-optic modulator (EOM) within the fiber laser cavity, enabling stable sweeping control of the pulse repetition rate over a 1.0-MHz scan range with 0.4-Hz steps with reference to the Rb clock. Experimental results demonstrate that the P-branch lines of the H13CN reference cell can be observed with a signal-to-noise ratio reaching 350 for the most intense line.

  3. Optimization of graffiti removal on natural stone by means of high repetition rate UV laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, M. P.; López, A. J.; Ramil, A.; Pozo, S.; Rivas, T.

    2013-08-01

    The use of laser for graffiti removal is a promising alternative to conventional cleaning methods, though irradiation parameters must be carefully selected in order to achieve the effective cleaning without damaging the substrate, especially when referring to natural stone. From a practical point of view, once a safe working window is selected, it is necessary to determine the irradiation conditions to remove large paint areas, with minimal time consumption. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic procedure to select the optimum parameters for graffiti removal by means of the 3rd harmonic of a high repetition rate nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser. Ablation thresholds of four spray paint colors were determined and the effect of pulse repetition frequency, beam diameter and line scan separation was analyzed, obtaining a set of values which optimize the ablation process.

  4. PIN-diode diagnostics of pulsed electron beam for high repetition rate mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Ivan; Xiao, Yu; Poloskov, Artem

    2017-05-01

    This work describes the operating principle and test results of the diagnostics for measuring the pulsed electron beam parameters under repetitive operation mode. The diagnostics is based on a PIN-diode, which is used as a bremsstrahlung detector. The signal from a PIN-diode was converted to a pseudo constant voltage signal which can be measured by a conventional voltmeter. Then the signal acquired by the voltmeter was compared with a reference signal indicating the normal operating regime of the accelerator, thus information about the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the electron beam parameters was given. The system was developed and tested for the ASTRA-M accelerator with the following operating parameters: 470 kV accelerating voltage, 120 ns beam duration and up to 50 pulses per second repetition rate.

  5. Two-gigahertz repetition-rate, diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Weingarten, K.J.; Shannon, D.C.; Wallace, R. ); Keller, U. )

    1990-09-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YLF laser has been acousto-optically mode locked at a 2-GHz repetition rate, giving pulse widths of 7 psec with an average power of 135 mW at a wavelength of 1.047 {mu}m. The 2-GHz pulse rate corresponds to a free-space cavity length of 7.5 cm, while the laser's actual cavity length is approximately 6.6 cm. The mode locker consists of a sapphire substrate with a lithium niobate transducer, giving 0.5% loss modulation per watt. Stable mode-locked pulses were achieved for loss modulations of 1% or greater.

  6. Improving the ablation efficiency of excimer laser systems with higher repetition rates through enhanced debris removal and optimized spot pattern.

    PubMed

    Arba-Mosquera, Samuel; Klinner, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the reasons for the required increased radiant exposure for higher-repetition-rate excimer lasers and determine experimentally possible compensations to achieve equivalent ablation profiles maintaining the same single-pulse energies and radiant exposures for laser repetition rates ranging from 430 to 1000 Hz. Schwind eye-tech-solutions GmbH and Co. KG, Kleinostheim, Germany. Experimental study. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates were photoablated. The pulse laser energy was maintained during all experiments; the effects of the flow of the debris removal, the shot pattern for the correction, and precooling the PMMA plates were evaluated in terms of achieved ablation versus repetition rate. The mean ablation performance ranged from 88% to 100%; the variability between the profile measurements ranged from 1.4% to 6.2%. Increasing the laser repetition rate from 430 Hz to 1000 Hz reduced the mean ablation performance from 98% to 91% and worsened the variability from 1.9% to 4.3%. Increasing the flow of the debris removal, precooling the PMMA plates to -18°C, and adapting the shot pattern for the thermal response of PMMA to excimer ablation helped stabilize the variability. Only adapting the shot pattern for the thermal response of PMMA to excimer ablation helped stabilize the mean ablation performance. The ablation performance of higher-repetition-rate excimer lasers on PMMA improved with improvements in the debris removal systems and shot pattern. More powerful debris removal systems and smart shot patterns in terms of thermal response improved the performance of these excimer lasers. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stability Reliability of the Behavior Rating Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellers, Robert A.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined test-retest stability of Behavior Rating Profile for students grades l-12 (N=198), parents (N=212), and teachers (N=176) on 3 norm-referenced scales. Found Teacher Rating scale reliable across all grades for screening and eligibility, Parent Rating scale reliable for Grade 3-12 screening and Grade 3-6,ll, and l2, eligibility. Found…

  8. Front end for high-repetition rate thin disk-pumped OPCPA beamline at ELI-beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jonathan T.; Novák, Jakub; Antipenkov, Roman; Batysta, František; Zervos, Charalampos; Naylon, Jack A.; Mazanec, TomáÅ.¡; Horáček, Martin; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2015-02-01

    The ELI-Beamlines facility, currently under construction in Prague, Czech Republic, will house multiple high power laser systems with varying pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates. Here we present the status of a high repetition rate beamline currently under construction with target parameters of 20 fs pulse duration, 100 mJ pulse energy, and 1 kHz repetition rate. Specifically we present the Yb:YAG thin disk lasers which are intended to pump picosecond OPCPA, synchronization between pump and signal pulses in the OPCPA, and the first stages of OPCPA.

  9. Progress in high repetition rate soft x-ray laser development and pump lasers at Colorado State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, Jorge J.; Reagan, Brendan A.; Baumgarten, Cory; Wang, Yong; Wang, Shoujun; Pedicone, Michael; Berrill, Mark; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Kyaw, C. N.; Yin, Liang; Wang, Hanchen; Marconi, Mario C.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2017-05-01

    We will review recent progress in the development of high repetition, high average power rate soft x-ray lasers at 10-20 nm wavelength at Colorado State University, and the compact diode- pumped solid state lasers that drive them. The latter includes the development of a 1 J picosecond laser capable of operating at 500 Hz repetition rate. Results that demonstrate soft x-ray laser operation at the highest repetition rate reported to date: 400 Hz, and prospects of the use of these lasers in applications are discussed.

  10. Ultrastable fiber amplifier delivering 145-fs pulses with 6-μJ energy at 10-MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Wunram, Marcel; Storz, Patrick; Brida, Daniele; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    A high-power femtosecond Yb:fiber amplifier operating with exceptional noise performance and long-term stability is demonstrated. It generates a 10-MHz train of 145-fs pulses at 1.03 μm with peak powers above 36 MW. The system features a relative amplitude noise of 1.5·10⁻⁶  Hz(-1/2) at 1 MHz and drifts of the 60-W average power below 0.3% over 72 hours of continuous operation. The passively phase-stable Er:fiber seed system provides ultrabroadband pulses that are synchronized at a repetition rate of 40 MHz. This combination aims at new schemes for sensitive experiments in ultrafast scientific applications.

  11. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOEpatents

    Neev, J.; Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Glinsky, M.E.; Stuart, B.C.; Perry, M.D.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.

    1998-02-24

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment. 8 figs.

  12. Ultrashort pulse high repetition rate laser system for biological tissue processing

    DOEpatents

    Neev, Joseph; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Glinsky, Michael E.; Stuart, Brent C.; Perry, Michael D.; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for fast, efficient, precise and damage-free biological tissue removal using an ultrashort pulse duration laser system operating at high pulse repetition rates. The duration of each laser pulse is on the order of about 1 fs to less than 50 ps such that energy deposition is localized in a small depth and occurs before significant hydrodynamic motion and thermal conduction, leading to collateral damage, can take place. The depth of material removed per pulse is on the order of about 1 micrometer, and the minimal thermal and mechanical effects associated with this ablation method allows for high repetition rate operation, in the region 10 to over 1000 Hertz, which, in turn, achieves high material removal rates. The input laser energy per ablated volume of tissue is small, and the energy density required to ablate material decreases with decreasing pulse width. The ablation threshold and ablation rate are only weakly dependent on tissue type and condition, allowing for maximum flexibility of use in various biological tissue removal applications. The use of a chirped-pulse amplified Titanium-doped sapphire laser is disclosed as the source in one embodiment.

  13. Single-pass high harmonic generation at high repetition rate and photon flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hädrich, Steffen; Rothhardt, Jan; Krebs, Manuel; Demmler, Stefan; Klenke, Arno; Tünnermann, Andreas; Limpert, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Sources of short wavelength radiation with femtosecond to attosecond pulse durations, such as synchrotrons or free electron lasers, have already made possible numerous, and will facilitate more, seminal studies aimed at understanding atomic and molecular processes on fundamental length and time scales. Table-top sources of coherent extreme ultraviolet to soft x-ray radiation enabled by high harmonic generation (HHG) of ultrashort pulse lasers have also gained significant attention in the last few years due to their enormous potential for addressing a plethora of applications, therefore constituting a complementary source to large-scale facilities (synchrotrons and free electron lasers). Ti:sapphire based laser systems have been the workhorses for HHG for decades, but are limited in repetition rate and average power. On the other hand, it has been widely recognized that fostering applications in fields such as photoelectron spectroscopy and microscopy, coincidence detection, coherent diffractive imaging and frequency metrology requires a high repetition rate and high photon flux HHG sources. In this article we will review recent developments in realizing the demanding requirement of producing a high photon flux and repetition rate at the same time. Particular emphasis will be put on suitable ultrashort pulse and high average power lasers, which directly drive harmonic generation without the need for external enhancement cavities. To this end we describe two complementary schemes that have been successfully employed for high power fiber lasers, i.e. optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers and nonlinear pulse compression. Moreover, the issue of phase-matching in tight focusing geometries will be discussed and connected to recent experiments. We will highlight the latest results in fiber laser driven high harmonic generation that currently produce the highest photon flux of all existing sources. In addition, we demonstrate the first promising applications and

  14. All-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences based on cascaded TOADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenchao; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Wang, Fu; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    A scheme for all-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS) is demonstrated with all-optical wavelength conversion and optical logic gate 'OR' based on cascaded Tera-Hertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexers (TOADs). Its feasibility is verified by multiplication experiments from 500 Mb/s to 4 Gb/s for 23-1 PRBS and from 1 Gb/s to 4 Gb/s for 27-1 PRBS. This scheme can be employed for rate multiplication for much longer cycle PRBS at much higher bit rate over 40 Gb/s when the time-delay, the loss and the dispersion of the optical delay line are all precisely managed. The upper limit of bit rate will be restricted by the recovery time of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) finally.

  15. OBSERVATION OF REPETITION-RATE DEPENDANT EMISSION FROM AN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUN

    SciTech Connect

    Edelen, J. P.; Sun, Y.; Harris, J. R.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2016-09-28

    Recent work at Fermilab in collaboration with the Advanced Photon Source and members of other national labs, designed an experiment to study the relationship between the RF repetition rate and the average current per RF pulse. While existing models anticipate a direct relationship between these two parameters we observed an inverse relationship. We believe this is a result of damage to the barium coating on the cathode surface caused by a change in back-bombardment power that is unaccounted for in the existing theories. These observations shed new light on the challenges and fundamental limitations associated with scaling an ungated thermionic cathode RF gun to high average current machines.

  16. Power scaling of supercontinuum seeded megahertz-repetition rate optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Riedel, R; Stephanides, A; Prandolini, M J; Gronloh, B; Jungbluth, B; Mans, T; Tavella, F

    2014-03-15

    Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifiers with high average power are possible with novel high-power Yb:YAG amplifiers with kW-level output powers. We demonstrate a compact wavelength-tunable sub-30-fs amplifier with 11.4 W average power with 20.7% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency. For parametric amplification, a beta-barium borate crystal is pumped by a 140 W, 1 ps Yb:YAG InnoSlab amplifier at 3.25 MHz repetition rate. The broadband seed is generated via supercontinuum generation in a YAG crystal.

  17. Optimal repetition rates of excitation pulses in a Tm-vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V A; Gerasimov, V V; Pavlinskii, A V

    2011-01-31

    The optimal excitation pulse repetition rates (PRRs) for a gas-discharge Tm-vapour laser with indirect population of upper laser levels are determined. It is shown that, under the same excitation conditions, the optimal PRRs increase with a decrease in the energy defect between the upper laser acceptor level and the nearest resonant donor level. The reasons for the limitation of the optimal PRRs in Tm-vapour laser are discussed. It is shown that the maximum average power of Tm-vapour laser radiation may exceed several times the Cu-vapour laser power under the same excitation conditions and in identical gas-discharge tubes. (lasers)

  18. Optimal repetition rates of excitation pulses in a Tm-vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskii, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal excitation pulse repetition rates (PRRs) for a gas-discharge Tm-vapour laser with indirect population of upper laser levels are determined. It is shown that, under the same excitation conditions, the optimal PRRs increase with a decrease in the energy defect between the upper laser acceptor level and the nearest resonant donor level. The reasons for the limitation of the optimal PRRs in Tm-vapour laser are discussed. It is shown that the maximum average power of Tm-vapour laser radiation may exceed several times the Cu-vapour laser power under the same excitation conditions and in identical gas-discharge tubes.

  19. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F.; Ciavola, G.

    2012-05-15

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  20. High Pulse Repetition Rate, Eye Safe, Visible Wavelength Lidar Systems: Design, Results and Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Berkoff, Timothy; Welton, Elsworth; Campbell, James; OCStarr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 1993 the first of the eye safe visible wavelength lidar systems known now as Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) became operational. Since that time there have been several dozen of these systems produced and applied for full time profiling of atmospheric cloud and aerosol structure. There is currently an observational network of MPL sites to support global climate research. In the course of application of these instruments there have been significant improvements in understanding, design and performance of the systems. There are addition potential and applications beyond current practice for the high repetition rate, eye safe designs. The MPL network and the current capability, design and future potential of MPL systems are described.

  1. Application of the Repetitions in Reserve-Based Rating of Perceived Exertion Scale for Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, John; Storey, Adam; Zourdos, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RATINGS OF PERCEIVED EXERTION ARE A VALID METHOD OF ESTIMATING THE INTENSITY OF A RESISTANCE TRAINING EXERCISE OR SESSION. SCORES ARE GIVEN AFTER COMPLETION OF AN EXERCISE OR TRAINING SESSION FOR THE PURPOSES OF ATHLETE MONITORING. HOWEVER, A NEWLY DEVELOPED SCALE BASED ON HOW MANY REPETITIONS ARE REMAINING AT THE COMPLETION OF A SET MAY BE A MORE PRECISE TOOL. THIS APPROACH ADJUSTS LOADS AUTOMATICALLY TO MATCH ATHLETE CAPABILITIES ON A SET-TO-SET BASIS AND MAY MORE ACCURATELY GAUGE INTENSITY AT NEAR-LIMIT LOADS. THIS ARTICLE OUTLINES HOW TO INCORPORATE THIS NOVEL SCALE INTO A TRAINING PLAN. PMID:27531969

  2. High Pulse Repetition Rate, Eye Safe, Visible Wavelength Lidar Systems: Design, Results and Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James; Berkoff, Timothy; Welton, Elsworth; Campbell, James; OCStarr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 1993 the first of the eye safe visible wavelength lidar systems known now as Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) became operational. Since that time there have been several dozen of these systems produced and applied for full time profiling of atmospheric cloud and aerosol structure. There is currently an observational network of MPL sites to support global climate research. In the course of application of these instruments there have been significant improvements in understanding, design and performance of the systems. There are addition potential and applications beyond current practice for the high repetition rate, eye safe designs. The MPL network and the current capability, design and future potential of MPL systems are described.

  3. High repetition rate optical switch using an electroabsorption modulator in TOAD configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Li; Yang, Yanfu; Lou, Caiyun; Gao, Yizhi

    2007-07-01

    A novel optical switch featured with high repetition rate, short switching window width, and high contrast ratio is proposed and demonstrated for the first time by placing an electroabsorption modulator (EAM) in a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD) configuration. The feasibility and main characteristics of the switch are investigated by numerical simulations and experiments. With this EAM-based TOAD, an error-free return-to-zero signal wavelength conversion with 0.62 dB power penalty at 20 Gbit/s is demonstrated.

  4. Plasmon-enhanced photocathode for high brightness and high repetition rate x-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, A; Senft, C; Thompson, K F; Feng, J; Cabrini, S; Schuck, P J; Padmore, H A; Peppernick, S J; Hess, W P

    2013-02-15

    In this Letter, we report on the efficient generation of electrons from metals using multiphoton photoemission by use of nanostructured plasmonic surfaces to trap, localize, and enhance optical fields. The plasmonic surface increases absorption over normal metals by more than an order of magnitude, and due to the localization of fields, this results in over 6 orders of magnitude increase in effective nonlinear quantum yield. We demonstrate that the achieved quantum yield is high enough for use in rf photoinjectors operating as electron sources for MHz repetition rate x-ray free electron lasers.

  5. High Repetition Rate Pulsed 2-Micron Laser Transmitter for Coherent CO2 DIAL Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Uprendra N.; Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Lee, Hyung

    2009-01-01

    A high repetition rate, highly efficient, Q-switched 2-micron laser system as the transmitter of a coherent differential absorption lidar for CO2 measurement has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center. Such a laser transmitter is a master-slave laser system. The master laser operates in a single frequency, either on-line or off-line of a selected CO2 absorption line. The slave laser is a Q-switched ring-cavity Ho:YLF laser which is pumped by a Tm:fiber laser. The repetition rate can be adjusted from a few hundred Hz to 10 kHz. The injection seeding success rate is from 99.4% to 99.95%. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy is 5.5mJ with the pulse length of approximately 50 ns. The optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W. The measured standard deviation of the laser frequency jitter is about 3 MHz.

  6. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ventturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Sun, C.; Wells, R.

    2012-05-18

    We present recent progress toward the design of a super-conducting linac driver for a high-repetition rate FEL-based soft x-ray light source. The machine is designed to accept beams generated by the APEX photo-cathode gun operating with MHz-range repetition rate and deliver them to an array of SASE and seeded FEL beamlines. We review the current baseline design and report results of beam dynamics studies.

  7. How Do Algebra I Course Repetition Rates Vary among English Learner Students by Length of Time to Reclassification as English Proficient? REL 2017-222

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaquet, Karina; Fong, Anthony B.

    2017-01-01

    Research has found high repetition rates for students in Algebra I, with one study finding a repetition rate of 44 percent for students in a large urban high school district. Less is known about how math performance and Algebra I course repetition rates vary among students with different levels of English proficiency. This report examines Algebra…

  8. Analyzing the effect of high repetition laser shock peening on dynamic corrosion rate of magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caralapatti, Vinodh Krishna; Narayanswamy, Sivakumar

    2017-08-01

    Magnesium as implant material is being investigated extensively due to its superior suitability. With corrosion rate being the major obstacle, this paper aims to determine the effects of high repetition laser shock peening (HRLSP) on the dynamic corrosion rate of magnesium. While there is lot of research on corrosion of magnesium, in this work, a specially designed test bench was used for characterization of dynamic corrosion to mimic the physiological conditions experienced by the implant inside human body. From the results, it can be inferred that corrosion rate of peened samples reduced by at least 6 times compared to unpeened sample and sample peened with 66% overlap 1 scans exhibited the least corrosion. The wettability of the samples was also determined as a measure to analyze the effects of HRLSP on biocompatibility. In addition, peening is seen to induce surface corrosion, which minimizes the risks of implant failure.

  9. The Validity of Submaximal Ratings of Perceived Exertion to Predict One Repetition Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Eston, Roger; Evans, Harrison James Llewelyn

    2009-01-01

    The One Repetition Maximum (1-RM) test is commonly used to assess strength. However, direct assessments of 1-RM are time consuming and unsafe for novice lifters. Whilst various equations exist to predict 1-RM, there is limited research on the validity of these equations. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of using sub-maximal ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) to predict 1-RM in young adults, using the Borg 6-20 RPE Scale. Twenty healthy participants (ten male (Mean ± SD, 20.8 ± 0.6 y, 75.7 ± 9.3 kg, 1.8 ± 0.07 m) and ten female (20.3 ± 0.7 y, 68.4 ± 10.0 kg, 1.68 ± 0.03 m)) completed two trials involving resistance exercises for both the upper and lower body. In the first trial the 1-RM for the bilateral biceps curl (BC) and the bilateral knee extension (KE) were determined for each participant. In the second trial, participants performed blinded repetitions which were equivalent to 20, 40 and 60 % of 1-RM for both exercises. The RPE was recorded immediately after two repetitions had been completed at each intensity. The order of intensity of the repetitions was randomly assigned with participants wearing blindfolds to exclude the possibility of pre-determined judgments about load and RPE. Individual RPE recorded at each intensity was subjected to linear regression analysis and the line of best fit was extrapolated to RPE 20 to predict 1-RM in both exercises. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the 1-RM predicted from RPE 20 and measured 1-RM for both exercises for the men and women. Measured and predicted values for men were 46.0 ± 4.6 and 45.2 ± 6. 1 kg for biceps curl, and 46.3 ± 3.8 and 43.0 ± 7.1 kg for knee extension, respectively. Measured and predicted values for women were 18.6 ± 5.7 and 19.3 ± 5.6 kg for biceps curl, and 25.5 ± 9.6 and 27.2 ± 12.6 kg for knee extension, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients between actual and predicted 1-RM for the BC and KE were 0.97 and 0

  10. Diagnostic for a high-repetition rate electron photo-gun and first measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippetto, D.; Doolittle, L.; Huang, G.; Norum, E.; Portmann, G.; Qian, H.; Sannibale, F.

    2015-05-01

    The APEX electron source at LBNL combines the high-repetition-rate with the high beam brightness typical of photoguns, delivering low emittance electron pulses at MHz frequency. Proving the high beam quality of the beam is an essential step for the success of the experiment, opening the doors of the high average power to brightness-hungry applications as X-Ray FELs, MHz ultrafast electron diffraction etc.. As first step, a complete characterization of the beam parameters is foreseen at the Gun beam energy of 750 keV. Diagnostics for low and high current measurements have been installed and tested, and measurements of cathode lifetime and thermal emittance in a RF environment with mA current performed. The recent installation of a double slit system, a deflecting cavity and a high precision spectrometer, allow the exploration of the full 6D phase space. Here we discuss the present layout of the machine and future upgrades, showing the latest results at low and high repetition rate, together with the tools and techniques used.

  11. Cellular response to high pulse repetition rate nanosecond pulses varies with fluorescent marker identity.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary A; Tolstykh, Gleb P; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-09-23

    Nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP's) are a well-studied phenomena in biophysics that cause substantial alterations to cellular membrane dynamics, internal biochemistry, and cytoskeletal structure, and induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. While several studies have attempted to measure the effects of multiple nanosecond pulses, the effect of pulse repetition rate (PRR) has received little attention, especially at frequencies greater than 100 Hz. In this study, uptake of Propidium Iodide, FM 1-43, and YO-PRO-1 fluorescent dyes in CHO-K1 cells was monitored across a wide range of PRRs (5 Hz-500 KHz) using a laser-scanning confocal microscope in order to better understand how high frequency repetition rates impact induced biophysical changes. We show that frequency trends depend on the identity of the dye under study, which could implicate transmembrane protein channels in the uptake response due to their chemical selectivity. Finally, YO-PRO-1 fluorescence was monitored in the presence of Gadolinium (Gd(3+)), Ruthenium Red, and in calcium-free solution to elucidate a mechanism for its unique frequency trend. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Pulsed infrared laser irradiation of biological tissue: effect of pulse duration and repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, E. Duco; Chundru, Ravi K.; Samanani, Salim A.; Tibbetts, Todd A.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    Pulsed laser ablation is a trade off between minimizing thermal damage (for relatively long pulses) and mechanical damage (for relatively short pulses) to tissue adjacent to the ablation crater. Often it is not known what the optimal laser parameters are for a specific application, since clinically used parameters have at least partially been dictated by physical limitations of the laser devices. We recently obtained a novel type of cryogenic continuous wave holmium:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) with a galvanometric drive outcouple mirror that acts as a Q-switch. This unique device provides pulse repetition rates from a few Hz up to kHz and the pulse length is variable from microsecond(s) to ms. The effect of pulse duration and repetition rate on the thermal response of chicken breast is documented using temperature measurements with a thermal camera. We varied the pulse width from 10 microsecond(s) to 5 ms and fond that these pulse durations can be considered impulses of thermalized optical energy. In this paper some theoretical considerations of the pulse length will be described that support the experimental data. It was also found that even at 1 pulse per second thermal superposition occurs, indicating a much longer thermal relaxation time than predicted by a simple time constant model.

  13. A high repetition rate laser-heavy water based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Jungmoo; He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons have numerous applications in diverse areas, such as medicine, security, and material science. For example, sources of MeV neutrons may be used for active interrogation for nuclear security applications. Recently, alternative ways to generate neutron flux have been studied. Among them, ultrashort laser pulse interactions with dense plasma have attracted significant attention as compact, pulse sources of neutrons. To generate neutrons using a laser through fusion reactions, thin solid density targets have been used in a pitcher-catcher arrangement, using deuterated plastic for example. However, the use of solid targets is limited for high-repetition rate operation due to the need to refresh the target for every laser shot. Here, we use a free flowing heavy water target with a high repetition rate (500 Hz) laser without a catcher. From the interaction between a 10 micron scale diameter heavy water stream with the Lambda-cubed laser system at the Univ. of Michigan (12mJ, 800nm, 35fs), deuterons collide with each other resulting in D-D fusion reactions generating 2.45 MeV neutrons. Under best conditions a time average of ~ 105 n/s of neutrons are generated.

  14. Ultrafast XUV Pulses at High Repetition Rate for Time Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xinlong; Muraca, Amanda R.; Kershis, Matthew D.; White, Michael G.; Allison, Thomas K.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast photoelectron studies of surface dynamics are often limited by low repetition rates. At Stony Brook we have built a cavity-enhanced high-harmonic generation XUV source that delivers ultrafast pulses to a surface science apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy. We begin with a Ytterbium fiber laser at a repetition rate of 78 MHz and up to 90 W of average power. After compression the pulses have μJ's of energy with < 180 fs pulse width. We then use an enhancement cavity with a finesse of a few hundred to build up to the peak intensity required for high harmonic generation. The enhancement cavity is a six mirror double folded bow-tie geometry with a focus of 15 μm at a Krypton gas jet, followed by a Sapphire crystal at Brewster's angle for the fundamental to allow outcoupling of the harmonics. A single harmonic is selected using a time-preserving monochromator to maintain the short pulses, and is sent to an ultra high vacuum chamber with sample preparation and diagnostic tools as well as an electron energy spectrometer. This allows us to study the electronic dynamics of semiconductor surfaces and their interfaces with adsorbed molecules which enable various charge transfer effects. Supported by AFOSR.

  15. Sustained blood oxygenation and volume response to repetition rate-modulated sound in human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Seifritz, Erich; Di Salle, Francesco; Esposito, Fabrizio; Bilecen, Deniz; Neuhoff, John G; Scheffler, Klaus

    2003-10-01

    The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal time course in the auditory cortex is characterized by two components, an initial transient peak and a subsequent sustained plateau with smaller amplitude. Because the T(2)(*) signal detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on at least two counteracting factors, blood oxygenation and volume, we examined whether the reduction in the sustained BOLD signal results from decreased levels of oxygenation or from increased levels of blood volume. We used conventional fMRI to quantify the BOLD signal and fMRI in combination with superparamagnetic contrast agent to quantify blood volume and employed repetition rate-modulated sounds in a silent background to manipulate the response amplitude in the auditory cortex. In the BOLD signal, the initial peak reached 3.3% with pulsed sound and 1.9% with continuous sound, whereas the sustained BOLD signal fell to 2.2% with pulsed sound and to 0.5% with continuous sound, respectively. The repetition rate-dependent reduction in the sustained BOLD amplitude was accompanied by concordant changes in sustained blood volume levels, which, compared to silence, increased by approximately 30% with pulsed and by approximately 10% with continuous sound. Thus, our data suggest that the reduced amplitude of the sustained BOLD signal reflects stimulus-dependent modulation of blood oxygenation rather than blood volume-related effects.

  16. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Höppner, H.; Hage, A.; Tanikawa, T.; ...

    2015-05-15

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to manymore » hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation.« less

  17. Fabrication of embedded microball lens in PMMA with high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chong; Hu, Anming; Li, Ruozhou; Bridges, Denzel; Chen, Tao

    2015-06-29

    Embedded microball lenses with superior optical properties function as convex microball lens (VMBL) and concave microball lens (CMBL) were fabricated inside a PMMA substrate with a high repetition rate femtosecond fiber laser. The VMBL was created by femtosecond laser-induced refractive index change, while the CMBL was fabricated due to the heat accumulation effect of the successive laser pulses irradiation at a high repetition rate. The processing window for both types of the lenses was studied and optimized, and the optical properties were also tested by imaging a remote object with an inverted microscope. In order to obtain the microball lenses with adjustable focal lengths and suppressed optical aberration, a shape control method was thus proposed and examined with experiments and ZEMAX® simulations. Applying the optimized fabrication conditions, two types of the embedded microball lenses arrays were fabricated and then tested with imaging experiments. This technology allows the direct fabrication of microlens inside transparent bulk polymer material which has great application potential in multi-function integrated microfluidic devices.

  18. High repetition rate collisional soft x-ray lasers based on grazing incidence pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, B M; Wang, Y; Larotonda, M A; Alessi, D; Berrill, M; Rocca, J J; Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2005-11-18

    We discuss the demonstration of gain-saturated high repetition rate table-top soft x-ray lasers producing microwatt average powers at wavelengths ranging from 13.9 to 33 nm. The results were obtained heating a pre-created plasma with a picosecond optical laser pulse impinging at grazing incidence onto a pre-created plasma. This pumping geometry increases the energy deposition efficiency of the pump beam into the gain region, making it possible to saturate soft x-ray lasers in this wavelength range with a short pulse pump energy of only 1 J at 800 nm wavelength. Results corresponding to 5 Hz repetition rate operation of gain-saturated 14.7 nm Ni-like Pd and 32.6 nm line Ne-like Ti lasers pumped by a table-top Ti:sapphire laser are reported. We also discuss results obtained using a 1 {omega} 1054 nm pre-pulse and 2{omega} 527 nm short pulse from a Nd:glass pump laser. This work demonstrates the feasibility of producing compact high average power soft x-ray lasers for applications.

  19. Characterization of MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this study, MHz pulse repetition rate femtosecond laser-irradiated gold-coated silicon surfaces under ambient condition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The radiation fluence used was 0.5 J/cm2 at a pulse repetition rate of 25 MHz with 1 ms interaction time. SEM analysis of the irradiated surfaces showed self-assembled intermingled weblike nanofibrous structure in and around the laser-irradiated spots. Further TEM investigation on this nanostructure revealed that the nanofibrous structure is formed due to aggregation of Au-Si/Si nanoparticles. The XRD peaks at 32.2°, 39.7°, and 62.5° were identified as (200), (211), and (321) reflections, respectively, corresponding to gold silicide. In addition, the observed chemical shift of Au 4f and Si 2p lines in XPS spectrum of the irradiated surface illustrated the presence of gold silicide at the irradiated surface. The generation of Si/Au-Si alloy fibrous nanoparticles aggregate is explained by the nucleation and subsequent condensation of vapor in the plasma plume during irradiation and expulsion of molten material due to high plasma pressure. PMID:21711595

  20. Acute effects of mechanical shocks on finger blood flow: influence of shock repetition rate and shock magnitude.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ying; Mauro, Marcella; Bovenzi, Massimo; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-08-01

    Finger blood flow is reduced by hand-transmitted vibration but there has been little study of the peripheral vascular response to repetitive mechanical shocks. This study investigated how reductions in finger blood flow depend on shock repetition rate and the peak and rms magnitude of acceleration. Subjects attended seven sessions: six with repetitive mechanical shocks and a control session with no shocks. Each session comprised five successive 5-min periods: (1) no force and no vibration, (2) force and no vibration, (3) force and vibration, (4) force and no vibration and (5) no force and no vibration. During the second-fourth periods, the palm of the right hand applied 2-N force to a vibrator. During the third period, a 125-Hz mechanical shock was applied with one of four repetition rates (1.3, 5.3, 21 or 83.3/s) and one of three acceleration magnitudes (2.5, 5 or 10 ms(-2) rms, unweighted). Finger blood flow was measured every 30 s in the middle and little fingers of the right (exposed) hand and the left (unexposed) hand. Different repetition rates (1.3-83.3 s(-1)) and different peak magnitudes (10-88 ms(-2) peak) but the same rms acceleration (10 ms(-2) rms) caused similar decreases in blood flow in fingers on exposed and unexposed hands. Shocks with a 83.3 s(-1) repetition rate, peak magnitude of 10 ms(-2) and rms acceleration of 10 ms(-2) provoked greater reduction in finger blood flow than shocks with the same peak magnitude but lower repetition rate (21 or 5.3 s(-1)) and lower rms acceleration (5 or 2.5 ms(-2)). For shocks similar to those based on 125-Hz oscillations with repetition rates between 1.3 and 83.3 s(-1), acute reductions in finger blood flow can be predicted from the rms acceleration.

  1. Performance of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry based estimates of primary productivity in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C.; Suggett, D. J.; Cherukuru, N.; Ralph, P. J.; Doblin, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Capturing the variability of primary productivity in highly dynamic coastal ecosystems remains a major challenge to marine scientists. To test the suitability of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf) for rapid assessment of primary productivity in estuarine and coastal locations, we conducted a series of paired analyses estimating 14C carbon fixation and primary productivity from electron transport rates with a Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer MkII, from waters on the Australian east coast. Samples were collected from two locations with contrasting optical properties and we compared the relative magnitude of photosynthetic traits, such as the maximum rate of photosynthesis (Pmax), light utilisation efficiency (α) and minimum saturating irradiance (EK) estimated using both methods. In the case of FRRf, we applied recent algorithm developments that enabled electron transport rates to be determined free from the need for assumed constants, as in most previous studies. Differences in the concentration and relative proportion of optically active substances at the two locations were evident in the contrasting attenuation of PAR (400-700 nm), blue (431 nm), green (531 nm) and red (669 nm) wavelengths. FRRF-derived estimates of photosynthetic parameters were positively correlated with independent estimates of 14C carbon fixation (Pmax: n = 19, R2 = 0.66; α: n = 21, R2 = 0.77; EK: n = 19, R2 = 0.45; all p < 0.05), however primary productivity was frequently underestimated by the FRRf method. Up to 81% of the variation in the relationship between FRRf and 14C estimates was explained by the presence of pico-cyanobacteria and chlorophyll-a biomass, and the proportion of photoprotective pigments, that appeared to be linked to turbidity. We discuss the potential importance of cyanobacteria in influencing the underestimations of FRRf productivity and steps to overcome this potential limitation.

  2. Coupling effects of the number of pulses, pulse repetition rate and fluence during laser PMMA ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Feng, Y.; Yi, X.-S.

    2000-10-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was ablated using a 248-nm long-pulsed KrF excimer laser operating at a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 2 and 10 Hz, and fluence varying from 0.4 to 2 J/cm 2. The coupling effects of multiple shots, PRR, and fluence are found and discussed on the etching depth data and topography of PMMA. An increase in either PRR, or fluence or the number of pulses can accelerate the etching efficiency in terms of ablation rate, as a result of strengthened thermal effects. Quality of the craters such as roughness, porosity and contamination is sensitively dependent on the specific laser operating conditions. Basically, increasing the PRR and the number of pulses gives rise to a crater with smoother and less porous bottom.

  3. Monitoring copper toxicity in natural phytoplankton assemblages: application of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Patricia; Beiras, Ricardo; Fernández, Emilio

    2010-09-01

    Four experiments were conducted with natural coastal phytoplankton assemblages exposed to [Cu] within the range 5-80 microg L(-1). The effect of Cu on several biological variables such as chlorophyll a concentration, particle size distribution, O2-production and fluorescence variables recorded by a Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer was monitored during 72 h. Variable fluorescence (Fv) was the most sensitive and rapid among all the variables tested. This work contributes to reinforce the use of fluorescence endpoints in ecotoxicological studies by proving their ecological relevance through relationships found between fluorescence and population-level responses as growth rate and gross O2 production. The lowest calculated EC10 was 2.65 microg L(-1), concentration commonly exceeded in polluted waters.

  4. Future of ePix detectors for high repetition rate FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Blaj, G. Caragiulo, P.; Carini, G.; Dragone, A.; Haller, G.; Hart, P.; Hasi, J.; Herbst, R.; Kenney, C.; Markovic, B.; Pines, J.; Segal, J.; Tamma, C.; Tomada, A.; Nishimura, K.

    2016-07-27

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) made the imaging of atoms and molecules in motion possible, opening new science opportunities with high brilliance, ultra-short x-ray laser pulses at up to 120 Hz. Some new or upgraded FEL facilities will operate at greatly increased pulse rates (kHz to MHz), presenting additional requirements on detection. We will present the ePix platform for x-ray detectors and the current status of the ePix detectors: ePix100 for low noise applications, ePix10k for high dynamic range applications, and ePixS for spectroscopic applications. Then we will introduce the plans to match the ePix detectors with the requirements of currently planned high repetition rate FELs (mainly readout speed and energy range).

  5. Sir2 regulates stability of repetitive domains differentially in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Gourlay, Sarah; Berman, Judith; Buscaino, Alessia

    2016-01-01

    DNA repeats, found at the ribosomal DNA locus, telomeres and subtelomeric regions, are unstable sites of eukaryotic genomes. A fine balance between genetic variability and genomic stability tunes plasticity of these chromosomal regions. This tuning mechanism is particularly important for organisms such as microbial pathogens that utilise genome plasticity as a strategy for adaptation. For the first time, we analyse mechanisms promoting genome stability at the rDNA locus and subtelomeric regions in the most common human fungal pathogen: Candida albicans. In this organism, the histone deacetylase Sir2, the master regulator of heterochromatin, has acquired novel functions in regulating genome stability. Contrary to any other systems analysed, C. albicans Sir2 is largely dispensable for repressing recombination at the rDNA locus. We demonstrate that recombination at subtelomeric regions is controlled by a novel DNA element, the TLO Recombination Element, TRE, and by Sir2. While the TRE element promotes high levels of recombination, Sir2 represses this recombination rate. Finally, we demonstrate that, in C. albicans, mechanisms regulating genome stability are plastic as different environmental stress conditions lead to general genome instability and mask the Sir2-mediated recombination control at subtelomeres. Our data highlight how mechanisms regulating genome stability are rewired in C. albicans. PMID:27369382

  6. Sir2 regulates stability of repetitive domains differentially in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Gourlay, Sarah; Berman, Judith; Buscaino, Alessia

    2016-11-02

    DNA repeats, found at the ribosomal DNA locus, telomeres and subtelomeric regions, are unstable sites of eukaryotic genomes. A fine balance between genetic variability and genomic stability tunes plasticity of these chromosomal regions. This tuning mechanism is particularly important for organisms such as microbial pathogens that utilise genome plasticity as a strategy for adaptation. For the first time, we analyse mechanisms promoting genome stability at the rDNA locus and subtelomeric regions in the most common human fungal pathogen: Candida albicans In this organism, the histone deacetylase Sir2, the master regulator of heterochromatin, has acquired novel functions in regulating genome stability. Contrary to any other systems analysed, C. albicans Sir2 is largely dispensable for repressing recombination at the rDNA locus. We demonstrate that recombination at subtelomeric regions is controlled by a novel DNA element, the TLO Recombination Element, TRE, and by Sir2. While the TRE element promotes high levels of recombination, Sir2 represses this recombination rate. Finally, we demonstrate that, in C. albicans, mechanisms regulating genome stability are plastic as different environmental stress conditions lead to general genome instability and mask the Sir2-mediated recombination control at subtelomeres. Our data highlight how mechanisms regulating genome stability are rewired in C. albicans. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. High-repetition-rate single-frequency electro-optic Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with feedback controlled prelase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Shutao; Shi, Fei; Huang, Jianhong; Deng, Jing; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Huagang; Wu, Hongchun; Weng, Wen; Ge, Yan; Li, Jinhui; Lin, Wenxiong

    2015-10-01

    A stable high-repetition-rate, high pulse energy and single-frequency electro-optic Q-switched laser has been developed and demonstrated in this paper. The prelase technique has been used in this single-frequency laser. And a PID feedback control electronics is applied to stabilize the prelase. Meanwhile, a two-plate resonant reflector take the place of traditional dielectric output coupler mirror to enhance the single-axial-mode selection. And a Cr:YAG saturable absorber is also inserted in the cavity to improve single-axial-mode selection. Output laser power over 2 W with 10 ns pulse duration has been obtained at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. And the single-axial-mode probability was 100% in one hour without any manual adjustments. The experimental results show that the prelase technique is reliable to attain single-frequency operation.

  8. Rate-dependent impairments in repetitive finger movements in patients with Parkinson's disease are not due to peripheral fatigue.

    PubMed

    Stegemöller, Elizabeth L; Allen, David P; Simuni, Tanya; MacKinnon, Colum D

    2010-09-20

    Performance of repetitive finger movements is an important clinical measure of disease severity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and is associated with a dramatic deterioration in performance at movement rates near 2 Hz and above. The mechanisms contributing to this rate-dependent movement impairment are poorly understood. Since clinical and experimental testing of these movements involve prolonged repetition of movement, a loss of force-generating capacity due to peripheral fatigue may contribute to performance deterioration. This study examined the contribution of peripheral fatigue to the performance of unconstrained index finger flexion movements by measuring maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) immediately before and after repetitive finger movements in patients with PD (both off- and on-medication) and matched control subjects. Movement performance was quantified using finger kinematics, maximum force production, and electromyography (EMG). The principal finding was that peak force and EMG activity during the MVC did not significantly change from the pre- to post-movement task in patients with PD despite the marked deterioration in movement performance of repetitive finger movements. These findings show that the rate-dependent deterioration of repetitive finger movements in PD cannot be explained by a loss of force-generating capacity due to peripheral fatigue, and further suggest that mechanisms contributing to impaired isometric force production in PD are different from those that mediate impaired performance of high-rate repetitive movements.

  9. Autonomic Nervous System Reactivity During Speech Repetition Tasks: Heart Rate Variability and Skin Conductance.

    PubMed

    Mackersie, Carol L; Calderon-Moultrie, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive and emotional challenges may elicit a physiological stress response that can include arousal of the sympathetic nervous system (fight or flight response) and withdrawal of the parasympathetic nervous system (responsible for recovery and rest). This article reviews studies that have used measures of electrodermal activity (skin conductance) and heart rate variability (HRV) to index sympathetic and parasympathetic activity during auditory tasks. In addition, the authors present results from a new study with normal-hearing listeners examining the effects of speaking rate on changes in skin conductance and high-frequency HRV (HF-HRV). Sentence repetition accuracy for normal and fast speaking rates was measured in noise using signal to noise ratios that were adjusted to approximate 80% accuracy (+3 dB fast rate; 0 dB normal rate) while monitoring skin conductance and HF-HRV activity. A significant increase in skin conductance level (reflecting sympathetic nervous system arousal) and a decrease in HF-HRV (reflecting parasympathetic nervous system withdrawal) were observed with an increase in speaking rate indicating sensitivity of both measures to increased task demand. Changes in psychophysiological reactivity with increased auditory task demand may reflect differences in listening effort, but other person-related factors such as motivation and stress may also play a role. Further research is needed to understand how psychophysiological activity during listening tasks is influenced by the acoustic characteristics of stimuli, task demands, and by the characteristics and emotional responses of the individual.

  10. Characteristics of a Saturated 18.9 nm Tabletop Laser Operating at 5 Hz Repetition Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Larotonda, M A; Luther, B M; Wang, Y; Liu, Y; Alessi, D; Berrill, M; Dummer, A; Brizuela, F; Menoni, C S; Marconi, M; Shlyaptsev, V N; Dunn, J; Rocca, J J

    2005-01-10

    We report the characteristics of a saturated high repetition rate Ni-like Mo laser at 18.9 nm. This table-top soft x-ray laser was pumped at 5 Hz repetition rate by 8 ps, 1 J optical laser pulses impinging at grazing incidence into a pre-created Mo plasma. The variation of the laser output intensity as a function of the grazing incidence angle of the main pump beam is reported. The maximum laser intensity was observed for an angle of 20 degrees, at which we measured a small signal gain of 65 cm{sup -1} and a gain-length product gxl > 15. Spatial coherence measurements resulting from a Young's double slit interference experiment show the equivalent incoherent source diameter is about 11 {micro}m. The peak spectral brightness is estimated to be of the order of 1 x 10{sup 24} photons s{sup -1} mm{sup -2} mrad{sup -2} within 0.01% spectral bandwidth. This type of practical, small scale, high repetition soft x-ray laser is of interest for many applications. This acts to reduce the sensitivity of burst properties to metallicity. Only the first anomalous burst in one model produces nuclei as heavy as A = 100. For the present choice of nuclear physics and accretion rates, other bursts and models make chiefly nuclei with A {approx} 64. The amount of carbon remaining after hydrogen-helium bursts is typically {approx}< 1% by mass, and decreases further as the ashes are periodically heated by subsequent bursts. For M = 3.5 x 10{sup -10} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} and solar metallicity, bursts are ignited in a hydrogen-free helium layer. At the base of this layer, up to 90% of the helium has already burned to carbon prior to the unstable ignition of the helium shell. These helium-ignited bursts have (a) briefer, brighter light curves with shorter tails; (b) very rapid rise times (< 0.1 s); and (c) ashes lighter than the iron group.

  11. Producing ultrashort Terahertz to UV photons at high repetition rates for research into materials

    SciTech Connect

    G. R. Neil; C. Behre; S. V. Benson; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H. F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M. J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; N. Nishimori; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; R. Walker; G. P. Williams; and S. Zhang

    2005-11-01

    A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on a Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power (see G. P. Williams, this conference). The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser vapor deposition, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of

  12. Design of laser beam expander in underwater high-repetition-rate range-gated imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2015-10-01

    Active underwater imaging systems, using an artificial light source for underwater target illumination, have preferable practical value in military and civil domain. Back-scattering of water impacts imaging system performance by reducing image contrast, and this is especially bad when the light source is close to the camera. Range-gated technique can effectively rejecting the back-scattering of water and improve the range of underwater target detection, while it can only collect image at certain distance for every laser impulse. High-repetition-rate green laser is a better light source in underwater range-gated imaging system. It has smaller pulse energy, while it can improve the imaging result. In order to illuminate the proper area underwater according to the different distance between the laser source and targets, there must be a magnifying-ratio variable beam expander to adjust the divergent angle of the laser. Challenges associated with magnifying-ratio computation and designing of beam expander are difficult to overcome due to the obvious refraction and forward-scattering of water. An efficiency computing method is presented to obtain the magnifying-ratio of beam expander. The illuminating area of laser beam can be computed according to the refraction index and beam spread function (BSF) which has already considered forward-scattering process. The magnifying-ratio range of beam expander should be 0.925~3.09 in order to obtain about φ1m illuminating area when the distance between laser and target is 10~40m. A magnifying-ratio variable beam expander is designed according to computation. Underwater experiments show that this beam expander plays an effective role on illuminating in underwater high-repetition-rate range-rated Imaging system.

  13. Repetition rate after non-fatal self-poisoning in Sri-Lanka: a one year prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, T N; Griffiths, K M; Cotton, S; Christensen, H

    2016-12-30

    Attempted or non-fatal self-poisoning is an important public health problem in Sri Lanka. Current evidence from Sri Lanka suggests that this phenomenon is more common among young people, and females, and is associated with a recent interpersonal conflict. International studies indicate that recent non-fatal selfharm is associated with an increased risk of repetition and completed suicide. Prospective follow-up data regarding rates of repetition of self-harm in Sri Lanka is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the rate of repetition, and rate of suicidal ideation, at one-year follow up among those who have survived an act of selfpoisoning. Participants who presented to the toxicology unit, Teaching Hospital Peradeniya over a 14-month period, for medical management of non-fatal self-poisoning, were contacted by telephone one-year following the initial presentation. A total of 949 persons were included in the study, of which 35.3% (n=335) were contactable at one-year follow-up. The rate of repetition of self-harm after one year was 2.5% and 2.7% of participants had suicidal ideation at one-year follow-up. The rate of repetition of self-harm in Sri Lanka is lower than the rate reported in the West (15%).

  14. Variable Thickness Liquid Crystal Films for High Repetition Rate Laser Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Cochran, Ginevra; Hanna, Randall; Andereck, C. David; Schumacher, Douglass

    2015-05-01

    The presentation of a clean target or target substrate at high repetition rates is of importance to a number of photoelectron spectroscopy and free electron laser applications, often in high vacuum environments. Additionally, high intensity laser facilities are approaching the 10 Hz shot rate at petawatt powers, but are currently unable to insert targets at these rates. We have developed liquid crystal films to address this need for high rep rate targets while preserving the planar geometry advantageous to many applications. The molecular ordering of liquid crystal is variable with temperature and can be manipulated to form a layered thin film. In this way temperature and volume control can be used to vary film thickness in vacuo and on-demand between 10 nm and over 10 μm. These techniques were previously applied to a single-shot ion acceleration experiment in, where target thickness critically determines the physics of the acceleration. Here we present an automatic film formation device that utilizes a linear sliding rail to form liquid crystal films within the aforementioned range at rates up to 0.1 Hz. The design ensures film formation location within 2 μm RMS, well within the Rayleigh range of even short f-number systems. Details of liquid crystal films and this target formation device will be shown as well as recent experimental data from the Scarlet laser facility at OSU. This work was supported by DARPA through a grant from AMRDEC.

  15. Repetition rate operation of an improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Yuwei; Zhong Huihuang; Li Zhiqiang; Shu Ting; Yang Hanwu; Zhou Heng; Yuan Chengwei; Zhou Weihong; Luo Ling

    2008-08-15

    In order to investigate the performances of repetition rate (rep-rate) operation of an improved magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO), a series of experiments are carried out on the improved MILO device, which is driven by a 40 {omega}, 50 ns rep-rate pulser, TORCH-01. Polymer velvet and graphite cathodes are tested, respectively, in the experiments, whose diameters and lengths are the same. The results of experimental comparison between them are presented in the paper. Both cathodes are tested at electric field strengths of about 300 kV/cm. The applied voltage has 60 ns duration with a rise time of 10 ns. This paper focuses on the performance of the voltage and current characteristics, the shot-to-shot reproducibility, the pressure evolution of the diode, and the lifetime of the cathodes, not upon the radiated microwave power. The experimental results show that the graphite cathode is superior to the velvet cathode in the lifetime and the shot-to-shot reproducibility during the rep-rate operation, and it is a promising cathode for the MILO device under the rep-rate conditions.

  16. High repetition rate, multi-MeV proton source from cryogenic hydrogen jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, M.; Curry, C. B.; Göde, S.; Brack, F.-E.; Kim, J. B.; MacDonald, M. J.; Metzkes, J.; Obst, L.; Rehwald, M.; Rödel, C.; Schlenvoigt, H.-P.; Schumaker, W.; Schramm, U.; Zeil, K.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2017-09-01

    We report on a high repetition rate proton source produced by high-intensity laser irradiation of a continuously flowing, cryogenic hydrogen jet. The proton energy spectra are recorded at 1 Hz for Draco laser powers of 6, 20, 40, and 100 TW. The source delivers ˜1013 protons/MeV/sr/min. We find that the average proton number over one minute, at energies sufficiently far from the cut-off energy, is robust to laser-target overlap and nearly constant. This work is therefore a first step towards pulsed laser-driven proton sources for time-resolved radiation damage studies and applications which require quasi-continuous doses at MeV energies.

  17. High repetition rate tunable femtosecond pulses and broadband amplification from fiber laser pumped parametric amplifier.

    PubMed

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, O; Bruchmann, C; Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Cormier, E; Tünnermann, A

    2006-05-29

    We report on the generation of high energy femtosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate from a fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Nonlinear bandwidth enhancement in fibers provides the intrinsically synchronized signal for the parametric amplifier. We demonstrate large tunability extending from 700 nm to 1500 nm of femtosecond pulses with pulse energies as high as 1.2 muJ when the OPA is seeded by a supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Broadband amplification over more than 85 nm is achieved at a fixed wavelength. Subsequent compression in a prism sequence resulted in 46 fs pulses. With an average power of 0.5 W these pulses have a peak-power above 10 MW. In particular, the average power and pulse energy scalability of both involved concepts, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier, will enable easy up-scaling to higher powers.

  18. High Repetition Rate Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser operating at 18.9 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Keenan, R; Dunn, J; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-05-11

    We have demonstrated a 10 Hz Ni-like Mo X-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ total pump energy by employing a novel pumping scheme. The grazing incidence scheme is described, where a picosecond pulse is incident at a grazing angle to a Mo plasma column produced by a slab target irradiated by a 200 ps laser pulse. This scheme uses refraction of the short pulse at a pre-determined electron density to increase absorption to pump a specific gain region. The high efficiency inherent to this scheme allows a reduction in the pump energy where 70 mJ long pulse energy and 80 mJ short pulse energy are sufficient to produce lasing at a 10 Hz repetition rate. Under these conditions and by optimizing the delay between the pulses, we achieve strong amplification and saturation for 4 mm long targets.

  19. A high repetition rate passively Q-switched microchip laser for controllable transverse laser modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; Bai, Sheng-Chuang; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Ueda, Ken-Ichi; Kaminskii, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    A Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 microchip laser for versatile controllable transverse laser modes has been demonstrated by adjusting the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal along the tilted pump beam direction. The pump beam diameter-dependent asymmetric saturated inversion population inside the Nd:YVO4 crystal governs the oscillation of various Laguerre-Gaussian, Ince-Gaussian and Hermite-Gaussian modes. Controllable transverse laser modes with repetition rates over 25 kHz and up to 183 kHz, depending on the position of the Nd:YVO4 crystal, have been achieved. The controllable transverse laser beams with a nanosecond pulse width and peak power over hundreds of watts have been obtained for potential applications in optical trapping and quantum computation.

  20. Pulse repetition rate in a self-contained strontium ion laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, Anatolii N; Vasil'eva, Anna V; Polunin, Yurii P; Yudin, Nikolai A; Chebotarev, Gennady D; Latush, Evgeny L; Fesenko, A A

    2008-11-30

    The frequency and energy parameters of self-contained strontium ion laser ({lambda} = 1.033 and 1.091 {mu}m) are studied upon excitation by an additional pulse before each excitation pulse. The kinetics of processes in the active medium of this laser is numerically simulated. It is shown that the pulse repetition rate of the self-contained strontium laser can achieve {approx}1 MHz. It is found that the laser pulse energy in the first pulse and the average output power and efficiency increase in a certain range of time delays between the additional and excitation pulses, which is caused by the significant prepulse concentration of strontium ions which had no time to recombine. The outlook for the application of pulse trains to excite self-contained IR transitions in strontium ions is shown. (lasers)

  1. Thyratron characteristics under high di/dt and high-repetition-rate operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.; Hill, J.; Kan, T.

    1981-05-11

    Power conditioning systems for high peak and average power, high repetition rate discharge excited lasers involve operation of modulator components in unconventional regimes. Reliable operation of switches and energy storage elements under high voltage and high di/dt conditions is a pacing item for laser development at the present time. To test and evaluate these components a Modulator Component Test Facility (MCTF) was constructed. The MCTF consists of a command charge system, energy storage capacitors, thyratron switch with inverse thyratron protection, and a resistive load. The modulator has initially been operated at voltages up to 60 kV at 600 Hz. Voltage, current, and calorimetric diagnostics are provided for major modulator components. Measurements of thyratron characteristics under high di/dt operation are presented. Commutation energy loss and di/dt have been measured as functions of the tube hydrogen pressure.

  2. High-power, high repetition-rate, green-pumped, picosecond LBO optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Florian; Teh, Peh Siong; Lin, Dejiao; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Price, Jonathan H V; Hanna, D C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2012-03-26

    We report on a picosecond, green-pumped, lithium triborate optical parametric oscillator with record-high output power. It was synchronously pumped by a frequency-doubled (530 nm), pulse-compressed (4.4 ps), high-repetition-rate (230 MHz), fiber-amplified gain-switched laser diode. For a pump power of 17 W, a maximum signal and idler power of 3.7 W and 1.8 W was obtained from the optical parametric oscillator. A signal pulse duration of ~3.2 ps was measured and wide tunability from 651 nm to 1040 nm for the signal and from 1081 nm to 2851 nm for the idler was achieved.

  3. Evaluating parallel architectures for two real-time applications with 100 kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Baldier, J.; Busson, Ph.; Charlot, C. ); Centro, S.; Pascoli, D ); Davis, E.E.; Ni, P. ); Denes, E.; Odor, G.; Vesztergombi ); Gheorghe, A.; Legrand, I. ); Klefenz, F.; Maenner, R.; Noffz, K.H.; Zoz, R. ); Lourens, W.; Taal, A. ); Malecki, P.; Sobala, A. ); Thielmann, A. ); Vermeulen, J. )

    1993-02-01

    In the context of Research and Development (R and D) activities for future hadron colliders, competitive implementations of real-time algorithms for feature extraction have been made on various forms of commercial pipelined and parallel architectures. The algorithms used for benchmarking serve for decision making and are of relative complexity; they are required to run with a repetition rate of 1,000 kHz in data sets of kilobyte size. Results are reported and discussed in detail. Among the commercially available architectures, pipelined image processing systems can compete with custom-designed architectures. General-purpose processors with systolic mesh connectivity can also be used. Massively parallel systems of the SIMD type (many processors executing the same program on different data) are less suitable in the presently marketed form.

  4. High power high repetition rate VCSEL array side-pumped pulsed blue laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Robert; Zhao, Pu; Chen, Tong; Xu, Bing; Watkins, Laurence; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2013-03-01

    High power, kW-class, 808 nm pump modules based on the vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) technology were developed for side-pumping of solid-state lasers. Two 1.2 kW VCSEL pump modules were implemented in a dual side-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 946 nm. The laser output was frequency doubled in a BBO crystal to produce pulsed blue light. With 125 μs pump pulses at a 300 Hz repetition rate 6.1 W QCW 946 nm laser power was produced. The laser power was limited by thermal lensing in the Nd:YAG rod.

  5. High repetition rate Q-switched radially polarized laser with a graphene-based output coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lifei; Jin, Chenjie; Qi, Mei; Chen, Xiaoming; Ren, Zhaoyu E-mail: rzy@nwu.edu.cn; Zheng, Xinliang E-mail: rzy@nwu.edu.cn; Bai, Jintao; Sun, Zhipei

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a Q-switched radially polarized all-solid-state laser by transferring a graphene film directly onto an output coupler. The laser generates Q-switched radially polarized beam (QRPB) with a pulse width of 192 ns and 2.7 W average output power. The corresponding single pulse energy is up to 16.2 μJ with a high repetition rate of 167 kHz. The M{sup 2} factor and the polarization purity are ∼2.1 and 96%, respectively. Our QRPB source is a simple and low-cost source for a variety of applications, such as industrial material processing, optical trapping, and microscopy.

  6. New results on spin determination of nanosatellite BLITS from High Repetition Rate SLR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, D.; Kirchner, G.; Lim, H.-C.; Koidl, F.

    2013-03-01

    The nanosatellite BLITS (Ball Lens In The Space) demonstrates a successful design of the new spherical lens type satellite for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). The spin parameters of the satellite were calculated from more than 1000 days of SLR data collected from 6 High Repetition Rate (HRR) systems: Beijing, Changchun, Graz, Herstmonceux, Potsdam, Shanghai.Analysis of the 892 passes (September 26, 2009-June 18, 2012) shows precession of the spin axis around orientation of the along track vector calculated at the launch epoch of the satellite RA = 9h16m39s, Dec = 43.1°. The spin period of BLITS remains stable with the mean value Tmean = 5.613 s, RMS = 11 ms. The incident angle between the spin axis and the symmetry axis of the body changes within 60° range.

  7. High-repetition-rate laser ignition of fuel-air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Paul S; Roy, Sukesh; Zhang, Zhili; Sawyer, Jordan; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Mance, Jason G; Gord, James R

    2016-04-01

    A laser-ignition (LI) method is presented that utilizes a high-repetition-rate (HRR) nanosecond laser to reduce minimal ignition energies of individual pulses by ∼10 times while maintaining comparable total energies. The most common LI employs a single nanosecond-laser pulse with energies on the order of tens of millijoules to ignite combustible gaseous mixtures. Because of the requirements of high energy per pulse, fiber coupling of traditional LI systems is difficult to implement in real-world systems with limited optical access. The HRR LI method demonstrated here has an order of magnitude lower per-pulse energy requirement than the traditional single-pulse LI technique, potentially allowing delivery through standard commercial optical fibers. Additionally, the HRR LI approach significantly increases the ignition probability of lean combustible mixtures in high-speed flows while maintaining low individual pulse energies.

  8. Design Studies for a High-Repetition-Rate FEL Facility at LBNL.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT, J.; BELKACEM, A.; BYRD, J. M.; FAWLEY, W.; KIRZ, J.; LIDIA, S.; MCCURDY, W.; PADMORE, H.; PENN, G.; POGORELOV, I.; QIANG, J.; ROBIN, D.; SANNIBALE, F.; SCHOENLEIN, R.; STAPLES, J.; STEIER, C.; VENTURINI, M.; WAN, W.; WILCOX, R.; ZHOLENTS, A.

    2007-10-04

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working to address the needs of the primary scientific Grand Challenges now being considered by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences: we are exploring scientific discovery opportunities, and new areas of science, to be unlocked with the use of advanced photon sources. A partnership of several divisions at LBNL is working to define the science and instruments needed in the future. To meet these needs, we propose a seeded, high-repetition-rate, free-electron laser (FEL) facility. Temporally and spatially coherent photon pulses, of controlled duration ranging from picosecond to sub-femtosecond, are within reach in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to soft X-ray regime, and LBNL is developing critical accelerator physics and technologies toward this goal. We envision a facility with an array of FELs, each independently configurable and tunable, providing a range of photon-beam properties with high average and peak flux and brightness.

  9. 200 ps FWHM and 100 MHz repetition rate ultrafast gated camera for optical medical functional imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhring, Wilfried; Poulet, Patrick; Hanselmann, Walter; Glazenborg, René; Zint, Virginie; Nouizi, Farouk; Dubois, Benoit; Hirschi, Werner

    2012-04-01

    The paper describes the realization of a complete optical imaging device to clinical applications like brain functional imaging by time-resolved, spectroscopic diffuse optical tomography. The entire instrument is assembled in a unique setup that includes a light source, an ultrafast time-gated intensified camera and all the electronic control units. The light source is composed of four near infrared laser diodes driven by a nanosecond electrical pulse generator working in a sequential mode at a repetition rate of 100 MHz. The resulting light pulses, at four wavelengths, are less than 80 ps FWHM. They are injected in a four-furcated optical fiber ended with a frontal light distributor to obtain a uniform illumination spot directed towards the head of the patient. Photons back-scattered by the subject are detected by the intensified CCD camera; there are resolved according to their time of flight inside the head. The very core of the intensified camera system is the image intensifier tube and its associated electrical pulse generator. The ultrafast generator produces 50 V pulses, at a repetition rate of 100 MHz and a width corresponding to the 200 ps requested gate. The photocathode and the Micro-Channel-Plate of the intensifier have been specially designed to enhance the electromagnetic wave propagation and reduce the power loss and heat that are prejudicial to the quality of the image. The whole instrumentation system is controlled by an FPGA based module. The timing of the light pulses and the photocathode gating is precisely adjustable with a step of 9 ps. All the acquisition parameters are configurable via software through an USB plug and the image data are transferred to a PC via an Ethernet link. The compactness of the device makes it a perfect device for bedside clinical applications.

  10. High repetition rate sealed CO2 TEA lasers using heterogeneous catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. T.; Shaw, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    The significant operational advantages offered by CO2 lasers, operating in the 10.6 micron region of the spectrum, over current solid state lasers, emitting in the near IR region, have prompted increased interest in the development of compact, reliable, rugged CO2 laser sources. Perhaps the most critical aspect associated with achieving a laser compatible with military use is the development of lasers which require no gas replenishment. Sealed, single shot, CO2 TEA lasers have been available for a number of years. Stark et al were first to demonstrate reliable sealed operation in single shot CO2 TEA lasers in 1975 using gas catalysis. GEC Avionics reported the compact, environmentally qualified, MKIII CO2 TEA laser with a pulse life of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses in 1980. A sealed laser lifetime of greater than 10 to the 6th power pulses is acceptable for single shot cases, such as direct detection rangefinders for tank laser sights. However, in many other applications, such as tracking of fast moving targets, it is essential that a repetition rate of typically 30Hz to 100Hz is employed. In such cases, a pulse lifetime of 10 to the 6th power pulses is no longer sufficient and a minimum pulse lifetime 10 to the 7th power pulses is essential to ensure a useful service life. In 1983 Stark el al described a sealed, 100Hz CO2 TEA laser, with a life of greater than 2.6 x 10 to the 6th power, which employed heterogeneous catalysis. Following this pioneering work, GEC Avionics has been engaged in the development of sealed high repetition rate lasers with a pulse lifetime of 20 million pulses.

  11. A study of high repetition rate pulse generation and all-optical add/drop multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongmin

    Ultra high-speed optical time-division-multiplexed (OTDM) transmission technologies are essential for the construction of ultra high-speed all-optical networks needed in the information era. In this Ph. D thesis dissertation, essential mechanisms associated with ultra high speed OTDM transmission systems, such as, high speed ultra short pulse generation, all optical demultiplexing and all optical add/drop multiplexing, have been studied. Both experimental demonstrations and numerical simulations have been performed. In order to realize high-speed optical TDM systems, high repetition rate, ultra short pulses are needed. A rational harmonic mode-locked ring fiber laser has been used to produce ultrashort pulses, the pulse jitter will be eliminated using a Phase-Locked-Loop (PLL), and the self-pulsation has been suppressed using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Sub pico-second pulses are very important for all optical sampling in the ultrahigh-speed OTDM transmission system. In this thesis, a two stage compression scheme utilizing the nonlinearity and dispersion of the optical fibers has been constructed and used to compress the gain switched DFB laser pulses. Also a nonlinear optical loop mirror has been constructed to suppress the wings associated with nonlinear compression. Pedestal free, transform-limited pulses with pulse widths in range of 0.2 to 0.4 ps have been generated. LiNbO3 modulators play a very important role in fiber optical communication systems. In this thesis, LiNbO3 modulators have been used to perform high repetition rate pulse generation, all optical demultiplexing and all optical add/drop for the TDM transmission system.

  12. Exploring the relationship between local and global dynamic trunk stabilities during repetitive lifting tasks.

    PubMed

    Mavor, Matthew P; Graham, Ryan B

    2015-11-05

    Lifting is a major risk factor for low back injury. Lifters experience small continual perturbations, because moving a load provides a disturbance to the lifter׳s equilibrium. The goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between local and global trunk/spine stabilities during external perturbations introduced at the foot-floor interface. 12 healthy males were recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed a freestyle lifting protocol on a perturbation treadmill, under three randomized load conditions: ~0, 4, and 8 kg. Participants performed a total of 40 lifts under each load condition; no perturbations occurred during the first 20 lifts. During the last 20 lift cycles (in blocks of 5) the participants were randomly perturbed. Local dynamic trunk stability was quantified using the local divergence exponent (λmax) of the first 20 lifts. In addition, the distance traveled from the unperturbed lifting pattern (B), the time to max distance (Tau), the relaxation distance (A), and the rate of return toward the normal lifting pattern (Beta) were analyzed following each external perturbation. An increase in lifted load lead to significantly increased local trunk stability (p=0.046). Higher load also lead to decreased distance (B) traveled away from the unperturbed trajectory (p=0.023). Results agree with previous research that increasing load lifted significantly improves local trunk/spine stability during lifting. Here we have shown that altered local stability also translates into a greater ability to resist external global perturbations, which may reduce injury risk and should be explored in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. NOx diesel exhaust treatment using a pulsed corona discharge: the pulse repetition rate effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankelevich, Y.; Wolf, M.; Baksht, R.; Pokryvailo, A.; Vinogradov, J.; Rivin, B.; Sher, E.

    2007-05-01

    The pulsed corona offers real promise for degradation of pollutants in gas and water streams. This paper presents a study of NOx removal from diesel exhaust. Special emphasis is laid on the investigation of the dependence of the NO removal rate and efficiency on the pulse repetition rate (PRR). A nanosecond solid state power supply (45 kV, 60 ns, up to 1 kHz) was used for driving the corona reactor. A Mitsubishi 10 kW 3-cylinder diesel-generator engine with a total volume of 1300 cm3 was used as a source of exhaust gas. At an NO removal rate of 35% the NO removal efficiency was 53 g kW-1h-1 for PRR = 500 Hz and the initial NO concentration was 375 ppm. A semi-empirical expression for the corona reactor removal efficiency related both to PRR and to the residence time is presented. The removal efficiency decreases with increasing PRR at constant flow rate or constant residence time. This expression demonstrates reasonable agreement between the calculation results and the experimental data.

  14. Assessing Sub-Antarctic Zone primary productivity from fast repetition rate fluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheah, Wee; McMinn, Andrew; Griffiths, F. Brian; Westwood, Karen J.; Wright, Simon W.; Molina, Ernesto; Webb, Jason P.; van den Enden, Rick

    2011-11-01

    In situ primary productivity (PP) in the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) and the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) south of Australia was estimated using fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF). FRRF-derived PP at Process station 3 (P3) southeast of Tasmania (46°S, 153°E) were higher than P1 in the southwest of Tasmania (46°S, 140°E) and P2 in the Polar Frontal Zone (54°S, 146°E). The FRRF-derived PP rates were well correlated with 14C-uptake rates from one-hour incubations ( r2=0.85, slope=1.23±0.05, p<0.01, n=85) but the relationship between both methods differed vertically and spatially. There was a linear relationship between FRRF-based PP and 14C-based PP under light-limited conditions in deeper waters. Under light-saturated conditions near the surface (0-45 m), the relationship was less clear. This was likely associated with the effects of physiological processes such as cyclic electron flow and the Mehler reaction, which are stimulated at high irradiance. Our results indicate that FRRF can be used to estimate photosynthesis rates in the SAZ and PFZ but to derive an accurate estimation of C-fixation requires a detailed understanding of the physiological properties of the cells and their response to oceanographic parameters under different environmental conditions.

  15. Nonthermal Biological Treatments Using Discharge Plasma Produced by Pulsed Power 2.Generation Technologies of High Repetition Rate Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakugawa, Takashi

    Recently, high repetition rate, long lifetime, and high reliability pulsed power generators have been developed using semiconductor switches. We have studied and developed an all solid-state pulsed power generator for industrial applications such as a high repetition rate pulsed gas laser and a pulsed ozonizer. Recently, semiconductor power device technology has improved the performance of fast high-power switching devices. However, the semiconductor switch is still not sufficient to drive the pulse laser and the pulse ozonizer directly. Therefore, the semiconductor switch can be used in practical application with the assistance of a magnetic switch and a gate driving technique. This all solid-state generator consists of a semiconductor switch and a magnetic switch. The progress of high repetition rate pulsed power generators is reviewed herein, with particular emphasis on pulse power conditioning by solid-state switching techniques.

  16. Generation of ultrahigh and tunable repetition rates in CW injection-seeded frequency-shifted feedback lasers.

    PubMed

    Guillet de Chatellus, H; Jacquin, O; Hugon, O; Glastre, W; Lacot, E; Marklof, J

    2013-07-01

    We show both theoretically and experimentally that frequency-shifted feedback (FSF) lasers seeded with a single frequency laser can generate Fourier transform-limited pulses with a repetition rate tunable and limited by the spectral bandwidth of the laser. We demonstrate experimentally in a FSF laser with a 150 GHz spectral bandwidth, the generation of 6 ps-duration pulses at repetition rates tunable over more than two orders of magnitude between 0.24 and 37 GHz, by steps of 80 MHz. A simple linear analytical model i.e. ignoring both dynamic and non-linear effects, is sufficient to account for the experimental results. This possibility opens new perspectives for various applications where lasers with ultra-high repetition rates are required, from THz generation to ultrafast data processing systems.

  17. Low-repetition-rate, high-energy, twin-pulse, passively mode locked Yb3+-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongfeng; Zhu, Xiaojun; Wang, Chinhua; Yu, Jianjun; Hu, Danfeng

    2011-02-01

    We report an all-normal-dispersion, low-repetition-rate, high-energy, twin-pulse, passively mode locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser. The mode-locking mechanism of the laser is based on nonlinear polarization evolution and strong pulse shaping with a cascade long-period fiber grating bandpass filtering in a highly chirped pulse. The laser generates a highly stable twin-pulse group with 248 ps and 296 ps duration simultaneously and maximum pulse energy of 26.8 nJ-each pulse at a 2.5445 MHz repetition rate. Energy quantization is observed, which demonstrates the nonparabolic nature of these pulses. The laser can also work in third-harmonic mode locking with 17.8 nJ energy (at a repetition rate of 7.65 MHz and pulse width of 780 ps).

  18. Pulsed laser deposition of SrRuO3 thin-films: The role of the pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraknepper, H.; Bäumer, C.; Gunkel, F.; Dittmann, R.; De Souza, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    SrRuO3 thin-films were deposited with different pulse repetition rates, fdep, epitaxially on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition. The measurement of several physical properties (e.g., composition by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the out-of-plane lattice parameter, the electric conductivity, and the Curie temperature) consistently reveals that an increase in laser repetition rate results in an increase in ruthenium deficiency in the films. By the same token, it is shown that when using low repetition rates, approaching a nearly stoichiometric cation ratio in SrRuO3 becomes feasible. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism to explain the widely observed Ru deficiency of SrRuO3 thin-films. Our findings demand these theoretical considerations to be based on kinetic rather than widely employed thermodynamic arguments.

  19. Graphene-deposited microfiber photonic device for ultrahigh-repetition rate pulse generation in a fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Qi, You-Li; Liu, Hao; Cui, Hu; Huang, Yu-Qi; Ning, Qiu-Yi; Liu, Meng; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Luo, Ai-Ping; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2015-07-13

    We report on the generation of a high-repetition-rate pulse in a fiber laser using a graphene-deposited microfiber photonic device (GMPD) and a Fabry-Perot filter. Taking advantage of the unique nonlinear optical properties of the GMPD, dissipative four-wave mixing effect (DFWM) could be induced at low pump power. Based on DFWM mode-locking mechanism, the fiber laser delivers a 100 GHz repetition rate pulse train. The results indicate that the small sized GMPD offers an alternative candidate of highly nonlinear optical component to achieve high-repetition rate pulses, and also opens up possibilities for the investigation of other abundant nonlinear effects or related fields of photonics.

  20. Comparison of the effects of the repetition rate between microsecond and nanosecond pulses: electropermeabilization-induced electro-desensitization?

    PubMed

    Silve, A; Guimerà Brunet, A; Al-Sakere, B; Ivorra, A; Mir, L M

    2014-07-01

    Applications of cell electropermeabilization are rapidly growing but basic concepts are still unclear. In particular, the impact of electric pulse repetition rate in the efficiency of permeabilization has not yet been understood. The impact of electric pulse repetition rate in the efficiency of permeabilization was analyzed in experiments performed on potato tissue and partially transposed on mice liver. On potato tissue, pulses with durations of 100μs or 10ns are applied. The intensity of permeabilization was quantified by means of bioimpedance changes and electric current measurements and a new index was defined. For the two pulse durations tested, very low repetition rates (below 0.1Hz) are much more efficient to achieve cell permeabilization in potato tissue. In mice liver, using 100μs pulses, the influence of the repetition rate is more complex. Indeed, repetition rates of 1Hz and 10Hz are more efficient than 100Hz or 1kHz, but not the repetition rate of 0.1Hz for which there is an impact of the living mice organism response. We propose that the effects reported here might be caused by an electroporation-induced cell membrane 'electro-desensitization' which requires seconds to dissipate due to membrane resealing. This study not only reinforces previous observations, but moreover it sustains a new concept of 'electro-desensitization' which is the first unifying mechanism enabling to explain all the results obtained until now both in vitro and in vivo, with long and short pulses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Repetitive behavior and restricted interests in young children with autism: comparisons with controls and stability over 2 years.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Lisa; Thurm, Audrey; Farmer, Cristan; Shumway, Stacy

    2013-12-01

    Restricted, repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activities [RRBs] are among the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Previous studies have indicated that RRBs differentiate ASD from other developmental disorders and from typical development. This study examined the presentation of RRBs as reported on the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised, a caregiver report, in children with ASD [separated into autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified groups] compared with children with nonspectrum developmental delays or typical development. We examined the role of age, cognitive functioning, sex and social communication impairment as they relate to RRBs. The stability of RRBs in children with autism was also examined over the course of 2 years. Results of the study confirmed that the amount and type of RRBs differs by diagnosis. Age, cognitive functioning, sex and social-communication impairment were not significant correlates. Among children with autism, RRBs remained stable over time.

  2. Relativistic electron beams driven by single-cycle laser pulses at kHz repetition rate (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Jérôme; Guénot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Böhle, Frederik; López-Martens, Rodrigo; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2017-05-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators are usually driven by 100-TW class laser systems with rather low repetition rates. However, recent years have seen the emergence of laser-plasma accelerators operating with kHz lasers and energies lower than 10 mJ. The high repetition-rate is particularly interesting for applications requiring high stability and high signal-to-noise ratio but lower energy electrons. For example, our group recently demonstrated that kHz laser-driven electron beams could be used to capture ultrafast structural dynamics in Silicon nano-membranes via electron diffraction with picosecond resolution. In these first experiments, electrons were injected in the density gradients located at the plasma exit, resulting in rather low energies in the 100 keV range. The electrons being nonrelativistic, the bunch duration quickly becomes picosecond long. Relativistic energies are required to mitigate space charge effects and maintain femtosecond bunches. In this paper, we will show very recent results where electrons are accelerated in laser-driven wakefields to relativistic energies, reaching up to 5 MeV at kHz repetition rate. The electron energy was increased by nearly two orders of magnitude by using single-cycle laser pulses of 3.5 fs, with only 2.5 mJ of energy. Using such short pulses of light allowed us to resonantly excite high amplitude and nonlinear plasma waves at high plasma density, ne=1.5-2×1020 cm-3, in a regime close to the blow-out regime. Electrons had a peaked distribution around 5 MeV, with a relative energy spread of 30 %. Charges in the 100's fC/shot and up to pC/shot where measured depending on plasma density. The electron beam was fairly collimated, 20 mrad divergence at Full Width Half Maximum. The results show remarkable stability of the beam parameters in terms of beam pointing and electron distribution. 3D PIC simulations reproduce the results very well and indicate that electrons are injected by the ionization of Nitrogen atoms, N5+ to N6

  3. Limits to the burster repetition rate as deduced from the 2nd catalog of the interplanetary network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J. L.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    The burster repetition rate is an important parameter in many gamma ray burst models. The localizations of the interplanetary network, which have a relatively small combined surface area, may be used to estimate the average repetition rate. The method consists of (1) estimating the number of random overlaps between error boxes expected in the catalog and comparing this number to that actually observed; (2) modeling the response of the detectors in the network, so that the probability of detecting a burst can be estimated; and (3) simulating the arrival of bursts at the network assuming that burster repetition is governed by a Poisson process. The application of this method for many different burster luminosity functions shows that (1) the lower limit to the burster repetition rate depends strongly upon the assumed luminosity function; (2) the best lower limit to the repetition period obtainable from the data of the network is about 100 months; and (3) that a luminosity function for all bursters similar to that of the 1979 Mar 5 burster is inconsistent with the data.

  4. A Real-Time Terahertz Time-Domain Polarization Analyzer with 80-MHz Repetition-Rate Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Yasumatsu, Naoya; Oguchi, Kenichi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tachizaki, Takehiro

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a real-time terahertz time-domain polarization analyzer by using 80-MHz repetition-rate femtosecond laser pulses. Our technique is based on the spinning electro-optic sensor method, which we recently proposed and demonstrated by using a regenerative amplifier laser system; here we improve the detection scheme in order to be able to use it with a femtosecond laser oscillator with laser pulses of a much higher repetition rate. This improvement brings great advantages for realizing broadband, compact and stable real-time terahertz time-domain polarization measurement systems for scientific and industrial applications. PMID:23478599

  5. Efficient high-peak-power and high-repetition-rate eye-safe laser using an intracavity KTP OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; He, G. Y.; Jiao, Z. X.; Wang, B.

    2015-03-01

    An efficient high-peak-power and high-repetition-rate intracavity KTP optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YVO4 laser is demonstrated. We achieved 1.5 W output power of 1.5 μm at 10 kHz repetition rate with the pulse duration of 6 ns. The maximum peak power of 25 kW and the maximum pulse energy of 150 μJ have been obtained. The maximum conversion efficiency of 9.5% is achieved with respect to a laser diode power of 10.5 W.

  6. High Repetition Rate Electron Beam RF-Acceleration and Sub-Millimeter Wave Generation via a Free Electron Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-14

    the American Physical Society 29. 1180 (1984). (b) D.B. McDermott, W.J. Nunan and N.C. Luhmann. Jr.. "A High Repetition Rate. Compact Free Electron...Laser." to be published in Proc. of 1985 IEEE IEDM Meeting. (c) D.B. McDermott. W.J. Nunan and N.C. Luhmann. Jr.. "A High Repetition Rate. Compact Free...Electron Laser". to be published in Proc. of Tenth S Int. Conf. on IR and mm-Waves. tApI (d) W.3. Nunan . D.B. McDermott and N.C. Luhmann. Jr.. "A

  7. Tunability of Injection Seeded High-Repetition Rate Ti:Sapphire Laser Far Off the Gain Peak

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, H.; Muramatsu, T.; Watanabe, K.; Iguchi, T.; Mattolat, Ch.; Wendt, K.; Kessler, Th.

    2009-03-17

    We have investigated a tunability of a high-repetition rate Ti:Sapphire laser seeded off the gain peak. By applying a birefringent filter, the 7 kHz injection seeded Ti:Sapphire laser system was operated with the average seeding efficiency of over 90% and the output power of over 1 W on the spectral range of 900-930 nm. We conclude that the birefringent filter suited for widely tunable operation of the injection seeded Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at high repetition rate.

  8. Compact and high repetition rate Kerr-lens mode-locked 532 nm Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuohan; Peng, Jiying; Yuan, Ruixia; Wang, Tongtong; Yao, Jianquan; Zheng, Yi

    2015-11-01

    A compact and feasible CW Kerr-lens-induced mode-locked 532 nm Nd:YVO4 laser system was experimentally demonstrated for the first time with theoretical analysis. Kerr-lens mode locking with intracavity second harmonic generation provides a promising method to generate a high-repetition-rate picosecond green laser. With an incident pump power of 6 W, the average output power of mode locking was 258 mW at a high repetition rate of 1.1 GHz.

  9. Study of filamentation with a high power high repetition rate ps laser at 1.03 µm.

    PubMed

    Houard, A; Jukna, V; Point, G; André, Y-B; Klingebiel, S; Schultze, M; Michel, K; Metzger, T; Mysyrowicz, A

    2016-04-04

    We study the propagation of intense, high repetition rate laser pulses of picosecond duration at 1.03 µm central wavelength through air. Evidence of filamentation is obtained from measurements of the beam profile as a function of distance, from photoemission imaging and from spatially resolved sonometric recordings. Good agreement is found with numerical simulations. Simulations reveal an important self shortening of the pulse duration, suggesting that laser pulses with few optical cycles could be obtained via double filamentation. An important lowering of the voltage required to induce guided electric discharges between charged electrodes is measured at high laser pulse repetition rate.

  10. Development of a Watt-level gamma-ray source based on high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, D.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Ruan, J.

    2017-07-01

    A high-brilliance (∼1022 photon s-1 mm-2 mrad-2/0.1%) gamma-ray source experiment is currently being planned at Fermilab (Eγ ≃ 1.1 MeV). The source implements a high-repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering by colliding electron bunches formed in a ∼300-MeV superconducting linac with a high-intensity laser pulse. This paper describes the design rationale along with some of technical challenges associated to producing high-repetition-rate collision. The expected performances of the gamma-ray source are also presented.

  11. Yb:YAG Innoslab amplifier: efficient high repetition rate subpicosecond pumping system for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Riedel, R; Willner, A; Mans, T; Schnitzler, C; Russbueldt, P; Dolkemeyer, J; Seise, E; Gottschall, T; Hädrich, S; Duesterer, S; Schlarb, H; Feldhaus, J; Limpert, J; Faatz, B; Tünnermann, A; Rossbach, J; Drescher, M; Tavella, F

    2011-07-01

    We report on a Yb:YAG Innoslab laser amplifier system for generation of subpicsecond high energy pump pulses for optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) at high repetition rates. Pulse energies of up to 20 mJ (at 12.5 kHz) and repetition rates of up to 100 kHz were attained with pulse durations of 830 fs and average power in excess of 200 W. We further investigate the possibility to use subpicosecond pulses to derive a stable continuum in a YAG crystal for OPCPA seeding.

  12. 615 fs pulses with 17 mJ energy generated by an Yb:thin-disk amplifier at 3 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jonathan; Heinrich, Alexander-Cornelius; Maier, Simon; Jungwirth, Julian; Brida, Daniele; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2016-01-15

    A combination of Er/Yb:fiber and Yb:thin-disk technology produces 615 fs pulses at 1030 nm with an average output power of 72 W. The regenerative amplifier allows variation of the repetition rate between 3 and 5 kHz with pulse energies from 13 to 17 mJ. A broadband and intense seed provided by the compact and versatile fiber front-end minimizes gain narrowing. The resulting sub-ps performance is ideal for nonlinear frequency conversion and pulse compression. Operating in the upper branch of a bifurcated pulse train, the system exhibits exceptional noise performance and stability.

  13. High repetition rate operation of a photoinitiated impulse-enhanced electrically excited CO2 laser discharge using a burst-mode technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikumb, S. K.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Seguin, V. A.; Presakarchuk, D.

    1988-10-01

    The incorporation of a gating signal into the trigger circuit of a photoinitiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited (PIE) laser system has permitted high-power, pulsed operation of a normally cw CO2 discharge. The 40 liter gain medium has been run at repetition rates approaching 1 kHz utilizing this approach. Plasma uniformity and stability have been significantly enhanced, such that a factor of two increase in electrical power deposition into the excited volume has been achieved. Results suggest that pulsed performance considerably in excess of that achievable under cw operating conditions can be realized through the adoption of this simple modification to the PIE ionization process.

  14. Improved repetition rate mixed isotope CO{sub 2} TEA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, D. B.

    2014-09-15

    A compact CO{sub 2} TEA laser has been developed for remote chemical detection that operates at a repetition rate of 250 Hz. It emits 700 mJ/pulse at 10.6 μm in a multimode beam with the {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} isotope. With mixed {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} plus {sup 13}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} isotopes it emits multiple lines in both isotope manifolds to improve detection of a broad range of chemicals. In particular, output pulse energies are 110 mJ/pulse at 9.77 μm, 250 mJ/pulse at 10 μm, and 550 mJ/pulse at 11.15 μm, useful for detection of the chemical agents Sarin, Tabun, and VX. Related work shows capability for long term sealed operation with a catalyst and an agile tuner at a wavelength shift rate of 200 Hz.

  15. High-repetition rate relativistic electron beam generation from intense laser solid interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batson, Thomas; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, Karl

    2015-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams have applications spanning materials science, medicine, and home- land security. Recent advances in short pulse laser technology have enabled the production of very high focused intensities at kHz rep rates. Consequently this has led to the generation of high ux sources of relativistic electrons- which is a necessary characteristic of these laser plasma sources for any potential application. In our experiments, through the generation of a plasma with the lambda cubed laser system at the University of Michigan (a 5 × 1018W=cm2, 500 Hz, Ti:Sapphire laser), we have measured electrons ejected from the surface of fused silica nd Cu targets having energies in excess of an MeV. The spectrum of these electrons was measured with respect to incident laser angle, prepulse timing, and focusing conditions. While taken at a high repetition rate, the pulse energy of the lambda cubed system was consistently on the order of 10 mJ. In order to predict scaling of the electron energy with laser pulse energy, simulations are underway which compare the spectrum generated with the lambda cubed system to the predicted spectrum generated on the petawatt scale HERCULES laser system at the University of Michigan.

  16. Evolution of high-repetition-rate induction accelerators through advancements in switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.; Caporaso, G. J.; Newton, M. A.; Yu, S. S.

    1992-08-01

    Future applications of linear and recirculating induction accelerators include microwave sources for plasma heating and linear colliders, industrial manufacturing processes, and heavy ion fusion. These applications require pulsed sources capable of sustained operation at high pulse-repetition rates. Powering these new accelerators places severe switching demands on the source, demands that often can not be met withcommercially-available technology. Consequently, several new accelerator switching schemes have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our transition from spark-gap technology to magnetic switching has merged the formerly independent roles of source and cell into a single system and reshaped our design methods to emphasize high efficiency. Treatment of the accelerator as a system has also enabled us to optimize new accelerator designs based on cost considerations. Presently, we are developing a technology for driving a heavy-ion induction recirculator at pulse rates exceeding 100 kHz. In this case, the switching method is all solid state and the source and cell have evolved into a unified device.

  17. GHz repetition rate tabletop X-band photoinjector for free-electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G.P.; Fochs, S.N.; Feng, H.X.C.

    1995-12-31

    A 1-1/2 cell {pi}-mode X-bend (8.568 GHz) photoinjector system capable of producing trains of up to one hundred, 1 nC, 1ps, 5 MeV, {epsilon}{sub n} < 2.5 {pi} mm-mrad photoelectron bunches, at a micropulse repetition rate of 1-10 Hz, is currently under development at LLNL, in the UC Davis DAS coherent millimeter-wave group. The system is powered by a 20 MW, 8.568 GHz SLAC development klystron. The system also uses a Cs{sub 2}Te (Cesium Telluride) photocathode which has a quantum efficiency > 5% in the UV (210 nm). The compact UV laser system is composed of a synchronously modelocked AlGaAs semiconductor laser oscillator which produces pulses with a duration of 250 fs and 100 pJ energy at 830 nm, at a repetion rate of 2.142 GHz with less 400 is jitter, a 5 GHz bandwidth Lithium Niobate Mach-Zender fiber modulator, an 8-pass, 10{sup 6} gain, TiAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Titanium:Sapphire) chirped pulse amplifier, and 2 BBO frequency doublers in series to quadruple the laser frequency into the UV (207 nm).

  18. Research of application of high-repetition-rate green laser in underwater imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie-fei; Luo, Tao; Sun, Li-ying; Ding, Chi-zhu; Xia, Min; Yang, Ke-cheng

    2013-09-01

    It is commonly known that absorption and scattering are the main causes of reducing performance of imaging system, especially imaging distance and resolution. Generally, various techniques are applied to decrease the effect of scattering, such as synchronous scanning and range-gated technique. Continuous-laser imaging technique meets requirements of imaging objects in the large field of view in real time, but imaging distance is less than 2 attenuation lengths in natural water. High-repetition-rate green laser, called quasi-continuous wave (QCW) green laser, is a better light source for underwater imaging. It has 1 kHz-100 kHz modulated rate, and its single pulse peak power is KW magnitude, which can be applied to range-gated imaging as Canadian LUCIE system. In addition, its polarization property is excellent for underwater polarization imaging. Therefore, it has enormous potential to underwater imaging. In order to realize its performance in underwater imaging system, we setup a separated underwater staring imaging system. For this system, a theoretic model is built by the lidar equation and optic transmission theory, and the system is evaluated by modulation transfer function (MTF). The effects of laser and receiver's parameters for the system are analyzed. Then the comparative experiments are conducted in turbid water in laboratory. The results indicate that high pulse energy improves imaging distance. Aperture and polarization could reduce the effect of scattering effectively in staring system. The result shows that this underwater system performs better by choosing suitable parameters of source and receiver.

  19. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  20. Effects of water spray and repetition rate on the temperature elevation during Er:YAG laser ablation of dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1996-01-01

    The Er:YAG is currently used as an alternative instrument for the removal of dental decay. Safe laser parameters have been found, but in order to increase the preparation speed also higher pulse energies or repetition rates are under consideration. To investigate systematically the temperature effect of these parameters and of water spray, slices of dentine were perforated with the laser radiation, exactly towards a thermocouple placed in a hole at the back side. During and after preparation temperature was monitored, and maximum temperature rise reached at the moment of perforation (Tm) was evaluated. For preparation without water irrigation Tm was in the range of 30 to 40 K, increasing slightly with pulse repetition rate (prr). For low prr (2 Hz) the same was observed for the radiant energy, however for high prr (10 Hz) the effect was inverse. When moistening the slices during preparation by a fine water spray, Tm decreases. The temperature reduction is very pronounced for low prr, leading to a temperature rise of only 2 K at 2 Hz (200 mJ). When prr is enhanced the spray becomes less effective, even when higher flow rates are chosen. With respect to temperature, combinations of low pulse energy and high repetition rate are least favorable. For safe preparations in dentine low pulse repetition rates are recommended.

  1. Heart Rate Variability and Skin Conductance During Repetitive TMS Course in Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Hensley, Marie K; Tasman, Allan; Sears, Lonnie; Casanova, Manuel F; Sokhadze, Estate M

    2016-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder marked by difficulty in social interactions and communication. ASD also often present symptoms of autonomic nervous system (ANS) functioning abnormalities. In individuals with autism the sympathetic branch of the ANS presents an over-activation on a background of the parasympathetic activity deficits, creating an autonomic imbalance, evidenced by a faster heart rate with little variation and increased tonic electrodermal activity. The objective of this study was to explore the effect of 12 sessions of 0.5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on autonomic activity in children with ASD. Electrocardiogram and skin conductance level (SCL) were recorded and analyzed during each session of rTMS. The measures of interest were time domain (i.e., R-R intervals, standard deviation of cardiac intervals, NN50-cardio-intervals >50 ms different from preceding interval) and frequency domain heart rate variability (HRV) indices [i.e., power of high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) components of HRV spectrum, LF/HF ratio]. Based on our prior pilot studies it was proposed that the course of 12 weekly inhibitory low-frequency rTMS bilaterally applied to the DLPFC will improve autonomic balance probably through improved frontal inhibition of the ANS activity, and will be manifested in an increased length of cardiointervals and their variability, and in higher frequency-domain HRV in a form of increased HF power, decreased LF power, resulting in decreased LF/HF ratio, and in decreased SCL. Our post-12 TMS results showed significant increases in cardiac intervals variability measures and decrease of tonic SCL indicative of increased cardiac vagal control and reduced sympathetic arousal. Behavioral evaluations showed decreased irritability, hyperactivity, stereotype behavior and compulsive behavior ratings that correlated with several autonomic variables.

  2. Direct electron acceleration in plasma waveguides for compact high-repetition-rate x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M.-W.; Jovanovic, I.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous applications in fundamental and applied research, security, and industry require robust, compact sources of x-rays, with a particular recent interest in monochromatic, spatially coherent, and ultrafast x-ray pulses in well-collimated beams. Such x-ray sources usually require production of high-quality electron beams from compact accelerators. Guiding a radially polarized laser pulse in a plasma waveguide has been proposed for realizing direct laser acceleration (DLA), where the electrons are accelerated by the axial electric field of a co-propagating laser pulse (Serafim et al 2000 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 28 1190). A moderate laser peak power is required for DLA when compared to laser wakefield acceleration, thus offering the prospect for high repetition rate operation. By using a density-modulated plasma waveguide for DLA, the acceleration distance can be extended with pulse guiding, while the density-modulation with proper axial structure can realize the quasi-phase matching between the laser pulses and electrons for a net gain accumulation (York et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 195001; York et al 2008 J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25 B137; Palastro et al 2008 Phys. Rev. E 77 036405). We describe the development and application of a test particle model and particle-in-cell model for DLA. Experimental setups designed for fabrication of optically tailored plasma waveguides via the ignitor-heater scheme, and for generation and characterization of radially polarized short pulses used to drive DLA, are presented.

  3. Design of high gradient, high repetition rate damped C -band rf structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alesini, David; Bellaveglia, Marco; Bini, Simone; Gallo, Alessandro; Lollo, Valerio; Pellegrino, Luigi; Piersanti, Luca; Cardelli, Fabio; Migliorati, Mauro; Mostacci, Andrea; Palumbo, Luigi; Tocci, Simone; Ficcadenti, Luca; Pettinacci, Valerio

    2017-03-01

    The gamma beam system of the European Extreme Light Infrastructure-Nuclear Physics project foresees the use of a multibunch train colliding with a high intensity recirculated laser pulse. The linac energy booster is composed of 12 traveling wave C -band structures, 1.8 m long with a field phase advance per cell of 2 π /3 and a repetition rate of 100 Hz. Because of the multibunch operation, the structures have been designed with a dipole higher order mode (HOM) damping system to avoid beam breakup (BBU). They are quasiconstant gradient structures with symmetric input couplers and a very effective damping of the HOMs in each cell based on silicon carbide (SiC) rf absorbers coupled to each cell through waveguides. An optimization of the electromagnetic and mechanical design has been done to simplify the fabrication and to reduce the cost of the structures. In the paper, after a review of the beam dynamics issues related to the BBU effects, we discuss the electromagnetic and thermomechanic design criteria of the structures. We also illustrate the criteria to compensate the beam loading and the rf measurements that show the effectiveness of the HOM damping.

  4. Choppers to optimise the repetition rate multiplication technique on a direct geometry neutron chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Vickery, A.; Deen, P. P.

    2014-11-15

    In recent years the use of repetition rate multiplication (RRM) on direct geometry neutron spectrometers has been established and is the common mode of operation on a growing number of instruments. However, the chopper configurations are not ideally optimised for RRM with a resultant 100 fold flux difference across a broad wavelength band. This paper presents chopper configurations that will produce a relative constant (RC) energy resolution and a relative variable (RV) energy resolution for optimised use of RRM. The RC configuration provides an almost uniform ΔE/E for all incident wavelengths and enables an efficient use of time as the entire dynamic range is probed with equivalent statistics, ideal for single shot measurements of transient phenomena. The RV energy configuration provides an almost uniform opening time at the sample for all incident wavelengths with three orders of magnitude in time resolution probed for a single European Spallation Source (ESS) period, which is ideal to probe complex relaxational behaviour. These two chopper configurations have been simulated for the Versatile Optimal Resolution direct geometry spectrometer, VOR, that will be built at ESS.

  5. Effect of biofilm on fluorescence measurements derived from fast repetition rate fluorometers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Jagadish S; Saino, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates, for the first time, the influence of biofilms on single and double optical window (SOW and DOW, respectively) fast repetition rate fluorometer (FRRF) measurements of microalgal photosystem-II initial fluorescence (F0), maximum fluorescence (Fm), variable fluorescence (Fv = Fm - F0), quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and functional absorption cross section (σPSII)]. Biofilms with chlorophyll > 0.1 μg cm(-2) and > 0.3 μgcm(-2) on SOW and DOW, respectively, produced a substantial increase in fluorescence. However, the relative magnitude of biofouling effects depended on sample chlorophyll concentrations, being more critical at concentrations < 1 mg m(-3). In DOW-FRRF, biofilms affected F0 (increased) and Fv/Fm (decreased) but not Fv and σPSII, whereas in SOW-FRRF, biofilms increased fluorescence and showed a variable effect on Fv/Fm and σPSII, because only biofilms on SOW attained actual Fm. As a result, the biofilm effect was substantial on SOW-FRRF measurements. On the other hand, the neutral-density filters (representing non-chlorophyll containing biofilms) with different transmission levels reduced the fluorescence signal. Correction procedures for the above photosystem-II parameters are proposed here.

  6. Bottle microresonator broadband and low-repetition-rate frequency comb generator.

    PubMed

    Dvoyrin, V; Sumetsky, M

    2016-12-01

    We propose a new type of broadband and low repetition rate (RR) frequency comb generator that has the shape of an elongated and nanoscale-shallow optical bottle microresonator created at the surface of an optical fiber. The free spectral range (FSR) of the broadband azimuthal eigenfrequency series of this resonator is the exact multiple of the FSR of the dense and narrowband axial series. The effective radius variation of the microresonator is close to a parabola with a nanoscale height that is greater or equal to λ/2πn0. (Here λ is the characteristic radiation wavelength and n0 is the refractive index of the microresonator material.) Overall, the microresonator possesses a broadband, small FSR and accurately equidistant spectrum convenient for the generation of a broadband and low RR optical frequency comb. It is shown that this comb can be generated by pumping with a cw laser, with a radiation frequency that matches a single axial eigenfrequency of the microresonator or, alternatively, by pumping with a mode-locked laser, which generates a narrowband low RR comb matching a series of equidistant axial eigenfrequencies situated between adjacent azimuthal eigenfrequencies.

  7. Resolving range ambiguities in high-repetition rate airborne lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Peter; Ullrich, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Correctly determining a measurement range in LIDAR instruments, based on time-of-flight measurements on laser pulses, requires the allocation of each received echo pulse to its causative emitted laser pulse. Without further precautions this definite allocation is only possible under specific conditions constraining the usability of range finders and laser scanners with very high measurement rates. Losing the unambiguity of ranges in high repetition systems is well known in RADAR and the term "multiple time around" (MTA) has been coined. However because of fundamental differences between scanning LIDAR and RADAR, with respect to MTA processing, new approaches for resolving range ambiguities in LIDAR are possible. In this paper we compare known and novel techniques for avoiding or even resolving range ambiguities without any further user interaction required. Such techniques may be based upon measures affecting hardware (e.g. spatial multiplexing or modulation of consecutive laser pulses), software (e.g. assumptions about the true measurement range based on a rough DTM) or both hard- and soft-ware in order to achieve a high probability of correctly resolved range ambiguities. Furthermore a comparison of different approaches is given, discussing their specific (dis-) advantages and their current status of implementation.

  8. A high repetition rate transverse beam profile diagnostic for laser-plasma proton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, Nicholas; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Sakaki, Hironao; Kando, Masaki; Nishitani, Keita

    2016-10-01

    The recently upgraded J-KAREN-P laser can provide PW peak power and intensities approaching 1022 Wcm-2 at 0.1 Hz. Scaling of sheath acceleration to such high intensities predicts generation of protons to near 100 MeV, but changes in electron heating mechanisms may affect the emitted proton beam properties, such as divergence and pointing. High repetition rate simultaneous measurement of the transverse proton distribution and energy spectrum are therefore key to understanding and optimising the source. Recently plastic scintillators have been used to measure online proton beam transverse profiles, removing the need for time consuming post-processing. We are therefore developing a scintillator based transverse proton beam profile diagnostic for use in ion acceleration experiments using the J-KAREN-P laser. Differential filtering provides a coarse energy spectrum measurement, and time-gating allows differentiation of protons from other radiation. We will discuss the design and implementation of the diagnostic, as well as proof-of-principle results from initial experiments on the J-KAREN-P system demonstrating the measurement of sheath accelerated proton beams up to 20 MeV.

  9. Compact high-repetition-rate source of coherent 100 eV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupeza, I.; Holzberger, S.; Eidam, T.; Carstens, H.; Esser, D.; Weitenberg, J.; Rußbüldt, P.; Rauschenberger, J.; Limpert, J.; Udem, Th.; Tünnermann, A.; Hänsch, T. W.; Apolonski, A.; Krausz, F.; Fill, E.

    2013-08-01

    Coherently enhancing laser pulses in a passive cavity provides ideal conditions for high-order harmonic generation in a gas, with repetition rates around 100 MHz (refs 1,2,3). Recently, extreme-ultraviolet radiation with photon energies of up to 30 eV was obtained, which is sufficiently bright for direct frequency-comb spectroscopy at 20 eV (ref. 4). Here, we identify a route to scaling these radiation sources to higher photon energies. We demonstrate that the ionization-limited attainable intracavity peak intensity increases with decreasing pulse duration. By enhancing nonlinearly compressed pulses of an Yb-based laser and coupling out the harmonics through a pierced cavity mirror, we generate spatially coherent 108 eV (11.45 nm) radiation at 78 MHz. Exploiting the full potential of the demonstrated techniques will afford high-photon-flux ultrashort-pulsed extreme-ultraviolet sources for a number of applications in science and technology, including photoelectron spectroscopy, coincidence spectroscopy with femtosecond to attosecond resolution and characterization of components and materials for nanolithography.

  10. A voltage-division-type low-jitter self-triggered repetition-rate switch.

    PubMed

    Su, Jian-Cang; Zeng, Bo; Gao, Peng-Cheng; Li, Rui; Wu, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Liang

    2016-10-01

    A voltage-division-type (V/N) low-jitter self-triggered multi-stage switch is put forward. It comprises of a triggered corona gap, several quasi-uniform-field gaps, and an inversion inductor. When the corona gap is in the stage of self-breakdown, the multi-stage gaps are triggered and the switch is closed via an over-voltage. This type of V/N switch has the advantage of compact structure since the auxiliary components like the gas-blowing system and the triggered system are eliminated from the whole system. It also has advantages such as low breakdown jitter and high energy efficiency. The dependence of the self-triggered voltage on the over-voltage factor and the switch operating voltage is deduced. A switch of this type is designed and fabricated and experiments to research its characteristics are conducted. The results show that this switch can operate on a voltage of 1 MV at 50 Hz and can generate 1000 successive pulses with a jitter as low as 3% and an energy efficiency as high as 90%. This V/N switch can work under a high repetition rate with a long lifetime.

  11. A voltage-division-type low-jitter self-triggered repetition-rate switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jian-cang; Zeng, Bo; Gao, Peng-cheng; Li, Rui; Wu, Xiao-long; Zhao, Liang

    2016-10-01

    A voltage-division-type (V/N) low-jitter self-triggered multi-stage switch is put forward. It comprises of a triggered corona gap, several quasi-uniform-field gaps, and an inversion inductor. When the corona gap is in the stage of self-breakdown, the multi-stage gaps are triggered and the switch is closed via an over-voltage. This type of V/N switch has the advantage of compact structure since the auxiliary components like the gas-blowing system and the triggered system are eliminated from the whole system. It also has advantages such as low breakdown jitter and high energy efficiency. The dependence of the self-triggered voltage on the over-voltage factor and the switch operating voltage is deduced. A switch of this type is designed and fabricated and experiments to research its characteristics are conducted. The results show that this switch can operate on a voltage of 1 MV at 50 Hz and can generate 1000 successive pulses with a jitter as low as 3% and an energy efficiency as high as 90%. This V/N switch can work under a high repetition rate with a long lifetime.

  12. A high repetition rate experimental setup for quantum non-linear optics with cold Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busche, Hannes; Ball, Simon W.; Huillery, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Using electromagnetically induced transparency and photon storage, the strong dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms and the resulting dipole blockade can be mapped onto light fields to realise optical non-linearities and interactions at the single photon level. We report on the realisation of an experimental apparatus designed to study interactions between single photons stored as Rydberg excitations in optically trapped microscopic ensembles of ultracold 87Rb atoms. A pair of in-vacuum high numerical aperture lenses focus excitation and trapping beams down to 1 μm, well below the Rydberg blockade. Thanks to efficient magneto-optical trap (MOT) loading from an atomic beam generated by a 2D MOT and the ability to recycle the microscopic ensembles more than 20000 times without significant atom loss, we achieve effective repetition rates exceeding 110 kHz to obtain good photon counting statistics on reasonable time scales. To demonstrate the functionality of the setup, we present evidence of strong photon interactions including saturation of photon storage and the retrieval of non-classical light. Using in-vacuum antennae operating at up to 40 GHz, we perform microwave spectroscopy on photons stored as Rydberg excitations and observe an interaction induced change in lineshape depending on the number of stored photons.

  13. Advances in generation of high-repetition-rate burst mode laser output.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Naibo; Webster, Matthew C; Lempert, Walter R

    2009-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the incorporation of variable pulse duration flashlamp power supplies into an Nd:YAG burst mode laser system results in very substantial increases in the realizable energy per pulse, the total pulse train length, and uniformity of the intensity envelope. As an example, trains of 20 pulses at burst frequencies of 50 and 20 kHz are demonstrated with individual pulse energy at 1064 nm of 220 and 400 mJ, respectively. Conversion efficiency to the second- (532 nm) and third- (355 nm) harmonic wavelengths of approximately 50% and 35-40%, respectively, is also achieved. Use of the third-harmonic output of the burst mode laser as a pump source for a simple, home built optical parametric oscillator (OPO) produces pulse trains of broadly wavelength tunable output. Sum-frequency mixing of OPO signal output at 622 nm with residual output from the 355 nm pump beam is shown to produce uniform bursts of tunable output at approximately 226 nm, with individual pulse energy of approximately 0.5 mJ. Time-correlated NO planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) image sequences are obtained in a Mach 3 wind tunnel at 500 kHz, representing, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of NO PLIF imaging at repetition rates exceeding tens of hertz.

  14. Design of a high repetition rate S-band photocathode gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jang-Hui; Cox, Matthew; Huang, Houcheng; Pande, Shivaji

    2011-08-01

    Photocathode RF guns have been developed in many laboratories for generating high quality electron beams for free-electron lasers based on linear accelerators. Such guns can generate electron beams with an exceptionally high peak current as well as a small transverse emittance. Their applications have been recently expanded for ultrafast electron diffraction, coherent terahertz radiation, and X-ray or γ-ray radiation by Compton scattering. In this paper, we design an S-band normal-conducting gun with capabilities of high quality beam generation and high repetition rate operation. The RF design and thermal analysis of the gun cavity and coupler are introduced. Optimal position of the gun focusing solenoid for low emittance beam generation is found by performing particle tracking simulations. Then, the gun system is designed to be able to afford the optimal solenoid position. The cooling-water channel surrounding the gun cavity and coupler is designed and analyzed numerically. The pressure in the gun is simulated with a vacuum model containing the detailed inner structure of the gun. An injector for a free-electron laser application is designed by using this gun and the beam dynamics simulation is shown. A cold test with a prototype gun for confirmation of the RF design is reported.

  15. Design of a VHF-band RF Photoinjector with Megahertz BeamRepetition Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.W.; Baptiste, K.M.; Corlett, J.N.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Lidia, S.M.; Qiang, J.; Sannibale, F.; Sonnad, K.G.; Virostek, S.P.; Wells, R.P.

    2007-06-01

    New generation accelerator-based X-ray light sources require high quality beams with high average brightness. Normal conducting L- and S-band photoinjectors are limited in repetition rate and D-C (photo)injectors are limited in field strength at the cathode. We propose a low frequency normal-conducting cavity, operating at 50 to 100MHz CW, to provide beam bunches of up to the cavity frequency. The photoinjector uses a re-entrant cavity structure, requiring less than 100 kW CW, with a peak wall power density less than 10 W/cm{sup 2}. The cavity will support a vacuum down to 10 picoTorr, with a load-lock mechanism for easy replacement of photocathodes. The photocathode can be embedded in a magnetic field to provide correlations useful for emittance exchange. Beam dynamics simulations indicate that normalized emittances smaller than 1 mm-mrad are possible with gap voltage of 750 kV, with fields up to 20 MV/m at the photocathode, for 1 nanocoulomb charge per bunch after acceleration and emittance compensation. Long-bunch operation (10's of picosecond) is made possible by the low cavity frequency, permitting low bunch current at the 750 kV gap voltage.

  16. A HIGH REPETITION RATE VUV-SOFT X-RAY FEL CONCEPT

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.; Byrd, J.; Fawley, W.M.; Gullans, M.; Li, D.; Lidia,S.M.; Padmore, H.; Penn, G.; Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Staples, J.W.; Steier, C.; Venturini, M.; Virostek, S.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A.

    2007-06-24

    We report on design studies for a seeded FEL light source that is responsive to the scientific needs of the future. The FEL process increases radiation flux by several orders of magnitude above existing incoherent sources, and offers the additional enhancements attainable by optical manipulations of the electron beam: control of the temporal duration and bandwidth of the coherent output, reduced gain length in the FEL, utilization of harmonics to attain shorter wavelengths, and precise synchronization of the x-ray pulse with seed laser systems. We describe an FEL facility concept based on a high repetition rate RF photocathode gun, that would allow simultaneous operation of multiple independent FEL's, each producing high average brightness, tunable over the VUV-soft x-ray range, and each with individual performance characteristics determined by the configuration of the FEL. SASE, enhanced-SASE (ESASE), seeded, harmonic generation, and other configurations making use of optical manipulations of the electron beam may be employed, providing a wide range of photon beam properties to meet varied user demands.

  17. Surface-Enhanced Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy at 1 MHz Repetition Rates.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Lauren E; Gruenke, Natalie L; McAnally, Michael O; Negru, Bogdan; Mayhew, Hannah E; Apkarian, Vartkess A; Schatz, George C; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-11-17

    Surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SE-FSRS) is an ultrafast Raman technique that combines the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman scattering with the temporal resolution of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS). Here, we present the first successful implementation of SE-FSRS using a 1 MHz amplified femtosecond laser system. We compare SE-FSRS and FSRS spectra measured at 1 MHz and 100 kHz using both equal pump average powers and equal pump energies to demonstrate that higher repetition rates allow spectra with higher signal-to-noise ratios to be obtained at lower pulse energies, a significant advance in the implementation of SE-FSRS. The ability to use lower pulse energies significantly mitigates sample damage that results from plasmonic enhancement of high-energy ultrafast pulses. As a result of the improvements to SE-FSRS developed in this Letter, we believe that SE-FSRS is now poised to become a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of plasmonic materials and adsorbates thereon.

  18. Efficient femtosecond pulse generation in an all-normal-dispersion Yb:fiber ring laser at 605 MHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongyu; Wang, Aimin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2012-03-01

    We report a 1030 nm-wavelength Yb:fiber laser that produces the shortest/direct output pulse duration (502 fs) among all-normal-dispersion fiber lasers at the highest repetition rate (605 MHz) among the passively fundamentally mode-locked fiber lasers. The laser also exhibits an optical efficiency of 70% at CW and 65% at mode-locking modes.

  19. Breaking the trade-off: rainforest bats maximize bandwidth and repetition rate of echolocation calls as they approach prey.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Daniela A; Kingston, Tigga; Hashim, Rosli; Siemers, Björn M

    2010-10-23

    Both mammals and birds experience a performance trade-off between producing vocalizations with high bandwidths and at high repetition rate. Echolocating bats drastically increase repetition rate from 2-20 calls s(-1) up to about 170 calls s(-1) prior to intercepting airborne prey in order to accurately track prey movement. In turn, bandwidth drops to about 10-30 kHz for the calls of this 'final buzz'. We have now discovered that Southeast Asian rainforest bats (in the vespertilionid subfamilies Kerivoulinae and Murininae) are able to maintain high call bandwidths at very high repetition rates throughout approach to prey. Five species of Kerivoula and Phoniscus produced call bandwidths of between 78 and 170 kHz at repetition rates of 140-200 calls s(-1) and two of Murina at 80 calls s(-1). The 'typical' and distinct drop in call frequency was present in none of the seven species. This stands in striking contrast to our present view of echolocation during approach to prey in insectivorous bats, which was established largely based on European and American members of the same bat family, the Vespertilionidae. Buzz calls of Kerivoula pellucida had mean bandwidths of 170 kHz and attained maximum starting frequencies of 250 kHz which makes them the most broadband and most highly pitched tonal animal vocalization known to date. We suggest that the extreme vocal performance of the Kerivoulinae and Murininae evolved as an adaptation to echolocating and tracking arthropods in the dense rainforest understorey.

  20. Optical short pulse generation at high repetition rate over 80 GHz from a monolithic passively modelocked DBR laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahira, S.; Matsui, Y.; Kunii, T.; Oshiba, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    1993-05-01

    Optical short pulses at high repetition rate over 80 GHz were successfully generated using a monolithically fabricated passively modelocked distributed Bragg reflector laser diode for the first time. By using linear fibre compression, a transform-limited optical pulse train with a duration of 2.7 ps was obtained. The pulse envelope closely matched a sech(sup 2) waveform.

  1. High-repetition-rate optical delay line using a micromirror array and galvanometer mirror for a terahertz system.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Hideaki; Tani, Masahiko; Hangyo, Masanori

    2009-07-01

    We developed a high-repetition-rate optical delay line based on a micromirror array and galvanometer mirror for terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The micromirror array is fabricated by using the x-ray lithographic technology. The measurement of terahertz time-domain waveforms with the new optical delay line is demonstrated successfully up to 25 Hz.

  2. Modeling transient gain dynamics in a cladding-pumped Yb-doped fiber ampliefier pulsed at low repetition rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, G. C.; Wright, M.

    2001-01-01

    Simulations of 1-50 kHz repetition rate, pulsed Yb-fiber amplifiers show peak powers to 10 kW with half-widths < 30 ns, consistent with commercial amplifier performance. This device is a potential source for deep space-communication.

  3. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy using novel high-repetition-rate passively Q-switched microchip and fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Kerr, Shaun; Utkin, Ilya; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka; Pan, Lei; Godwal, Yogesh; Zemp, Roger J; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is a novel imaging technology for visualizing optically absorbing superficial structures in vivo with lateral spatial resolution determined by optical focusing rather than acoustic detection. Since scanning of the illumination spot is required, OR-PAM imaging speed is limited by both scanning speed and laser pulse repetition rate. Unfortunately, lasers with high repetition rates and suitable pulse durations and energies are not widely available and can be cost-prohibitive and bulky. We are developing compact, passively Q-switched fiber and microchip laser sources for this application. The properties of these lasers are discussed, and pulse repetition rates up to 100 kHz are demonstrated. OR-PAM imaging was conducted using a previously developed photoacoustic probe, which enabled flexible scanning of the focused output of the lasers. Phantom studies demonstrate the ability to image with lateral spatial resolution of 7±2 μm with the microchip laser system and 15±5 μm with the fiber laser system. We believe that the high pulse repetition rates and the potentially compact and fiber-coupled nature of these lasers will prove important for clinical imaging applications where real-time imaging performance is essential.

  4. Pulse repetition rate scaling from 5 to 100 GHz with a high-power semiconductor disk laser.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Mario; Zaugg, Christian A; Link, Sandro M; Golling, Matthias; Tilma, Bauke W; Keller, Ursula

    2014-03-10

    The high-power semiconductor laser studied here is a modelocked integrated external-cavity surface emitting laser (MIXSEL), which combines the gain of vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) with the saturable absorber of a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) in a single semiconductor layer stack. The MIXSEL concept allows for stable and self-starting fundamental passive modelocking in a simple straight cavity and the average power scaling is based on the semiconductor disk laser concept. Previously record-high average output power from an optically pumped MIXSEL was demonstrated, however the long pulse duration of 17 ps prevented higher pulse repetition rates and many interesting applications such as supercontinuum generation and broadband frequency comb generation. With a novel MIXSEL structure, the first femtosecond operation was then demonstrated just recently. Here we show that such a MIXSEL can also support pulse repetition rate scaling from ≈5 GHz to >100 GHz with excellent beam quality and high average output power, by mechanically changing the cavity length of the linear straight cavity and the output coupler. Up to a pulse repetition rate of 15 GHz we obtained average output power >1 W and pulse durations <4 ps. Furthermore we have been able to demonstrate the highest pulse repetition rate from any fundamentally modelocked semiconductor disk laser with 101.2 GHz at an average output power of 127 mW and a pulse duration of 570 fs.

  5. MW ps pulse generation at sub-MHz repetition rates from a phase conjugate Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier.

    PubMed

    Omatsu, Takashige; Nawata, Kouji; Okida, Masahito; Furuki, Kenji

    2007-07-23

    We demonstrated high-repetition-rate (sub-MHz) MW pulse generation by combining a picosecond phase conjugate laser system based on a diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier with a pulse selector based on a RbTiOPO(4) electro-optical modulator. Peak output powers in the range of 2.8-6.8 MW at a pulse repetition frequency range of 0.33-1.0 MHz were achieved at an extraction efficiency of 34-35%.

  6. High Repetition Rate Electron Beam RF-Acceleration and Sub-Millimeter Wave Generation Via a Free Electron Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-14

    Period, Including Journal References: (a) D.B. McDermott, W.J. Nunan and N.C. Luhmann, Jr., "A High Duty Cycle, Compact 94 GHz Free Electron Laser...34 submitted to Journal IR and am-Waves. (b) W.J. Nunan , D.B. McDermott and N.C. Luhmann, Jr., "A High Repetition *Rate, Compact 94 GHz Free Electron Laser...34 Bulletin of the American Phy- * ) sical Society 30, 1543 (1985). L J (c) D.B. McDermott, W.J. Nunan and N.C. Luhmann, Jr., "A High RepetitionLL

  7. High-power, high-repetition-rate performance characteristics of β-BaB₂O₄ for single-pass picosecond ultraviolet generation at 266 nm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Chaitanya; Casals, J Canals; Wei, Junxiong; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2015-10-19

    We report a systematic study on the performance characteristics of a high-power, high-repetition-rate, picosecond ultraviolet (UV) source at 266 nm based on β-BaB2O4 (BBO). The source, based on single-pass fourth harmonic generation (FHG) of a compact Yb-fiber laser in a two-crystal spatial walk-off compensation scheme, generates up to 2.9 W of average power at 266 nm at a pulse repetition rate of ~80 MHz with a single-pass FHG efficiency of 35% from the green to UV. Detrimental issues such as thermal effects have been studied and confirmed by performing relevant measurements. Angular and temperature acceptance bandwidths in BBO for FHG to 266 nm are experimentally determined, indicating that the effective interaction length is limited by spatial walk-off and thermal gradients under high-power operation. The origin of dynamic color center formation due to two-photon absorption in BBO is investigated by measurements of intensity-dependent transmission at 266 nm. Using a suitable theoretical model, two-photon absorption coefficients as well as the color center densities have been estimated at different temperatures. The measurements show that the two-photon absorption coefficient in BBO at 266 nm is ~3.5 times lower at 200°C compared to that at room temperature. The long-term power stability as well as beam pointing stability is analyzed at different output power levels and focusing conditions. Using cylindrical optics, we have circularized the generated elliptic UV beam to a circularity of >90%. To our knowledge, this is the first time such high average powers and temperature-dependent two-photon absorption measurements at 266 nm are reported at repetition rates as high as ~80 MHz.

  8. High-repetition-rate pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering on the MST reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. C.; Morton, L. A.; Parke, E.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2013-11-01

    A new, high-repetition-rate pulse-burst laser system for the MST Thomson scattering diagnostic has operated with 2 J pulses at repetition rates up to 75 kHz within a burst. The 1064 nm laser currently employs a q-switched, diode pumped Nd:YVO4 master oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifier stages, and a Nd:glass amplifier, with plans for an additional Nd:glass amplifier. The laser can maintain 1.5-2 J pulses in two operating modes: either at a uniform repetition rate of 5-10 kHz (sustained for 5-8 ms), or reach rates of up to 75 kHz in pulse-burst operation (for 10 bursts of 15 pulses each), limited by flashlamp explosion energy and wall loading. The full system, including an additional Nd:glass amplifier, is designed to produce bursts of 2 J pulses at a repetition rate of at least 250 kHz. Custom programmable square-pulse power supplies drive the amplifier flashlamps, providing fine control of pulse timing, duration, and repetition, and allow for pulse-burst operation. The new laser system integrates with the same collection optics and detectors as used by the previous MST Thomson laser: 21 spatial points across the MST minor radius, filter polychromators with 6 to 8 channels (10 eV-5 keV range), avalanche photodiode detectors, and 1 GSample/s/channel digitization. Use of the previous pulse-burst laser continues concurrently with new laser development. Additional notes on optimization of flashlamp simmering will also be covered, showing that an increase in simmer currents can improve pulse-to-pulse energy consistency on both the new and older lasers.

  9. Micro-processing of polymers and biological materials using high repetition rate femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li

    High repetition rate femtosecond laser micro-processing has been applied to ophthalmological hydrogel polymers and ocular tissues to create novel refractive and diffractive structures. Through the optimization of laser irradiation conditions and material properties, this technology has become feasible for future industrial applications and clinical practices. A femtosecond laser micro-processing workstation has been designed and developed. Different experimental parameters of the workstation such as laser pulse duration, focusing lens, and translational stages have been described and discussed. Diffractive gratings and three-dimensional waveguides have been fabricated and characterized in hydrogel polymers, and refractive index modifications as large as + 0.06 have been observed within the laser-irradiated region. Raman spectroscopic studies have shown that our femtosecond laser micro-processing induces significant thermal accumulation, resulting in a densification of the polymer network and increasing the localized refractive index of polymers within the laser irradiated region. Different kinds of dye chromophores have been doped in hydrogel polymers to enhance the two-photon absorption during femtosecond laser micro-processing. As the result, laser scanning speed can be greatly increased while the large refractive index modifications remain. Femtosecond laser wavelength and pulse energy as well as water and dye concentration of the hydrogels are optimized. Lightly fixed ocular tissues such as corneas and lenses have been micro-processed by focused femtosecond laser pulses, and refractive index modifications without any tissue-breakdown are observed within the stromal layer of the corneas and the cortex of the lenses. Living corneas are doped with Sodium Fluorescein to increase the two-photon absorption during the laser micro-processing, and laser scanning speed can be greatly increased while inducing large refractive index modifications. No evidence of cell death

  10. Design study of a low-emittance high-repetition rate thermionic rf gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opanasenko, A.; Mytrochenko, V.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Goryashko, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    We propose a novel gridless continuous-wave radiofrequency (rf) thermionic gun capable of generating nC ns electron bunches with a rms normalized slice emittance close to the thermal level of 0.3 mm mrad. In order to gate the electron emission, an externally heated thermionic cathode is installed into a stripline-loop conductor. Two high-voltage pulses propagating towards each other in the stripline-loop overlap in the cathode region and create a quasielectrostatic field gating the electron emission. The repetition rate of pulses is variable and can reach up to one MHz with modern solid-state pulsers. The stripline attached to a rf gun cavity wall has with the wall a common aperture that allows the electrons to be injected into the rf cavity for further acceleration. Thanks to this innovative gridless design, simulations suggest that the bunch emittance is approximately at the thermal level after the bunch injection into the cavity provided that the geometry of the cathode and aperture are properly designed. Specifically, a concave cathode is adopted to imprint an Ƨ-shaped distribution onto the beam transverse phase-space to compensate for an S-shaped beam distribution created by the spherical aberration of the aperture-cavity region. In order to compensate for the energy spread caused by rf fields of the rf gun cavity, a 3rd harmonic cavity is used. A detailed study of the electrodynamics of the stripline and rf gun cavity as well as the beam optics and bunch dynamics are presented.

  11. Oral-diadochokinetic rates for Hebrew-speaking healthy ageing population: non-word versus real-word repetition.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Boaz M; Icht, Michal

    2017-05-01

    Oral-diadochokinesis (oral-DDK) tasks are extensively used in the evaluation of motor speech abilities. Currently, validated normative data for older adults (aged 65 years and older) are missing in Hebrew. The effect of task stimuli (non-word versus real-word repetition) is also non-clear in the population of older adult Hebrew speakers. (1) To establish a norm for oral-DDK rate for older adult (aged 65 years and older) Hebrew speakers, and to investigate the possible effect of age and gender on performance rate; and (2) to examine the effects of stimuli (non-word versus real word) on oral-DDK rates. In experiment 1, 88 healthy older Hebrew speakers (60-95 years, 48 females and 40 males) were audio-recorded while performing an oral-DDK task (repetition of /pataka/), and repetition rates (syllables/s) were coded. In experiment 2, the effect of real-word repetition was evaluated. Sixty-eight older Hebrew speakers (aged 66-95 years, 43 females and 25 males) were asked to repeat 'pataka' (non-word) and 'bodeket' (Hebrew real word). Experiment 1: Oral-DDK performance for older adult Hebrew speakers was 5.07 syllables/s (SD = 1.16 syllables/s), across age groups and gender. Comparison of this data with Hebrew norms for younger adults (and equivalent data in English) shows the following gradient of oral-DDK rates: ages 15-45 > 65-74 > 75-86 years. Gender was not a significant factor in our data. Experiment 2: Repetition of real words was faster than that of non-words, by 13.5%. The paper provides normative values for oral-DDK rates for older Hebrew speakers. The data show the large impact of ageing on oro-motor functions. The analysis further indicates that speech and language pathologists should consider separate norms for clients of 65-74 years and those of 75-86 years. Hebrew rates were found to be different from English norms for the oldest group, shedding light on the impact of language on these norms. Finally, the data support using a dual-protocol (real- and non

  12. Upper arm elevation and repetitive shoulder movements: a general population job exposure matrix based on expert ratings and technical measurements.

    PubMed

    Dalbøge, Annett; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-08-01

    We recently constructed a general population job exposure matrix (JEM), The Shoulder JEM, based on expert ratings. The overall aim of this study was to convert expert-rated job exposures for upper arm elevation and repetitive shoulder movements to measurement scales. The Shoulder JEM covers all Danish occupational titles, divided into 172 job groups. For 36 of these job groups, we obtained technical measurements (inclinometry) of upper arm elevation and repetitive shoulder movements. To validate the expert-rated job exposures against the measured job exposures, we used Spearman rank correlations and the explained variance[Formula: see text] according to linear regression analyses (36 job groups). We used the linear regression equations to convert the expert-rated job exposures for all 172 job groups into predicted measured job exposures. Bland-Altman analyses were used to assess the agreement between the predicted and measured job exposures. The Spearman rank correlations were 0.63 for upper arm elevation and 0.64 for repetitive shoulder movements. The expert-rated job exposures explained 64% and 41% of the variance of the measured job exposures, respectively. The corresponding calibration equations were y=0.5%time+0.16×expert rating and y=27°/s+0.47×expert rating. The mean differences between predicted and measured job exposures were zero due to calibration; the 95% limits of agreement were ±2.9% time for upper arm elevation >90° and ±33°/s for repetitive shoulder movements. The updated Shoulder JEM can be used to present exposure-response relationships on measurement scales. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Time-resolved gas thermometry by laser-induced grating spectroscopy with a high-repetition rate laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Felix J.; Crua, Cyril; Davy, Martin; Ewart, Paul

    2017-07-01

    Thermometry using laser-induced grating spectroscopy (LIGS) is reported using a high-repetition rate laser system, extending the technique to allow time-resolved measurements of gas dynamics. LIGS signals were generated using the second harmonic output at 532 nm of a commercially available high-repetition rate Nd:YAG laser with nitrogen dioxide as molecular seed. Measurements at rates up to 10 kHz were demonstrated under static cell conditions. Transient temperature changes of the same gas contained in a cell subjected to rapid compression by injection of gas were recorded at 1 kHz to derive the temperature evolution of the compressed gas showing temperature changes of 50 K on a time-scale of 0.1 s with a measurement precision of 1.4%. The data showed good agreement with an analytical thermodynamic model of the compression process.

  14. The effect of unstable loading versus unstable support conditions on spine rotational stiffness and spine stability during repetitive lifting.

    PubMed

    Beaudette, Shawn M; Graham, Ryan B; Brown, Stephen H M

    2014-01-22

    Lumbar spine stability has been extensively researched due to its necessity to facilitate load-bearing human movements and prevent structural injury. The nature of certain human movement tasks are such that they are not equivalent in levels of task-stability (i.e. the stability of the external environment). The goal of the current study was to compare the effects of dynamic lift instability, administered through both the load and base of support, on the dynamic stability (maximal Lyapunov exponents) and stiffness (EMG-driven model) of the lumbar spine during repeated sagittal lifts. Fifteen healthy males performed 23 repetitive lifts with varying conditions of instability at the loading and support interfaces. An increase in spine rotational stiffness occurred during unstable support scenarios resulting in an observed increase in mean and maximum Euclidean norm spine rotational stiffness (p=0.0011). Significant stiffening effects were observed in unstable support conditions about all lumbar spine axes with the exception of lateral bend. Relative to a stable control lifting trial, the addition of both an unstable load as well as an unstable support did not result in a significant change in the local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine (p=0.5592). The results suggest that local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine represents a conserved measure actively controlled, at least in part, by trunk muscle stiffening effects. It is evident therefore that local dynamic stability of the lumbar spine can be modulated effectively within a young-healthy population; however this may not be the case in a patient population.

  15. Nonword Repetition by Children with Cochlear Implants: Accuracy Ratings from Normal-Hearing Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Caitlin M.; Burkholder, Rose A.; Cleary, Miranda; Pisoni, David B.

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-six children with cochlear implants completed a nonword repetition task. The children were presented with 20 nonword auditory patterns over a loudspeaker and were asked to repeat them aloud to the experimenter. The children's responses were recorded on digital audiotape and then played back to normal-hearing adult listeners to obtain…

  16. Nonword Repetition by Children with Cochlear Implants: Accuracy Ratings from Normal-Hearing Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Caitlin M.; Burkholder, Rose A.; Cleary, Miranda; Pisoni, David B.

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-six children with cochlear implants completed a nonword repetition task. The children were presented with 20 nonword auditory patterns over a loudspeaker and were asked to repeat them aloud to the experimenter. The children's responses were recorded on digital audiotape and then played back to normal-hearing adult listeners to obtain…

  17. Rapid micromachining of high aspect ratio holes in fused silica glass by high repetition rate picosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimelahi, Samira; Abolghasemi, Ladan; Herman, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    We present multiple methods of high aspect ratio hole drilling in fused silica glass, taking advantage of high power and high repetition rate picosecond lasers and flexible beam delivery methods to excise deep holes with minimal collateral damage. Combinations of static and synchronous scanning of laser focus were explored over a range of laser repetition rates and burst-train profiles that dramatically vary laser plume interaction dynamics, heat-affected zone, and heat accumulation physics. Chemically assisted etching of picosecond laser modification tracks are also presented as an extension from femtosecond laser writing of volume nanograting to form high aspect ratio (77) channels. Processing windows are identified for the various beam delivery methods that optimize the laser exposure over energy, wavelength, and repetition rate to reduce microcracking and deleterious heating effects. The results show the benefits of femtosecond laser interactions in glass extend into the picosecond domain, where the attributes of higher power further yield wide processing windows and significantly faster fabrication speed. High aspect ratio holes of 400 μm depth were formed over widely varying rates of 333 holes per second for mildly cracked holes in static-focal positioning through to one hole per second for low-damage and taper free holes in synchronous scanning.

  18. Low-pump-power, low-phase-noise, and microwave to millimeter-wave repetition rate operation in microcombs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang; Lee, Hansuek; Chen, Tong; Vahala, Kerry J

    2012-12-07

    Microresonator-based frequency combs (microcombs or Kerr combs) can potentially miniaturize the numerous applications of conventional frequency combs. A priority is the realization of broadband (ideally octave spanning) spectra at detectable repetition rates for comb self-referencing. However, access to these rates involves pumping larger mode volumes and hence higher threshold powers. Moreover, threshold power sets both the scale for power per comb tooth and also the optical pump. Along these lines, it is shown that a class of resonators having surface-loss-limited Q factors can operate over a wide range of repetition rates with minimal variation in threshold power. A new, surface-loss-limited resonator illustrates the idea. Comb generation on mode spacings ranging from 2.6 to 220 GHz with overall low threshold power (as low as 1 mW) is demonstrated. A record number of comb lines for a microcomb (around 1900) is also observed with pump power of 200 mW. The ability to engineer a wide range of repetition rates with these devices is also used to investigate a recently observed mechanism in microcombs associated with dispersion of subcomb offset frequencies. We observe high-coherence phase locking in cases where these offset frequencies are small enough so as to be tuned into coincidence. In these cases, a record-low microcomb phase noise is reported at a level comparable to an open-loop, high-performance microwave oscillator.

  19. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi-Jie; Yang, Dong-Xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Chen, Teng-Yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  20. Ytterbium fiber-based, 270 fs, 100 W chirped pulse amplification laser system with 1 MHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2016-01-01

    A 100 W Yb-doped, fiber-based, femtosecond, chirped pulse amplification laser system was developed with a repetition rate of 1 MHz, corresponding to a pulse energy of 100 µJ. Large-scale, fused-silica transmission gratings were used for both the pulse stretcher and compressor, with a compression throughput efficiency of ∼85%. A pulse duration of 270 fs was measured by second harmonic generation frequency-resolved optical gating (SHG-FROG). To the best of our knowledge, this is the shortest pulse duration ever achieved by a 100-W-level fiber chirped pulse amplification laser system at a repetition rate of few megahertz, without any special post-compression manipulation.

  1. 1  J, 0.5  kHz repetition rate picosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Cory; Pedicone, Michael; Bravo, Herman; Wang, Hanchen; Yin, Liang; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J; Reagan, Brendan A

    2016-07-15

    We report the demonstration of a diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser that produces λ=1.03  μm pulses of up to 1.5 J energy compressible to sub-5 ps duration at a repetition rate of 500 Hz (750 W average power). Amplification to high energy takes place in cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG active mirrors designed for kilowatt average power laser operation. This compact laser system will enable new advances in high-average-power ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-repetition-rate tabletop soft x-ray lasers. As a first application, the laser was used to pump a 400 Hz λ=18.9  nm laser.

  2. Real-time energy measurement of high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses using pulse integration and FPGA processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qi-jie; Yang, Dong-xu; Wang, Jian; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Hong-fei; Chen, Teng-yun

    2016-11-01

    Real-time energy measurement using pulse integration method for high repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses based on FPGA (Field-Programmable Gate Array) and high-speed pipeline ADC (Analog-to-Digital Convertor) is introduced in this paper. There are two parts contained in this method: pulse integration and real-time data processing. The pulse integration circuit will convert the pulse to the step type signals which are linear to the laser pulse energy. Through the real-time data processing part, the amplitude of the step signals will be obtained by ADC sampling and conducting calculation in real time in FPGA. The test result shows that the method with good linearity (4.770%) and without pulse measurement missing is suitable for ultrashort laser pulses with high repetition rate up to 100 MHz.

  3. Generation of 30 microJ single-cycle terahertz pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate by optical rectification.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Andrei G; Bonacina, Luigi; Chekalin, Sergei V; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2008-11-01

    We report the generation of 30 microJ single-cycle terahertz pulses at 100 Hz repetition rate by phase-matched optical rectification in lithium niobate using 28 mJ femtosecond laser pulses. The phase-matching condition is achieved by tilting the laser pulse intensity front. Temporal, spectral, and propagation properties of the generated terahertz pulses are presented. In addition, we discuss possibilities for further increasing the energy of single-cycle terahertz pulses obtained by optical rectification.

  4. Neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmin, A A; Kulagin, O V; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A

    2013-07-31

    A compact neodymium glass laser with a pulse energy of 220 J and a record-high pulse repetition rate of 0.02 Hz (pulse duration 30 ns) is developed. Thermally induced phase distortions are compensated using wave phase conjugation. The integral depolarisation of radiation is decreased to 0.4% by using linear compensation schemes. The second harmonic of laser radiation can be used for pumping Ti : sapphire multipetawatt complexes. (letters)

  5. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-01

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was ˜100ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  6. Nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure as an x-ray source with high pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2006-02-20

    The properties of x-ray radiation and runaway electrons produced using a nanosecond volume discharge are examined. X-ray radiation at a pulse repetition rate of 3 kHz was obtained time in a gas diode filled with air at atmospheric pressure. The current pulse width (FWHM) for runaway electrons generated in the gas diode was {approx}100 ps. A prepulse was observed on an oscilloscope trace of the main runaway electron beam current.

  7. High energy picosecond Yb:YAG CPA system at 10 Hz repetition rate for pumping optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Klingebiel, Sandro; Wandt, Christoph; Skrobol, Christoph; Ahmad, Izhar; Trushin, Sergei A; Major, Zsuzsanna; Krausz, Ferenc; Karsch, Stefan

    2011-03-14

    We present a chirped pulse amplification (CPA) system based on diode-pumped Yb:YAG. The stretched ns-pulses are amplified and have been compressed to less than 900 fs with an energy of 200 mJ and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. This system is optically synchronized with a broadband seed laser and therefore ideally suited for pumping optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA) stages on a ps-timescale.

  8. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  9. Wakefield-acceleration of relativistic electrons with few-cycle laser pulses at kHz-repetition-rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenot, Diego; Gustas, Dominykas; Vernier, Aline; Boehle, Frederik; Beaurepaire, Benoit; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Faure, Jerome; Appli Team

    2016-10-01

    The generation of relativistic electron beams using laser wakefield acceleration has become a standard technique, providing low emittance electron bunches with femtosecond durations. However, this technique usually requires multi-ten-terawatt lasers and is thus limited to low repetition-rate (typically 10 Hz or less). We have recently demonstrated the generation of few MeV electrons using 2.5-mJ, 4-fs, 1-kHz repetition-rate laser pulses, focused to relativistic intensity onto a gas jet with electron density 1020 cm-3. We have investigated the influence of the pulse duration, the gas density. We demonstrated that an electron beam with a charge in the range of 10-fC/shot, with a divergence of 20-mrad and a peaked spectrum with energies between 2 and 4 MeV can be generated at kHz repetition-rate. These results confirm the possibility of using few-cycle laser pulses with very low energy for exciting wakefields in the bubble regime and for trapping electrons, as predicted by PIC simulations. This kHz electron source is ideally suited for performing electron diffraction experiments with very high temporal resolution. Our results also open the way to other applications, such as the generation of a kHz ultrafast X-ray source. ERC femtoelec.

  10. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-07-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc.

  11. Effects of high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser micromachining on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA).

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei; Luo, Yiming; Yu, Jian; Liu, Bowen; Hu, Minglie; Chai, Lu; Wang, Chingyue

    2015-10-19

    The effects of femtosecond laser ablation, with 115 fs pulses at 1040 nm wavelength and 57 MHz repetition-rate, on the physical and chemical properties of polylactide (PLA) were studied in air and in water. The surface of the PLA sample ablated by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser was analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, raman spectroscopy, as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared with the experiments in the air at ambient temperature, melting resolidification was negligible for the experiments conducted under water. Neither in air nor under water did oxidation and crystallization process take place in the laser ablated surface. In addition, the intensity of some oxygen related peaks increased for water experiments, probably due to the hydrolysis. Meantime, the chemical shift to higher energies appeared in C1s XPS spectrum of laser processing in water. Interestingly, a large amount of defects were observed after laser processing in air, while no significant change was shown under water experiments. This indicates that thermal and mechanical effects by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser ablation in water are quite limited, which could be even ignored.

  12. High speed laser drilling of metals using a high repetition rate, high average power ultrafast fiber CPA system.

    PubMed

    Ancona, A; Röser, F; Rademaker, K; Limpert, J; Nolte, S; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present an experimental study on the drilling of metal targets with ultrashort laser pulses at high repetition rates (from 50 kHz up to 975 kHz) and high average powers (up to 68 Watts), using an ytterbium-doped fiber CPA system. The number of pulses to drill through steel and copper sheets with thicknesses up to 1 mm have been measured as a function of the repetition rate and the pulse energy. Two distinctive effects, influencing the drilling efficiency at high repetition rates, have been experimentally found and studied: particle shielding and heat accumulation. While the shielding of subsequent pulses due to the ejected particles leads to a reduced ablation efficiency, this effect is counteracted by heat accumulation. The experimental data are in good qualitative agreement with simulations of the heat accumulation effect and previous studies on the particle emission. However, for materials with a high thermal conductivity as copper, both effects are negligible for the investigated processing parameters. Therefore, the full power of the fiber CPA system can be exploited, which allows to trepan high-quality holes in 0.5mm-thick copper samples with breakthrough times as low as 75 ms.

  13. All-fiberized SBS-based high repetition rate sub-nanosecond Yb fiber laser for supercontinuum generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Dacheng; Su, Jianjia; Cui, Wei; Yan, Yaxi; Jiang, Peipei

    2014-12-01

    We report an all-fiberized SBS-based high repetition rate sub-nanosecond Yb fiber laser for supercontinuum generation. The high repetition rate ns laser pulses were produced from a fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-constructed fiber laser cavity consisting of a piece of double cladding Yb fiber as the gain medium and a short piece of Bi/Cr-doped fiber as a saturable absorber (SA). By optimizing the fiber length of the Bi/Cr-doped fiber and the reflectivity of the FBG, the Q-switching state of the fiber laser can be adjusted so that the energy storing condition within the fiber cavity can assure the start of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and as a result, compress the laser pulse duration. The fiber laser had an average laser power output of 1.2 W at 1064 nm with pulse repetition rate of about 80 kHz, almost four times the reported results. The pulse duration was about 1 ns with peak power of about 15 kW. After one stage of amplification, the laser power was raised to about 3 W and was used to pump a 20 m long photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Supercontiuum (SC) laser output was obtained with average power up to 1.24 W and spectrum spanning from 550 to 2200 nm.

  14. C -band disk-loaded-type accelerating structure for a high acceleration gradient and high-repetition-rate operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, T.; Ego, H.; Inagaki, T.; Asaka, T.; Suzuki, D.; Miura, S.; Otake, Y.

    2017-04-01

    A high-acceleration-gradient linear accelerator (LINAC) for an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) offers the advantages of a short accelerator length and low construction costs. In addition, the high pulse repetition rate of the LINAC, which can drive multiple x-ray beam lines, provides additional user opportunities for experiments involving XFEL. A C -band disk-loaded-type accelerating structure was developed to achieve a high acceleration gradient of >50 MV /m and an rf-pulse repetition rate of 120 pps, which is twice as high as that of the XFEL facility, SACLA (60 pps). The structure has a quasiconstant gradient and a traveling wave type with an accelerating mode of TM 01 -2 π /3 . To reduce the surface electric fields, we employed a cross section with an ellipsoidal curvature around an iris aperture. The accelerating structure was manufactured for SACLA. High-power rf conditioning was conducted to investigate its performance. Owing to the conditioning, the acceleration gradient reached a value of more than 50.1 MV /m . The structure was operated without any serious issues at a repetition rate of 120 pps. The accelerating structures were installed in the dedicated accelerator for EUV-FEL at SACLA beam line-1. Finally, we obtained accelerated electron beams with the structures operated at an acceleration gradient of 41.4 MV /m .

  15. Venus climate stability and volcanic resurfacing rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, M. A.; Grinspoon, D. H.; Pollack, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The climate of Venus is to a large degree controlled by the radiative properties of its massive atmosphere. In addition, outgassing due to volcanic activity, exospheric escape processes, and surface/atmosphere interactions may all be important in moderating the abundances of atmospheric CO2 and other volatiles. We have developed an evolutionary climate model for Venus using a systems approach that emphasizes feedbacks between elements in the climate system. Modules for atmospheric radiative transfer, surface/atmosphere interactions, tropospheric chemistry, and exospheric escape processes have so far been developed. Climate feedback loops result from interconnections between modules, in the form of the environmental parameters pressure, temperature, and atmospheric mixing ratios. The radiative transfer module has been implemented by using Rosseland mean opacities in a one dimensional grey radiative-convective model. The model has been solved for the static (time independent) case to determine climate equilibrium points. The dynamics of the model have also been explored by employing reaction/diffusion kinetics for possible surface atmosphere heterogeneous reactions over geologic timescales. It was found that under current conditions, the model predicts that the climate of Venus is at or near an unstable equilibrium point. The effects of constant rate volcanism and corresponding exsolution of volatiles on the stability of the climate model were also explored.

  16. Experienced workers may sacrifice peak torso kinematics/kinetics for enhanced balance/stability during repetitive lifting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungyong; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2013-04-05

    Work-related low back disorders (WRLBDs) are widely recognized problems, and work experience, while often considered important, has an unclear role with respect to modifying WRLBD risks. For example, some studies have shown that peak torso kinematics/kinetics are higher among experienced workers, suggesting a counterintuitive higher risk. To better understand the movement strategies of experienced workers, additional analyses were conducted using data from a prior study, to assess whole body balance and torso movement stability of 6 experienced workers vs. 6 novices during repetitive lifts/lowers. Dynamic balance and torso movement stability were quantified using peak linear/angular momenta and largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE) of torso flexion/extension, respectively. Peak horizontal linear momenta, all angular momenta, and LLEs were lower among experienced workers, suggestive of superior balance maintenance and more stable torso flexion/extension. Thus, experienced workers seem to sacrifice peak torso kinematics/kinetics to obtain better balance maintenance and torso movement stability, whereas the opposite strategies were evident among novices. These findings highlight that movement strategies can be modified by work experience and have potential implications/applications for worker training or work method analyses.

  17. Influence of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges on the stability of a swirled propane/air burner representative of an aeronautical combustor

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, S.; Pilla, G.; Lacoste, D. A.; Scouflaire, P.; Ducruix, S.; Laux, C. O.; Veynante, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an experimental study of the influence of a nanosecond repetitively pulsed spark discharge on the stability domain of a propane/air flame. This flame is produced in a lean premixed swirled combustor representative of an aeronautical combustion chamber. The lean extinction limits of the flame produced without and with plasma are determined and compared. It appears that only a low mean discharge power is necessary to increase the flame stability domain. Lastly, the effects of several parameters (pulse repetition frequency, global flowrate, electrode location) are studied. PMID:26170424

  18. LD pumped high-repetition-rate high-power 532nm Nd:YAG/LBO solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Liu, Dongyu; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Hu, Haowei; Zhang, Guangju; Yao, Yifei

    2013-09-01

    Diode pumped solid state 532 nm green laser is widely required for many industrial, medical and scientific applications. Among most of these applications, high power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) green laser output is demanded. This can be efficiently achieved through a diode-side-pumped acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with an intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG). In our experiment, LBO crystal is used for the second harmonic generation of high-average-power lasers of near infrared (NIR) range, though its effective NLO coefficient deff is relatively small. It is because of its high damage threshold (greater than 2.5 GW/cm2), large acceptance angle, small walk-off angle, and the nonhygroscopic characteristic. In this paper, we reported a high-repetition-rate high-power diode-side-pumped AO Q-switched Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. A plane-plane cavity with two rods, two AO Q-switches and the type II critical phase-matched LBO at room temperature were employed. Under the LD pump power of 480 W, 95.86 W at 1064 nm wavelength was achieved when the repetition rate was 15 kHz, and the 532 nm average output power of 44.77 W was obtained, with a pulse width of 111.7 ns, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 46.7% from 1064 nm to 532 nm. The 532 nm average output power was 40.10 W at a repetition rate of 10 kHz with a pulse width of 78.65 ns. The output characteristics of the SHG varying with the pumping current and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the laser were also investigated. Further improvement of the SHG is under study.

  19. Laser-diode pumped self-mode-locked praseodymium visible lasers with multi-gigahertz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Di Lieto, Alberto; Tonelli, Mauro; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate efficient laser-diode pumped multi-gigahertz (GHz) self-mode-locked praseodymium (Pr3+) visible lasers with broadband spectra from green to deep red for the first time to our knowledge. With a Pr3+-doped GdLiF4 crystal, stable self-mode-locked visible pulsed lasers at the wavelengths of 522 nm, 607 nm, 639 nm, and 720 nm have been obtained with the repetition rates of 2.8 GHz, 3.1 GHz, 3.1 GHz, and 3.0 GHz, respectively. The maximum output power was 612 mW with the slope efficiency of 46.9% at 639 nm. The mode-locking mechanism was theoretically analyzed. The stable second-harmonic mode-locking with doubled repetition frequency was also realized based on the Fabry-Perot effect formed in the laser cavity. In addition, we find that the polarization directions were turned with lasing wavelengths. This work may provide a new way for generating efficient ultrafast pulses with high- and changeable-repetition rates in the visible range.

  20. Selection Constrains High Rates of Tandem Repetitive DNA Mutation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jullien M; Caldas, Ian; Cristescu, Melania E; Clark, Andrew G

    2017-10-01

    A long-standing evolutionary puzzle is that all eukaryotic genomes contain large amounts of tandemly-repeated DNA whose sequence motifs and abundance vary greatly among even closely related species. To elucidate the evolutionary forces governing tandem repeat dynamics, quantification of the rates and patterns of mutations in repeat copy number and tests of its selective neutrality are necessary. Here, we used whole-genome sequences of 28 mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Daphnia pulex, in addition to six isolates from a non-MA population originating from the same progenitor, to both estimate mutation rates of abundances of repeat sequences and evaluate the selective regime acting upon them. We found that mutation rates of individual repeats were both high and highly variable, ranging from additions/deletions of 0.29-105 copies per generation (reflecting changes of 0.12-0.80% per generation). Our results also provide evidence that new repeat sequences are often formed from existing ones. The non-MA population isolates showed a signal of either purifying or stabilizing selection, with 33% lower variation in repeat copy number on average than the MA lines, although the level of selective constraint was not evenly distributed across all repeats. The changes between many pairs of repeats were correlated, and the pattern of correlations was significantly different between the MA lines and the non-MA population. Our study demonstrates that tandem repeats can experience extremely rapid evolution in copy number, which can lead to high levels of divergence in genome-wide repeat composition between closely related species. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Sensor positioning and experimental constraints influence estimates of local dynamic stability during repetitive spine movements.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Samuel J; Graham, Ryan B

    2015-04-13

    Application of non-linear dynamics analyses to study human movement has increased recently, which necessitates an understanding of how dependent measures may be influenced by experimental design and setup. Quantifying local dynamic stability for a multi-articulated structure such as the spine presents the possibility for estimates to be influenced by positioning of kinematic sensors used to measure spine angular kinematics. Oftentimes researchers will also choose to constrain the spine's movement by physically restraining the pelvis and/or using targets to control movement endpoints. Ten healthy participants were recruited, and asked to perform separate trials of 35 consecutive cycles of spine flexion under both constrained and unconstrained conditions. Electromagnetic sensors that measure three-dimensional angular orientations were positioned over the pelvis and the spinous processes of L3, L1, and T11. Using the pelvic sensor as a reference, each sensor location on the spine was used to obtain a different representation of the three-dimensional spine angular kinematics. Local dynamic stability of each kinematic time-series was determined by calculating the maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponent (λmax). Estimates for λmax were significantly lower (i.e. dynamically more stable) for spine kinematic data obtained from the L3 sensor than those obtained from kinematic data using either the L1 or T11 sensors. Likewise, λmax was lower when the movement was constrained. These results emphasize the importance of proper placement of instrumentation for quantifying local dynamic stability of spine kinematics and are especially relevant for repeated measures designs where data are obtained from the same individual on multiple days.

  2. 3.7 GHz repetition rate operated narrow-bandwidth picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with an all-fiber multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, K. H.; Wen, R. H.; Guo, Y.

    2016-04-01

    A high power picosecond pulsed Yb fiber amplifier with a pulse repetition rate of 3.7 GHz is experimentally demonstrated. The seed is a gain switched distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) structured laser diode (LD) with a pulse duration of 130 ps and a repetition rate of 460 MHz. The pulse repetition rate is increased to 3.7 GHz by introducing an all-fiber multiplier, which is composed of four 2  ×  2 structured fiber couplers. The multiplied pulse train is amplified to 81 W through two stage Yb fiber amplifiers.

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE: Harmonically mode-locked semiconductor-based lasers as high repetition rate ultralow noise pulse train and optical frequency comb sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinlan, F.; Ozharar, S.; Gee, S.; Delfyett, P. J.

    2009-10-01

    Recent experimental work on semiconductor-based harmonically mode-locked lasers geared toward low noise applications is reviewed. Active, harmonic mode-locking of semiconductor-based lasers has proven to be an excellent way to generate 10 GHz repetition rate pulse trains with pulse-to-pulse timing jitter of only a few femtoseconds without requiring active feedback stabilization. This level of timing jitter is achieved in long fiberized ring cavities and relies upon such factors as low noise rf sources as mode-lockers, high optical power, intracavity dispersion management and intracavity phase modulation. When a high finesse etalon is placed within the optical cavity, semiconductor-based harmonically mode-locked lasers can be used as optical frequency comb sources with 10 GHz mode spacing. When active mode-locking is replaced with regenerative mode-locking, a completely self-contained comb source is created, referenced to the intracavity etalon.

  4. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  5. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  6. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-12-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. rate theory | stochastic gene expression | gene switches

  7. Filamentation effect in a gas attenuator for high-repetition-rate X-ray FELs.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yiping; Krzywinski, Jacek; Schafer, Donald W; Ortiz, Eliazar; Rowen, Michael; Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2016-01-01

    A sustained filamentation or density depression phenomenon in an argon gas attenuator servicing a high-repetition femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser has been studied using a finite-difference method applied to the thermal diffusion equation for an ideal gas. A steady-state solution was obtained by assuming continuous-wave input of an equivalent time-averaged beam power and that the pressure of the entire gas volume has reached equilibrium. Both radial and axial temperature/density gradients were found and describable as filamentation or density depression previously reported for a femtosecond optical laser of similar attributes. The effect exhibits complex dependence on the input power, the desired attenuation, and the geometries of the beam and the attenuator. Time-dependent simulations were carried out to further elucidate the evolution of the temperature/density gradients in between pulses, from which the actual attenuation received by any given pulse can be properly calculated.

  8. High-power, high repetition rate picosecond and femtosecond sources based on Yb-doped fiber amplification of VECSELs.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Pascal; Finot, Christophe; Malinowski, Andy; Sahu, Jayanta K; Nilsson, Johan; Richardson, David J; Wilcox, Keith G; Foreman, Hannah D; Tropper, Anne C

    2006-10-16

    Picosecond pulses at gigahertz repetition rates from two different passively mode-locked VECSELs are amplified to high powers in cascaded ytterbium doped fiber amplifiers. Small differences in pulse durations between the two VECSELs led to amplification in different nonlinear regimes. The shorter 0.5 ps pulses could be amplified to 53 W of average power in the parabolic pulse regime. This was confirmed by excellent pulse compression down to 110 fs. The VECSEL producing longer 4.6 ps pulses was amplified in an SPM dominated regime up to 200 W of average power but with poor recompressed pulse quality.

  9. In-situ detection of OH in the lower stratosphere with a balloon borne high repetition rate laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpfle, R. M.; Anderson, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    Midday stratospheric OH density measurements have been carried out within the altitude interval of 31 to 24 km using the laser-induced fluorescence technique deployed on a balloon-borne gondola launched from Palestine, Texas on July 15, 1987. Laser output at 282 nm is produced with a pulsed, 17 kHz repetition rate, copper vapor laser pumped tunable dye laser. The OH mixing ratio ranged from 16 + or - 5 ppt at 31 km to 4 + or - 3 ppt in the 27 to 24 km region. Simultaneous ozone and water vapor measurements were also obtained with separate instruments.

  10. High-repetition-rate widely tunable LiF : \\mathbf{\\mathsf{F}}_\\mathbf{\\mathsf{2}}^{-} color center lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shaojie; Liu, Zhaojun; Cong, Zhenhua; Rao, Han; Zhang, Sasa; Liu, Yang; Zverev, Petr G.; Konyushkin, Vasily A.; Zhang, Xingyu

    2016-02-01

    High-repetition-rate tunable LiF:\\text{F}2- color center lasers pumped by quasi-continuous-wave diode-side-pumped acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG laser are demonstrated. Littrow-grating and Littman-grating tuning schemes are studied respectively. In the Littrow-grating scheme, the tuning range was 1085 nm to 1275 nm, and the maximal average output power was 275 mW. In the Littman-grating scheme, the tuning range was 1105.5 nm to 1215.5 nm, and the maximal average output power was 135 mW.

  11. Efficient intracavity frequency doubling of a high-repetition-rate diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, F.; Poirier, P. )

    1994-10-01

    Efficient operation of a pulsed, high-repetition-rate diode-pumped and intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser is reported. A 3-mm-diameter laser rod was side-pumped with a 5-bar stack of high-duty-cycle 1-cm diode arrays. The average [ital Q]-switched power at 1.06 [mu]m was 3.8 W at 1.33 kHz, and more than 4 W at 0.532 [mu]m was obtained through intracavity frequency doubling with LiB[sub 3]O[sub 5].

  12. High-power tunable narrow-linewidth Ti:sapphire laser at repetition rate of 1 kHz.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Nan; Teng, Hao; Wei, Zhiyi

    2012-08-01

    We report a high-power tunable narrow-bandwidth Ti:sapphire laser at a repetition rate of 1 kHz. The spectral linewidth of 0.4 pm with wavelength tuning range from 780 nm to 820 nm is obtained by a spectrum-compressing technique that consists of one grating and four fused silica prisms in the oscillator cavity. This narrow-bandwidth seed from the oscillator is further amplified to 6.5 W with pulse duration of 16 ns under the pumper power of 22 W. This high-power laser with narrow linewidth is candidate for isotope separation and accuracy spectrum analysis.

  13. High-power optical parametric oscillator based on a high-pulse repetition rate, master Nd : KGW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, M. V.; Grigor'ev, A. V.; Lantsov, K. I.; Lepchenkov, K. V.; Ryabtsev, A. G.; Ryabtsev, G. I.; Shchemelev, M. A.; Titovets, V. S.; Agrawal, L.; Bhardwaj, A.

    2017-05-01

    An optical scheme of an optical parametric oscillator with a master laser based on an Nd : KGW active element excited by two orthogonally oriented diode side pump modules is proposed to form radiation pulses with energies above 30 mJ and a repetition rate of 1 - 20 Hz in the eye-safe spectral range of 1.5 - 1.6 μm. The two-module excitation of the active medium makes the distribution of the master laser radiation intensity in the output beam cross section more uniform and provides a reliable operation of the optical parametric oscillator.

  14. Low repetition rate and broad frequency tuning from a grating-coupled passively mode-locked quantum dot laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H. C. Wu, Q. Y.; Pan, C. H.; Lee, C. P.; Lin, G.

    2013-11-18

    Passively mode-locked quantum dot lasers with a grating-coupled external cavity arrangement are investigated. A broad repetition-rate tuning range of fundamental mode-locking from 2 GHz to a record-low frequency of 79.3 MHz is achieved with selecting the wavelength at 1.28 μm. A narrow RF linewidth of ∼25 Hz and an intrinsic linewidth as low as 0.15 Hz are also obtained.

  15. High repetition-rate inverse Compton scattering x-ray source driven by a free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsten, B. E.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Lewellen, J. W.; Marksteiner, Q. R.; Nguyen, D. C.; Yampolsky, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a hybrid free-electron laser (FEL)/inverse Compton scattering (ICS) system that can be operated at very high repetition rates and with higher average gamma-ray fluxes than possible from ICS systems driven by J/kHz laser systems. Also, since the FEL system can generate 100 mJ class photon pulses at UV wavelengths, the electron beam energy can be lower than for systems driven with ˜micron wavelength lasers for attaining gamma rays of similar energy.

  16. Absolute Rate Theories of Epigenetic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, Jose N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-03-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape, and the transmission factor, depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates.

  17. Absolute rate theories of epigenetic stability

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Onuchic, José N.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous switching events in most characterized genetic switches are rare, resulting in extremely stable epigenetic properties. We show how simple arguments lead to theories of the rate of such events much like the absolute rate theory of chemical reactions corrected by a transmission factor. Both the probability of the rare cellular states that allow epigenetic escape and the transmission factor depend on the rates of DNA binding and unbinding events and on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation. Different mechanisms of escape from the stable attractors occur in the nonadiabatic, weakly adiabatic, and strictly adiabatic regimes, characterized by the relative values of those input rates. PMID:16361441

  18. Performance Optimization of a High-Repetition-Rate KrF Laser Plasma X-Ray Source for Microlithography.

    PubMed

    Bukerk, F; Louis, E; Turcu, E C; Tallents, G J; Batani, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to develop a high-intensity laser plasma x-ray source appropriate for industrial application of x-ray lithography, experiments have been carried out using a high-repetition-rate (up to 40 Hz) excimer laser (249 nm, 300 mJ) with a power density of 2 × 1013 W/ cm2 in the laser focus. In this study emphasis is given to remedying specific problems inherent in operating the laser plasma x-ray source at high repetition rates and in its prolonged operation. Two different methods of minimizing the production of target debris are investigated. First, the use of helium as a quenching gas results in a reduction of the amount of atomic debris particles by more than two orders of magnitude with negligible x-ray absorption. Second, a tape target as opposed to a solid target reduces the production of larger debris particles by a further factor of 100. Remaining debris is stopped by an aluminized plastic or beryllium filter used to avoid exposure of the resist by plasma ultraviolet radiation. The x-ray source has been used to image x-ray transmission mask structures down to 0.3 μm onto general purpose x-ray photo-resist. Results have been analyzed with SEM. The x-ray emission spectrum of the repetitive laser plasmas created from an iron target has been recorded and the conversion efficiency of the laser light into x-rays that contribute to exposure of the resist was measured to be 0.3% over 2π sr.

  19. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S.; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2015-06-11

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. In this article, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s-1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10-5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Finally, spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications.

  20. Tests of photocathodes for high repetition rate x-ray FELs at the APEX facility at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Filippetto, Daniele; Qian, Houjun; Papadopoulos, Christos F.; Wells, Russell; Kramasz, Toby; Padmore, Howard; Feng, Jun; Nasiatka, James; Huang, Ruixuan; Zolotorev, Max; Staples, John W.

    2015-05-01

    After the formidable results of X-ray 4th generation light sources based on free electron lasers around the world, a new revolutionary step is undergoing to extend the FEL performance from the present few hundred Hz to MHz-class repetition rates. In such facilities, temporally equi-spaced pulses will allow for a wide range of previously non-accessible experiments. The Advanced Photo-injector EXperiment (APEX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is devoted to test the capability of a novel scheme electron source, the VHF-Gun, to generate the required electron beam brightness at MHz repetition rates. In linac-based FELs, the ultimate performance in terms of brightness is defined at the injector, and in particular, cathodes play a major role in the game. Part of the APEX program consists in testing high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable to operate at the conditions required by such challenging machines. Results and status of these tests at LBNL are presented.

  1. High-peak-power, high-repetition-rate LD end-pumped Nd:YVO4 burst mode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hu; Yan, Renpeng; Fa, Xin; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Fan, Rongwei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A compact high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate burst mode laser is achieved by an acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YVO4 1064 nm laser directly pumped at 878.6 nm. Pulse trains with 10-100 pulses are obtained using acousto-optical Q-switch at repetition rates of 10-100 kHz under a pulsed pumping with a 1 ms duration. At the maximum pump energy of 108.5 mJ, the pulse energy of 10 kHz burst mode laser reaches 44 mJ corresponding to a single pulse energy of 4.4 mJ and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 40.5 %.The maximum peak power of ~468.1 kW at 10 kHz is obtained with a pulse width of 9.4 ns. The beam quality factor is measured to be M 2 ~1.5 and the pulse jitter is estimated to be less than 1 % in both amplitude and time region.

  2. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV.

    PubMed

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A

    2015-06-11

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 10(13) s(-1) is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10(-5) conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications.

  3. Monolithic all-fiber repetition-rate tunable gain-switched single-frequency Yb-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yubin; Zhang, Qian; Qi, Shuxian; Feng, Xian; Wang, Pu

    2016-12-12

    We report a monolithic gain-switched single-frequency Yb-doped fiber laser with widely tunable repetition rate. The single-frequency laser operation is realized by using an Yb-doped distributed Bragg reflection (DBR) fiber cavity, which is pumped by a commercial-available laser diode (LD) at 974 nm. The LD is electronically modulated by the driving current and the diode output contains both continuous wave (CW) and pulsed components. The CW component is set just below the threshold of the single-frequency fiber laser for reducing the requirement of the pump pulse energy. Above the threshold, the gain-switched oscillation is trigged by the pulsed component of the diode. Single-frequency pulsed laser output is achieved at 1.063 μm with a pulse duration of ~150 ns and a linewidth of 14 MHz. The repetition rate of the laser output can be tuned between 10 kHz and 400 kHz by tuning the electronic trigger signal. This kind of lasers shows potential for the applications in the area of coherent LIDAR etc.

  4. High-power, variable repetition rate, picosecond optical parametric oscillator pumped by an amplified gain-switched diode.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Florian; Chen, Kang K; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Gawith, Corin B E; Mackenzie, Jacob I; Hanna, David C; Richardson, David J; Shepherd, David P

    2010-04-12

    We demonstrate a picosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) that is synchronously pumped by a fiber-amplified gain-switched laser diode. At 24W of pump power, up to 7.3W at 1.54microm and 3.1W at 3.4microm is obtained in separate output beams. The periodically poled MgO-doped LiNbO(3) OPO operates with ~17ps pulses at a fundamental repetition rate of 114.8MHz but can be switched to higher repetition rates up to ~1GHz. Tunabilty between 1.4microm and 1.7microm (signal) and 2.9microm and 4.4microm (idler) is demonstrated by translating the nonlinear crystal to access different poling-period gratings and typical M(2) values of 1.1 by 1.2 (signal) and 1.6 by 3.2 (idler) are measured at high power for the singly resonant oscillator.

  5. Effect of triggered discharge using an excimer laser with high-repetition-rate of the order of kilohertz

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru; Watanabe, Takashi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Ihara, Satoshi

    2005-03-28

    The triggering ability of the laser-triggered lightning method is improved by using a KrF excimer laser with a high-repetition-rate of the order of kHz order. It is clarified that the effect of a triggered discharge is considerably enhanced when the plasma density is greater than 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. Thus far, the laser-triggered lightning method has not been expected to display a triggering ability since one pulse of an excimer laser possesses energy of less than 1 J, and the produced plasma has a low density of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}, its plasma density is one order lower than that required for its application in the triggering and guiding of lightning discharge. The enhancement of plasma density achieved by utilizing the accumulation effect of charged particles generated by the high-repetition-rate laser was 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}. This led to an effective a 50% reduction in the self-breakdown voltage.

  6. Bright high-repetition-rate source of narrowband extreme-ultraviolet harmonics beyond 22 eV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, He; Xu, Yiming; Ulonska, Stefan; Robinson, Joseph S.; Ranitovic, Predrag; Kaindl, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Novel table-top sources of extreme-ultraviolet light based on high-harmonic generation yield unique insight into the fundamental properties of molecules, nanomaterials or correlated solids, and enable advanced applications in imaging or metrology. Extending high-harmonic generation to high repetition rates portends great experimental benefits, yet efficient extreme-ultraviolet conversion of correspondingly weak driving pulses is challenging. Here, we demonstrate a highly-efficient source of femtosecond extreme-ultraviolet pulses at 50-kHz repetition rate, utilizing the ultraviolet second-harmonic focused tightly into Kr gas. In this cascaded scheme, a photon flux beyond ≈3 × 1013 s−1 is generated at 22.3 eV, with 5 × 10−5 conversion efficiency that surpasses similar harmonics directly driven by the fundamental by two orders-of-magnitude. The enhancement arises from both wavelength scaling of the atomic dipole and improved spatio-temporal phase matching, confirmed by simulations. Spectral isolation of a single 72-meV-wide harmonic renders this bright, 50-kHz extreme-ultraviolet source a powerful tool for ultrafast photoemission, nanoscale imaging and other applications. PMID:26067922

  7. Filamentation effect in a gas attenuator for high-repetition-rate X-ray FELs

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yiping; Krzywinski, Jacek; Schafer, Donald W.; Ortiz, Eliazar; Rowen, Michael; Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    2016-01-01

    A sustained filamentation or density depression phenomenon in an argon gas attenuator servicing a high-repetition femtosecond X-ray free-electron laser has been studied using a finite-difference method applied to the thermal diffusion equation for an ideal gas. A steady-state solution was obtained by assuming continuous-wave input of an equivalent time-averaged beam power and that the pressure of the entire gas volume has reached equilibrium. Both radial and axial temperature/density gradients were found and describable as filamentation or density depression previously reported for a femtosecond optical laser of similar attributes. The effect exhibits complex dependence on the input power, the desired attenuation, and the geometries of the beam and the attenuator. Time-dependent simulations were carried out to further elucidate the evolution of the temperature/density gradients in between pulses, from which the actual attenuation received by any given pulse can be properly calculated.

  8. A pulse-burst laser system for a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Den Hartog, D J; Jiang, N; Lempert, W R

    2008-10-01

    A "pulse-burst" laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. This laser is designed to produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250 kHz. This laser system will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier. The master oscillator is a compact diode-pumped Nd:YVO(4) laser, intermediate amplifier stages are flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, and final stages will be flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass (silicate). Variable pulse width drive (0.3-20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated-gate bipolar transistor switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of electron temperature (T(e)) and electron density (n(e)) dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of T(e) and n(e) fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities.

  9. A pulse-burst laser system for a high-repetition-rate Thomson scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Jiang, N.; Lempert, W. R.

    2008-10-15

    A ''pulse-burst'' laser system is being constructed for addition to the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. This laser is designed to produce a burst of up to 200 approximately 1 J Q-switched pulses at repetition frequencies 5-250 kHz. This laser system will operate at 1064 nm and is a master oscillator, power amplifier. The master oscillator is a compact diode-pumped Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser, intermediate amplifier stages are flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG, and final stages will be flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass (silicate). Variable pulse width drive (0.3-20 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by insulated-gate bipolar transistor switching of large electrolytic capacitor banks. The burst train of laser pulses will enable the study of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and electron density (n{sub e}) dynamics in a single MST shot, and with ensembling, will enable correlation of T{sub e} and n{sub e} fluctuations with other fluctuating quantities.

  10. Embedded optical waveguides fabricated in SF10 glass by low-repetition-rate ultrafast laser.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Long, Xuewen; Liu, Xin; Huo, Guangwen; Zhao, Wei; Stoian, Razvan; Hui, Rongqing; Cheng, Guanghua

    2013-10-20

    Symmetric embedded waveguides were fabricated in heavy metal oxide SF10 glass using slit-shaped infrared femtosecond laser writing in the low-repetition frequency regime. The impact of the writing parameters on the waveguide formation in the transverse writing scheme was systemically studied. Results indicate that efficient waveguides can be inscribed in a wide parameter space ranging from 500 fs to 1.5 ps pulse duration, 0.7-4.2 μJ pulse energy, and 5 μm/s to 640 μm/s scan speed and pointing out the robustness of the photoinscription process. The refractive index profile reconstructed from the measured near field pattern goes up to 10(-3). In addition, propagation losses of the waveguides are tolerable, with the lowest propagation loss estimated at 0.7 dB/cm. With a 5 μm/s scan speed and 3.5 μJ pulse energy in a high-dose regime, few-mode guiding was achieved in the waveguide at 800 nm signal injection wavelength. This is due to a combination of increased refractive index in the core of the trace and the appearance of a depressed cladding.

  11. Initial operation of a pulse-burst laser system for high-repetition-rate Thomson scatteringa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. S.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Hurst, N. C.

    2010-10-01

    A pulse-burst laser has been installed for Thomson scattering measurements on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. The laser design is a master-oscillator power-amplifier. The master oscillator is a commercial Nd:YVO4 laser (1064 nm) which is capable of Q-switching at frequencies between 5 and 250 kHz. Four Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) amplifier stages are in place to amplify the Nd:YVO4 emission. Single pulses through the Nd:YAG amplifier stages gives energies up to 1.5 J and the gain for each stage has been measured. Repetitive pulsing at 10 kHz has also been performed for 2 ms bursts, giving average pulse energies of 0.53 J with ΔE /E of 4.6%, where ΔE is the standard deviation between pulses. The next step will be to add one of two Nd:glass (silicate) amplifier stages to produce final pulse energies of 1-2 J for bursts up to 250 kHz.

  12. Clinical results of using a high-repetition-rate excimer laser with an optimized ablation profile for myopic correction in 10 235 eyes.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Minoru; Waring, George O; Magnago, Thomas; Watabe, Miyuki

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the visual outcomes, safety, stability, efficacy, and predictability of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to correct myopia using a high-repetition-rate excimer laser with an optimized ablation profile. Private clinic, Tokyo, Japan. Retrospective noncomparative study. In this study, patients had LASIK using the Schwind Amaris excimer laser for myopic correction. The study comprised 10  235 eyes of 5191 patients. The patients' mean age was 33.9 years ± 7.84 (SD) (range 18 to 56 years). The mean preoperative manifest refraction spherical equivalent (MRSE) was -5.02 ± 2.17 diopters (D) (range -2.75 to -11.50 D). Three months postoperatively, 82.0% of patients achieved an uncorrected distance visual acuity of -0.18 logMAR or better and 96.9% achieved 0.00 logMAR or better. The MRSE was within ±0.50 D of the intended refractive target in 88.4% of eyes and within ±1.00 D in 98.8%. Despite using the profile designed to minimize postoperative aberrations, the postoperative corneal and ocular higher-order aberrations increased. Laser in situ keratomileusis using a high-repetition-rate excimer laser was a safe and effective procedure, yielding predictable results for a wide range of myopic patients. Mr. Magnago is an employee of Schwind Eye-Tech Solutions GmbH & Co. KG. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2013 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of pulse to pulse interactions on ultra-short pulse laser drilling of steel with repetition rates up to 10 MHz.

    PubMed

    Finger, Johannes; Reininghaus, Martin

    2014-07-28

    We report on the effect of pulse to pulse interactions during percussion drilling of steel using high power ps-laser radiation with repetition rates of up to 10 MHz and high average powers up to 80 W. The ablation rate per pulse is measured as a function of the pulse repetition rate for four fluences ranging from 500 mJ/cm2 up to 1500 mJ/cm2. For every investigated fluence an abrupt increase of the ablation rate per pulse is observed at a distinctive repetition rate. The onset repetition rate for this effect is strongly dependent on the applied pulse fluence. The origin of the increase of the ablation rate is attributed to the emergence of a melt based ablation processes, as Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) images show the occurrence of melt ejected material surrounding the drilling holes. A semi empirical model based on classical heat conduction including heat accumulation as well as pulse-particle interactions is applied to enable quantitative conclusions on the origin of the observed data. In agreement with previous studies, the acquired data confirm the relevance of these two effects for the fundamental description of materials processing with ultra-short pulsed laser radiation at high repetition rates and high average power.

  14. Rate-Dependent Impairments in Repetitive Finger Movements in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease are not Due to Peripheral Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Stegemöller, Elizabeth L.; Allen, David P.; Simuni, Tanya; MacKinnon, Colum D.

    2010-01-01

    Performance of repetitive finger movements is an important clinical measure of disease severity in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and is associated with a dramatic deterioration in performance at movement rates near 2 Hz and above. The mechanisms contributing to this rate-dependent movement impairment are poorly understood. Since clinical and experimental testing of these movements involve prolonged repetition of movement, a loss of force generating capacity due to peripheral fatigue may contribute to performance deterioration. This study examined the contribution of peripheral fatigue to the performance of unconstrained index finger flexion movements by measuring maximum voluntary contractions (MVC) immediately before and after repetitive finger movements in patients with PD (both off- and on-medication) and matched control subjects. Movement performance was quantified using finger kinematics, maximum force production, and electromyography (EMG). The principal finding was that peak force and EMG activity during the MVC did not significantly change from the pre- to post- movement task in patients with PD despite the marked deterioration in movement performance of repetitive finger movements. These findings show that the rate-dependent deterioration of repetitive finger movements in PD cannot be explained by a loss of force-generating capacity due to peripheral fatigue, and further suggest that mechanisms contributing to impaired isometric force production in PD are different from those that mediate impaired performance of high-rate repetitive movements. PMID:20599591

  15. Fluid dynamics analysis of a gas attenuator for X-ray FELs under high-repetition-rate operation

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Bo; Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; ...

    2017-04-18

    Newtonian fluid dynamics simulations were performed using the Navier–Stokes–Fourier formulations to elucidate the short time-scale (µs and longer) evolution of the density and temperature distributions in an argon-gas-filled attenuator for an X-ray free-electron laser under high-repetition-rate operation. Both hydrodynamic motions of the gas molecules and thermal conductions were included in a finite-volume calculation. It was found that the hydrodynamic wave motions play the primary role in creating a density depression (also known as a filament) by advectively transporting gas particles away from the X-ray laser–gas interaction region, where large pressure and temperature gradients have been built upon the initial energymore » depositionviaX-ray photoelectric absorption and subsequent thermalization. Concurrent outward heat conduction tends to reduce the pressure in the filament core region, generating a counter gas flow to backfill the filament, but on an initially slower time scale. If the inter-pulse separation is sufficiently short so the filament cannot recover, the depth of the filament progressively increases as the trailing pulses remove additional gas particles. Since the rate of hydrodynamic removal decreases while the rate of heat conduction back flow increases as time elapses, the two competing mechanisms ultimately reach a dynamic balance, establishing a repeating pattern for each pulse cycle. By performing simulations at higher repetition rates but lower per pulse energies while maintaining a constant time-averaged power, the amplitude of the hydrodynamic motion per pulse becomes smaller, and the evolution of the temperature and density distributions approach asymptotically towards, as expected, those calculated for a continuous-wave input of the equivalent power.« less

  16. Fluid dynamics analysis of a gas attenuator for X-ray FELs under high-repetition-rate operation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Feng, Yiping

    2017-05-01

    Newtonian fluid dynamics simulations were performed using the Navier-Stokes-Fourier formulations to elucidate the short time-scale (µs and longer) evolution of the density and temperature distributions in an argon-gas-filled attenuator for an X-ray free-electron laser under high-repetition-rate operation. Both hydrodynamic motions of the gas molecules and thermal conductions were included in a finite-volume calculation. It was found that the hydrodynamic wave motions play the primary role in creating a density depression (also known as a filament) by advectively transporting gas particles away from the X-ray laser-gas interaction region, where large pressure and temperature gradients have been built upon the initial energy deposition via X-ray photoelectric absorption and subsequent thermalization. Concurrent outward heat conduction tends to reduce the pressure in the filament core region, generating a counter gas flow to backfill the filament, but on an initially slower time scale. If the inter-pulse separation is sufficiently short so the filament cannot recover, the depth of the filament progressively increases as the trailing pulses remove additional gas particles. Since the rate of hydrodynamic removal decreases while the rate of heat conduction back flow increases as time elapses, the two competing mechanisms ultimately reach a dynamic balance, establishing a repeating pattern for each pulse cycle. By performing simulations at higher repetition rates but lower per pulse energies while maintaining a constant time-averaged power, the amplitude of the hydrodynamic motion per pulse becomes smaller, and the evolution of the temperature and density distributions approach asymptotically towards, as expected, those calculated for a continuous-wave input of the equivalent power.

  17. Effects of joint rate and displacement constraints on stability regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, P. C.

    1987-01-01

    A block diagram showing plant dynamics in normal mode coordinates, a linear feedback controller with command limits, and actuator dynamics with rate and displacement limits is given. The objective is to examine the effects of joint rate and displacement saturation limits on the stability regions. An unstable short period dynamic model is transformed into normal mode coordinates and is augmented with actuator dynamics. A linear feedback controller is used to provide closed-loop stability. The stability with constrained actuator rate limits under varying bandwidth, displacement and command limits is examined.

  18. Sampling rate and the estimation of ensemble variability for repetitive signals.

    PubMed

    Laguna, P; Sörnmo, L

    2000-09-01

    The measurement of ensemble variability in time-aligned event signals is studied in relation to sampling rate requirements. The theoretical analysis is based on statistical modelling of time misalignment in which the time resolution is limited by the length of the sampling interval. For different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), the sampling rate is derived which limits the misalignment effect to less than 10% of the noise effect. Each signal is assumed to be corrupted by additive noise. Using a normal QRS complex with a high SNR (approximately equal to 30 dB), a sampling rate of approximately 3 kHz is needed for accurate ensemble variability measurements. This result is surprising since it implies that the Nyquist rate is far too low for accurate variability measurements. The theoretical results are supplemented with results obtained from an ECG database of 94 subjects for which the ensemble variability is computed at different sampling rates using signal interpolation. The ensemble variability is substantially reduced (40%) when increasing the rate from 1 to 3 kHz, thus corroborating the results suggested by the theoretical analysis.

  19. High-Repetition-Rate Grazing-Incidence Pumped X-Ray Laser Operating at 18.9 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, R.; Dunn, J.; Patel, P. K.; Price, D. F.; Smith, R. F.; Shlyaptsev, V. N.

    2005-03-01

    We have demonstrated a 10 Hz Ni-like Mo x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm with 150 mJ total pump energy by employing a novel pumping scheme. The grazing-incidence scheme is described, where a picosecond pulse is incident at a grazing angle to a Mo plasma column produced by a slab target irradiated by a 200 ps laser pulse. This scheme uses refraction of the short pulse at a predetermined electron density to increase absorption to pump a specific gain region. The higher coupling efficiency inherent to this scheme allows a reduction in the pump energy where 70 mJ long pulse energy and 80 mJ short pulse energy are sufficient to produce lasing at a 10 Hz repetition rate. Under these conditions and by optimizing the delay between the pulses, we achieve strong amplification and close to saturation for 4 mm long targets.

  20. Time-gated single-photon detection module with 110 ps transition time and up to 80 MHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Buttafava, Mauro Boso, Gianluca; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto; Dalla Mora, Alberto

    2014-08-15

    We present the design and characterization of a complete single-photon counting module capable of time-gating a silicon single-photon avalanche diode with ON and OFF transition times down to 110 ps, at repetition rates up to 80 MHz. Thanks to this sharp temporal filtering of incoming photons, it is possible to reject undesired strong light pulses preceding (or following) the signal of interest, allowing to increase the dynamic range of optical acquisitions up to 7 decades. A complete experimental characterization of the module highlights its very flat temporal response, with a time resolution of the order of 30 ps. The instrument is fully user-configurable via a PC interface and can be easily integrated in any optical setup, thanks to its small and compact form factor.

  1. Octave-spanning spectrum of femtosecond Yb:fiber ring laser at 528 MHz repetition rate in microstructured tellurite fiber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guizhong; Jiang, Tongxiao; Li, Chen; Yang, Hongyu; Wang, Aimin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-02-25

    The octave-spanning spectrum was generated in a tellurite glass based microstructured fiber pumped by a 528 MHz repetition rate Yb:fiber ring laser without amplification. The laser achieved 40% output optical-to-optical efficiency with the output power of 410 mW. By adjusting the grating pair in the cavity, this oscillator can work at different cavity dispersion regimes with the shortest dechirped pulse width of 46 fs. The output pulses were then launched into a high-nonlinearity tellurite fiber, which has the zero-dispersion wavelength at ~1 μm. The high nonlinearity coefficient (1348 km⁻¹W⁻¹) and the matched zero-dispersion wavelength with pump laser enable the octave-spanning supercontinuum generated from 750 nm to 1700 nm with the coupled pulse energy above 10 pJ.

  2. Experimental and theoretical study of the laser micro-machining of glass using high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashkir, Yuri; Liu, Qiang

    2006-04-01

    We present a systematic study of the ultrafast laser micro-machining of glass using a Ti:Spp laser with moderate pulse energy (<5 μJ) at a high repetition rate (50 kHz). Optimal conditions were identified for high resolution surface laser etching, and via drilling. Several practical applications were developed: glass templates for micro fluid diffraction devices, phase gratings for excimer laser projection techniques, micro fluid vertical channel-connectors, etc. It is demonstrated that the interaction of ultrafast laser pulses with glass combines several different processes (direct ablation, explosive material ejection, and thermal material modification). A dynamic numerical model was developed for this process. It was successfully used for modelling of laser micro-machining with arbitrary 3D translations of the target.

  3. Thermoelastic study of nanolayered structures using time-resolved X-ray diffraction at high repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navirian, H. A.; Schick, D.; Gaal, P.; Leitenberger, W.; Shayduk, R.; Bargheer, M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the thermoelastic response of a nanolayered sample composed of a metallic SrRuO3 electrode sandwiched between a ferroelectric Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 film with negative thermal expansion and a SrTiO3 substrate. SrRuO3 is rapidly heated by fs-laser pulses with 208 kHz repetition rate. Diffraction of X-ray pulses derived from a synchrotron measures the transient out-of-plane lattice constant c of all three materials simultaneously from 120 ps to 5 μs with a relative accuracy up to Δc/c = 10-6. The in-plane propagation of sound is essential for understanding the delayed out-of-plane compression of Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3.

  4. X-ray spectrometer based on a bent diamond crystal for high repetition rate free-electron laser applications

    DOE PAGES

    Boesenberg, Ulrike; Samoylova, Liubov; Roth, Thomas; ...

    2017-02-03

    A precise spectral characterization of every single pulse is required in many x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments due to the fluctuating spectral content of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) beams. Bent single-crystal spectrometers can provide sufficient spectral resolution to resolve the SASE spikes while also covering the full SASE bandwidth. To better withstand the high heat load induced by the 4.5 MHz repetition rate of pulses at the forthcoming European XFEL facility, a spectrometer based on single-crystal diamond has been developed. Here, we report a direct comparison of the diamond spectrometer with its Si counterpart in experiments performed at the Linacmore » Coherent Light Source.« less

  5. Application of a high-repetition-rate laser diagnostic system for single-cycle-resolved imaging in internal combustion engines.

    PubMed

    Hult, Johan; Richter, Mattias; Nygren, Jenny; Aldén, Marcus; Hultqvist, Anders; Christensen, Magnus; Johansson, Bengt

    2002-08-20

    High-repetition-rate laser-induced fluorescence measurements of fuel and OH concentrations in internal combustion engines are demonstrated. Series of as many as eight fluorescence images, with a temporal resolution ranging from 10 micros to 1 ms, are acquired within one engine cycle. A multiple-laser system in combination with a multiple-CCD camera is used for cycle-resolved imaging in spark-ignition, direct-injection stratified-charge, and homogeneous-charge compression-ignition engines. The recorded data reveal unique information on cycle-to-cycle variations in fuel transport and combustion. Moreover, the imaging system in combination with a scanning mirror is used to perform instantaneous three-dimensional fuel-concentration measurements.

  6. Three-dimensional temperature distribution and modification mechanism in glass during ultrafast laser irradiation at high repetition rates.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Sakakura, Masaaki; Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Yamaji, Masahiro; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Miura, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-16

    We experimentally determined the three-dimensional temperature distribution and modification mechanism in a soda-lime-silicate glass under irradiation of ultrafast laser pulses at high repetition rates by analyzing the relationship between the morphology of the modification and ambient temperature. In contrast to previous studies, we consider the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties and the nonlinear effect on the absorbed energy distribution along the beam propagation axis in carrying out analyses. The optical absorptivity evaluated with the temperature distribution is approximately 80% and at most 3.5% smaller than that evaluated by the transmission loss measurement. The temperature distribution and the strain distribution indicate that visco-elastic deformation and material flow play important roles in the laser-induced modification inside a glass.

  7. Duty-cycle dependence of the filamentation effect in gas devices for high repetition rate pulsed x-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yiping; Raubenheimer, Tor O.

    2017-06-01

    Time-dependent simulations were carried out to study the duty-cycle dependence of the density depression effect in gas attenuators and gas intensity monitors servicing a high repetition rate pulsed Free-electron laser beam. The evolution of the temperature/density gradients in-between the pulses in the entire gas volume, especially during the on-cycle, were obtained to evaluate the performance of any given pulse. It was found that the actual achieved attenuation in the attenuator or the intensity measured by the gas monitor deviates from the asymptotic value expected for a uniformly spaced pulse train after reaching a steady state, becoming progressively more significant as the duty-cycle tends lower.

  8. Intense high repetition rate Mo Kα x-ray source generated from laser solid interaction for imaging application.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Li, M H; Yan, W C; Guo, X; Li, D Z; Chen, Y P; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, Y F; Zhang, J; Chen, L M

    2014-11-01

    We report an efficient Mo Kα x-ray source produced by interaction of femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser pulses with a solid Molybdenum target working at 1 kHz repetition rate. The generated Mo Kα x-ray intensity reaches to 4.7 × 10(10) photons sr(-1) s(-1), corresponding to an average power of 0.8 mW into 2π solid angle. The spatial resolution of this x-ray source is measured to be 26 lp/mm. With the high flux and high spatial resolution characteristics, high resolving in-line x-ray radiography was realized on test objects and large size biological samples within merely half a minute. This experiment shows the possibility of laser plasma hard x-ray source as a new low cost and high resolution system for radiography and its ability of ultrafast x-ray pump-probe study of matter.

  9. Periodic disruptions induced by high repetition rate femtosecond pulses on magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuanggen; Kan, Hongli; Zhai, Kaili; Ma, Xiurong; Luo, Yiming; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Qingyue

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the periodic disruption formation on magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate surfaces by a femtosecond fiber laser system with wavelength and repetition rate of 1040 nm and 52 MHz, respectively. Three main experimental conditions, laser average power, scanning speed, and orientation of sample were systematically studied. In particular, the ablation morphologies of periodic disruptions under different crystal orientations were specifically researched. The result shows that such disruptions consisting of a bamboo-like inner structure appears periodically for focusing on the surface of X-, Y- and Z-cut wafers, which are formed by a rapid quenching of the material. Meanwhile, due to the anisotropic property, the bamboo-like inner structures consist of a cavity only arise from X- and Z-cut orientation.

  10. Hour-long continuous operation of a tabletop soft x-ray laser at 50-100 Hz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Brendan A; Li, Wei; Urbanski, Lukasz; Wernsing, Keith A; Salsbury, Chase; Baumgarten, Cory; Marconi, Mario C; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J

    2013-11-18

    We report the uninterrupted operation of an 18.9 nm wavelength tabletop soft x-ray laser at 100 Hz repetition rate for extended periods of time. An average power of about 0.1 mW was obtained by irradiating a Mo target with pulses from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Series of up to 1.8 x 10(5) consecutive laser pulses of ~1 µJ energy were generated by displacing the surface of a high shot-capacity rotating molybdenum target by ~2 µm between laser shots. As a proof-of-principle demonstration of the use of this compact ultrashort wavelength laser in applications requiring a high average power coherent beam, we lithographically printed an array of nanometer-scale features using coherent Talbot self-imaging.

  11. Development of high-repetition-rate X-ray chopper system for time-resolved measurements with synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Hitoshi; Kudo, Togo; Kimura, Shigeru

    2017-04-01

    A high-repetition-rate X-ray chopper system has been developed for pump–probe time-resolved measurements with synchrotron radiation. This system has a rotating disc with 108 or 54 grooves (X-ray path on the disc) that provides an opening time of 1.17 or 0.52 µs with a rotating speed of 28,997 rpm. Also, this system could select single-pulse X-rays every 4 or 8 periods of the several-bunch structure operated at SPring-8, corresponding to an X-ray pulse frequency of 52.2 or 26.1 kHz, respectively, and is suitable for pump–probe studies of electronic devices such as next-generation memory devices.

  12. High-Power fiber amplifier with widely tunable repetition rate, fixed pulse duration, and multiple output wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Paul E; Farrow, Roger L; Kliner, Dahv A V; Fève, Jean-Philippe; Landru, Nicolas

    2006-11-27

    We report a pulsed, fiber-amplified microchip laser providing widely tunable repetition rate (7.1 - 27 kHz) with constant pulse duration (1.0 ns), pulse energy up to 0.41 mJ, linear output polarization, diffraction-limited beam quality (M(2) < 1.2), and < 1% pulse-energy fluctuations. The pulse duration was shown to minimize nonlinear effects that cause temporal and spectral distortion of the amplified pulses. This source employs passive Q-switching, single-stage single-pass amplification, and cw pumping, thus offering high efficiency, simplicity, and compact, rugged packaging for use in practical applications. The high peak power and high beam quality make this system an ideal pump source for nonlinear frequency conversion, and we demonstrated efficient harmonic generation and optical parametric generation of wavelengths from 213 nm to 4.4 mum with Watt-level output powers.

  13. Monosomy 1p36 breakpoints indicate repetitive DNA sequence elements may be involved in generating and/or stabilizing some terminal deletions.

    PubMed

    Ballif, Blake C; Gajecka, Marzena; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2004-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most commonly observed terminal deletion syndrome in humans. Our previous molecular studies on a large cohort of subjects suggest that monosomy 1p36 can result from a variety of chromosomal rearrangements including terminal truncations, interstitial deletions, derivative chromosomes, inverted duplications, and complex rearrangements. However, the mechanism(s) by which rearrangements of 1p36 are generated and/or stabilized is not understood. Sequence analysis of breakpoint junctions may provide valuable clues to the underlying mechanisms of many chromosomal aberrations. In this report, we analyze the breakpoints at the DNA-sequence level in four subjects with variable-sized deletions of 1p36. All four breakpoints fall within repetitive DNA-sequence elements (LINEs, SINEs, etc). This suggests that repetitive DNA-sequence elements may play an important role in generating and/or stabilizing terminal deletions of 1p36. Mechanisms by which repetitive elements may be involved in the process of terminal deletion formation and stabilization are discussed.

  14. Study of waveguide directly writing in LiNbO3 crystal by high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuan; Jie, Feng; Yang, Yongjia; Mao, Jiangui; Luo, Anlin; Zhou, Zigang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the buried waveguides directly writing in LiNbO3 crystal by a tightly focused femtosecond laser with repetition rate 75MHz, and the femtosecond laser was focused by the microscope objective of which NA is 0.65. Fabricating nine carved paths in LiNbO3 crystal by moving three-dimensional electric translation stage at different speeds varying from 2mm/s to 10mm/s, controlled by a computer. Analyzing the structure of the end face of the directly writing region by laser Raman, which shows the large-scale defects are generated in the center of the etching region, densification induced by the thermal effect of high repetition rate femtosecond laser interaction of LiNbO3 were generated below and down of the center of the etching region. Using a He-Ne laser focused by a microscope objective with NA 0.65 coupling to the end face of the prefabricated nine carved paths, which shows two waveguides are generated in the top and below of the inscribing region. Testing the insert loses of these waveguides with an optical power meter, the result shows that the insert loses of the waveguides fabricated at speed of 8 10mm/s is low to 3dB·cm-1, and the insert loses was low to 1.5 dB·cm-1 when the scanning speed is 9mm/s, moreover, the insert loses of the below region was low to the top region.

  15. Miniaturized two-stack Blumlein pulser with a variable repetition-rate for non-thermal irreversible-electroporation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sun-Hong; Kwon, Ohjoon; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; Jeong, Jin-Young; Hong, Dongpyo; Park, Seunghyuk; Park, Gun-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) to avoid thermal damage to cells during intense DC ns pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is a recent modality for medical applications. This mechanism, related to bioelectrical dynamics of the cell, is linked to the effect of a DC electric field and a threshold effect with an electrically stimulated membrane for the charge distribution in the cell. To create the NTIRE condition, the pulse width of the nsPEF should be shorter than the charging time constant of the membrane related to the cell radius, membrane capacitance, cytoplasm resistivity, and medium resistivity. It is necessary to design and fabricate a very intense nanosecond DC electric field pulser that is capable of producing voltages up to the level of 100 kV/cm with an artificial pulse width (˜ns) with controllable repetition rates. Many devices to generate intense DC nsPEF using various pulse-forming line technologies have been introduced thus far. However, the previous Blumlein pulse-generating devices are clearly inefficient due to the energy loss between the input voltage and the output voltage. An improved two-stage stacked Blumlein pulse-forming line can overcome this limitation and decrease the energy loss from a DC power supply. A metal oxide silicon field-effect transistor switch with a fast rise and fall time would enable a high repetition rate (max. 100 kHz) and good endurance against very high voltages (DC ˜ 30 kV). The load is designed to match the sample for exposure to cell suspensions consisting of a 200 Ω resistor matched with a Blumlein circuit and two electrodes without the characteristic RC time effect of the circuit (capacitance =0.174 pF).

  16. The readout of the LHC beam luminosity monitor: Accurate shower energy measurements at a 40 MHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, P.F.; Ratti, L.; Speziali, V.; Traversi, G.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W.C.; Datte, P.S.; Millaud, J.E.

    2003-05-10

    The LHC beam luminosity monitor is based on the following principle. The neutrals that originate in LHC at every PP interaction create showers in the absorbers placed in front of the cryogenic separation dipoles. The shower energy, as it can be measured by suitable detectors in the absorbers is proportional to the number of neutral particles and, therefore, to the luminosity. This principle lends itself to a luminosity measurement on a bunch-by-bunch basis. However, detector and front-end electronics must comply with extremely stringent requirements. To make the bunch-by-bunch measurement feasible, their speed of operation must match the 40 MHz bunch repetition rate of LHC. Besides, in the actual operation the detector must stand extremely high radiation doses. The front-end electronics, to survive, must be located at some distance from the region of high radiation field, which means that a properly terminated, low-noise, cable connection is needed between detector and front-end electronics. After briefly reviewing the solutions that have been adopted for the detector and the front-end electronics and the results that have been obtained so far in tests on the beam, the latest version of the instrument in describe in detail. It will be shown how a clever detector design, a suitable front-end conception based on the use of a ''cold resistance'' cable termination and a careful low-noise design, along with the use of an effective deconvolution algorithm, make the luminosity measurement possible on a bunch-by-bunch basis at the LHC bunch repetition rates.

  17. Generation of tunable, high repetition rate frequency combs with equalized spectra using carrier injection based silicon modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarjun, K. P.; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2016-03-01

    High repetition-rate frequency combs with tunable repetition rate and carrier frequency are extensively used in areas like Optical communications, Microwave Photonics and Metrology. A common technique for their generation is strong phase modulation of a CW-laser. This is commonly implemented using Lithium-Niobate based modulators. With phase modulation alone, the combs have poor spectral flatness and significant number of missing lines. To overcome this, a complex cascade of multiple intensity and phase modulators are used. A comb generator on Silicon based on these principles is desirable to enable on-chip integration with other functionalities while reducing power consumption and footprint. In this work, we analyse frequency comb generation in carrier injection based Silicon modulators. We observe an interesting effect in these comb generators. Enhanced absorption accompanying carrier injection, an undesirable effect in data modulators, shapes the amplitude here to enable high quality combs from a single modulator. Thus, along with reduced power consumption to generate a specific number of lines, the complexity has also been significantly reduced. We use a drift-diffusion solver and mode solver (Silvaco TCAD) along with Soref-Bennett relations to calculate the variations in refractive indices and absorption of an optimized Silicon PIN - waveguide modulator driven by an unbiased high frequency (10 Ghz) voltage signal. Our simulations demonstrate that with a device length of 1 cm, a driving voltage of 2V and minor shaping with a passive ring-resonator filter, we obtain 37 lines with a flatness better than 5-dB across the band and power consumption an order of magnitude smaller than Lithium-Niobate modulators.

  18. Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with low-repetition-rate pulsed light source through phase-domain sampling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haomin; Wang, Le; Xu, Xiaoji G.

    2016-01-01

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows spectroscopic imaging with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. With suitable light sources, s-SNOM is instrumental in numerous discoveries at the nanoscale. So far, the light sources have been limited to continuous wave or high-repetition-rate pulsed lasers. Low-repetition-rate pulsed sources cannot be used, due to the limitation of the lock-in detection mechanism that is required for current s-SNOM techniques. Here, we report a near-field signal extraction method that enables low-repetition-rate pulsed light sources. The method correlates scattering signals from pulses with the mechanical phases of the oscillating s-SNOM probe to obtain near-field signal, by-passing the apparent restriction imposed by the Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem on the repetition rate. The method shall enable s-SNOM with low-repetition-rate pulses with high-peak-powers, such as femtosecond laser amplifiers, to facilitate investigations of strong light–matter interactions and nonlinear processes at the nanoscale. PMID:27748360

  19. Investigating MALDI MSI parameters (Part 1) - A systematic survey of the effects of repetition rates up to 20kHz in continuous raster mode.

    PubMed

    Steven, Rory T; Dexter, Alex; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-07-15

    Recent developments in laser performance, combined with the desire for increases in detected ion intensity and throughput, have led to the adoption of high repetition-rate diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) lasers in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). Previous studies have demonstrated a more complex relationship between detected ion intensity, stage raster speed and laser pulse repetition rate than the simple linear relationship between number of pulses and detected ion intensity that might be expected. Here we report, for the first time, the interrelated influence of varying laser energy, repetition rate and stage raster speed on detected ion intensity. Thin films of PC 34:1 lipid standard and murine brain tissue with CHCA are analysed by continuous stage raster MALDI MSI. Contrary to previous reports, the optimum laser repetition rate is found to be dependent on both laser energy and stage raster speed and is found to be as high as 20kHz under some conditions. The effects of different repetition rates and raster speeds are also found to vary for different ion species within MALDI MSI of tissue and so may be significant when either targeting specific molecules or seeking to minimize bias. A clear dependence on time between laser pulses is also observed indicating the underlying mechanisms may be related to on-plate hysteresis-exhibiting processes such as matrix chemical modification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy with low-repetition-rate pulsed light source through phase-domain sampling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haomin; Wang, Le; Xu, Xiaoji G

    2016-10-17

    Scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) allows spectroscopic imaging with spatial resolution below the diffraction limit. With suitable light sources, s-SNOM is instrumental in numerous discoveries at the nanoscale. So far, the light sources have been limited to continuous wave or high-repetition-rate pulsed lasers. Low-repetition-rate pulsed sources cannot be used, due to the limitation of the lock-in detection mechanism that is required for current s-SNOM techniques. Here, we report a near-field signal extraction method that enables low-repetition-rate pulsed light sources. The method correlates scattering signals from pulses with the mechanical phases of the oscillating s-SNOM probe to obtain near-field signal, by-passing the apparent restriction imposed by the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem on the repetition rate. The method shall enable s-SNOM with low-repetition-rate pulses with high-peak-powers, such as femtosecond laser amplifiers, to facilitate investigations of strong light-matter interactions and nonlinear processes at the nanoscale.

  1. A 600 VOLT MULTI-STAGE, HIGH REPETITION RATE GAN FET SWITCH

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, D.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.

    2016-10-05

    Using recently available GaN FETs, a 600 Volt three- stage, multi-FET switch has been developed having 2 nanosecond rise time driving a 200 Ohm load with the potential of approaching 30 MHz average switching rates. Possible applications include driving particle beam choppers kicking bunch-by-bunch and beam deflectors where the rise time needs to be custom tailored. This paper reports on the engineering issues addressed, the design approach taken and some performance results of this switch.

  2. Frequency and Amplitude Characteristics of a High-Repetition-Rate Hybrid TEA-CO2 Laser,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-02-01

    RA—ETC(U) FEB 78 J - LACNAMBRE» P LAVIGNE. M VERREAULT DREV-R-«»091/78 NL | OF | A05I853 4-78 Uftt I.I IM 12.5 i- m 12.2 I US 12.0...L. Lachambre P. Lavigne M. Verreault G. Otis Po ^e O OS«l BUREAU - RECHERCHE ET OEVEIOPPEMENT MINISTER« DE IA DEFENSE NATIONALE CANADA...JSEPETITION-RATE , HYBRID T£A.-C£? L.ASER . / J.-L./Lachambre, p/Lavigne, M./ Verreault ^jBi G./°tis *Gen-Tec Inc., Quebec (S2E57 <^s Quebec

  3. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process.

  4. Implementation of Time-Resolved Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy Using a kHz Repetition Rate Pump Laser

    PubMed Central

    MAGANA, DONNY; PARUL, DZMITRY; DYER, R. BRIAN; SHREVE, ANDREW P.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been shown to be invaluable for studying excited-state structures and dynamics in both biological and inorganic systems. Despite the established utility of this method, technical challenges continue to limit the data quality and more wide ranging applications. A critical problem has been the low laser repetition rate and interferometer stepping rate (both are typically 10 Hz) used for data acquisition. Here we demonstrate significant improvement in the quality of time-resolved spectra through the use of a kHz repetition rate laser to achieve kHz excitation and data collection rates while stepping the spectrometer at 200 Hz. We have studied the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state of Ru(bipyridine)3Cl2 in deuterated acetonitrile to test and optimize high repetition rate data collection. Comparison of different interferometer stepping rates reveals an optimum rate of 200 Hz due to minimization of long-term baseline drift. With the improved collection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio, better assignments of the MLCT excited-state bands can be made. Using optimized parameters, carbonmonoxy myoglobin in deuterated buffer is also studied by observing the infrared signatures of carbon monoxide photolysis upon excitation of the heme. We conclude from these studies that a substantial increase in performance of ss-FT-IR instrumentation is achieved by coupling commercial infrared benches with kHz repetition rate lasers. PMID:21513597

  5. Implementation of time-resolved step-scan fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy using a kHz repetition rate pump laser.

    PubMed

    Magana, Donny; Parul, Dzmitry; Dyer, R Brian; Shreve, Andrew P

    2011-05-01

    Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been shown to be invaluable for studying excited-state structures and dynamics in both biological and inorganic systems. Despite the established utility of this method, technical challenges continue to limit the data quality and more wide ranging applications. A critical problem has been the low laser repetition rate and interferometer stepping rate (both are typically 10 Hz) used for data acquisition. Here we demonstrate significant improvement in the quality of time-resolved spectra through the use of a kHz repetition rate laser to achieve kHz excitation and data collection rates while stepping the spectrometer at 200 Hz. We have studied the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state of Ru(bipyridine)(3)Cl(2) in deuterated acetonitrile to test and optimize high repetition rate data collection. Comparison of different interferometer stepping rates reveals an optimum rate of 200 Hz due to minimization of long-term baseline drift. With the improved collection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio, better assignments of the MLCT excited-state bands can be made. Using optimized parameters, carbonmonoxy myoglobin in deuterated buffer is also studied by observing the infrared signatures of carbon monoxide photolysis upon excitation of the heme. We conclude from these studies that a substantial increase in performance of ss-FT-IR instrumentation is achieved by coupling commercial infrared benches with kHz repetition rate lasers.

  6. Dynamic absorption and scattering of water and hydrogel during high-repetition-rate (>100 MHz) burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zuoming; Covarrubias, Andrés; Grindal, Alexander W.; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    High-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation and disruption of biological tissues depends on interaction of each pulse with the sample, but under those particular conditions which persist from previous pulses. This work characterizes and compares the dynamics of absorption and scattering of a 133-MHz repetition-rate, burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser, in agar hydrogel targets and distilled water. The differences in energy partition are quantified, pulse-by-pulse, using a time-resolving integrating-sphere-based device. These measurements reveal that high-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation is a highly dynamical process affected by the persistence of ionization, dissipation of plasma plume, neutral material flow, tissue tensile strength, and the hydrodynamic oscillation of cavitation bubbles. PMID:27375948

  7. Efficient generation of twin photons at telecom wavelengths with 2.5 GHz repetition-rate-tunable comb laser.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rui-Bo; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Morohashi, Isao; Wakui, Kentaro; Takeoka, Masahiro; Izumi, Shuro; Sakamoto, Takahide; Fujiwara, Mikio; Yamashita, Taro; Miki, Shigehito; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen; Sasaki, Masahide

    2014-12-19

    Efficient generation and detection of indistinguishable twin photons are at the core of quantum information and communications technology (Q-ICT). These photons are conventionally generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC), which is a probabilistic process, and hence occurs at a limited rate, which restricts wider applications of Q-ICT. To increase the rate, one had to excite SPDC by higher pump power, while it inevitably produced more unwanted multi-photon components, harmfully degrading quantum interference visibility. Here we solve this problem by using recently developed 10 GHz repetition-rate-tunable comb laser, combined with a group-velocity-matched nonlinear crystal, and superconducting nanowire single photon detectors. They operate at telecom wavelengths more efficiently with less noises than conventional schemes, those typically operate at visible and near infrared wavelengths generated by a 76 MHz Ti Sapphire laser and detected by Si detectors. We could show high interference visibilities, which are free from the pump-power induced degradation. Our laser, nonlinear crystal, and detectors constitute a powerful tool box, which will pave a way to implementing quantum photonics circuits with variety of good and low-cost telecom components, and will eventually realize scalable Q-ICT in optical infra-structures.

  8. Femtosecond laser bone ablation with a high repetition rate fiber laser source

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Alt, Clemens; Turcotte, Raphaël; Masek, Marissa; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Côté, Daniel C.; Xu, Chris; Intini, Giuseppe; Lin, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to perform very precise cutting of material, including biological samples from subcellular organelles to large areas of bone, through plasma-mediated ablation. The use of a kilohertz regenerative amplifier is usually needed to obtain the pulse energy required for ablation. This work investigates a 5 megahertz compact fiber laser for near-video rate imaging and ablation in bone. After optimization of ablation efficiency and reduction in autofluorescence, the system is demonstrated for the in vivo study of bone regeneration. Image-guided creation of a bone defect and longitudinal evaluation of cellular injury response in the defect provides insight into the bone regeneration process. PMID:25657872

  9. The Stability of Student Ratings of the Class Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peter M.; Hall, Gordon; Christ, Theodore J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study used data for 30 classes across 10 middle and high school teachers to evaluate the stability of class-level ratings on the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching across time. Teachers collected data on 2 occasions and students' ratings (N = 806) were aggregated to the class-level. Classes were arranged into 2…

  10. The Stability of Student Ratings of the Class Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Peter M.; Hall, Gordon; Christ, Theodore J.

    2016-01-01

    The present study used data for 30 classes across 10 middle and high school teachers to evaluate the stability of class-level ratings on the Responsive Environmental Assessment for Classroom Teaching across time. Teachers collected data on 2 occasions and students' ratings (N = 806) were aggregated to the class-level. Classes were arranged into 2…

  11. Brown meagre vocalization rate increases during repetitive boat noise exposures: a possible case of vocal compensation.

    PubMed

    Picciulin, Marta; Sebastianutto, Linda; Codarin, Antonio; Calcagno, Giuliana; Ferrero, Enrico A

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated whether or not boat noise causes variations in brown meagre (Sciaena umbra) vocalizations recorded in a nearshore Mediterranean marine reserve. Six nocturnal experimental sessions were carried out from June to September 2009. In each of them, a recreational boat passed over vocalizing fish 6 times with 1 boat passage every 10 min. For this purpose three different boats were used in random order: an 8.5-m cabin-cruiser (CC), a 5-m fiberglass boat (FB), and a 7-m inflatable boat (INF). In situ continuous acoustic recordings were collected using a self-standing sonobuoy. Because boat noise levels largely exceeded both background noise and S. umbra vocalizations in the species' hearing frequency range, masking of acoustic communication was assumed. Although no immediate effect was observed during a single boat passage, the S. umbra mean pulse rate increased over multiple boat passages in the experimental condition but not in the control condition, excluding that the observed effect was due to a natural rise in fish vocalizations. The observed vocal enhancement may result either from an increased density of callers or from an increased number of pulses/sounds produced by already acoustically active individuals, as a form of vocal compensation. These two explanations are discussed.

  12. High-average-power 2 μm few-cycle optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Yariv; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Demmler, Stefan; Tschernajew, Maxim; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Sources of long wavelengths few-cycle high repetition rate pulses are becoming increasingly important for a plethora of applications, e.g., in high-field physics. Here, we report on the realization of a tunable optical parametric chirped pulse amplifier at 100 kHz repetition rate. At a central wavelength of 2 μm, the system delivered 33 fs pulses and a 6 W average power corresponding to 60 μJ pulse energy with gigawatt-level peak powers. Idler absorption and its crystal heating is experimentally investigated for a BBO. Strategies for further power scaling to several tens of watts of average power are discussed.

  13. Strong modulation of ectopic focus as a mechanism of repetitive interpolated ventricular bigeminy with heart rate doubling.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Kan; Nakahara, Shiro; Toratani, Noritaka; Chida, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Sayuki; Sakai, Yoshihiko; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-10-01

    Repetitive interpolated ventricular bigeminy (RIVB) can introduce a doubling of the ventricular rate. To clarify the mechanism of RIVB, we hypothesized that it was introduced by a strong modulation of the ventricular automatic focus. RIVB, defined as more than 7 bigeminy events, was detected by instantaneous heart rate and bigeminy interval (BI) tachograms in 1450 successive patients with frequent ventricular premature contractions (≥3000 per day). Postextrasystolic interval bigeminy interval curves were plotted to determine the degree of modulation. Mean sinus cycle length bigeminy interval curves were plotted for selection. RIVB was simulated by using a computer-based parasystole model. RIVB was observed in 7 patients (age 60 ± 16 years; 2 men and 5 women) with a heart rate of 58.2 ± 6.5 beats/min during a rest period both during the day and at night. The tachograms disclosed the onset of the RIVB with a doubled ventricular rate to 112.3 ± 8.5 beats/min. On the postextrasystolic interval bigeminy interval curves, compensatory bigeminy and interpolated bigeminy constituted overlapping regression lines with slopes close to 1.00 and RIVB was located in the lower left portion. RIVB lasting for up to 3 hours was quickly detected by mean sinus cycle length bigeminy interval curve. The PQ interval immediately after RIVB was prolonged in comparison with baseline (0.18 ± 0.02 to 0.21 ± 0.02 seconds; P < .001). The simulation was able to reproduce RIVB faithfully at a slow heart rate. Our findings support the hypothesis that RIVB was introduced by strongly modulated ventricular pacemaker accelerated by an intervening normal QRS. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Thin Disk Ti:Sapphire amplifiers for Joule-class ultrashort pulses with high repetition rate (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagymihály, Roland S.; Cao, Huabao; Kalashnikov, Mikhail P.; Khodakovskiy, Nikita; Ehrentraut, Lutz; Osvay, Károly; Chvykov, Vladimir V.

    2017-05-01

    High peak power CPA laser systems can deliver now few petawatt pulses [1]. Reaching the high energies with broad spectral bandwidth necessary for these pulses was possible by the use of large aperture Ti:Sa crystals as final amplifier media. Wide applications for these systems will be possible if the repetition rate could be increased. Therefore, thermal deposition in Ti:Sa amplifiers is a key issue, which has to be solved in case of high average power pumping. The thin disk (TD) laser technology, which is intensively developed nowadays by using new laser materials, is able to overcome thermal distortions and damages of laser crystals [2]. TD technique also has the potential to be used in systems with both high peak and average power. For this, the commonly used laser materials with low absorption and emission cross sections, also low heat conductivity, like Yb:YAG, need to be replaced by a gain medium that supports broad enough emission spectrum and high thermal conductivity to obtain few tens of fs pulses with high repetition rates. Parasitic effects during the amplification process however seriously limit the energy that can be extracted from the gain medium and also they distort the gain profile. Nevertheless, the application of the Extraction During Pumping (EDP) technique can mitigate the depopulation losses in the gain medium with high aspect ratio [3]. We proposed to use Ti:Sa in combination with TD and EDP techniques to reach high energies at high repetition rates, and we presented numerical simulations for different amplifier geometries and parameters of the amplification [4,5]. We present the results of the proof-of-principle experiment, where a EDP-TD Ti:Sa amplifier was tested for the first time. In our experiment, the final cryogenically cooled Ti:Sa amplifier in a 100 TW/10 Hz/28 fs laser system was replaced with the EDP-TD room temperature cooled arrangement. Amplified seed pulse energy of 2.6 J was reached only for 3 passes through TD with 0.5 J of

  15. Development of Miniature and High-repetition-rate Magnetic Pulse Compression Circuit for Production of Streamer-like Discharge Plasmas in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Takahisa; Kouno, Kanako; Akiyama, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sakugawa, Takashi

    Pulsed power technology enables production of non-thermal plasmas with a large volume in gases by generating a high electric field at the tip of streamer discharge plasmas. Recently, all solid-state pulsed power generators which are operated with a high repetition rate, long lifetime and high reliability, have been developed aiming for industrial applications. Here, a new high-repetition-rate pulsed power generator for discharge plasmas in water is developed. The generator consists of semiconductor switches and saturable inductors. The semiconductor switches are thyristors in parallel and series circuits. An output peak voltage over 20kV is generated with a voltage rise time of 100ns, and streamer-like discharge plasmas in water are produced repetitively.

  16. High-energy femtosecond Yb-doped all-fiber monolithic chirped-pulse amplifier at repetition rate of 1 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Zhi-Guo; Teng, Hao; Wang, Li-Na; Wang, Jun-Li; Wei, Zhi-Yi

    2016-09-01

    A high-energy femtosecond all ytterbium fiber amplifier based on a chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) technique at a repetition rate of 1 MHz seeded by a dispersion-management mode-locked picosecond broadband oscillator is studied. We find that the compressed pulse duration is dependent on the amplified energy, the pulse duration of 804 fs corresponds to the maximum amplified energy of 10.5 μJ, while the shortest pulse duration of 424 fs corresponds to the amplified energy of 6.75 μJ. The measured energy fluctuation is approximately 0.46% root mean square (RMS) over 2 h. The low-cost femtosecond fiber laser source with super-stability will be widely used in industrial micromachines, medical therapy, and scientific studies. Project supported by the National Key Technology Research and Development Program of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2012BAC23B03), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922401), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474002).

  17. High-power LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier at 1 kHz repetition rate with volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for broadening and compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Ming-Liang; Chen, Li-Yuan; Chen, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Pulse width of 8.7 ps was broadened to 102.2, 198 ps with single and double pass the VBG respectively. When the 102.2 ps pulse was injected into 1 kHz repetition rate of LD side-pump Nd: YAG regenerative amplifier (RA), pulse width of 87.5 ps at 1 kHz was obtained with the pulse energy of 9.4 mJ, the beam quality of M^2 factor was 1.2. The pulse width was compressed to 32.7 ps with a single pass VBG and the pulse energy reduced to 8.8 mJ, and the power density was up to 15.2 GW/cm2, the stability for pulse to pulse rms is about 0.6 %, beam pointing was about 35 μrad. In addition, when 198 ps pulse was injected into RA, pulse width of 156 ps was obtained which energy was 9.6 mJ, the pulse width was compressed to 38 ps by double passing the VBG, the pulse energy decreased to 8.5 mJ. Chirped VBG is a new way to obtain high-intensity picosecond pulse laser system simple and smaller.

  18. The Effect of Solidification Rate on Morphological Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerka, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    At low solidification rates, the criterion for the onset of morphological instability parallels closely the criterion of constitutional supercooling. At somewhat larger rates of solidification, however, the results of the perturbation theory of morphological instability differ significantly from the predictions of constitutional supercooling. This arises because the critical wave length for instability decreases as solidification rate increases and thus the effects of capillarity (solid-liquid surface tension) play a strong stabilizing role. This gives rise to the concept of absolute stability, according to which the system will always be stable for a sufficiently large rate of solidification. This enhanced stabilization by capillarity is present only so long as local equilibrium is maintained at the solid-liquid interface. If the interfacial temperature drops below its equilibrium value by an amount dependent on growth rate, oscillatory morphological instabilities can occur. The differences among these various stability criteria are illustrated by means of some simple two-dimensional diagrams that should supplant the conventional plots of (temperature gradient)/(growth rate) vs. alloy concentration.

  19. The Effect of Solidification Rate on Morphological Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerka, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    At low solidification rates, the criterion for the onset of morphological instability parallels closely the criterion of constitutional supercooling. At somewhat larger rates of solidification, however, the results of the perturbation theory of morphological instability differ significantly from the predictions of constitutional supercooling. This arises because the critical wave length for instability decreases as solidification rate increases and thus the effects of capillarity (solid-liquid surface tension) play a strong stabilizing role. This gives rise to the concept of absolute stability, according to which the system will always be stable for a sufficiently large rate of solidification. This enhanced stabilization by capillarity is present only so long as local equilibrium is maintained at the solid-liquid interface. If the interfacial temperature drops below its equilibrium value by an amount dependent on growth rate, oscillatory morphological instabilities can occur. The differences among these various stability criteria are illustrated by means of some simple two-dimensional diagrams that should supplant the conventional plots of (temperature gradient)/(growth rate) vs. alloy concentration.

  20. Test-Retest Reliability of Rating of Perceived Exertion and Agreement With 1-Repetition Maximum in Adults.

    PubMed

    Bove, Allyn M; Lynch, Andrew D; DePaul, Samantha M; Terhorst, Lauren; Irrgang, James J; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Clinical measurement. Background It has been suggested that rating of perceived exertion (RPE) may be a useful alternative to 1-repetition maximum (1RM) to determine proper resistance exercise dosage. However, the test-retest reliability of RPE for resistance exercise has not been determined. Additionally, prior research regarding the relationship between 1RM and RPE is conflicting. Objectives The purpose of this study was to (1) determine test-retest reliability of RPE related to resistance exercise and (2) assess agreement between percentages of 1RM and RPE during quadriceps resistance exercise. Methods A sample of participants with and without knee pathology completed a series of knee extension exercises and rated the perceived difficulty of each exercise on a 0-to-10 RPE scale, then repeated the procedure 1 to 2 weeks later for test-retest reliability. To determine agreement between RPE and 1RM, participants completed knee extension exercises at various percentages of their 1RM (10% to 130% of predicted 1RM) and rated the perceived difficulty of each exercise on a 0-to-10 RPE scale. Percent agreement was calculated between the 1RM and RPE at each resistance interval. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient indicated excellent test-retest reliability of RPE for quadriceps resistance exercises (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.895; 95% confidence interval: 0.866, 0.918). Overall percent agreement between RPE and 1RM was 60%, but agreement was poor within the ranges that would typically be used for training (50% 1RM for muscle endurance, 70% 1RM and greater for strength). Conclusion Test-retest reliability of perceived exertion during quadriceps resistance exercise was excellent. However, agreement between the RPE and 1RM was poor, especially in common training zones for knee extensor strengthening. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):768-774. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6498.

  1. Effects of repetitive use of hormonal implants on beef carcass quality, tenderness, and consumer ratings of beef palatability.

    PubMed

    Platter, W J; Tatum, J D; Belk, K E; Scanga, J A; Smith, G C

    2003-04-01

    Effects of repetitive use of anabolic implants on beef carcass quality, tenderness, and consumer ratings for palatability were investigated using crossbred steer calves (n = 550). Steers from five ranches were randomly allocated to one of 10 different lifetime implant strategies or to a nonimplanted control group. Cattle were implanted at some or all of five phases of production (branding, weaning, backgrounding, feedlot entry, or reimplant time). Carcasses from the control group had higher (P < 0.05) marbling scores than carcasses from steers in all other treatment groups. Implanting steers at branding, weaning, or backgrounding vs. not implanting steers at these production stages did not affect (P > 0.05) marbling scores. Steers implanted twice during their lifetime produced carcasses with higher (P < 0.05) marbling scores than did steers receiving a total of four or five implants. Steaks obtained from carcasses in the control group had lower (P < 0.05) shear force values and were rated by consumers as more desirable (P < 0.05) for tenderness like/dislike than steaks obtained from carcasses in all other treatment groups. Implanting steers at branding or weaning production stages did not affect (P > 0.05) steak shear force values, consumer ratings for like/dislike of steak tenderness, or percentage of consumers rating overall eating quality of steaks as satisfactory. Implanting steers at backgrounding vs. not implanting steers at this production stage increased (P < 0.05) steak shear force values, but did not influence (P > 0.05) consumer ratings for like/dislike of steak tenderness or percentage of consumers rating overall eating quality of steaks as satisfactory. Steaks from nonimplanted steers were rated as more desirable (P < 0.05) for overall eating quality than steaks from steers implanted two, three, four, or five times. Use of implants increased (P < 0.05) average daily gain by 11.8 to 20.5% from weaning to harvest compared with nonimplanted controls

  2. 500 MW peak power degenerated optical parametric amplifier delivering 52 fs pulses at 97 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Röser, F; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2008-06-09

    We present a high peak power degenerated parametric amplifier operating at 1030 nm and 97 kHz repetition rate. Pulses of a state-of-the art fiber chirped-pulse amplification (FCPA) system with 840 fs pulse duration and 410 microJ pulse energy are used as pump and seed source for a two stage optical parametric amplifier. Additional spectral broadening of the seed signal in a photonic crystal fiber creates enough bandwidth for ultrashort pulse generation. Subsequent amplification of the broadband seed signal in two 1 mm BBO crystals results in 41 microJ output pulse energy. Compression in a SF 11 prism compressor yields 37 microJ pulses as short as 52 fs. Thus, pulse shortening of more than one order of magnitude is achieved. Further scaling in terms of average power and pulse energy seems possible and will be discussed, since both concepts involved, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier have the reputation to be immune against thermo-optical effects.

  3. Measurement of acoustic velocity components in a turbulent flow using LDV and high-repetition rate PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léon, Olivier; Piot, Estelle; Sebbane, Delphine; Simon, Frank

    2017-06-01

    The present study provides theoretical details and experimental validation results to the approach proposed by Minotti et al. (Aerosp Sci Technol 12(5):398-407, 2008) for measuring amplitudes and phases of acoustic velocity components (AVC) that are waveform parameters of each component of velocity induced by an acoustic wave, in fully turbulent duct flows carrying multi-tone acoustic waves. Theoretical results support that the turbulence rejection method proposed, based on the estimation of cross power spectra between velocity measurements and a reference signal such as a wall pressure measurement, provides asymptotically efficient estimators with respect to the number of samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the estimator uncertainties can be simply estimated, accounting for the characteristics of the measured flow turbulence spectra. Two laser-based measurement campaigns were conducted in order to validate the acoustic velocity estimation approach and the uncertainty estimates derived. While in previous studies estimates were obtained using laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV), it is demonstrated that high-repetition rate particle image velocimetry (PIV) can also be successfully employed. The two measurement techniques provide very similar acoustic velocity amplitude and phase estimates for the cases investigated, that are of practical interest for acoustic liner studies. In a broader sense, this approach may be beneficial for non-intrusive sound emission studies in wind tunnel testings.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of CO-oxidation catalysts for high repetition rate CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, Thomas P.

    1990-01-01

    An extremely active class of noble metal catalysts supported on titania was developed and fabricated at Hughes for the recombination of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in closed-cycle CO2 TEA lasers. The incipient wetness technique was used to impregnate titania and alumina pellets with precious metals including platinum and palladium. In particular, the addition of cerium (used as an oxygen storage promoter) produced an extremely active Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst. By comparison, the complementary Pt/Ce/ gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was considerably less active. In general, chloride-free catalyst precursors proved critical in obtaining an active catalyst while also providing uniform metal distributions throughout the support structure. Detailed characterization of the Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst demonstrated uniform dendritic crystal growth of the metals throughout the support. Electron spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis was used to characterize the oxidation states of Pt, Ce and Ti. The performance of the catalysts was evaluated with an integral flow reactor system incorporating real time analysis of O2 and CO. With this system, the transient and steady-state behavior of the catalysts were evaluated. The kinetic evaluation was complemented by tests in a compact, closed-cycle Hughes CO2 TEA laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz with a catalyst temperature of 75 to 95 C. The Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst was compatible with a C(13)O(16)2 gas fill.

  5. Laser driven nuclear science and applications: The need of high efficiency, high power and high repetition rate Laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gales, S.

    2015-10-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) is a pan European research initiative selected on the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures Roadmap that aims to close the gap between the existing laboratory-based laser driven research and international facility-grade research centre. The ELI-NP facility, one of the three ELI pillars under construction, placed in Romania and to be operational in 2018, has as core elements a couple of new generation 10 PW laser systems and a narrow bandwidth Compton backscattering gamma source with photon energies up to 19 MeV. ELI-NP will address nuclear photonics, nuclear astrophysics and quantum electrodynamics involving extreme photon fields. Prospective applications of high power laser in nuclear astrophysics, accelerator physics, in particular towards future Accelerator Driven System, as well as in nuclear photonics, for detection and characterization of nuclear material, and for nuclear medicine, will be discussed. Key issues in these research areas will be at reach with significant increase of the repetition rates and of the efficiency at the plug of the high power laser systems as proposed by the ICAN collaboration.

  6. Thermoelastic study of nanolayered structures using time-resolved X-ray diffraction at high repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Navirian, H. A.; Schick, D. Leitenberger, W.; Bargheer, M.; Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R.

    2014-01-13

    We investigate the thermoelastic response of a nanolayered sample composed of a metallic SrRuO{sub 3} electrode sandwiched between a ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} film with negative thermal expansion and a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. SrRuO{sub 3} is rapidly heated by fs-laser pulses with 208 kHz repetition rate. Diffraction of X-ray pulses derived from a synchrotron measures the transient out-of-plane lattice constant c of all three materials simultaneously from 120 ps to 5 μs with a relative accuracy up to Δc/c = 10{sup −6}. The in-plane propagation of sound is essential for understanding the delayed out-of-plane compression of Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}.

  7. High repetition rate dual-rod acousto-optics Q-switched composite Nd:YVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xingpeng; Liu, Qiang; Fu, Xing; Chen, Hailong; Gong, Mali; Wang, Dongsheng

    2009-11-23

    We demonstrate the high-repetition rate acousto-optic Q-switching of a dual-rod Nd:YVO4 laser. Two thermally bonded composite YVO4-Nd:YVO4-YVO4 rod crystals were used as the gain medium to reduce the serious thermal effect. The pump mode and its influence on the laser mode were analyzed, and the effective pump radius was controlled by tuning the spectrum of laser diodes with adjustment on the temperature of laser diodes. Three different configurations of cavity optics were designed and the output performance using these cavities was investigated. In Q-switching operation, 73.2 W TEM00 mode average power at 650 kHz was obtained. The stable Q-switching range was from 80 kHz to 650 kHz with the pulse duration increasing from 17.5 ns to 80 ns. In CW operation, 78 W TEM00 mode and 93 W multi-mode output power was achieved with different cavity designs, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 46.5% and 52.2% respectively.

  8. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Brendon; Berrill, Mark A; Wernsing, Keith; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  9. Intense high repetition rate Mo Kα x-ray source generated from laser solid interaction for imaging application

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, K.; Li, M. H.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, Y. F.; Chen, L. M.; Guo, X.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Y. P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-11-15

    We report an efficient Mo Kα x-ray source produced by interaction of femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser pulses with a solid Molybdenum target working at 1 kHz repetition rate. The generated Mo Kα x-ray intensity reaches to 4.7 × 10{sup 10} photons sr{sup −1} s{sup −1}, corresponding to an average power of 0.8 mW into 2π solid angle. The spatial resolution of this x-ray source is measured to be 26 lp/mm. With the high flux and high spatial resolution characteristics, high resolving in-line x-ray radiography was realized on test objects and large size biological samples within merely half a minute. This experiment shows the possibility of laser plasma hard x-ray source as a new low cost and high resolution system for radiography and its ability of ultrafast x-ray pump-probe study of matter.

  10. Yb-fiber-laser-pumped, high-repetition-rate picosecond optical parametric oscillator tunable in the ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Samanta, G K; Kumar, S Chaitanya; Aadhi, A; Ebrahim-Zadeh, M

    2014-05-19

    We report a compact tunable 240-MHz picosecond source for the ultraviolet based on intra-cavity frequency doubling of a signal-resonant MgO:sPPLT optical parametric oscillator (OPO), synchronously pumped at 532 nm in the green by the second harmonic of a mode-locked Yb-fiber laser at 80-MHz repetition rate. By deploying a 30-mm-long multi-grating MgO:sPPLT crystal for the OPO and a 5-mm-long BiB(3)O(6) crystal for internal doubling, we have generated tunable UV radiation across 317-340.5 nm, with up to 30 mW at 334.5 nm. The OPO also provides tunable visible signal in the red, across 634-681 nm, and mid-infrared idler radiation over 2429-3298 nm, with as maximum signal power of 800 mW at 642 nm. The signal pulses have a temporal duration of 12 ps at 665 nm and exhibit high spatial beam quality with Gaussian profile. The signal power is recorded to be naturally stable with a fluctuation of 1.4% rms over 14 hours, while UV power degradation has been observed and studied.

  11. K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbanescu, Cristina; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-08-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target, K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum pulse energy of 110 mJ before compression. The source has x-ray conversion efficiency greater than 10-5 into K-alpha line emission. In preparation for phase contrast imaging applications, the size of the resultant K-alpha x-ray emission spot has been also characterized. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. We observe a relatively small broadening of the K-alpha source size compared to the size of the laser beam itself. Detailed characterization of the source including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented.

  12. Low-repetition rate femtosecond laser writing of optical waveguides in KTP crystals: analysis of anisotropic refractive index changes.

    PubMed

    Butt, Muhammad Ali; Nguyen, Huu-Dat; Ródenas, Airán; Romero, Carolina; Moreno, Pablo; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Aguiló, Magdalena; Solé, Rosa Maria; Pujol, Maria Cinta; Díaz, Francesc

    2015-06-15

    We report on the direct low-repetition rate femtosecond pulse laser microfabrication of optical waveguides in KTP crystals and the characterization of refractive index changes after the thermal annealing of the sample, with the focus on studying the potential for direct laser fabricating Mach-Zehnder optical modulators. We have fabricated square cladding waveguides by means of stacking damage tracks, and found that the refractive index decrease is large for vertically polarized light (c-axis; TM polarized) but rather weak for horizontally polarized light (a-axis; TE polarized), this leading to good near-infrared light confinement for TM modes but poor for TE modes. However, after performing a sample thermal annealing we have found that the thermal process enables a refractive index increment of around 1.5x10(-3) for TE polarized light, while maintaining the negative index change of around -1x10(-2) for TM polarized light. In order to evaluate the local refractive index changes we have followed a multistep procedure: We have first characterized the waveguide cross-sections by means of Raman micro-mapping to access the lattice micro-modifications and their spatial extent. Secondly we have modeled the waveguides following the modified region sizes obtained by micro-Raman with finite element method software to obtain a best match between the experimental propagation modes and the simulated ones. Furthermore we also report the fabrication of Mach-Zehnder structures and the evaluation of propagation losses.

  13. High-power sub-two-cycle mid-infrared pulses at 100 MHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupeza, I.; Sánchez, D.; Zhang, J.; Lilienfein, N.; Seidel, M.; Karpowicz, N.; Paasch-Colberg, T.; Znakovskaya, I.; Pescher, M.; Schweinberger, W.; Pervak, V.; Fill, E.; Pronin, O.; Wei, Z.; Krausz, F.; Apolonski, A.; Biegert, J.

    2015-11-01

    Powerful coherent light with a spectrum spanning the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral range is crucial for a number of applications in natural as well as life sciences, but so far has only been available from large-scale synchrotron sources. Here we present a compact apparatus that generates pulses with a sub-two-cycle duration and with an average power of 0.1 W and a spectral coverage of 6.8-16.4 μm (at -30 dB). The demonstrated source combines, for the first time in this spectral region, a high power, a high repetition rate and phase coherence. The MIR pulses emerge via difference-frequency generation (DFG) driven by the nonlinearly compressed pulses of a Kerr-lens mode-locked ytterbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Yb:YAG) thin-disc oscillator. The resultant 100 MHz MIR pulse train is hundreds to thousands of times more powerful than state-of-the-art frequency combs that emit in this range, and offers a high dynamic range for spectroscopy in the molecular fingerprint region and an ideal prerequisite for hyperspectral imaging as well as for the time-domain coherent control of vibrational dynamics.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and evaluation of CO-oxidation catalysts for high repetition rate CO2 TEA lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Thomas P.

    1990-06-01

    An extremely active class of noble metal catalysts supported on titania was developed and fabricated at Hughes for the recombination of oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) in closed-cycle CO2 TEA lasers. The incipient wetness technique was used to impregnate titania and alumina pellets with precious metals including platinum and palladium. In particular, the addition of cerium (used as an oxygen storage promoter) produced an extremely active Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst. By comparison, the complementary Pt/Ce/ gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was considerably less active. In general, chloride-free catalyst precursors proved critical in obtaining an active catalyst while also providing uniform metal distributions throughout the support structure. Detailed characterization of the Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst demonstrated uniform dendritic crystal growth of the metals throughout the support. Electron spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA) analysis was used to characterize the oxidation states of Pt, Ce and Ti. The performance of the catalysts was evaluated with an integral flow reactor system incorporating real time analysis of O2 and CO. With this system, the transient and steady-state behavior of the catalysts were evaluated. The kinetic evaluation was complemented by tests in a compact, closed-cycle Hughes CO2 TEA laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz with a catalyst temperature of 75 to 95 C. The Pt/Ce/TiO2 catalyst was compatible with a C(13)O(16)2 gas fill.

  15. Thin liquid sheet target capabilities for ultra-intense laser acceleration of ions at a kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klim, Adam; Morrison, J. T.; Orban, C.; Feister, S.; Ngirmang, G. K.; Smith, J.; Frische, K.; Peterson, A. C.; Chowdhury, E. A.; Freeman, R. R.; Roquemore, W. M.

    2016-10-01

    The success of laser-accelerated ion experiments depends crucially on a number of factors including how thin the targets can be created. We present experimental results demonstrating extremely thin (under 200 nm) water sheet targets that can be used for ultra-intense laser-accelerated ion experiments conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Importantly, these experiments operate at a kHz repetition rate and the recovery time of the liquid targets is fast enough to allow the laser to interact with a refreshed, thin target on every shot. We present results from liquid water targets which are useful for proton acceleration experiments via the mechanism of Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA). In future work, we will create thin sheets from deuterated water in order to perform laser-accelerated deuteron experiments. This research was sponsored by the Quantum and Non-Equilibrium Processes Division of the AFOSR, under the management of Dr. Enrique Parra, and support from the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  16. Multi-gigawatt ultrashort pulses at high repetition rate and average power from two-stage nonlinear compression.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, S; Carstens, H; Rothhardt, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2011-04-11

    We present simple and compact (1.5m x 0.5m footprint) post-compression of a state-of-the-art fiber chirped pulse amplification system. By using two stage nonlinear compression in noble gas filled hollow core fibers we shorten 1 mJ, 480 fs, 50 kHz pulses. The first stage is a 53 cm long, 200 µm inner diameter fiber filled with xenon with subsequent compression in a chirped mirror compressor. A 20 cm, 200 µm inner diameter fiber filled with argon further broadens the spectrum in a second stage and compression is achieved with another set of chirped mirrors. The average power is 24.5 W/19 W after the first/second stage, respectively. Compression to 35 fs is achieved. Numerical simulations, agreeing well with experimental data, yield a peak power of 5.7 GW at a pulse energy of 380 µJ making this an interesting source for high harmonic generation at high repetition rate and average power. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  17. Macroeconomic Stabilization When the Natural Real Interest Rate Is Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttet, Sebastien; Roy, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The authors modify the Dynamic Aggregate Demand-Dynamic Aggregate Supply model in Mankiw's widely used intermediate macroeconomics textbook to discuss monetary policy when the natural real interest rate is falling over time. Their results highlight a new role for the central bank's inflation target as a tool of macroeconomic stabilization. They…

  18. Macroeconomic Stabilization When the Natural Real Interest Rate Is Falling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttet, Sebastien; Roy, Udayan

    2015-01-01

    The authors modify the Dynamic Aggregate Demand-Dynamic Aggregate Supply model in Mankiw's widely used intermediate macroeconomics textbook to discuss monetary policy when the natural real interest rate is falling over time. Their results highlight a new role for the central bank's inflation target as a tool of macroeconomic stabilization. They…

  19. Returning Home in Systems of Care: Rates, Predictors, and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Southerland, Dannia; Mustillo, Sarah A.; Burns, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent work suggests that out-of-home placements continue to be relatively common for youth with mental health problems, even within systems of care. The current work examines rates and predictors of movement back home and stability of reunifications. During the focal period, 1,778 youths experienced out-of-home placements; 61% moved back home,…

  20. Experimental setup to determine the pulse energies and radiant exposures for excimer lasers with repetition rates ranging from 100 to 1050 Hz.

    PubMed

    Mrochen, Michael; Wuellner, Christian; Rose, Kristin; Donitzky, Christof

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of surface profiling for central ablation depth measurements and determine experimentally the required single-pulse energies and radiant exposures to achieve equivalent central ablation depths on bovine corneas for a myopic correction of -6.00 diopters (optical zone 6.5 mm) performed with laser repetition rates ranging from 100 to 1050 Hz. Institute for Refractive and Ophthalmic Surgery, Zurich, Switzerland, and WaveLight AG, Erlangen, Germany. Freshly enucleated bovine corneas and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plates were photoablated. The shot pattern for the myopic correction was maintained during all experiments; the pulse laser energy was adjusted to achieve equal ablation depths for all repetition rates. Pulse energy, radiant exposure, and pulse duration were monitored to determine the required laser parameter. The variations (standard deviation) of the profile measurements were +/-0.45 microm or less for PMMA and +/-1.50 microm or less for bovine corneas. Measurements with bovine corneas should be performed within 3 minutes or less to avoid larger variations in profile measurements. Increasing the repetition rate from 100 Hz to 1050 Hz required an increase in peak radiant exposure from 400 mJ/cm(2) to 530 mJ/cm(2) to achieve equal ablation for the myopic correction. The required increase in the mean radiant exposure ranged from 190 to 260 mJ/cm(2). Higher-repetition-rate excimer lasers require increased radiant exposure. Further experimental studies should be performed to determine the relevance of spatial and temporal spot positioning, ablation-plume dynamics, and temperature increases during high-repetition-rate laser treatments.

  1. Evaluation of long-term antinociceptive properties of stabilized hyaluronic acid preparation (NASHA) in an animal model of repetitive joint pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Clinical trials provided controversial results on whether the injection of hyaluronan preparations into osteoarthritic joints reduces pain. Problems of clinical studies may be the substantial placebo effects of intra-articular injections, different severity and rate of progression of the disease and others. We hypothesize that the use of preclinical pain models may help to clarify whether a certain hyaluronan exerts antinociceptive effects upon intra-articular injection. In the present study we tested in the bradykinin/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) model primarily the putative antinociceptive effect of stabilized hyaluronic acid from a non animal source (NASHA), a stabilized hyaluronic acid based gel for intra-articular treatment of OA. We established a dose-response relationship for NASHA and we compared NASHA to other hyaluronans with different formulations that are in clinical use. Methods To induce transient joint pain episodes bradykinin and PGE2 were repetitively administered intra-articularly and unilaterally into rat knee joints during short anaesthesia. After establishment of the predrug nociceptive responses, a single intra-articular injection of saline or NASHA at different concentrations was administered and pain responses to further bradykinin/PGE2 injections were monitored up to 56 days after NASHA. Furthermore, the obtained effective dose was compared to clinically defined concentrations of Hylan GF20 and sodium hyaluronate. The primary outcome measures were primary mechanical hyperalgesia at the knee joint and pain-induced weight bearing. Results On day 1 after injection, all tested hyaluronan preparations showed an antinociceptive effect >50% compared to saline. Single injections of higher doses of NASHA (50, 75 and 100 μl) were antinociceptive up to 56 days. When injection volumes in rat knee joints were adapted to clinical injection volumes in humans, the antinociceptive effects of the cross-linked NASHA and Hylan GF20 had a longer

  2. Evaluation of long-term antinociceptive properties of stabilized hyaluronic acid preparation (NASHA) in an animal model of repetitive joint pain.

    PubMed

    Boettger, Michael Karl; Kümmel, Diana; Harrison, Andrew; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2011-07-07

    Clinical trials provided controversial results on whether the injection of hyaluronan preparations into osteoarthritic joints reduces pain. Problems of clinical studies may be the substantial placebo effects of intra-articular injections, different severity and rate of progression of the disease and others. We hypothesize that the use of preclinical pain models may help to clarify whether a certain hyaluronan exerts antinociceptive effects upon intra-articular injection. In the present study we tested in the bradykinin/prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) model primarily the putative antinociceptive effect of stabilized hyaluronic acid from a non animal source (NASHA), a stabilized hyaluronic acid based gel for intra-articular treatment of OA. We established a dose-response relationship for NASHA and we compared NASHA to other hyaluronans with different formulations that are in clinical use. To induce transient joint pain episodes bradykinin and PGE(2) were repetitively administered intra-articularly and unilaterally into rat knee joints during short anaesthesia. After establishment of the predrug nociceptive responses, a single intra-articular injection of saline or NASHA at different concentrations was administered and pain responses to further bradykinin/PGE(2) injections were monitored up to 56 days after NASHA. Furthermore, the obtained effective dose was compared to clinically defined concentrations of Hylan GF20 and sodium hyaluronate. The primary outcome measures were primary mechanical hyperalgesia at the knee joint and pain-induced weight bearing. On day 1 after injection, all tested hyaluronan preparations showed an antinociceptive effect >50% compared to saline. Single injections of higher doses of NASHA (50, 75 and 100 μl) were antinociceptive up to 56 days. When injection volumes in rat knee joints were adapted to clinical injection volumes in humans, the antinociceptive effects of the cross-linked NASHA and Hylan GF20 had a longer duration than that of the

  3. 100 Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  4. 100 Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  5. Confirmation of gravitationally induced attitude drift of spinning satellite Ajisai with Graz high repetition rate SLR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharski, Daniel; Kirchner, Georg; Otsubo, Toshimichi; Lim, Hyung-Chul; Bennett, James; Koidl, Franz; Kim, Young-Rok; Hwang, Joo-Yeon

    2016-02-01

    The high repetition rate Satellite Laser Ranging system Graz delivers the millimeter precision range measurements to the corner cube reflector panels of Ajisai. The analysis of 4599 passes measured from October 2003 until November 2014 reveals the secular precession and nutation of Ajisai spin axis due to the gravitational forces as predicted by Kubo (1987) with the periods of 35.6 years and 116.5 days respectively. The observed precession cone is oriented at RA = 88.9°, Dec = -88.85° (J2000) and has a radius of 1.08°. The radius of the nutation cone increases from 1.32° to 1.57° over the 11 years of the measurements. We also detect a draconitic wobbling of Ajisai orientation due to the 'motion' of the Sun about the satellite's orbit. The observed spin period of Ajisai increases exponentially over the investigated time span according to the trend function: T = 1.492277·exp(0.0148388·Y) [s], where Y is in years since launch (1986.6133), RMS = 0.412 ms. The physical simulation model fitted to the observed spin parameters proves a very low interaction between Ajisai and the Earth's magnetic field, what assures that the satellite's angular momentum vector will remain in the vicinity of the south celestial pole for the coming decades. The developed empirical model of the spin axis orientation can improve the accuracy of the range determination between the ground SLR systems and the satellite's center-of-mass (Kucharski et al., 2015) and enable the accurate attitude prediction of Ajisai for the laser time-transfer experiments (Kunimori et al., 1992).

  6. High repetition rate laser produced soft x-ray source for ultrafast x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Lecherbourg, L; Harmand, M; Servol, M; Kieffer, J C

    2007-11-01

    Recent progress in high intensity ultrafast laser systems provides the opportunity to produce laser plasma x-ray sources exhibiting broad spectrum and high average x-ray flux that are well adapted to x-ray absorption measurements. In this paper, the development of a laser based x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) beamline exhibiting high repetition rate by using the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) facility 100 Hz laser system (100 mJ, 35 fs at 800 nm) is presented. This system is based on a broadband tantalum solid target soft x-ray source and a grazing incidence grating spectrometer in the 1-5 nm wavelength range. To demonstrate the high potential of this laser based XANES technique in condensed matter physics, material science, or biology, measurements realized with several samples are presented: VO2 vanadium L edge, Si3N4 nitrogen K edge, and BPDA/PPD polyimide carbon K edge. The characteristics of this laser based beamline are discussed in terms of brightness, signal to noise ratio, and compared to conventional synchrotron broadband x-ray sources which allow achieving similar measurements. Apart from the very compact size and the relative low cost, the main advantages of such a laser based soft x-ray source are the picosecond pulse duration and the perfect synchronization between this x-ray probe and a laser pulse excitation which open the way to the realization of time resolved x-ray absorption measurements with picosecond range time resolution to study the dynamics of ultrafast processes and phase transition.

  7. High repetition rate laser produced soft x-ray source for ultrafast x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmaux, S.; Lecherbourg, L.; Harmand, M.; Servol, M.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2007-11-15

    Recent progress in high intensity ultrafast laser systems provides the opportunity to produce laser plasma x-ray sources exhibiting broad spectrum and high average x-ray flux that are well adapted to x-ray absorption measurements. In this paper, the development of a laser based x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) beamline exhibiting high repetition rate by using the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) facility 100 Hz laser system (100 mJ, 35 fs at 800 nm) is presented. This system is based on a broadband tantalum solid target soft x-ray source and a grazing incidence grating spectrometer in the 1-5 nm wavelength range. To demonstrate the high potential of this laser based XANES technique in condensed matter physics, material science, or biology, measurements realized with several samples are presented: VO{sub 2} vanadium L edge, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nitrogen K edge, and BPDA/PPD polyimide carbon K edge. The characteristics of this laser based beamline are discussed in terms of brightness, signal to noise ratio, and compared to conventional synchrotron broadband x-ray sources which allow achieving similar measurements. Apart from the very compact size and the relative low cost, the main advantages of such a laser based soft x-ray source are the picosecond pulse duration and the perfect synchronization between this x-ray probe and a laser pulse excitation which open the way to the realization of time resolved x-ray absorption measurements with picosecond range time resolution to study the dynamics of ultrafast processes and phase transition.

  8. 10  GHz pulse repetition rate Er:Yb:glass laser modelocked with quantum dot semiconductor saturable absorber mirror.

    PubMed

    Resan, B; Kurmulis, S; Zhang, Z Y; Oehler, A E H; Markovic, V; Mangold, M; Südmeyer, T; Keller, U; Hogg, R A; Weingarten, K J

    2016-05-10

    Semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) modelocked high pulse repetition rate (≥10  GHz) diode-pumped solid-state lasers are proven as an enabling technology for high data rate coherent communication systems owing to their low noise and high pulse-to-pulse optical phase-coherence. Compared to quantum well, quantum dot (QD)-based SESAMs offer potential advantages to such laser systems in terms of reduced saturation fluence, broader bandwidth, and wavelength flexibility. Here, we describe the first 10 GHz pulse repetition rate QD-SESAM modelocked laser at 1.55 μm, exhibiting 2 ps pulse width from an Er-doped glass oscillator (ERGO). The 10 GHz ERGO laser is modelocked with InAs/GaAs QD-SESAM with saturation fluence as low as 9  μJ/cm2.

  9. Parameters of a trigatron-driven low-pulse-repetition-rate TEA CO{sub 2} laser preionised by a surface corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Aram, M; Shabanzadeh, M; Mansori, F; Behjat, A

    2007-01-31

    The design of a TEA CO{sub 2} laser with UV preionisation by a surface corona discharge is described and the dependences of its average output energy on the gas-flow rate, discharge voltage and pulse repetition rate are presented. The scheme of the electric circuit and the geometry of the pre-ionisation system are considered. The electric circuit is designed to produce only impulse voltage difference between the laser electrodes. The triggering system of the trigatron is used to prevent the appearance of the arc. The dependences of the current, voltage and average output energy on the gas-mixture composition and applied voltages at a low pulse repetition rate are presented. The central output wavelength of the laser was measured with an IR spectrometer. Lasing at two adjacent vibrational-rotational transitions of the CO{sub 2} molecule was observed, which demonstrates the possibility of simultaneous lasing at several lines. (lasers)

  10. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-21

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  11. Linear Stability of Binary Alloy Solidification for Unsteady Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Mullins and Sekerka (MS) linear stability analysis to the unsteady growth rate case is considered for dilute binary alloys. In particular, the stability of the planar interface during the initial solidification transient is studied in detail numerically. The rapid solidification case, when the system is traversing through the unstable region defined by the MS criterion, has also been treated. It has been observed that the onset of instability is quite accurately defined by the "quasi-stationary MS criterion", when the growth rate and other process parameters are taken as constants at a particular time of the growth process. A singular behavior of the governing equations for the perturbed quantities at the constitutional supercooling demarcation line has been observed. However, when the solidification process, during its transient, crosses this demarcation line, a planar interface is stable according to the linear analysis performed.

  12. Oral-Diadochokinetic Rates for Hebrew-Speaking Healthy Ageing Population: Non-Word versus Real-Word Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-David, Boaz M.; Icht, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oral-diadochokinesis (oral-DDK) tasks are extensively used in the evaluation of motor speech abilities. Currently, validated normative data for older adults (aged 65 years and older) are missing in Hebrew. The effect of task stimuli (non-word versus real-word repetition) is also non-clear in the population of older adult Hebrew…

  13. Oxygen Mass Flow Rate Generated for Monitoring Hydrogen Peroxide Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, H. Richard

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in propellants with non-toxic reaction products has led to a resurgence of interest in hydrogen peroxide for various propellant applications. Because peroxide is sensitive to contaminants, material interactions, stability and storage issues, monitoring decomposition rates is important. Stennis Space Center (SSC) uses thermocouples to monitor bulk fluid temperature (heat evolution) to determine reaction rates. Unfortunately, large temperature rises are required to offset the heat lost into the surrounding fluid. Also, tank penetration to accomodate a thermocouple can entail modification of a tank or line and act as a source of contamination. The paper evaluates a method for monitoring oxygen evolution as a means to determine peroxide stability. Oxygen generation is not only directly related to peroxide decomposition, but occurs immediately. Measuring peroxide temperature to monitor peroxide stability has significant limitations. The bulk decomposition of 1% / week in a large volume tank can produce in excess of 30 cc / min. This oxygen flow rate corresponds to an equivalent temperature rise of approximately 14 millidegrees C, which is difficult to measure reliably. Thus, if heat transfer were included, there would be no temperature rise. Temperature changes from the surrounding environment and heat lost to the peroxide will also mask potential problems. The use of oxygen flow measurements provides an ultra sensitive technique for monitoring reaction events and will provide an earlier indication of an abnormal decomposition when compared to measuring temperature rise.

  14. Optimizing Stimulus Repetition Rate for Recording Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Elicited by Air-Conduction Tone Bursts of 500 Hz.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Kadisonga, Peter; Ashitha, Palliyath

    2014-03-06

    Amidst several publications reporting the effects of stimulus-related parameters on ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP), the effect of the repetition rate on oVEMP responses has largely gone unexplored. Studies have used a repetition rate of ~5.1 Hz mainly due to a presumption that oVEMP, like cervical VEMP, should produce best responses for ~5 Hz, although there is paucity of experimental evidence to support this hypothesis. 52 healthy individuals in the age range of 17-35 years underwent air-conduction oVEMP elicited by 500 Hz tone-bursts using seven different repetition rates (3.1, 5.1, 10.1, 15.1, 20.1, 25.1 and 30.1 Hz). The results revealed a tendency for prolongation of latencies and reduction in amplitude with increasing repetition rate. However, significantly longer latencies were observed only for 20.1 Hz and larger amplitudes for 3.1 and 5.1 Hz (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the rates of 3.1 Hz and 5.1 Hz. However 3.1 Hz produced poorer signal-to-noise ratio and required considerably longer time and thereby had lesser efficiency than 5.1 Hz (P<0.05). This would also result in higher fatigue and irritation levels considering the physical act of maintaining a supero-medial gaze. Thus the use of 5.1 Hz is recommended for clinical recording of oVEMP.

  15. Disturbance and recovery of trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours following repetitive lifting: influences of flexion angle and lift rate on creep-induced effects.

    PubMed

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Bazrgari, Babak; Hendershot, Brad; Muslim, Khoirul; Nussbaum, Maury A; Madigan, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive lifting is associated with an increased risk of occupational low back disorders, yet potential adverse effects of such exposure on trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours were not well described. Here, 12 participants, gender balanced, completed 40 min of repetitive lifting in all combinations of three flexion angles (33, 66, and 100% of each participant's full flexion angle) and two lift rates (2 and 4 lifts/min). Trunk behaviours were obtained pre- and post-exposure and during recovery using sudden perturbations. Intrinsic trunk stiffness and reflexive responses were compromised after lifting exposures, with larger decreases in stiffness and reflexive force caused by larger flexion angles, which also delayed reflexive responses. Consistent effects of lift rate were not found. Except for reflex delay no measures returned to pre-exposure values after 20 min of recovery. Simultaneous changes in both trunk stiffness and neuromuscular behaviours may impose an increased risk of trunk instability and low back injury. An elevated risk of low back disorders is attributed to repetitive lifting. Here, the effects of flexion angle and lift rate on trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours were investigated. Increasing flexion angle had adverse effects on these outcomes, although lift rate had inconsistent effects and recovery time was more than 20 min.

  16. Cinematographic imaging of hydroxyl radicals in turbulent flames by planar laser-induced fluorescence up to 5 kHz repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittler, C.; Dreizler, A.

    2007-11-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of transient phenomena in turbulent flames, such as extinction, ignition or flashback, require cinematographic sampling of two-dimensional scalar fields. Hereby, repetition rates must exceed typical flame-inherent frequencies. The high sensitivity planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) has already proved to be a practical method for scalar imaging. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of generating tuneable narrowband radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range at repetition rates up to 5 kHz. Pulse energies were sufficiently high to electronically excite hydroxyl radicals (OH) produced in a partially-premixed turbulent opposed jet (TOJ) flame. Red-shifted fluorescence was detected two-dimensionally by means of an image-intensified CMOS camera. Sequences comprising up to 4000 frames per run were recorded. Besides statistically stationary conditions, extinction of a turbulent flame due to small Damköhler numbers is presented showing the potential of the technique.

  17. A high-repetition rate scheme for synchrotron-based picosecond laser pump/x-ray probe experiments on chemical and biological systems in solution.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Milne, Christopher J; Amarasinghe, Dimali C V; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes Hannelore; van der Veen, Renske M; Reinhard, Marco; Pham, Van-Thai; Karlsson, Susanne; Johnson, Steven L; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Huthwelker, Thomas; Janousch, Markus; van Mourik, Frank; Abela, Rafael; Chergui, Majed

    2011-06-01

    We present the extension of time-resolved optical pump/x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe experiments towards data collection at MHz repetition rates. The use of a high-power picosecond laser operating at an integer fraction of the repetition rate of the storage ring allows exploitation of up to two orders of magnitude more x-ray photons than in previous schemes based on the use of kHz lasers. Consequently, we demonstrate an order of magnitude increase in the signal-to-noise of time-resolved XAS of molecular systems in solution. This makes it possible to investigate highly dilute samples at concentrations approaching physiological conditions for biological systems. The simplicity and compactness of the scheme allows for straightforward implementation at any synchrotron beamline and for a wide range of x-ray probe techniques, such as time-resolved diffraction or x-ray emission studies.

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser microprocessing in a gas environment at a high repetition rate of ablative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2004-06-01

    The parameters of laser ablation of channels in steel are studied in a wide range of nanosecond pulse repetition rates f (5 Hz <= f <= 200 kHz). It is found that for f >= 4 kHz, the results of ablation in air are identical to those obtained under the action of single laser pulses in vacuum. The experimental data as well as the estimates of the parameters of laser plasma and the gas environment in the region of the laser action lead to the conclusion that there exists a long-lived region of hot rarefied gas, known as a fire ball in the theory of explosions. The emerging rarefaction reduces the screening effect of the surface plasma formed under the action of subsequent pulses. This makes it possible to use lasers with a high pulse repetition rate for attaining ablation conditions close to the conditions in vacuum without complicating the technology of microprocessing by using vacuum chambers and evacuating pumps.

  19. Generation of deep ultraviolet narrow linewidth laser by mixing frequency Ti:sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Wang, Rui; Teng, Hao; Li, Dehua; Wei, Zhiyi

    2012-04-20

    We demonstrate a scheme to generate deep ultraviolet source by the single-stage high-power Ti:sapphire laser with linewidth of 0.05 nm cryogenically operating at repetition rate of 5 kHz. The fundamental laser was tuned by an intracavity birefringent filter and three etalons with an output power greater than 8 W, corresponding to about 17% optical efficiency. The pulse width was 112 ns and M2<1.1. By using the nonlinear crystals BiB3O6 and KBe2BO3F2, the output power of 2.2 W at second harmonic and 8.5 mW at fourth harmonic laser of about 195 nm were produced. This compact high-repetition rate laser with narrow linewidth would be a promising tunable source for spectroscopy.

  20. Dual-frequency comb generation with differing GHz repetition rates by parallel Fabry-Perot cavity filtering of a single broadband frequency comb source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildner, Jutta; Meiners-Hagen, Karl; Pollinger, Florian

    2016-07-01

    We present a dual-comb-generator based on a coupled Fabry-Perot filtering cavity doublet and a single seed laser source. By filtering a commercial erbium-doped fiber-based optical frequency comb with CEO-stabilisation and 250 MHz repetition rate, two broadband coherent combs of different repetition rates in the GHz range are generated. The filtering doublet consists of two Fabry-Perot cavities with a tunable spacing and Pound-Drever-Hall stabilisation scheme. As a prerequisite for the development of such a filtering unit, we present a method to determine the actual free spectral range and transmission bandwidth of a Fabry-Perot cavity in situ. The transmitted beat signal of two diode lasers is measured as a function of their tunable frequency difference. Finally, the filtering performance and resulting beat signals of the heterodyned combs are discussed as well as the optimisation measures of the whole system.

  1. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Jitter and the minimal pulse repetition rate of a diode-pumped passively Q-switched solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belovolov, M. I.; Shatalov, A. F.

    2008-10-01

    The jitter of radiation pulses from diode-pumped passively Q-switched Nd3+:Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and Nd3+:Ca3Ga2Ge3O12 (Nd:CGGG) crystal lasers is studied. It is found that the jitter j depends on the laser pulse repetition rate f as j = A/fγ. It is shown that the minimal pulse repetition rate fL of the laser is determined by the jitter parameters A and γ and is equal to A1/(γ-1). For the Nd:YAG and Nd:CGGG lasers, fL was 14 Hz and 5 Hz, respectively.

  2. Gigahertz repetition rate, sub-femtosecond timing jitter optical pulse train directly generated from a mode-locked Yb:KYW laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heewon; Kim, Hyoji; Shin, Junho; Kim, Chur; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Guang-Hoon; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2014-01-01

    We show that a 1.13 GHz repetition rate optical pulse train with 0.70 fs high-frequency timing jitter (integration bandwidth of 17.5 kHz-10 MHz, where the measurement instrument-limited noise floor contributes 0.41 fs in 10 MHz bandwidth) can be directly generated from a free-running, single-mode diode-pumped Yb:KYW laser mode-locked by single-wall carbon nanotube-coated mirrors. To our knowledge, this is the lowest-timing-jitter optical pulse train with gigahertz repetition rate ever measured. If this pulse train is used for direct sampling of 565 MHz signals (Nyquist frequency of the pulse train), the jitter level demonstrated would correspond to the projected effective-number-of-bit of 17.8, which is much higher than the thermal noise limit of 50 Ω load resistance (~14 bits).

  3. Addressing Stability Robustness, Period Uncertainties, and Startup of Multiple-Period Repetitive Control for Spacecraft Jitter Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Edwin S.

    Repetitive Control (RC) is a relatively new form of control that seeks to converge to zero tracking error when executing a periodic command, or when executing a constant command in the presence of a periodic disturbance. The design makes use of knowledge of the period of the disturbance or command, and makes use of the error observed in the previous period to update the command in the present period. The usual RC approaches address one period, and this means that potentially they can simultaneously address DC or constant error, the fundamental frequency for that period, and all harmonics up to Nyquist frequency. Spacecraft often have multiple sources of periodic excitation. Slight imbalance in reaction wheels used for attitude control creates three disturbance periods. A special RC structure was developed to allow one to address multiple unrelated periods which is referred to as Multiple-Period Repetitive Control (MPRC). MPRC in practice faces three main challenges for hardware implementation. One is instability due to model errors or parasitic high frequency modes, the second is degradation of the final error level due to period uncertainties or fluctuations, and the third is bad transients due to issues in startup. Regarding these three challenges, the thesis develops a series of methods to enhance the performance of MPRC or to assist in analyzing its performance for mitigating optical jitter induced by mechanical vibration within the structure of a spacecraft testbed. Experimental analysis of MPRC shows contrasting advantages over existing adaptive control algorithms, such as Filtered-X LMS, Adaptive Model Predictive Control, and Adaptive Basis Method, for mitigating jitter within the transmitting beam of Laser Communication (LaserCom) satellites.

  4. Generation of a coherent x ray in the water window region at 1 kHz repetition rate using a mid-infrared pump source.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui; Xu, Han; Fu, Yuxi; Yao, Jinping; Zeng, Bin; Chu, Wei; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Takahashi, Eiji J; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Liu, X; Chen, J

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrate the generation of a coherent x ray in the water window region in a gas cell filled with neon gas using a wavelength-tunable mid-IR femtosecond laser operating at 1 kHz repetition rate. The cutoff energy and conversion efficiency of the water window x ray can be optimized by tuning gas pressure as well as the focal position.

  5. 1 W average-power 100 MHz repetition-rate 259 nm femtosecond deep ultraviolet pulse generation from ytterbium fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Yoshitomi, Dai; Kobayashi, Yohei; Torizuka, Kenji

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate 1W average-power ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond (fs) ultrashort pulse generation at a wavelength of 259 nm and a repetition rate as high as 100 MHz by quadrupling a fs ytterbium-fiber laser. A cavity-enhanced design is employed for efficient frequency doubling to the UV region. The optical-to-optical efficiency of UV output to the pump diode is 2.6%.

  6. On the stability of robotic systems with random communication rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yun, X.; Paul, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Control problems of sampled data systems which are subject to random sample rate variations and delays are studied. Due to the rapid growth of the use of computers more and more systems are controlled digitally. Complex systems such as space telerobotic systems require the integration of a number of subsystems at different hierarchical levels. While many subsystems may run on a single processor, some subsystems require their own processor or processors. The subsystems are integrated into functioning systems through communications. Communications between processes sharing a single processor are also subject to random delays due to memory management and interrupt latency. Communications between processors involve random delays due to network access and to data collisions. Furthermore, all control processes involve delays due to casual factors in measuring devices and to signal processing. Traditionally, sampling rates are chosen to meet the worst case communication delay. Such a strategy is wasteful as the processors are then idle a great proportion of the time; sample rates are not as high as possible resulting in poor performance or in the over specification of control processors; there is the possibility of missing data no matter how low the sample rate is picked. Asymptotical stability with probability one for randomly sampled multi-dimensional linear systems is studied. A sufficient condition for the stability is obtained. This condition is so simple that it can be applied to practical systems. A design procedure is also shown.

  7. 300-MHz-repetition-rate, all-fiber, femtosecond laser mode-locked by planar lightwave circuit-based saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chur; Kim, Dohyun; Cheong, YeonJoon; Kwon, Dohyeon; Choi, Sun Young; Jeong, Hwanseong; Cha, Sang Jun; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Yeom, Dong-Il; Rotermund, Fabian; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-10-05

    We show the implementation of fiber-pigtailed, evanescent-field-interacting, single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT)-based saturable absorbers (SAs) using standard planar lightwave circuit (PLC) fabrication processes. The implemented PLC-CNT-SA device is employed to realize self-starting, high-repetition-rate, all-fiber ring oscillators at telecommunication wavelength. We demonstrate all-fiber Er ring lasers operating at 303-MHz (soliton regime) and 274-MHz (stretched-pulse regime) repetition-rates. The 303-MHz (274-MHz) laser centered at 1555 nm (1550 nm) provides 7.5 nm (19 nm) spectral bandwidth. After extra-cavity amplilfication, the amplified pulse train of the 303-MHz (274-MHz) laser delivers 209 fs (178 fs) pulses. To our knowledge, this corresponds to the highest repetition-rates achieved for femtosecond lasers employing evanescent-field-interacting SAs. The demonstrated SA fabrication method, which is based on well-established PLC processes, also shows a potential way for mass-producible and lower-cost waveguide-type SA devices suitable for all-fiber and waveguide lasers.

  8. Highly efficient, versatile, self-Q-switched, high-repetition-rate microchip laser generating Ince-Gaussian modes for optical trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jun; He, Yu; Zhou, Xiao; Bai, Shengchuang

    2016-03-01

    Lasers operating in the Ince-Gaussian (IG) mode have potential applications for optical manipulation of microparticles and formation of optical vortices, as well as for optical trapping and optical tweezers. Versatile, self-Q-switched, high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate Cr, Nd:YAG microchip lasers operating in the IG mode are implemented under tilted, tightly focused laser-diode pumping. An average output power of over 2 W is obtained at an absorbed pump power of 6.4 W. The highest optical-to-optical efficiency of 33.2% is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 3.9 W. Laser pulses with a pulse energy of 7.5 μJ, pulse width of 3.5 ns and peak power of over 2 kW are obtained. A repetition rate up to 335 kHz is reached at an absorbed pump power of 5.8 W. Highly efficient, versatile, IG-mode lasers with a high repetition rate and a high peak power ensure a better flexibility in particle manipulation and optical trapping.

  9. Tunable GHz pulse repetition rate operation in high-power TEM(00)-mode Nd:YLF lasers at 1047 nm and 1053 nm with self mode locking.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y J; Tzeng, Y S; Tang, C Y; Huang, Y P; Chen, Y F

    2012-07-30

    We report on a high-power diode-pumped self-mode-locked Nd:YLF laser with the pulse repetition rate up to several GHz. A novel tactic is developed to efficiently select the output polarization state for achieving the stable TEM(00)-mode self-mode-locked operations at 1053 nm and 1047 nm, respectively. At an incident pump power of 6.93 W and a pulse repetition rate of 2.717 GHz, output powers as high as 2.15 W and 1.35 W are generated for the σ- and π-polarization, respectively. We experimentally find that decreasing the separation between the gain medium and the input mirror not only brings in the pulse shortening thanks to the enhanced effect of the spatial hole burning, but also effectively introduces the effect of the spectral filtering to lead the Nd:YLF laser to be in a second harmonic mode-locked status. Consequently, pulse durations as short as 8 ps and 8.5 ps are obtained at 1053 nm and 1047 nm with a pulse repetition rate of 5.434 GHz.

  10. Effect of therapeutic femtosecond laser pulse energy, repetition rate, and numerical aperture on laser-induced second and third harmonic generation in corneal tissue.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, William R; Ilev, Ilko K

    2015-05-01

    Clinical therapy incorporating femtosecond laser (FSL) devices is a quickly growing field in modern biomedical technology due to their precision and ability to generate therapeutic effects with substantially less laser pulse energy. FSLs have the potential to produce nonlinear optical effects such as harmonic generation (HG), especially in tissues with significant nonlinear susceptibilities such as the cornea. HG in corneal tissue has been demonstrated in nonlinear harmonic microscopy using low-power FSLs. Furthermore, the wavelength ranges of harmonic spectral emissions generated in corneal tissues are known to be phototoxic above certain intensities. We have investigated how the critical FSL parameters pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and numerical aperture influence both second (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) in corneal tissue. Experimental results demonstrated corresponding increases in HG intensity with increasing repetition rate and numerical aperture. HG duration decreased with increasing repetition rate and pulse energy. The data also demonstrated a significant difference in HG between FSL parameters representing the two most common classes of FSL therapeutic devices.

  11. Synchronizing single-shot high-energy iodine photodissociation laser PALS and high-repetition-rate femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostal, J.; Dudzak, R.; Pisarczyk, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Huynh, J.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Krousky, E.; Skala, J.; Hrebicek, J.; Medrik, T.; Golasowski, J.; Juha, L.; Ullschmied, J.

    2017-04-01

    A system of precise pulse synchronization between a single-shot large-scale laser exploiting an acousto-optical modulator and a femtosecond high repetition rate laser is reported in this article. This opto-electronical system has been developed for synchronization of the sub-nanosecond kJ-class iodine photodissociation laser system (Prague Asterix Laser System—PALS) with the femtosecond 25-TW Ti:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser operating at a repetition rate 1 kHz or 10 Hz depending on the required energy level of output pulses. At 1 kHz synchronization regime, a single femtosecond pulse of duration about 45 fs and a small energy less than 1 mJ are exploited as a probe beam for irradiation of a three-frame interferometer, while at 10 Hz repetition rate a single femtosecond pulse with higher energy about 7-10 mJ is exploited as a probe beam for irradiation of a two-channel polaro-interferometer. The synchronization accuracy ±100 ps between the PALS and the Ti:Sa laser pulses has been achieved in both regimes of synchronization. The femtosecond interferograms of laser-produced plasmas obtained by the three-frame interferometer and the femtosecond polarimetric images obtained by the two-frame polaro-interferometer confirm the full usefulness and correct functionality of the proposed method of synchronization.

  12. Demonstration of saturated tabletop soft x-ray lasers at 5 Hz repetition rate in transitions of Ne-like ions with wavelengths near 30 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2005-10-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the laser pump energy required to operate collisional soft x-ray lasers in the gain saturated regime can be significantly reduced by directing the heating pulse into the plasma at grazing incidence for a more efficient energy deposition [1-2]. Optimization of the incidence angle led to gain-saturated operation at 5Hz repetition rate in several transitions of Ni-like ions at wavelengths ranging from 18.9nm to 13.2nm [3]. We report saturated high repetition rate laser-pumped table-top soft x-ray lasers in Ne-like ions at wavelengths near 30nm. Gain-saturated lasers operating at 5Hz repetition rate were obtained in Ne-like Ti at 32.6nm and in Ne-like V at 30.4nm heating plasmas with laser pulses of ˜1J and 8ps impinging at 20^o grazing incidence. Average powers > 1μW were measured. Strong lasing was also observed in Ne-like Cr at 28.6nm. 1. R. Keenan et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 94, 103901, (2005). 2. B. M. Luther et al, Opt. Lett., 30, 165, (2005). 3. Y. Wang et al, submitted to Phys. Rev. A, (2005).

  13. Highly efficient, versatile, self-Q-switched, high-repetition-rate microchip laser generating Ince–Gaussian modes for optical trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Jun Dong; Yu He; Xiao Zhou; Shengchuang Bai

    2016-03-31

    Lasers operating in the Ince-Gaussian (IG) mode have potential applications for optical manipulation of microparticles and formation of optical vortices, as well as for optical trapping and optical tweezers. Versatile, self-Q-switched, high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate Cr, Nd:YAG microchip lasers operating in the IG mode are implemented under tilted, tightly focused laser-diode pumping. An average output power of over 2 W is obtained at an absorbed pump power of 6.4 W. The highest optical-to-optical efficiency of 33.2% is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 3.9 W. Laser pulses with a pulse energy of 7.5 μJ, pulse width of 3.5 ns and peak power of over 2 kW are obtained. A repetition rate up to 335 kHz is reached at an absorbed pump power of 5.8 W. Highly efficient, versatile, IG-mode lasers with a high repetition rate and a high peak power ensure a better flexibility in particle manipulation and optical trapping. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Compact High-Repetition-Rate Monochromatic Terahertz Source Based on Difference Frequency Generation from a Dual-Wavelength Nd:YAG Laser and DAST Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kai; Mei, Jialin; Wang, Maorong; Liu, Pengxiang; Xu, Degang; Wang, Yuye; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan; Teng, Bing; Xiao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Although high-repetition-rate dual-wavelength Nd:YAG lasers at 1319 and 1338 nm have been realized for quite a long time, we have employed it in generating monochromatic terahertz (THz) wave in this paper for the first time. The dual-wavelength laser was LD-end-pumped and acousto-optically (AO) Q-switched with the output power of watt level operating at different repetition rates from 5.5 to 30 kHz. Using a 0.6-mm-thick organic nonlinear crystal DAST for difference frequency generation (DFG), a compact terahertz source was achieved at 3.28 THz. The maximum average output power was about 0.58 μW obtained at a repetition rate of 5.5 kHz, corresponding to the conversion efficiency of about 6.4 × 10-7. The output power scaling is still feasible with higher pump power and a longer nonlinear DFG crystal. Owing to the compactness of the dual-wavelength laser and the nonlinear crystal, a palm-top terahertz source is expected for portable applications such as imaging and so on.

  15. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Winnerl, S; Seidel, W; Bauer, C; Gensch, M; Schneider, H; Helm, M

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE.

  16. Single-pulse picking at kHz repetition rates using a Ge plasma switch at the free-electron laser FELBE

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. Helm, M.; Winnerl, S.; Seidel, W.; Schneider, H.; Bauer, C.; Gensch, M.

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate a system for picking of mid-infrared and terahertz (THz) radiation pulses from the free-electron laser (FEL) FELBE operating at a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Single pulses are reflected by a dense electron-hole plasma in a Ge slab that is photoexcited by amplified near-infrared (NIR) laser systems operating at repetition rates of 1 kHz and 100 kHz, respectively. The peak intensity of picked pulses is up to 400 times larger than the peak intensity of residual pulses. The required NIR fluence for picking pulses at wavelengths in the range from 5 μm to 30 μm is discussed. In addition, we show that the reflectivity of the plasma decays on a time scale from 100 ps to 1 ns dependent on the wavelengths of the FEL and the NIR laser. The plasma switch enables experiments with the FEL that require high peak power but lower average power. Furthermore, the system is well suited to investigate processes with decay times in the μs to ms regime, i.e., much longer than the 77 ns long pulse repetition period of FELBE.

  17. Ventricular rate stabilization for treatment of recurrent VT.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Mate; Bogyi, Peter; Duray, Gabor Z; Nyolczas, Noemi; Hohnloser, Stefan H

    2017-06-01

    A patient with ischaemic cardiomyopathy received a secondary prevention VVI implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) after an episode of sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). Because of recurrent VTs transmitted via CareLink, medical therapy was optimized and VT ablation was performed. Subsequently, a fast VT with a typical short-long-short initiation developed. In addition, there was an increasing need for ventricular pacing due to sinus bradycardia. This new type of VT could be successfully dealt with by upgrading to DDD ICD and activating the Ventricular Rate Stabilization algorithm.

  18. Seismicity and sedimentation rate effects on submarine slope stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brink, U. S.; Andrews, B. D.; Miller, N. C.

    2016-12-01

    Large submarine mass-transport scars are commonly observed on continental margins, but are noticeably less abundant on margins that experience frequent earthquakes than on those that seldom experience them. This is a surprising observation, given that horizontal acceleration from earthquakes and associated strength loss from cyclic loading and liquefaction are commonly thought to provide the primary triggers for inducing failures and subsequent mass movements. Mapping submarine failure scars in ten margins worldwide, we find decreasing scar abundance with both increasing frequency of earthquakes and decreasing sedimentation rate. The decrease in scar abundance is interpreted to represent increasing slope stability. The increase in stability is non linear (power law with b<0.5), accelerating with decreasing inter-seismic sediment accumulation, a parameter combining earthquake recurrence with sedimentation rate. The correlation is interpreted as evidence for sediment densification and associated shear strength gain induced by repeated seismic shaking. This conclusion is supported by the correlation of higher mean margin gradient with higher earthquake frequency and with lower scar abundance and by published in-situ measurements showing over consolidation of shallow sediments in areas of frequent earthquakes. Outliers to this correlation likely identify margins where tectonic activity (salt diapirs, seamount subduction, etc.) leads to relatively rapid oversteepening of the slope, implying that the morphology of most margins is in fact, stable over many earthquake cycles. Note that the above correlation averages scar area and sedimentation rate over entire margin areas. Variations in sedimentation rate with time, such as over glacial-interglacial cycles, and intra-margin variations in seismic attenuation, sedimentation rate, composition, and pore pressure, have likely affected the abundance of slope failures in time and space.

  19. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddick, S. N.; Spyrou, A.; Crider, B. P.; Naqvi, F.; Larsen, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Mumpower, M.; Surman, R.; Perdikakis, G.; Bleuel, D. L.; Couture, A.; Crespo Campo, L.; Dombos, A. C.; Lewis, R.; Mosby, S.; Nikas, S.; Prokop, C. J.; Renstrom, T.; Rubio, B.; Siem, S.; Quinn, S. J.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on 69Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  20. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability.

    PubMed

    Liddick, S N; Spyrou, A; Crider, B P; Naqvi, F; Larsen, A C; Guttormsen, M; Mumpower, M; Surman, R; Perdikakis, G; Bleuel, D L; Couture, A; Crespo Campo, L; Dombos, A C; Lewis, R; Mosby, S; Nikas, S; Prokop, C J; Renstrom, T; Rubio, B; Siem, S; Quinn, S J

    2016-06-17

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on ^{69}Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  1. Repetition through Successive Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littell, Katherine M.

    This study was conducted in an attempt to provide an alternative to the long-established method of tape listening and repetition drills, a method that has had disappointing results. It is suggested that the rate of speed of phonic presentation is not commensurate with the rate of comprehension. The proposed method seeks to prevent cognitive…

  2. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates

    DOE PAGES

    Kovalev, S.; Green, B.; Golz, T.; ...

    2017-03-06

    Here, understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systemsmore » and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms). Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession.« less

  3. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, S.; Green, B.; Golz, T.; Maehrlein, S.; Stojanovic, N.; Fisher, A. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Gensch, M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systems and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms). Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession. PMID:28382317

  4. Probing ultra-fast processes with high dynamic range at 4th-generation light sources: Arrival time and intensity binning at unprecedented repetition rates.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, S; Green, B; Golz, T; Maehrlein, S; Stojanovic, N; Fisher, A S; Kampfrath, T; Gensch, M

    2017-03-01

    Understanding dynamics on ultrafast timescales enables unique and new insights into important processes in the materials and life sciences. In this respect, the fundamental pump-probe approach based on ultra-short photon pulses aims at the creation of stroboscopic movies. Performing such experiments at one of the many recently established accelerator-based 4th-generation light sources such as free-electron lasers or superradiant THz sources allows an enormous widening of the accessible parameter space for the excitation and/or probing light pulses. Compared to table-top devices, critical issues of this type of experiment are fluctuations of the timing between the accelerator and external laser systems and intensity instabilities of the accelerator-based photon sources. Existing solutions have so far been only demonstrated at low repetition rates and/or achieved a limited dynamic range in comparison to table-top experiments, while the 4th generation of accelerator-based light sources is based on superconducting radio-frequency technology, which enables operation at MHz or even GHz repetition rates. In this article, we present the successful demonstration of ultra-fast accelerator-laser pump-probe experiments performed at an unprecedentedly high repetition rate in the few-hundred-kHz regime and with a currently achievable optimal time resolution of 13 fs (rms). Our scheme, based on the pulse-resolved detection of multiple beam parameters relevant for the experiment, allows us to achieve an excellent sensitivity in real-world ultra-fast experiments, as demonstrated for the example of THz-field-driven coherent spin precession.

  5. μJ-level, kHz-repetition rate femtosecond fiber-CPA system at 1555 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Gluszek, Aleksander; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a high-power, fiber-based chirped pulse amplification (CPA) setup utilizing Er- and Er/Yb-doped fibers, operating at 1555 nm central wavelength. The integrated all-fiber pulse-picker allows to reduce the repetition frequency down to the kHz-range, which enables generation of sub-picosecond pulses with energies above 2 μJ and pulse peak power exceeding 1 MW. The system utilizes an Er/Yb co-doped large mode area fiber in the final amplification stage. Thanks to the used mode-field adapters and fiber-based components, the setup is almost fully fiberized, except the bulk grating pulse compressor. In order to provide compactness and simplicity, the compressor was designed using dense 1100 lines per millimeter gratings, that allow to keep the small grating separation.

  6. 1-MW peak power, 574-kHz repetition rate picosecond pulses at 515 nm from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Feng; Wang, Ziwei; Wang, Zhaokun; Bai, Yang; Li, Qiurui; Zhou, Jun

    2016-11-01

    1-MW peak power picosecond, 574-kHz repetition rate green laser at 515-nm is generated from a frequency-doubled fiber amplifier. 12-ps pulses with 13.9-μJ energy at 515 nm are achieved with a noncritically phase-matched lithium triborate (LBO) crystal through second harmonic generation of a 1030 nm infrared source. The infrared source employs ultra-large-mode-area rod-type photonic crystal fiber (Rod-PCF) for direct picosecond amplification and delivers 20-W 11.6-ps 2.97-MW pulse train with near-diffraction-limited beam quality (M2 = 1.01).

  7. Generation of 220 mJ nanosecond pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate with excellent beam quality in a diode-pumped Yb:YAG MOPA system.

    PubMed

    Wandt, Christoph; Klingebiel, Sandro; Siebold, Mathias; Major, Zsuzsanna; Hein, Joachim; Krausz, Ferenc; Karsch, Stefan

    2008-05-15

    A novel all-diode-pumped master oscillator power amplifier system based on Yb:YAG crystal rods has been developed. It consists of a Q-switched oscillator delivering 3 mJ, 6.4 ns pulses at a 10 Hz repetition rate and an additional four-pass amplifier, which boosts the output energy to 220 mJ, while a close to TEM(00) beam quality could be observed. Additionally a simulation of the amplification was written that allows for further scaling considerations.

  8. High-energy 13.9 nm table-top soft-x-ray laser at 2.5 Hz repetition rate excited by a slab-pumped Ti:sapphire laser.

    PubMed

    Martz, D H; Alessi, D; Luther, B M; Wang, Y; Kemp, D; Berrill, M; Rocca, J J

    2010-05-15

    We have demonstrated repetitive operation of a table-top lambda=13.9 nm Ni-like Ag soft-x-ray laser that generates laser pulses with 10 microJ energy. The soft-x-ray laser is enabled by a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by high-repetition-rate frequency-doubled high-energy Nd:glass slab amplifiers. Soft-x-ray laser operation at 2.5 Hz repetition rate resulted in 20 microwatt average power.

  9. 1.55 µm InAs/GaAs quantum dots and high repetition rate quantum dot SESAM mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z Y; Oehler, A E H; Resan, B; Kurmulis, S; Zhou, K J; Wang, Q; Mangold, M; Süedmeyer, T; Keller, U; Weingarten, K J; Hogg, R A

    2012-01-01

    High pulse repetition rate (≥ 10 GHz) diode-pumped solid-state lasers, modelocked using semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) are emerging as an enabling technology for high data rate coherent communication systems owing to their low noise and pulse-to-pulse optical phase-coherence. Quantum dot (QD) based SESAMs offer potential advantages to such laser systems in terms of reduced saturation fluence, broader bandwidth, and wavelength flexibility. Here, we describe the development of an epitaxial process for the realization of high optical quality 1.55 µm In(Ga)As QDs on GaAs substrates, their incorporation into a SESAM, and the realization of the first 10 GHz repetition rate QD-SESAM modelocked laser at 1.55 µm, exhibiting ∼2 ps pulse width from an Er-doped glass oscillator (ERGO). With a high areal dot density and strong light emission, this QD structure is a very promising candidate for many other applications, such as laser diodes, optical amplifiers, non-linear and photonic crystal based devices.

  10. 1.55 µm InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots and High Repetition Rate Quantum Dot SESAM Mode-locked Laser

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. Y.; Oehler, A. E. H.; Resan, B.; Kurmulis, S.; Zhou, K. J.; Wang, Q.; Mangold, M.; Süedmeyer, T.; Keller, U.; Weingarten, K. J.; Hogg, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    High pulse repetition rate (≥10 GHz) diode-pumped solid-state lasers, modelocked using semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) are emerging as an enabling technology for high data rate coherent communication systems owing to their low noise and pulse-to-pulse optical phase-coherence. Quantum dot (QD) based SESAMs offer potential advantages to such laser systems in terms of reduced saturation fluence, broader bandwidth, and wavelength flexibility. Here, we describe the development of an epitaxial process for the realization of high optical quality 1.55 µm In(Ga)As QDs on GaAs substrates, their incorporation into a SESAM, and the realization of the first 10 GHz repetition rate QD-SESAM modelocked laser at 1.55 µm, exhibiting ∼2 ps pulse width from an Er-doped glass oscillator (ERGO). With a high areal dot density and strong light emission, this QD structure is a very promising candidate for many other applications, such as laser diodes, optical amplifiers, non-linear and photonic crystal based devices. PMID:22745898

  11. In vivo near-realtime volumetric optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy using a high-repetition-rate nanosecond fiber-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Shao, Peng; Forbrich, Alexander; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) is capable of achieving optical-absorption-contrast images with micron-scale spatial resolution. Previous OR-PAM systems have been frame-rate limited by mechanical scanning speeds and laser pulse repetition rate (PRR). We demonstrate OR-PAM imaging using a diode-pumped nanosecond-pulsed Ytterbium-doped 532-nm fiber laser with PRR up to 600 kHz. Combined with fast-scanning mirrors, our proposed system provides C-scan and 3D images with acquisition frame rate of 4 frames per second (fps) or higher, two orders of magnitude faster than previously published systems. High-contrast images of capillary-scale microvasculature in a live Swiss Webster mouse ear with ~6-μm optical lateral spatial resolution are demonstrated.

  12. C-cut Nd-doped vanadate crystal self-Raman laser with narrow Q-switched envelope and high mode-locked repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuo-han; Peng, Ji-ying; Zheng, Yi; Yang, Ye; Kou, Jin-hua

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a passively Q-switched and mode-locked c-cut Nd-doped vanadate crystal self-Raman laser at 1.17 μm is firstly demonstrated by using Cr4+:YAG. Two crystals of Nd3+:YVO4 and Nd3+:GdVO4 are adopted to generate laser, respectively. With the incident pump power of 13 W, the average output powers of 678 mW and 852 mW at 1.17 μm are obtained with the durations of Q-switched envelope of 1.8 ns and 2 ns, respectively. The mode-locked repetition rates are as high as 2.3 Hz and 2.2 GHz, respectively. As far as we know, the Q-switched envelope is the narrowest and the mode-locked repetition rate is the highest at present in this field. In addition, yellow laser output is also achieved by using the LiB3O5 frequency doubling crystal.

  13. Influence of pulse repetition rate of Er:YAG laser and dentin depth on tensile bond strength of dentin-resin interface.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Mariane; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2008-08-01

    The study evaluated the in vitro influence of pulse-repetition rate of Er:YAG laser and dentin depth on tensile bond strength of dentin-resin interface. Dentin surfaces of buccal or lingual surfaces from human third molars were submitted to tensile test in different depths (superficial, 1.0 and 1.5 mm) of the same dental area, using the same sample. Surface treatments were acid conditioning solely (control) and Er:YAG laser irradiation (80 mJ) followed by acid conditioning, with different pulse-repetition rates (1, 2, 3, or 4 Hz). Single bond/Z-250 system was used. The samples were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, and then the first test (superficial dentine) was performed. The bond failures were analyzed. Following, the specimens were identified, grounded until 1.0- and 1.5-mm depths, submitted again to the treatments and to the second and, after that, to third-bond tests on a similar procedure and failure analysis. ANOVA and Tukey test demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.001) for treatment and treatment x depth interaction (p < 0.05). The tested depths did not show influence (p > 0.05) on the bond strength of dentin-resin interface. It may be concluded that Er:YAG laser with 1, 2, 3, or 4 Hz combined with acid conditioning did not increase the resin tensile bond strength to dentin, regardless of dentin depth.

  14. Gain-switched laser diode seeded Yb-doped fiber amplifier delivering 11-ps pulses at repetition rates up to 40-MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryser, Manuel; Neff, Martin; Pilz, Soenke; Burn, Andreas; Romano, Valerio

    2012-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate all-fiber direct amplification of 11 picosecond pulses from a gain-switched laser diode at 1063 nm. The diode was driven at a repetition rate of 40 MHz and delivered 13 μW of fiber-coupled average output power. For the low output pulse energy of 0.33 pJ we have designed a multi-stage core pumped preamplifier based on single clad Yb-doped fibers in order to keep the contribution of undesired amplified spontaneous emission as low as possible and to minimize temporal and spectral broadening. After the preamplifier we reduced the 40 MHz repetition rate to 1 MHz using a fiber coupled pulse-picker. The final amplification was done with a cladding pumped Yb-doped large mode area fiber and a subsequent Yb-doped rod-type fiber. With our setup we achieved amplification of 72 dBs to an output pulse energy of 5.7 μJ, pulse duration of 11 ps and peak power of >0.6 MW.

  15. Demonstration of a 100 Hz repetition rate gain-saturated diode-pumped table-top soft x-ray laser.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Brendan A; Wernsing, Keith A; Curtis, Alden H; Furch, Federico J; Luther, Bradley M; Patel, Dinesh; Menoni, Carmen S; Rocca, Jorge J

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate the operation of a gain-saturated table-top soft x-ray laser at 100 Hz repetition rate. The laser generates an average power of 0.15 mW at λ=18.9  nm, the highest laser power reported to date from a sub-20-nm wavelength compact source. Picosecond laser pulses of 1.5 μJ energy were produced at λ=18.9  nm by amplification in a Mo plasma created by tailoring the temporal intensity profile of single pump pulses with 1 J energy produced by a diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Lasing was also obtained in the 13.9 nm line of Ni-like Ag. These results increase by an order of magnitude the repetition rate of plasma-based soft x-ray lasers opening the path to milliwatt average power table-top lasers at sub-20 nm wavelengths.

  16. Efficacy of a Low Fluence, High Repetition Rate 810nm Diode Laser for Permanent Hair Reduction in Indian Patients with Skin Types IV–VI

    PubMed Central

    Velaskar, Sangeeta; Gold, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study’s aim is to evaluate the novel “in motion” technique for permanent hair removal using a low level fluence/high repetition rate on patients with a dark skin type over different areas of the body. Objectives: To assess fluence, accumulative energy, and number of treatments needed to achieve a significant hair reduction and patient satisfaction with minimal side effects, low discomfort levels, and high safety profile in a skin type IV–VI Indian patients. Methods: Seventy-one Indian female patients with skin type IV–VI were enrolled in the study. All patients were treated with a low fluence, high repetition rate 810nm diode laser using a predetermined set of parameters for 5 to 6 treatments in 1- to 3-month intervals. Hair reduction was measured by patients’ satisfaction and all adverse effects were documented. Results: Results obtained a high degree of patient satisfaction and a very low record of adverse events. Treatments were complication-free for dark skins and a reasonable schedule or sessions and intervals. The discomfort during the sessions was negligible. PMID:28210387

  17. High repetition rate tabletop soft x-ray lasers at wavelengths down to 11.9 nm in Nickel-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Bradley M.; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2005-10-01

    There is significant interest in the development of high average power table-top soft x-ray lasers (SXL) for applications. The repetition rate of gain-saturated collisional SXL operating at wavelengths of less than 30nm has been limited to one shot every several minutes by the large laser pump energy required to heat the plasma. Recent experiments have demonstrated a large pump energy reduction by directing the heating pulse into the plasma at grazing incidence [1-3]. This pumping geometry takes advantage of the refraction of the pump beam in the plasma to deposit a large fraction of its energy into the gain region. Here we report 5Hz repetition rate operation of gain-saturated table-top lasers with 1-2μW average power in transitions of Ni-like ions (Mo, Ru, Pd, Ag and Cd) at wavelengths between 18.9nm and 13.2nm, using a 1J, 8 ps heating pulse from a Ti:Sa laser. Strong amplification was also observed at 11.9 nm in Ni-like Sn. 1. R. Keenan et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 94, 103901, (2005). 2. B. M. Luther et al, Opt. Lett., 30, 165, (2005). 3. D. Alessi et al, Opt. Express, 13, 2093, (2005).

  18. Sample exchange by beam scanning with applications to noncollinear pump-probe spectroscopy at kilohertz repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Austin P.; Hill, Robert J.; Peters, William K.; Baranov, Dmitry; Cho, Byungmoon; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Carollo, Alexa R.; Curtis, Anna C.; Jonas, David M.

    2017-06-01

    In laser spectroscopy, high photon flux can perturb the sample away from thermal equilibrium, altering its spectroscopic properties. Here, we describe an optical beam scanning apparatus that minimizes repetitive sample excitation while providing shot-to-shot sample exchange for samples such as cryostats, films, and air-tight cuvettes. In this apparatus, the beam crossing point is moved within the focal plane inside the sample by scanning both tilt angles of a flat mirror. A space-filling spiral scan pattern was designed that efficiently utilizes the sample area and mirror scanning bandwidth. Scanning beams along a spiral path is shown to increase the average number of laser shots that can be sampled before a spot on the sample cell is resampled by the laser to ˜1700 (out of the maximum possible 2500 for the sample area and laser spot size) while ensuring minimal shot-to-shot spatial overlap. Both an all-refractive version and an all-reflective version of the apparatus are demonstrated. The beam scanning apparatus does not measurably alter the time delay (less than the 0.4 fs measurement uncertainty), the laser focal spot size (less than the 2 μ m measurement uncertainty), or the beam overlap (less than the 3.3% measurement uncertainty), leading to pump-probe and autocorrelation signal transients that accurately characterize the equilibrium sample.

  19. Human sensory-evoked responses differ coincident with either "fusion-memory" or "flash-memory", as shown by stimulus repetition-rate effects

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Don L; Hart, Toryalai; Larson-Prior, Linda J; Baird, Bill; Olson, Marram; Trumpis, Michael; Makayed, Katherine; Bavafa, Payam

    2006-01-01

    Background: A new method has been used to obtain human sensory evoked-responses whose time-domain waveforms have been undetectable by previous methods. These newly discovered evoked-responses have durations that exceed the time between the stimuli in a continuous stream, thus causing an overlap which, up to now, has prevented their detection. We have named them "A-waves", and added a prefix to show the sensory system from which the responses were obtained (visA-waves, audA-waves, somA-waves). Results: When A-waves were studied as a function of stimulus repetition-rate, it was found that there were systematic differences in waveshape at repetition-rates above and below the psychophysical region in which the sensation of individual stimuli fuse into a continuity. The fusion phenomena is sometimes measured by a "Critical Fusion Frequency", but for this research we can only identify a frequency-region [which we call the STZ (Sensation-Transition Zone)]. Thus, the A-waves above the STZ differed from those below the STZ, as did the sensations. Study of the psychophysical differences in auditory and visual stimuli, as shown in this paper, suggest that different stimulus features are detected, and remembered, at stimulation rates above and below STZ. Conclusion: The results motivate us to speculate that: 1) Stimulus repetition-rates above the STZ generate waveforms which underlie "fusion-memory" whereas rates below the STZ show neuronal processing in which "flash-memory" occurs. 2) These two memories differ in both duration and mechanism, though they may occur in the same cell groups. 3) The differences in neuronal processing may be related to "figure" and "ground" differentiation. We conclude that A-waves provide a novel measure of neural processes that can be detected on the human scalp, and speculate that they may extend clinical applications of evoked response recordings. If A-waves also occur in animals, it is likely that A-waves will provide new methods for

  20. Repetition reduction: Lexical repetition in the absence of referent repetition

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence compared to words that are new to a discourse. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and lexical items simultaneously. Therefore, repetition reduction could be due to repeated mention of a referent, or repetition of a word or referring expression. In our study, we test whether repetition reduction is due to repetition of lexical items or repeated mention of referents using an event description task. The results show that repeated lexical items lead to reduced duration and intensity even in the absence of referent repetition whereas repeated referents lead to reduced intensity alone. The general pattern suggests that repetition reduction is due most strongly to repetition of the lexical item, rather than repeated mention of the referent. PMID:24548320

  1. Bounded rational expectations and the stability of interest rate policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Orlando; Mendes, Diana A.; Mendes, Vivaldo M.

    2008-06-01

    The New Keynesian model has recently been subject to two serious criticisms: the model cannot produce plausible inflation and output dynamics following a monetary shock, and the stability of its dynamics suffers from indeterminacy. The procedures that have been proposed to eliminate these two shortcomings fall into two categories: the introduction of some sort of backward price indexation into the standard model and/or other forms of stickiness (like sticky information); and the adoption of some form of policy rule that completely offsets the effects of forward looking dynamics in the optimization process. In this paper we do not eradicate forward looking behavior from the dynamics of the New Keynesian model, neither do we impose some form of backward price indexation. We assume that private economic agents have forward looking behavior and that they do try to optimize with all available information; the only novelty is that they are allowed to make small mistakes near the rational expectations equilibrium, in a fully deterministic setup. These “near rational” or “bounded rational” expectations show that the dynamics of the model with active interest rate rules is much richer than the simple problem of local indeterminacy as is usually found in the literature.

  2. Differential contributions of motor cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum to speech motor control: effects of syllable repetition rate evaluated by fMRI.

    PubMed

    Wildgruber, D; Ackermann, H; Grodd, W

    2001-01-01

    In order to delineate the neuroanatomical correlates of speech motor control, functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed during silent repetitions of the syllable "ta" at three different rates (2.5, 4.0, and 5.5 Hz). Spatial extent and magnitude of hemodynamic responses at the level of the motor cortex showed a positive correlation to production frequencies. As concerns the basal ganglia, the lower rates (2.5 and 4.0 Hz) gave rise to higher magnitudes of activation within the left putamen as compared to the 5.5 Hz condition. In contrast, cerebellar responses were rather restricted to fast performance (4.0 and 5.5 Hz) and exhibited a shift in caudal direction during 5.5 as compared to 4.0 Hz. These findings corroborate the suggestion of a differential impact of various cortical and subcortical areas on speech motor control.

  3. PULSAR: A High-Repetition-Rate, High-Power, CE Phase-Locked Laser for the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Itzhak, Itzik; Carnes, Kevin D.; Cocke, C. Lew; Fehrenbach, Charles W.; Kumarappan, Vinod; Rudenko, Artem; Trallero, Carlos

    2014-05-09

    This instrumentation grant funded the development and installation of a state-of-the-art laser system to be used for the DOE funded research at the J.R. Macdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. Specifically, we purchased a laser based on the KMLABs Red-Dragon design, which has a high repetition rate of 10-20 kHz crucial for multi-parameter coincidence measurements conducted in our lab. This laser system is carrier-envelope phase (CEP) locked and provides pulses as short as 21 fs directly from the amplifier (see details below). In addition, we have developed a pulse compression setup that provides sub 5 fs pulses and a CEP tagging capability that allows for long measurements of CEP dependent processes.

  4. Laser ablation efficiency during the production of Ag nanoparticles in ethanol at a low pulse repetition rate (1-10 Hz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valverde-Alva, M. A.; García-Fernández, T.; Esparza-Alegría, E.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.; Sánchez-Aké, C.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; de la Mora, M. B.; Márquez-Herrera, C. E.; Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of the repetition rate of laser pulses (RRLP) in the range from 1-10 Hz in the production of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) by laser ablation in ethanol. Laser pulses with a duration of 7 ns, a wavelength of 1064 nm and an energy of 60 mJ were used to ablate a 99.99% pure silver target immersed in 10 ml of ethanol. Transmittance analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy were used to study the silver concentration in the colloidal solutions. The ablation process was studied by measuring the transmission of the laser pulses through the colloid. It is shown that for a fixed number of laser pulses (NLP) the ablation efficiency, in terms of the ablated silver mass per laser pulse, increases with the RRLP. This result contradicts what had previously been established in the literature.

  5. Experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of pulse repetition rate adjustable deep ultraviolet picosecond radiation by second harmonic generation in KBe2BO3F2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Zhang, Fengfeng; Zhang, Shenjin; Wang, Zhimin; Yang, Feng; Xu, Fengliang; Peng, Qinjun; Cui, Dafu; Zhang, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chuangtian; Xu, Zuyan

    2014-06-01

    We reported on an experimental investigation and theoretical analysis of pulse repetition rate (PRR) adjustable deep ultraviolet (DUV) picosecond (ps) radiation by second harmonic generation (SHG) in KBe2BO3F2 (KBBF) crystal. Third harmonic radiation at 355 nm of a ps Nd:YVO4 laser output with PRR of 200 kHz-1 MHz was employed as the pump source. The dependence of the 177.3 nm output power on the 355 nm pump power was measured at different PRRs, and the maximum 177.3 nm average output power of 695 μW was obtained at the PRR of 200 kHz. The measured data agreed well with the results of the ps KBBF SHG theoretical simulations. Using simulations, the pulse width and the spectral bandwidth of the generated radiation at 177.3 nm were estimated to be 5.88 ps and 7.84 pm, respectively.

  6. High energy pulses generation with giant spectrum bandwidth and submegahertz repetition rate from a passively mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser in all normal dispersion cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-H.; Wang, D.; Lin, K.-H.

    2011-01-01

    Robust passively mode-locked pulse generation with low pulse repetition rate and giant spectrum bandwidth in an all-fiber, all-normal-dispersion ytterbium-doped fiber laser has been experimentally demonstrated using nonlinear polarization evolution technique. The highest pulse energy over 20 nJ with spectrum bandwidth over 50 nm can be experimentally obtained at 175 mW pump power. The mode-locked pulses reveal broadened 3-dB pulsewidth about several nanosecond and widened pedestal in time trace that is resulted from enormous dispersion in laser cavity and gain dynamics. At certain mode-locking state, a spectrum gap around 1056 nm are observed between the three and four energy levels of Yb-doped fiber laser. By properly rotating the polarization controller, the gap can be eliminated due to four-wave mixing to produce more flattened spectrum output.

  7. Temperature scaling of hot electrons produced by a tightly focused relativistic-intensity laser at 0.5 kHz repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Mordovanakis, Aghapi G.; Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Easter, James; Hou Bixue; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl; Popov, Konstantin; Rozmus, Wojciech; Mourou, Gerard; Haines, Malcolm G.

    2010-02-15

    The energy spectrum of hot electrons emitted from the interaction of a relativistically intense laser with an Al plasma is measured at a repetition rate of 0.5 kHz by accumulating approx10{sup 3} highly reproducible laser shots. In the 10{sup 17}-2x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} range, the temperature of electrons escaping the plasma along the specular direction scales as (Ilambda{sup 2}){sup 0.64+}-{sup 0.05} for p-polarized pulses incident at 45 deg. This scaling is in good agreement with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and a simple model that estimates the hot-electron temperature by considering the balance between the deposited laser intensity and the energy carried away by those electrons.

  8. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Krastelev, E. G. Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80–90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  9. Nanosecond pulsed power generator for a voltage amplitude up to 300 kV and a repetition rate up to 16 Hz for fine disintegration of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krastelev, E. G.; Sedin, A. A.; Tugushev, V. I.

    2015-12-01

    A generator of high-power high-voltage nanosecond pulses is intended for electrical discharge disintegration of mineral quartz and other nonconducting minerals. It includes a 320 kV Marx pulsed voltage generator, a high-voltage glycerin-insulated coaxial peaking capacitor, and an output gas spark switch followed by a load, an electric discharge disintegration chamber. The main parameters of the generator are as follows: a voltage pulse amplitude of up to 300 kV, an output impedance of ≈10 Ω, a discharge current amplitude of up to 25 kA for a half-period of 80-90 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of up to 16 Hz.

  10. 12-fs pulses from a continuous-wave-pumped 200-nJ Ti:sapphire amplifier at a variable repetition rate as high as 4 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, R.; Adler, F.; Leitenstorfer, A.; Beutter, M.; Baum, P.; Riedle, E.

    2003-11-01

    We demonstrate a novel compact femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system operating at repetition rates from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. The scheme is based on the combination of a broadband cavity-dumped oscillator and a double-pass Ti:sapphire amplifier pumped by a low-noise cw solid-state laser. Amplified pulses with an extremely smooth spectrum, a duration of only 12 fs, and less than 0.25% rms fluctuation are generated in a beam with M2 < 1.2. A maximum pulse energy of 210 nJ and an average output power of as much as 720 mW are achieved. This output energy is sufficient to generate a stable continuum in a sapphire disk.

  11. Confocal Raman imaging of optical waveguides in LiNbO3 fabricated by ultrafast high-repetition rate laser-writing.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, Airán; Nejadmalayeri, Amir H; Jaque, Daniel; Herman, Peter

    2008-09-01

    We report on the confocal Raman characterization of the micro-structural lattice changes induced during the high-repetition rate ultrafast laser writing of buried optical waveguides in lithium niobate (LiNbO(3)) crystals. While the laser beam focal volume is characterized by a significant lattice expansion together with a high defect concentration, the adjacent waveguide zone is largely free of defects, undergoing only slight rearrangement of the oxygen octahedron in the LiNbO(3) lattice. The close proximity of these two zones has been found responsible for the propagation losses of the guided light. Subjacent laser-induced periodic micro-structures have been also observed inside the laser focal volume, and identified with a strong periodic distribution of lattice defects.

  12. Ultrafast laser with an average power of 120 W at 515 nm and a highly dynamic repetition rate in the MHz range for novel applications in micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, F.; Piontek, M. C.; Herrmann, T.; L'huillier, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    A new generation of resonant scanners in the kHz-range shows ultra-high deflection speeds of more than 1000m/s but suffer from an inherent nonlinear mirror oscillation. If this oscillation is not compensated, a typical bitmap, written point by point, would be strongly distorted because of the decreasing spot distance at the turning point of the scanning mirror. However, this can be avoided by a dynamic adaption of the repetition rate (RR) of the ultrafast laser. Since resonant scanners are operated in the 10 kHz-range, this means that the RR has to be continuously swept up to several 10 000 times per second between e.g. 5MHz and 10 MHz. High-speed continuous adaption of the RR could also optimize laser micromachining of narrow curved geometries, where nowadays a time consuming approximation with numerous vectors is required. We present a laser system, which is capable of sweeping the RR more than 32 000 times per second between 5MHz and 10MHz at an average output power of more than 120W at 515nm with a pulse duration of about 40 ps. The laser consists of a semiconductor oscillator, a 3-stage fiber pre-amplifier, a solid state InnoSlab power amplifier and a SHG stage. We systematically analyzed the dynamic of the laser system as well as the spectral and temporal behavior of the optical pulses. Switching the repetition rate typically causes a varying pulse energy, which could affect the machining quality over one scanning line. This effect will be analyzed and discussed. Possible techniques to compensate or avoid this effect will be considered.

  13. Efficient femtosecond 50 MHz repetition rate mid-IR source up to 17 µm by difference-frequency generation in AgGaSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutler, Marcus; Rimke, Ingo; Büttner, Edlef; Badikov, Valery; Badikov, Dmitri; Petrov, Valentin

    2014-02-01

    We present an efficient coherent source widely tunable in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range consisting of a novel femtosecond Yb-fiber laser operating at ~50 MHz repetition rate, a synchronously-pumped OPO (SPOPO) and difference-frequency generation (DFG) in AgGaSe2. With an average input power of 5 W for ~260 fs pump pulses at 1034 nm, the SPOPO outputs are tunable from ~1710 to 1950 nm (signal) and from 2200 to 2600 nm (idler) with pulse durations between 200 and 250 fs over the entire tuning range. After temporally overlapping signal and idler through a delay line, the two beams are spatially recombined with a dichroic mirror and focused to a beam diameter of ~75 μm. For DFG we employ an uncoated 2-mm-thick AgGaSe2 nonlinear crystal cut for type-I interaction at θ=57°. The generated femtosecond mid-IR pulses are continuously tunable between 5 and 17 μm with average power of up to 69 mW at 6 μm and more than 1 mW at 17 μm. Their spectra and autocorrelation traces are measured up to 12 μm and 8 μm, respectively, and indicate that the input spectral bandwidth and pulse duration are maintained to a great extent in the nonlinear frequency conversion processes. The DFG pulse width measured at 7.2 μm amounts to ~300 fs (FWHM). The measured spectral bandwidth supports ~150 fs Gaussian pulse durations across the entire DFG tuning range. For the first time mid-IR pulses with energy exceeding 1 nJ are generated at such high repetition rates.

  14. Tunable Yb-doped fiber laser based on a FBG array and a theta ring resonator ensuring a constant repetition rate (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiess, Tobias; Becker, Martin; Rothhardt, Manfred; Bartelt, Hartmut; Jäger, Matthias L.

    2017-03-01

    Fiber lasers provide the perfect basis to develop broadly tunable lasers with high efficiency, excellent beam quality and user-friendly operation as they are increasingly demanded by applications in biophotonics and spectroscopy. Recently, a novel tuning scheme has been presented using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) arrays as fiber-integrated spectral filters containing many standard FBGs with different feedback wavelengths. Based on the discrete spectral sampling, these reflective filters uniquely enable tailored tuning ranges and broad bandwidths to be implemented into fiber lasers. Even though the first implementation of FBG arrays in pulsed tunable lasers based on a sigma ring resonators works with good emission properties, the laser wavelength is tuned by a changing repetition rate, which causes problems with applications in synchronized environments. In this work, we present a modified resonator scheme to maintain a constant repetition rate over the tuning range and still benefit from the advantages of FBG arrays as filters. With a theta ring cavity and two counter propagating filter passes, the distributed feedback of the FBG array is compensated resulting in a constant pulse round trip time for each filter wavelength. Together with an adapted gating scheme controlling the emission wavelength with a modulator, the tuning principle has been realized based on a Ytterbium-doped fiber laser. We present first experimental results demonstrating a tuning range of 25nm, high signal contrast and pulse durations of about 10ns. With the prospect of tailored tuning ranges, this pulsed fiber-integrated laser may be the basis to tackle challenging applications in spectroscopy.

  15. High-repetition-rate, widely tunable terahertz generation in GaSe pumped by a dual-wavelength KTP-OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dexian; Xu, Degang; Wang, Yuye; Shi, Wei; Zhong, Kai; Liu, Pengxiang; Yan, Chao; Sheng, Quan; Mei, Jialin; Shi, Jia; Yao, Jianquan

    2016-11-01

    High-repetition-rate, monochromatic and tunable terahertz (THz) source is demonstrated. We use an orthogonally polarized dual-wavelength intracavity OPO to complete the type-II phase-matched collinear difference-frequency generation in GaSe. A high average-power 2 μm laser with 12 W output power and good beam quality based on an intracavity KTP OPO is experimentally designed. The KTP OPO is intracavity pumped by an acousto-optical Q-switched side-pumped Nd:YAG with the repetition rate of 10 kHz. Two identical KTP crystals were 7 × 8 × 15 mm3 in size, cut at θ = 51.2°, φ = 0°, which were tuned in the x-z plane to achieve type-II phase-matching. The KTP OPO consists of two identical KTP crystals to reduce the walk-off effect and improve the beam overlap area of the output signal and idler waves. The pulse-width of the 2-μm KTP OPO laser is about 11 ns with the linewidth about 0.8 nm. The focused OPO beam is injected into the uncoated GaSe with the length of 8 mm, and the generated THz wave is detected with a 4.2-K Si-bolometer after focusing with a polyethylene lens. The tunable and coherent radiation from 0.2 to 3 THz has been achieved based on the type-II phase-matching DFG when the two pump waves are in the range of 2.1064 - 2.1272 μm and 2.1516 - 2.1304 μm while symmetrically tuning the phase-matching angle of the KTPs. The maximum output THz average power can reach μW-level around 1.48 THz.

  16. Use of a high repetition rate neutron generator for in vivo body composition measurements via neutron inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kehayias, J.J.; Ellis, K.J.; Cohn, S.H.; Weinlein, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    A small D-T neutron generator with a high pulse rate is used for the in vivo measurement of body carbon, oxygen and hydrogen. The core of the neutron generator is a 13 cm-long Zetatron tube pulsed at a rate of 10 kHz delivering 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/ neutrons per pulse. A target-current feedback system regulates the source of the accelerator to assure constant neutron output. Carbon is measured by detecting the 4.44 MeV ..gamma..-rays from inelastic scattering. The short half-life of the 4.44 MeV state of carbon requires detection of the ..gamma..-rays during the 10 ..mu..s neutron pulse. Generators with low pulsing rate were found inappropriate for carbon measurements because of their low duty-cycle (high neutron output during the pulse). In vivo measurements were performed with normal volunteers using a scanning bed facility for a dose less than 25 mrem. This technique offers medical as well as general bulk analysis applications. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Impressions of College Intructors: Stability and Change in Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the topic of stability and change in classroom impressions research is not new, there remain unanswered questions about what impressions are stable, when they are likely to change, and for whom they are likely to change over the course of a semester. My research will begin to answer those questions. My research took place in four college…

  18. University Instructors' Ratings Profiles: Stability Over Time, and Disciplinary Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hativa, Nira; Raviv, Alona

    1996-01-01

    A study compared the teaching behaviors of University of Tel Aviv (Israel) physics and chemistry faculty over two consecutive years, at mid- and end-semester. Findings indicate a high degree of stability in behaviors over time, with no clear-cut improvement during a semester except for faculty undertaking special instructional improvement…

  19. Impressions of College Intructors: Stability and Change in Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the topic of stability and change in classroom impressions research is not new, there remain unanswered questions about what impressions are stable, when they are likely to change, and for whom they are likely to change over the course of a semester. My research will begin to answer those questions. My research took place in four college…

  20. Demonstration of a time-resolved x-ray scattering instrument utilizing the full-repetition rate of x-ray pulses at the Pohang Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Wonhyuk; Eom, Intae; Landahl, Eric C.; Lee, Sooheyong; Yu, Chung-Jong

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of a new experimental instrument for time-resolved x-ray scattering (TRXS) at the Pohang Light Source (PLS-II). It operates with a photon energy ranging from 5 to 18 keV. It is equipped with an amplified Ti:sappahire femtosecond laser, optical diagnostics, and laser beam delivery for pump-probe experiments. A high-speed single-element detector and high trigger-rate oscilloscope are used for rapid data acquisition. While this instrument is capable of measuring sub-nanosecond dynamics using standard laser pump/x-ray probe techniques, it also takes advantage of the dense 500 MHz standard fill pattern in the PLS-II storage ring to efficiently record nano-to-micro-second dynamics simultaneously. We demonstrate this capability by measuring both the (fast) impulsive strain and (slower) thermal recovery dynamics of a crystalline InSb sample following intense ultrafast laser excitation. Exploiting the full repetition rate of the storage ring results in a significant improvement in data collection rates compared to conventional bunch-tagging methods.