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Sample records for repetitive sequence composition

  1. Roles of repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  2. Paucity of moderately repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, C.W.

    1991-01-01

    We examined clones of renatured repetitive human DNA to find novel repetitive DNAs. After eliminating known repeats, the remaining clones were subjected to sequence analysis. These clones also corresponded to known repeats, but with greater sequence diversity. This indicates that either these libraries were depleted of short interspersed repeats in construction, or these repeats are much less prevalent in the human genome than is indicated by data from {und Xenopus} or sea urchin studies. We directly investigated the sequence composition of human DNA through traditional renaturation techniques with the goal of estimating the limits of abundance of repetitive sequence classes in human DNA. Our results sharply limit the maximum possible abundance to 1--2% of the human genome. Our estimate, minus the known repeats in this fraction, leaves about 1% (3 {times} 10{sup 7} nucleotides) of the human genome for novel repetitive elements. 2 refs. (MHB)

  3. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  4. DNA polymerase-catalyzed elongation of repetitive hexanucleotide sequences: application to creation of repetitive DNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Hiroyuki; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate the elongation of various hexanucleotide sequences with thermophilic DNA polymerase, under isothermal or thermal cyclic reaction conditions. We prepared 10 types of double repeat hexanucleotide duplexes with various GC compositions containing between 0 and 6 GC nucleotides per repeat and incubated these duplexes with thermophilic Taq DNA polymerase and dNTPs at various temperatures. All of the model repetitive short duplexes were elongated under the isothermal incubation conditions, although there were some differences in the elongation efficiencies derived from the GC composition in the repetitive sequences. It was also found that all of the model repetitive duplexes were extended more effectively by a 3-step thermal cyclic reaction involving denaturation, annealing, and extension. On the basis of this technique, we prepared a glutamate-encoding short repetitive duplex and created long repetitive DNAs under isothermal and thermal cyclic reaction conditions. DNA sequencing analysis of the cloned repetitive DNA revealed that well-ordered long repetitive DNAs of various chain lengths were created by this DNA polymerase-catalyzed ligation method, and these were easily cloned into vectors by the TA-cloning method. This method could be useful for obtaining DNAs encoding arbitrary long repetitive amino acid sequences more effectively than the conventional T4 ligase-catalyzed ligation method.

  5. Sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    De Bustos, Alfredo; Cuadrado, Angeles; Jouve, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is widespread in eukaryotic genomes, in some cases making up more than 80% of the total. SSRs are a type of repetitive DNA formed by short motifs repeated in tandem arrays. In some species, SSRs may be organized into long stretches, usually associated with the constitutive heterochromatin. Variation in repeats can alter the expression of genes, and changes in the number of repeats have been linked to certain human diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular characterization of these repeats has been hampered by technical limitations related to cloning and sequencing. Indeed, most sequenced genomes contain gaps owing to repetitive DNA-related assembly difficulties. This paper reports an alternative method for sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA based on the combined use of 1) a linear vector to stabilize the cloning process, and 2) the use of exonuclease III for obtaining progressive deletions of SSR-rich fragments. This strategy allowed the sequencing of a fragment containing a stretch of 6.2 kb of continuous SSRs. To demonstrate that this procedure can sequence other kinds of repetitive DNA, it was used to examine a 4.5 kb fragment containing a cluster of 15 repeats of the 5S rRNA gene of barley. PMID:27819354

  6. Highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences are present at human centromeres.

    PubMed Central

    Grady, D L; Ratliff, R L; Robinson, D L; McCanlies, E C; Meyne, J; Moyzis, R K

    1992-01-01

    Highly conserved repetitive DNA sequence clones, largely consisting of (GGAAT)n repeats, have been isolated from a human recombinant repetitive DNA library by high-stringency hybridization with rodent repetitive DNA. This sequence, the predominant repetitive sequence in human satellites II and III, is similar to the essential core DNA of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae centromere, centromere DNA element (CDE) III. In situ hybridization to human telophase and Drosophila polytene chromosomes shows localization of the (GGAAT)n sequence to centromeric regions. Hyperchromicity studies indicate that the (GGAAT)n sequence exhibits unusual hydrogen bonding properties. The purine-rich strand alone has the same thermal stability as the duplex. Hyperchromicity studies of synthetic DNA variants indicate that all sequences with the composition (AATGN)n exhibit this unusual thermal stability. DNA-mobility-shift assays indicate that specific HeLa-cell nuclear proteins recognize this sequence with a relative affinity greater than 10(5). The extreme evolutionary conservation of this DNA sequence, its centromeric location, its unusual hydrogen bonding properties, its high affinity for specific nuclear proteins, and its similarity to functional centromeres isolated from yeast suggest that this sequence may be a component of the functional human centromere. Images PMID:1542662

  7. Intranuclear Anchoring of Repetitive DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian; Almeder, Marlene; Philimonenko, Vlada V.; Frei, Klemens; Wachtler, Franz; Hozák, Pavel

    1999-01-01

    Centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal gene clusters consist of repetitive DNA sequences. To assess their contributions to the spatial organization of the interphase genome, their interactions with the nucleoskeleton were examined in quiescent and activated human lymphocytes. The nucleoskeletons were prepared using “physiological” conditions. The resulting structures were probed for specific DNA sequences of centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization; the electroeluted DNA fractions were examined by blot hybridization. In both nonstimulated and stimulated lymphocytes, centromeric alpha-satellite repeats were almost exclusively found in the eluted fraction, while telomeric sequences remained attached to the nucleoskeleton. Ribosomal genes showed a transcription-dependent attachment pattern: in unstimulated lymphocytes, transcriptionally inactive ribosomal genes located outside the nucleolus were eluted completely. When comparing transcription unit and intergenic spacer, significantly more of the intergenic spacer was removed. In activated lymphocytes, considerable but similar amounts of both rDNA fragments were eluted. The results demonstrate that: (a) the various repetitive DNA sequences differ significantly in their intranuclear anchoring, (b) telomeric rather than centromeric DNA sequences form stable attachments to the nucleoskeleton, and (c) different attachment mechanisms might be responsible for the interaction of ribosomal genes with the nucleoskeleton. PMID:10613900

  8. Repetitive DNA sequences in Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Two types of different repetitive DNA sequences called RepMP1 and RepMP2 were identified in the genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. The number of these repeated elements, their nucleotide sequence and their localization on a physical map of the M. pneumoniae genome were determined. The results show that RepMP1 appears at least 10 times and RepMP2 at least 8 times in the genome. The repeated elements are dispersed on the chromosome and, in three cases, linked to each other by a homologous DNA sequence of 400 bp. The elements themselves are 300 bp (for RepMP1) and 150 bp (for RepMP2) long showing a high degree of homology. One copy of RepMP2 is a translated part of the gene for the major cytadhesin protein P1 which is responsible for the adsorption of M. pneumoniae to its host cell. Images PMID:3138660

  9. Cloning and characterization of a highly repetitive fish nucleotide sequence.

    PubMed

    Datta, U; Dutta, P; Mandal, R K

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a highly repetitive HindIII fragment of DNA from the common carp Cyprinus carpio. It represents a tandemly repeated sequence with a monomeric unit of 245 bp and comprises 8% of the fish genome. Higher units of this monomer appear as a ladder in Southern blots. The monomeric unit has been sequenced; it is A + T-rich with some direct and some inverse-repeat nucleotide clusters.

  10. Repetitive sequences: the hidden diversity of heterochromatin in prochilodontid fish

    PubMed Central

    Terencio, Maria L.; Schneider, Carlos H.; Gross, Maria C.; do Carmo, Edson Junior; Nogaroto, Viviane; de Almeida, Mara Cristina; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Vicari, Marcelo R.; Feldberg, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The structure and organization of repetitive elements in fish genomes are still relatively poorly understood, although most of these elements are believed to be located in heterochromatic regions. Repetitive elements are considered essential in evolutionary processes as hotspots for mutations and chromosomal rearrangements, among other functions – thus providing new genomic alternatives and regulatory sites for gene expression. The present study sought to characterize repetitive DNA sequences in the genomes of Semaprochilodus insignis (Jardine & Schomburgk, 1841) and Semaprochilodus taeniurus (Valenciennes, 1817) and identify regions of conserved syntenic blocks in this genome fraction of three species of Prochilodontidae (Semaprochilodus insignis, Semaprochilodus taeniurus, and Prochilodus lineatus (Valenciennes, 1836) by cross-FISH using Cot-1 DNA (renaturation kinetics) probes. We found that the repetitive fractions of the genomes of Semaprochilodus insignis and Semaprochilodus taeniurus have significant amounts of conserved syntenic blocks in hybridization sites, but with low degrees of similarity between them and the genome of Prochilodus lineatus, especially in relation to B chromosomes. The cloning and sequencing of the repetitive genomic elements of Semaprochilodus insignis and Semaprochilodus taeniurus using Cot-1 DNA identified 48 fragments that displayed high similarity with repetitive sequences deposited in public DNA databases and classified as microsatellites, transposons, and retrotransposons. The repetitive fractions of the Semaprochilodus insignis and Semaprochilodus taeniurus genomes exhibited high degrees of conserved syntenic blocks in terms of both the structures and locations of hybridization sites, but a low degree of similarity with the syntenic blocks of the Prochilodus lineatus genome. Future comparative analyses of other prochilodontidae species will be needed to advance our understanding of the organization and evolution of

  11. Storage and retrieval of highly repetitive sequence collections.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Veli; Navarro, Gonzalo; Sirén, Jouni; Välimäki, Niko

    2010-03-01

    A repetitive sequence collection is a set of sequences which are small variations of each other. A prominent example are genome sequences of individuals of the same or close species, where the differences can be expressed by short lists of basic edit operations. Flexible and efficient data analysis on such a typically huge collection is plausible using suffix trees. However, the suffix tree occupies much space, which very soon inhibits in-memory analyses. Recent advances in full-text indexing reduce the space of the suffix tree to, essentially, that of the compressed sequences, while retaining its functionality with only a polylogarithmic slowdown. However, the underlying compression model considers only the predictability of the next sequence symbol given the k previous ones, where k is a small integer. This is unable to capture longer-term repetitiveness. For example, r identical copies of an incompressible sequence will be incompressible under this model. We develop new static and dynamic full-text indexes that are able of capturing the fact that a collection is highly repetitive, and require space basically proportional to the length of one typical sequence plus the total number of edit operations. The new indexes can be plugged into a recent dynamic fully-compressed suffix tree, achieving full functionality for sequence analysis, while retaining the reduced space and the polylogarithmic slowdown. Our experimental results confirm the practicality of our proposal.

  12. Piriform spider silk sequences reveal unique repetitive elements.

    PubMed

    Perry, David J; Bittencourt, Daniela; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Rech, Elibio L; Lewis, Randolph V

    2010-11-08

    Orb-weaving spider silk fibers are assembled from very large, highly repetitive proteins. The repeated segments contain, in turn, short, simple, and repetitive amino acid motifs that account for the physical and mechanical properties of the assembled fiber. Of the six orb-weaver silk fibroins, the piriform silk that makes the attachment discs, which lashes the joints of the web and attaches dragline silk to surfaces, has not been previously characterized. Piriform silk protein cDNAs were isolated from phage libraries of three species: A. trifasciata , N. clavipes , and N. cruentata . The deduced amino acid sequences from these genes revealed two new repetitive motifs: an alternating proline motif, where every other amino acid is proline, and a glutamine-rich motif of 6-8 amino acids. Similar to other spider silk proteins, the repeated segments are large (>200 amino acids) and highly homogenized within a species. There is also substantial sequence similarity across the genes from the three species, with particular conservation of the repetitive motifs. Northern blot analysis revealed that the mRNA is larger than 11 kb and is expressed exclusively in the piriform glands of the spider. Phylogenetic analysis of the C-terminal regions of the new proteins with published spidroins robustly shows that the piriform sequences form an ortholog group.

  13. ReRep: Computational detection of repetitive sequences in genome survey sequences (GSS)

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Thomas D; Gomes, Leonardo HF; Alves-Ferreira, Marcelo; de Miranda, Antonio B; Degrave, Wim M

    2008-01-01

    Background Genome survey sequences (GSS) offer a preliminary global view of a genome since, unlike ESTs, they cover coding as well as non-coding DNA and include repetitive regions of the genome. A more precise estimation of the nature, quantity and variability of repetitive sequences very early in a genome sequencing project is of considerable importance, as such data strongly influence the estimation of genome coverage, library quality and progress in scaffold construction. Also, the elimination of repetitive sequences from the initial assembly process is important to avoid errors and unnecessary complexity. Repetitive sequences are also of interest in a variety of other studies, for instance as molecular markers. Results We designed and implemented a straightforward pipeline called ReRep, which combines bioinformatics tools for identifying repetitive structures in a GSS dataset. In a case study, we first applied the pipeline to a set of 970 GSSs, sequenced in our laboratory from the human pathogen Leishmania braziliensis, the causative agent of leishmaniosis, an important public health problem in Brazil. We also verified the applicability of ReRep to new sequencing technologies using a set of 454-reads of an Escheria coli. The behaviour of several parameters in the algorithm is evaluated and suggestions are made for tuning of the analysis. Conclusion The ReRep approach for identification of repetitive elements in GSS datasets proved to be straightforward and efficient. Several potential repetitive sequences were found in a L. braziliensis GSS dataset generated in our laboratory, and further validated by the analysis of a more complete genomic dataset from the EMBL and Sanger Centre databases. ReRep also identified most of the E. coli K12 repeats prior to assembly in an example dataset obtained by automated sequencing using 454 technology. The parameters controlling the algorithm behaved consistently and may be tuned to the properties of the dataset, in particular

  14. Repetitive sequences in plant nuclear DNA: types, distribution, evolution and function.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goyal, Vinod

    2014-08-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences are a major component of eukaryotic genomes and may account for up to 90% of the genome size. They can be divided into minisatellite, microsatellite and satellite sequences. Satellite DNA sequences are considered to be a fast-evolving component of eukaryotic genomes, comprising tandemly-arrayed, highly-repetitive and highly-conserved monomer sequences. The monomer unit of satellite DNA is 150-400 base pairs (bp) in length. Repetitive sequences may be species- or genus-specific, and may be centromeric or subtelomeric in nature. They exhibit cohesive and concerted evolution caused by molecular drive, leading to high sequence homogeneity. Repetitive sequences accumulate variations in sequence and copy number during evolution, hence they are important tools for taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, and are known as "tuning knobs" in the evolution. Therefore, knowledge of repetitive sequences assists our understanding of the organization, evolution and behavior of eukaryotic genomes. Repetitive sequences have cytoplasmic, cellular and developmental effects and play a role in chromosomal recombination. In the post-genomics era, with the introduction of next-generation sequencing technology, it is possible to evaluate complex genomes for analyzing repetitive sequences and deciphering the yet unknown functional potential of repetitive sequences.

  15. Repetitive Sequences in Plant Nuclear DNA: Types, Distribution, Evolution and Function

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goyal, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences are a major component of eukaryotic genomes and may account for up to 90% of the genome size. They can be divided into minisatellite, microsatellite and satellite sequences. Satellite DNA sequences are considered to be a fast-evolving component of eukaryotic genomes, comprising tandemly-arrayed, highly-repetitive and highly-conserved monomer sequences. The monomer unit of satellite DNA is 150–400 base pairs (bp) in length. Repetitive sequences may be species- or genus-specific, and may be centromeric or subtelomeric in nature. They exhibit cohesive and concerted evolution caused by molecular drive, leading to high sequence homogeneity. Repetitive sequences accumulate variations in sequence and copy number during evolution, hence they are important tools for taxonomic and phylogenetic studies, and are known as “tuning knobs” in the evolution. Therefore, knowledge of repetitive sequences assists our understanding of the organization, evolution and behavior of eukaryotic genomes. Repetitive sequences have cytoplasmic, cellular and developmental effects and play a role in chromosomal recombination. In the post-genomics era, with the introduction of next-generation sequencing technology, it is possible to evaluate complex genomes for analyzing repetitive sequences and deciphering the yet unknown functional potential of repetitive sequences. PMID:25132181

  16. Terminal repetitive sequences in herpesvirus saimiri virion DNA.

    PubMed

    Bankier, A T; Dietrich, W; Baer, R; Barrell, B G; Colbère-Garapin, F; Fleckenstein, B; Bodemer, W

    1985-07-01

    The H-DNA repeat unit of Herpesvirus saimiri strain 11 was cloned in plasmid vector pAGO, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by the dideoxy chain termination method. One unit of repetitive DNA has 1,444 base pairs with 70.8% G+C content. The structural features of repeat DNA sequences at the termini of intact virion M-DNA (160 kilobases) and orientation of reiterated DNA were analyzed by radioactive end labeling of M-DNA, followed by cleavage of the end fragments with restriction endonucleases. The termini appeared to be blunt ended with a 5'-phosphate group, probably generated during encapsidation by cleavage in the immediate vicinity of the single ApaI recognition site in the H-DNA repeat unit. The sequence did not reveal sizeable open reading frames, the longest hypothetical peptide from H-DNA being 85 amino acids. There was no evidence for an mRNA promoter or terminator element, and H-DNA-specific transcription could not be found in productively infected cells.

  17. Accurate Prediction of the Statistics of Repetitions in Random Sequences: A Case Study in Archaea Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Régnier, Mireille; Chassignet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive patterns in genomic sequences have a great biological significance and also algorithmic implications. Analytic combinatorics allow to derive formula for the expected length of repetitions in a random sequence. Asymptotic results, which generalize previous works on a binary alphabet, are easily computable. Simulations on random sequences show their accuracy. As an application, the sample case of Archaea genomes illustrates how biological sequences may differ from random sequences. PMID:27376057

  18. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in Anostomidae species: implications for genomic and sex chromosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Members of the Anostomidae family provide an interesting model system for the study of the influence of repetitive elements on genome composition, mainly because they possess numerous heterochromatic segments and a peculiar system of female heterogamety that is restricted to a few species of the Leporinus genus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify important new repetitive DNA elements in Anostomidae through restriction enzyme digestion, followed by cloning, characterisation and chromosome mapping of this fragment. To identify repetitive elements in other Leporinus species and expand on studies of repetitive elements in Anostomidae, hybridisation experiments were also performed using previously described probes of LeSpeI repetitive elements. Results The 628-base pair (bp) LeSpeII fragment was hybridised to metaphase cells of L. elongatus individuals as well as those of L. macrocephalus, L. obtusidens, L. striatus, L. lacustris, L. friderici, Schizodon borellii and S. isognathus. In L. elongatus, both male and female cells contained small clusters of LeSpeII repetitive elements dispersed on all of the chromosomes, with enrichment near most of the terminal portions of the chromosomes. In the female sex chromosomes of L. elongatus (Z2,Z2/W1W2), however, this repeated element was absent. In the remaining species, a dispersed pattern of hybridisation was observed on all chromosomes irrespective of whether or not they were sex chromosomes. The repetitive element LeSpeI produced positive hybridisations signals only in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens, i.e., species with differentiated sex chromosomes. In the remaining species, the LeSpeI element did not produce hybridisation signals. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the effects of repetitive sequences on the differentiation of the Anostomidae genome, especially with respect to sex chromosome evolution. LeSpeII showed hybridisation patterns typical of Long Interspersed

  19. Evolved gas composition monitoring by repetitive injection gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    White, Robert L

    2015-11-20

    Performance characteristics and applications of a small volume gas chromatograph oven are described. Heating and cooling properties of the apparatus are evaluated and examples are given illustrating the advantages of greatly reducing the air bath volume surrounding fused silica columns. Fast heating and cooling of the oven permit it to be employed for repetitive injection analyses. By using fast gas chromatography separations to achieve short assay cycle times, the apparatus can be employed for on-line species-specific gas stream composition monitoring when volatile species concentrations vary on time scales of a few minutes or longer. This capability facilitates repeated sampling and fast gas chromatographic separations of volatile product mixtures produced during thermal analyses. Applications of repetitive injection gas chromatography-mass spectrometry evolved gas analyses to monitoring purge gas effluent streams containing volatile acid catalyzed polymer cracking products are described. The influence of thermal analysis and chromatographic experimental parameters on effluent sampling frequency are delineated.

  20. Repetitive sequences in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Sindičić, Magda; Gomerčić, Tomislav; Galov, Ana; Polanc, Primož; Huber, Duro; Slavica, Alen

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of numerous species is known to include up to five different repetitive sequences (RS1-RS5) that are found at various locations, involving motifs of different length and extensive length heteroplasmy. Two repetitive sequences (RS2 and RS3) on opposite sides of mtDNA central conserved region have been described in domestic cat (Felis catus) and some other felid species. However, the presence of repetitive sequence RS3 has not been detected in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) yet. We analyzed mtDNA CR of 35 Eurasian lynx (L. lynx L.) samples to characterize repetitive sequences and to compare them with those found in other felid species. We confirmed the presence of 80 base pairs (bp) repetitive sequence (RS2) at the 5' end of the Eurasian lynx mtDNA CR L strand and for the first time we described RS3 repetitive sequence at its 3' end, consisting of an array of tandem repeats five to ten bp long. We found that felid species share similar RS3 repetitive pattern and fundamental repeat motif TACAC.

  1. Isolation and characterization of centromeric repetitive DNA sequences in Saccharum spontaneum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenpan; Zuo, Sheng; Li, Zhanjie; Meng, Zhuang; Han, Jinlei; Song, Junqi; Pan, Yong-Bao; Wang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum hybrids spp.) is the most important sugar crop that accounts for ~75% of the world’s sugar production. Recently, a whole-genome sequencing project was launched on the wild species S. spontaneum. To obtain information on the DNA composition of the repeat-enriched region of the centromere, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of the DNA sequences associated with CenH3 (a mutant of histone H3 located in eukaryote centromeres) using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) method. We demonstrate that the centromeres contain mainly SCEN-like single satellite repeat (Ss1) and several Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon-related repeats (Ss166, Ss51, and Ss68). Ss1 dominates in the centromeric regions and spans up to 500 kb. In contrast, the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon-related repeats are either clustered spanning over a short range, or dispersed in the centromere regions. Interestingly, Ss1 exhibits a chromosome-specific enrichment in the wild species S. spontaneum and S. robustum, but not in the domesticated species S. officinarum and modern sugarcane cultivars. This finding suggests an autopolyploid genome identity of S. spontaneum with a high level of homology among its eight sub-genomes. We also conducted a genome-wide survey of the repetitive DNAs in S. spontaneum following a similarity-based sequence clustering strategy. These results provide insight into the composition of sugarcane genome as well as the genome assembly of S. spontaneum. PMID:28134354

  2. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in eubacteria and application to fingerprinting of bacterial genomes.

    PubMed Central

    Versalovic, J; Koeuth, T; Lupski, J R

    1991-01-01

    Dispersed repetitive DNA sequences have been described recently in eubacteria. To assess the distribution and evolutionary conservation of two distinct prokaryotic repetitive elements, consensus oligonucleotides were used in polymerase chain reaction [PCR] amplification and slot blot hybridization experiments with genomic DNA from diverse eubacterial species. Oligonucleotides matching Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic [REP] elements and Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus [ERIC] sequences were synthesized and tested as opposing PCR primers in the amplification of eubacterial genomic DNA. REP and ERIC consensus oligonucleotides produced clearly resolvable bands by agarose gel electrophoresis following PCR amplification. These band patterns provided unambiguous DNA fingerprints of different eubacterial species and strains. Both REP and ERIC probes hybridized preferentially to genomic DNA from Gram-negative enteric bacteria and related species. Widespread distribution of these repetitive DNA elements in the genomes of various microorganisms should enable rapid identification of bacterial species and strains, and be useful for the analysis of prokaryotic genomes. Images PMID:1762913

  3. Using suffix tree to discover complex repetitive patterns in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    He, Dan

    2006-01-01

    The discovery of repetitive patterns is a fundamental problem in bioinformatics. It remains a challenging open problem because most of the existing methods, such as using annotated repeat database and extracting pairs of maximum repeated regions, can not give a correct definition incorporating both the length and frequency factors of the repetitive patterns. There is an algorithm considering both the pattern length and frequency. However, it could only find the simple "elementary" repeats and is not able to reveal the complex structure of the repetitive patterns. Furthermore, its time complexity O(n2 f), where n is the length of the sequence, f is the minimum frequency requirement, could be still too high for long DNA sequences. In this paper, we propose a novel algorithm using suffix tree to reveal the complex structure of the repetitive patterns in DNA sequences. We show that our algorithm achieves an O(n2/f2) time complexity.

  4. The Peculiar Landscape of Repetitive Sequences in the Olive (Olea europaea L.) Genome

    PubMed Central

    Barghini, Elena; Natali, Lucia; Cossu, Rosa Maria; Giordani, Tommaso; Pindo, Massimo; Cattonaro, Federica; Scalabrin, Simone; Velasco, Riccardo; Morgante, Michele; Cavallini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing genome structure in different species allows to gain an insight into the evolution of plant genome size. Olive (Olea europaea L.) has a medium-sized haploid genome of 1.4 Gb, whose structure is largely uncharacterized, despite the growing importance of this tree as oil crop. Next-generation sequencing technologies and different computational procedures have been used to study the composition of the olive genome and its repetitive fraction. A total of 2.03 and 2.3 genome equivalents of Illumina and 454 reads from genomic DNA, respectively, were assembled following different procedures, which produced more than 200,000 differently redundant contigs, with mean length higher than 1,000 nt. Mapping Illumina reads onto the assembled sequences was used to estimate their redundancy. The genome data set was subdivided into highly and medium redundant and nonredundant contigs. By combining identification and mapping of repeated sequences, it was established that tandem repeats represent a very large portion of the olive genome (∼31% of the whole genome), consisting of six main families of different length, two of which were first discovered in these experiments. The other large redundant class in the olive genome is represented by transposable elements (especially long terminal repeat-retrotransposons). On the whole, the results of our analyses show the peculiar landscape of the olive genome, related to the massive amplification of tandem repeats, more than that reported for any other sequenced plant genome. PMID:24671744

  5. The peculiar landscape of repetitive sequences in the olive (Olea europaea L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Barghini, Elena; Natali, Lucia; Cossu, Rosa Maria; Giordani, Tommaso; Pindo, Massimo; Cattonaro, Federica; Scalabrin, Simone; Velasco, Riccardo; Morgante, Michele; Cavallini, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    Analyzing genome structure in different species allows to gain an insight into the evolution of plant genome size. Olive (Olea europaea L.) has a medium-sized haploid genome of 1.4 Gb, whose structure is largely uncharacterized, despite the growing importance of this tree as oil crop. Next-generation sequencing technologies and different computational procedures have been used to study the composition of the olive genome and its repetitive fraction. A total of 2.03 and 2.3 genome equivalents of Illumina and 454 reads from genomic DNA, respectively, were assembled following different procedures, which produced more than 200,000 differently redundant contigs, with mean length higher than 1,000 nt. Mapping Illumina reads onto the assembled sequences was used to estimate their redundancy. The genome data set was subdivided into highly and medium redundant and nonredundant contigs. By combining identification and mapping of repeated sequences, it was established that tandem repeats represent a very large portion of the olive genome (∼31% of the whole genome), consisting of six main families of different length, two of which were first discovered in these experiments. The other large redundant class in the olive genome is represented by transposable elements (especially long terminal repeat-retrotransposons). On the whole, the results of our analyses show the peculiar landscape of the olive genome, related to the massive amplification of tandem repeats, more than that reported for any other sequenced plant genome.

  6. An improved protocol for sequencing of repetitive genomic regions and structural variations using mutagenesis and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Botond; Massingham, Tim; Stütz, Adrian M; Goldman, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The rise of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies has transformed de novo genome sequencing into an accessible research tool, but obtaining high quality eukaryotic genome assemblies remains a challenge, mostly due to the abundance of repetitive elements. These also make it difficult to study nucleotide polymorphism in repetitive regions, including certain types of structural variations. One solution proposed for resolving such regions is Sequence Assembly aided by Mutagenesis (SAM), which relies on the fact that introducing enough random mutations breaks the repetitive structure, making assembly possible. Sequencing many different mutated copies permits the sequence of the repetitive region to be inferred by consensus methods. However, this approach relies on molecular cloning in order to isolate and amplify individual mutant copies, making it hard to scale-up the approach for use in conjunction with high-throughput sequencing technologies. To address this problem, we propose NG-SAM, a modified version of the SAM protocol that relies on PCR and dilution steps only, coupled to a NGS workflow. NG-SAM therefore has the potential to be scaled-up, e.g. using emerging microfluidics technologies. We built a realistic simulation pipeline to study the feasibility of NG-SAM, and our results suggest that under appropriate experimental conditions the approach might be successfully put into practice. Moreover, our simulations suggest that NG-SAM is capable of reconstructing robustly a wide range of potential target sequences of varying lengths and repetitive structures.

  7. Polymerase Chain Reaction-based Suppression of Repetitive Sequences in Whole Chromosome Painting Probes for FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, L C; Pattee, M; Williams, J; Eklund, M; Bedford, J S; Christian, A T

    2004-04-21

    We have developed a method to suppress the PCR amplification of repetitive sequences in whole chromosome painting probes by adding Cot-1 DNA to the amplification mixture. The repetitive sequences in the Cot-1 DNA bind to their homologous sequences in the probe library, prevent the binding of primers, and interfere with extension of the probe sequences, greatly decreasing PCR efficiency selectively across these blocked regions. A second labeling reaction is then done and this product is resuspended in FISH hybridization mixture without further addition of blocking DNA. The hybridization produces little if any non-specific binding on any other chromosomes. We have been able to successfully use this procedure with both human and rat chromosome probes. This technique should be applicable in producing probes for CGH, M-FISH and SKY, as well as reducing the presence of repetitive DNA in genomic libraries.

  8. The Effects of Delayed Reinforcement on Variability and Repetition of Response Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odum, Amy L.; Ward, Ryan D.; Burke, K. Anne; Barnes, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments examined the effects of delays to reinforcement on key peck sequences of pigeons maintained under multiple schedules of contingencies that produced variable or repetitive behavior. In Experiments 1, 2, and 4, in the repeat component only the sequence right-right-left-left earned food, and in the vary component four-response…

  9. Identification of individual barley chromosomes based on repetitive sequences: conservative distribution of Afa-family repetitive sequences on the chromosomes of barley and wheat.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, H; Mukai, Y; Akagawa, K; Nagaki, K; Fujigaki, J; Yamamoto, M; Sasakuma, T

    1997-10-01

    The Afa-family repetitive sequences were isolated from barley (Hordeum vulgare, 2n = 14) and cloned as pHvA14. This sequence distinguished each barely chromosome by in situ hybridization. Double color fluorescence in situ hybridization using pHvA14 and 5S rDNA or HvRT-family sequence (subtelomeric sequence of barley) allocated individual barley chromosomes showing a specific pattern of pHvA14 to chromosome 1H to 7H. As the case of the D genome chromosomes of Aegilops squarrosa and common wheat (Triticum aestivum) hybridized by its Afa-family sequences, the signals of pHvA14 in barley chromosomes tended to appear in the distal regions that do not carry many chromosome band markers. In the telomeric regions these signals always placed in more proximal portions than those of HvRT-family. Based on the distribution patterns of Afa-family sequences in the chromosomes of barley and D genome chromosomes of wheat, we discuss a possible mechanism of amplification of the repetitive sequences during the evolution of Triticeae. In addition, we show here that HvRT-family also could be used to distinguish individual barley chromosomes from the patterns of in situ hybridization.

  10. Molecular analyses of a repetitive DNA sequence in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Ueng, P P; Hang, A; Tsang, H; Vega, J M; Wang, L; Burton, C S; He, F T; Liu, B

    2000-06-01

    A repetitive sequence designated WE35 was isolated from wheat genomic DNA. This sequence consists of a 320-bp repeat unit and represents approximately 0.002% of the total wheat DNA. It is unidirectionally distributed either continuously or discretely in the genome. Ladder-like banding patterns were observed in Southern blots when the wheat genomic DNA was restricted with endonuclease enzymes EcoRI, HincII, NciI, and NdeI, which is characteristic for tandemly organized sequences. Two DNA fragments in p451 were frequently associated with the WE35 repetitive unit in a majority of lambda wheat genomic clones. A 475-bp fragment homologous to the 5'-end long terminal repeat (LTR) of cereal retroelements was also found in some lambda wheat genomic clones containing the repetitive unit. Physical mapping by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that one pair of wheat chromosomes could be specifically detected with the WE35 positive probe p551. WE35 can be considered a chromosome-specific repetitive sequence. This repetitive unit could be used as a molecular marker for genetic, phylogenetic, and evolutionary studies in the tribe Triticeae.

  11. Isolation, characterization and chromosome localization of repetitive DNA sequences in bananas (Musa spp.).

    PubMed

    Valárik, M; Simková, H; Hribová, E; Safár, J; Dolezelová, M; Dolezel, J

    2002-01-01

    Partial genomic DNA libraries were constructed in Musa acuminata and M. balbisiana and screened for clones carrying repeated sequences, and sequences carrying rDNA. Isolated clones were characterized in terms of copy number, genomic distribution in M. acuminata and M. balbisiana, and sequence similarity to known DNA sequences. Ribosomal RNA genes have been the most abundant sequences recovered. FISH with probes for DNA clones Radkal and Radka7, which carry different fragments of Musa 26S rDNA, and Radka14, for which no homology with known DNA sequences has been found, resulted in clear signals at secondary constrictions. Only one clone carrying 5S rDNA, named Radka2, has been recovered. All remaining DNA clones exhibited more or less pronounced clustering at centromeric regions. The study revealed small differences in genomic distribution of repetitive DNA sequences between M. acuminata and M. balbisiana, the only exception being the 5S rDNA where the two Musa clones under study differed in the number of sites. All repetitive sequences were more abundant in M. acuminata whose genome is about 12% larger than that of M. balbisiana. While, for some sequences, the differences in copy number between the species were relatively small, for some of them, e.g. Radka5, the difference was almost thirty-fold. These observations suggest that repetitive DNA sequences contribute to the difference in genome size between both species, albeit to different extents. Isolation and characterization of new repetitive DNA sequences improves the knowledge of long-range organization of chromosomes in

  12. Identifying satellites and periodic repetitions in biological sequences.

    PubMed

    Sagot, M F; Myers, E W

    1998-01-01

    We present in this paper an algorithm for identifying satellites in DNA sequences. Satellites (simple, micro, or mini) are repeats in number between 30 and as many as 1,000,000 whose lengths vary between 2 and hundreds of base pairs and that appear, with some mutations, in tandem along the sequence. We concentrate here on short to moderately long (up to 30-40 base pairs) approximate tandem repeats where copies may differ up to epsilon = 15-20% from a consensus model of the repeating unit (implying individual units may vary by 2 epsilon from each other). The algorithm is composed of two parts. The first one consists of a filter that basically eliminates all regions whose probability of containing a satellite is less than one in 10(4) when epsilon = 10%. The second part realizes an exhaustive exploration of the space of all possible models for the repeating units present in the sequence. It therefore has the advantage over previous work of being able to report a consensus model, say m, of the repeated unit as well as the span of the satellite. The first phase was designed for efficiency and takes only O (n) time where n is the length of the sequence. The second phase was designed for sensitivity and takes time O (n . N (e, k)) in the worst case where k is the length of the repeating unit m, e = [epsilon k] is the number of differences allowed between each repeat unit and the model m, and N (e, k) is the maximum number of words that are not more than e differences from another word of length k. That is, N (e, k) is the maximum size of an e-neighborhood of a string of length k. Experiments reveal the second phase to be considerably faster in practice than the worst-case complexity bound suggests. Finally, the present algorithm is easily adapted to finding tandem repeats in protein sequences, as well as extended to identifying mixed direct-inverse tandem repeats.

  13. Next-generation sequencing detects repetitive elements expansion in giant genomes of annual killifish genus Austrolebias (Cyprinodontiformes, Rivulidae).

    PubMed

    García, G; Ríos, N; Gutiérrez, V

    2015-06-01

    Among Neotropical fish fauna, the South American killifish genus Austrolebias (Cyprinodontiformes: Rivulidae) constitutes an excellent model to study the genomic evolutionary processes underlying speciation events. Recently, unusually large genome size has been described in 16 species of this genus, with an average DNA content of about 5.95 ± 0.45 pg per diploid cell (mean C-value of about 2.98 pg). In the present paper we explore the possible origin of this unparallel genomic increase by means of comparative analysis of the repetitive components using NGS (454-Roche) technology in the lowest and highest Rivulidae genomes. Here, we provide the first annotated Rivulidae-repeated sequences composition and their relative repetitive fraction in both genomes. Remarkably, the genomic proportion of the moderately repetitive DNA in Austrolebias charrua genome represents approximately twice (45%) of the repetitive components of the highly related rivulinae taxon Cynopoecilus melanotaenia (25%). Present work provides evidence about the impact of the repeat families that could be distinctly proliferated among sublineages within Rivulidae fish group, explaining the great genome size differences encompassing the differentiation and speciation events in this family.

  14. Evidence of Anticipatory Eye Movements in the Spatial Hebb Repetition Effect: Insights for Modeling Sequence Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Sebastien; Saint-Aubin, Jean

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the authors offer a window onto the mechanisms that drive the Hebb repetition effect through the analysis of eye movement and recall performance. In a spatial serial recall task in which sequences of dots are to be remembered in order, when one particular series is repeated every 4 trials, memory performance markedly improves…

  15. Predicting Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotypes by Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic Sequence-Based PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DiversiLabTM System, which employs repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) to genotype microorganisms, was evaluated as a method to predict the serotype of Salmonella isolates. Two hundred and thirty-three Salmonella isolates belonging to 14 frequently isolated serotypes f...

  16. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by C ot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by C ot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using C ot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, C ot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of C ot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position.

  17. Differential repetitive DNA composition in the centromeric region of chromosomes of Amazonian lizard species in the family Teiidae

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Natalia D. M.; Carmo, Edson; Neves, Rogerio O.; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Differences in heterochromatin distribution patterns and its composition were observed in Amazonian teiid species. Studies have shown repetitive DNA harbors heterochromatic blocks which are located in centromeric and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Kentropyx calcarata (Spix, 1825), Kentropyx pelviceps (Cope, 1868), and Tupinambis teguixin (Linnaeus, 1758). In Cnemidophorus sp.1, repetitive DNA has multiple signals along all chromosomes. The aim of this study was to characterize moderately and highly repetitive DNA sequences by Cot1-DNA from Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 genomes through cloning and DNA sequencing, as well as mapping them chromosomally to better understand its organization and genome dynamics. The results of sequencing of DNA libraries obtained by Cot1-DNA showed that different microsatellites, transposons, retrotransposons, and some gene families also comprise the fraction of repetitive DNA in the teiid species. FISH using Cot1-DNA probes isolated from both Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 showed these sequences mainly located in heterochromatic centromeric, and telomeric regions in Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin chromosomes, indicating they play structural and functional roles in the genome of these species. In Cnemidophorus sp.1, Cot1-DNA probe isolated from Ameiva ameiva had multiple interstitial signals on chromosomes, whereas mapping of Cot1-DNA isolated from the Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus sp.1 highlighted centromeric regions of some chromosomes. Thus, the data obtained showed that many repetitive DNA classes are part of the genome of Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp.1, Kentroyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin, and these sequences are shared among the analyzed teiid species, but they were not always allocated at the same chromosome position. PMID:27551343

  18. B chromosome in the beetle Coprophanaeus cyanescens (Scarabaeidae): emphasis in the organization of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To contribute to the knowledge of coleopteran cytogenetics, especially with respect to the genomic content of B chromosomes, we analyzed the composition and organization of repetitive DNA sequences in the Coprophanaeus cyanescens karyotype. We used conventional staining and the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) mapping using as probes C0t-1 DNA fraction, the 18S and 5S rRNA genes, and the LOA-like non-LTR transposable element (TE). Results The conventional analysis detected 3 individuals (among 50 analyzed) carrying one small metacentric and mitotically unstable B chromosome. The FISH analysis revealed a pericentromeric block of C0t-1 DNA in the B chromosome but no 18S or 5S rDNA clusters in this extra element. Using the LOA-like TE probe, the FISH analysis revealed large pericentromeric blocks in eight autosomal bivalents and in the B chromosome, and a pericentromeric block extending to the short arm in one autosomal pair. No positive hybridization signal was observed for the LOA-like element in the sex chromosomes. Conclusions The results indicate that the origin of the B chromosome is associated with the autosomal elements, as demonstrated by the hybridization with C0t-1 DNA and the LOA-like TE. The present study is the first report on the cytogenetic mapping of a TE in coleopteran chromosomes. These TEs could have been involved in the origin and evolution of the B chromosome in C. cyanescens. PMID:23131070

  19. Control of transcriptional pausing by biased thermal fluctuations on repetitive genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Afek, Ariel; Takahashi, Hiroki; Lubkowska, Lucyna; Lukatsky, David B.

    2016-01-01

    In the process of transcription elongation, RNA polymerase (RNAP) pauses at highly nonrandom positions across genomic DNA, broadly regulating transcription; however, molecular mechanisms responsible for the recognition of such pausing positions remain poorly understood. Here, using a combination of statistical mechanical modeling and high-throughput sequencing and biochemical data, we evaluate the effect of thermal fluctuations on the regulation of RNAP pausing. We demonstrate that diffusive backtracking of RNAP, which is biased by repetitive DNA sequence elements, causes transcriptional pausing. This effect stems from the increased microscopic heterogeneity of an elongation complex, and thus is entropy-dominated. This report shows a linkage between repetitive sequence elements encoded in the genome and regulation of RNAP pausing driven by thermal fluctuations. PMID:27830653

  20. Chromosomal localization of two novel repetitive sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome.

    PubMed

    Kolano, B; Gardunia, B W; Michalska, M; Bonifacio, A; Fairbanks, D; Maughan, P J; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Jellen, E N; Maluszynska, J

    2011-09-01

    The chromosomal organization of two novel repetitive DNA sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome was analyzed across the genomes of selected Chenopodium species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with the repetitive DNA clone 18-24J in the closely related allotetraploids C. quinoa and Chenopodium berlandieri Moq. (2n = 4x = 36) evidenced hybridization signals that were mainly present on 18 chromosomes; however, in the allohexaploid Chenopodium album L. (2n = 6x = 54), cross-hybridization was observed on all of the chromosomes. In situ hybridization with rRNA gene probes indicated that during the evolution of polyploidy, the chenopods lost some of their rDNA loci. Reprobing with rDNA indicated that in the subgenome labeled with 18-24J, one 35S rRNA locus and at least half of the 5S rDNA loci were present. A second analyzed sequence, 12-13P, localized exclusively in pericentromeric regions of each chromosome of C. quinoa and related species. The intensity of the FISH signals differed considerably among chromosomes. The pattern observed on C. quinoa chromosomes after FISH with 12-13P was very similar to GISH results, suggesting that the 12-13P sequence constitutes a major part of the repetitive DNA of C. quinoa.

  1. Tandem repetitive Afa-family sequences from Leymus racemosus and Psathyrostachys juncea (Poaceae)

    PubMed

    Nagaki; Kishii; Tsujimoto; Sasakuma

    1999-12-01

    Tandem repetitive Afa-family sequences of 340 bp are known to occur in wheat and related species of tribe Triticeae. We isolated six and three Afa-family sequences from Leymus racemosus and Psathyrostachys juncea, respectively, both of which are perennial species. The sequences account for 0.5% and 0.2% of L. racemosus and P. juncea genomes, respectively, and using in situ hybridization were located in subtelomeric and interstitial regions of L. racemosus chromosomes. These sequences are clustered with those of Elymus trachycaulus in the phylogenetic tree. Our findings indicate that the Afa-family sequences have been amplified at least twice in the lineage of L. racemosus, P. juncea, and E. trachycaulus.

  2. Chromosomal localization of a novel repetitive sequence in the Chenopodium quinoa genome.

    PubMed

    Kolano, Bozena; Plucienniczak, Andrzej; Kwasniewski, Miroslaw; Maluszynska, Jolanta

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a novel repetitive sequence pTaq10 was isolated from the Taq I digest of the genomic DNA of the pseudocereal Chenopodium quinoa. Sequence analysis indicated that this 286-bp monomer is not homologous to any known retroelement sequence. FISH and Southern blot analysis showed that this sequence is characterized by an interspersed genomic organization. After FISH, hybridization signals were observed as small dots spread throughout all of the chromosomes. pTaq hybridization signals were excluded from 45S rRNA gene loci, but they partly overlapped with 5S rDNA loci. pTaq10 is not a species-specific sequence, as it was also detected in C. berlandieri.

  3. Dynamics of tandem repetitive Afa-family sequences in Triticeae, wheat-related species.

    PubMed

    Nagaki, K; Tsujimoto, H; Sasakuma, T

    1998-08-01

    The Afa-family sequences in wheat-related species, Triticeae, are tandem repetitive sequences of 340 bp. All the analyzed Triticeae species carried the sequences in their genomes, though the copy numbers varied about 100-fold among the species. The nucleotide fragments amplified by PCR were cloned and sequenced, and their behavior in the evolution of Triticeae was analyzed by the neighbor-joining (NJ) method. The sequences in genomes with many copies of this family clustered at independent branches of the phylogenic tree, whereas the sequences in genomes with a few copies did not. This may suggest that Afa-family sequences had amplified several times in the evolution of Triticeae, each using a limited number of different master copies. In addition, the sequences of the A and B genomes of hexaploid common wheat indicated that the Afa-family sequences had not evolved in a concerted manner between the genomes. Furthermore, the sequences of each chromosome of the D genome of this species indicated that the sequences had amplified on all over the D-genome chromosomes in a short period.

  4. H genome specific repetitive sequence, pEt2, of Elymus trachycaulus in part of Afa family of Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Nagaki, K; Tsujimoto, H; Sasakuma, T

    1998-02-01

    The H genome specific repetitive sequence of Elymus trachycaulus, pEt2, consists of three units of a 337-339 bp repeat aligned in tandem. The sequence is homologous to Afa-family sequences that are widely distributed in the genomes of Triticeae (Gramineae) species.

  5. Sequence conservation in avian CR1: an interspersed repetitive DNA family evolving under functional constraints.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z Q; Ritzel, R G; Lin, C C; Hodgetts, R B

    1991-01-01

    CR1 is a short interspersed repetitive DNA element originally identified in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). However, unlike virtually all other such sequences described to date, CR1 is not confined to one or a few closely related species. It is probably a ubiquitous component of the avian genome, having been detected in representatives of nine orders encompassing a wide spectrum of the class Aves. This identification was made possible by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which revealed interspecific similarities not detected by conventional Southern analysis. DNA sequence comparisons between a CR1 element isolated from a sarus crane (Grus antigone) and those isolated from an emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) showed that two short highly conserved regions are present. These are included within two regions previously characterized in the CR1 units of domestic fowl. One of these behaves as a transcriptional silencer and the other is a binding site for a nuclear protein. Our observations suggest that CR1 has evolved under functional constraints and that interspersed repetitive sequences as a class may constitute a more significant component of the eukaryotic genome than is generally acknowledged. Images PMID:1829530

  6. Methylation Status of Alu and LINE-1 Interspersed Repetitive Sequences in Behcet's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Şahru; Kucukazman, Selma Ozbek; Karataş, Gülten Sungur; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Prombhul, Sasiprapa; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2016-01-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a multisystem chronic inflammatory disease. The pathology is believed to involve both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Hypomethylation leading to activation of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) such as LINE-1 and Alu contributes to the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer. Herein, the epigenetic changes of IRSs in BD were evaluated using combined bisulfite restriction analysis-interspersed repetitive sequences (COBRA-IRS). DNA from neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of BD patients with ocular involvement that were in active or inactive states and healthy controls were used to analyze LINE-1 and Alu methylation levels. For Alu sequences, significant differences were observed in the frequency of (u)C(u)C alleles between PBMCs of patients and controls (p = 0.03), and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.03). For neutrophils, the frequency of (u)C(u)C was significantly higher between patients and controls (p = 0.006) and between inactive patients and controls (p = 0.002). The partial methylation ((u)C(m)C + (m)C(u)C) frequencies of Alu between inactive patients and control samples also differed (p = 0.02). No statistically significant differences for LINE-1 were detected. Thus, changes in the methylation level of IRS elements might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. The role of Alu transcripts in BD should be investigated further.

  7. MOM1 mediates DNA-methylation-independent silencing of repetitive sequences in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Isabelle; Schubert, Ingo; Tourmente, Sylvette; Mathieu, Olivier

    2006-12-01

    The heterochromatic regions around centromeres of animal and plant chromosomes are composed of tandem repetitive sequences, interspersed with transposons and transposon derivatives. These sequences are largely transcriptionally silent and highly methylated, and are associated with specifically modified histones. Although embedded in heterochromatin, Arabidopsis 5S ribosomal RNA genes are among the most highly transcribed genes. However, some 5S genes are silenced, and we show here that this silencing can be suppressed by a reduction in CG methylation. Importantly, we show that mutation of MORPHEUS' MOLECULE 1 (MOM1) releases 5S repeat silencing independently of chromatin properties, as illustrated by the absence of detectable alteration of DNA and histone H3 methylation patterns. MOM1 also prevents transcription of 180-bp satellite repeats and 106B dispersed repeats but not of transposons. Our results provide evidence that transcription of densely methylated and highly repetitive heterochromatic sequences is controlled by two distinct epigenetic silencing pathways, one dependent on and the other independent of DNA methylation.

  8. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in chromosomes of five opisthorchid species (Trematoda, Opisthorchiidae).

    PubMed

    Zadesenets, Kira S; Karamysheva, Tatyana V; Katokhin, Alexei V; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A; Rubtsov, Nikolay B

    2012-03-01

    Genomes of opisthorchid species are characterized by small size, suggesting a reduced amount of repetitive DNA in their genomes. Distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the chromosomes of five species of the family Opisthorchiidae (Opisthorchis felineus 2n = 14 (Rivolta, 1884), Opisthorchis viverrini 2n = 12 (Poirier, 1886), Metorchis xanthosomus 2n = 14 (Creplin, 1846), Metorchis bilis 2n = 14 (Braun, 1890), Clonorchis sinensis 2n = 14 (Cobbold, 1875)) was studied with C- and AgNOR-banding, generation of microdissected DNA probes from individual chromosomes and fluorescent in situ hybridization on mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Small-sized C-bands were discovered in pericentric regions of chromosomes. Ag-NOR staining of opisthorchid chromosomes and FISH with ribosomal DNA probe showed that karyotypes of all studied species were characterized by the only nucleolus organizer region in one of small chromosomes. The generation of DNA probes from chromosomes 1 and 2 of O. felineus and M. xanthosomus was performed with chromosome microdissection followed by DOP-PCR. FISH of obtained microdissected DNA probes on chromosomes of these species revealed chromosome specific DNA repeats in pericentric C-bands. It was also shown that microdissected DNA probes generated from chromosomes could be used as the Whole Chromosome Painting Probes without suppression of repetitive DNA hybridization. Chromosome painting using microdissected chromosome specific DNA probes showed the overall repeat distribution in opisthorchid chromosomes.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic mapping of Cucumis sativus and C. melo using highly repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Koo, Dal-Hoe; Nam, Young-Woo; Choi, Doil; Bang, Jae-Wook; de Jong, Hans; Hur, Yoonkang

    2010-04-01

    Chromosomes often serve as one of the most important molecular aspects of studying the evolution of species. Indeed, most of the crucial mutations that led to differentiation of species during the evolution have occurred at the chromosomal level. Furthermore, the analysis of pachytene chromosomes appears to be an invaluable tool for the study of evolution due to its effectiveness in chromosome identification and precise physical gene mapping. By applying fluorescence in situ hybridization of 45S rDNA and CsCent1 probes to cucumber pachytene chromosomes, here, we demonstrate that cucumber chromosomes 1 and 2 may have evolved from fusions of ancestral karyotype with chromosome number n = 12. This conclusion is further supported by the centromeric sequence similarity between cucumber and melon, which suggests that these sequences evolved from a common ancestor. It may be after or during speciation that these sequences were specifically amplified, after which they diverged and specific sequence variants were homogenized. Additionally, a structural change on the centromeric region of cucumber chromosome 4 was revealed by fiber-FISH using the mitochondrial-related repetitive sequences, BAC-E38 and CsCent1. These showed the former sequences being integrated into the latter in multiple regions. The data presented here are useful resources for comparative genomics and cytogenetics of Cucumis and, in particular, the ongoing genome sequencing project of cucumber.

  10. All-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences by employing power coupler and equalizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenchao; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Wang, Fu; Li, Qiang

    2015-10-01

    A scheme for all-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS) is demonstrated with a precision delay feedback loop cascaded with a terahertz optical asymmetric demultiplexer (TOAD)-based power equalizer. Its feasibility has been verified by experiments, which show a multiplication for PRBS at cycle 2^7-1 from 2.5 to 10 Gb/s. This scheme can be employed for the rate multiplication of a much longer cycle PRBS at a much higher bit rate over 40 Gb/s if the time-delay, the loss, and the dispersion of an optical delay line are all precisely managed.

  11. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-02-04

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species--diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis--was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species--rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies--IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)--were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs.

  12. Identification of two families of satellite-like repetitive DNA sequences from the zebrafish (Brachydanio rerio).

    PubMed

    Ekker, M; Fritz, A; Westerfield, M

    1992-08-01

    To further our understanding of the structure and organization of the zebrafish genome, we have undertaken the analysis of highly and middle-repetitive DNA sequences. We have cloned and sequenced two families of tandemly repeated DNA fragments. The monomer units of the Type I satellite-like sequence are 186 bp long, A+T-rich (65%), and exhibit a high degree of sequence conservation. The Type I satellite-like sequence constitutes 8% of the zebrafish genome, or approximately 8 x 10(5) copies per haploid genome. Southern analysis of genomic DNA, digested with several restriction endonucleases, shows a ladder of hybridizing bands, consistent with a tandem array, and suggests longer range periodic variations in the sequence of the tandem repeats. The Type II satellite has a monomer length of 165 bp, is also A+T-rich (68%), and constitutes 0.2% of the zebrafish genome (22,000 copies per haploid genome). Southern analysis reveals a complex pattern rather than a ladder of regularly spaced hybridizing bands.

  13. Use of Repetitive Sequences for Molecular and Cytogenetic Characterization of Avena Species from Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Tomás, Diana; Rodrigues, Joana; Varela, Ana; Veloso, Maria Manuela; Viegas, Wanda; Silva, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Genomic diversity of Portuguese accessions of Avena species—diploid A. strigosa and hexaploids A. sativa and A. sterilis—was evaluated through molecular and cytological analysis of 45S rDNA, and other repetitive sequences previously studied in cereal species—rye subtelomeric sequence (pSc200) and cereal centromeric sequence (CCS1). Additionally, retrotransposons and microsatellites targeting methodologies—IRAP (inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism) and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism)—were performed. A very high homology was detected for ribosomal internal transcribed sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) between the species analyzed, although nucleolar organizing regions (NOR) fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed distinct number of Nor loci between diploid and hexaploid species. Moreover, morphological diversity, evidenced by FISH signals with different sizes, was observed between distinct accessions within each species. pSc200 sequences were for the first time isolated from Avena species but proven to be highly similar in all genotypes analyzed. The use of primers designed for CCS1 unraveled a sequence homologous to the Ty3/gypsy retrotransposon Cereba, that was mapped to centromeric regions of diploid and hexaploid species, being however restricted to the more related A and D haplomes. Retrotransposon-based methodologies disclosed species- and accessions-specific bands essential for the accurate discrimination of all genotypes studied. Centromeric, IRAP and REMAP profiles therefore allowed accurate assessment of inter and intraspecific variability, demonstrating the potential of these molecular markers on future oat breeding programs. PMID:26861283

  14. Simple quantitative PCR approach to reveal naturally occurring and mutation-induced repetitive sequence variation on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, John C; Maggert, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence.

  15. Simple Quantitative PCR Approach to Reveal Naturally Occurring and Mutation-Induced Repetitive Sequence Variation on the Drosophila Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, John C.; Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence. PMID:25285439

  16. Recondensation level of repetitive sequences in the plant protoplast nucleus is limited by oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Ondřej, Vladan; Navrátilová, Božena; Protivánková, Iva; Piterková, Jana; Sedlářová, Michaela; Luhová, Lenka; Lebeda, Aleš

    2010-01-01

    Protoplast cultures are remarkable examples of plant cell dedifferentiation. The state of dedifferentiation is evidenced by changes in cell morphology, genome organization, as well as by the capability of protoplasts to differentiate into multiple types of cells (depending on the type of the stimulus applied). The first change in the genome structure is connected with large-scale chromatin decondensation, affecting chromocentres involving various types of these repetitive sequences. This paper describes not only the de- and recondensation of satellite DNA type I and 5S rDNA repetitive sequences, but it also compares the recondensation level of chromatin with the levels of oxidative stress which were decreased by using an antioxidant, as well as the capabilities of the antioxidative systems within protoplasts, during the first 72 h of their culture. It is demonstrated that the treatment of protoplasts with ascorbic acid not only decreased the level of oxidative stress but also positively stimulated the expression of the ascorbate peroxidase and catalase. It also led to a greater recondensation of the chromatin (when compared to the untreated protoplasts); in addition, it supported cell proliferation. It is concluded that large-scale genome relaxation is more directly connected with oxidative stress than with large changes in the expression of genes; and further, that its recondensation is related to the start of (as well as the level of) protection by the antioxidative systems. PMID:20363868

  17. Molecular characterization and physical localization of highly repetitive DNA sequences from Brazilian Alstroemeria species.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, A G J; Kamstra, S A; de Jeu, M J; Visser, R G F

    2002-01-01

    Highly repetitive DNA sequences were isolated from genomic DNA libraries of Alstroemeria psittacina and A. inodora. Among the repetitive sequences that were isolated, tandem repeats as well as dispersed repeats could be discerned. The tandem repeats belonged to a family of interlinked Sau3A subfragments with sizes varying from 68-127 bp, and constituted a larger HinfI repeat of approximately 400 bp. Southern hybridization showed a similar molecular organization of the tandem repeats in each of the Brazilian Alstroemeria species tested. None of the repeats hybridized with DNA from Chilean Alstroemeria species, which indicates that they are specific for the Brazilian species. In-situ localization studies revealed the tandem repeats to be localized in clusters on the chromosomes of A. inodora and A. psittacina: distal hybridization sites were found on chromosome arms 2PS, 6PL, 7PS, 7PL and 8PL, interstitial sites on chromosome arms 2PL, 3PL, 4PL and 5PL. The applicability of the tandem repeats for cytogenetic analysis of interspecific hybrids and their role in heterochromatin organization are discussed.

  18. Karyotype analysis of four Vicia species using in situ hybridization with repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Navrátilová, Alice; Neumann, Pavel; Macas, Jirí

    2003-06-01

    Mitotic chromosomes of four Vicia species (V. sativa, V. grandiflora, V. pannonica and V. narbonensis) were subjected to in situ hybridization with probes derived from conserved plant repetitive DNA sequences (18S-25S and 5S rDNA, telomeres) and genus-specific satellite repeats (VicTR-A and VicTR-B). Numbers and positions of hybridization signals provided cytogenetic landmarks suitable for unambiguous identification of all chromosomes, and establishment of the karyotypes. The VicTR-A and -B sequences, in particular, produced highly informative banding patterns that alone were sufficient for discrimination of all chromosomes. However, these patterns were not conserved among species and thus could not be employed for identification of homologous chromosomes. This fact, together with observed variations in positions and numbers of rDNA loci, suggests considerable divergence between karyotypes of the species studied.

  19. Unique nucleotide sequence-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Torella, JP; Lienert, F; Boehm, CR; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2014-08-07

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts, and they hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies-for example, repeated terminator and insulator sequences-that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods, which we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2-3 d. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2-5 d are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques.

  20. Unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly of repetitive DNA parts for synthetic biology applications

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Joseph P.; Lienert, Florian; Boehm, Christian R.; Chen, Jan-Hung; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Recombination-based DNA construction methods, such as Gibson assembly, have made it possible to easily and simultaneously assemble multiple DNA parts and hold promise for the development and optimization of metabolic pathways and functional genetic circuits. Over time, however, these pathways and circuits have become more complex, and the increasing need for standardization and insulation of genetic parts has resulted in sequence redundancies — for example repeated terminator and insulator sequences — that complicate recombination-based assembly. We and others have recently developed DNA assembly methods that we refer to collectively as unique nucleotide sequence (UNS)-guided assembly, in which individual DNA parts are flanked with UNSs to facilitate the ordered, recombination-based assembly of repetitive sequences. Here we present a detailed protocol for UNS-guided assembly that enables researchers to convert multiple DNA parts into sequenced, correctly-assembled constructs, or into high-quality combinatorial libraries in only 2–3 days. If the DNA parts must be generated from scratch, an additional 2–5 days are necessary. This protocol requires no specialized equipment and can easily be implemented by a student with experience in basic cloning techniques. PMID:25101822

  1. Effects of "D"-Amphetamine and Ethanol on Variable and Repetitive Key-Peck Sequences in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Ryan D.; Bailey, Ericka M.; Odum, Amy L.

    2006-01-01

    This experiment assessed the effects of "d"-Amphetamine and ethanol on reinforced variable and repetitive key-peck sequences in pigeons. Pigeons responded on two keys under a multiple schedule of Repeat and Vary components. In the Repeat component, completion of a target sequence of right, right, left, left resulted in food. In the Vary component,…

  2. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes)

    PubMed Central

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found. PMID:26372604

  3. Repetitive DNA Sequences and Evolution of ZZ/ZW Sex Chromosomes in Characidium (Teleostei: Characiformes).

    PubMed

    Scacchetti, Priscilla Cardim; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Characidium constitutes an interesting model for cytogenetic studies, since a large degree of karyotype variation has been detected in this group, like the presence/absence of sex and supernumerary chromosomes and variable distribution of repetitive sequences in different species/populations. In this study, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis in 13 Characidium species collected at different South American river basins in order to investigate the karyotype diversification in this group. Chromosome analyses involved the karyotype characterization, cytogenetic mapping of repetitive DNA sequences and cross-species chromosome painting using a W-specific probe obtained in a previous study from Characidium gomesi. Our results evidenced a conserved diploid chromosome number of 2n = 50, and almost all the species exhibited homeologous ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes in different stages of differentiation, except C. cf. zebra, C. tenue, C. xavante and C. stigmosum. Notably, some ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes showed 5S and/or 18S rDNA clusters, while no U2 snDNA sites could be detected in the sex chromosomes, being restricted to a single chromosome pair in almost all the analyzed species. In addition, the species Characidium sp. aff. C. vidali showed B chromosomes with an inter-individual variation of 1 to 4 supernumerary chromosomes per cell. Notably, these B chromosomes share sequences with the W-specific probe, providing insights about their origin. Results presented here further confirm the extensive karyotype diversity within Characidium in contrast with a conserved diploid chromosome number. Such chromosome differences seem to constitute a significant reproductive barrier, since several sympatric Characidium species had been described during the last few years and no interespecific hybrids were found.

  4. The repetitive component of the sunflower genome as shown by different procedures for assembling next generation sequencing reads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing provides a powerful tool to study genome structure in species whose genomes are far from being completely sequenced. In this work we describe and compare different computational approaches to evaluate the repetitive component of the genome of sunflower, by using medium/low coverage Illumina or 454 libraries. Results By varying sequencing technology (Illumina or 454), coverage (0.55 x-1.25 x), assemblers and assembly procedures, six different genomic databases were produced. The annotation of these databases showed that they were composed of different proportions of repetitive DNA families. The final assembly of the sequences belonging to the six databases produced a whole genome set of 283,800 contigs. The redundancy of each contig was estimated by mapping the whole genome set with a large Illumina read set and measuring the number of matched Illumina reads. The repetitive component amounted to 81% of the sunflower genome, that is composed mainly of numerous families of Gypsy and Copia retrotransposons. Also many families of non autonomous retrotransposons and DNA transposons (especially of the Helitron superfamily) were identified. Conclusions The results substantially matched those previously obtained by using a Sanger-sequenced shotgun library and a standard 454 whole-genome-shotgun approach, indicating the reliability of the proposed procedures also for other species. The repetitive sequences were collected to produce a database, SUNREP, that will be useful for the annotation of the sunflower genome sequence and for studying the genome evolution in dicotyledons. PMID:24093210

  5. All-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences based on cascaded TOADs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenchao; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Chongqing; Wang, Fu; Li, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    A scheme for all-optical repetition rate multiplication of pseudorandom bit sequences (PRBS) is demonstrated with all-optical wavelength conversion and optical logic gate 'OR' based on cascaded Tera-Hertz Optical Asymmetric Demultiplexers (TOADs). Its feasibility is verified by multiplication experiments from 500 Mb/s to 4 Gb/s for 23-1 PRBS and from 1 Gb/s to 4 Gb/s for 27-1 PRBS. This scheme can be employed for rate multiplication for much longer cycle PRBS at much higher bit rate over 40 Gb/s when the time-delay, the loss and the dispersion of the optical delay line are all precisely managed. The upper limit of bit rate will be restricted by the recovery time of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) finally.

  6. Cutting edge: natural DNA repetitive extragenic sequences from gram-negative pathogens strongly stimulate TLR9.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Mattias; Tobes, Raquel; Sancho, Jaime; Pareja, Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial DNA exerts immunostimulatory effects on mammalian cells via the intracellular TLR9. Although broad analysis of TLR9-mediated immunostimulatory potential of synthetic oligonucleotides has been developed, which kinds of natural bacterial DNA sequences are responsible for immunostimulation are not known. This work provides evidence that the natural DNA sequences named repetitive extragenic palindromic (REPs) sequences present in Gram-negative bacteria are able to produce innate immune system stimulation via TLR9. A strong induction of IFN-alpha production by REPs from Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Neisseria meningitidis was detected in splenocytes from 129 mice. In addition, the involvement of TLR9 in immune stimulation by REPs was confirmed using B6.129P2-Tlr9(tm1Aki) knockout mice. Considering the involvement of TLRs in Gram-negative septic shock, it is conceivable that REPs play a role in its pathogenesis. This study highlights REPs as a potential novel target in septic shock treatment.

  7. Unbiased K-mer Analysis Reveals Changes in Copy Number of Highly Repetitive Sequences During Maize Domestication and Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sanzhen; Zheng, Jun; Migeon, Pierre; Ren, Jie; Hu, Ying; He, Cheng; Liu, Hongjun; Fu, Junjie; White, Frank F.; Toomajian, Christopher; Wang, Guoying

    2017-01-01

    The major component of complex genomes is repetitive elements, which remain recalcitrant to characterization. Using maize as a model system, we analyzed whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequences for the two maize inbred lines B73 and Mo17 using k-mer analysis to quantify the differences between the two genomes. Significant differences were identified in highly repetitive sequences, including centromere, 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), knob, and telomere repeats. Genotype specific 45S rDNA sequences were discovered. The B73 and Mo17 polymorphic k-mers were used to examine allele-specific expression of 45S rDNA in the hybrids. Although Mo17 contains higher copy number than B73, equivalent levels of overall 45S rDNA expression indicates that transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms operate for the 45S rDNA in the hybrids. Using WGS sequences of B73xMo17 doubled haploids, genomic locations showing differential repetitive contents were genetically mapped, which displayed different organization of highly repetitive sequences in the two genomes. In an analysis of WGS sequences of HapMap2 lines, including maize wild progenitor, landraces, and improved lines, decreases and increases in abundance of additional sets of k-mers associated with centromere, 45S rDNA, knob, and retrotransposons were found among groups, revealing global evolutionary trends of genomic repeats during maize domestication and improvement. PMID:28186206

  8. A PCR technique based on the Hip1 interspersed repetitive sequence distinguishes cyanobacterial species and strains.

    PubMed

    Smith, J K; Parry, J D; Day, J G; Smith, R J

    1998-10-01

    The use of primers based on the Hip1 sequence as a typing technique for cyanobacteria has been investigated. The discovery of short repetitive sequence structures in bacterial DNA during the last decade has led to the development of PCR-based methods for typing, i.e., distinguishing and identifying, bacterial species and strains. An octameric palindromic sequence known as Hip1 has been shown to be present in the chromosomal DNA of many species of cyanobacteria as a highly repetitious interspersed sequence. PCR primers were constructed that extended the Hip1 sequence at the 3' end by two bases. Five of the 16 possible extended primers were tested. Each of the five primers produced a different set of products when used to prime PCR from cyanobacterial genomic DNA. Each primer produced a distinct set of products for each of the 15 cyanobacterial species tested. The ability of Hip1-based PCR to resolve taxonomic differences was assessed by analysis of independent isolates of Anabaena flos-aquae and Nostoc ellipsosporum obtained from the CCAP (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa, IFE, Cumbria, UK). A PCR-based RFLP analysis of products amplified from the 23S-16S rDNA intergenic region was used to characterize the isolates and to compare with the Hip1 typing data. The RFLP and Hip1 typing yielded similar results and both techniques were able to distinguish different strains. On the basis of these results it is suggested that the Hip1 PCR technique may assist in distinguishing cyanobacterial species and strains.

  9. Under-representation of repetitive sequences in whole-genome shotgun sequence databases: an illustration using a recently acquired transposable element.

    PubMed

    Koga, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    It is widely accepted in a conceptual framework that repetitive sequences, especially those with high sequence homogeneity among copies, tend to be under-represented in whole-genome shotgun sequence databases, because of the difficulty of assembling sequence reads into contigs. Although this is easily inferred, there is no quantitative illustration of this phenomenon. An example using a currently used database is expected to contribute to the intuitive understanding of how serious the under-representation is. The present study provides the first quantitative example (in the case of 16 copies of virtually identical, 4.7-kb sequences in a genome of 7 × 10 (8) bp) by comparing the results of BLAST searches of a sequence database (contig N50; 9.8 kb) with those of Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA. This has revealed that the internal regions of the repetitive sequences are under-represented to a striking extent.

  10. Isolation and characterization of centromeric repetitive DNA sequences in Saccharum spontaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum hybrids spp.) is the most important sugar crop that accounts for ~75% of the world's sugar production. Recently, a whole-genome sequencing project was launched on the wild species S. spontaneum. To obtain information on the DNA composition of the repeat-enriched region of the ce...

  11. Tracking the evolution of sex chromosome systems in Melanoplinae grasshoppers through chromosomal mapping of repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The accumulation of repetitive DNA during sex chromosome differentiation is a common feature of many eukaryotes and becomes more evident after recombination has been restricted or abolished. The accumulated repetitive sequences include multigene families, microsatellites, satellite DNAs and mobile elements, all of which are important for the structural remodeling of heterochromatin. In grasshoppers, derived sex chromosome systems, such as neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀, are frequently observed in the Melanoplinae subfamily. However, no studies concerning the evolution of sex chromosomes in Melanoplinae have addressed the role of the repetitive DNA sequences. To further investigate the evolution of sex chromosomes in grasshoppers, we used classical cytogenetic and FISH analyses to examine the repetitive DNA sequences in six phylogenetically related Melanoplinae species with X0♂/XX♀, neo-XY♂/XX♀ and neo-X1X2Y♂/X1X1X2X2♀ sex chromosome systems. Results Our data indicate a non-spreading of heterochromatic blocks and pool of repetitive DNAs (C0t-1 DNA) in the sex chromosomes; however, the spreading of multigene families among the neo-sex chromosomes of Eurotettix and Dichromatos was remarkable, particularly for 5S rDNA. In autosomes, FISH mapping of multigene families revealed distinct patterns of chromosomal organization at the intra- and intergenomic levels. Conclusions These results suggest a common origin and subsequent differential accumulation of repetitive DNAs in the sex chromosomes of Dichromatos and an independent origin of the sex chromosomes of the neo-XY and neo-X1X2Y systems. Our data indicate a possible role for repetitive DNAs in the diversification of sex chromosome systems in grasshoppers. PMID:23937327

  12. Stem-loop structures of the repetitive DNA sequences located at human centromeres

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Garcia, A.E.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.K.; Catasti, P.; Hong, Lin; Yau, P.; Bradbury, E.M. |

    1993-09-01

    The presence of the highly conserved repetitive DNA sequences in the human centromeres argues for a special role of these sequences in their biological functions - most likely achieved by the formation of unusual structures. This prompted us to carry out quantitative one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (lD/2D NMR) spectroscopy to determine the structural properties of the human centromeric repeats, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. The studies on centromeric DNAs reveal that the complementary sequence, d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}, adopts the usual Watson-Crick B-DNA duplex and the pyrimidine-rich d(CCATT){sub n} strand is essentially a random coil. However, the purine-rich d(AATGG){sub n} strand is shown to adopt unusual stem-loop structures for repeat lengths, n=2,3,4, and 6. In addition to normal Watson-Crick A{center_dot}T pairs, the stem-loop structures are stabilized by mismatch A{center_dot}G and G{center_dot}G pairs in the stem and G-G-A stacking in the loop. Stem-loop structures of d(AATGG)n are independently verified by gel electrophoresis and nuclease digestion studies. Thermal melting studies show that the DNA repeats, d(AATGG){sub n}, are as stable as the corresponding Watson-Crick duplex d(AATGG){sub n.d}(CCATT){sub n}. Therefore, the sequence d(AATGG){sub n} can, indeed, nucleate a stem-loop structure at little free-energy cost and if, during mitosis, they are located on the chromosome surface they can provide specific recognition sites for kinetochore function.

  13. Non-homologous sex chromosomes of birds and snakes share repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    O'Meally, Denis; Patel, Hardip R; Stiglec, Rami; Sarre, Stephen D; Georges, Arthur; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A; Ezaz, Tariq

    2010-11-01

    Snake sex chromosomes provided Susumo Ohno with the material on which he based his theory of how sex chromosomes differentiate from autosomal pairs. Like birds, snakes have a ZZ male/ZW female sex chromosome system, in which the snake Z is a macrochromosome much the same size as the bird Z. However, the gene content shows clearly that the snake and bird Z chromosomes are completely non-homologous. The molecular aspect of W chromosome degeneration in snakes remains largely unexplored. We used comparative genomic hybridization to identify the female-specific region of the W chromosome in representative species of Australian snakes. Using this approach, we show that an increasingly complex suite of repeats accompanies the evolution of W chromosome heteromorphy. In particular, we found that while the python Liasis fuscus exhibits no sex-specific repeats and indeed, no cytologically recognizable sex-specific region, the colubrid Stegonotus cucullatus shows a large domain on the short arm of the W chromosome that consists of female-specific repeats, and the large W of Notechis scutatus is composed almost entirely of repetitive sequences, including Bkm and 18S rDNA-related elements. FISH mapping of both simple and complex probes shows patterns of repeat amplification concordant with the size of the female-specific region in each species examined. Mapping of intronic sequences of genes that are sex-linked in both birds (DMRT1) and snakes (CTNNB1) reveals massive amplification in discrete domains on the W chromosome of the elapid N. scutatus. Using chicken W chromosome paint, we demonstrate that repetitive sequences are shared between the sex chromosomes of birds and derived snakes. This could be explained by ancestral but as yet undetected shared synteny of bird and snake sex chromosomes or may indicate functional homology of the repeats and suggests that degeneration is a convergent property of sex chromosome evolution. We also establish that synteny of snake Z

  14. Repetitive reef to ooid sequences near leeward margin of Caicos Platform, British West Indies

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, M.; Rossinsky, V.; Wanless, H.R.

    1987-05-01

    Drill core transects and outcrops near the leeward margin of the Caicos Platform, BWI, reveal repetitive (one Holocene and two Pleistocene) shallowing-upward sequences of either (a) reefal boundstones overlain by layered oolitic grainstones or (b) burrowed oolitic grainstones overlain by layered oolitic grainstones. Each sediment sequence is separated from the other by a calcrete exposure surface. A transect, perpendicular to the trend of an exposed Pleistocene barrier reef/ooid sand complex, shows two separate sediment packages of reefal boundstones and reef-derived skeletal packstones overlain by layered oolitic grainstones. The well-exposed upper package consists of a shallowing-upward barrier reef, which is immediately overlain by burrowed and cross-bedded oolitic grainstones, beach rock blocks, and coral rubble, capped by layered oolitic grainstones. Separated by an exposure horizon, the lowermost package consists of coral and skeletal sands overlain by layered oolitic grainstones. Cores from a transect in a non-reefal setting north of the barrier reef complex reveal highly burrowed oolitic grainstones capped by layered oolitic grainstones. As a Holocene example, immediately offshore of this transect, modern reefs and bioturbated oolitic grainstones are presently being buried beneath coral rubble, beach rock blocks, and prograding oolitic beaches. Deposition of the capping layered oolitic grainstones appears to occur during stable and falling sea levels. This co-occurrence of reefal sediment and ooid sands suggests that the two are not mutually exclusive and that reef-ooid succession is a reoccurring part of leeward margin platform margin-building.

  15. Repetitive sequences in the ITS1 region of the ribosomal DNA of Tunga penetrans and other flea species (Insecta, Siphonaptera).

    PubMed

    Gamerschlag, Sara; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Heukelbach, Jörg; Feldmeier, Hermann; D'Haese, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Different Tunga penetrans isolates from various hosts obtained from South America (Fortaleza. Brazil) have been studied by nucleotide sequence comparison of the first and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS1, ITS2) of the ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) and part of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA. Results show no significant host-dependent sequence differences. No indication for intraindividual and intraspecific polymorphisms could be detected. Comparing the ITS1 spacer region of T. penetrans from South America with that from Africa (Togo, Cameroon), distinct length variations have been observed caused by a repetitive sequence motif of 99 bp. The ITS1 from the South American T. penetrans contain two tandemly repeated copies, whereas four of these units are present in the spacer of the African T. penetrans. The absence of homogenization of these units indicates a recent separation of both populations. However, the different number of repetitions together with two base substitutions put the evolutionary distance of only 135 years as postulated for the transfer of T. penetrans from South America to Africa into question. Repetitive sequences could also be detected within the ITS1 rDNA region of other flea species Ctenocephalides felis, Echidnophaga gallinacea, Pulex irritans, Spilopsyllus cuniculi, and Xenopsylla cheopis. The repeat units with lengths from 10 to 99 bp are arranged in pure tandem or interspersed. The repetitive elements observed in the ITS1 of various flea species may serve as a valuable tool for phylogeographic studies.

  16. Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Repeats in Yersiniae: Genomic Organization and Functional Properties

    PubMed Central

    De Gregorio, Eliana; Silvestro, Giustina; Petrillo, Mauro; Carlomagno, Maria Stella; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses carried out in silico revealed that the DNA repeats called enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequences (ERICs), which are present in several Enterobacteriaceae, are overrepresented in yersiniae. From the alignment of DNA regions from the wholly sequenced Yersinia enterocolitica 8081 and Yersinia pestis CO92 strains, we could establish that ERICs are miniature mobile elements whose insertion leads to duplication of the dinucleotide TA. ERICs feature long terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) and can fold as RNA into hairpin structures. The proximity to coding regions suggests that most Y. enterocolitica ERICs are cotranscribed with flanking genes. Elements which either overlap or are located next to stop codons are preferentially inserted in the same (or B) orientation. In contrast, ERICs located far apart from open reading frames are inserted in the opposite (or A) orientation. The expression of genes cotranscribed with A- and B-oriented ERICs has been monitored in vivo. In mRNAs spanning B-oriented ERICs, upstream gene transcripts accumulated at lower levels than downstream gene transcripts. This difference was abolished by treating cells with chloramphenicol. We hypothesize that folding of B-oriented elements is impeded by translating ribosomes. Consequently, upstream RNA degradation is triggered by the unmasking of a site for the RNase E located in the right-hand TIR of ERIC. A-oriented ERICs may act in contrast as upstream RNA stabilizers or may have other functions. The hypothesis that ERICs act as regulatory RNA elements is supported by analyses carried out in Yersinia strains which either lack ERIC sequences or carry alternatively oriented ERICs at specific loci. PMID:16291667

  17. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of chromosome site-specific repetitive sequences in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum, Petromyzontidae)

    PubMed Central

    Ishijima, Junko; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nunome, Mitsuo; Nishida, Chizuko; Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract All extant lamprey karyotypes are characterized by almost all dot-shaped microchromosomes. To understand the molecular basis of chromosome structure in lampreys, we performed chromosome C-banding and silver staining and chromosome mapping of the 18S–28S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and telomeric TTAGGG repeats in the Arctic lamprey (Lethenteron camtschaticum). In addition, we cloned chromosome site-specific repetitive DNA sequences and characterized them by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. Three types of repetitive sequences were detected; a 200-bp AT-rich repetitive sequence, LCA-EcoRIa that co-localized with the 18S–28S rRNA gene clusters of 3 chromosomal pairs; a 364-bp AT-rich LCA-EcoRIb sequence that showed homology to the EcoRI sequence family from the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), which contains short repeats as centromeric motifs; and a GC-rich 702-bp LCA-ApaI sequence that was distributed on nearly all chromosomes and showed significant homology with the integrase-coding region of a Ty3/Gypsy family long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon. All three repetitive sequences are highly conserved within the Petromyzontidae or within Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of these site-specific repeats showed that they may be correlated with programed genome rearrangement (LCA-EcoRIa), centromere structure and function (LCA-EcoRIb), and site-specific amplification of LTR retroelements through homogenization between non-homologous chromosomes (LCA-ApaI). PMID:28025319

  18. Nonconsensus Protein Binding to Repetitive DNA Sequence Elements Significantly Affects Eukaryotic Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Barber-Zucker, Shiran; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide experiments in different eukaryotic genomes provide an unprecedented view of transcription factor (TF) binding locations and of nucleosome occupancy. These experiments revealed that a large fraction of TF binding events occur in regions where only a small number of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs) have been detected. Furthermore, in vitro protein-DNA binding measurements performed for hundreds of TFs indicate that TFs are bound with wide range of affinities to different DNA sequences that lack known consensus motifs. These observations have thus challenged the classical picture of specific protein-DNA binding and strongly suggest the existence of additional recognition mechanisms that affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We have previously demonstrated that repetitive DNA sequence elements characterized by certain symmetries statistically affect protein-DNA binding preferences. We call this binding mechanism nonconsensus protein-DNA binding in order to emphasize the point that specific consensus TFBSs do not contribute to this effect. In this paper, using the simple statistical mechanics model developed previously, we calculate the nonconsensus protein-DNA binding free energy for the entire C. elegans and D. melanogaster genomes. Using the available chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) results on TF-DNA binding preferences for ~100 TFs, we show that DNA sequences characterized by low predicted free energy of nonconsensus binding have statistically higher experimental TF occupancy and lower nucleosome occupancy than sequences characterized by high free energy of nonconsensus binding. This is in agreement with our previous analysis performed for the yeast genome. We suggest therefore that nonconsensus protein-DNA binding assists the formation of nucleosome-free regions, as TFs outcompete nucleosomes at genomic locations with enhanced nonconsensus binding. In addition, here we perform a new, large-scale analysis using

  19. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  20. Fast and Non-Toxic In Situ Hybridization without Blocking of Repetitive Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Matthiesen, Steen H.; Hansen, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Formamide is the preferred solvent to lower the melting point and annealing temperature of nucleic acid strands in in situ hybridization (ISH). A key benefit of formamide is better preservation of morphology due to a lower incubation temperature. However, in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), against unique DNA targets in tissue sections, an overnight hybridization is required to obtain sufficient signal intensity. Here, we identified alternative solvents and developed a new hybridization buffer that reduces the required hybridization time to one hour (IQFISH method). Remarkably, denaturation and blocking against repetitive DNA sequences to prevent non-specific binding is not required. Furthermore, the new hybridization buffer is less hazardous than formamide containing buffers. The results demonstrate a significant increased hybridization rate at a lowered denaturation and hybridization temperature for both DNA and PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes. We anticipate that these formamide substituting solvents will become the foundation for changes in the understanding and performance of denaturation and hybridization of nucleic acids. For example, the process time for tissue-based ISH for gene aberration tests in cancer diagnostics can be reduced from days to a few hours. Furthermore, the understanding of the interactions and duplex formation of nucleic acid strands may benefit from the properties of these solvents. PMID:22911704

  1. Molecular typing of Candida albicans strains isolated from denture wearers by repetitive sequence-based PCR.

    PubMed

    Abaci, O; Haliki-Uztan, A; Ozturk, B; Toksavul, S; Ulusoy, M; Boyacioglu, H

    2011-02-01

    Long-term use of prosthesis is the most important risk factor for the colonization of Candida species on the mucosal surfaces, which can lead to the development of denture-related stomatitis (DRS). Some individuals wearing prosthesis develop DRS and others do not. C. albicans strains isolated from both groups were genotypically compared. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the strain causing prosthesis stomatitis was different from the other strains genotypically. The study included 90 individuals wearing different prostheses and 20 control individuals with natural teeth. In the study 109 C. albicans strains were used which were isolated from the saliva samples and the mucosal surfaces of the tongues and palates of 51 individuals and then defined phenotypically. Phenotypic diagnosis of the isolates was genotypically verified by using species-specific PCR. For molecular typing, repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR) was employed. The results of the study revealed that REP-PCR had the capability to separate 109 C. albicans strains and six reference strains into 44 genotypes. Whereas C. albicans strains showed heterogenic distribution, C. albicans strains isolated from the individuals suffering from prosthesis stomatitis showed no specific genotypes. REP-PCR is a simple, fast and low-cost method and helped work on a great number of samples.

  2. Epigenetic silencing of endogenous repetitive sequences by MORPHEUS' MOLECULE1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Habu, Yoshiki

    2010-10-01

    Morpheus' molecule1 (MOM1) is a plant-specific epigenetic regulator of transcriptional gene silencing. Mutants of MOM1 release silencing of subsets of endogenous repetitive elements and transgenes without affecting their cytosine methylation status. Although MOM1 is evolutionarily related to chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein3 (CHD3), a family of chromatin remodeling proteins involved in repression of gene expression, MOM1 does not carry the functional ATPase/helicase domain essential for chromatin remodeling activity, and therefore, its mode of action is unknown. We recently performed a genome-wide survey for endogenous targets silenced by MOM1 and identified loci that are concentrated around centromeres and rich in sequences homologous to the 24-nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that accumulate in wild type plants. Further and independent analyses indicated that the degree of contribution of MOM1 to maintenance of the silent states varies in different loci and that other silencing machineries, including those in the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway, interact genetically with MOM1. In this short article, I review what we know about MOM1 and discuss its possible functions in silencing through examination of other silencing factors that interact genetically with MOM1.

  3. Repetitive DNA sequences as an insight into Aeglidae (Crustacea, Anomura) evolution.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, M E; Corach, D

    1997-08-01

    The evolutionary relationships of five Atlantic Aeglidae species (Aegla neuquensis affinis, A. humahuaca, A. jujuyana, A. platensis, and A. uruguayana) were studied by (i) satellite DNA analysis using a restriction enzyme digestion and hybridization pattern approach and (ii) genome screening by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing. The identical restriction patterns and intense interspecific hybridization patterns obtained in this study strongly suggest a recent cladogenetic event for the Aeglidae. The species-specific amplification products which were detected using RAPD markers allowed species characterization. A total of 49 amplification products were used to construct trees by cluster analysis. The new scheme agrees in part with previous proposals based on biogeography and morphology. We considered that the subdivision northwestern-platensis species was probably due to the rising of the Andes, which started in the Middle Miocene. Divergence due to altitude is suggested by the different altitudinal distribution of three northwestern species along the same river. The possible role of selection by ecological factor/s was observed at the population level in A. jujuyana, which has a wider altitudinal range distribution. RAPD markers revealed a high level of intraspecific diversity and important genetic flow among populations. However, a few markers showed significant differences in frequency or H between the lowermost population and the other populations, located in a different biogeographical region. The differences were not in relation to geographical distance, and we interpreted them as being due to selection. Repetitive sequences constitute an important reservoir of genetic variation, and these results show their usefulness in testing and proposing evolutionary hypothesis in crabs. These sequences seem to have played an important role in aeglid evolution. Ecological factors related to altitude have probably influenced macro- and

  4. Repetitive flanking sequences challenge microsatellite marker development: a case study in the lepidopteran Melanargia galathea.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Max; Csencsics, Daniela; Gugerli, Felix

    2016-11-01

    Microsatellite DNA families (MDF) are stretches of DNA that share similar or identical sequences beside nuclear simple-sequence repeat (nSSR) motifs, potentially causing problems during nSSR marker development. Primers positioned within MDFs can bind several times within the genome and might result in multiple banding patterns. It is therefore common practice to exclude MDF loci in the course of marker development. Here, we propose an approach to deal with multiple primer-binding sites by purposefully positioning primers within the detected repetitive element. We developed a new protocol to determine the family type and the primer position in relation to MDFs using the software packages repark and repeatmasker together with an in-house R script. We re-evaluated newly developed nSSR markers for the lepidopteran Marbled White (Melanargia galathea) and explored the implications of our results with regard to published data sets of the butterfly Euphydryas aurinia, the grasshopper Stethophyma grossum, the conifer Pinus cembra and the crucifer Arabis alpina. For M. galathea, we show that it is not only possible to develop reliable nSSR markers for MDF loci, but even to benefit from their presence in some cases: We used one unlabelled primer, successfully binding within an MDF, for two different loci in a multiplex PCR, combining this family primer with uniquely binding and fluorescently labelled primers outside of MDFs, respectively. As MDFs are abundant in many taxa, we propose to consider these during nSSR marker development in taxa concerned. Our new approach might help in reducing the number of tested primers during nSSR marker development.

  5. Genomic organization and dynamics of repetitive DNA sequences in representatives of three Fagaceae genera.

    PubMed

    Alves, Sofia; Ribeiro, Teresa; Inácio, Vera; Rocheta, Margarida; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor

    2012-05-01

    Oaks, chestnuts, and beeches are economically important species of the Fagaceae. To understand the relationship between these members of this family, a deep knowledge of their genome composition and organization is needed. In this work, we have isolated and characterized several AFLP fragments obtained from Quercus rotundifolia Lam. through homology searches in available databases. Genomic polymorphisms involving some of these sequences were evaluated in two species of Quercus, one of Castanea, and one of Fagus with specific primers. Comparative FISH analysis with generated sequences was performed in interphase nuclei of the four species, and the co-immunolocalization of 5-methylcytosine was also studied. Some of the sequences isolated proved to be genus-specific, while others were present in all the genera. Retroelements, either gypsy-like of the Tat/Athila clade or copia-like, are well represented, and most are dispersed in euchromatic regions of these species with no DNA methylation associated, pointing to an interspersed arrangement of these retroelements with potential gene-rich regions. A particular gypsy-sequence is dispersed in oaks and chestnut nuclei, but its confinement to chromocenters in beech evidences genome restructuring events during evolution of Fagaceae. Several sequences generated in this study proved to be good tools to comparatively study Fagaceae genome organization.

  6. Sequence-Independent Cloning and Post-Translational Modification of Repetitive Protein Polymers through Sortase and Sfp-Mediated Enzymatic Ligation.

    PubMed

    Ott, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Thomas; Gaub, Hermann E; Nash, Michael A

    2016-04-11

    Repetitive protein-based polymers are important for many applications in biotechnology and biomaterials development. Here we describe the sequential additive ligation of highly repetitive DNA sequences, their assembly into genes encoding protein-polymers with precisely tunable lengths and compositions, and their end-specific post-translational modification with organic dyes and fluorescent protein domains. Our new Golden Gate-based cloning approach relies on incorporation of only type IIS BsaI restriction enzyme recognition sites using PCR, which allowed us to install ybbR-peptide tags, Sortase c-tags, and cysteine residues onto either end of the repetitive gene polymers without leaving residual cloning scars. The assembled genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using inverse transition cycling (ITC). Characterization by cloud point spectrophotometry, and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with fluorescence detection confirmed successful phosphopantetheinyl transferase (Sfp)-mediated post-translational N-terminal labeling of the protein-polymers with a coenzyme A-647 dye (CoA-647) and simultaneous sortase-mediated C-terminal labeling with a GFP domain containing an N-terminal GG-motif in a one-pot reaction. In a further demonstration, we installed an N-terminal cysteine residue into an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) that was subsequently conjugated to a single chain poly(ethylene glycol)-maleimide (PEG-maleimide) synthetic polymer, noticeably shifting the ELP cloud point. The ability to straightforwardly assemble repetitive DNA sequences encoding ELPs of precisely tunable length and to post-translationally modify them specifically at the N- and C- termini provides a versatile platform for the design and production of multifunctional smart protein-polymeric materials.

  7. New families of site-specific repetitive DNA sequences that comprise constitutive heterochromatin of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus, Cricetinae, Rodentia).

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiko; Kamimura, Eikichi; Kondo, Mariko; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Nishida-Umehara, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2006-02-01

    We molecularly cloned new families of site-specific repetitive DNA sequences from BglII- and EcoRI-digested genomic DNA of the Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus, Cricetrinae, Rodentia) and characterized them by chromosome in situ hybridization and filter hybridization. They were classified into six different types of repetitive DNA sequence families according to chromosomal distribution and genome organization. The hybridization patterns of the sequences were consistent with the distribution of C-positive bands and/or Hoechst-stained heterochromatin. The centromeric major satellite DNA and sex chromosome-specific and telomeric region-specific repetitive sequences were conserved in the same genus (Mesocricetus) but divergent in different genera. The chromosome-2-specific sequence was conserved in two genera, Mesocricetus and Cricetulus, and a low copy number of repetitive sequences on the heterochromatic chromosome arms were conserved in the subfamily Cricetinae but not in the subfamily Calomyscinae. By contrast, the other type of repetitive sequences on the heterochromatic chromosome arms, which had sequence similarities to a LINE sequence of rodents, was conserved through the three subfamilies, Cricetinae, Calomyscinae and Murinae. The nucleotide divergence of the repetitive sequences of heterochromatin was well correlated with the phylogenetic relationships of the Cricetinae species, and each sequence has been independently amplified and diverged in the same genome.

  8. Distinctive patterns of age-dependent hypomethylation in interspersed repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Jintaridth, Pornrutsami; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2010-04-01

    Interspersed repetitive sequences (IRSs) are a major contributor to genome size and may contribute to cellular functions. IRSs are subdivided according to size and functionally related structures into short interspersed elements, long interspersed elements (LINEs), DNA transposons, and LTR-retrotransposons. Many IRSs may produce RNA and regulate genes by a variety of mechanisms. The majority of DNA methylation occurs in IRSs and is believed to suppress IRS activities. Global hypomethylation, or the loss of genome-wide methylation, is a common epigenetic event not only in senescent cells but also in cancer cells. Loss of LINE-1 methylation has been characterized in many cancers. Here, we evaluated the methylation levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of LINE-1, Alu, and human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) in 177 samples obtained from volunteers between 20 and 88 yr of age. Age was negatively associated with methylation levels of Alu (r = -0.452, P < 10(-3)) and HERV-K (r = -0.326, P < 10(-3)) but not LINE-1 (r = 0.145, P = 0.055). Loss of methylation of Alu occurred during ages 34-68 yr, and loss of methylation of HERV-K occurred during ages 40-63 yr and again during ages 64-83 yr. Interestingly, methylation of Alu and LINE-1 are directly associated, particularly at ages 49 yr and older (r = 0.49, P < 10(-3)). Therefore, only some types of IRSs lose methylation at certain ages. Moreover, Alu and HERV-K become hypomethylated differently. Finally, there may be several mechanisms of global methylation. However, not all of these mechanisms are age-dependent. This finding may lead to a better understanding of not only the biological causes and consequences of genome-wide hypomethylation but also the role of IRSs in the aging process.

  9. Repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences in the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 genome: extragenic signals for genome reannotation.

    PubMed

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja, Eduardo

    2005-04-01

    Repetitive extragenic palindromic (REPs) sequences were first described in enterobacteriacea and later in Pseudomonas putida. We have detected a new variant (51 base pairs) of REP sequences that appears to be disseminated in more than 300 copies in the Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 genome. The finding of REP sequences in P. syringae confirms the broad presence of this type of repetitive sequence in bacteria. We analyzed the distribution of REP sequences and the structure of the clusters, and we show that palindromy is conserved. REP sequences appear to be allocated to the extragenic space, with a special preference for the intergenic spaces limited by convergent genes, while their presence is scarce between divergent genes. Using REP sequences as markers of extragenicity we re-annotated a set of genes of the P. syringae DC3000 genome demonstrating that REP sequences can be used for refinement of annotation of a genome. The similarity detected between virulence genes from evolutionarily distant pathogenic bacteria suggests the acquisition of clusters of virulence genes by horizontal gene transfer. We did not detect the presence of P. syringae REP elements in the principal pathogenicity gene clusters. This absence suggests that genome fragments lacking REP sequences could point to regions recently acquired from other organisms, and REP sequences might be new tracers for gaining insight into key aspects of bacterial genome evolution, especially when studying pathogenicity acquisition. In addition, as the P. syringae REP sequence is species-specific with respect to the sequenced genomes, it is an exceptional candidate for use as a fingerprint in precise genotyping and epidemiological studies.

  10. Comparison of the distribution of the repetitive DNA sequences in three variants of Cucumis sativus reveals their phylogenetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Lu, Jingyuan; Zhang, Zhonghua; Hu, Jiajin; Huang, Sanwen; Jin, Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences with variability in copy number or/and sequence polymorphism can be employed as useful molecular markers to study phylogenetics and identify species/chromosomes when combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Cucumis sativus has three variants, Cucumis sativus L. var. sativus, Cucumis sativus L. var. hardwickii and Cucumis sativus L. var. xishuangbannesis. The phylogenetics among these three variants has not been well explored using cytological landmarks. Here, we concentrate on the organization and distribution of highly repetitive DNA sequences in cucumbers, with emphasis on the differences between cultivar and wild cucumber. The diversity of chromosomal karyotypes in cucumber and its relatives was detected in our study. Thereby, sequential FISH with three sets of multi-probe cocktails (combined repetitive DNA with chromosome-specific fosmid clones as probes) were conducted on the same metaphase cell, which helped us to simultaneously identify each of the 7 metaphase chromosomes of wild cucumber C. sativus var. hardwickii. A standardized karyotype of somatic metaphase chromosomes was constructed. Our data also indicated that the relationship between cultivar cucumber and C. s. var. xishuangbannesis was closer than that of C. s. var. xishuangbannesis and C. s. var. hardwickii.

  11. Highly Differentiated ZW Sex Microchromosomes in the Australian Varanus Species Evolved through Rapid Amplification of Repetitive Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Kazumi; Sarre, Stephen D.; Georges, Arthur; Matsuda, Yoichi; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Ezaz, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    Transitions between sex determination systems have occurred in many lineages of squamates and it follows that novel sex chromosomes will also have arisen multiple times. The formation of sex chromosomes may be reinforced by inhibition of recombination and the accumulation of repetitive DNA sequences. The karyotypes of monitor lizards are known to be highly conserved yet the sex chromosomes in this family have not been fully investigated. Here, we compare male and female karyotypes of three Australian monitor lizards, Varanus acanthurus, V. gouldii and V. rosenbergi, from two different clades. V. acanthurus belongs to the acanthurus clade and the other two belong to the gouldii clade. We applied C-banding and comparative genomic hybridization to reveal that these species have ZZ/ZW sex micro-chromosomes in which the W chromosome is highly differentiated from the Z chromosome. In combination with previous reports, all six Varanus species in which sex chromosomes have been identified have ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes, spanning several clades on the varanid phylogeny, making it likely that the ZZ/ZW sex chromosome is ancestral for this family. However, repetitive sequences of these ZW chromosome pairs differed among species. In particular, an (AAT)n microsatellite repeat motif mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization on part of W chromosome in V. acanthurus only, whereas a (CGG)n motif mapped onto the W chromosomes of V. gouldii and V. rosenbergi. Furthermore, the W chromosome probe for V. acanthurus produced hybridization signals only on the centromeric regions of W chromosomes of the other two species. These results suggest that the W chromosome sequences were not conserved between gouldii and acanthurus clades and that these repetitive sequences have been amplified rapidly and independently on the W chromosome of the two clades after their divergence. PMID:24743344

  12. Comparison of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) fingerprinting for differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni isolated from broiler in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Patchanee, Prapas; Chokboonmongkol, Chomporn; Zessin, Karl-Hans; Alter, Thomas; Pornaem, Sarinya; Chokesajjawatee, Nipa

    2012-11-01

    We compared rapid fingerprinting using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) for subtyping Campylobacter jejuni isolates to the widely used multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Representative C. jejuni isolates (n = 16) from broilers were analyzed using MLST and rep-PCR. Both techniques demonstrated an equal discriminatory power of 0.8917, and 9 subgroups were identified. Clonal identification of all 16 isolates was identical for both techniques. The rep-PCR as described in this study may be used as a rapid and cost-effective alternative for subtyping of C. jejuni isolates, or as an effective screening tool in large epidemiological studies.

  13. Total DNA transcription in vitro: a procedure to detect highly repetitive and transcribable sequences with tRNA-like structures

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, H.; Okada, N.

    1986-01-01

    Total DNAs from various animals were transcribed in vitro in a HeLa cell extract, and it was found that one to several discrete RNAs were transcribed by RNA polymerase III. With tortoise (Geoclemys reevessi) and newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster), distinct 6.5S and 8S RNAs were transcribed from these respective DNAs. Representative phage clones carrying the 6.5S and 8S RNA genes were isolated from genomic libraries of these animals, and the sequences of these genes were determined. The 5' parts of highly repetitive and transcribable sequences of tortoise and newt were found to have close resemblance to tRNA/sub 1//sup Lys/ (rabbit) gene (78% homology) and a tRNA/sup Glu/ (Drosophila) gene (74% homology, not counting the aminoacyl stem region), respectively. The homologies extended to secondary structures, homologous nucleotides being located on similar secondary structures. It is proposed that many, if not all, highly repetitive and transcribable sequences detected by total DNA transcription have specific tRNA genes as their progenitors.

  14. Next-Generation Sequencing Reveals the Impact of Repetitive DNA Across Phylogenetically Closely Related Genomes of Orobanchaceae

    PubMed Central

    Piednoël, Mathieu; Aberer, Andre J.; Schneeweiss, Gerald M.; Macas, Jiri; Novak, Petr; Gundlach, Heidrun; Temsch, Eva M.; Renner, Susanne S.

    2013-01-01

    We used next-generation sequencing to characterize the genomes of nine species of Orobanchaceae of known phylogenetic relationships, different life forms, and including a polyploid species. The study species are the autotrophic, nonparasitic Lindenbergia philippensis, the hemiparasitic Schwalbea americana, and seven nonphotosynthetic parasitic species of Orobanche (Orobanche crenata, Orobanche cumana, Orobanche gracilis (tetraploid), and Orobanche pancicii) and Phelipanche (Phelipanche lavandulacea, Phelipanche purpurea, and Phelipanche ramosa). Ty3/Gypsy elements comprise 1.93%–28.34% of the nine genomes and Ty1/Copia elements comprise 8.09%–22.83%. When compared with L. philippensis and S. americana, the nonphotosynthetic species contain higher proportions of repetitive DNA sequences, perhaps reflecting relaxed selection on genome size in parasitic organisms. Among the parasitic species, those in the genus Orobanche have smaller genomes but higher proportions of repetitive DNA than those in Phelipanche, mostly due to a diversification of repeats and an accumulation of Ty3/Gypsy elements. Genome downsizing in the tetraploid O. gracilis probably led to sequence loss across most repeat types. PMID:22723303

  15. Repetitive DNA in the pea (Pisum sativum L.) genome: comprehensive characterization using 454 sequencing and comparison to soybean and Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Macas, Jiří; Neumann, Pavel; Navrátilová, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Background Extraordinary size variation of higher plant nuclear genomes is in large part caused by differences in accumulation of repetitive DNA. This makes repetitive DNA of great interest for studying the molecular mechanisms shaping architecture and function of complex plant genomes. However, due to methodological constraints of conventional cloning and sequencing, a global description of repeat composition is available for only a very limited number of higher plants. In order to provide further data required for investigating evolutionary patterns of repeated DNA within and between species, we used a novel approach based on massive parallel sequencing which allowed a comprehensive repeat characterization in our model species, garden pea (Pisum sativum). Results Analysis of 33.3 Mb sequence data resulted in quantification and partial sequence reconstruction of major repeat families occurring in the pea genome with at least thousands of copies. Our results showed that the pea genome is dominated by LTR-retrotransposons, estimated at 140,000 copies/1C. Ty3/gypsy elements are less diverse and accumulated to higher copy numbers than Ty1/copia. This is in part due to a large population of Ogre-like retrotransposons which alone make up over 20% of the genome. In addition to numerous types of mobile elements, we have discovered a set of novel satellite repeats and two additional variants of telomeric sequences. Comparative genome analysis revealed that there are only a few repeat sequences conserved between pea and soybean genomes. On the other hand, all major families of pea mobile elements are well represented in M. truncatula. Conclusion We have demonstrated that even in a species with a relatively large genome like pea, where a single 454-sequencing run provided only 0.77% coverage, the generated sequences were sufficient to reconstruct and analyze major repeat families corresponding to a total of 35–48% of the genome. These data provide a starting point for

  16. Repetitive sequences in the ITS1 region of ribosomal DNA in congeneric microphallid species (Trematoda: Digenea).

    PubMed

    Warberg, Rikke; Jensen, K Thomas; Frydenberg, Jane

    2005-11-01

    In searching for species-specific DNA sequences of microphallid species (Digenea, Trematoda) we examined the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of three closely related species (Levinseniella group) hosted by mud snails (first intermediate host) and marine crustaceans (second intermediate host). In the ITS1 region we found consistent patterns of repeating sequences of 130 bp. Within each main repeat there was a varying number of subrepeats specific for each of the species. All repeats including subrepeats were identified by a similar starting sequence: 5'-CCTGTGG-3'. As this sequence has close resemblance to the chi sequence 5'-GCTGGTGG-3' found in phage lambda we speculate if it serves the same function as a recombination hotspot. Alternatively but less likely, it could be an inactive, mutational relic of a sequence that once served this purpose.

  17. Chromosomal Mapping of Repetitive DNA Sequences in the Genus Bryconamericus (Characidae) and DNA Barcoding to Differentiate Populations.

    PubMed

    Santos, Angélica Rossotti Dos; Usso, Mariana Campaner; Gouveia, Juceli Gonzalez; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Frantine-Silva, Wilson; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Foresti, Fausto; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2017-03-29

    The mapping of repetitive DNA sites by fluorescence in situ hybridization has been widely used for karyotype studies in different species of fish, especially when dealing with related species or even genera presenting high chromosome variability. This study analyzed three populations of Bryconamericus, with diploid number preserved, but with different karyotype formulae. Bryconamericus ecai, from the Forquetinha river/RS, presented three new cytotypes, increasing the number of karyotype forms to seven in this population. Other two populations of Bryconamericus sp. from the Vermelho stream/PR and Cambuta river/PR exhibited interpopulation variation. The chromosome mapping of rDNA sites revealed unique markings among the three populations, showing inter- and intrapopulation variability located in the terminal region. The molecular analysis using DNA barcoding complementing the cytogenetic analysis also showed differentiation among the three populations. The U2 small nuclear DNA repetitive sequence exhibited conserved features, being located in the interstitial region of a single chromosome pair. This is the first report on its occurrence in the genus Bryconamericus. Data obtained revealed a karyotype variability already assigned to the genus, along with polymorphism of ribosomal sites, demonstrating that this group of fish can be undergoing a divergent evolutionary process, constituting a substantive model for studies of chromosomal evolution.

  18. Monopolin recruits condensin to organize centromere DNA and repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Laura S.; Applen Clancey, Shelly E.; Chacón, Jeremy M.; Gardner, Melissa K.; Berman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of higher-order structure at centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. The monopolin complex is thought to cross-link multiple kinetochore complexes to prevent merotelic attachments that result in chromosome missegregation. This model is based on structural analysis and the requirement that monopolin execute mitotic and meiotic chromosome segregation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which has more than one kinetochore–microtubule attachment/centromere, and co-orient sister chromatids in meiosis I in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent data from S. pombe suggest an alternative possibility: that the recruitment of condensin is the primary function of monopolin. Here we test these models using the yeast Candida albicans. C. albicans cells lacking monopolin exhibit defects in chromosome segregation, increased distance between centromeres, and decreased stability of several types of repeat DNA. Of note, changing kinetochore–microtubule copy number from one to more than one kinetochore–microtubule/centromere does not alter the requirement for monopolin. Furthermore, monopolin recruits condensin to C. albicans centromeres, and overexpression of condensin suppresses chromosome segregation defects in strains lacking monopolin. We propose that the key function of monopolin is to recruit condensin in order to promote the assembly of higher-order structure at centromere and repetitive DNA. PMID:23885115

  19. Pitfalls of mapping high throughput sequencing data to repetitive sequences: Piwi’s genomic targets still not identified

    PubMed Central

    Marinov, Georgi K.; Wang, Jie; Handler, Dominik; Wold, Barbara J.; Weng, Zhiping; Hannon, Gregory J.; Aravin, Alexei A.; Zamore, Phillip D.; Brennecke, Julius; Toth, Katalin Fejes

    2015-01-01

    Huang et al. (2013) recently reported that chromatin immuno-precipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) reveals the genome-wide sites of occupancy by Piwi - a piRNA-guided Argonaute protein central to transposon silencing in Drosophila. Their study also reported that loss of Piwi causes widespread rewiring of transcriptional patterns as evidenced by changes in RNA polymerase II occupancy across the genome. Here we reanalyze their underlying deep sequencing data and report that the data do not support the author’s central conclusions. PMID:25805138

  20. DNA Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Gene: Amino Acid Sequence of Repetitive Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enea, Vincenzo; Ellis, Joan; Zavala, Fidel; Arnot, David E.; Asavanich, Achara; Masuda, Aoi; Quakyi, Isabella; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1984-08-01

    A clone of complementary DNA encoding the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been isolated by screening an Escherichia coli complementary DNA library with a monoclonal antibody to the CS protein. The DNA sequence of the complementary DNA insert encodes a four-amino acid sequence: proline-asparagine-alanine-asparagine, tandemly repeated 23 times. The CS β -lactamase fusion protein specifically binds monoclonal antibodies to the CS protein and inhibits the binding of these antibodies to native Plasmodium falciparum CS protein. These findings provide a basis for the development of a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  1. Structural Analysis of a Repetitive Protein Sequence Motif in Strepsirrhine Primate Amelogenin

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Keith M.; Hacia, Joseph G.; Bromage, Timothy G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Paine, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Strepsirrhines are members of a primate suborder that has a distinctive set of features associated with the development of the dentition. Amelogenin (AMEL), the better known of the enamel matrix proteins, forms 90% of the secreted organic matrix during amelogenesis. Although AMEL has been sequenced in numerous mammalian lineages, the only reported strepsirrhine AMEL sequences are those of the ring-tailed lemur and galago, which contain a set of additional proline-rich tandem repeats absent in all other primates species analyzed to date, but present in some non-primate mammals. Here, we first determined that these repeats are present in AMEL from three additional lemur species and thus are likely to be widespread throughout this group. To evaluate the functional relevance of these repeats in strepsirrhines, we engineered a mutated murine amelogenin sequence containing a similar proline-rich sequence to that of Lemur catta. In the monomeric form, the MQP insertions had no influence on the secondary structure or refolding properties, whereas in the assembled form, the insertions increased the hydrodynamic radii. We speculate that increased AMEL nanosphere size may influence enamel formation in strepsirrhine primates. PMID:21437261

  2. Microarray-based survey of repetitive genomic sequences in Vicia spp.

    PubMed

    Nouzová, M; Neumann, P; Navrátilová, A; Galbraith, D W; Macas, J

    2001-01-01

    A modified DNA microarray-based technique was devised for preliminary screening of short fragment genomic DNA libraries from three Vicia species (V. melanops, V. narbonensis, and V. sativa) to isolate representative highly abundant DNA sequences that show different distribution patterns among related legume species. The microarrays were sequentially hybridized with labeled genomic DNAs of thirteen Vicia and seven other Fabaceae species and scored for hybridization signals of individual clones. The clones were then assigned to one of the following groups characterized by hybridization to: (1) all tested species, (2) most of the Vicia and Pisum species, (3) only a few Vicia species, and (4) preferentially a single Vicia species. Several clones from each group, 65 in total, were sequenced. All Group I clones were identified as rDNA genes or fragments of chloroplast genome, whereas the majority of Group II clones showed significant homologies to retroelement sequences. Clones in Groups III and IV contained novel dispersed repeats with copy numbers 10(2)-10(6)/1C and two genus-specific tandem repeats. One of these belongs to the VicTR-B repeat family, and the other clone (S12) contains an amplified portion of the rDNA intergenic spacer. In situ hybridization using V. sativa metaphase chromosomes revealed the presence of the S12 sequences not only within rDNA genes, but also at several additional loci. The newly identified repeats, as well as the retroelement-like sequences, were characterized with respect to their abundance within individual genomes. Correlations between the repeat distributions and the current taxonomic classification of these species are discussed.

  3. Repetitive sequence variation and dynamics in the ribosomal DNA array of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as revealed by whole-genome resequencing

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen A.; O'Kelly, Michael J.T.; Carter, David M.; Davey, Robert P.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Roberts, Ian N.

    2009-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) plays a key role in ribosome biogenesis, encoding genes for the structural RNA components of this important cellular organelle. These genes are vital for efficient functioning of the cellular protein synthesis machinery and as such are highly conserved and normally present in high copy numbers. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there are more than 100 rDNA repeats located at a single locus on chromosome XII. Stability and sequence homogeneity of the rDNA array is essential for function, and this is achieved primarily by the mechanism of gene conversion. Detecting variation within these arrays is extremely problematic due to their large size and repetitive structure. In an attempt to address this, we have analyzed over 35 Mbp of rDNA sequence obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing (WGSS) of 34 strains of S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectation, we find significant rDNA sequence variation exists within individual genomes. Many of the detected polymorphisms are not fully resolved. For this type of sequence variation, we introduce the term partial single nucleotide polymorphism, or pSNP. Comparative analysis of the complete data set reveals that different S. cerevisiae genomes possess different patterns of rDNA polymorphism, with much of the variation located within the rapidly evolving nontranscribed intergenic spacer (IGS) region. Furthermore, we find that strains known to have either structured or mosaic/hybrid genomes can be distinguished from one another based on rDNA pSNP number, indicating that pSNP dynamics may provide a reliable new measure of genome origin and stability. PMID:19141593

  4. Multiple site-selective insertions of non-canonical amino acids into sequence-repetitive polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I-Lin; Patterson, Melissa A.; Carpenter Desai, Holly E.; Mehl, Ryan A.; Giorgi, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    A simple and efficient method is described for introduction of non-canonical amino acids at multiple, structurally defined sites within recombinant polypeptide sequences. E. coli MRA30, a bacterial host strain with attenuated activity for release factor 1 (RF1), is assessed for its ability to support the incorporation of a diverse range of non-canonical amino acids in response to multiple encoded amber (TAG) codons within genetic templates derived from superfolder GFP and an elastin-mimetic protein polymer. Suppression efficiency and isolated protein yield were observed to depend on the identity of the orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair and the non-canonical amino acid substrate. This approach afforded elastin-mimetic protein polymers containing non-canonical amino acid derivatives at up to twenty-two positions within the repeat sequence with high levels of substitution. The identity and position of the variant residues was confirmed by mass spectrometric analysis of the full-length polypeptides and proteolytic cleavage fragments resulting from thermolysin digestion. The accumulated data suggest that this multi-site suppression approach permits the preparation of protein-based materials in which novel chemical functionality can be introduced at precisely defined positions within the polypeptide sequence. PMID:23625817

  5. Visualization of specific repetitive genomic sequences with fluorescent TALEs in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Satoru; Sugano, Shigeo S; Kuwata, Keiko; Osakabe, Keishi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-11-01

    Live imaging of the dynamics of nuclear organization provides the opportunity to uncover the mechanisms responsible for four-dimensional genome architecture. Here, we describe the use of fluorescent protein (FP) fusions of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to visualize endogenous genomic sequences in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ability to engineer sequence-specific TALEs permits the investigation of precise genomic sequences. We could detect TALE-FP signals associated with centromeric, telomeric, and rDNA repeats and the signal distribution was consistent with that observed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. TALE-FPs are advantageous because they permit the observation of intact tissues. We used our TALE-FP method to investigate the nuclei of several multicellular plant tissues including roots, hypocotyls, leaves, and flowers. Because TALE-FPs permit live-cell imaging, we successfully observed the temporal dynamics of centromeres and telomeres in plant organs. Fusing TALEs to multimeric FPs enhanced the signal intensity when observing telomeres. We found that the mobility of telomeres was different in sub-nuclear regions. Transgenic plants stably expressing TALE-FPs will provide new insights into chromatin organization and dynamics in multicellular organisms.

  6. Visualization of specific repetitive genomic sequences with fluorescent TALEs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Satoru; Sugano, Shigeo S.; Kuwata, Keiko; Osakabe, Keishi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro

    2016-01-01

    Live imaging of the dynamics of nuclear organization provides the opportunity to uncover the mechanisms responsible for four-dimensional genome architecture. Here, we describe the use of fluorescent protein (FP) fusions of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) to visualize endogenous genomic sequences in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ability to engineer sequence-specific TALEs permits the investigation of precise genomic sequences. We could detect TALE-FP signals associated with centromeric, telomeric, and rDNA repeats and the signal distribution was consistent with that observed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. TALE-FPs are advantageous because they permit the observation of intact tissues. We used our TALE-FP method to investigate the nuclei of several multicellular plant tissues including roots, hypocotyls, leaves, and flowers. Because TALE-FPs permit live-cell imaging, we successfully observed the temporal dynamics of centromeres and telomeres in plant organs. Fusing TALEs to multimeric FPs enhanced the signal intensity when observing telomeres. We found that the mobility of telomeres was different in sub-nuclear regions. Transgenic plants stably expressing TALE-FPs will provide new insights into chromatin organization and dynamics in multicellular organisms. PMID:27811079

  7. Paleogenomics: Investigation of an ancient family of repetitive sequences present in great numbers in human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D.; Jurka, J.

    1994-09-01

    Paleogenomics is the research activity aiming to reconstruct ancient genetic events and/or structures from the {open_quotes}fossil{close_quotes} genomic record. With about 120,000 copies, mammalian interspersed repeats, MIRs, represent the second most abundant family of short interspersed repeats in human DNA, only outnumbered by Alu elements. MIR consensus sequence of 100 nucleotides was reconstructed from 455 mutated copies preserved in contemporary genome (GenBank release 69). As no division into subfamilies was observed, we assume that this consensus represents an ancestral MIR sequence. To find out how far MIRs can be traced down the phylogenetic tree, we examined their distribution in a variety of mammalian and non-mammalian DNAs. Oligonucleotide primers based on the MIR consensus were used, one at a time, for PCR amplification of the genomic fragments flanked by MIR repeats (inter-MIR-PCR). Significant amplification in DNA samples from a variety of placental orders as well as marsupials and monotremes indicates that MIRs originated in early mammals. Sequence analysis is consistent with their proliferation during the Mesozoic era. Electrophoretic profiles of inter-MIR-PCR products are distinct among different species. Intra-species comparison of multiple human samples reveals polymorphic bands segregating as Mendelian traits which can be used as genetic markers in both mapping and fingerprinting.

  8. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of species-specific repetitive DNA sequences from Beta corolliflora, a wild relative of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Schmidt, T; Jung, C

    2000-12-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences have been isolated from a Sau3AI plasmid library of tetraploid Beta corolliflora (2n = 4x = 36), a wild relative of sugar beet (B. vulgaris). The library was screened by differential hybridization with genomic DNA of B. corolliflora and B. vulgaris. When used as probes for Southern hybridization of genomic DNA, six clones were determined to represent highly repetitive DNA families present only in the B. corolliflora genome. Five other sequences were highly repetitive in B. corolliflora and low or single copy in B. vulgaris. The insert size varied between 43 bp and 448 bp. Two sequences pBC1279 and pBC1944 displayed strong homology to a previously cloned satellite DNA from B. nana. With one exception, sequences are tandemly arranged as revealed by a typical ladder pattern after genomic Southern hybridization. The chromosomal distribution of five probes was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of mitotic metaphases from B. corolliflora and a triploid hybrid between B. vulgaris and B. corolliflora. Three sequences were spread along all chromosome arms of B. corolliflora while one sequence was present on only six chromosomes. The chromosome-specific sequence pBC216 was found in close vicinity to the 5S rDNA located on B. corolliflora chromosome IV. This set of species-specific sequences has the potential to be used as probes for the identification of monosomic alien addition lines and for marker-assisted gene transfer from wild beet to cultivated beet.

  9. A dispersed family of repetitive DNA sequences exhibits characteristics of a transposable element in the genus Lycopersicon.

    PubMed

    Young, R J; Francis, D M; St Clair, D A; Taylor, B H

    1994-06-01

    A segment of DNA 5' to the transcribed region of an auxin-regulated gene, ARPI, from Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. VFN8 contains a sequence with the structural characteristics of a transposable element. The putative element (Lyt1) is 1340 bp long, has terminal inverted repeats of approximately 235 bp and is flanked by 9-bp direct repeats. Lyt1 has a structure similar to the Robertson's Mutator (Mu) family from maize. The terminal inverted repeats are 80% AT-rich, are 96.6% identical, and define a larger family of repetitive elements. Southern analysis and genomic dot-blot reconstructions detected at least 41 copies of Lyt1-hybridizing sequences in red-fruited Lycopersicon spp. (L. esculentum, L. pimpinellifolium and L. cheesmanii), and 2-8 copies in the green-fruited species (L. hirsutum, L. pennellii, L. peruvianum, L. chilense and L. chmielewskii). There were two to four copies in the Solanum spp. closely allied with the genus Lycopersicon (S. lycopersicoides, S. ochranthum and S. juglandifolium), while the more distantly related Solanum spp. showed little (one to two copies in S. tuberosum) to no (S. quitoense) detectable hybridization under stringent conditions. Linkage analysis in the F2 progeny of a cross between L. esculentum and L. cheesmanii indicated that at least six loci that hybridize to the Lyt1 sequence are dispersed in the genome. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern analyses revealed that some red-fruited accessions and L. chmielewskii lacked Lyt1 5' to the transcribed region of ARPI. Subsequent sequence analysis indicated that only one copy of the 9-bp direct repeat (target site) was present, suggesting that transposition of the element into the ARPI gene occurred after the divergence of the red-fruited and green-fruited Lycopersicon species.

  10. Characterization of RFRS9, a second member of the Rhizobium fredii repetitive sequence family from the nitrogen-fixing symbiont R. fredii USDA257.

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, H B; Pueppke, S G

    1993-01-01

    The genome of the nitrogen-fixing symbiont, Rhizobium fredii USDA257, contains nine copies of repetitive sequences known as the R. fredii repetitive sequence (RFRS) family. We previously sequenced RFRS3, which is linked to symbiosis plasmid-borne nodulation genes of this organism and has substantial homology to the T-DNA of Agrobacterium rhizogenes and lesser homology to reiterated sequences of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Here we characterize a second family member, RFRS9. The EcoRI fragment containing RFRS9 is 1,248 bp in length and contains a single 666-bp open reading frame that is flanked by perfect 8-bp inverted repeats. Nucleic and amino acid sequences corresponding to the C terminus of the putative RFRS9 protein are nearly identical to those of RFRS3, and they retain homology to DNA from A. rhizogenes. The central portion of the RFRS9 protein also appears to be related to the S locus-specific glycoprotein family of pollen stigma incompatibility glycoproteins from Brassica oleracea, which are involved in signal perception. Sequences that define the RFRS family are restricted to the open reading frame of RFRS9 and associated upstream sequences. These regions also contain a second group of repetitive sequences, which is present in four copies within the genome of USDA257. Both families of repetitive sequences are ubiquitous in R. fredii, and they are preferentially localized on symbiosis plasmids. Southern hybridization confirms that sequences homologous to RFRS9 are present in broad-host-range Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, in A. rhizogenes, and in two biotype 3 strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Images PMID:8382462

  11. Physical localisation of repetitive DNA sequences in Alstroemeria: karyotyping of two species with species-specific and ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; Kuipers, A G; De Jeu, M J; Ramanna, M S; Jacobsen, E

    1997-10-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to localise two species-specific repetitive DNA sequences, A001-I and D32-13, and two highly conserved 25S and 5S rDNA sequences on the metaphase chromosomes of two species of Alstroemeria. The Chilean species, Alstroemeria aurea (2n = 16), has abundant constitutive heterochromatin, whereas the Brazilian species, Alstroemeria inodora, has hardly any heterochromatin. The A. aurea specific A001-I probe hybridized specifically to the C-band regions on all chromosomes. The FISH patterns on A. inodora chromosomes using species-specific probe D32-13 resembled the C-banding pattern and the A001-I pattern on A. aurea chromosomes. There were notable differences in number and distribution of rDNA sites between the two species. The 25S rDNA probe revealed 16 sites in A. aurea that closely colocalised with A001-I sites and 12 in A. inodora that were predominantly detected in the centromeric regions. FISH karyotypes of the two Alstroemeria species were constructed accordingly, enabling full identification of all individual chromosomes. These FISH karyotypes will be useful for monitoring the chromosomes of both Alstroemeria species in hybrids and backcross derivatives.

  12. Specific genomic fingerprints of phytopathogenic Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas pathovars and strains generated with repetitive sequences and PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Louws, F.J.; Stephens, C.T.; Fulbright, D.W.

    1994-07-01

    DNA primers corresponding to conserved motifs in bacterial repetitive (REP, ERIC, and BOX) elements and PCR were used to show that REP-, ERIC-, and BOX-like DNA sequences are widely distributed in phytopathogenic Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas strains. REP-, ERIC-, and BOX-PCR (collectively known as rep-PCR) were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas isolates and to to identify pathovars and strains that were previously not distinguishable by other classification methods. Analogous rep-PCR-derived genomic fingerprints were generated from purified genomic DNA, colonies on agar plates, liquid cultures, and directly from lesions on infected plants. REP-, ERIC-, and BOX-PCR-generated fingerprints of specific Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas strains were found to yield similar conclusions with regard to the identity of and relationship between these strains. This suggests that the distribution of REP-, ERIC-, and BOX-like sequences in these strains is a reflection of their genomic structure. Thus, the rep-PCR technique appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas strains, and it may be a useful diagnostic tool for these important plant pathogens. 70 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Role of repetitive nine-residue sequence motifs in secretion, enzymatic activity, and protein conformation of a family I.3 lipase.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Ju; Haruki, Mitsuru; Morikawa, Masaaki; Omori, Kenji; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2002-01-01

    A family I.3 lipase from Pseudomonas sp. MIS38 (PML) contains 12 repeats of a nine-residue sequence motif in the C-terminal region. To elucidate the role of these repetitive sequences, mutant proteins PML5, PML4, PML1, and PML0, in which 7, 8, 11, and all 12 of the repetitive sequences are deleted, and PMLdelta19, in which 19 C-terminal residues are truncated, were constructed. Escherichia coli DH5 cells carrying the Serratia marcescens Lip system permitted the secretion of the wild-type and all of the mutant proteins except for PMLdelta19, although they were partially accumulated in the cells in an insoluble form as well. Both the secretion level and cellular content of the proteins decreased in the order PML > PML5 > PML4 > PML1 > PML0, indicating that repetitive sequences are not required for secretion of PML but are important for its stability in the cells. All the mutant proteins were purified in a refolded form and their biochemical properties were characterized. CD spectra, the Ca2+ contents, and susceptibility to chymotryptic digestion strongly suggested that the five repetitive sequences remaining in PML5 are sufficient to form a beta-roll structure, whereas the four in PML4 are not. PML5 and PMLdelta19 showed both lipase and esterase activities, whereas PML4, PML1, and PML0 were inactive. These results suggest that the enzymatic activity of PML is not seriously affected by a deletion or truncation at the C-terminal region as long as a succession of repetitive sequences can build a beta-roll structure.

  14. Karyotypic Evolution and Chromosomal Organization of Repetitive DNA Sequences in Species of Panaque, Panaqolus, and Scobinancistrus (Siluriformes and Loricariidae) from the Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Ayres-Alves, Thayana; Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; de Sousa, Leandro Melo; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues

    2017-03-09

    Loricariidae family comprises the greatest variability of Neotropical catfish species, with more than 800 valid species. This family shows significant chromosomal diversity. Mapping of repetitive DNA sequences can be very useful in exploring such diversity, especially among groups that appear to share a preserved karyotypic macrostructure. We describe the karyotypes of Panaque armbrusteri and Panaqolus sp., as assessed using classical cytogenetic methods. Moreover, we offer a map of their repetitive sequences, including 18S and 5S ribosomal DNAs, the Rex1 and Rex3 retrotransposons, and the Tc1-mariner transposon in P. armbrusteri, Panaqolus sp., Scobinancistrus aureatus, and Scobinancistrus pariolispos. Those species share chromosome numbers of 2n = 52, but are divergent in their chromosome structures and the distributions of their repetitive DNA sequences. In situ hybridization with 18S and 5S rDNA probes confirms chromosome location in different pairs; in Panaqolus sp. these sites are in synteny. This multigene family organization can be explained by the occurrence of chromosome rearrangements, and possible events, such as transposition and unequal crossing-over. Rex1 and Rex3 retrotransposons and the Tc1-mariner transposon appeared predominantly dispersed and in small clusters in some chromosome regions. These data emphasize the importance of repetitive sequences in promoting the karyotypic evolution of these species.

  15. CONTRAILS: A tool for rapid identification of transgene integration sites in complex, repetitive genomes using low-coverage paired-end sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lambirth, Kevin C.; Whaley, Adam M.; Schlueter, Jessica A.; Bost, Kenneth L.; Piller, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic crops have become a staple in modern agriculture, and are typically characterized using a variety of molecular techniques involving proteomics and metabolomics. Characterization of the transgene insertion site is of great interest, as disruptions, deletions, and genomic location can affect product selection and fitness, and identification of these regions and their integrity is required for regulatory agencies. Here, we present CONTRAILS (Characterization of Transgene Insertion Locations with Sequencing), a straightforward, rapid and reproducible method for the identification of transgene insertion sites in highly complex and repetitive genomes using low coverage paired-end Illumina sequencing and traditional PCR. This pipeline requires little to no troubleshooting and is not restricted to any genome type, allowing use for many molecular applications. Using whole genome sequencing of in-house transgenic Glycine max, a legume with a highly repetitive and complex genome, we used CONTRAILS to successfully identify the location of a single T-DNA insertion to single base resolution. PMID:26697366

  16. CA88, a nuclear repetitive DNA sequence identified in Schistosoma mansoni, aids in the genotyping of nine Schistosoma species of medical and veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Diana; Rodrigues, Nilton B; Araújo, Flávio Marcos G; Romanha, Alvaro José; Ruiz, Jerônimo C; Johnston, David A; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2010-07-01

    CA88 is the first long nuclear repetitive DNA sequence identified in the blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. The assembled S. mansoni sequence, which contains the CA88 repeat, has 8,887 nucleotides and at least three repeat units of approximately 360 bp. In addition, CA88 also possesses an internal CA microsatellite, identified as SmBr18. Both PCR and BLAST analysis have been used to analyse and confirm the CA88 sequence in other S. mansoni sequences in the public database. PCR-acquired nuclear repetitive DNA sequence profiles from nine Schistosoma species were used to classify this organism into four genotypes. Included among the nine species analysed were five sequences of both African and Asian lineages that are known to infect humans. Within these genotypes, three of them refer to recognised species groups. A panel of four microsatellite loci, including SmBr18 and three previously published loci, has been used to characterise the nine Schistosoma species. Each species has been identified and classified based on its CA88 DNA fingerprint profile. Furthermore, microsatellite sequences and intra-specific variation have also been observed within the nine Schistosoma species sequences. Taken together, these results support the use of these markers in studying the population dynamics of Schistosoma isolates from endemic areas and also provide new methods for investigating the relationships between different populations of parasites. In addition, these data also indicate that Schistosoma magrebowiei is not a sister taxon to Schistosoma mattheei, prompting a new designation to a basal clade.

  17. Monosomy 1p36 breakpoints indicate repetitive DNA sequence elements may be involved in generating and/or stabilizing some terminal deletions.

    PubMed

    Ballif, Blake C; Gajecka, Marzena; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2004-01-01

    Monosomy 1p36 is the most commonly observed terminal deletion syndrome in humans. Our previous molecular studies on a large cohort of subjects suggest that monosomy 1p36 can result from a variety of chromosomal rearrangements including terminal truncations, interstitial deletions, derivative chromosomes, inverted duplications, and complex rearrangements. However, the mechanism(s) by which rearrangements of 1p36 are generated and/or stabilized is not understood. Sequence analysis of breakpoint junctions may provide valuable clues to the underlying mechanisms of many chromosomal aberrations. In this report, we analyze the breakpoints at the DNA-sequence level in four subjects with variable-sized deletions of 1p36. All four breakpoints fall within repetitive DNA-sequence elements (LINEs, SINEs, etc). This suggests that repetitive DNA-sequence elements may play an important role in generating and/or stabilizing terminal deletions of 1p36. Mechanisms by which repetitive elements may be involved in the process of terminal deletion formation and stabilization are discussed.

  18. Spoligotyping and polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence fingerprinting of mycobacterium tuberculosis strains having few copies of IS6110.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z H; Ijaz, K; Bates, J H; Eisenach, K D; Cave, M D

    2000-10-01

    Several genetic loci have been utilized to genotype isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A shortcoming of the most commonly used method, IS6110 fingerprinting, is that it does not adequately discriminate between isolates having few copies of IS6110. This study was undertaken to compare pTBN12 fingerprinting of polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence genes and spoligotyping of the direct repeat locus as secondary typing procedures for M. tuberculosis isolates having fewer than six copies of IS6110. A total of 88 isolates (100% of the isolates with fewer than six copies of IS6110 isolated in Arkansas during 1996 and 1997) were included in this study. Among the 88 isolates, 34 different IS6110 patterns were observed, 10 of which were shared by more than 1 isolate, involving a total of 64 isolates. The 64 isolates were subdivided into 13 clusters (containing 37 isolates) and 27 unique isolates based on a combination of IS6110 and pTBN12 fingerprinting and into 11 clusters (containing 51 isolates) and 13 unique isolates based on a combination of IS6110 fingerprinting and spoligotyping. Identical spoligotypes were found among isolates having different IS6110 patterns, as well as among isolates showing different pTBN12 patterns. In contrast, all isolates that had different IS6110 patterns were found to be unique by pTBN12 typing. The clustering rate was 73, 58, and 42%, respectively, for IS6110 fingerprinting alone, IS6110 fingerprinting and spoligotyping combined, and IS6110 and pTBN12 combined fingerprinting. The data indicate that the pTBN12 method has greater discriminating power among low-copy-number isolates than does spoligotyping.

  19. Neonatal Pasteurella multocida subsp. septica Meningitis Traced to Household Cats: Molecular Linkage Analysis Using Repetitive-Sequence-Based PCR

    PubMed Central

    Freij, Bishara J.; Robinson-Dunn, Barbara; Makin, Jacob; Runge, Jessica K.; Luna, Ruth Ann

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of neonatal bacterial meningitis. We describe such a case and verify two household cats as the source of infection using repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) molecular fingering. PMID:26491173

  20. Sequence composition and genome organization of maize

    PubMed Central

    Messing, Joachim; Bharti, Arvind K.; Karlowski, Wojciech M.; Gundlach, Heidrun; Kim, Hye Ran; Yu, Yeisoo; Wei, Fusheng; Fuks, Galina; Soderlund, Carol A.; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Wing, Rod A.

    2004-01-01

    Zea mays L. ssp. mays, or corn, one of the most important crops and a model for plant genetics, has a genome ≈80% the size of the human genome. To gain global insight into the organization of its genome, we have sequenced the ends of large insert clones, yielding a cumulative length of one-eighth of the genome with a DNA sequence read every 6.2 kb, thereby describing a large percentage of the genes and transposable elements of maize in an unbiased approach. Based on the accumulative 307 Mb of sequence, repeat sequences occupy 58% and genic regions occupy 7.5%. A conservative estimate predicts ≈59,000 genes, which is higher than in any other organism sequenced so far. Because the sequences are derived from bacterial artificial chromosome clones, which are ordered in overlapping bins, tagged genes are also ordered along continuous chromosomal segments. Based on this positional information, roughly one-third of the genes appear to consist of tandemly arrayed gene families. Although the ancestor of maize arose by tetraploidization, fewer than half of the genes appear to be present in two orthologous copies, indicating that the maize genome has undergone significant gene loss since the duplication event. PMID:15388850

  1. Chromosomal organization of repetitive DNA sequences in Astyanax bockmanni (Teleostei, Characiformes): dispersive location, association and co-localization in the genome.

    PubMed

    Silva, Duílio M Z A; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Daniel, Sandro Natal; Hashimoto, Diogo Teruo; Oliveira, Claudio; Porto-Foresti, Fabio; Foresti, Fausto

    2013-09-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences constitute a great portion of the genome of eukaryotes and are considered key components to comprehend evolutionary mechanisms and karyotypic differentiation. Aiming to contribute to the knowledge of chromosome structure and organization of some repetitive DNA classes in the fish genome, chromosomes of two allopatric populations of Astyanax bockmanni were analyzed using classic cytogenetics techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization, with probes for ribosomal DNA sequences, histone DNA and transposable elements. These Astyanax populations showed the same diploid number (2n = 50), however with differences in chromosome morphology, distribution of constitutive heterochromatin, and location of 18S rDNA and retroelement Rex3 sites. In contrast, sites for 5S rDNA and H1, H3 and H4 histones showed to be co-located and highly conserved. Our results indicate that dispersion and variability of 18S rDNA and heterochromatin sites are not associated with macro rearrangements in the chromosome structure of these populations. Similarly, distinct evolutionary mechanisms would act upon histone genes and 5S rDNA, contributing to chromosomal association and co-location of these sequences. Data obtained indicate that distinct mechanisms drive the spreading of repetitive DNAs in the genome of A. bockmanni. Also, mobile elements may account for the polymorphism of the major rDNA sites and heterochromatin in this genus.

  2. Effects of creatine supplementation on repetitive sprint performance and body composition in competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Grindstaff, P D; Kreider, R; Bishop, R; Wilson, M; Wood, L; Alexander, C; Almada, A

    1997-12-01

    In a double-blind and randomized manner, 18 male and female junior competitive swimmers supplemented their diets with 21 g.day-1 of creatine monohydrate (Cr) or a maltodextrin placebo (P) for 9 days during training. Prior to and following supplementation, subjects performed three 100-m freestyle sprint swims (long course) with 60 s rest/recovery between heats. In addition, subjects performed three 20-s arm ergometer maximal-effort sprint tests in the prone position with 60 s rest/recovery between sprint tests. Significant differences were observed among swim times, with Cr subjects swimming significantly faster than P subjects following supplementation in Heat 1 and significantly decreasing swim time in the second 100-m sprint. There was also some evidence that cumulative time to perform the three 100-m swims was decreased in the Cr group. Results indicate that 9 days of Cr supplementation during swim training may provide some ergogenic value to competitive junior swimmers during repetitive sprint performance.

  3. Nucleotide sequence composition and method for detection of neisseria gonorrhoeae

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, A.; Yang, H.L.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes a composition of matter that is specific for {ital Neisseria gonorrhoeae}. It comprises: at least one nucleotide sequence for which the ratio of the amount of the sequence which hybridizes to chromosomal DNA of {ital Neisseria gonorrhoeae} to the amount of the sequence which hybridizes to chromosomal DNA of {ital Neisseria meningitidis} is greater than about five. The ratio being obtained by a method described.

  4. Optimal arbitrarily accurate composite pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Guang Hao; Yoder, Theodore J.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2014-02-01

    Implementing a single-qubit unitary is often hampered by imperfect control. Systematic amplitude errors ɛ, caused by incorrect duration or strength of a pulse, are an especially common problem. But a sequence of imperfect pulses can provide a better implementation of a desired operation, as compared to a single primitive pulse. We find optimal pulse sequences consisting of L primitive π or 2π rotations that suppress such errors to arbitrary order O (ɛn) on arbitrary initial states. Optimality is demonstrated by proving an L =O(n) lower bound and saturating it with L =2n solutions. Closed-form solutions for arbitrary rotation angles are given for n =1,2,3,4. Perturbative solutions for any n are proven for small angles, while arbitrary angle solutions are obtained by analytic continuation up to n =12. The derivation proceeds by a novel algebraic and nonrecursive approach, in which finding amplitude error correcting sequences can be reduced to solving polynomial equations.

  5. Optimal arbitrarily accurate composite pulse sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, Guang Hao; Yoder, Theodore

    2014-03-01

    Implementing a single qubit unitary is often hampered by imperfect control. Systematic amplitude errors ɛ, caused by incorrect duration or strength of a pulse, are an especially common problem. But a sequence of imperfect pulses can provide a better implementation of a desired operation, as compared to a single primitive pulse. We find optimal pulse sequences consisting of L primitive π or 2 π rotations that suppress such errors to arbitrary order (ɛn) on arbitrary initial states. Optimality is demonstrated by proving an L = (n) lower bound and saturating it with L = 2 n solutions. Closed-form solutions for arbitrary rotation angles are given for n = 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 . Perturbative solutions for any n are proven for small angles, while arbitrary angle solutions are obtained by analytic continuation up to n = 12 . The derivation proceeds by a novel algebraic and non-recursive approach, in which finding amplitude error correcting sequences can be reduced to solving polynomial equations.

  6. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2006-07-04

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  7. Methods and compositions for efficient nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are novel methods and compositions for rapid and highly efficient nucleic acid sequencing based upon hybridization with two sets of small oligonucleotide probes of known sequences. Extremely large nucleic acid molecules, including chromosomes and non-amplified RNA, may be sequenced without prior cloning or subcloning steps. The methods of the invention also solve various current problems associated with sequencing technology such as, for example, high noise to signal ratios and difficult discrimination, attaching many nucleic acid fragments to a surface, preparing many, longer or more complex probes and labelling more species.

  8. Construction of validated, non-redundant composite protein sequence databases.

    PubMed

    Bleasby, A J; Wootton, J C

    1990-01-01

    A strategy has been developed for the construction of a validated, comprehensive composite protein sequence database. Entries are amalgamated from primary source data bases by a largely automated set of processes in which redundant and trivially different entries are eliminated. A modular approach has been adopted to allow scientific judgement to be used at each stage of database processing and amalgamation. Source databases are assigned a priority depending on the quality of sequence validation and commenting. Rejection of entries from the lower priority database, in each pairwise comparison of databases, is carried out according to optionally defined redundancy criteria based on sequence segment mismatches. Efficient algorithms for this methodology are embodied in the COMPO software system. COMPO has been applied for over 2 years in construction and regular updating of the OWL composite protein sequence database from the source databases NBRF-PIR, SWISS-PROT, a GenBank translation retrieved from the feature tables, NBRF-NEW, NEWAT86, PSD-KYOTO and the sequences contained in the Brookhaven protein structure databank. OWL is part of the ISIS integrated data resource of protein sequence and structure [Akrigg et al. (1988) Nature, 335, 745-746]. The modular nature of the integration process greatly facilitates the frequent updating of OWL following releases of the source databases. The extent of redundancy in these sources is revealed by the comparison process. The advantages of a robust composite database for sequence similarity searching and information retrieval are discussed.

  9. 100 Repetitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    One hundred repetitions--100 "useful" repetitions. This notion has guided the author's work in alternative education programs for almost 20 years, dealing with the most challenging students, from addicts to conduct-disordered adolescents to traumatized 5th graders. There are no magic tricks. The role of educators is to align with the healthy…

  10. Expectancy and Repetition in Task Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, E.; Remington, R. W.; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We studied the mechanisms of task preparation using a design that pitted task expectancy against task repetition. In one experiment, two simple cognitive tasks were presented in a predictable sequence containing both repetitions and non-repetitions. The typical task sequence was AABBAABB. Occasional violations of this sequence allowed us to measure the effects of valid versus invalid expectancy. With this design, we were able to study the effects of task expectancy, task repetition, and interaction.

  11. Differentiation of the XY sex chromosomes in the fish Hoplias malabaricus (Characiformes, Erythrinidae): unusual accumulation of repetitive sequences on the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, M B; Martins, C; Vicari, M R; Rebordinos, L; Bertollo, L A C

    2010-01-01

    The wolf fish Hoplias malabaricus (Erythrinidae) presents a high karyotypic diversity, with 7 karyomorphs identified. Karyomorph A is characterized by 2n = 42 chromosomes, without morphologically differentiated sex chromosomes. Karyomorph B also has 2n = 42 chromosomes for both sexes, but differs by a distinct heteromorphic XX/XY sex chromosome system. The cytogenetic mapping of 5 classes of repetitive DNA indicated similarities between both karyomorphs and the probable derivation of the XY chromosomes from pair No. 21 of karyomorph A. These chromosomes appear to be homeologous since the distribution of (GATA)(n) sequences, 18S rDNA and 5SHindIII-DNA sites supports their potential relatedness. Our data indicate that the differentiation of the long arms of the X chromosome occurred by accumulation of heterochromatin and 18S rDNA cistrons from the ancestral homomorphic pair No. 21 present in karyomorph A. These findings are further supported by the distribution of the Cot-1 DNA fraction. In addition, while the 18S rDNA cistrons were maintained and amplified on the X chromosomes, they were lost in the Y chromosome. The X chromosome was a clearly preferred site for the accumulation of DNA repeats, representing an unusual example of an X clustering more repetitive sequences than the Y during sex chromosome differentiation in fish.

  12. Variation in extragenic repetitive DNA sequences in Pseudomonas syringae and potential use of modified REP primers in the identification of closely related isolates

    PubMed Central

    Çepni, Elif; Gürel, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    In this study, Pseudomonas syringe pathovars isolated from olive, tomato and bean were identified by species-specific PCR and their genetic diversity was assessed by repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP)-PCR. Reverse universal primers for REP-PCR were designed by using the bases of A, T, G or C at the positions of 1, 4 and 11 to identify additional polymorphism in the banding patterns. Binding of the primers to different annealing sites in the genome revealed additional fingerprint patterns in eight isolates of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and two isolates of P. syringae pv. tomato. The use of four different bases in the primer sequences did not affect the PCR reproducibility and was very efficient in revealing intra-pathovar diversity, particularly in P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi. At the pathovar level, the primer BOX1AR yielded shared fragments, in addition to five bands that discriminated among the pathovars P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and P. syringae pv. tomato. REP-PCR with a modified primer containing C produced identical bands among the isolates in a pathovar but separated three pathovars more distinctly than four other primers. Although REP- and BOX-PCRs have been successfully used in the molecular identification of Pseudomonas isolates from Turkish flora, a PCR based on inter-enterobacterial repetitive intergenic concensus (ERIC) sequences failed to produce clear banding patterns in this study. PMID:23055805

  13. Structure of a D-protein gene and amino-acid sequences of the highly repetitive D-proteins secreted by the accessory glands of the mealworm beetle.

    PubMed

    Paesen, G C; Feng, X; Happ, G M

    1996-04-16

    The D-group proteins form the major component of the proteinaceous secretion of the tubular accessory glands of the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor. In a previous paper, we reported the sequence of two D-protein cDNAs and their inferred translation products. Both proteins contain three highly repetitive domains (A, A' and B). In this paper, we present the cDNA-inferred sequences of 8 more D-proteins, none of which contains an A' domain. We also present the structure of a D-protein gene. Southern analysis suggests that genes coding for an A' domain are relatively rare. Genes with a total of 7 or 8 (A + B domain) repeats seem most common.

  14. Highly species-specific centromeric repetitive DNA sequences in lizards: molecular cytogenetic characterization of a novel family of satellite DNA sequences isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota).

    PubMed

    Chaiprasertsri, Nampech; Uno, Yoshinobu; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Prakhongcheep, Ornjira; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Charernsuk, Saranon; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi; Koga, Akihiko; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2013-01-01

    Two novel repetitive DNA sequences, VSAREP1 and VSAREP2, were isolated from the water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Platynota) and characterized using molecular cytogenetics. The respective lengths and guanine-cytosine (GC) contents of the sequences were 190 bp and 57.5% for VSAREP1 and 185 bp and 59.7% for VSAREP2, and both elements were tandemly arrayed as satellite DNA in the genome. VSAREP1 and VSAREP2 were each located at the C-positive heterochromatin in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 2q, the centromeric region of chromosome 5, and 3 pairs of microchromosomes. This suggests that genomic compartmentalization between macro- and microchromosomes might not have occurred in the centromeric repetitive sequences of V. salvator macromaculatus. These 2 sequences did only hybridize to genomic DNA of V. salvator macromaculatus, but no signal was observed even for other squamate reptiles, including Varanus exanthematicus, which is a closely related species of V. salvator macromaculatus. These results suggest that these sequences were differentiated rapidly or were specifically amplified in the V. salvator macromaculatus genome.

  15. Sex determination of porcine embryos using a new developed duplex polymerase chain reaction procedure based on the amplification of repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Torner, Eva; Bussalleu, Eva; Briz, M Dolors; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Bonet, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays have become increasingly prevalent for sexing embryos. The aim of the present study was to develop a suitable duplex PCR procedure based on the amplification of porcine repetitive sequences for sexing porcine tissues, embryos and single cells. Primers were designed targeting the X12696 Y chromosome-specific repeat sequence (SUSYa and SUSYb; sex-related primer sets), the multicopy porcine-specific mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene (SUS12S; control primer set) and the X51555 1 chromosome repeat sequence (SUS1; control primer set). The specificity of the primer sets was established and the technique was optimised by testing combinations of two specific primer sets (SUSYa/SUS12S; SUSYb/SUS12S), different primer concentrations, two sources of DNA polymerase, different melting temperatures and different numbers of amplification cycles using genomic DNA from porcine ovarian and testicular tissue. The optimised SUSYa/SUS12S- and SUSYb/SUS12S-based duplex PCR procedures were applied to porcine in vitro-produced (IVP) blastocysts, cell-stage embryos and oocytes. The SUSYb/SUS12S primer-based procedure successfully sexed porcine single cells and IVP cell-stage embryos (100% efficiency), as well as blastocysts (96.6% accuracy; 96.7% efficiency). This is the first report to demonstrate the applicability of these repetitive sequences for this purpose. In conclusion, the SUSYb/SUS12S primer-based duplex PCR procedure is highly reliable and sensitive for sexing porcine IVP embryos.

  16. Phylogenetic Heatmaps Highlight Composition Biases in Sequenced Reads

    PubMed Central

    Choudhari, Sulbha; Grigoriev, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Due to advancements in sequencing technology, sequence data production is no longer a constraint in the field of microbiology and has made it possible to study uncultured microbes or whole environments using metagenomics. However, these new technologies introduce different biases in metagenomic sequencing, affecting the nucleotide distribution of resulting sequence reads. Here, we illustrate such biases using two methods. One is based on phylogenetic heatmaps (PGHMs), a novel approach for compact visualization of sequence composition differences between two groups of sequences containing the same phylogenetic groups. This method is well suited for finding noise and biases when comparing metagenomics samples. We apply PGHMs to detect noise and bias in the data produced with different DNA extraction protocols, different sequencing platforms and different experimental frameworks. In parallel, we use principal component analysis displaying different clustering of sequences from each sample to support our findings and illustrate the utility of PGHMs. We considered contributions of the read length and GC-content variation and observed that in most cases biases were generally due to the GC-content of the reads. PMID:28125031

  17. The RNase P RNA from cyanobacteria: short tandemly repeated repetitive (STRR) sequences are present within the RNase P RNA gene in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Vioque, A

    1997-01-01

    The RNase P RNA gene (rnpB) from 10 cyanobacteria has been characterized. These new RNAs, together with the previously available ones, provide a comprehensive data set of RNase P RNA from diverse cyanobacterial lineages. All heterocystous cyanobacteria, but none of the non-heterocystous strains analyzed, contain short tandemly repeated repetitive (STRR) sequences that increase the length of helix P12. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that the STRR sequences are not required for catalytic activity in vitro. STRR sequences seem to have recently and independently invaded the RNase P RNA genes in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria because closely related strains contain unrelated STRR sequences. Most cyanobacteria RNase P RNAs lack the sequence GGU in the loop connecting helices P15 and P16 that has been established to interact with the 3'-end CCA in precursor tRNA substrates in other bacteria. This character is shared with plastid RNase P RNA. Helix P6 is longer than usual in most cyanobacteria as well as in plastid RNase P RNA. PMID:9254706

  18. One hertz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex enhances offline motor memory consolidation for sequence-specific implicit learning.

    PubMed

    Meehan, S K; Zabukovec, J R; Dao, E; Cheung, K L; Linsdell, M A; Boyd, L A

    2013-10-01

    Consolidation of motor memories associated with skilled practice can occur both online, concurrent with practice, and offline, after practice has ended. The current study investigated the role of dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) in early offline motor memory consolidation of implicit sequence-specific learning. Thirty-three participants were assigned to one of three groups of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left PMd (5 Hz, 1 Hz or control) immediately following practice of a novel continuous tracking task. There was no additional practice following rTMS. This procedure was repeated for 4 days. The continuous tracking task contained a repeated sequence that could be learned implicitly and random sequences that could not. On a separate fifth day, a retention test was performed to assess implicit sequence-specific motor learning of the task. Tracking error was decreased for the group who received 1 Hz rTMS over the PMd during the early consolidation period immediately following practice compared with control or 5 Hz rTMS. Enhanced sequence-specific learning with 1 Hz rTMS following practice was due to greater offline consolidation, not differences in online learning between the groups within practice days. A follow-up experiment revealed that stimulation of PMd following practice did not differentially change motor cortical excitability, suggesting that changes in offline consolidation can be largely attributed to stimulation-induced changes in PMd. These findings support a differential role for the PMd in support of online and offline sequence-specific learning of a visuomotor task and offer converging evidence for competing memory systems.

  19. Patterns of rDNA and telomeric sequences diversification: contribution to repetitive DNA organization in Phyllostomidae bats.

    PubMed

    Calixto, Merilane da Silva; de Andrade, Izaquiel Santos; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; Santos, Neide; Martins, Cesar; Loreto, Vilma; de Souza, Maria José

    2014-02-01

    Chromosomal organization and the evolution of genome architecture can be investigated by physical mapping of the genes for 45S and 5S ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) and by the analysis of telomeric sequences. We studied 12 species of bats belonging to four subfamilies of the family Phyllostomidae in order to correlate patterns of distribution of heterochromatin and the multigene families for rDNA. The number of clusters for 45S gene ranged from one to three pairs, with exclusively location in autosomes, except for Carollia perspicillata that had in X chromosome. The 5S gene all the species studied had only one site located on an autosomal pair. In no species the 45S and 5S genes collocated. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe for telomeric sequences revealed fluorescence on all telomeres in all species, except in Carollia perspicillata. Non-telomeric sites in the pericentromeric region of the chromosomes were observed in most species, ranged from one to 12 pairs. Most interstitial telomeric sequences were coincident with heterochromatic regions. The results obtained in the present work indicate that different evolutionary mechanisms are acting in Phyllostomidae genome architecture, as well as the occurrence of Robertsonian fusion during the chromosomal evolution of bats without a loss of telomeric sequences. These data contribute to understanding the organization of multigene families and telomeric sequences on bat genome as well as the chromosomal evolutionary history of Phyllostomidae bats.

  20. Heterogeneity of clinical and environmental isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum using repetitive element sequence-based PCR: municipal water an unlikely source of community-acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Thomson, R M; Tolson, C E; Carter, R; Huygens, F; Hargreaves, M

    2014-10-01

    M. fortuitum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium associated with community-acquired and nosocomial wound, soft tissue, and pulmonary infections. It has been postulated that water has been the source of infection especially in the hospital setting. The aim of this study was to determine if municipal water may be the source of community-acquired or nosocomial infections in the Brisbane area. Between 2007 and 2009, 20 strains of M. fortuitum were recovered from municipal water and 53 patients' isolates were submitted to the reference laboratory. A wide variation in strain types was identified using repetitive element sequence-based PCR, with 13 clusters of ⩾2 indistinguishable isolates, and 28 patterns consisting of individual isolates. The clusters could be grouped into seven similar groups (>95% similarity). Municipal water and clinical isolates collected during the same time period and from the same geographical area consisted of different strain types, making municipal water an unlikely source of sporadic human infection.

  1. Evaluation of a high-throughput repetitive-sequence-based PCR system for DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex strains.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Gerard A; Freeman, Robert J; Lewis, Kaeryn N; Livingston-Rosanoff, Devon; Shah, Ketan S; Milan, Sparrow Joy; Goldberg, Stefan V

    2004-06-01

    Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) is useful for generating DNA fingerprints of diverse bacterial and fungal species. Rep-PCR amplicon fingerprints represent genomic segments lying between repetitive sequences. A commercial system that electrophoretically separates rep-PCR amplicons on microfluidic chips, and provides computer-generated readouts of results has been adapted for use with Mycobacterium species. The ability of this system to type M. tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) isolates was evaluated. M. tuberculosis strains (n = 56) were typed by spoligotyping with rep-PCR as a high-resolution adjunct. Results were compared with those generated by a standard approach of spoligotyping with IS6110-targeted restriction fragment length polymorphism (IS6110-RFLP) as the high-resolution adjunct. The sample included 11 epidemiologically and genotypically linked outbreak isolates and a population-based sample of 45 isolates from recent immigrants to Seattle, Wash., from the African Horn countries of Somalia, Eritrea, and Ethiopia. Twenty isolates exhibited unique spoligotypes and were not analyzed further. Of the 36 outbreak and African Horn isolates with nonunique spoligotypes, 23 fell into four clusters identified by IS6110-RFLP and rep-PCR, with 97% concordance observed between the two methods. Both approaches revealed extensive strain heterogeneity within the African Horn sample, consistent with a predominant pattern of reactivation of latent infections in this immigrant population. Rep-PCR exhibited 89% concordance with IS1245-RFLP typing of 28 M. avium subspecies avium strains. For M. tuberculosis as well as M. avium subspecies avium, the discriminative power of rep-PCR equaled or exceeded that of RFLP. Rep-PCR also generated DNA fingerprints from M. intracellulare (n = 8) and MAC(x) (n = 2) strains. It shows promise as a fast, unified method for high-throughput genotypic fingerprinting of multiple Mycobacterium species.

  2. Comparison of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis & repetitive sequence-based PCR methods for molecular epidemiological studies of Escherichia coli clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Il Kwon; Kim, Juwon; Sun, Je Young Hannah; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, Yong-Rok; Wang, Kang-Kyun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: PFGE, rep-PCR, and MLST are widely used to identify related bacterial isolates and determine epidemiologic associations during outbreaks. This study was performed to compare the ability of repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to determine the genetic relationships among Escherichia coli isolates assigned to various sequence types (STs) by two multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. Methods: A total of 41 extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL-) and/or AmpC β-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical isolates were included in this study. MLST experiments were performed following the Achtman's MLST scheme and the Whittam's MLST scheme, respectively. Rep-PCR experiments were performed using the DiversiLab system. PFGE experiments were also performed. Results: A comparison of the two MLST methods demonstrated that these two schemes yielded compatible results. PFGE correctly segregated E. coli isolates belonging to different STs as different types, but did not group E. coli isolates belonging to the same ST in the same group. Rep-PCR accurately grouped E. coli isolates belonging to the same ST together, but this method demonstrated limited ability to discriminate between E. coli isolates belonging to different STs. Interpretation & conclusions: These results suggest that PFGE would be more effective when investigating outbreaks in a limited space, such as a specialty hospital or an intensive care unit, whereas rep-PCR should be used for nationwide or worldwide epidemiology studies. PMID:25579152

  3. Repetitive sequences originating from the centromere constitute large-scale heterochromatin in the telomere region in the siamang, a small ape.

    PubMed

    Koga, A; Hirai, Y; Hara, T; Hirai, H

    2012-09-01

    Chromosomes of the siamang Symphalangus syndactylus (a small ape) carry large-scale heterochromatic structures at their ends. These structures look similar, by chromosome C-banding, to chromosome-end heterochromatin found in chimpanzee, bonobo and gorilla (African great apes), of which a major component is tandem repeats of 32-bp-long, AT-rich units. In the present study, we identified repetitive sequences that are a major component of the siamang heterochromatin. Their repeat units are 171 bp in length, and exhibit sequence similarity to alpha satellite DNA, a major component of the centromeres in primates. Thus, the large-scale heterochromatic structures have different origins between the great apes and the small ape. The presence of alpha satellite DNA in the telomere region has previously been reported in the white-cheeked gibbon Nomascus leucogenys, another small ape species. There is, however, a difference in the size of the telomere-region alpha satellite DNA, which is far larger in the siamang. It is not known whether the sequences of these two species (of different genera) have a common origin because the phylogenetic relationship of genera within the small ape family is still not clear. Possible evolutionary scenarios are discussed.

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of Ptychobarbus kaznakovi (Teleostei: Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae), and repetitive sequences in the D-loop.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingzhan; Wu, Bo; Li, Jiuxuan; Song, Zhaobin

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Ptychobarbus kaznakovi was sequenced and characterized. The genome is 16,842 bp in length. Similar with most teleosts, it has two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, and one displacement loop (D-loop) region. Conserved sequence blocks, including ETAS, CSB-B, D, E, F, and CSB1-3, were identified in the D-loop, which is similar to other species in Cypriniformes. Nevertheless, a 55 bp tandem repeat array was also identified at 3' end of the D-loop, which is the first finding in Schizothoracinae. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the species of Ptychobarbus (P. dipogon and P. kaznakovi) formed a monophyletic group and represented close relationship to the species without scales in Schizothoracinae.

  5. Structural biology of disease-associated repetitive DNA sequences and protein-DNA complexes involved in DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, G.; Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Chen, X.; Catasti, P.; Silks, L.A. III; Moyzis, R.K.; Bradbury, E.M.; Garcia, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    This project is aimed at formulating the sequence-structure-function correlations of various microsatellites in the human (and other eukaryotic) genomes. Here the authors have been able to develop and apply structure biology tools to understand the following: the molecular mechanism of length polymorphism microsatellites; the molecular mechanism by which the microsatellites in the noncoding regions alter the regulation of the associated gene; and finally, the molecular mechanism by which the expansion of these microsatellites impairs gene expression and causes the disease. Their multidisciplinary structural biology approach is quantitative and can be applied to all coding and noncoding DNA sequences associated with any gene. Both NIH and DOE are interested in developing quantitative tools for understanding the function of various human genes for prevention against diseases caused by genetic and environmental effects.

  6. The Repetitive Oligopeptide Sequences Modulate Cytopathic Potency but Are Not Crucial for Cellular Uptake of Clostridium difficile Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Olling, Alexandra; Goy, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Florian; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenicity of Clostridium difficile is primarily linked to secretion of the intracellular acting toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) which monoglucosylate and thereby inactivate Rho GTPases of host cells. Although the molecular mode of action of TcdA and TcdB is well understood, far less is known about toxin binding and uptake. It is acknowledged that the C-terminally combined repetitive oligopeptides (CROPs) of the toxins function as receptor binding domain. The current study evaluates the role of the CROP domain with respect to functionality of TcdA and TcdB. Therefore, we generated truncated TcdA devoid of the CROPs (TcdA1–1874) and found that this mutant was still cytopathic. However, TcdA1–1874 possesses about 5 to 10-fold less potency towards 3T3 and HT29 cells compared to the full length toxin. Interestingly, CHO-C6 cells even showed almost identical susceptibility towards truncated and full length TcdA concerning Rac1 glucosylation or cell rounding, respectively. FACS and Western blot analyses elucidated these differences and revealed a correlation between CROP-binding to the cell surface and toxin potency. These findings refute the accepted opinion of solely CROP- mediated toxin internalization. Competition experiments demonstrated that presence neither of TcdA CROPs nor of full length TcdA reduced binding of truncated TcdA1–1874 to HT29 cells. We assume that toxin uptake might additionally occur through alternative receptor structures and/or other associated endocytotic pathways. The second assumption was substantiated by TER measurements showing that basolaterally applied TcdA1–1874 exhibits considerably higher cytotoxic potency than apically applied mutant or even full length TcdA, the latter being almost independent of the side of application. Thus, different routes for cellular uptake might enable the toxins to enter a broader repertoire of cell types leading to the observed multifarious pathogenesis of C. difficile. PMID:21445253

  7. Repetitive transpositions of mitochondrial DNA sequences to the nucleus during the radiation of horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus, Chiroptera).

    PubMed

    Shi, Huizhen; Dong, Ji; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi; Mao, Xiuguang

    2016-05-01

    Transposition of mitochondrial DNA into the nucleus, which gives rise to nuclear mitochondrial DNAs (NUMTs), has been well documented in eukaryotes. However, very few studies have assessed the frequency of these transpositions during the evolutionary history of a specific taxonomic group. Here we used the horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus) as a case study to determine the frequency and relative timing of nuclear transfers of mitochondrial control region sequences. For this, phylogenetic and coalescent analyzes were performed on NUMTs and authentic mtDNA sequences generated from eight horseshoe bat species. Our results suggest at least three independent transpositions, including two ancient and one more recent, during the evolutionary history of Rhinolophus. The two ancient transpositions are represented by the NUMT-1 and -2 clades, with each clade consisting of NUMTs from almost all studied species but originating from different portions of the mtDNA genome. Furthermore, estimates of the most recent common ancestor for each clade corresponded to the time of the initial diversification of this genus. The recent transposition is represented by NUMT-3, which was discovered only in a specific subgroup of Rhinolophus and exhibited a close relationship to its mitochondrial counterpart. Our similarity searches of mtDNA in the R. ferrumequinum genome confirmed the presence of NUMT-1 and NUMT-2 clade sequences and, for the first time, assessed the extent of NUMTs in a bat genome. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report on the frequency of transpositions of mtDNA occurring before the common ancestry of a genus.

  8. Robustness of composite pulse sequences to time-dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabytayev, Chingiz; Green, Todd J.; Khodjasteh, Kaveh; Viola, Lorenza; Biercuk, Michael J.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-03-01

    Quantum control protocols can minimize the effect of noise sources that reduce the quality of quantum operations. Originally developed for NMR, composite pulse sequences correct for unknown static control errors . We study these compensating pulses in the general case of time-varying Gaussian control noise using a filter-function approach and detailed numerics. Three different noise models were considered in this work: amplitude noise, detuning noise and simultaneous presence of both noises. Pulse sequences are shown to be robust to noise up to frequencies as high as ~10% of the Rabi frequency. Robustness of pulses designed for amplitude noise is explained using a geometric picture that naturally follows from filter function. We also discuss future directions including new pulses correcting for noise of certain frequency. True J. Merrill and Kenneth R. Brown. arXiv:1203.6392v1. In press Adv. Chem. Phys. (2013)

  9. Microhomology-mediated DNA strand annealing and elongation by human DNA polymerases λ and β on normal and repetitive DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Crespan, Emmanuele; Czabany, Tibor; Maga, Giovanni; Hübscher, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    ‘Classical’ non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), dependent on the Ku70/80 and the DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 complexes, is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Eukaryotic cells possess also an alternative microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) mechanism, which is independent from Ku and DNA ligase 4/XRCC4. The components of the MMEJ machinery are still largely unknown. Family X DNA polymerases (pols) are involved in the classical NHEJ pathway. We have compared in this work, the ability of human family X DNA pols β, λ and μ, to promote the MMEJ of different model templates with terminal microhomology regions. Our results reveal that DNA pol λ and DNA ligase I are sufficient to promote efficient MMEJ repair of broken DNA ends in vitro, and this in the absence of auxiliary factors. However, DNA pol β, not λ, was more efficient in promoting MMEJ of DNA ends containing the (CAG)n triplet repeat sequence of the human Huntingtin gene, leading to triplet expansion. The checkpoint complex Rad9/Hus1/Rad1 promoted end joining by DNA pol λ on non-repetitive sequences, while it limited triplet expansion by DNA pol β. We propose a possible novel role of DNA pol β in MMEJ, promoting (CAG)n triplet repeats instability. PMID:22373917

  10. Large-scale cloning of human chromosome 2-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Stanton, V P; Fujiwara, T M; Wang, J X; Rezonzew, R; Crumley, M J; Morgan, K; Gros, P; Housman, D; Schurr, E

    1995-03-20

    We report here an efficient approach to the establishment of extended YAC contigs on human chromosome 2 by using an interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS)-PCR-based screening strategy for YAC DNA pools. Genomic DNA was extracted from 1152 YAC pools comprised of 55,296 YACs mostly derived from the CEPH Mark I library. Alu-element-mediated PCR was performed for each pool, and amplification products were spotted on hybridization membranes (IRS filters). IRS probes for the screening of the IRS filters were obtained by Alu-element-mediated PCR. Of 708 distinct probes obtained from chromosome 2-specific somatic cell hybrids, 85% were successfully used for library screening. Similarly, 80% of 80 YAC walking probes were successfully used for library screening. Each probe detected an average of 6.6 YACs, which is in good agreement with the 7- to 7.5-fold genome coverage provided by the library. In a preliminary analysis, we have identified 188 YAC groups that are the basis for building contigs for chromosome 2. The coverage of the telomeric half of chromosome 2q was considered to be good since 31 of 34 microsatellites and 22 of 23 expressed sequence tags that were chosen from chromosome region 2q13-q37 were contained in a chromosome 2 YAC sublibrary generated by our experiments. We have identified a minimum of 1610 distinct chromosome 2-specific YACs, which will be a valuable asset for the physical mapping of the second largest human chromosome.

  11. Molecular and cytogenetic analysis of the telomeric (TTAGGG)n repetitive sequences in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Teleostei: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Chew, Joyce S K; Oliveira, Claudio; Wright, Jonathan M; Dobson, Melanie J

    2002-03-01

    The majority of chromosomes in Oreochromis niloticus, as with most fish karyotyped to date, cannot be individually identified owing to their small size. As a first step in establishing a physical map for this important aquaculture species of tilapia we have analyzed the location of the vertebrate telomeric repeat sequence, (TTAGGG)n, in O. niloticus. Southern blot hybridization analysis and a Bal31 sensitivity assay confirm that the vertebrate telomeric repeat is indeed present at O. niloticus chromosomal ends with repeat tracts extending for 4-10 kb on chromosomal ends in erythrocytes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that (TTAGGG)n is found not only at telomeres, but also at two interstitial loci on chromosome 1. These data support the hypothesis that chromosome 1, which is significantly larger than all the other chromosomes in the karyotype, was produced by the fusion of three chromosomes and explain the overall reduction of chromosomal number from the ancestral teleost karyotype of 2n=48 to 2n=44 observed in tilapia.

  12. Indole acetic acid production by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. from the rhizosphere of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng. and their variation in extragenic repetitive DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sethia, Bedhya; Mustafa, Mariam; Manohar, Sneha; Patil, Savita V; Jayamohan, Nellickal Subramanian; Kumudini, Belur Satyan

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas (FP) is a heterogenous group of growth promoting rhizobacteria that regulate plant growth by releasing secondary metabolic compounds viz., indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophores, ammonia and hydrogen cyanide. In the present study, IAA producing FPs from the rhizosphere of Plectranthus amboinicus were characterized morphologically, biochemically and at the molecular level. Molecular identification of the isolates were carried out using Pseudomonas specific primers. The effect of varying time (24, 48, 72 and 96 h), Trp concentrations (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μg x ml(-1)), temperature (10, 26, 37 and 50 ± 2 degrees C) and pH (6, 7 and 8) on IAA production by 10 best isolates were studied. Results showed higher IAA production at 72 h incubation, at 300 μg x ml(-1) Trp concentration, temperature 26 ± 2 degrees C and pH 7. TLC with acidified ethyl acetate extract showed that the IAA produced has a similar Rf value to that of the standard IAA. Results of TLC were confirmed by HPLC analysis. Genetic diversity of the isolates was also studied using 40 RAPD and 4 Rep primers. Genetic diversity parameters such as dominance, Shannon index and Simpson index were calculated. Out of 40 RAPD primers tested, 9 (2 OP-D series and 7 OP-E series) were shortlisted for further analysis. Studies using RAPD, ERIC, BOX, REP and GTG5 primers revealed that isolates exhibit significant diversity in repetitive DNA sequences irrespective of the rhizosphere.

  13. Identification and molecular epidemiology of dermatophyte isolates by repetitive-sequence-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting using the DiversiLab system in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Koc, A Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa A; Inci, Melek; Sariguzel, Fatma M; Sav, Hafize

    2017-05-01

    Dermatophyte species, isolation and identification in clinical samples are still difficult and take a long time. The identification and molecular epidemiology of dermatophytes commonly isolated in a clinical laboratory in Turkey by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) were assessed by comparing the results with those of reference identification. A total of 44 dermatophytes isolated from various clinical specimens of 20 patients with superficial mycoses in Kayseri and 24 patients in Hatay were studied. The identification of dermatophyte isolates was based on the reference identification and rep-PCR using the DiversiLab System (BioMerieux). The genotyping of dermatophyte isolates from different patients was determined by rep-PCR. In the identification of dermatophyte isolates, agreement between rep-PCR and conventional methods was 87.8 % ( 36 of 41). The dermatophyte strains belonged to four clones (A -D) which were determined by the use of rep-PCR. The dermatophyte strains in Clone B, D showed identical patterns with respect to the region. In conclusion, rep-PCR appears to be useful for evaluation of the identification and clonal relationships between Trichophyton rubrum species complex and Trichophyton mentagrophytes species complex isolates. The similarity and diversity of these isolates may be assessed according to different regions by rep-PCR.

  14. Occurrence and genotyping using automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in Southeast Austria.

    PubMed

    Grisold, Andrea J; Zarfel, Gernot; Hoenigl, Martin; Krziwanek, Karina; Feierl, Gebhard; Masoud, Lilian; Leitner, Eva; Wagner-Eibel, Ute; Badura, Alexandra; Marth, Egon

    2010-02-01

    In this retrospective study, the occurrence and genetic relatedness of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 in Austrian MRSA patients was investigated. From 2002 to 2008, 14 MRSA ST398 were detected. First occurrence of MRSA ST398 was already found in 2004. Spa ribotyping assigned 12 isolates to spa type t011 and 1 each to spa type t034 and spa type t1451. Isolated MRSA ST398 was nontypeable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (NT-MRSA) using restriction enzyme SmaI; therefore, genotyping was performed using automated repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) on the DiversiLab system. Rep-PCR results assigned 10 (71%) of the 14 MRSA ST398 into 1 cluster with a similarity >95%; there was 1 cluster consisting of 2 isolates with a similarity >99% and 2 unique MRSA ST398 isolates. In conclusion, MRSA ST398 was continuously detected in Southeast Austria; first in 2004 with up to 5 MRSA ST398 isolates in 2008. Automated rep-PCR proved as a reliable technique in determining genetic relatedness of NT-MRSA ST398 and demonstrates clonal spread of MRSA ST398 in the investigated region.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction for the amplification of the 121-bp repetitive sequence of Schistosoma mansoni: a highly sensitive potential diagnostic tool for areas of low endemicity.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, E; Pérez, F; Bello, I; Bolívar, A; Lares, M; Osorio, A; León, L; Amarista, M; Incani, R N

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a disease caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, whose diagnosis has limitations, such as the low sensitivity and specificity of parasitological and immunological methods, respectively. In the present study an alternative molecular technique requiring previous standardization was carried out using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the amplification of a 121-bp highly repetitive sequence for Schistosoma mansoni. DNA was extracted from eggs of S. mansoni by salting out. Different conditions were standardized for the PCR technique, including the concentration of reagents and the DNA template, annealing temperature and number of cycles, followed by the determination of the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the technique. Furthermore, the standardized PCR technique was employed in DNA extracted, using Chelex®100, from samples of sera of patients with an immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. The optimal conditions for the PCR were 2.5 mm MgCl2, 150 mm deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), 0.4 μm primers, 0.75 U DNA polymerase, using 35 cycles and an annealing temperature of 63°C. The analytical sensitivity of the PCR was 10 attograms of DNA and the specificity was 100%. The DNA sequence was successfully detected in the sera of two patients, demonstrating schistosomiasis transmission, although low, in the community studied. The standardized PCR technique, using smaller amounts of reagents than in the original protocol, is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of DNA from S. mansoni and could be an important tool for diagnosis in areas of low endemicity.

  16. The Organization of Repetitive DNA in the Genomes of Amazonian Lizard Species in the Family Teiidae.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Natalia D M; Pinheiro, Vanessa S S; Carmo, Edson J; Goll, Leonardo G; Schneider, Carlos H; Gross, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is the largest fraction of the eukaryote genome and comprises tandem and dispersed sequences. It presents variations in relation to its composition, number of copies, distribution, dynamics, and genome organization, and participates in the evolutionary diversification of different vertebrate species. Repetitive sequences are usually located in the heterochromatin of centromeric and telomeric regions of chromosomes, contributing to chromosomal structures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to physically map repetitive DNA sequences (5S rDNA, telomeric sequences, tropomyosin gene 1, and retroelements Rex1 and SINE) of mitotic chromosomes of Amazonian species of teiids (Ameiva ameiva, Cnemidophorus sp. 1, Kentropyx calcarata, Kentropyx pelviceps, and Tupinambis teguixin) to understand their genome organization and karyotype evolution. The mapping of repetitive sequences revealed a distinct pattern in Cnemidophorus sp. 1, whereas the other species showed all sequences interspersed in the heterochromatic region. Physical mapping of the tropomyosin 1 gene was performed for the first time in lizards and showed that in addition to being functional, this gene has a structural function similar to the mapped repetitive elements as it is located preferentially in centromeric regions and termini of chromosomes.

  17. Repetition Reduction: Lexical Repetition in the Absence of Referent Repetition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Watson, Duane G.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to words that are new to a discourse, repeated words are produced with reduced acoustic prominence. Although these effects are often attributed to priming in the production system, the locus of the effect within the production system remains unresolved because, in natural speech, repetition often involves repetition of referents and…

  18. Diverse nucleotide compositions and sequence fluctuation in Rubisco protein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Dehipawala, S.; Cheung, E.; Bienaime, R.; Ye, J.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Schneider, P.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2011-10-01

    The Rubisco protein-enzyme is arguably the most abundance protein on Earth. The biology dogma of transcription and translation necessitates the study of the Rubisco genes and Rubisco-like genes in various species. Stronger correlation of fractal dimension of the atomic number fluctuation along a DNA sequence with Shannon entropy has been observed in the studied Rubisco-like gene sequences, suggesting a more diverse evolutionary pressure and constraints in the Rubisco sequences. The strategy of using metal for structural stabilization appears to be an ancient mechanism, with data from the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in Capsaspora owczarzaki and Monosiga brevicollis. Using the chi-square distance probability, our analysis supports the conjecture that the more ancient Rubisco-like sequence in Microcystis aeruginosa would have experienced very different evolutionary pressure and bio-chemical constraint as compared to Bordetella bronchiseptica, the two microbes occupying either end of the correlation graph. Our exploratory study would indicate that high fractal dimension Rubisco sequence would support high carbon dioxide rate via the Michaelis- Menten coefficient; with implication for the control of the whooping cough pathogen Bordetella bronchiseptica, a microbe containing a high fractal dimension Rubisco-like sequence (2.07). Using the internal comparison of chi-square distance probability for 16S rRNA (~ E-22) versus radiation repair Rec-A gene (~ E-05) in high GC content Deinococcus radiodurans, our analysis supports the conjecture that high GC content microbes containing Rubisco-like sequence are likely to include an extra-terrestrial origin, relative to Deinococcus radiodurans. Similar photosynthesis process that could utilize host star radiation would not compete with radiation resistant process from the biology dogma perspective in environments such as Mars and exoplanets.

  19. Influence of Stacking Sequence and Notch Angle on the Charpy Impact Behavior of Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnia, S.; Daghigh, V.; Nikbin, K.; Fereidoon, A.; Ghorbani, J.

    2016-09-01

    The low-velocity impact behavior of hybrid composite laminates was investigated. The epoxy matrix was reinforced with aramid, glass, basalt, and carbon fabrics using the hand lay-up technique. Different stacking sequences and notch angles were and notch angles considered and tested using a Charpy impact testing machine to study the hybridization and notch angle effects on the impact response of the hybrid composites. The energy absorption capability of specimens with different stacking sequences and notch angles is compared and discussed. It is shown that the hybridization can enhance the mechanical performance of composite materials.

  20. A base composition analysis of natural patterns for the preprocessing of metagenome sequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background On the pretext that sequence reads and contigs often exhibit the same kinds of base usage that is also observed in the sequences from which they are derived, we offer a base composition analysis tool. Our tool uses these natural patterns to determine relatedness across sequence data. We introduce spectrum sets (sets of motifs) which are permutations of bacterial restriction sites and the base composition analysis framework to measure their proportional content in sequence data. We suggest that this framework will increase the efficiency during the pre-processing stages of metagenome sequencing and assembly projects. Results Our method is able to differentiate organisms and their reads or contigs. The framework shows how to successfully determine the relatedness between these reads or contigs by comparison of base composition. In particular, we show that two types of organismal-sequence data are fundamentally different by analyzing their spectrum set motif proportions (coverage). By the application of one of the four possible spectrum sets, encompassing all known restriction sites, we provide the evidence to claim that each set has a different ability to differentiate sequence data. Furthermore, we show that the spectrum set selection having relevance to one organism, but not to the others of the data set, will greatly improve performance of sequence differentiation even if the fragment size of the read, contig or sequence is not lengthy. Conclusions We show the proof of concept of our method by its application to ten trials of two or three freshly selected sequence fragments (reads and contigs) for each experiment across the six organisms of our set. Here we describe a novel and computationally effective pre-processing step for metagenome sequencing and assembly tasks. Furthermore, our base composition method has applications in phylogeny where it can be used to infer evolutionary distances between organisms based on the notion that related organisms

  1. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Semi; Lim, Nara; Kwon, Seungjik; Shim, Taesun; Park, Misun; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seonghan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods. Methods Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), and VNTR assay targeting 44 M. intracellulare isolates obtained from patients with pulmonary infections were performed. Results All the antibiotic susceptibility patterns had no association with the molecular and sequence types tested in this study; however, the molecular and sequence types were related with each other. PFGE gave best results for discriminatory capacity, followed by VNTR, MLST, and MIRU-VNTR. Conclusion The high discriminatory power of PFGE, VNTR, and MLST is enough for differentiating between reinfection and relapse, as well as for other molecular epidemiological usages. The MLST could be regarded as a representative classification method, because it showed the clearest relation with the sequence types. PMID:25180144

  2. Targeted Capture Sequencing in Whitebark Pine Reveals Range-Wide Demographic and Adaptive Patterns Despite Challenges of a Large, Repetitive Genome

    PubMed Central

    Syring, John V.; Tennessen, Jacob A.; Jennings, Tara N.; Wegrzyn, Jill; Scelfo-Dalbey, Camille; Cronn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) inhabits an expansive range in western North America, and it is a keystone species of subalpine environments. Whitebark is susceptible to multiple threats – climate change, white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, and fire exclusion – and it is suffering significant mortality range-wide, prompting the tree to be listed as ‘globally endangered’ by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and ‘endangered’ by the Canadian government. Conservation collections (in situ and ex situ) are being initiated to preserve the genetic legacy of the species. Reliable, transferrable, and highly variable genetic markers are essential for quantifying the genetic profiles of seed collections relative to natural stands, and ensuring the completeness of conservation collections. We evaluated the use of hybridization-based target capture to enrich specific genomic regions from the 27 GB genome of whitebark pine, and to evaluate genetic variation across loci, trees, and geography. Probes were designed to capture 7,849 distinct genes, and screening was performed on 48 trees. Despite the inclusion of repetitive elements in the probe pool, the resulting dataset provided information on 4,452 genes and 32% of targeted positions (528,873 bp), and we were able to identify 12,390 segregating sites from 47 trees. Variations reveal strong geographic trends in heterozygosity and allelic richness, with trees from the southern Cascade and Sierra Range showing the greatest distinctiveness and differentiation. Our results show that even under non-optimal conditions (low enrichment efficiency; inclusion of repetitive elements in baits), targeted enrichment produces high quality, codominant genotypes from large genomes. The resulting data can be readily integrated into management and gene conservation activities for whitebark pine, and have the potential to be applied to other members of 5-needle pine group (Pinus subsect. Quinquefolia) due to

  3. Targeted Capture Sequencing in Whitebark Pine Reveals Range-Wide Demographic and Adaptive Patterns Despite Challenges of a Large, Repetitive Genome.

    PubMed

    Syring, John V; Tennessen, Jacob A; Jennings, Tara N; Wegrzyn, Jill; Scelfo-Dalbey, Camille; Cronn, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) inhabits an expansive range in western North America, and it is a keystone species of subalpine environments. Whitebark is susceptible to multiple threats - climate change, white pine blister rust, mountain pine beetle, and fire exclusion - and it is suffering significant mortality range-wide, prompting the tree to be listed as 'globally endangered' by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and 'endangered' by the Canadian government. Conservation collections (in situ and ex situ) are being initiated to preserve the genetic legacy of the species. Reliable, transferrable, and highly variable genetic markers are essential for quantifying the genetic profiles of seed collections relative to natural stands, and ensuring the completeness of conservation collections. We evaluated the use of hybridization-based target capture to enrich specific genomic regions from the 27 GB genome of whitebark pine, and to evaluate genetic variation across loci, trees, and geography. Probes were designed to capture 7,849 distinct genes, and screening was performed on 48 trees. Despite the inclusion of repetitive elements in the probe pool, the resulting dataset provided information on 4,452 genes and 32% of targeted positions (528,873 bp), and we were able to identify 12,390 segregating sites from 47 trees. Variations reveal strong geographic trends in heterozygosity and allelic richness, with trees from the southern Cascade and Sierra Range showing the greatest distinctiveness and differentiation. Our results show that even under non-optimal conditions (low enrichment efficiency; inclusion of repetitive elements in baits), targeted enrichment produces high quality, codominant genotypes from large genomes. The resulting data can be readily integrated into management and gene conservation activities for whitebark pine, and have the potential to be applied to other members of 5-needle pine group (Pinus subsect. Quinquefolia) due to their

  4. Factoring local sequence composition in motif significance analysis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Patrick; Keich, Uri

    2008-01-01

    We recently introduced a biologically realistic and reliable significance analysis of the output of a popular class of motif finders. In this paper we further improve our significance analysis by incorporating local base composition information. Relying on realistic biological data simulation, as well as on FDR analysis applied to real data, we show that our method is significantly better than the increasingly popular practice of using the normal approximation to estimate the significance of a finder's output. Finally we turn to leveraging our reliable significance analysis to improve the actual motif finding task. Specifically, endowing a variant of the Gibbs Sampler with our improved significance analysis we demonstrate that de novo finders can perform better than has been perceived. Significantly, our new variant outperforms all the finders reviewed in a recently published comprehensive analysis of the Harbison genome-wide binding location data. Interestingly, many of these finders incorporate additional information such as nucleosome positioning and the significance of binding data.

  5. Mitochondrial genomes and divergence times of crocodile newts: inter-islands distribution of Echinotriton andersoni and the origin of a unique repetitive sequence found in Tylototriton mt genomes.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Nishitani, Takuma; Katsuren, Seiki; Oumi, Shohei; Sumida, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Crocodile newts, which constitute the genera Echinotriton and Tylototriton, are known as living fossils, and these genera comprise many endangered species. To identify mitochondrial (mt) genes suitable for future population genetic analyses for endangered taxa, we determined the complete nucleotide sequences of the mt genomes of the Japanese crocodile newt Echinotriton andersoni and Himalayan crocodile newt Tylototriton verrucosus. Although the control region (CR) is known as the most variable mtDNA region in many animal taxa, the CRs of crocodile newts are highly conservative. Rather, the genes of NADH dehydrogenase subunits and ATPase subunit 6 were found to have high sequence divergences and to be usable for population genetics studies. To estimate the inter-population divergence ages of E. andersoni endemic to the Ryukyu Islands, we performed molecular dating analysis using whole and partial mt genomic data. The estimated divergence ages of the inter-island individuals are older than the paleogeographic segmentation ages of the islands, suggesting that the lineage splits of E. andersoni populations were not caused by vicariant events. Our phylogenetic analysis with partial mt sequence data also suggests the existence of at least two more undescribed species in the genus Tylototriton. We also found unusual repeat sequences containing the 3' region of cytochrome apoenzyme b gene, whole tRNA-Thr gene, and a noncoding region (the T-P noncoding region characteristic in caudate mtDNAs) from T. verrucosus mtDNA. Similar repeat sequences were found in two other Tylototriton species. The Tylototriton taxa with the repeats become a monophyletic group, indicating a single origin of the repeat sequences. The intra-and inter-specific comparisons of the repeat sequences suggest the occurrences of homologous recombination-based concerted evolution among the repeat sequences.

  6. A novel repetitive sequence, termed the JNK repeat family, located on an extra heterochromatic region of chromosome 2R of Japanese rye.

    PubMed

    Nagaki, K; Tsujimoto, H; Sasakuma, T

    1999-01-01

    Among cultivated rye, Seccale cereale L., collected in Japan, we found an extra heterochromatin on the long-arm interstitial region of chromosome 2R. This extra heterochromatin was polymorphic in the population. The plants with the extra heterochromatin showed a specific DNA fragment of 1.2 kb in digests prepared with the restriction enzyme Dral. The fragment was cloned and used as a probe for fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH). The clone, pScJNK1, showed a hybridization signal at the extra heterochromatic region. The segregation of the number of signals corresponded to the number of the extra heterochromatin of the 2R chromosome, indicating that the sequence might construct the heterochromatin. Southern hybridization using the clone as a probe showed a ladder pattern, suggesting that the sequence was a tandem repeat. Three sequences homologous to pScJNK1 were isolated; these were 1192 1232 bp, 44.7-45.9% in GC content, highly homologous (> 93%) with each other, and did not show any significant homology to other sequences in a DNA database. Slot blot hybridization using pScJNK1 as a probe indicated that there were about 4000 copies of the sequence in the haploid genome carrying the extra heterochromatin, whereas less than 20 copies existed in the genome without the heterochromatin. Southern hybridization using MspI and HapII indicated that all of the second cytosine nucleotides in CCGG sites in the sequence were methylated in the extra heterochromatin.

  7. Evidence of Bacillus thuringiensis intra-serovar diversity revealed by Bacillus cereus group-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR genomic fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Sauka, Diego H; Basile, Juan I; Benintende, Graciela

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is classified into serovars on the basis of H-flagellar antigens. Several alternative typing methods have been described. Among them, a B. cereus group-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic (Rep)-PCR fingerprinting technique was shown to be discriminative and able to identify B. thuringiensis serovars. The aim of this study was to investigate the genomic diversity and relationship among B. thuringiensis strains collected from different Argentinean ecosystems. Thirty-seven B. thuringiensis reference strains and 131 Argentinean isolates were analyzed using a B. cereus group-specific Rep-PCR. Fourteen different patterns were identified among the Argentinean isolates. Eight could not be associated to any pattern obtained from a reference strain. The pattern identical to the serovar kurstaki HD-1 strain was the most frequently identified in 68 native isolates. The profiles allowed tracing a single dendrogram with two groups and eight main lineages. Some strains showed distinctive patterns despite belonging to the same serovar. An intraspecific diversity resulted from this analysis that was highlighted by this technique since strains from a given serovar showed distinct profiles. This study may help to establish a system of B. thuringiensis classification with a higher discrimination level than established by the H antigen serotyping.

  8. Comparison of a Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic Sequence-Based PCR Method and Clinical and Microbiological Methods for Determining Strain Sources in Cases of Nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Lozano, David; Cisneros, José Miguel; Becerril, Berta; Cuberos, Lucila; Prados, Trinidad; Ortíz-Leyba, Carlos; Cañas, Elías; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2002-01-01

    Using a repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR), we genotypically characterized strains causing nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii infections and analyzed the source of bacteremia in 67 patients from an institution in which infections by this bacterium were endemic. Six different genotypes were found, including 21, 27, 3, 9, 3, and 4 strains. The probable source of bacteremia, according to clinical and/or microbiological criteria, was known in 42 patients (63%): respiratory tract (n = 19), surgical sites (n = 12), intravascular catheters (n = 5), burns (n = 3), and urinary tract (n = 3). The definite source of bacteremia, according to REP-PCR, could be established in 30 (71%) out of the 42 patients with strains from blood and other sites; in these cases clinical and microbiological criteria for the source of bacteremia were thus confirmed. In the remaining 12 patients (29%) the probable source was refuted by the REP-PCR method. The definite sources of bacteremia according to genotype were as follows: respiratory tract in 13 patients (31%), surgical sites in 8 (19%), intravascular catheters in 4 (9%), burns in 3 (7%), and urinary tract in 2 (5%). A comparison of strains from blood cultures and other sites with regard to their REP-PCR and antimicrobial resistance profiles was also made. Taking the REP-PCR as the “gold standard,” the positive predictive value of antibiotype was 77% and the negative predictive value was 42%. In summary, the utility of the diagnosis of the source of nosocomial A. baumannii bacteremia using clinical and/or microbiological criteria, including antibiotyping, is limited, as demonstrated by REP-PCR. PMID:12454154

  9. Pseudo nucleotide composition or PseKNC: an effective formulation for analyzing genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2015-10-01

    With the avalanche of DNA/RNA sequences generated in the post-genomic age, it is urgent to develop automated methods for analyzing the relationship between the sequences and their functions. Towards this goal, a series of sequence-based methods have been proposed and applied to analyze various character-unknown DNA/RNA sequences in order for in-depth understanding their action mechanisms and processes. Compared with the classical sequence-based methods, the pseudo nucleotide composition or PseKNC approach developed very recently has the following advantages: (1) it can convert length-different DNA/RNA sequences into dimension-fixed digital vectors that can be directly handled by all the existing machine-learning algorithms or operation engines; (2) it can contain the desired features and properties according to the selection or definition of users; (3) it can cover considerable sequence pattern information, both local and global. This minireview is focused on the concept of pseudo nucleotide composition, its development and applications.

  10. Repetitively pulsed vacuum insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Buttram, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the flashover strength of various vacuum insulators under conditions of repetitive pulsing. The pulse duration was 30 ns, and the thickness of a typical insulator sample was 1.8 cm. Data were taken for 45 insulators from five different materials. An insulator was subjected to an extended series of pulses at a given repetition rate and field. If flashover was not detected, the field level was increased and the sequence repeated. At rates up to 50 pulses per second, there was no apparent dependence of flashover field on rate. In addition, some ''single shot'' data were taken, including various modifications of the geometries and surface textures of the insulators. Only two to the modifications increased the flashover strength significantly over that of a 45 sample: (1) annealing some plastics (roughly a 35% increase), and (2) extending the insulator to cover the surfaces of both electrodes (an increase of nearly a factor of two).

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Cyanobacterium sp. Strain IPPAS B-1200 with a Unique Fatty Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Starikov, Alexander Y.; Usserbaeva, Aizhan A.; Sinetova, Maria A.; Sarsekeyeva, Fariza K.; Zayadan, Bolatkhan K.; Ustinova, Vera V.; Kupriyanova, Elena V.; Los, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome of Cyanobacterium sp. IPPAS strain B-1200, isolated from Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan, and characterized by the unique fatty acid composition of its membrane lipids, which are enriched with myristic and myristoleic acids. The approximate genome size is 3.4 Mb, and the predicted number of coding sequences is 3,119. PMID:27856596

  12. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  13. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that happen when too much stress is placed on a part of the body, resulting in inflammation (pain and swelling), muscle strain, or tissue damage. This stress generally occurs from ...

  14. Precipitation Sequence of a SiC Particle Reinforced Al-Mg-Si Alloy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rujuan; Wang, Yihan; Guo, Baisong; Song, Min

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the precipitation sequence of a 5 vol.% SiC particles reinforced Al-1.12 wt.%Mg-0.77 wt.%Si alloy composite fabricated by traditional powder metallurgy method was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and hardness measurements. The results indicated that the addition of SiC reinforcements not only suppresses the initial aging stage but also influences the subsequent precipitates. The precipitation sequence of the composite aged at 175 °C can be described as: Guinier-Preston (G.P.) zone → β″ → β' → B', which was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. This work might provide the guidance for the design and fabrication of hardenable automobile body sheet by Al-based composites with enhanced mechanical properties.

  15. Influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Yu; Nishitani, Yosuke; Kitano, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    In order to develop the new tribomaterials for mechanical sliding parts with sufficient balance of mechanical and tribological properties, we investigated the influence of processing sequence on the tribological properties of the ternary nanocomposites: the polymer blends of polyamide 6 (PA6) and styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene copolymer (SEBS) filled with vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF-X), which is one of carbon nanofiber (CNF) and has 15nm diameter and 3μm length. Five different processing sequences: (1) VGCF-X, PA6 and SEBS were mixed simultaneously (Process A), (2) Re-mixing (Second compounding) of the materials prepared by Process A (Process AR),(3) SEBS was blended with PA6 (PA6/SEBS blends) and then these blends were mixed with VGCF-X (Process B), (4) VGCF-X was mixed with PA6 (VGCF-X/PA6 composites) and then these composites were blended with SEBS (Process C), and (5) VGCF-X were mixed with SEBS (VGCF-X/SEBS composites) and then these composites were blended with PA6 (Process D) were attempted for preparing of the ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS composites). These ternary polymer nanocomposites were extruded by a twin screw extruder and injection-molded. Their tribological properties were evaluated by using a ring-on-plate type sliding wear tester under dry condition. The tribological properties such as the frictional coefficient and the specific wear rate were influenced by the processing sequence. These results may be attributed to the change of internal structure formation, which is a dispersibility of SEBS particle and VGCF-X in ternary nanocomposites (VGCF-X/PA6/SEBS) by different processing sequences. In particular, the processing sequences of AR, B and D, which are those of re-mixing of VGCF-X, have a good dispersibility of VGCF-X for the improvement of tribological properties.

  16. Effect of stacking sequence on the coefficients of mutual influence of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupir (Hudișteanu, I.; Țăranu, N.; Axinte, A.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites are nowadays widely used in engineering applications due to their outstanding features, such as high specific strength and specific stiffness as well as good corrosion resistance. A major advantage of fibrous polymeric composites is that their anisotropy can be controlled through suitable choice of the influencing parameters. The unidirectional fiber reinforced composites provide much higher longitudinal mechanical properties compared to the transverse ones. Therefore, composite laminates are formed by stacking two or more laminas, with different fiber orientations, as to respond to complex states of stresses. These laminates experience the effect of axial-shear coupling, which is caused by applying normal or shear stresses, implying shear or normal strains, respectively. The normal-shear coupling is expressed by the coefficients of mutual influence. They are engineering constants of primary interest for composite laminates, since the mismatch of the material properties between adjacent layers can produce interlaminar stresses and/or plies delamination. The paper presents the variation of the in-plane and flexural coefficients of mutual influence for three types of multi-layered composites, with different stacking sequences. The results are obtained using the Classical Lamination Theory (CLT) and are illustrated graphically in terms of fiber orientations, for asymmetric, antisymmetric and symmetric laminates. Conclusions are formulated on the variation of these coefficients, caused by the stacking sequence.

  17. Sequence-Based Analysis of Structural Organization and Composition of the Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Genome.

    PubMed

    Gill, Navdeep; Buti, Matteo; Kane, Nolan; Bellec, Arnaud; Helmstetter, Nicolas; Berges, Hélène; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2014-04-16

    Sunflower is an important oilseed crop, as well as a model system for evolutionary studies, but its 3.6 gigabase genome has proven difficult to assemble, in part because of the high repeat content of its genome. Here we report on the sequencing, assembly, and analyses of 96 randomly chosen BACs from sunflower to provide additional information on the repeat content of the sunflower genome, assess how repetitive elements in the sunflower genome are organized relative to genes, and compare the genomic distribution of these repeats to that found in other food crops and model species. We also examine the expression of transposable element-related transcripts in EST databases for sunflower to determine the representation of repeats in the transcriptome and to measure their transcriptional activity. Our data confirm previous reports in suggesting that the sunflower genome is >78% repetitive. Sunflower repeats share very little similarity to other plant repeats such as those of Arabidopsis, rice, maize and wheat; overall 28% of repeats are "novel" to sunflower. The repetitive sequences appear to be randomly distributed within the sequenced BACs. Assuming the 96 BACs are representative of the genome as a whole, then approximately 5.2% of the sunflower genome comprises non TE-related genic sequence, with an average gene density of 18kbp/gene. Expression levels of these transposable elements indicate tissue specificity and differential expression in vegetative and reproductive tissues, suggesting that expressed TEs might contribute to sunflower development. The assembled BACs will also be useful for assessing the quality of several different draft assemblies of the sunflower genome and for annotating the reference sequence.

  18. Trialogue: Preparation, Repetition and...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberg, Antoinette; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This paper interrogates both curriculum theory and the limits and potentials of textual forms. A set of overlapping discourses (a trialogue) focuses on inquiring into the roles of obsession and repetition in creating deeply interpretive locations for understanding. (SM)

  19. Replication in the amplified dihydrofolate reductase domain in CHO cells may initiate at two distinct sites, one of which is a repetitive sequence element.

    PubMed

    Anachkova, B; Hamlin, J L

    1989-02-01

    To study initiation of DNA replication in mammalian chromosomes, we have established a methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line (CHOC 400) that contains approximately 1,000 copies of the early replicating dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) domain. We have previously shown that DNA replication in the prevalent 243-kilobase (kb) amplicon type in this cell line initiates somewhere within a 28-kb region located downstream from the DHFR gene. In an attempt to localize the origin of replication with more precision, we blocked the progress of replication forks emanating from origins at the beginning of the S phase by the introduction of trioxsalen cross-links at 1- to 5-kb intervals in the parental double-stranded DNA. The small DNA fragments synthesized under these conditions (which should be centered around replication origins) were then used as hybridization probes on digests of cosmids and plasmids from the DHFR domain. These studies suggested that in cells synchronized by this regimen, DNA replication initiates at two separate sites within the previously defined 28-kb replication initiation locus, in general agreement with results described in the accompanying paper (T.-H. Leu and J. L. Hamlin, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:523-531, 1989). One of these sites contains a repeated DNA sequence element that is found at or near many other initiation sites in the genome, since it was also highly enriched in the early replicating DNA isolated from cross-linked CHO cells that contain only two copies of the DHFR domain.

  20. Chromosomal distribution patterns of the (AC)10 microsatellite and other repetitive sequences, and their use in chromosome rearrangement analysis of species of the genus Avena.

    PubMed

    Fominaya, Araceli; Loarce, Yolanda; Montes, Alexander; Ferrer, Esther

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to determine the physical location of the (AC)10 microsatellite in metaphase chromosomes of six diploid species (AA or CC genomes), two tetraploid species (AACC genome), and five cultivars of two hexaploid species (AACCDD genome) of the genus Avena, a genus in which genomic relationships remain obscure. A preferential distribution of the (AC)10 microsatellite in the pericentromeric and interstitial regions was seen in both the A- and D-genome chromosomes, while in C-genome chromosomes the majority of signals were located in the pericentromeric heterochromatic regions. New large chromosome rearrangements were detected in two polyploid species: an intergenomic translocation involving chromosomes 17AL and 21DS in Avena sativa 'Araceli' and another involving chromosomes 4CL and 21DS in the analyzed cultivars of Avena byzantina. The latter 4CL-21DS intergenomic translocation differentiates clearly between A. sativa and A. byzantina. Searches for common hybridization patterns on the chromosomes of different species revealed chromosome 10A of Avena magna and 21D of hexaploid oats to be very similar in terms of the distribution of 45S and Am1 sequences. This suggests a common origin for these chromosomes and supports a CCDD rather than an AACC genomic designation for this species.

  1. Characterizing temporal repetition

    SciTech Connect

    Cukierman, D.; Delgrande, J.

    1996-12-31

    We are investigating the representation and reasoning about schedulable, repeated activities, specified using calendars. Examples of such activities include meeting every Tuesday and Thursday during a semester and attending a seminar every first day of a month. This research provides for a valuable framework for scheduling systems, financial systems and, in general, date-based systems. Very recently work has been done related to reasoning about repetition in the Artificial Intelligence community and others. A partial reference list is provided here. However, to our knowledge no extensive taxonomy of repetition has been proposed in the literature. We believe that reasoning about repeated activities calls for a study and precise definition of the topological characteristics in a repetitive series. In this abstract we summarize a proposal to classify types of repetition according to parameters. The combination of all possible values of these parameters provides a complete taxonomy of repetitive classes with respect to the proposed parameters. Several notions of repetition are considered, some are extremely general, some are very specific.

  2. Nucleotide composition of CO1 sequences in Chelicerata (Arthropoda): detecting new mitogenomic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Arabi, Juliette; Judson, Mark L I; Deharveng, Louis; Lourenço, Wilson R; Cruaud, Corinne; Hassanin, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Here we study the evolution of nucleotide composition in third codon-positions of CO1 sequences of Chelicerata, using a phylogenetic framework, based on 180 taxa and three markers (CO1, 18S, and 28S rRNA; 5,218 nt). The analyses of nucleotide composition were also extended to all CO1 sequences of Chelicerata found in GenBank (1,701 taxa). The results show that most species of Chelicerata have a positive strand bias in CO1, i.e., in favor of C nucleotides, including all Amblypygi, Palpigradi, Ricinulei, Solifugae, Uropygi, and Xiphosura. However, several taxa show a negative strand bias, i.e., in favor of G nucleotides: all Scorpiones, Opisthothelae spiders and several taxa within Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida. Several reversals of strand-specific bias can be attributed to either a rearrangement of the control region or an inversion of a fragment containing the CO1 gene. Key taxa for which sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes will be necessary to determine the origin and nature of mtDNA rearrangements involved in the reversals are identified. Acari, Opiliones, Pseudoscorpiones, and Pycnogonida were found to show a strong variability in nucleotide composition. In addition, both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes have been affected by higher substitution rates in Acari and Pseudoscorpiones. The results therefore indicate that these two orders are more liable to fix mutations of all types, including base substitutions, indels, and genomic rearrangements.

  3. Composite Sequences for Triple-dot Qubits that Compensate for Miscalibration and Hyperfine Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Thaddeus

    2014-03-01

    Exchange-only qubits defined in triple quantum dots form a promising means for all-electrical semiconductor quantum control, but they suffer from both charge noise and random magnetic field gradients. Low-frequency noise sources can be compensated using composite sequences, but the development of such sequences is constrained by the fact that exchange energies are always positive and the control axes are non-orthogonal. Here, we present the results of both analytical approaches and computational searches for composite pulse sequences, which compensate for simultaneous low-frequency miscalibration (due to fixed random electric fields) and hyperfine effects (due to nuclear magnetic fields) in a single triple-dot qubit. We also present compensation sequences for multi-qubit gates. These results can substantially improve the working fidelity of quantum operations in semiconductor quantum dot devices. Sponsored by United States Department of Defense. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressly or implied, of the United States Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  4. Influence of Stacking Sequence on the Impact and Postimpact Bending Behavior of Hybrid Sandwich Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özen, M.

    2017-01-01

    A new hybrid sandwich structure was developed by using carbon, e-glass, and s-glass fabrics as reinforcement materials, an epoxy resin as the matrix material for face sheets, and a PVC foam as the core material. Six different configurations were prepared. Sandwich composites plates with different stacking sequences were subjected to low-speed impacts will energies of 7.5, 15, and 22.5 J. Their impact response is analyzed and reported in terms of the peak load as a function of impact energy. After impact tests, 3-point bending tests were conducted to determine the bending behavior of the sandwich composites after impacts in terms of their flexural strength. The results obtained showed that the use of carbon fabrics in the face sheets increased the peak loads for all the impact energies considered. The presence of carbon fibers in skin regions increased the flexural strength of the composites, but e-glass fibers decreased this strength.

  5. Compositional analysis: a valid approach to analyze microbiome high-throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Gloor, Gregory B; Reid, Gregor

    2016-08-01

    A workshop held at the 2015 annual meeting of the Canadian Society of Microbiologists highlighted compositional data analysis methods and the importance of exploratory data analysis for the analysis of microbiome data sets generated by high-throughput DNA sequencing. A summary of the content of that workshop, a review of new methods of analysis, and information on the importance of careful analyses are presented herein. The workshop focussed on explaining the rationale behind the use of compositional data analysis, and a demonstration of these methods for the examination of 2 microbiome data sets. A clear understanding of bioinformatics methodologies and the type of data being analyzed is essential, given the growing number of studies uncovering the critical role of the microbiome in health and disease and the need to understand alterations to its composition and function following intervention with fecal transplant, probiotics, diet, and pharmaceutical agents.

  6. Fine mapping and DNA fiber FISH analysis locates the tobamovirus resistance gene L3 of Capsicum chinense in a 400-kb region of R-like genes cluster embedded in highly repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Tomita, R; Murai, J; Miura, Y; Ishihara, H; Liu, S; Kubotera, Y; Honda, A; Hatta, R; Kuroda, T; Hamada, H; Sakamoto, M; Munemura, I; Nunomura, O; Ishikawa, K; Genda, Y; Kawasaki, S; Suzuki, K; Meksem, K; Kobayashi, K

    2008-11-01

    The tobamovirus resistance gene L(3) of Capsicum chinense was mapped using an intra-specific F2 population (2,016 individuals) of Capsicum annuum cultivars, into one of which had been introduced the C. chinense L(3) gene, and an inter-specific F2 population (3,391 individuals) between C. chinense and Capsicum frutescence. Analysis of a BAC library with an AFLP marker closely linked to L(3)-resistance revealed the presence of homologs of the tomato disease resistance gene I2. Partial or full-length coding sequences were cloned by degenerate PCR from 35 different pepper I2 homologs and 17 genetic markers were generated in the inter-specific combination. The L(3) gene was mapped between I2 homolog marker IH1-04 and BAC-end marker 189D23M, and located within a region encompassing two different BAC contigs consisting of four and one clones, respectively. DNA fiber FISH analysis revealed that these two contigs are separated from each other by about 30 kb. DNA fiber FISH results and Southern blotting of the BAC clones suggested that the L(3) locus-containing region is rich in highly repetitive sequences. Southern blot analysis indicated that the two BAC contigs contain more than ten copies of the I2 homologs. In contrast to the inter-specific F2 population, no recombinant progeny were identified to have a crossover point within two BAC contigs consisting of seven and two clones in the intra-specific F2 population. Moreover, distribution of the crossover points differed between the two populations, suggesting linkage disequilibrium in the region containing the L locus.

  7. Model for repetitive cycles of large earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, W.I.; Knopoff, L.

    1983-04-01

    The theory of the fusion of small cracks into large ones reproduces certain features also observed in the clustering of earthquake sequences. By modifying our earlier model to take into account the stress release associated with the occurrence of large earthquakes, we obtain repetitive periodic cycles of large earthquakes. A preliminary conclusion is that a combination of the stress release or elastic rebound mechanism plus time delays in the fusion process are sufficient to destabilize the crack populations and, ultimately, give rise to repetitive episodes of seismicity.

  8. Simple Sequence Repeats in Escherichia coli: Abundance, Distribution, Composition, and Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Arie, Riva; Cohen, Cyril J.; Eitan, Yuval; Shelef, Leora; Hallerman, Eric M.; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2000-01-01

    Computer-based genome-wide screening of the DNA sequence of Escherichia coli strain K12 revealed tens of thousands of tandem simple sequence repeat (SSR) tracts, with motifs ranging from 1 to 6 nucleotides. SSRs were well distributed throughout the genome. Mononucleotide SSRs were over-represented in noncoding regions and under-represented in open reading frames (ORFs). Nucleotide composition of mono- and dinucleotide SSRs, both in ORFs and in noncoding regions, differed from that of the genomic region in which they occurred, with 93% of all mononucleotide SSRs proving to be of A or T. Computer-based analysis of the fine position of every SSR locus in the noncoding portion of the genome relative to downstream ORFs showed SSRs located in areas that could affect gene regulation. DNA sequences at 14 arbitrarily chosen SSR tracts were compared among E. coli strains. Polymorphisms of SSR copy number were observed at four of seven mononucleotide SSR tracts screened, with all polymorphisms occurring in noncoding regions. SSR polymorphism could prove important as a genome-wide source of variation, both for practical applications (including rapid detection, strain identification, and detection of loci affecting key phenotypes) and for evolutionary adaptation of microbes.[The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession numbers AF209020–209030 and AF209508–209518.] PMID:10645951

  9. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, S T

    2001-05-01

    Repetitive strain injury is a group of musculoskeletal disorders affecting muscles, tendons, nerves and blood vessels. These disorders could be attributed to occupational causes; however non-occupational causes should be excluded. The management of these cases required a multidisciplinary team approach.

  10. Repetition through Successive Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littell, Katherine M.

    This study was conducted in an attempt to provide an alternative to the long-established method of tape listening and repetition drills, a method that has had disappointing results. It is suggested that the rate of speed of phonic presentation is not commensurate with the rate of comprehension. The proposed method seeks to prevent cognitive…

  11. Process of labeling specific chromosomes using recombinant repetitive DNA

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, R.K.; Meyne, J.

    1988-02-12

    Chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family members and consensus sequences of the repetitive DNA families for the chromosome preferential sequences. The selected low homology regions are then hybridized with chromosomes to determine those low homology regions hybridized with a specific chromosome under normal stringency conditions.

  12. Analytical Singular Value Decomposition of infrared image sequences: microcrack detection on ceramic composites under mechanical stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, Matthieu; Batsale, Jean Christophe

    2008-05-01

    In this Note, infrared image sequences of a SiC f/SiC composite excited with a uniform heat pulse are processed using a modal approach. A new analytical integral transform (called analytical SVD or ASVD) inspired by the classical Singular Value Decomposition is developed and implemented on the raw experimental data. The second resulting spatial mode (out of a thousand) yielded by the ASVD provides, without further processing, a 2D mapping of the normalized local transverse diffusivity variations around a nominal value. Such mapping yields information on the inner structure of the material, and can be used to reveal the presence of voids inside the medium. This method is thus implemented on a tensile testing machine, to detect microcracks in a SiC f/SiC composite sample under mechanical stress in almost real time. To cite this article: M. Bamford, J.C. Batsale, C. R. Mecanique 336 (2008).

  13. Selective confinement of vibrations in composite systems with alternate quasi-regular sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalbán, A.; Velasco, V. R.; Tutor, J.; Fernández-Velicia, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the atom displacements and the vibrational frequencies of 1D systems formed by combinations of Fibonacci, Thue-Morse and Rudin-Shapiro quasi-regular stacks and their alternate ones. The materials are described by nearest-neighbor force constants and the corresponding atom masses, particularized to the Al, Ag systems. These structures exhibit differences in the frequency spectrum as compared to the original simple quasi-regular generations but the most important feature is the presence of separate confinement of the atom displacements in one of the sequences forming the total composite structure for different frequency ranges.

  14. Analysis of repetitive DNA in chromosomes by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Brind'Amour, Julie; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2011-06-01

    We developed a flow cytometry method, chromosome flow fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), called CFF, to analyze repetitive DNA in chromosomes using FISH with directly labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. We used CFF to measure the abundance of interstitial telomeric sequences in Chinese hamster chromosomes and major satellite sequences in mouse chromosomes. Using CFF we also identified parental homologs of human chromosome 18 with different amounts of repetitive DNA.

  15. Types of DNA methylation status of the interspersed repetitive sequences for LINE-1, Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from systemic lupus erythematosus patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sukapan, Patadon; Promnarate, Paramate; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2014-04-01

    Changes of the DNA methylation at the interspersed repetitive sequences can occur in various conditions including cancer as well as autoimmune diseases. We previously reported the hypomethylation of LINE-1 and HERV-E in the lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. As neutrophils are another important cell type contributing to SLE pathogenesis, in this study, we evaluated the methylation levels and patterns for LINE-1, ALU, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from SLE patients compared with the healthy controls. We observed that the methylation levels, especially for LINE-1, in the neutrophils from SLE patients were significantly lower than the healthy controls (P-value < 0.0001). Interestingly, this hypomethylation was not correlated with the activity of the disease. Furthermore, the methylation levels and patterns for Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were not significantly different from the healthy controls. In addition, we further investigated whether there were any correlations between the intragenic LINE-1 and differential expressions of the neutrophils from the SLE patients using public arrays data. The upregulated genes in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were significantly associated with the genes containing LINE-1s compared with the healthy controls (P-value GSE27427 = 7.74 × 10(-3); odds ratio (OR) = 1.28). Interestingly, this association was mainly found among genes with antisense LINE-1s (P-value GSE27427 = 6.22 × 10(-3); OR = 1.38). Bioinformatics data suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation may affect expression of the genes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. However, additional functional studies of these proposed genes are warranted to prove this hypothesis.

  16. Repetition blindness is orientation blind.

    PubMed

    Corballis, Michael C; Armstrong, Cole

    2007-03-01

    In identifying rapid sequences of three letters, subjects were worse at identifying the first and third letters when they were the same than when they were different, indicating repetition blindness (RB). This effect occurred regardless of the angular orientations of the letters, but was more pronounced when the orientations of the repeated letters were different than when they were the same. In a second experiment, RB was also evident when the first and third letters were lowercase bs or ds, presented upright or inverted, even though they are differently named when inverted (q and p, respectively). Conversely, a third experiment showed that RB occurred when the letters had the same names but were repeated in different case. These results suggest that the early extraction of letter shape is independent of its orientation and left-right sense, and that RB can occur at the levels of both shape and name.

  17. Postglacial climate-change record in biomarker lipid compositions of the Hani peat sequence, Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijian; Zheng, Yanhong; Meyers, Philip A.; Jull, A. J. Timothy; Xie, Shucheng

    2010-05-01

    The peat sequence at Hani in northeastern China accumulated over the past 16 cal kyr in a percolation mire in which rain water and ground water seeped through the peat system. The molecular compositions of n-alkanes, n-alkanols, and n-alkanoic acids extracted from the Hani peat sequence reveal different responses to the progressive evolution of climate and changes in the nature of the peat-forming vegetation. Long chain length components that originate from the waxy coatings of subaerial vascular plants dominate the n-alkane distributions throughout the Hani peat sequence. The paleoclimate integrity of these biomarker molecules appears to be well preserved. Most of the n-alkanol distributions are similarly dominated by long chain components that indicate their origins from subaerial plants. In contrast, n-alkanoic acid distributions are dominated by secondary components that record the importance of post-depositional microbial activity in this peat sequence, which evidently can be extensive in a percolation mire. Elevated n-alkane Paq values and C 23/C 29 ratios, which are both molecular proxies for water-loving plants, record an especially moist local climate in the Bølling-Allerød (14.5 to 12.9 ka), Younger Dryas (12.9 to 11.5 ka), and Pre-Boreal (11.5 to 10.5 ka) portions of the Hani peat sequence. Depressed Paq values and C 23/C 29 ratios and larger n-alkane average chain length values indicate that the Holocene Climatic Optimum (10.5 to 6 ka) was a period of warmer climate with lower effective precipitation, which contrasts with evidence of wetter climates in most of East Asia.

  18. Stacking sequence and shape optimization of laminated composite plates via a level-set method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaire, G.; Delgado, G.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the optimal design of composite laminates by allowing a variable stacking sequence and in-plane shape of each ply. In order to optimize both variables we rely on a decomposition technique which aggregates the constraints into one unique constraint margin function. Thanks to this approach, an exactly equivalent bi-level optimization problem is established. This problem is made up of an inner level represented by the combinatorial optimization of the stacking sequence and an outer level represented by the topology and geometry optimization of each ply. We propose for the stacking sequence optimization an outer approximation method which iteratively solves a set of mixed integer linear problems associated to the evaluation of the constraint margin function. For the topology optimization of each ply, we lean on the level set method for the description of the interfaces and the Hadamard method for boundary variations by means of the computation of the shape gradient. Numerical experiments are performed on an aeronautic test case where the weight is minimized subject to different mechanical constraints, namely compliance, reserve factor and buckling load.

  19. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5’ upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile. PMID:28005945

  20. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  1. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition.

    PubMed

    Muraya, Moses M; Schmutzer, Thomas; Ulpinnis, Chris; Scholz, Uwe; Altmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents). Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV) of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful approach for

  2. Multiplexed Metagenomic Deep Sequencing To Analyze the Composition of High-Priority Pathogen Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael R.; Stenglein, Mark D.; Olejnik, Judith; Rennick, Linda J.; Nambulli, Sham; Feldmann, Friederike; Duprex, W. Paul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Laboratories studying high-priority pathogens need comprehensive methods to confirm microbial species and strains while also detecting contamination. Metagenomic deep sequencing (MDS) inventories nucleic acids present in laboratory stocks, providing an unbiased assessment of pathogen identity, the extent of genomic variation, and the presence of contaminants. Double-stranded cDNA MDS libraries were constructed from RNA extracted from in vitro-passaged stocks of six viruses (La Crosse virus, Ebola virus, canine distemper virus, measles virus, human respiratory syncytial virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus). Each library was dual indexed and pooled for sequencing. A custom bioinformatics pipeline determined the organisms present in each sample in a blinded fashion. Single nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis identified viral isolates. We confirmed that (i) each sample contained the expected microbe, (ii) dual indexing of the samples minimized false assignments of individual sequences, (iii) multiple viral and bacterial contaminants were present, and (iv) SNV analysis of the viral genomes allowed precise identification of the viral isolates. MDS can be multiplexed to allow simultaneous and unbiased interrogation of mixed microbial cultures and (i) confirm pathogen identity, (ii) characterize the extent of genomic variation, (iii) confirm the cell line used for virus propagation, and (iv) assess for contaminating microbes. These assessments ensure the true composition of these high-priority reagents and generate a comprehensive database of microbial genomes studied in each facility. MDS can serve as an integral part of a pathogen-tracking program which in turn will enhance sample security and increase experimental rigor and precision. IMPORTANCE Both the integrity and reproducibility of experiments using select agents depend in large part on unbiased validation to ensure the correct identity and purity of the species in question. Metagenomic deep sequencing

  3. An Adapting Auditory-motor Feedback Loop Can Contribute to Generating Vocal Repetition

    PubMed Central

    Brainard, Michael S.; Jin, Dezhe Z.

    2015-01-01

    Consecutive repetition of actions is common in behavioral sequences. Although integration of sensory feedback with internal motor programs is important for sequence generation, if and how feedback contributes to repetitive actions is poorly understood. Here we study how auditory feedback contributes to generating repetitive syllable sequences in songbirds. We propose that auditory signals provide positive feedback to ongoing motor commands, but this influence decays as feedback weakens from response adaptation during syllable repetitions. Computational models show that this mechanism explains repeat distributions observed in Bengalese finch song. We experimentally confirmed two predictions of this mechanism in Bengalese finches: removal of auditory feedback by deafening reduces syllable repetitions; and neural responses to auditory playback of repeated syllable sequences gradually adapt in sensory-motor nucleus HVC. Together, our results implicate a positive auditory-feedback loop with adaptation in generating repetitive vocalizations, and suggest sensory adaptation is important for feedback control of motor sequences. PMID:26448054

  4. Use of Composite Protein Database including Search Result Sequences for Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Cell Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jihye; Kim, Gamin; Kabir, Mohammad Humayun; Park, Seong Jun; Lee, Seoung Taek; Lee, Cheolju

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometric (MS) data of human cell secretomes are usually run through the conventional human database for identification. However, the search may result in false identifications due to contamination of the secretome with fetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins. To overcome this challenge, here we provide a composite protein database including human as well as 199 FBS protein sequences for MS data search of human cell secretomes. Searching against the human-FBS database returned more reliable results with fewer false-positive and false-negative identifications compared to using either a human only database or a human-bovine database. Furthermore, the improved results validated our strategy without complex experiments like SILAC. We expect our strategy to improve the accuracy of human secreted protein identification and to also add value for general use. PMID:25822838

  5. A view of an elemental naturalist at the DNA world (base composition, sequences, methylation).

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F

    2007-12-01

    The pioneering data on base composition and pyrimidine sequences in DNA of pro- and eukaryotes are considered, and their significance for the origin of genosystematics is discussed. The modern views on specificity and functional role of enzymatic DNA methylation in eukaryotes are described. DNA methylation controls all genetic functions and is a mechanism of cellular differentiation and gene silencing. A model of regulation of DNA replication by methylation is suggested. Adenine DNA methylation in higher eukaryotes (higher plants) was first observed, and it was established that one and the same gene can be methylated at both cytosine and adenine moieties. Thus, there are at least two different and seemingly interdependent DNA methylation systems present in eukaryotic cells. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA-methyltransferase is isolated from wheat seedlings and described: the enzyme methylates DNA with formation of N6-methyladenine in the sequence TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA. It is found that higher plants have endonucleases that are dependent on S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and sensitive to DNA methylation status. Therefore, as in bacteria, plants seem to have a restriction-modification (R-M) system. A system of conjugated up- and down-regulation of SAM-dependent endonucleases by SAM modulations is found in plants. Revelation of an essential role of DNA methylation in regulation of genetic processes is a fundament of materialization of epigenetics and epigenomics.

  6. Metagenomic sequencing reveals the relationship between microbiota composition and quality of Chinese Rice Wine

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xutao; Chen, Jing; Liu, Lin; Wu, Huan; Tan, Haiqin; Xie, Guangfa; Xu, Qian; Zou, Huijun; Yu, Wenjing; Wang, Lan; Qin, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Rice Wine (CRW) is a common alcoholic beverage in China. To investigate the influence of microbial composition on the quality of CRW, high throughput sequencing was performed for 110 wine samples on bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer II (ITS2). Bioinformatic analyses demonstrated that the quality of yeast starter and final wine correlated with microbial taxonomic composition, which was exemplified by our finding that wine spoilage resulted from a high proportion of genus Lactobacillus. Subsequently, based on Lactobacillus abundance of an early stage, a model was constructed to predict final wine quality. In addition, three batches of 20 representative wine samples selected from a pool of 110 samples were further analyzed in metagenomics. The results revealed that wine spoilage was due to rapid growth of Lactobacillus brevis at the early stage of fermentation. Gene functional analysis indicated the importance of some pathways such as synthesis of biotin, malolactic fermentation and production of short-chain fatty acid. These results led to a conclusion that metabolisms of microbes influence the wine quality. Thus, nurturing of beneficial microbes and inhibition of undesired ones are both important for the mechanized brewery. PMID:27241862

  7. Treatment of composite chemical wastewater by aerobic GAC-biofilm sequencing batch reactor (SBGR).

    PubMed

    Rao, N Chandrasekhara; Mohan, S Venkata; Muralikrishna, P; Sarma, P N

    2005-09-30

    The performance of granular activated carbon (GAC)-biofilm configured sequencing batch reactor (SBGR) in aerobic environment was investigated for the treatment of composite chemical wastewater [low BOD/COD ratio ( approximately 0.3), high sulfate content (1.75 g/l) and high TDS concentration (11 g/l)]. Composite wastewater was a combined mixture of effluents from about 100 chemical based industries. Reactor was operated under anoxic-aerobic-anoxic microenvironment conditions with a total cycle period of 24 h (fill: 15 min; reaction (aeration with recirculation): 23 h; settle: 30 min; decant: 15 min) and the performance of the system was studied at organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.7 kg COD/cum-day, 3.5 kg COD/cum-day and 5.5 kg COD/cum-day. The reactor showed efficient performance with respect to substrate degradation rate and sustained its performance at higher operating OLR (5.5 kg COD/cum-day) and at low BOD/COD ratio. Substrate utilization was found to increase with increase in the operating OLR. Maximum non-cumulative substrate utilization of 1.837 kg COD/cum-h, 2.99 kg COD/cum-h and 3.821 kg COD/cum-h was observed after 15 h of the cycle operation for operating OLRs of 1.7 kg COD/cum-day, 3.5 kg COD/cum-day and 5.5 kg COD/cum-day, respectively. Sulfate removal efficiency of 11+/-2% was recorded in the SBGR due to the induced anoxic conditions prevailing during the sequence phase operation of the reactor and the existing internal anoxic zones in the biofilm. Effective performance of the reactor may be attributed to sorption capacity of GAC as carrier material facilitating low toxicant concentration in the mixed liquor. The existing high flow rates around the GAC particle results in good mass transfer of the substrate from the bulk liquid. The long retention of biofilm on GAC increases the potential for the treatment of recalcitrant industrial wastewater. GAC configured biofilm configuration coupled with sequencing batch mode operation appears to be promising

  8. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    van Tulder, Maurits; Malmivaara, Antti; Koes, Bart

    2007-05-26

    Repetitive strain injury remains a controversial topic. The term repetitive strain injury includes specific disorders such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, Guyon canal syndrome, lateral epicondylitis, and tendonitis of the wrist or hand. The diagnosis is usually made on the basis of history and clinical examination. Large high-quality studies using newer imaging techniques, such as MRI and ultrasonography are few. Consequently, the role of such imaging in diagnosis of upper limb disorders remains unclear. In many cases, no specific diagnosis can be established and complaints are labelled as non-specific. Little is known about the effectiveness of treatment options for upper limb disorders. Strong evidence for any intervention is scarce and the effect, if any, is mainly short-term pain relief. Exercise is beneficial for non-specific upper limb disorders. Immobilising hand braces and open carpal tunnel surgery release are beneficial for carpal tunnel syndrome, and topical and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroid injections are helpful for lateral epicondylitis. Exercise is probably beneficial for neck pain, as are corticosteroid injections and exercise for shoulder pain. Although upper limb disorders occur frequently in the working population, most trials have not exclusively included a working population or assessed effects on work-related outcomes. Further high-quality trials should aim to include sufficient sample sizes, working populations, and work-related outcomes.

  9. Influence of fiber lay-up sequence on mechanical properties of SiC(f)/SiC composites

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Singh, J.P.; Sutaria, M.

    1996-03-01

    Mechanical properties of Nicalon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites with two different fiber lay-up sequences (0{degree}/40{degree}/60{degree} and 0{degree}/45{degree}) were evaluated at various temperatures ranging from ambient to 1300{degree}C. Composites with 0{degree}/40{degree}/60{degree} fiber lay-up sequence showed a higher average first matrix cracking stress than that of 0{degree}/45{degree} composites. The measured room-temperature ultimate strength of the 0{degree}/40{degree}/60{degree} composites was 300 MPa compared to 180 MPa for the 0{degree}/45{degree} composites. These measured ultimate strengths were correlated to the predictions made with an analytical model and to in-situ fiber strength characteristics. The large difference in room-temperature ultimate strengths between the two sets of composites is attributed to the relative contributions of the off-axis fibers to the load-bearing capacity of each composite. Up to 1200{degree}C, ultimate strength and work-of-fracture in each set of composites increased, but then declined above 1300{degree}C. The decreases were correlated to in-situ Nicalon fiber strength and fiber/matrix interface degradation.

  10. The Perceptual Determinants of Repetition Learning in Auditory Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Maybery, Murray T.; Huitson, Matthew; Jones, Dylan M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study includes seven experiments examining the effect of repetition learning (Hebb effect) on auditory spatial serial recall. Participants were asked to remember sequences of spatial locations marked by auditory stimuli, where one sequence was repeated across trials. Consistent with the proposition that the spatial scattering of…

  11. Modeling repetitive motions using structured light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Aliaga, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining models of dynamic 3D objects is an important part of content generation for computer graphics. Numerous methods have been extended from static scenarios to model dynamic scenes. If the states or poses of the dynamic object repeat often during a sequence (but not necessarily periodically), we call such a repetitive motion. There are many objects, such as toys, machines, and humans, undergoing repetitive motions. Our key observation is that when a motion-state repeats, we can sample the scene under the same motion state again but using a different set of parameters; thus, providing more information of each motion state. This enables robustly acquiring dense 3D information difficult for objects with repetitive motions using only simple hardware. After the motion sequence, we group temporally disjoint observations of the same motion state together and produce a smooth space-time reconstruction of the scene. Effectively, the dynamic scene modeling problem is converted to a series of static scene reconstructions, which are easier to tackle. The varying sampling parameters can be, for example, structured-light patterns, illumination directions, and viewpoints resulting in different modeling techniques. Based on this observation, we present an image-based motion-state framework and demonstrate our paradigm using either a synchronized or an unsynchronized structured-light acquisition method.

  12. Influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the inherent acoustic nonlinearity in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Chakrapani, Sunil Kishore; Barnard, Daniel J; Dayal, Vinay

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the study of influence of laminate sequence and fabric type on the baseline acoustic nonlinearity of fiber-reinforced composites. Nonlinear elastic wave techniques are increasingly becoming popular in detecting damage in composite materials. It was earlier observed by the authors that the non-classical nonlinear response of fiber-reinforced composite is influenced by the fiber orientation [Chakrapani, Barnard, and Dayal, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 137(2), 617-624 (2015)]. The current study expands this effort to investigate the effect of laminate sequence and fabric type on the non-classical nonlinear response. Two hypotheses were developed using the previous results, and the theory of interlaminar stresses to investigate the influence of laminate sequence and fabric type. Each hypothesis was tested by capturing the nonlinear response by performing nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and measuring frequency shifts, loss factors, and higher harmonics. It was observed that the laminate sequence can either increase or decrease the nonlinear response based on the stacking sequence. Similarly, tests were performed to compare unidirectional fabric and woven fabric and it was observed that woven fabric exhibited a lower nonlinear response compared to the unidirectional fabric. Conjectures based on the matrix properties and interlaminar stresses were used in an attempt to explain the observed nonlinear responses for different configurations.

  13. Comparison of base composition analysis and Sanger sequencing of mitochondrial DNA for four U.S. population groups.

    PubMed

    Kiesler, Kevin M; Coble, Michael D; Hall, Thomas A; Vallone, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    A set of 711 samples from four U.S. population groups was analyzed using a novel mass spectrometry based method for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) base composition profiling. Comparison of the mass spectrometry results with Sanger sequencing derived data yielded a concordance rate of 99.97%. Length heteroplasmy was identified in 46% of samples and point heteroplasmy was observed in 6.6% of samples in the combined mass spectral and Sanger data set. Using discrimination capacity as a metric, Sanger sequencing of the full control region had the highest discriminatory power, followed by the mass spectrometry base composition method, which was more discriminating than Sanger sequencing of just the hypervariable regions. This trend is in agreement with the number of nucleotides covered by each of the three assays.

  14. Genome-Wide Prediction of DNA Methylation Using DNA Composition and Sequence Complexity in Human

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengchao; Yao, Shixin; Li, Xinghao; Chen, Chujia; Hu, Xuehai

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a significant role in transcriptional regulation by repressing activity. Change of the DNA methylation level is an important factor affecting the expression of target genes and downstream phenotypes. Because current experimental technologies can only assay a small proportion of CpG sites in the human genome, it is urgent to develop reliable computational models for predicting genome-wide DNA methylation. Here, we proposed a novel algorithm that accurately extracted sequence complexity features (seven features) and developed a support-vector-machine-based prediction model with integration of the reported DNA composition features (trinucleotide frequency and GC content, 65 features) by utilizing the methylation profiles of embryonic stem cells in human. The prediction results from 22 human chromosomes with size-varied windows showed that the 600-bp window achieved the best average accuracy of 94.7%. Moreover, comparisons with two existing methods further showed the superiority of our model, and cross-species predictions on mouse data also demonstrated that our model has certain generalization ability. Finally, a statistical test of the experimental data and the predicted data on functional regions annotated by ChromHMM found that six out of 10 regions were consistent, which implies reliable prediction of unassayed CpG sites. Accordingly, we believe that our novel model will be useful and reliable in predicting DNA methylation. PMID:28212312

  15. Repetition Blindness for Rotated Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayward, William G.; Zhou, Guomei; Man, Wai-Fung; Harris, Irina M.

    2010-01-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) is the finding that observers often miss the repetition of an item within a rapid stream of words or objects. Recent studies have shown that RB for objects is largely unaffected by variations in viewpoint between the repeated items. In 5 experiments, we tested RB under different axes of rotation, with different types of…

  16. Variation, Repetition, And Choice

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Rodrigues, Josele; Lattal, Kennon A; dos Santos, Cristiano V; Matos, Ricardo A

    2005-01-01

    Experiment 1 investigated the controlling properties of variability contingencies on choice between repeated and variable responding. Pigeons were exposed to concurrent-chains schedules with two alternatives. In the REPEAT alternative, reinforcers in the terminal link depended on a single sequence of four responses. In the VARY alternative, a response sequence in the terminal link was reinforced only if it differed from the n previous sequences (lag criterion). The REPEAT contingency generated low, constant levels of sequence variation whereas the VARY contingency produced levels of sequence variation that increased with the lag criterion. Preference for the REPEAT alternative tended to increase directly with the degree of variation required for reinforcement. Experiment 2 examined the potential confounding effects in Experiment 1 of immediacy of reinforcement by yoking the interreinforcer intervals in the REPEAT alternative to those in the VARY alternative. Again, preference for REPEAT was a function of the lag criterion. Choice between varying and repeating behavior is discussed with respect to obtained behavioral variability, probability of reinforcement, delay of reinforcement, and switching within a sequence. PMID:15828592

  17. Agrobacterium T-DNA integration in Arabidopsis is correlated with DNA sequence compositions that occur frequently in gene promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Richard G; Zhang, Ke; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Troukhan, Max; Kwok, Shing F; Drais, Josh; Klinger, Kevin; Orejudos, Francis; Macy, Kimberly; Bhakta, Amit; Burns, James; Subramanian, Gopal; Donson, Jonathan; Flavell, Richard; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2005-10-01

    Mobile insertion elements such as transposons and T-DNA generate useful genetic variation and are important tools for functional genomics studies in plants and animals. The spectrum of mutations obtained in different systems can be highly influenced by target site preferences inherent in the mechanism of DNA integration. We investigated the target site preferences of Agrobacterium T-DNA insertions in the chromosomes of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The relative frequencies of insertions in genic and intergenic regions of the genome were calculated and DNA composition features associated with the insertion site flanking sequences were identified. Insertion frequencies across the genome indicate that T-strand integration is suppressed near centromeres and rDNA loci, progressively increases towards telomeres, and is highly correlated with gene density. At the gene level, T-DNA integration events show a statistically significant preference for insertion in the 5' and 3' flanking regions of protein coding sequences as well as the promoter region of RNA polymerase I transcribed rRNA gene repeats. The increased insertion frequencies in 5' upstream regions compared to coding sequences are positively correlated with gene expression activity and DNA sequence composition. Analysis of the relationship between DNA sequence composition and gene activity further demonstrates that DNA sequences with high CG-skew ratios are consistently correlated with T-DNA insertion site preference and high gene expression. The results demonstrate genomic and gene-specific preferences for T-strand integration and suggest that DNA sequences with a pronounced transition in CG- and AT-skew ratios are preferred targets for T-DNA integration.

  18. Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The phenomenon of repetition blindness (RB) may reveal a new limitation on human perceptual processing. Recently, however, researchers have attributed RB to post-perceptual processes such as memory retrieval and/or reporting biases. The standard rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm used in most RB studies is, indeed, open to such objections. Here we investigate RB using a "single-frame" paradigm introduced by Johnston and Hale (1984) in which memory demands are minimal. Subjects made only a single judgement about whether one masked target word was the same or different than a post-target probe. Confidence ratings permitted use of signal detection methods to assess sensitivity and bias effects. In the critical condition for RB a precue of the post-target word was provided prior to the target stimulus (identity precue), so that the required judgement amounted to whether the target did or did not repeat the precue word. In control treatments, the precue was either an unrelated word or a dummy.

  19. Orthographic repetition blindness.

    PubMed

    Harris, C L; Morris, A L

    2000-11-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) is the failure to report the second occurrence of a repeated word, when words are sequentially and briefly displayed (Kanwisher, 1987). RB is also observed for non-identical words, such as home, dome. Explanations for non-identity RB assume that similarity at the level of the whole word causes the second word to be suppressed ("similarity inhibition"). Three experiments demonstrate that RB is robust for diverse types of orthographic relatedness, including critical words that share only their first initial letter, their last two letters, first three letters, middle three letters, beginning and final letters, three alternating letters, and three non-aligned letters (as in chance hand). The theoretical construct of similarity inhibition may be able to account for these data, although one mechanism previously proposed in the literature, neighbourhood inhibition, is probably not a useful way to explain the data on RB for words sharing only one or two letters. We introduce an alternative explanation for orthographic RB: Only the repeated letters are suppressed, and amount of RB depends on how easily the perceiver can reconstruct the target word from the non-suppressed letters.

  20. Repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, P S; Taylor, W J

    2004-08-01

    Pain in the forearm is relatively common in the community. In the workplace forearm pain is associated with work involving frequent repetition, high forces, and prolonged abnormal postures. Nevertheless, other factors are involved in the presentation and the continuation of the pain. Notable among these factors are psychosocial issues and the workplace environment-the attitude to workers and their welfare, the physical conditions, and design of the job. Primary prevention may be effective but active surveillance is important with early intervention and an active management approach. Physical treatments have not been extensively evaluated. In the established case, management should be multidisciplinary, addressing physical aspects of the job but also addressing the "yellow, blue, and black flags" which should be viewed as obstacles to recovery. For the worker "on sick" a dialogue should be established between the worker, the primary care physician, and the workplace. Return to work should be encouraged and facilitated by medical interventions and light duty options. Rehabilitation programmes may be of use in chronic cases.

  1. Perceptual repetition blindness effects.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, L; Johnston, J C

    1996-04-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) may reveal a new limitation on human perceptual processing. Recently, however, researchers have attributed RB to postperceptual processes. The standard rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm used in most RB studies is open to such objections. The "single-frame" paradigm introduced by J. C. Johnston and B. L. Hale (1984) allowed investigation of RB with minimal memory demands. Participants made a judgment about whether 1 masked target word was the same or different than a posttarget probe. Confidence ratings permitted use of signal detection methods. In the critical condition for RB, a precue of the posttarget word was provided prior to the target stimulus so that the required judgment amounted to whether the target did or did not repeat the precue word. In control treatments, the precue was an unrelated word or a dummy. Results showed that perceptual sensitivity was significantly reduced in the RB condition relative to baseline control conditions. The data showed that RB can be obtained under conditions in which memory problems are minimal and perceptual sensitivity is assessed independently of biases. RB therefore can be a perceptual phenomenon.

  2. Neural Basis of Repetition Priming during Mathematical Cognition: Repetition Suppression or Repetition Enhancement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salimpoor, Valorie N.; Chang, Catie; Menon, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the neural basis of repetition priming (RP) during mathematical cognition. Previous studies of RP have focused on repetition suppression as the basis of behavioral facilitation, primarily using word and object identification and classification tasks. More recently, researchers have suggested associative stimulus-response learning…

  3. Repetitively pumped electron beam device

    DOEpatents

    Schlitt, L.G.

    1979-07-24

    Disclosed is an apparatus for producing fast, repetitive pulses of controllable length of an electron beam by phased energy storage in a transmission line of length matched to the number of pulses and specific pulse lengths desired. 12 figs.

  4. A Perceptual Repetition Blindness Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhaus, Larry; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Before concluding Repetition Blindness is a perceptual phenomenon, alternative explanations based on memory retrieval problems and report bias must be rejected. Memory problems were minimized by requiring a judgment about only a single briefly displayed field. Bias and sensitivity effects were empirically measured with an ROC-curve analysis method based on confidence ratings. Results from five experiments support the hypothesis that Repetition Blindness can be a perceptual phenomenon.

  5. A mapping of an ensemble of mitochondrial sequences for various organisms into 3D space based on the word composition.

    PubMed

    Aita, Takuyo; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-11-01

    To visualize a bird's-eye view of an ensemble of mitochondrial genome sequences for various species, we recently developed a novel method of mapping a biological sequence ensemble into Three-Dimensional (3D) vector space. First, we represented a biological sequence of a species s by a word-composition vector x(s), where its length [absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the sequence length, and its unit vector x(s)/[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] represents the relative composition of the K-tuple words through the sequence and the size of the dimension, N=4(K), is the number of all possible words with the length of K. Second, we mapped the vector x(s) to the 3D position vector y(s), based on the two following simple principles: (1) [absolute value]y(s)[absolute value]=[absolute value]x(s)[absolute value] and (2) the angle between y(s) and y(t) maximally correlates with the angle between x(s) and x(t). The mitochondrial genome sequences for 311 species, including 177 Animalia, 85 Fungi and 49 Green plants, were mapped into 3D space by using K=7. The mapping was successful because the angles between vectors before and after the mapping highly correlated with each other (correlation coefficients were 0.92-0.97). Interestingly, the Animalia kingdom is distributed along a single arc belt (just like the Milky Way on a Celestial Globe), and the Fungi and Green plant kingdoms are distributed in a similar arc belt. These two arc belts intersect at their respective middle regions and form a cross structure just like a jet aircraft fuselage and its wings. This new mapping method will allow researchers to intuitively interpret the visual information presented in the maps in a highly effective manner.

  6. Grid-Assembly: An oligonucleotide composition-based partitioning strategy to aid metagenomic sequence assembly.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Mehra, Varun; Mande, Sharmila S

    2015-06-01

    Metagenomics approach involves extraction, sequencing and characterization of the genomic content of entire community of microbes present in a given environment. In contrast to genomic data, accurate assembly of metagenomic sequences is a challenging task. Given the huge volume and the diverse taxonomic origin of metagenomic sequences, direct application of single genome assembly methods on metagenomes are likely to not only lead to an immense increase in requirements of computational infrastructure, but also result in the formation of chimeric contigs. A strategy to address the above challenge would be to partition metagenomic sequence datasets into clusters and assemble separately the sequences in individual clusters using any single-genome assembly method. The current study presents such an approach that uses tetranucleotide usage patterns to first represent sequences as points in a three dimensional (3D) space. The 3D space is subsequently partitioned into "Grids". Sequences within overlapping grids are then progressively assembled using any available assembler. We demonstrate the applicability of the current Grid-Assembly method using various categories of assemblers as well as different simulated metagenomic datasets. Validation results indicate that the Grid-Assembly approach helps in improving the overall quality of assembly, in terms of the purity and volume of the assembled contigs.

  7. Chronic occupational repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. A.; Forsythe, M. E.; Stanish, W. D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review common repetitive strain injuries (RSIs) that occur in the workplace, emphasizing diagnosis, treatment, and etiology of these conditions. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from January 1966 to June 1999 focused on articles published since 1990 because RSIs are relatively new diagnoses. MeSH headings that were explored using the thesaurus included "cumulative trauma disorder," "overuse injury," and "repetitive strain injury." The search was limited to English articles only, and preference was given to randomized controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Repetitive strain injuries result from repeated stress to the body's soft tissue structures including muscles, tendons, and nerves. They often occur in patients who perform repetitive movements either in their jobs or in extracurricular activities. Common RSIs include tendon-related disorders, such as rotator cuff tendonitis, and peripheral nerve entrapment disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. A careful history and physical examination often lead to the diagnosis, but newer imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound, can help in refractory cases. Conservative management with medication, physiotherapy, or bracing is the mainstay of treatment. Surgery is reserved for cases that do not respond to treatment. CONCLUSION: Repetitive strain injury is common; primary care physicians must establish a diagnosis and, more importantly, its relationship to occupation. Treatment can be offered by family physicians who refer to specialists for cases refractory to conservative management. PMID:11228032

  8. Recombinant human MDM2 oncoprotein shows sequence composition selectivity for binding to both RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Challen, Christine; Anderson, John J; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N; Lunec, John

    2012-03-01

    MDM2 is a 90 kDa nucleo-phosphoprotein that binds p53 and other proteins contributing to its oncogenic properties. Its structure includes an amino proximal p53 binding site, a central acidic domain and a carboxy region which incorporates Zinc and Ring Finger domains suggestive of nucleic acid binding or transcription factor function. It has previously been reported that a bacculovirus expressed MDM2 protein binds RNA in a sequence-specific manner through the Ring Finger domain, however, its ability to bind DNA has yet to be examined. We report here that a bacterially expressed human MDM2 protein binds both DNA as well as the previously defined RNA consensus sequence. DNA binding appears selective and involves the carboxy-terminal domain of the molecule. RNA binding is inhibited by an MDM2 specific antibody, which recognises an epitope within the carboxy region of the protein. Selection cloning and sequence analysis of MDM2 DNA binding sequences, unlike RNA binding sequences, revealed no obvious DNA binding consensus sequence, but preferential binding to oligopurine:pyrimidine-rich stretches. Our results suggest that the observed preferential DNA binding may occur through the Zinc Finger or in a charge-charge interaction through the Ring Finger, thereby implying potentially different mechanisms for DNA and RNA MDM2 binding.

  9. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Mathew D; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G; Davis, Stephen R; Spelman, Richard J

    2016-05-05

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes.

  10. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Mathew D.; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A.; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G.; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G.; Davis, Stephen R.; Spelman, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  11. Sequence stratigraphy and composition of late quaternary shelf-margin deltas, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, R.A.; Suter, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles and foundation borings from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico record the physical attributes and depositional histories of several late Quaternary sequences that were deposited by wave-modified, river-dominated shelf-margin deltas during successive periods of lowered sea level. Each progressively younger deltaic sequence is thinner and exhibits a systematic decrease in the abundance and concentration of sand, which is attributed to a shift in the axes of trunk streams and greater structural influence through time. Our study shows that (1) contemporaneous structural deformation controlled the thickness of each sequence, the oblique directions of delta progradation, the axes of major fluvial channels, and the geometries of delta lobes at the shelf margin; (2) sedimentation was rapid in response to rapid eustatic fluctuations and structural influence; (3) boundaries of these high-frequency sequences are the correlative conformities of updip fluvial incision and coincide with downlap surfaces at the shelf margin; (4) the downlap surfaces are not true surfaces, but zones of parallel reflections that become progressively higher and younger in the direction of progradation; (5) the downlap zones are composed of marine muds that do not contain the high concentrations of shell debris expected in condensed sections; (6) possible paleosols capping the two oldest sequences are regressive surfaces of subaerial exposure that were preserved during transgressions; and (7) no incised valleys or submarine canyons breach the paleoshelf margin, even though incised drainages were present updip and sea level curves indicate several periods of rapid fall.

  12. The venom composition of the parasitic wasp Chelonus inanitus resolved by combined expressed sequence tags analysis and proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Parasitic wasps constitute one of the largest group of venomous animals. Although some physiological effects of their venoms are well documented, relatively little is known at the molecular level on the protein composition of these secretions. To identify the majority of the venom proteins of the endoparasitoid wasp Chelonus inanitus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), we have randomly sequenced 2111 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a cDNA library of venom gland. In parallel, proteins from pure venom were separated by gel electrophoresis and individually submitted to a nano-LC-MS/MS analysis allowing comparison of peptides and ESTs sequences. Results About 60% of sequenced ESTs encoded proteins whose presence in venom was attested by mass spectrometry. Most of the remaining ESTs corresponded to gene products likely involved in the transcriptional and translational machinery of venom gland cells. In addition, a small number of transcripts were found to encode proteins that share sequence similarity with well-known venom constituents of social hymenopteran species, such as hyaluronidase-like proteins and an Allergen-5 protein. An overall number of 29 venom proteins could be identified through the combination of ESTs sequencing and proteomic analyses. The most highly redundant set of ESTs encoded a protein that shared sequence similarity with a venom protein of unknown function potentially specific of the Chelonus lineage. Venom components specific to C. inanitus included a C-type lectin domain containing protein, a chemosensory protein-like protein, a protein related to yellow-e3 and ten new proteins which shared no significant sequence similarity with known sequences. In addition, several venom proteins potentially able to interact with chitin were also identified including a chitinase, an imaginal disc growth factor-like protein and two putative mucin-like peritrophins. Conclusions The use of the combined approaches has allowed to discriminate between cellular

  13. Microbial Community Composition in the Marine Sediments of Jeju Island: Next-Generation Sequencing Surveys.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heebok; Koh, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Hongik; Chae, Jong-Chan; Park, Soo-Je

    2016-05-28

    Marine sediments are a microbial biosphere with an unknown physiology, and the sediments harbor numerous distinct phylogenetic lineages of Bacteria and Archaea that are at present uncultured. In this study, the structure of the archaeal and bacterial communities was investigated in the surface and subsurface sediments of Jeju Island using a next-generation sequencing method. The microbial communities in the surface sediments were distinct from those in the subsurface sediments; the relative abundance of sequences for Thaumarchaeota, Actinobacteria, Bacteroides, Alphaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria were higher in the surface than subsurface sediments, whereas the sequences for Euryarchaeota, Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, and Deltaproteobacteria were relatively more abundant in the subsurface than surface sediments. This study presents detailed characterization of the spatial distribution of benthic microbial communities of Jeju Island and provides fundamental information on the potential interactions mediated by microorganisms with the different biogeochemical cycles in coastal sediments.

  14. Tongue Motion Averaging from Contour Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Min; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a method to get the best representation of a speech motion from several repetitions is presented. Each repetition is a representation of the same speech captured at different times by sequence of ultrasound images and is composed of a set of 2D spatio-temporal contours. These 2D contours in different repetitions are time aligned…

  15. Using DGGE and 16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis to Evaluate Changes in Oral Bacterial Composition

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Zhou; TRIVEDI, Harsh M.; CHHUN, Nok; BARNES, Virginia M.; SAXENA, Deepak; XU, Tao; LI, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether a standard dental prophylaxis followed by tooth brushing with an antibacterial dentifrice will affect the oral bacterial community, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) combined with 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults were instructed to brush their teeth using commercial dentifrice for 1 week during a washout period. An initial set of pooled supragingival plaque samples was collected from each participant at baseline (0 h) before prophylaxis treatment. The subjects were given a clinical examination and dental prophylaxis and asked to brush for 1 min with a dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride (Colgate Total). On the following day, a second set of pooled supragingival plaque samples (24 h) was collected. Total bacterial genomic DNA was isolated from the samples. Differences in the microbial composition before and after the prophylactic procedure and tooth brushing were assessed by comparing the DGGE profiles of PCR-amplified and 16S rRNA gene segments sequence analysis. Results Two distinct clusters of DGGE profiles were found, suggesting that a shift in the microbial composition had occurred 24 h after the prophylaxis and brushing. A detailed sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene segments further identified six phyla and 29 genera, including known and unknown bacterial species. Importantly, an increase in bacterial diversity was observed after 24 h, including members of the Streptococcaceae family, Prevotella, Corynebacterium, TM7 and other commensal bacteria. Conclusion The results suggest that the use of a standard prophylaxis followed by the use of the dentifrice containing 0.3% triclosan/2.0% PVM/MA copolymer/0.243% sodium fluoride may promote a healthier composition within the oral bacterial community. PMID:22319750

  16. Palynological composition of a Lower Cretaceous South American tropical sequence: Climatic implications and diversity comparisons with other latitudes.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mejia-Velasquez, Paula J.; Dilcher, David L.; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Fortini, Lucas B.; Manchester, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study: Reconstruction of floristic patterns during the early diversification of angiosperms is impeded by the scarce fossil record, especially in tropical latitudes. Here we collected quantitative palynological data from a stratigraphic sequence in tropical South America to provide floristic and climatic insights into such tropical environments during the Early Cretaceous. Methods: We reconstructed the floristic composition of an Aptian-Albian tropical sequence from central Colombia using quantitative palynology (rarefied species richness and abundance) and used it to infer its predominant climatic conditions. Additionally, we compared our results with available quantitative data from three other sequences encompassing 70 floristic assemblages to determine latitudinal diversity patterns. Key results: Abundance of humidity indicators was higher than that of aridity indicators (61% vs. 10%). Additionally, we found an angiosperm latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) for the Aptian, but not for the Albian, and an inverted LDG of the overall diversity for the Albian. Angiosperm species turnover during the Albian, however, was higher in humid tropics. Conclusions: There were humid climates in northwestern South America during the Aptian-Albian interval contrary to the widespread aridity expected for the tropical belt. The Albian inverted overall LDG is produced by a faster increase in per-sample angiosperm and pteridophyte diversity in temperate latitudes. However, humid tropical sequences had higher rates of floristic turnover suggesting a higher degree of morphological variation than in temperate regions.

  17. Limits on movement integration in children: The concatenation of trained subsequences into composite sequences as a specific experience-triggered skill.

    PubMed

    Ashtamker, Lilach; Karni, Avi

    2015-09-01

    Complex movement sequences may be easier to acquire in sub-segments. Nevertheless, the neuro-behavioral constraints on assembling short multi-element movement segments, acquired piecemeal and serially, into larger, composite units of action, are not clear. Here we examined the ability of children to combine movement subsequences into longer, composite, sequences. Eleven-year-olds were trained in the performance of two, 3-elements, finger-to-thumb opposition movement sequences and were tested, overnight, in the performance of composite, 6-elements, sequences. Two experiments were compared, differing only in whether or not a brief test for integration into a composite sequence was afforded immediately post-training. This composite sequence (Full) was a direct forward integration of the two subsequences, maintaining the order in which the two subsequences were trained. In both experiments, overnight performance of movement elements within the composite sequences was better than naive performance, but slower and less accurate compared to the performance of the identical movement elements in the context of the trained subsequences. Integration was as effective in the Full sequence as when the order between subsequences was switched (Reversed). However, the early test for subsequence integration was critical in inducing clear between-session ('offline') gains, as expressed in overnight performance, in both the Full and Reversed sequences. Without this brief experience in integration, no overnight gains were expressed in any of the 6-elements sequences. Moreover, the immediate post-training test resulted in a relative advantage of the Full and Reversed sequences over a 6-element sequence in which the order of the elements was mirror-reversed within each subsequence. Thus, training on subsequences may not spontaneously lead to an advantage in the performance of composite sequences, in children. However, an early brief experience with a composite sequence can suffice to

  18. Validation of use of whole-cell repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) for typing strains belonging to the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex and application of the method to the investigation of a hospital outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, A M; Gerner-Smidt, P; Hawkey, P M; Heritage, J; Parnell, P; Porter, C; Bodenham, A R; Inglis, T

    1996-01-01

    Acinetobacter spp. are being reported with increasing frequency as causes of nosocomial infection. In order to identify reservoirs of infection as quickly as possible, a rapid typing method that can differentiate epidemic strains from environmental and nonepidemic strains is needed. In 1993, a cluster of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates from five patients in the adult intensive therapy unit of our tertiary-care teaching hospital led us to develop and optimize a rapid repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR) typing protocol for members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex that uses boiled colonies and consensus primers aimed at repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences. Four of the five patient isolates gave the same REP-PCR typing pattern as isolates of A. baumannii obtained from the temperature probe of a Bennett humidifier; the fifth isolate had a unique profile. Disinfection of the probe with 70% ethanol, as recommended by the manufacturer, proved ineffective, as A. baumannii with the same REP-PCR pattern was isolated from it 10 days after cleaning, necessitating a change in our decontamination procedure. Results obtained with REP-PCR were subsequently confirmed by ribotyping. To evaluate the discriminatory power (D) of REP-PCR for typing members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex, compared with that of ribotyping, we have applied both methods to a collection of 85 strains that included representatives of six DNA groups within the complex. Ribotyping using EcoRI digests yielded 53 patterns (D = 0.98), whereas 68 different REP-PCR patterns were observed (D = 0.99). By computer-assisted analysis of gel images, 74 patterns were observed with REP-PCR (D = 1.0). Overall, REP-PCR typing proved to be slightly more discriminatory than ribotyping. Our results indicate that REP-PCR typing used boiled colonies is a simple, rapid, and effective means of typing members of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex. PMID

  19. A chenopod extensin lacks repetitive tetrahydroxyproline blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiongbiao; Kieliszewski, M.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1990-02-01

    An extensin isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) cell suspension cultures fulfills all criteria for membership of the extensin family save one, notably, lack of the diagnostic pentamer Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp. However, sequence analysis of the major tryptic peptides shows that sugar beet extensin shares a motif in common with tomato extensin P1 but differs by the position of an insertion sequence (X) or (Y) which, in sugar beet, splits the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-(X)-Hyp-Hyp-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys, where (X) is (Val-His-Glu/Lys-Tyr-Pro), while in tomato the insertion sequence (Y) = (Val-Lys-Pro-Tyr-His-Pro) and, when it occurs, immediately follows the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-(Y)-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys. Based on these data were reinterpret three highly repetitive cDNA sequences, including nodulin N75 from soybean and wound-induced P33 of carrot, as extensins with split tetra(hydroxy)proline blocks.

  20. Elevated nutrients change bacterial community composition and connectivity: high throughput sequencing of young marine biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lawes, Jasmin C; Neilan, Brett A; Brown, Mark V; Clark, Graeme F; Johnston, Emma L

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are integral to many marine processes but their formation and function may be affected by anthropogenic inputs that alter environmental conditions, including fertilisers that increase nutrients. Density composition and connectivity of biofilms developed in situ (under ambient and elevated nutrients) were compared using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S gene. Elevated nutrients shifted community composition from bacteria involved in higher processes (eg Pseudoalteromonas spp. invertebrate recruitment) towards more nutrient-tolerant bacterial species (eg Terendinibacter sp.). This may enable the persistence of biofilm communities by increasing resistance to nutrient inputs. A core biofilm microbiome was identified (predominantly Alteromonadales and Oceanospirillales) and revealed shifts in abundances of core microbes that could indicate enrichment by fertilisers. Fertiliser decreased density and connectivity within biofilms indicating that associations were disrupted perhaps via changes to energetic allocations within the core microbiome. Density composition and connectivity changes suggest nutrients can affect the stability and function of these important marine communities.

  1. Repetition Blindness Occurs in Nonwords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Catherine L.; Morris, Alison L.

    2004-01-01

    Theorists have predicted that repetition blindness (RB) should be absent for nonwords because they do not activate preexisting mental types. The authors hypothesized that RB would be observed for nonwords because RB can occur at a sublexical level. Four experiments showed that RB is observed for word-nonword pairs (noon noof), orthographically…

  2. Precautions regarding Nonword Repetition Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Using nonword repetition tasks as an experimental approach with both adults and children has become quite common in the past 10 to 15 years for studying lexical learning and phonological processing (e.g., Bailey & Hahn, 2001; Gathercole, Frankish, Pickering & Peaker, 1998; Munson, Edwards, & Beckman, 2005; Storkel, 2001; Vitevich & Luce, 2005). In…

  3. Constructive and Unconstructive Repetitive Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews research showing that repetitive thought (RT) can have constructive or unconstructive consequences. The main unconstructive consequences of RT are (a) depression, (b) anxiety, and (c) difficulties in physical health. The main constructive consequences of RT are (a) recovery from upsetting and traumatic events, (b) adaptive…

  4. Composition and phylogenetic analysis of vitellogenin coding sequences in the Indonesian coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis.

    PubMed

    Canapa, Adriana; Olmo, Ettore; Forconi, Mariko; Pallavicini, Alberto; Makapedua, Monica Daisy; Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Barucca, Marco

    2012-07-01

    The coelacanth Latimeria menadoensis, a living fossil, occupies a key phylogenetic position to explore the changes that have affected the genomes of the aquatic vertebrates that colonized dry land. This is the first study to isolate and analyze L. menadoensis mRNA. Three different vitellogenin transcripts were identified and their inferred amino acid sequences compared to those of other known vertebrates. The phylogenetic data suggest that the evolutionary history of this gene family in coelacanths was characterized by a different duplication event than those which occurred in teleosts, amniotes, and amphibia. Comparison of the three sequences highlighted differences in functional sites. Moreover, despite the presence of conserved sites compared with the other oviparous vertebrates, some sites were seen to have changed, others to be similar only to those of teleosts, and others still to resemble only to those of tetrapods.

  5. Domain of the composition of some triangles in the space of p-summable sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Feyzi

    2014-08-01

    Let 1 ≤ p < ∞. In the present paper, we introduce the space ˜ℓp of Euler-Cesáro p-summable difference sequences. Furthermore, we give an inclusion relation concerning the space ˜ℓp and compute the alpha-, beta- and gamma-duals of the space ˜ℓp and construct its basis. We characterize the classes (˜ℓp: ℓ∞), (˜ℓp: c) and (˜ℓp: c0) of infinite matrices, and give the characterization of some other classes of matrix transformations from the space ˜ℓp to the Euler, Riesz, difference, etc., sequence spaces, by means of a basic lemma.

  6. Fragmentation Characteristics of Deprotonated N-linked Glycopeptides: Influences of Amino Acid Composition and Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaze, Takashi; Kawabata, Shin-ichirou; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Glycopeptide structural analysis using tandem mass spectrometry is becoming a common approach for elucidating site-specific N-glycosylation. The analysis is generally performed in positive-ion mode. Therefore, fragmentation of protonated glycopeptides has been extensively investigated; however, few studies are available on deprotonated glycopeptides, despite the usefulness of negative-ion mode analysis in detecting glycopeptide signals. Here, large sets of glycopeptides derived from well-characterized glycoproteins were investigated to understand the fragmentation behavior of deprotonated N-linked glycopeptides under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. The fragment ion species were found to be significantly variable depending on their amino acid sequence and could be classified into three types: (i) glycan fragment ions, (ii) glycan-lost fragment ions and their secondary cleavage products, and (iii) fragment ions with intact glycan moiety. The CID spectra of glycopeptides having a short peptide sequence were dominated by type (i) glycan fragments (e.g., 2,4AR, 2,4AR-1, D, and E ions). These fragments define detailed structural features of the glycan moiety such as branching. For glycopeptides with medium or long peptide sequences, the major fragments were type (ii) ions (e.g., [peptide + 0,2X0-H]- and [peptide-NH3-H]-). The appearance of type (iii) ions strongly depended on the peptide sequence, and especially on the presence of Asp, Asn, and Glu. When a glycosylated Asn is located on the C-terminus, an interesting fragment having an Asn residue with intact glycan moiety, [glycan + Asn-36]-, was abundantly formed. Observed fragments are reasonably explained by a combination of existing fragmentation rules suggested for N-glycans and peptides.

  7. Visual identity and uncertainty in repetition blindness.

    PubMed

    Brill, Gary A; Glass, Arnold L; Rashid, Hanin; Hussey, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) was investigated in 6 experiments. In the first 3 experiments participants detected vowel targets in 11-letter sequences. When all letters were uppercase, detection was poorer for same (e.g., AA) than for different (e.g., AO) targets. However, when one target was uppercase and the other lowercase, RB was found only for targets visually identical except for size (e.g., Oo), not for visually different pairs (e.g., Aa). Experiment 4 found RB for visually identical versus different consonant-vowel-consonant words. Experiments 5 and 6 replicated Kanwisher's (1987) experiment in which RB was insensitive to word case but revealed these effects to be artifacts of poor recognition of 5-letter words coupled with a biased guessing strategy. Overall, these experiments found RB only at a low level of visual information processing.

  8. A close relationship between primary nucleotides sequence structure and the composition of functional genes in the genome of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Juan A L; Fernández-Guerra, Antoni; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2011-12-01

    Comparative genomics is an essential tool to unravel how genomes change over evolutionary time and to gain clues on the links between functional genomics and evolution. In prokaryotes, the large, good quality, genome sequences available in public databases and the recently developed large-scale computational methods, offer an unprecedent view on the ecology and evolution of microorganisms through comparative genomics. In this work, we examined the links among genome structure (i.e., the sequential distribution of nucleotides itself by detrended fluctuation analysis, DFA) and genomic diversity (i.e., gene functionality by Clusters of Orthologous Genes, COGs) in 828 full sequenced prokaryotic genomes from 548 different bacteria and archaea species. DFA scaling exponent α indicated persistent long-range correlations (fractality) in each genome analyzed. Higher resolution power was found when considering the sequential succession of purine (AG) vs. pyrimidine (CT) bases than either keto (GT) to amino (AC) forms or strongly (GC) vs. weakly (AT) bonded nucleotides. Interestingly, the phyla Aquificae, Fusobacteria, Dictyoglomi, Nitrospirae, and Thermotogae were closer to archaea than to their bacterial counterparts. A strong significant correlation was found between scaling exponent α and COGs distribution, and we consistently observed that the larger α the more heterogeneous was the gene distribution within each functional category, suggesting a close relationship between primary nucleotides sequence structure and functional genes composition.

  9. Phylogeny of prokaryotes and chloroplasts revealed by a simple composition approach on all protein sequences from complete genomes without sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z G; Zhou, L Q; Anh, V V; Chu, K H; Long, S C; Deng, J Q

    2005-04-01

    The complete genomes of living organisms have provided much information on their phylogenetic relationships. Similarly, the complete genomes of chloroplasts have helped to resolve the evolution of this organelle in photosynthetic eukaryotes. In this paper we propose an alternative method of phylogenetic analysis using compositional statistics for all protein sequences from complete genomes. This new method is conceptually simpler than and computationally as fast as the one proposed by Qi et al. (2004b) and Chu et al. (2004). The same data sets used in Qi et al. (2004b) and Chu et al. (2004) are analyzed using the new method. Our distance-based phylogenic tree of the 109 prokaryotes and eukaryotes agrees with the biologists "tree of life" based on 16S rRNA comparison in a predominant majority of basic branching and most lower taxa. Our phylogenetic analysis also shows that the chloroplast genomes are separated to two major clades corresponding to chlorophytes s.l. and rhodophytes s.l. The interrelationships among the chloroplasts are largely in agreement with the current understanding on chloroplast evolution.

  10. Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... RSIs are linked to the stress of repetitive motions at the computer or overuse injuries in sports. ... use, texting, playing musical instruments, or the repetitive motion of sports like tennis. An RSI occurs when ...

  11. Biosynthesis and characterization of a non-repetitive polypeptide derived from silk fibroin heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gaoqiang; Wu, Mingyang; Yi, Honggen; Wang, Jiannan

    2016-02-01

    Silk fibroin heavy chain is the major protein component of Bombyx mori silk fibroin and is composed of 12 repetitive and 11 non-repetitive regions, with the non-repetitive domain consisting of a hydrophilic polypeptide chain. In order to determine the biomedical function of the non-repetitive domain or potentially use it to modify hydrophobic biomaterials, high-purity isolation is necessary. Previously, we cloned and extended a gene motif (f(1)) encoding the non-repetitive domain. Here, this motif and its multimers are inserted into a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged fusion-protein expression vector. Motif f(1) and multimers f(4) and f(8) were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 cells following isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside induction, purified by GST-affinity chromatography, and single bands of purified fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8), were visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Target polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8), were cleaved clearly from the GST-fusion tag following thrombin digestion. Mass spectrometry results indicate that the molecular weights associated with fusion proteins GST-F(1), GST-F(4), and GST-F(8) are 31.5, 43.8, and 59.0kDa, respectively, and with the cleaved polypeptides F(1), F(4), and F(8) are 4.8, 16.8, and 32.8kDa, respectively. The F(1), F(4), and F(8) polypeptide chains are negatively charged with isoelectric points (pI) of 3.3, 3.2, and 3.0, respectively. The molecular weight and pI values of the polypeptide chains are consistent with the predicted values and the amino acid compositions similar to predicted sequences. FTIR and CD results show the molecular conformation of F(1) was mainly random coil, and more stable α-helix structure formed in longer molecular chain.

  12. Genotyping by PCR and High-Throughput Sequencing of Commercial Probiotic Products Reveals Composition Biases

    PubMed Central

    Morovic, Wesley; Hibberd, Ashley A.; Zabel, Bryan; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in microbiome research have brought renewed focus on beneficial bacteria, many of which are available in food and dietary supplements. Although probiotics have historically been defined as microorganisms that convey health benefits when ingested in sufficient viable amounts, this description now includes the stipulation “well defined strains,” encompassing definitive taxonomy for consumer consideration and regulatory oversight. Here, we evaluated 52 commercial dietary supplements covering a range of labeled species using plate counting and targeted genotyping. Strain identities were assessed using methods recently published by the United States Pharmacopeial Convention. We also determined the relative abundance of individual bacteria by high-throughput sequencing (HTS) of the 16S rRNA sequence using paired-end 2 × 250 bp Illumina MiSeq technology. Using these methods, we tested the hypothesis that products do contain the quantitative and qualitative list of labeled microbial species. We found that 17 samples (33%) were below label claim for CFU prior to their expiration dates. A multiplexed-PCR scheme showed that only 30/52 (58%) of the products contained a correctly labeled classification, with issues encompassing incorrect taxonomy, missing species, and un-labeled species. The HTS revealed that many blended products consisted predominantly of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. These results highlight the need for reliable methods to determine the correct taxonomy and quantify the relative amounts of mixed microbial populations in commercial probiotic products. PMID:27857709

  13. Bioinformatical parsing of folding-on-binding proteins reveals their compositional and evolutionary sequence design.

    PubMed

    Narasumani, Mohanalakshmi; Harrison, Paul M

    2015-12-18

    Intrinsic disorder occurs when (part of) a protein remains unfolded during normal functioning. Intrinsically-disordered regions can contain segments that 'fold on binding' to another molecule. Here, we perform bioinformatical parsing of human 'folding-on-binding' (FB) proteins, into four subsets: Ordered regions, FB regions, Disordered regions that surround FB regions ('Disordered-around-FB'), and Other-Disordered regions. We examined the composition and evolutionary behaviour (across vertebrate orthologs) of these subsets. From a convergence of three separate analyses, we find that for hydrophobicity, Ordered regions segregate from the other subsets, but the Ordered and FB regions group together as highly conserved, and the Disordered-around-FB and Other-Disordered regions as less conserved (with a lesser significant difference between Ordered and FB regions). FB regions are highly-conserved with net positive charge, whereas Disordered-around-FB have net negative charge and are relatively less hydrophobic than FB regions. Indeed, these Disordered-around-FB regions are excessively hydrophilic compared to other disordered regions generally. We describe how our results point towards a possible compositionally-based steering mechanism of folding-on-binding.

  14. Exploring the Gastrointestinal “Nemabiome”: Deep Amplicon Sequencing to Quantify the Species Composition of Parasitic Nematode Communities

    PubMed Central

    Avramenko, Russell W.; Redman, Elizabeth M.; Lewis, Roy; Yazwinski, Thomas A.; Wasmuth, James D.; Gilleard, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections have a considerable impact on global human health as well as animal welfare and production. Although co-infection with multiple parasite species within a host is common, there is a dearth of tools with which to study the composition of these complex parasite communities. Helminth species vary in their pathogenicity, epidemiology and drug sensitivity and the interactions that occur between co-infecting species and their hosts are poorly understood. We describe the first application of deep amplicon sequencing to study parasitic nematode communities as well as introduce the concept of the gastro-intestinal “nemabiome”. The approach is analogous to 16S rDNA deep sequencing used to explore microbial communities, but utilizes the nematode ITS-2 rDNA locus instead. Gastro-intestinal parasites of cattle were used to develop the concept, as this host has many well-defined gastro-intestinal nematode species that commonly occur as complex co-infections. Further, the availability of pure mono-parasite populations from experimentally infected cattle allowed us to prepare mock parasite communities to determine, and correct for, species representation biases in the sequence data. We demonstrate that, once these biases have been corrected, accurate relative quantitation of gastro-intestinal parasitic nematode communities in cattle fecal samples can be achieved. We have validated the accuracy of the method applied to field-samples by comparing the results of detailed morphological examination of L3 larvae populations with those of the sequencing assay. The results illustrate the insights that can be gained into the species composition of parasite communities, using grazing cattle in the mid-west USA as an example. However, both the technical approach and the concept of the ‘nemabiome’ have a wide range of potential applications in human and veterinary medicine. These include investigations of host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions

  15. Domain of the composition of some triangles in the space of p-summable sequences for 0 < p ≤ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Feyzi

    2016-08-01

    Let 0

    composition of E1, C1 and Δ of the Euler, Cesàro means of order one and the backward difference matrix. Furthermore, we give an inclusion relation concerning the space ℓ˜ p and compute the alpha-, beta- and gamma-duals of the space ℓ˜ p and construct its basis. We characterize the classes (ℓ˜ p:ℓ∞ ), (ℓ˜ p:c ) and (ℓ˜ p:c0 ) of infinite matrices, and give the characterization of some other classes of matrix transformations from the space ℓ˜ p to the Euler, Riesz, difference, etc., sequence spaces, by means of a basic lemma.

  16. The Role of Memory Processes in Repetition Blindness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, James C.; Hochhaus, Larry; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether Repetition Blindness (RB) in processing RSVP strings depends critically on memory demands. When all items in the sequence had to be reported, strong RB was found. When only the 2 critical items (cued by color) had to be reported, no RB was found. Preliminary results show that imposing a separate memory load, while reporting only the critical items, also produces little RB. Implications for the processing locus of RB will be discussed.

  17. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labeling of substrates (TAILS), and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1–10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations. PMID:26257763

  18. Bacterial community compositions of coking wastewater treatment plants in steel industry revealed by Illumina high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Shen, Wenli; Zhang, Zhaojing; Wang, Jingwei; Liu, Ziyan; Li, Duanxing; Li, Huijie; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-03-01

    In this study, Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used to reveal the community structures of nine coking wastewater treatment plants (CWWTPs) in China for the first time. The sludge systems exhibited a similar community composition at each taxonomic level. Compared to previous studies, some of the core genera in municipal wastewater treatment plants such as Zoogloea, Prosthecobacter and Gp6 were detected as minor species. Thiobacillus (20.83%), Comamonas (6.58%), Thauera (4.02%), Azoarcus (7.78%) and Rhodoplanes (1.42%) were the dominant genera shared by at least six CWWTPs. The percentages of autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were unexpectedly low, which were verified by both real-time PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses. Hierarchical clustering and canonical correspondence analysis indicated that operation mode, flow rate and temperature might be the key factors in community formation. This study provides new insights into our understanding of microbial community compositions and structures of CWWTPs.

  19. Modelling the Strength and Fatigue Life of a Unidirectional Fibrous Composite by Using Daniels' Sequence and Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramonov, Yu.; Cimanis, V.; Varickis, S.; Kleinhofs, M.

    2013-11-01

    A review of the previous works of the authors dedicated to the use of Daniels' sequence (DS) for analyzing the relation between the distribution of the static strength of components of a unidirectional fibrous composite (UFC) and the distribution of its fatigue life is presented. A generalization of the DS which can be used to analyze the association of distribution of the static strength of composite components with distribution of the static strength of the UFC itself is given. In analyzing the fatigue life of a UFC, unlike in Daniels' model, the loading rate and randomness of the number of still workable components in the weak microvolume in which the destruction process takes place are taken into account. By analyzing the fatigue life, it is possible to explain the existence of the random fatigue strength and to calculate the maximum load at which the probability of absence of fatigue failure is great enough when the number of cycles of fatigue loading tends to infinity. Numerical examples of processing of experimental data are presented, and estimates for parameters of the corresponding nonlinear regression model, which can be interpreted as the strength parameters of UFC, are obtained.

  20. Sequence-based analysis of the bacterial and fungal compositions of multiple kombucha (tea fungus) samples.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Alan J; O'Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; Cotter, Paul D

    2014-04-01

    Kombucha is a sweetened tea beverage that, as a consequence of fermentation, contains ethanol, carbon dioxide, a high concentration of acid (gluconic, acetic and lactic) as well as a number of other metabolites and is thought to contain a number of health-promoting components. The sucrose-tea solution is fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast embedded within a cellulosic pellicle, which forms a floating mat in the tea, and generates a new layer with each successful fermentation. The specific identity of the microbial populations present has been the focus of attention but, to date, the majority of studies have relied on culture-based analyses. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the kombucha microbiota we have carried out the first culture-independent, high-throughput sequencing analysis of the bacterial and fungal populations of 5 distinct pellicles as well as the resultant fermented kombucha at two time points. Following the analysis it was established that the major bacterial genus present was Gluconacetobacter, present at >85% in most samples, with only trace populations of Acetobacter detected (<2%). A prominent Lactobacillus population was also identified (up to 30%), with a number of sub-dominant genera, not previously associated with kombucha, also being revealed. The yeast populations were found to be dominated by Zygosaccharomyces at >95% in the fermented beverage, with a greater fungal diversity present in the cellulosic pellicle, including numerous species not identified in kombucha previously. Ultimately, this study represents the most accurate description of the microbiology of kombucha to date.

  1. Circuit considerations for repetitive railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Honih, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    Railgun electromagnetic launchers have significant military and scientific potential. They provide direct conversion of electrical energy to projectile kinetic energy, and they offer the hope of achieving projectile velocities greatly exceeding the limits of conventional guns. With over 10 km/sec already demonstrated, railguns are attracting attention for tactical and strategic weapons systems and for scientific equation-of-state research. The full utilization of railguns will require significant improvements in every aspect of system design - projectile, barrel, and power source - to achieve operation on a large scale. This paper will review fundamental aspects of railguns, with emphasis on circuit considerations and repetitive operation.

  2. The mitochondrial genomes of sponges provide evidence for multiple invasions by Repetitive Hairpin-forming Elements (RHE)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of sponges possess a variety of features, which appear to be intermediate between those of Eumetazoa and non-metazoan opisthokonts. Among these features is the presence of long intergenic regions, which are common in other eukaryotes, but generally absent in Eumetazoa. Here we analyse poriferan mitochondrial intergenic regions, paying particular attention to repetitive sequences within them. In this context we introduce the mitochondrial genome of Ircinia strobilina (Lamarck, 1816; Demospongiae: Dictyoceratida) and compare it with mtDNA of other sponges. Results Mt genomes of dictyoceratid sponges are identical in gene order and content but display major differences in size and organization of intergenic regions. An even higher degree of diversity in the structure of intergenic regions was found among different orders of demosponges. One interesting observation made from such comparisons was of what appears to be recurrent invasions of sponge mitochondrial genomes by repetitive hairpin-forming elements, which cause large genome size differences even among closely related taxa. These repetitive hairpin-forming elements are structurally and compositionally divergent and display a scattered distribution throughout various groups of demosponges. Conclusion Large intergenic regions of poriferan mt genomes are targets for insertions of repetitive hairpin- forming elements, similar to the ones found in non-metazoan opisthokonts. Such elements were likely present in some lineages early in animal mitochondrial genome evolution but were subsequently lost during the reduction of intergenic regions, which occurred in the Eumetazoa lineage after the split of Porifera. Porifera acquired their elements in several independent events. Patterns of their intra-genomic dispersal can be seen in the mt genome of Vaceletia sp. PMID:20003196

  3. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Modahl, Cassandra M.; Mackessy, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  4. Full-Length Venom Protein cDNA Sequences from Venom-Derived mRNA: Exploring Compositional Variation and Adaptive Multigene Evolution.

    PubMed

    Modahl, Cassandra M; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-06-01

    Envenomation of humans by snakes is a complex and continuously evolving medical emergency, and treatment is made that much more difficult by the diverse biochemical composition of many venoms. Venomous snakes and their venoms also provide models for the study of molecular evolutionary processes leading to adaptation and genotype-phenotype relationships. To compare venom complexity and protein sequences, venom gland transcriptomes are assembled, which usually requires the sacrifice of snakes for tissue. However, toxin transcripts are also present in venoms, offering the possibility of obtaining cDNA sequences directly from venom. This study provides evidence that unknown full-length venom protein transcripts can be obtained from the venoms of multiple species from all major venomous snake families. These unknown venom protein cDNAs are obtained by the use of primers designed from conserved signal peptide sequences within each venom protein superfamily. This technique was used to assemble a partial venom gland transcriptome for the Middle American Rattlesnake (Crotalus simus tzabcan) by amplifying sequences for phospholipases A2, serine proteases, C-lectins, and metalloproteinases from within venom. Phospholipase A2 sequences were also recovered from the venoms of several rattlesnakes and an elapid snake (Pseudechis porphyriacus), and three-finger toxin sequences were recovered from multiple rear-fanged snake species, demonstrating that the three major clades of advanced snakes (Elapidae, Viperidae, Colubridae) have stable mRNA present in their venoms. These cDNA sequences from venom were then used to explore potential activities derived from protein sequence similarities and evolutionary histories within these large multigene superfamilies. Venom-derived sequences can also be used to aid in characterizing venoms that lack proteomic profiles and identify sequence characteristics indicating specific envenomation profiles. This approach, requiring only venom, provides

  5. Neuroimaging in repetitive brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are one of the major causes of mild traumatic brain injury. Although most patients recover completely within days to weeks, those who experience repetitive brain trauma (RBT) may be at risk for developing a condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While this condition is most commonly observed in athletes who experience repetitive concussive and/or subconcussive blows to the head, such as boxers, football players, or hockey players, CTE may also affect soldiers on active duty. Currently, the only means by which to diagnose CTE is by the presence of phosphorylated tau aggregations post-mortem. Non-invasive neuroimaging, however, may allow early diagnosis as well as improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of RBT. The purpose of this article is to review advanced neuroimaging methods used to investigate RBT, including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and positron emission tomography. While there is a considerable literature using these methods in brain injury in general, the focus of this review is on RBT and those subject populations currently known to be susceptible to RBT, namely athletes and soldiers. Further, while direct detection of CTE in vivo has not yet been achieved, all of the methods described in this review provide insight into RBT and will likely lead to a better characterization (diagnosis), in vivo, of CTE than measures of self-report. PMID:25031630

  6. Neuroimaging in repetitive brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Ng, Thomas Sc; Lin, Alexander P; Koerte, Inga K; Pasternak, Ofer; Liao, Huijun; Merugumala, Sai; Bouix, Sylvain; Shenton, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are one of the major causes of mild traumatic brain injury. Although most patients recover completely within days to weeks, those who experience repetitive brain trauma (RBT) may be at risk for developing a condition known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). While this condition is most commonly observed in athletes who experience repetitive concussive and/or subconcussive blows to the head, such as boxers, football players, or hockey players, CTE may also affect soldiers on active duty. Currently, the only means by which to diagnose CTE is by the presence of phosphorylated tau aggregations post-mortem. Non-invasive neuroimaging, however, may allow early diagnosis as well as improve our understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of RBT. The purpose of this article is to review advanced neuroimaging methods used to investigate RBT, including diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional magnetic resonance imaging, susceptibility weighted imaging, and positron emission tomography. While there is a considerable literature using these methods in brain injury in general, the focus of this review is on RBT and those subject populations currently known to be susceptible to RBT, namely athletes and soldiers. Further, while direct detection of CTE in vivo has not yet been achieved, all of the methods described in this review provide insight into RBT and will likely lead to a better characterization (diagnosis), in vivo, of CTE than measures of self-report.

  7. Species composition of the genus Saprolegnia in fin fish aquaculture environments, as determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the nuclear rDNA ITS regions.

    PubMed

    de la Bastide, Paul Y; Leung, Wai Lam; Hintz, William E

    2015-01-01

    The ITS region of the rDNA gene was compared for Saprolegnia spp. in order to improve our understanding of nucleotide sequence variability within and between species of this genus, determine species composition in Canadian fin fish aquaculture facilities, and to assess the utility of ITS sequence variability in genetic marker development. From a collection of more than 400 field isolates, ITS region nucleotide sequences were studied and it was determined that there was sufficient consistent inter-specific variation to support the designation of species identity based on ITS sequence data. This non-subjective approach to species identification does not rely upon transient morphological features. Phylogenetic analyses comparing our ITS sequences and species designations with data from previous studies generally supported the clade scheme of Diéguez-Uribeondo et al. (2007) and found agreement with the molecular taxonomic cluster system of Sandoval-Sierra et al. (2014). Our Canadian ITS sequence collection will thus contribute to the public database and assist the clarification of Saprolegnia spp. taxonomy. The analysis of ITS region sequence variability facilitated genus- and species-level identification of unknown samples from aquaculture facilities and provided useful information on species composition. A unique ITS-RFLP for the identification of S. parasitica was also described.

  8. The Development of Long-Term Lexical Representations through Hebb Repetition Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szmalec, Arnaud; Page, Mike P. A.; Duyck, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This study clarifies the involvement of short- and long-term memory in novel word-form learning, using the Hebb repetition paradigm. In Experiment 1, participants recalled sequences of visually presented syllables (e.g., "la"-"va"-"bu"-"sa"-"fa"-"ra"-"re"-"si"-"di"), with one particular (Hebb) sequence repeated on every third trial. Crucially,…

  9. The Effect of N-3 on N-2 Repetition Costs in Task Switching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuch, Stefanie; Grange, James A.

    2015-01-01

    N-2 task repetition cost is a response time and error cost returning to a task recently performed after one intervening trial (i.e., an ABA task sequence) compared with returning to a task not recently performed (i.e., a CBA task sequence). This cost is considered a robust measure of inhibitory control during task switching. The present article…

  10. Stimulus-Category and Response-Repetition Effects in Task Switching: An Evaluation of Four Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druey, Michel D.

    2014-01-01

    In many task-switch studies, task sequence and response sequence interact: Response repetitions produce benefits when the task repeats but produce costs when the task switches. Four different theoretical frameworks have been proposed to explain these effects: a reconfiguration-based account, association-learning models, an episodic-retrieval…

  11. Rearrangement of repeated DNA sequences during development of macronucleus in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamura, Y; Sakai, M; Muramatsu, M

    1982-01-01

    Three clones of non-repetitive sequences and six clones containing repetitive sequences were obtained from micronuclear DNA of Tetrahymena thermophila. All the non-repetitive and three repetitive sequences had the same organization in micro- and macronuclear DNAs as revealed by blot hybridization. On the other hand, the remaining three clones with repetitive sequences had apparently different organization in the two nuclear DNAs. All these repetitive sequences showed a smear on the blot in addition to a number of discrete bands when micronuclear DNA was digested with EcoR I. In macronuclear DNAs, these sequences invariably became one or two bands and the smear disappeared. We conclude that, when a macronucleus develops from a micronucleus, the non-repetitive sequences amplify by more than 20 times with relatively few rearrangement, whereas some selected portions of repeated and/or repeat-contiguous sequences are amplified with rather extensive reorganization. Images PMID:6289270

  12. A computational tool for the genomic identification of regions of unusual compositional properties and its utilization in the detection of horizontally transferred sequences.

    PubMed

    Putonti, Catherine; Luo, Yi; Katili, Charles; Chumakov, Sergey; Fox, George E; Graur, Dan; Fofanov, Yuriy

    2006-10-01

    Similarity Plot (S-plot) is a Windows-based application for large-scale comparisons and 2-dimensional visualization of compositional similarities between genomic sequences. This application combines 2 approaches widely used in genomics: window analysis of statistical characteristics along genomes and dot-plot visual representation. S-plot is effective in identifying highly similar regions between genomes as well as regions with unusual compositional properties (RUCPs) within a single genome, which may be indicative of horizontal gene transfer or of locus-specific selective forces. We use S-plot to identify regions that may have originated through horizontal gene transfer through a 2-step approach, by first comparing a genomic sequence to itself and, subsequently, comparing it to the genomic sequence of a closely related taxon. Moreover, by comparing these suspect sequences to one another, we can estimate a minimum number of sources for these putative xenologous sequences. We illustrate the uses of S-plot in a comparison involving Escherichia coli K12 and E. coli O157:H7. In O157:H7, we found 145 regions that have most probably originated through horizontal gene transfer. By using S-plot to compare each of these regions with 277 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, 1 sequence was found to have similar compositional properties to the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genome, indicating a transfer from a Yersinia or Yersinia relative. Based upon our analysis of RUCPs in O157:H7, we infer that there were at least 53 sources of horizontally transferred sequences.

  13. Constructive and Unconstructive Repetitive Thought

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Edward R.

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews research showing that repetitive thought (RT) can have constructive or unconstructive consequences. The main unconstructive consequences of RT are (a) depression, (b) anxiety, and (c) difficulties in physical health. The main constructive consequences of RT are (a) recovery from upsetting and traumatic events, (b) adaptive preparation and anticipatory planning, (c) recovery from depression, and (d) uptake of health-promoting behaviors. Several potential principles accounting for these distinct consequences of RT are identified within this review: (a) the valence of thought content, (b) the intrapersonal and situational context in which RT occurs, and (c) the level of construal (abstract vs. concrete processing) adopted during RT. Of the existing models of RT, it is proposed that an elaborated version of the control theory account provides the best theoretical framework to account for its distinct consequences. PMID:18298268

  14. [Repetition and fear of dying].

    PubMed

    Lerner, B D

    1995-03-01

    In this paper a revision is made of the qualifications of Repetition (R) in Freuds work, i.e. its being at the service of the Pleasure Principle and, beyond it, the binding of free energy due to trauma. Freud intends to explain with this last concept the "fort-da" and the traumatic dreams (obsessively reiterated self-reproaches may be added to them). The main thesis of this work is that R. is not only a defense against the recollection of the ominous past (as in the metaphorical deaths of abandonment and desertion) but also a way of maintaining life and identify fighting against the inescapable omninous future (known but yet experienced), i.e. our own death. Some forms of R. like habits, identificatory behaviors and sometimes even magic, are geared to serve the life instinct. A literary illustration shows this desperate fight.

  15. Evolution of the structure and composition of house mouse satellite DNA sequences in the subgenus Mus (Rodentia: Muridea): a cytogenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Cazaux, B; Catalan, J; Justy, F; Escudé, C; Desmarais, E; Britton-Davidian, J

    2013-06-01

    The composition and orientation of the house mouse satellite DNA sequences (minor, major, TLC) were investigated by a FISH and CO-FISH approach in 11 taxa belonging to three clades of the subgenus Mus. Using a phylogenetic framework, our results highlighted two distribution patterns. The TLC satellite, the most recently discovered satellite, was present in all clades but varied quantitatively among species. This distribution supported its appearance in the ancestor of the subgenus followed by independent evolution in species of each clade. In contrast, the minor and major satellites occurred in only two clades of the subgenus indicating the simultaneous and recent amplification of these sequences. In addition, although qualitative differences in the composition and orientation of the satellite sequences were observed among the taxa, none of the features studied were unique to the house mouse and could account for the extensive chromosomal plasticity evidenced in Mus musculus domesticus.

  16. Lncident: A Tool for Rapid Identification of Long Noncoding RNAs Utilizing Sequence Intrinsic Composition and Open Reading Frame Information

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yanchun

    2016-01-01

    More and more studies have demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diversity of biological process and are also associated with various types of disease. How to rapidly identify lncRNAs and messenger RNA is the fundamental step to uncover the function of lncRNAs identification. Here, we present a novel method for rapid identification of lncRNAs utilizing sequence intrinsic composition features and open reading frame information based on support vector machine model, named as Lncident (LncRNAs identification). The 10-fold cross-validation and ROC curve are used to evaluate the performance of Lncident. The main advantage of Lncident is high speed without the loss of accuracy. Compared with the exiting popular tools, Lncident outperforms Coding-Potential Calculator, Coding-Potential Assessment Tool, Coding-Noncoding Index, and PLEK. Lncident is also much faster than Coding-Potential Calculator and Coding-Noncoding Index. Lncident presents an outstanding performance on microorganism, which offers a great application prospect to the analysis of microorganism. In addition, Lncident can be trained by users' own collected data. Furthermore, R package and web server are simultaneously developed in order to maximize the convenience for the users. The R package “Lncident” can be easily installed on multiple operating system platforms, as long as R is supported. PMID:28116287

  17. Influence of recirculation on the performance of anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (AnSBBR) treating hypersaline composite chemical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Lalit Babu, V; Vijaya Bhaskar, Y; Sarma, P N

    2007-05-01

    Influence of recirculation on the performance of anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (AnSBBR) was studied in the process of treating hypersaline (total dissolved inorganic solids (TDIS) approximately 26 g/l) and low biodegradable (BOD/COD approximately 0.3) composite chemical wastewater. Significant enhancement in the substrate removal efficiency and biogas yield was observed after introducing the recirculation to the system. Maximum efficiency (COD removal efficiency - 51%; SDR - 3.14 kg COD/cum-day) was observed at recirculation to feed (R/F) ratio of 2 (OLR - 6.15 kg C OD/cum-day; HLR - 2.30 cum (liquid)/cum day; UFV(A) - 0.023 m/h). Subsequent increase of R/F to 3 (OLR - 6.15 kg COD/cum-day; HLR - 3.07cum (liquid)/cum-day; UFV(A) - 0.035 m/h) resulted in reduction in COD removal efficiency (32%; SDR - 1.97 kg COD/cum-day). The enhanced performance of the system due to the introduction of recirculation was attributed to the improvement in the mass transfer between the substrate present in the bulk liquid and the attached biofilm. The hydrodynamic behavior due to recirculation mode of operation reduced the concentration gradient (substrate inhibition) of substrate and reaction by-products (VFA) resulting in mixed flow conditions.

  18. Development of a repetitive compact torus injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; McColl, David; Dreval, Mykola; Rohollahi, Akbar; Xiao, Chijin; Hirose, Akira; Zushi, Hideki

    2013-10-01

    A system for Repetitive Compact Torus Injection (RCTI) has been developed at the University of Saskatchewan. CTI is a promising fuelling technology to directly fuel the core region of tokamak reactors. In addition to fuelling, CTI has also the potential for (a) optimization of density profile and thus bootstrap current and (b) momentum injection. For steady-state reactor operation, RCTI is necessary. The approach to RCTI is to charge a storage capacitor bank with a large capacitance and quickly charge the CT capacitor bank through a stack of integrated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). When the CT bank is fully charged, the IGBT stack will be turned off to isolate banks, and CT formation/acceleration sequence will start. After formation of each CT, the fast bank will be replenished and a new CT will be formed and accelerated. Circuits for the formation and the acceleration in University of Saskatchewan CT Injector (USCTI) have been modified. Three CT shots at 10 Hz or eight shots at 1.7 Hz have been achieved. This work has been sponsored by the CRC and NSERC, Canada.

  19. Understanding communicative actions: a repetitive TMS study.

    PubMed

    Stolk, Arjen; Noordzij, Matthijs L; Volman, Inge; Verhagen, Lennart; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van Elswijk, Gijs; Bloem, Bas; Hagoort, Peter; Toni, Ivan

    2014-02-01

    Despite the ambiguity inherent in human communication, people are remarkably efficient in establishing mutual understanding. Studying how people communicate in novel settings provides a window into the mechanisms supporting the human competence to rapidly generate and understand novel shared symbols, a fundamental property of human communication. Previous work indicates that the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) is involved when people understand the intended meaning of novel communicative actions. Here, we set out to test whether normal functioning of this cerebral structure is required for understanding novel communicative actions using inhibitory low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). A factorial experimental design contrasted two tightly matched stimulation sites (right pSTS vs left MT+, i.e., a contiguous homotopic task-relevant region) and tasks (a communicative task vs a visual tracking task that used the same sequences of stimuli). Overall task performance was not affected by rTMS, whereas changes in task performance over time were disrupted according to TMS site and task combinations. Namely, rTMS over pSTS led to a diminished ability to improve action understanding on the basis of recent communicative history, while rTMS over MT+ perturbed improvement in visual tracking over trials. These findings qualify the contributions of the right pSTS to human communicative abilities, showing that this region might be necessary for incorporating previous knowledge, accumulated during interactions with a communicative partner, to constrain the inferential process that leads to action understanding.

  20. Characterization and distribution of repetitive elements in association with genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kai-Chiang; Tseng, Joseph T; Tsai, Shaw-Jenq; Sun, H Sunny

    2015-08-01

    Repetitive elements constitute more than 50% of the human genome. Recent studies implied that the complexity of living organisms is not just a direct outcome of a number of coding sequences; the repetitive elements, which do not encode proteins, may also play a significant role. Though scattered studies showed that repetitive elements in the regulatory regions of a gene control gene expression, no systematic survey has been done to report the characterization and distribution of various types of these repetitive elements in the human genome. Sequences from 5' and 3' untranslated regions and upstream and downstream of a gene were downloaded from the Ensembl database. The repetitive elements in the neighboring of each gene were identified and classified using cross-matching implemented in the RepeatMasker. The annotation and distribution of distinct classes of repetitive elements associated with individual gene were collected to characterize genes in association with different types of repetitive elements using systems biology program. We identified a total of 1,068,400 repetitive elements which belong to 37-class families and 1235 subclasses that are associated with 33,761 genes and 57,365 transcripts. In addition, we found that the tandem repeats preferentially locate proximal to the transcription start site (TSS) of genes and the major function of these genes are involved in developmental processes. On the other hand, interspersed repetitive elements showed a tendency to be accumulated at distal region from the TSS and the function of interspersed repeat-containing genes took part in the catabolic/metabolic processes. Results from the distribution analysis were collected and used to construct a gene-based repetitive element database (GBRED; http://www.binfo.ncku.edu.tw/GBRED/index.html). A user-friendly web interface was designed to provide the information of repetitive elements associated with any particular gene(s). This is the first study focusing on the gene

  1. Socio-Economic Status Affects Sentence Repetition, but Not Non-Word Repetition, in Chilean Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balladares, Jaime; Marshall, Chloë; Griffiths, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Sentence repetition and non-word repetition tests are widely used measures of language processing which are sensitive to language ability. Surprisingly little previous work has investigated whether children's socio-economic status (SES) affects their sentence and non-word repetition accuracy. This study investigates sentence and non-word…

  2. Resistance to change of operant variation and repetition.

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, A H; Lattal, K A

    2001-01-01

    A multiple chained schedule was used to compare the relative resistance to change of variable and fixed four-peck response sequences in pigeons. In one terminal link, a response sequence produced food only if it occurred infrequently relative to 15 other response sequences (vary). In the other terminal link, a single response sequence produced food (repeat). Identical variable-interval schedules operated in the initial links. During baseline, lower response rates generally occurred in the vary initial link, and similar response and reinforcement rates occurred in each terminal link. Resistance of responding to prefeeding and three rates of response-independent food delivered during the intercomponent intervals then was compared between components. During each disruption condition, initial- and terminal-link response rates generally were more resistant in the vary component than in the repeat component. During the response-independent food conditions, terminal-link response rates were more resistant than initial-link response rates in each component, but this did not occur during prefeeding. Variation (in vary) and repetition (in repeat) both decreased during the response-independent food conditions in the respective components, but with relatively greater disruption in repeat. These results extend earlier findings demonstrating that operant variation is more resistant to disruption than is operant repetition and suggest that theories of response strength, such as behavioral momentum theory, must consider factors other than reinforcement rate. The implications of the results for understanding operant response classes are discussed. PMID:11599639

  3. Repetitions: A Cross-Cultural Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murata, Kumiko

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated how repetition is used in conversation among native speakers of British English, native speakers of Japanese, and Japanese speakers of English. Five interactional functions of repetition (interruption-orientated, solidarity, silence-avoidance, hesitation, and reformulation) were identified, as well as the cultural factors…

  4. Grade Repetition in Queensland State Prep Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study considers grade repetition rates in the early years of schooling in Queensland state schools with specific focus on the pre-schooling year, Prep. In particular, it provides empirical evidence of grade repetition in Queensland state schools along with groups of students who are more often repeated. At the same time, much of the…

  5. Repetition priming results in sensitivity attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Allenmark, Fredrik; Hsu, Yi-Fang; Roussel, Cedric; Waszak, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Repetition priming refers to the change in the ability to perform a task on a stimulus as a consequence of a former encounter with that very same item. Usually, repetition results in faster and more accurate performance. In the present study, we used a contrast discrimination protocol to assess perceptual sensitivity and response bias of Gabor gratings that are either repeated (same orientation) or alternated (different orientation). We observed that contrast discrimination performance is worse, not better, for repeated than for alternated stimuli. In a second experiment, we varied the probability of stimulus repetition, thus testing whether the repetition effect is due to bottom-up or top-down factors. We found that it is top-down expectation that determines the effect. We discuss the implication of these findings for repetition priming and related phenomena as sensory attenuation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. PMID:25819554

  6. Strategies for Using Repetition as a Powerful Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Kirt

    2011-01-01

    Brain research indicates that repetition is of vital importance in the learning process. Repetition is an especially useful tool in the area of music education. The success of repetition can be enhanced by accurate and timely feedback. From "simple repetition" to "repetition with the addition or subtraction of degrees of freedom," there are many…

  7. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  8. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1997-02-11

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between Successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz.

  9. Sequencing-Based Analysis of the Bacterial and Fungal Composition of Kefir Grains and Milks from Multiple Sources

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Alan J.; O’Sullivan, Orla; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. Paul; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk-based beverage to which a number of health-promoting properties have been attributed. The microbes responsible for the fermentation of milk to produce kefir consist of a complex association of bacteria and yeasts, bound within a polysaccharide matrix, known as the kefir grain. The consistency of this microbial population, and that present in the resultant beverage, has been the subject of a number of previous, almost exclusively culture-based, studies which have indicated differences depending on geographical location and culture conditions. However, culture-based identification studies are limited by virtue of only detecting species with the ability to grow on the specific medium used and thus culture-independent, molecular-based techniques offer the potential for a more comprehensive analysis of such communities. Here we describe a detailed investigation of the microbial population, both bacterial and fungal, of kefir, using high-throughput sequencing to analyse 25 kefir milks and associated grains sourced from 8 geographically distinct regions. This is the first occasion that this technology has been employed to investigate the fungal component of these populations or to reveal the microbial composition of such an extensive number of kefir grains or milks. As a result several genera and species not previously identified in kefir were revealed. Our analysis shows that the bacterial populations in kefir are dominated by 2 phyla, the Firmicutes and the Proteobacteria. It was also established that the fungal populations of kefir were dominated by the genera Kazachstania, Kluyveromyces and Naumovozyma, but that a variable sub-dominant population also exists. PMID:23894461

  10. Analysis of repetitive DNA distribution patterns in the Tribolium castaneum genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suzhi; Lorenzen, Marcé D; Beeman, Richard W; Brown, Susan J

    2008-01-01

    Background Insect genomes vary widely in size, a large fraction of which is often devoted to repetitive DNA. Re-association kinetics indicate that up to 42% of the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is repetitive. Analysis of the abundance and distribution of repetitive DNA in the recently sequenced genome of T. castaneum is important for understanding the structure and function of its genome. Results Using TRF, TEpipe and RepeatScout we found that approximately 30% of the T. castaneum assembled genome is composed of repetitive DNA. Of this, 17% is found in tandem arrays and the remaining 83% is dispersed, including transposable elements, which in themselves constitute 5-6% of the genome. RepeatScout identified 31 highly repetitive DNA elements with repeat units longer than 100 bp, which constitute 7% of the genome; 65% of these highly repetitive elements and 74% of transposable elements accumulate in regions representing 40% of the assembled genome that is anchored to chromosomes. These regions tend to occur near one end of each chromosome, similar to previously described blocks of pericentric heterochromatin. They contain fewer genes with longer introns, and often correspond with regions of low recombination in the genetic map. Conclusion Our study found that transposable elements and other repetitive DNA accumulate in certain regions in the assembled T. castaneum genome. Several lines of evidence suggest these regions are derived from the large blocks of pericentric heterochromatin in T. castaneum chromosomes. PMID:18366801

  11. MinION nanopore sequencing identifies the position and structure of a bacterial antibiotic resistance island.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Philip M; Nair, Satheesh; Dallman, Tim; Rubino, Salvatore; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Wain, John; O'Grady, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Short-read, high-throughput sequencing technology cannot identify the chromosomal position of repetitive insertion sequences that typically flank horizontally acquired genes such as bacterial virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The MinION nanopore sequencer can produce long sequencing reads on a device similar in size to a USB memory stick. Here we apply a MinION sequencer to resolve the structure and chromosomal insertion site of a composite antibiotic resistance island in Salmonella Typhi Haplotype 58. Nanopore sequencing data from a single 18-h run was used to create a scaffold for an assembly generated from short-read Illumina data. Our results demonstrate the potential of the MinION device in clinical laboratories to fully characterize the epidemic spread of bacterial pathogens.

  12. Combinatorial codon scrambling enables scalable gene synthesis and amplification of repetitive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Nicholas C.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Most genes are synthesized using seamless assembly methods that rely on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, PCR of genes encoding repetitive proteins either fails or generates nonspecific products. Motivated by the need to efficiently generate new protein polymers through high-throughput gene synthesis, here we report a codon-scrambling algorithm that enables the PCR-based gene synthesis of repetitive proteins by exploiting the codon redundancy of amino acids and finding the least-repetitive synonymous gene sequence. We also show that the codon-scrambling problem is analogous to the well-known travelling salesman problem, and obtain an exact solution to it by using De Bruijn graphs and a modern mixed integer linear programme solver. As experimental proof of the utility of this approach, we use it to optimize the synthetic genes for 19 repetitive proteins, and show that the gene fragments are amenable to PCR-based gene assembly and recombinant expression.

  13. Unusual structure of a human middle repetitive DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnasinghe, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    The L2Hs sequences are a polymorphic, interspersed, middle repetitive DNA family unique to human genomes. Genomic fingerprinting indicates that these DNAs vary from one individual to another and between tissues of the same individual. Sequence analysis reveals that they are AT-rich (76%) and contain many unusual sequence arrangements (palindromes, inverted and direct repeats). These sequence properties confer on the L2Hs elements the potential to fold into non-B-form structures, a characteristic of recombination hot spots. To test this hypothesis carbodiimide, osmium tetroxide and S[sub 1] nuclease were used as single-strand specific probes to study a recombinant plasmid, pN6.4.39, containing a single L2Hs segment. Different forms of the plasmid substrate were analyzed, including linear molecules and circular forms of DNA in growing E. coli cells were analyzed. Modified plasmid DNA was analyzed by primer extension in a sequencing-type reaction format. These studies demonstrate that the L2Hs sequences: (1) assume non-B-form structures both in vitro and in vivo, (2) map to predicted cruciform structures, (3) behave as C-type extrusion sequences, and (4) that these unusual DNA structures are dependent on plasmid superhelicity.

  14. Item repetition in short-term memory: Ranschburg repeated.

    PubMed

    Henson, R N

    1998-09-01

    In serial recall from short-term memory, repeated items are recalled well when close together (repetition facilitation), but not when far apart (repetition inhibition; the Ranschburg effect). These effects were re-examined with a new scoring scheme that addresses the possibility that repetitions are distinct tokens in memory. Repetition facilitation and repetition inhibition proved robust, and were shown to interact with the temporal grouping of items (Experiment 1), which affected the probability of detecting repetition (Experiments 2A and 2B). It is argued that detection of a repetition is necessary for repetition facilitation, attributable to the tagging of immediate repetition, whereas the failure to detect or remember a repetition results in repetition inhibition, attributable to an automatic suppression of previous responses and a bias against guessing repeated items (Experiment 3). The findings are discussed in relation to models of short-term memory and the phenomenon of repetition blindness.

  15. Repetition Pitch glide from the step pyramid at Chichen Itza.

    PubMed

    Bilsen, Frans A

    2006-08-01

    Standing at the foot of the Mayan step pyramid at Chichen Itza in Mexico, one can produce a pitchy "chirp" echo by handclapping. As exposed by Declercq et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3328-3335 (2004)], an acoustic model based on optical Bragg diffraction at a periodic structure cannot explain satisfactorily the chirp-echo sonogram. Alternatively, considering the echo as a sequence of reflections, and given the dimensions of the pyramid and source-receiver position, the chirp is predicted correctly as a Repetition Pitch glide of which the pitch height is continuously decreasing within 177 ms from 796 to 471 Hz-equivalent.

  16. Temporal and spatial variations in the composition of freshwater photosynthetic picoeukaryotes revealed by MiSeq sequencing from flow cytometry sorted samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengnan; Bronner, Gisèle; Lepère, Cécile; Kong, Fanxiang; Shi, Xiaoli

    2017-03-09

    The diversity and composition of photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) in two large shallow lakes in China (Lake Taihu and Lake Chaohu) were investigated from flow cytometry sorted samples using Miseq high-throughput sequencing. We collected 65 samples covering different regions of the two lakes over four seasons to unveil spatial and temporal patterns of PPEs community composition. The use of flow cytometry sorting largely improved the efficiency of detecting PPEs sequences and over 70% of the retrieved reads belonged to PPEs. Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta dominated PPEs in most of the samples. A distinct but complex seasonality of PPEs composition emerged at the OTUs level. NGS-based Miseq sequencing facilitates an in-depth view of numerous rare OTUs. Nearly 80% of the PPEs OTUs were rare and lots of them were detected only in one season, whereas most of the abundant OTUs were frequently detected in all seasons but only changed in relative abundances. Besides, a close relative of the marine PPEs species Ostreococcus sp. (OTU_1144, 99% identity) was discovered in freshwater systems for the first time and was abundant especially in winter. The diversity and community composition of PPEs were more dependent on season rather than sampling sites. Temperature, phycocyanin and NO3 N concentrations in Lake Taihu explained the PPE composition variations, whereas in Lake Chaohu TN/TP ratios, temperature, pH and nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) seemed to be the most important factors. In addition, a great number of OTUs belong to nonpigmented picoeukaryotes, especially Chytridiomycota, Perkinsozoa, Ciliophora and Cercozoa, which are known to include algae parasites as well as predators. The results of mantel test also showed that the community of photosynthetic and nonpigmented picoeukaryotes were significantly correlated in both lakes.

  17. Epithelial topography for repetitive tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Fons, Juan Manuel; Popa, Elena Mădălina; Chatzeli, Lemonia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the formation of repetitive ectodermally derived organs such as mammary glands, lateral line and teeth, the tissue primordium iteratively initiates new structures. In the case of successional molar development, new teeth appear sequentially in the posterior region of the jaw from Sox2+ cells in association with the posterior aspect of a pre-existing tooth. The sequence of molar development is well known, however, the epithelial topography involved in the formation of a new tooth is unclear. Here, we have examined the morphology of the molar dental epithelium and its development at different stages in the mouse in vivo and in molar explants. Using regional lineage tracing we show that within the posterior tail of the first molar the primordium for the second and third molar are organized in a row, with the tail remaining in connection with the surface, where a furrow is observed. The morphology and Sox2 expression of the tail retains characteristics reminiscent of the earlier stages of tooth development, such that position along the A-P axes of the tail correlates with different temporal stages. Sox9, a stem/progenitor cell marker in other organs, is expressed mainly in the suprabasal epithelium complementary with Sox2 expression. This Sox2 and Sox9 expressing molar tail contains actively proliferating cells with mitosis following an apico-basal direction. Snail2, a transcription factor implicated in cell migration, is expressed at high levels in the tip of the molar tail while E-cadherin and laminin are decreased. In conclusion, our studies propose a model in which the epithelium of the molar tail can grow by posterior movement of epithelial cells followed by infolding and stratification involving a population of Sox2+/Sox9+ cells. PMID:26538639

  18. Repetitive strain injury: causes, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Shuttleworth, Ann

    Repetitive strain injury (RSI) has become increasingly prevalent with the growth of computer-based and automated occupations. While environmental factors such as work stations and repetitive tasks are primary causes, a number of secondary causes can increase a person's risk of RSI. Various treatments provide relief but the rate of recovery varies widely. Prevention involves adopting a range of measures that will also promote recovery in those with RSI.

  19. MetaGaAP: A Novel Pipeline to Estimate Community Composition and Abundance from Non-Model Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Noune, Christopher; Hauxwell, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Next generation sequencing and bioinformatic approaches are increasingly used to quantify microorganisms within populations by analysis of ‘meta-barcode’ data. This approach relies on comparison of amplicon sequences of ‘barcode’ regions from a population with public-domain databases of reference sequences. However, for many organisms relevant ‘barcode’ regions may not have been identified and large databases of reference sequences may not be available. A workflow and software pipeline, ‘MetaGaAP,’ was developed to identify and quantify genotypes through four steps: shotgun sequencing and identification of polymorphisms in a metapopulation to identify custom ‘barcode’ regions of less than 30 polymorphisms within the span of a single ‘read’, amplification and sequencing of the ‘barcode’, generation of a custom database of polymorphisms, and quantitation of the relative abundance of genotypes. The pipeline and workflow were validated in a ‘wild type’ Alphabaculovirus isolate, Helicoverpa armigera single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HaSNPV-AC53) and a tissue-culture derived strain (HaSNPV-AC53-T2). The approach was validated by comparison of polymorphisms in amplicons and shotgun data, and by comparison of predicted dominant and co-dominant genotypes with Sanger sequences. The computational power required to generate and search the database effectively limits the number of polymorphisms that can be included in a barcode to 30 or less. The approach can be used in quantitative analysis of the ecology and pathology of non-model organisms. PMID:28218638

  20. Candida albicans repetitive elements display epigenetic diversity and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Price, R. Jordan; Tarrant, Daniel; Berman, Judith; Buscaino, Alessia

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally silent heterochromatin is associated with repetitive DNA. It is poorly understood whether and how heterochromatin differs between different organisms and whether its structure can be remodelled in response to environmental signals. Here, we address this question by analysing the chromatin state associated with DNA repeats in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Our analyses indicate that, contrary to model systems, each type of repetitive element is assembled into a distinct chromatin state. Classical Sir2-dependent hypoacetylated and hypomethylated chromatin is associated with the rDNA locus while telomeric regions are assembled into a weak heterochromatin that is only mildly hypoacetylated and hypomethylated. Major Repeat Sequences, a class of tandem repeats, are assembled into an intermediate chromatin state bearing features of both euchromatin and heterochromatin. Marker gene silencing assays and genome-wide RNA sequencing reveals that C. albicans heterochromatin represses expression of repeat-associated coding and non-coding RNAs. We find that telomeric heterochromatin is dynamic and remodelled upon an environmental change. Weak heterochromatin is associated with telomeres at 30 °C, while robust heterochromatin is assembled over these regions at 39 °C, a temperature mimicking moderate fever in the host. Thus in C. albicans, differential chromatin states controls gene expression and epigenetic plasticity is linked to adaptation. PMID:26971880

  1. Fungal ITS1 Deep-Sequencing Strategies to Reconstruct the Composition of a 26-Species Community and Evaluation of the Gut Mycobiota of Healthy Japanese Individuals.

    PubMed

    Motooka, Daisuke; Fujimoto, Kosuke; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Maeda, Yuichi; Furuta, Yoki; Kurakawa, Takashi; Goto, Naohisa; Yasunaga, Teruo; Narazaki, Masashi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Horii, Toshihiro; Iida, Tetsuya; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Shota

    2017-01-01

    The study of mycobiota remains relatively unexplored due to the lack of sufficient available reference strains and databases compared to those of bacterial microbiome studies. Deep sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions is the de facto standard for fungal diversity analysis. However, results are often biased because of the wide variety of sequence lengths in the ITS regions and the complexity of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies. In this study, a curated ITS database, ntF-ITS1, was constructed. This database can be utilized for the taxonomic assignment of fungal community members. We evaluated the efficacy of strategies for mycobiome analysis by using this database and characterizing a mock fungal community consisting of 26 species representing 15 genera using ITS1 sequencing with three HTS platforms: Illumina MiSeq (MiSeq), Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (IonPGM), and Pacific Biosciences (PacBio). Our evaluation demonstrated that PacBio's circular consensus sequencing with greater than 8 full-passes most accurately reconstructed the composition of the mock community. Using this strategy for deep-sequencing analysis of the gut mycobiota in healthy Japanese individuals revealed two major mycobiota types: a single-species type composed of Candida albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a multi-species type. In this study, we proposed the best possible processing strategies for the three sequencing platforms, of which, the PacBio platform allowed for the most accurate estimation of the fungal community. The database and methodology described here provide critical tools for the emerging field of mycobiome studies.

  2. Fungal ITS1 Deep-Sequencing Strategies to Reconstruct the Composition of a 26-Species Community and Evaluation of the Gut Mycobiota of Healthy Japanese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Motooka, Daisuke; Fujimoto, Kosuke; Tanaka, Reiko; Yaguchi, Takashi; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Maeda, Yuichi; Furuta, Yoki; Kurakawa, Takashi; Goto, Naohisa; Yasunaga, Teruo; Narazaki, Masashi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Horii, Toshihiro; Iida, Tetsuya; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Shota

    2017-01-01

    The study of mycobiota remains relatively unexplored due to the lack of sufficient available reference strains and databases compared to those of bacterial microbiome studies. Deep sequencing of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions is the de facto standard for fungal diversity analysis. However, results are often biased because of the wide variety of sequence lengths in the ITS regions and the complexity of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies. In this study, a curated ITS database, ntF-ITS1, was constructed. This database can be utilized for the taxonomic assignment of fungal community members. We evaluated the efficacy of strategies for mycobiome analysis by using this database and characterizing a mock fungal community consisting of 26 species representing 15 genera using ITS1 sequencing with three HTS platforms: Illumina MiSeq (MiSeq), Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (IonPGM), and Pacific Biosciences (PacBio). Our evaluation demonstrated that PacBio’s circular consensus sequencing with greater than 8 full-passes most accurately reconstructed the composition of the mock community. Using this strategy for deep-sequencing analysis of the gut mycobiota in healthy Japanese individuals revealed two major mycobiota types: a single-species type composed of Candida albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a multi-species type. In this study, we proposed the best possible processing strategies for the three sequencing platforms, of which, the PacBio platform allowed for the most accurate estimation of the fungal community. The database and methodology described here provide critical tools for the emerging field of mycobiome studies. PMID:28261190

  3. The Prevalence and Phenomenology of Repetitive Behavior in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Joanna; Oliver, Chris; Arron, Kate; Burbidge, Cheryl; Berg, Katy

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and phenomenology of repetitive behavior in genetic syndromes to detail profiles of behavior. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ) provides fine-grained identification of repetitive behaviors. The RBQ was employed to examine repetitive behavior in Angelman (N = 104), Cornelia de Lange (N = 101), Cri-du-Chat…

  4. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5805 - Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation....5805 Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system. (a) Identification. A repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation system is an external device that delivers transcranial repetitive pulsed...

  7. A composite foraminiferal biostratigraphic sequence for the Lower Miocene deposits in the type area of the Qom Formation, central Iran, developed by constrained optimization (CONOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshian, Jahanbakhsh; Ramezani Dana, Leila; Sadler, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benthic foraminifera species commonly outnumber planktic species in the type area of the Lower Miocene Qom Formation, in north central Iran, where it records the Tethyan link between the eastern Mediterranean and Indo- Pacific provinces. Because measured sections preserve very different sequences of first and last occurrences of these species, no single section provides a completely suitable baseline for correlation. To resolve this problem, we combined bioevents from three stratigraphic sections into a single composite sequence by constrained optimization (CONOP). The composite section arranges the first and last appearance events (FAD and LAD) of 242 foraminifera in an optimal order that minimizes the implied diachronism between sections. The composite stratigraphic ranges of the planktic foraminifera support a practical biozonation which reveals substantial local changes of accumulation rate during Aquitanian to Burdigalian times. Traditional biozone boundaries emerge little changed but an order of magnitude more correlations can be interpolated. The top of the section at Dobaradar is younger than previously thought and younger than sections at Dochah and Tigheh Reza-Abad. The latter two sections probably extend older into the Aquitanian than the Dobaradar section, but likely include a hiatus near the base of the Burdigalian. The bounding contacts with the Upper Red and Lower Red Formations are shown to be diachronous.

  8. Retention of nucleic acids in ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography depends not only on base composition but also on base sequence.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jun-Qin; Liang, Chao; Wei, Lan-Chun; Cao, Zhao-Ming; Lian, Hong-Zhen

    2016-12-01

    The study on nucleic acid retention in ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography mainly focuses on size-dependence, however, other factors influencing retention behaviors have not been comprehensively clarified up to date. In this present work, the retention behaviors of oligonucleotides and double-stranded DNAs were investigated on silica-based C18 stationary phase by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. It is found that the retention of oligonucleotides was influenced by base composition and base sequence as well as size, and oligonucleotides prone to self-dimerization have weaker retention than those not prone to self-dimerization but with the same base composition. However, homo-oligonucleotides are suitable for the size-dependent separation as a special case of oligonucleotides. For double-stranded DNAs, the retention is also influenced by base composition and base sequence, as well as size. This may be attributed to the interaction of exposed bases in major or minor grooves with the hydrophobic alky chains of stationary phase. In addition, no specific influence of guanine and cytosine content was confirmed on retention of double-stranded DNAs. Notably, the space effect resulted from the stereostructure of nucleic acids also influences the retention behavior in ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

  9. A Survey of Repetitive Control for Nonlinear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Quan; Cai, Kai-Yuan

    2010-10-01

    In aerospace engineering and industry, control tasks are often of a periodic nature, while repetitive control is especially suitable for tracking and rejection of periodic exogenous signals. Because of limited research effort on nonlinear systems, we give a survey of repetitive control for nonlinear systems in this paper. First, a brief introduction of repetitive control is presented. Then, after giving a brief overview of repetitive control for linear systems, this paper summarizes design methods and existing problems of repetitive control for nonlinear systems in detail. Lastly, relationships between repetitive control and other control schemes are analyzed to recognize repetitive control from different aspects more insightfully.

  10. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, whole genome shotgun sequencing project first submission of genome sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The size and repetitive nature of the Rhipicephalus microplus genome makes obtaining a full genome sequence difficult. Cot filtration/selection techniques were used to reduce the repetitive fraction of the tick genome and enrich for the fraction of DNA with gene-containing regions. The Cot-selected ...

  11. Conservative treatment for repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, H S; de Wilde, N S; Gerritsen, A A; van Tulder, M W; de Vet, H C

    2001-10-01

    Various conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury are widely used, despite questionable evidence of their effectiveness. This systematic review evaluates the effectiveness of these treatment options for relieving symptoms of repetitive strain injury and improving activities of daily living. Searches in Medline and Embase, with additional reference checking resulted in 15 eligible trials for this review. Methodological quality was assessed, and data-extraction was performed. With the use of a "best-evidence synthesis", no strong evidence was found for the effectiveness of any of the treatment options. There is limited evidence that multidisciplinary rehabilitation, ergonomic intervention measures, exercises, and spinal manipulation combined with soft tissue therapy are effective in providing symptom relief or improving activities of daily living. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of behavioral therapy. In conclusion, little is known about the effectiveness of conservative treatment options for repetitive strain injury. To establish strong evidence, more high-quality trials are needed.

  12. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons characterizes bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with purulent meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aicui; Wang, Chao; Liang, Zhijuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Lin; Ma, Qiaoli; Wang, Guowei; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Wang, Zhenhai

    2015-01-01

    Purulent meningitis (PM) is a severe infectious disease that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. It has been recognized that bacterial infection is a major contributing factor to the pathogenesis of PM. However, there is a lack of information on the bacterial composition in PM, due to the low positive rate of cerebrospinal fluid bacterial culture. Herein, we aimed to discriminate and identify the main pathogens and bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid sample from PM patients using high-throughput sequencing approach. The cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from 26 PM patients, and were determined as culture-negative samples. The polymerase chain reaction products of the hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA gene in these 26 samples of PM were sequenced using the 454 GS FLX system. The results showed that there were 71,440 pyrosequencing reads, of which, the predominant phyla were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes; and the predominant genera were Streptococcus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Neisseria. The bacterial species in the cerebrospinal fluid were complex, with 61.5% of the samples presenting with mixed pathogens. A significant number of bacteria belonging to a known pathogenic potential was observed. The number of operational taxonomic units for individual samples ranged from six to 75 and there was a comparable difference in the species diversity that was calculated through alpha and beta diversity analysis. Collectively, the data show that high-throughput sequencing approach facilitates the characterization of the pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid and determine the abundance and the composition of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid samples of the PM patients, which may provide a better understanding of pathogens in PM and assist clinicians to make rational and effective therapeutic decisions.

  13. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E R; Sanders, Jon G; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Owens, Sarah M; Gilbert, Jack A; Moreau, Corrie S

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied. PMID:25257543

  14. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    SciTech Connect

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illumina 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.

  15. DNA extraction protocols cause differences in 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing efficiency but not in community profile composition or structure

    DOE PAGES

    None

    2014-12-01

    The recent development of methods applying next-generation sequencing to microbial community characterization has led to the proliferation of these studies in a wide variety of sample types. Yet, variation in the physical properties of environmental samples demands that optimal DNA extraction techniques be explored for each new environment. The microbiota associated with many species of insects offer an extraction challenge as they are frequently surrounded by an armored exoskeleton, inhibiting disruption of the tissues within. In this study, we examine the efficacy of several commonly used protocols for extracting bacterial DNA from ants. While bacterial community composition recovered using Illuminamore » 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was not detectably biased by any method, the quantity of bacterial DNA varied drastically, reducing the number of samples that could be amplified and sequenced. These results indicate that the concentration necessary for dependable sequencing is around 10,000 copies of target DNA per microliter. Exoskeletal pulverization and tissue digestion increased the reliability of extractions, suggesting that these steps should be included in any study of insect-associated microorganisms that relies on obtaining microbial DNA from intact body segments. Although laboratory and analysis techniques should be standardized across diverse sample types as much as possible, minimal modifications such as these will increase the number of environments in which bacterial communities can be successfully studied.« less

  16. Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  17. Nature and composition of interbedded marine basaltic pumice in the ˜52-50 Ma Vastan lignite sequence, western India: Implication for Early Eocene MORB volcanism offshore Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sensarma, Sarajit; Singh, Hukam; Rana, R. S.; Paul, Debajyoti; Sahni, Ashok

    2017-03-01

    The recognition of pyroclasts preserved in sedimentary environments far from its source is uncommon. We here describe occurrences of several centimetres-thick discontinuous basaltic pumice lenses occurring within the Early Eocene Vastan lignite mine sedimentary sequence, western India at two different levels - one at ˜5 m and the other at 10 m above a biostratigraphically constrained 52 Ma old marker level postdating the Deccan Volcanism. These sections have received global attention as they record mammalian and plant radiations. We infer the repetitive occurrence of pumice have been sourced from a ˜52-50 Ma MORB related to sea-floor spreading in the western Arabian Sea, most plausibly along the Carlsberg Ridge. Pyroclasts have skeletal plagioclase with horsetail morphologies ± pyroxene ± Fe-Ti oxide euhedral crystals, and typically comprise of circular polymodal (radii ≤10 to ≥30 μm), non-coalescing microvesicles (>40-60%). The pumice have undergone considerable syngenetic alteration during oceanic transport and post-burial digenesis, and are a composite mixture of Fe-Mn-rich clay and hydrated altered basaltic glass (palagonite). The Fe-Mn-rich clay is extremely low in SiO 2, Al 2 O 3, TiO 2, MgO, alkalies and REE, but very high in Fe 2 O 3, MnO, P, Ba, Sr contents, and palagonitization involved significant loss of SiO 2, Al 2 O 3, MgO and variable gain in Fe 2 O 3, TiO 2, Ni, V, Zr, Zn and REE. Bubble initiation to growth in the ascending basaltic magma (liquidus ˜1200-1250 ∘C) may have occured in ˜3 hr. Short-distance transport, non-connected vesicles, deposition in inner shelf to more confined lagoonal condition in the Early Eocene and quick burial helped preservation of the pumice in Vastan. Early Eocene Arabian Sea volcanism thus might have been an additional source to marginal sediments along the passive margin of western India.

  18. A Chenopod Extensin Lacks Repetitive Tetrahydroxyproline Blocks 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiong-biao; Kieliszewski, Marcia; Lamport, Derek T. A.

    1990-01-01

    An extensin isolated from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) cell suspension cultures fulfills all criteria for membership of the extensin family save one, notably, lack of the `diagnostic' pentamer Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp. However, sequence analysis of the major tryptic peptides shows that sugar beet extensin shares a motif in common with tomato extensin P1 but differs by the position of an insertion sequence [X] or [Y] which, in sugar beet, splits the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-[X]-Hyp-Hyp-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys, where [X] is [Val-His-Glu/Lys-Tyr-Pro], while in tomato the insertion sequence [Y] = [Val-Lys-Pro-Tyr-His-Pro] and, when it occurs, immediately follows the tetrahydroxyproline block: Ser-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-Hyp-[Y]-Thr-Hyp-Val-Tyr-Lys. Based on these data we reinterpret three highly repetitive cDNA sequences, including nodulin N75 from soybean and wound-induced P33 of carrot, as extensins with split tetra(hydroxy)proline blocks. Images Figure 4 PMID:16667277

  19. Maize genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lance E; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew L; Balija, Vivekanand S; Nascimento, Lidia U; Dike, Sujit; de la Bastide, Melissa; Martienssen, Robert A; McCombie, W Richard

    2003-12-19

    Gene enrichment strategies offer an alternative to sequencing large and repetitive genomes such as that of maize. We report the generation and analysis of nearly 100,000 undermethylated (or methylation filtration) maize sequences. Comparison with the rice genome reveals that methylation filtration results in a more comprehensive representation of maize genes than those that result from expressed sequence tags or transposon insertion sites sequences. About 7% of the repetitive DNA is unmethylated and thus selected in our libraries, but potentially active transposons and unmethylated organelle genomes can be identified. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction can be used to finish the maize transcriptome.

  20. Evolution of repetitive proteins: spider silks from Nephila clavipes (Tetragnathidae) and Araneus bicentenarius (Araneidae).

    PubMed

    Beckwitt, R; Arcidiacono, S; Stote, R

    1998-03-01

    Spider silks are highly repetitive proteins, characterized by regions of polyalanine and glycine-rich repeating units. We have obtained two variants of the Spidroin 1 (NCF-1) silk gene sequence from Nephila clavipes. One sequence (1726 bp) was from a cloned cDNA, and the other (1951 bp) was from PCR of genomic DNA. When these sequences are compared with each other and the previously published Spidroin 1 sequence, there are differences due to sequence rearrangements, as well as single base substitutions. These variations are similar to those that have been reported from other highly repetitive genes, and probably represent the results of unequal cross-overs. We have also obtained 708 bp of sequence from pCR of genomic DNA from Araneus biocentenarius. This sequence shows considerable similarity to a dragline sequence (ADF-3) from A. diadematus, as well as Spidroin 2 (NCF-2) from N. clavipes. Minor but consistent differences in the repeating unit sequence between A. bicentenarius and A. diadematus suggest that concerted evolution or gene conversion processes are acting to maintain similarity among repeat units within a single gene.

  1. Large-scale detection of repetitions.

    PubMed

    Smyth, W F

    2014-05-28

    Combinatorics on words began more than a century ago with a demonstration that an infinitely long string with no repetitions could be constructed on an alphabet of only three letters. Computing all the repetitions (such as ∙∙∙TTT ∙∙∙ or ∙∙∙ CGACGA ∙∙∙ ) in a given string x of length n is one of the oldest and most important problems of computational stringology, requiring time in the worst case. About a dozen years ago, it was discovered that repetitions can be computed as a by-product of the Θ(n)-time computation of all the maximal periodicities or runs in x. However, even though the computation is linear, it is also brute force: global data structures, such as the suffix array, the longest common prefix array and the Lempel-Ziv factorization, need to be computed in a preprocessing phase. Furthermore, all of this effort is required despite the fact that the expected number of runs in a string is generally a small fraction of the string length. In this paper, I explore the possibility that repetitions (perhaps also other regularities in strings) can be computed in a manner commensurate with the size of the output.

  2. Reducing Repetitive Speech: Effects of Strategy Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dipipi, Caroline M.; Jitendra, Asha K.; Miller, Judith A.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes an intervention with an 18-year-old young woman with mild mental retardation and a seizure disorder, which focused on her repetitive echolalic verbalizations. The intervention included time delay, differential reinforcement of other behaviors, and self-monitoring. Overall, the intervention was successful in facilitating…

  3. Effect of Repetitive Film Showings on Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mc Tavish, C. L.

    In a study made in 1949 to determine the increment in learning that could be attributed to repetition, four general science films were shown to each of four groups of college students in such a way that each group saw one of the films once, a second film twice, a third film three times, and a fourth film four times. The experimental population…

  4. EFFECT OF REPETITIVE FILM SHOWINGS ON LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCTAVISH, C.L.; AND OTHERS

    A DETERMINATION OF THE INCREMENT IN LEARNING ATTRIBUTABLE SOLELY TO ONE, TWO, AND THREE REPETITIONS OF A FILM OVER AND ABOVE A SINGLE SHOWING WAS INVESTIGATED. THE SUBJECTS WERE 319 COLLEGE FRESHMEN WHO WERE DIVIDED INTO FOUR GROUPS AND WHO WERE SHOWN FOUR GENERAL SCIENCE FILMS. EACH GROUP SAW ONE OF THE FILMS ONCE, A SECOND FILM TWICE, A THIRD…

  5. FRB repetition and non-Poissonian statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, Liam; Pen, Ue-Li; Oppermann, Niels

    2016-05-01

    We discuss some of the claims that have been made regarding the statistics of fast radio bursts (FRBs). In an earlier Letter, we conjectured that flicker noise associated with FRB repetition could show up in non-cataclysmic neutron star emission models, like supergiant pulses. We show how the current limits of repetition would be significantly weakened if their repeat rate really were non-Poissonian and had a pink or red spectrum. Repetition and its statistics have implications for observing strategy, generally favouring shallow wide-field surveys, since in the non-repeating scenario survey depth is unimportant. We also discuss the statistics of the apparent latitudinal dependence of FRBs, and offer a simple method for calculating the significance of this effect. We provide a generalized Bayesian framework for addressing this problem, which allows for direct model comparison. It is shown how the evidence for a steep latitudinal gradient of the FRB rate is less strong than initially suggested and simple explanations like increased scattering and sky temperature in the plane are sufficient to decrease the low-latitude burst rate, given current data. The reported dearth of bursts near the plane is further complicated if FRBs have non-Poissonian repetition, since in that case the event rate inferred from observation depends on observing strategy.

  6. Social Interaction and Repetitive Motor Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftin, Rachel L.; Odom, Samuel L.; Lantz, Johanna F.

    2008-01-01

    Students with autism have difficulty initiating social interactions and may exhibit repetitive motor behavior (e.g., body rocking, hand flapping). Increasing social interaction by teaching new skills may lead to reductions in problem behavior, such as motor stereotypies. Additionally, self-monitoring strategies can increase the maintenance of…

  7. Verbal Repetitions and Echolalia in Alzheimer's Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Da Cruz, Fernanda Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of echolalic repetition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A qualitative analysis of data from spontaneous conversations with MHI, a woman with AD, is presented. The data come from the DALI Corpus, a corpus of spontaneous conversations involving subjects with AD. This study argues that echolalic effects can be…

  8. The Value of Repetition in Articulation Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, John L.

    1970-01-01

    Exact analysis of an experiment involving children from the ages of 4 to 12 learning three new articulations revealed that most of the articulation learning took place on the second attempt with relatively moderate improvement in subsequent trials, thus placing the value of repetition in articulation learning in question. (FB)

  9. Repetition effects in human ERPs to faces.

    PubMed

    Schweinberger, Stefan R; Neumann, Markus F

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we review research conducted over the past 25 years addressing the effects of repeating various kinds of information in faces (e.g., pictorial, spatial configural, identity, semantic) on different components in human event-related brain potentials (ERPs). This body of evidence suggests that several ERP components are systematically linked to different functional components of face identity processing. Specifically, we argue (1) that repetition of the category of faces (categorical adaptation) strongly affects the occipitotemporal N170 amplitude, which is systematically suppressed when a face is preceded by another face, irrespective of its identity, whereas (2) the prototypicality of a face's second order spatial configuration has a prominent effect on the subsequent occipitotemporal P200. Longer-latency repetition effects are related to the processing of individual facial identities. These include (3) an ERP correlate of the transient activation of individual representations of repeated faces in the form of an enhanced occipitotemporal N250r as seen in repetition priming experiments, and (4) a correlate of the acquisition of individual face identity representations during learning as seen in a topographically similar long-lasting N250 effect. Finally, (5) the repetition of semantic information in familiar person recognition elicits a central-parietal N400 ERP effect. We hope that this overview will encourage researchers to further exploit the potential of ERPs to provide a continuous time window to neuronal correlates of multiple processes in face perception under comparatively natural viewing conditions.

  10. Large-scale detection of repetitions

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, W. F.

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorics on words began more than a century ago with a demonstration that an infinitely long string with no repetitions could be constructed on an alphabet of only three letters. Computing all the repetitions (such as ⋯TTT⋯ or ⋯CGACGA⋯ ) in a given string x of length n is one of the oldest and most important problems of computational stringology, requiring time in the worst case. About a dozen years ago, it was discovered that repetitions can be computed as a by-product of the Θ(n)-time computation of all the maximal periodicities or runs in x. However, even though the computation is linear, it is also brute force: global data structures, such as the suffix array, the longest common prefix array and the Lempel–Ziv factorization, need to be computed in a preprocessing phase. Furthermore, all of this effort is required despite the fact that the expected number of runs in a string is generally a small fraction of the string length. In this paper, I explore the possibility that repetitions (perhaps also other regularities in strings) can be computed in a manner commensurate with the size of the output. PMID:24751872

  11. Sentence Repetition: What Does the Task Measure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polišenská, Kamila; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sentence repetition is gaining increasing attention as a source of information about children's sentence-level abilities in clinical assessment, and as a clinical marker of specific language impairment. However, it is widely debated what the task is testing and therefore how informative it is. Aims: (1) To evaluate the effects of…

  12. Using Repetition to Make Ideas Stick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykins, Alicia N.

    2015-01-01

    In elementary school, the use of repetitive songs to help children remember concepts is commonplace and is usually very effective. Unfortunately for many students, this strategy is generally not used in later grades. A group of mathematics teachers at Westerville South High School in Westerville, Ohio, have taken this approach to a new creative…

  13. Pressure wave charged repetitively pulsed gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarny, Vijay A.

    1982-01-01

    A repetitively pulsed gas laser in which a system of mechanical shutters bracketing the laser cavity manipulate pressure waves resulting from residual energy in the cavity gas following a lasing event so as to draw fresh gas into the cavity and effectively pump spent gas in a dynamic closed loop.

  14. Temporal Processing Capabilities in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; Ackermann, Hermann; Wannke, Michael; Hertrich, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal resolution capacities of the central-auditory system in a subject (NP) suffering from repetition conduction aphasia. More specifically, the patient was asked to detect brief gaps between two stretches of broadband noise (gap detection task) and to evaluate the duration of two biphasic (WN-3) continuous noise…

  15. Variation in seed fatty acid composition and sequence divergence in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated sesame.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenbang; Tonnis, Brandon; Morris, Brad; Wang, Richard B; Zhang, Amy L; Pinnow, David; Wang, Ming Li

    2014-12-03

    Sesame germplasm harbors genetic diversity which can be useful for sesame improvement in breeding programs. Seven accessions with different levels of oleic acid were selected from the entire USDA sesame germplasm collection (1232 accessions) and planted for morphological observation and re-examination of fatty acid composition. The coding region of the FAD2 gene for fatty acid desaturase (FAD) in these accessions was also sequenced. Cultivated sesame accessions flowered and matured earlier than the wild species. The cultivated sesame seeds contained a significantly higher percentage of oleic acid (40.4%) than the seeds of the wild species (26.1%). Nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the FAD2 gene coding region between wild and cultivated species. Some nucleotide polymorphisms led to amino acid changes, one of which was located in the enzyme active site and may contribute to the altered fatty acid composition. Based on the morphology observation, chemical analysis, and sequence analysis, it was determined that two accessions were misnamed and need to be reclassified. The results obtained from this study are useful for sesame improvement in molecular breeding programs.

  16. Deep sequencing reveals different compositions of mRNA transcribed from the F8 gene in a panel of FVIII-producing CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Christian S; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J; Andersen, Mikael R; Kristensen, Claus

    2015-07-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is one of the most complex biopharmaceuticals due to the large size, poor protein stability and extensive post-translational modifications. As a consequence, efficient production of FVIII in mammalian cells poses a major challenge, with typical yields two to three orders of magnitude lower than for antibodies. In the present study we investigated CHO DXB11 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human coagulation factor VIII. Single cell clones were isolated from the pool of transfectants and a panel of 14 clones representing a dynamic range of FVIII productivities was selected for RNA sequencing analysis. The analysis showed distinct differences in F8 RNA composition between the clones. The exogenous F8-dhfr transcript was found to make up the most abundant transcript in the present clones. No correlation was seen between F8 mRNA levels and the measured FVIII productivity. It was found that three MTX resistant, nonproducing clones had different truncations of the F8 transcripts. We find that by using deep sequencing, in contrast to microarray technology, for determining the transcriptome from CHO transfectants, we are able to accurately deduce the mature mRNA composition of the transgene and identify significant truncations that would probably otherwise have remained undetected.

  17. Differential Preparation Intervals Modulate Repetition Processes in Task Switching: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Yang, Ping; Zhao, Qian-Jing; Wang, Meng; Jin, Zhenlan; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    In task-switching paradigms, reaction times (RTs) switch cost (SC) and the neural correlates underlying the SC are affected by different preparation intervals. However, little is known about the effect of the preparation interval on the repetition processes in task-switching. To examine this effect we utilized a cued task-switching paradigm with long sequences of repeated trials. Response-stimulus intervals (RSI) and cue-stimulus intervals (CSI) were manipulated in short and long conditions. Electroencephalography (EEG) and behavioral data were recorded. We found that with increasing repetitions, RTs were faster in the short CSI conditions, while P3 amplitudes decreased in the LS (long RSI and short CSI) conditions. Positive correlations between RT benefit and P3 activation decrease (repeat 1 − repeat 5), and between the slope of the RT and P3 regression lines were observed only in the LS condition. Our findings suggest that differential preparation intervals modulate repetition processes in task switching. PMID:26924974

  18. Enhanced immunogenicity of a sequence derived from hepatitis B virus surface antigen in a composite peptide that includes the immunostimulatory region from human interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K V; Nayak, A R

    1990-01-01

    The effect on immunogenicity of coupling the immunostimulatory nonapeptide sequence (residues 163-171) from human interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) to a small immunogen was examined. A 21-amino acid sequence spanning positions 12-32 on the large protein of hepatitis B surface antigen was chosen as a model. Three peptides were synthesized corresponding to the IL-1 beta-derived sequence [peptide IL-(163-171)], the hepatitis B surface antigen-derived sequence [peptide S1-(12-32)] and a composite peptide that included both these sequences separated by a spacer of two glycine residues [peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171)]. In an in vitro thymocyte proliferation assay, both peptides S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) and IL-(163-171) showed comparable activity, whereas peptide S1-(12-32) was inactive. Groups of five to seven mice each from C3H/CH, BALB/c, SJL/J, and C57BL/6 strains were immunized with equimolar amounts of either peptide S1-(12-32), peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171), or a mixture of peptides S1-(12-32) and IL-(163-171), and sera were screened for anti-S1-(12-32) antibodies. In all strains, peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) elicited an increased primary and secondary anti-S1-(12-32) antibody response compared to the other two groups. Further, peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) also induced an increased number of responders to primary immunization, though the number of responders was quantitative in all groups following secondary immunization. At least part of the enhanced immunogenicity of the S1-(12-32) sequence in peptide S1-(12-32)-IL-(163-171) appears to be due to augmented T-helper cell activity. These results suggest that coupling of the immunostimulatory IL-1 beta-derived sequence in tandem with an immunogen may confer inbuilt adjuvanticity. PMID:2371286

  19. The Corynebacterium xerosis composite transposon Tn5432 consists of two identical insertion sequences, designated IS1249, flanking the erythromycin resistance gene ermCX.

    PubMed

    Tauch, A; Kassing, F; Kalinowski, J; Pühler, A

    1995-09-01

    Analysis of the 50-kb R-plasmid pTP10 from the clinical isolate Corynebacterium xerosis M82B revealed that the erythromycin resistance gene, ermCX, is located on a 4524-bp composite transposable element, Tn5432. The ends of Tn5432 are identical, direct repeats of an insertion sequence, designated IS1249, encoding a putative transposase of the IS256 family. IS1249 consists of 1385 bp with 45/42 imperfect terminal inverted repeats. The nucleotide sequence of the 1754-bp Tn5432 central region is 99% identical to the previously sequenced erythromycin resistance region of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae plasmid pNG2. It encodes the erythromycin resistance gene, ermCX, and an ORF homologous to the amino-terminal end of the transposase of IS31831 from Corynebacterium glutamicum. Transposons with regions flanking the insertion sites were recovered from the C. glutamicum chromosome by a plasmid rescue technique. Insertion of Tn5432 created 8-bp target site duplications. A Tn5432-induced isoleucine/valine-auxotrophic mutant was found to carry the transposon in the 5' region of the ilvBNC cluster; in pTP10 the transposon is inserted in a region similar to replication and partitioning functions of the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pAD1 and the Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

  20. Surface damage characteristics of CFC and tungsten with repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Nishijima, D.; Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Ueno, Y.; Ishihara, M.; Shoda, K.; Nagata, M.; Kawai, T.; Ueda, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Doerner, R. P.

    2011-08-01

    Surface damage of carbon fiber composite (CFC) and tungsten (W) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. CX2002U CFC and stress-relieved W samples were exposed to repetitive pulsed deuterium plasmas with duration of ˜0.5 ms, incident ion energy of ˜30 eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ˜0.3-0.7 MJ/m2. Bright spots on a CFC surface during pulsed plasma exposures were clearly observed with a high-speed camera, indicating a local surface heating. No melting of a W surface was observed under a single plasma pulse exposure at energy density of ˜0.7 MJ/m2, although cracks were formed. Cracking of the W surface grew with repetitive pulsed plasma exposures. Subsequently, the surface melted due to localized heat absorption.

  1. [Repetitive strain injuries. Forearm pain caused by tissue responses to repetitive strain].

    PubMed

    Sorgatz, H

    2002-10-01

    According to the National Research Council, painful work-related upper limb disorders are caused by different pathophysiological mechanisms, one of which is repetitive strain injury (RSI). Forearm pain, tenderness, and paresthesias are thought to result from a continual risk of exceeding limits of "cumulative trauma load tolerance" (CTLT, cf. NRC 2001) in soft tissue by thousands of high-frequency, repetitive movements. On the other hand, repetitive painful stimulations also produce neuroplastic changes in the spinal and supraspinal nociceptive systems. Thus, repetitive motor and nociceptive impulses become part of the same motor programs, which are also responsible for high-frequency movements and tissue damage. In this way RSI pain may be felt as a task-related response, even after all injuries are completely healed. Consequences of this neuroplastic CTLT model for RSI prevention and therapy are discussed.

  2. Exact and conceptual repetition dissociate conceptual memory tests: problems for transfer appropriate processing theory.

    PubMed

    McDermott, K B; Roediger, H L

    1996-03-01

    Three experiments examined whether a conceptual implicit memory test (specifically, category instance generation) would exhibit repetition effects similar to those found in free recall. The transfer appropriate processing account of dissociations among memory tests led us to predict that the tests would show parallel effects; this prediction was based upon the theory's assumption that conceptual tests will behave similarly as a function of various independent variables. In Experiment 1, conceptual repetition (i.e., following a target word [e.g., puzzles] with an associate [e.g., jigsaw]) did not enhance priming on the instance generation test relative to the condition of simply presenting the target word once, although this manipulation did affect free recall. In Experiment 2, conceptual repetition was achieved by following a picture with its corresponding word (or vice versa). In this case, there was an effect of conceptual repetition on free recall but no reliable effect on category instance generation or category cued recall. In addition, we obtained a picture superiority effect in free recall but not in category instance generation. In the third experiment, when the same study sequence was used as in Experiment 1, but with instructions that encouraged relational processing, priming on the category instance generation task was enhanced by conceptual repetition. Results demonstrate that conceptual memory tests can be dissociated and present problems for Roediger's (1990) transfer appropriate processing account of dissociations between explicit and implicit tests.

  3. Olanzapine-related repetitive focal seizures with lingual dystonia.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Capasso, Margherita; Frazzini, Valerio; Onofrj, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Olanzapine-related seizures have rarely been reported despite associated proconvulsant risk factors described in the literature: myoclonic status, increased frequency of seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, as well as fatal status epilepticus. We present a psychiatric patient who developed repetitive focal motor seizures and lingual dystonia when olanzapine was added for psychomotor agitation and aggressiveness. Olanzapine was immediately suspended and the seizures progressively disappeared. A control EEG showed no paroxysmal discharges. Olanzapine shares some pharmacological similarities with clozapine, a neuroleptic with a high risk of dose-dependent seizures. This adverse effect should be taken into account, and olanzapine should be used with caution if concomitant circumstances decrease the seizure threshold. [Published with video sequence online].

  4. A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers with Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)

    PubMed Central

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine A.; Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Conceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. We describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetiton Task (SRT) that eliminates this confound and report findings from three validity studies. Method Ninety-five preschool children with Speech Delay and 63 with Typical Speech, completed an assessment battery that included the Nonword Repetition Task (NRT: Dollaghan & Campbell, 1998) and the SRT. SRT stimuli include only four of the earliest occurring consonants and one early occurring vowel. Results Study 1 findings indicated that the SRT eliminated the speech confound in nonword testing with speakers who misarticulate. Study 2 findings indicated that the accuracy of the SRT to identify expressive language impairment was comparable to findings for the NRT. Study 3 findings illustrated the SRT’s potential to interrogate speech processing constraints underlying poor nonword repetition accuracy. Results supported both memorial and auditory-perceptual encoding constraints underlying nonword repetition errors in children with speech-language impairment. Conclusion The SRT appears to be a psychometrically stable and substantively informative nonword repetition task for emerging genetic and other research with speakers who misarticulate. PMID:19635944

  5. HIV-1 and HIV-2 LTR nucleotide sequences: assessment of the alignment by N-block presentation, "retroviral signatures" of overrepeated oligonucleotides, and a probable important role of scrambled stepwise duplications/deletions in molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Laprevotte, I; Pupin, M; Coward, E; Didier, G; Terzian, C; Devauchelle, C; Hénaut, A

    2001-07-01

    Previous analyses of retroviral nucleotide sequences, suggest a so-called "scrambled duplicative stepwise molecular evolution" (many sectors with successive duplications/deletions of short and longer motifs) that could have stemmed from one or several starter tandemly repeated short sequence(s). In the present report, we tested this hypothesis by focusing on the long terminal repeats (LTRs) (and flanking sequences) of 24 human and 3 simian immunodeficiency viruses. By using a calculation strategy applicable to short sequences, we found consensus overrepresented motifs (often containing CTG or CAG) that were congruent with the previously defined "retroviral signature." We also show many local repetition patterns that are significant when compared with simply shuffled sequences. First- and second-order Markov chain analyses demonstrate that a major portion of the overrepresented oligonucleotides can be predicted from the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences, but by no means can biological mechanisms be deduced from these results: some of the listed local repetitions remain significant against dinucleotide-conserving shuffled sequences; together with previous results, this suggests that interspersed and/or local mononucleotide and oligonucleotide repetitions could have biased the dinucleotide compositions of the sequences. We searched for suggestive evolutionary patterns by scrutinizing a reliable multiple alignment of the 27 sequences. A manually constructed alignment based on homology blocks was in good agreement with the polypeptide alignment in the coding sectors and has been exhaustively assessed by using a multiplied alphabet obtained by the promising mathematical strategy called the N-block presentation (taking into account the environment of each nucleotide in a sequence). Sector by sector, we hypothesize many successive duplication/deletion scenarios that fit our previous evolutionary hypotheses. This suggests an important duplication/deletion role for

  6. Phenolic compositions of 50 and 30 year sequences of Australian red wines: the impact of wine age.

    PubMed

    McRae, Jacqui M; Dambergs, Robert G; Kassara, Stella; Parker, Mango; Jeffery, David W; Herderich, Markus J; Smith, Paul A

    2012-10-10

    The phenolic composition of red wine impacts upon the color and mouthfeel and thus quality of the wine. Both of these characteristics differ depending on the age of a wine, with the purple of young wines changing to brick red and the puckering or aggressive astringency softening in older wines. This study investigated the color parameters, tannin concentrations and tannin composition of a 50 year series of Cabernet Sauvignon wines from a commercial label as well as 30 year series of Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz wines from a separate commercial label to assess the impact of wine age on phenolic composition and concentration. The wine color density in wines of 40 to 50 years old was around 5 AU compared with 16 AU of wine less than 12 months old, which correlated well with the concentration of non-bleachable pigments and pigmented polymers. Conversely, the anthocyanin concentrations in 10 year old wines were substantially lower than that of recently bottled wines (around 100 mg/L compared with 627 mg/L, respectively), adding further evidence that non-bleachable pigments including pigmented polymers play a much larger role in long-term wine color than anthocyanins. No age-related trend was observed for tannin concentration, indicating that the widely noted softer astringency of older red wines cannot necessarily be directly related to lower concentrations of soluble wine tannin and is potentially a consequence of changes in tannin structure. Wine tannins from older wines were generally larger than tannins from younger wines and showed structural changes consistent with oxidation.

  7. Disparate molecular evolution of two types of repetitive DNAs in the genome of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, M; Ruíz-Ruano, F J; Marchal, J A; Sánchez, A; Cabrero, J; Camacho, J PM; Perfectti, F

    2014-01-01

    Wide arrays of repetitive DNA sequences form an important part of eukaryotic genomes. These repeats appear to evolve as coherent families, where repeats within a family are more similar to each other than to other orthologous representatives in related species. The continuous homogenization of repeats, through selective and non-selective processes, is termed concerted evolution. Ascertaining the level of variation between repeats is crucial to determining which evolutionary model best explains the homogenization observed for these sequences. Here, for the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans, we present the analysis of intragenomic diversity for two repetitive DNA sequences (a satellite DNA (satDNA) and the 45S rDNA) resulting from the independent microdissection of several chromosomes. Our results show different homogenization patterns for these two kinds of paralogous DNA sequences, with a high between-chromosome structure for rDNA but no structure at all for the satDNA. This difference is puzzling, considering the adjacent localization of the two repetitive DNAs on paracentromeric regions in most chromosomes. The disparate homogenization patterns detected for these two repetitive DNA sequences suggest that several processes participate in the concerted evolution in E. plorans, and that these mechanisms might not work as genome-wide processes but rather as sequence-specific ones. PMID:24346496

  8. Emergence of Sequence Type 779 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Harboring a Novel Pseudo Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec (SCCmec)-SCC-SCCCRISPR Composite Element in Irish Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Kinnevey, Peter M.; Shore, Anna C.; Brennan, Grainne I.; Sullivan, Derek J.; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan; Slickers, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a major cause of nosocomial infection in Irish hospitals for 4 decades, and replacement of predominant MRSA clones has occurred several times. An MRSA isolate recovered in 2006 as part of a larger study of sporadic MRSA exhibited a rare spa (t878) and multilocus sequence (ST779) type and was nontypeable by PCR- and DNA microarray-based staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element typing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed the presence of a novel 51-kb composite island (CI) element with three distinct domains, each flanked by direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences, including (i) a pseudo SCCmec element (16.3 kb) carrying mecA with a novel mec class region, a fusidic acid resistance gene (fusC), and two copper resistance genes (copB and copC) but lacking ccr genes; (ii) an SCC element (17.5 kb) carrying a novel ccrAB4 allele; and (iii) an SCC element (17.4 kb) carrying a novel ccrC allele and a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region. The novel CI was subsequently identified by PCR in an additional 13 t878/ST779 MRSA isolates, six from bloodstream infections, recovered between 2006 and 2011 in 11 hospitals. Analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) carried by the CI showed amino acid sequence similarity of 44 to 100% to ORFs from S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). These findings provide further evidence of genetic transfer between S. aureus and CoNS and show how this contributes to the emergence of novel SCCmec elements and MRSA strains. Ongoing surveillance of this MRSA strain is warranted and will require updating of currently used SCCmec typing methods. PMID:23147725

  9. The influence of vocabulary size, phonotactic probability, and wordlikeness on nonword repetitions of children with and without specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Munson, Benjamin; Kurtz, Beth A; Windsor, Jennifer

    2005-10-01

    Research has shown that children repeat high-probability phoneme sequences more accurately than low-probability ones. This effect attenuates with age, and its decrease is predicted by developmental changes in the size of the lexicon (J. Edwards, M. E. Beckman, & B. Munson, 2004; B. Munson, 2001; B. Munson, J. Edwards, & M. Beckman, 2005). This study expands on these findings by examining relationships between vocabulary size and repetition accuracy of nonwords varying in phonotactic probability by 16 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 16 chronological-age-matched (CA) peers with typical speech and language development, and 16 younger children matched with the children with SLI on vocabulary size (VS). As in previous research, children with SLI repeated nonwords less accurately than did CA children. The children with SLI and the VS children showed similar levels of nonword repetition accuracy. Phonotactic probability affected repetition accuracy more for children with SLI and VS children than for CA children. Regression analyses showed that measures of vocabulary size were the best predictor of the difference in repetition accuracy between high- and low-probability sequences. Analyses by items showed that measures of phonotactic probability were stronger predictors of repetition accuracy than judgments of wordlikeness. Taken together, the results support research demonstrating that vocabulary size mediates the influence of phonotactic probability on nonword repetition, perhaps due to its influence on the ongoing refinement of phonological categories.

  10. Repetitive cleavage of elastomeric membrane via controlled interfacial fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hun; Choi, Yong Whan; Kim, Min Sung; Um, Hyung Sik; Lee, Sung Hoon; Kim, Pilnam; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2014-07-23

    Here, we report a method of fabricating thin layer of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), with a thickness in the range of 60-80 nm, which can be repeatedly generated (more than 10 times) from the same block of PDMS via controlled interfacial fracture. The thin layers can be transferred to various substrates by peeling off from the bulk PDMS. The cleavage is attributed to the built-in stress at the fracture interface due to plasma treatment, resulting in the repetitive formation of the thin membranes, with no residue from processing, and with a surface roughness of ∼5 nm. We were able to demonstrate transferred patterns with controlled thickness by varying the oxygen plasma treatment conditions and the composition of bulk PDMS stamp. Using the method, we achieved residual-free patterns with submicrometer resolution for applications in biomolecule array templates.

  11. High sequence turnover in the regulatory regions of the developmental gene hunchback in insects.

    PubMed

    Hancock, J M; Shaw, P J; Bonneton, F; Dover, G A

    1999-02-01

    Extensive sequence analysis of the developmental gene hunchback and its 5' and 3' regulatory regions in Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila virilis, Musca domestica, and Tribolium castaneum, using a variety of computer algorithms, reveals regions of high sequence simplicity probably generated by slippage-like mechanisms of turnover. No regions are entirely refractory to the action of slippage, although the density and composition of simple sequence motifs varies from region to region. Interestingly, the 5' and 3' flanking regions share short repetitive motifs despite their separation by the gene itself, and the motifs are different in composition from those in the exons and introns. Furthermore, there are high levels of conservation of motifs in equivalent orthologous regions. Detailed sequence analysis of the P2 promoter and DNA footprinting assays reveal that the number, orientation, sequence, spacing, and protein-binding affinities of the BICOID-binding sites varies between species and that the 'P2' promoter, the nanos response element in the 3' untranslated region, and several conserved boxes of sequence in the gene (e.g., the two zinc-finger regions) are surrounded by cryptically-simple-sequence DNA. We argue that high sequence turnover and genetic redundancy permit both the general maintenance of promoter functions through the establishment of coevolutionary (compensatory) changes in cis- and trans-acting genetic elements and, at the same time, the possibility of subtle changes in the regulation of hunchback in the different species.

  12. Deep investigation of Arabidopsis thaliana junk DNA reveals a continuum between repetitive elements and genomic dark matter.

    PubMed

    Maumus, Florian; Quesneville, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain highly variable amounts of DNA with no apparent function. This so-called junk DNA is composed of two components: repeated and repeat-derived sequences (together referred to as the repeatome), and non-annotated sequences also known as genomic dark matter. Because of their high duplication rates as compared to other genomic features, transposable elements are predominant contributors to the repeatome and the products of their decay is thought to be a major source of genomic dark matter. Determining the origin and composition of junk DNA is thus important to help understanding genome evolution as well as host biology. In this study, we have used a combination of tools enabling to show that the repeatome from the small and reducing A. thaliana genome is significantly larger than previously thought. Furthermore, we present the concepts and results from a series of innovative approaches suggesting that a significant amount of the A. thaliana dark matter is of repetitive origin. As a tentative standard for the community, we propose a deep compendium annotation of the A. thaliana repeatome that may help addressing farther genome evolution as well as transcriptional and epigenetic regulation in this model plant.

  13. Deep Investigation of Arabidopsis thaliana Junk DNA Reveals a Continuum between Repetitive Elements and Genomic Dark Matter

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, Florian; Quesneville, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain highly variable amounts of DNA with no apparent function. This so-called junk DNA is composed of two components: repeated and repeat-derived sequences (together referred to as the repeatome), and non-annotated sequences also known as genomic dark matter. Because of their high duplication rates as compared to other genomic features, transposable elements are predominant contributors to the repeatome and the products of their decay is thought to be a major source of genomic dark matter. Determining the origin and composition of junk DNA is thus important to help understanding genome evolution as well as host biology. In this study, we have used a combination of tools enabling to show that the repeatome from the small and reducing A. thaliana genome is significantly larger than previously thought. Furthermore, we present the concepts and results from a series of innovative approaches suggesting that a significant amount of the A. thaliana dark matter is of repetitive origin. As a tentative standard for the community, we propose a deep compendium annotation of the A. thaliana repeatome that may help addressing farther genome evolution as well as transcriptional and epigenetic regulation in this model plant. PMID:24709859

  14. Use of competitive PCR to assay copy number of repetitive elements in banana.

    PubMed

    Baurens, F C; Noyer, J L; Lanaud, C; Lagoda, P J

    1996-11-27

    Banana is one of the most important subtropical fruit crops. Genetic improvement by traditional breeding strategies is difficult and better knowledge of genomic structure is needed. Repeated sequences are powerful markers for genetic fingerprinting. The method proposed here to determine the copy number of nuclear repetitive elements is based on competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and can also be used for quantifying cytosolic sequences. The reliability of this method was investigated on crude preparations of total DNA. Variations due to the heterogeneity of crude DNA extracts showed that a single locus reference is needed for accurate quantification. A mapped microsatellite locus was used to normalize copy number measurements. Copy number assay of repetitive elements using this method clearly distinguishes between the two banana subspecies investigated: Musa acuminata spp. banskii and M. acuminata spp. malaccensis. Two repetitive sequence families, pMaCIR1115 and pA9-26, were assayed that cover up to 1% of the M. acuminata genome. Their copy number varied up to six fold between the two subspecies. Furthermore, sequence quantification showed that mitochondrial genomes are present in crude leaf-extracted banana DNA at up to 40 copies per cell.

  15. Verbal repetitions and echolalia in Alzheimer's discourse.

    PubMed

    Da Cruz, Fernanda Miranda

    2010-11-01

    This article reports on an investigation of echolalic repetition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A qualitative analysis of data from spontaneous conversations with MHI, a woman with AD, is presented. The data come from the DALI Corpus, a corpus of spontaneous conversations involving subjects with AD. This study argues that echolalic effects can be explained through an analysis of their formal linguistic aspects, such as intonational-prosodic and enunciative-syntactic features. The analysis shows that the description of echolalic repetitions in these terms can help find parameters for the description of the linguistic and communicative characteristics of AD. This analysis even shows how a previous speech turn serves as a base for the elaboration of the next turn by the participant with AD. It also contributes to the understanding of echolalic productions in AD.

  16. Phosphor thermometry at high repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, N.; Brübach, J.; Dreizler, A.

    2013-09-01

    Phosphor thermometry is a semi-invasive surface temperature measurement technique utilizing the luminescence properties of thermographic phosphors. Typically these ceramic materials are coated onto the object of interest and are excited by a short UV laser pulse. Photomultipliers and high-speed camera systems are used to transiently detect the subsequently emitted luminescence decay point wise or two-dimensionally resolved. Based on appropriate calibration measurements, the luminescence lifetime is converted to temperature. Up to now, primarily Q-switched laser systems with repetition rates of 10 Hz were employed for excitation. Accordingly, this diagnostic tool was not applicable to resolve correlated temperature transients at time scales shorter than 100 ms. For the first time, the authors realized a high-speed phosphor thermometry system combining a highly repetitive laser in the kHz regime and a fast decaying phosphor. A suitable material was characterized regarding its temperature lifetime characteristic and precision. Additionally, the influence of laser power on the phosphor coating in terms of heating effects has been investigated. A demonstration of this high-speed technique has been conducted inside the thermally highly transient system of an optically accessible internal combustion engine. Temperatures have been measured with a repetition rate of one sample per crank angle degree at an engine speed of 1000 rpm. This experiment has proven that high-speed phosphor thermometry is a promising diagnostic tool for the resolution of surface temperature transients.

  17. Neural Correlates of Restricted, Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dara Manoach CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 06September2011–05September2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Neural Correlates of Restricted , Repetitive Behaviors in Autism ...complete, we will test the hypothesis that restrictive , repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are associated with specific reductions in brain

  18. Neural Correlates of Restricted, Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Restricted , Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0773... Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Santangelo, Susan L CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts...our dataset is complete, we will test the hypothesis that restrictive , repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are associated with

  19. Repetitive Behaviours in Typically Developing 2-Year-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leekam, Susan; Tandos, Jonathan; McConachie, Helen; Meins, Elizabeth; Parkinson, Kathryn; Wright, Charlotte; Turner, Michelle; Arnott, Bronia; Vittorini, Lucia; Le Couteur, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Background: Repetitive behaviours are an essential part of the diagnosis of autism but are also commonly seen in typically developing children. The current study investigated the frequency and factor structure of repetitive behaviours in a large community sample of 2-year-olds. Methods: A new measure, the Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire (RBQ-2)…

  20. Repetition Blindness: An Emergent Property of Inter-Item Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alison L.; Still, Mary L.; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Repeating an item in a brief or rapid display usually produces faster or more accurate identification of the item (repetition priming), but sometimes produces the opposite effect (repetition blindness). We present a theory of short-term repetition effects, the "competition hypothesis," which explains these paradoxical outcomes. The central tenet…

  1. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  2. Grade Repetition and Primary School Dropout in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabay, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Research on education in low-income countries rarely focuses on grade repetition. When addressed, repetition is typically presented along with early school dropout as the "wasting" of educational resources. Simplifying grade repetition in this way often fails to recognize significant methodological concerns and also overlooks the unique…

  3. Origin of temporal compositional trends in monogenetic vent eruptions: Insights from the crystal cargo in the Papoose Canyon sequence, Big Pine Volcanic Field, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ruohan; Lassiter, John C.; Ramirez, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    Many monogenetic vents display systematic temporal-compositional variations over the course of eruption. Previous studies have proposed that these trends may reflect variable degrees of crustal assimilation, or melting and mixing of heterogeneous mantle source(s). Discrimination between these two endmember hypotheses is critical for understanding the plumbing systems of monogenetic volcanoes, which pose a significant volcanic hazard in many areas. In this study, we examine the Papoose Canyon (PC) monogenetic vent in the Big Pine Volcanic Field (BPVF), which had been well characterized for temporal-compositional variations in erupted basalts. We present new major and trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic data from the PC "crystal cargo" (phenocrysts and xenoliths). Comparison of "crystal cargo" and host basalt provides new constraints on the history of magma storage, fractionation, and crustal contamination that are obscured in the bulk basalts due to pre- and syn-eruptive magma mixing processes. The abundances of phenocrysts and ultramafic xenoliths in the PC sequence decrease up-section. Olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts span a wide range of Mg# (77-89). The majority of phenocrysts are more evolved than olivine or clinopyroxene in equilibrium with their host basalts (Mg# = 68- 71, equilibrium Fo ≈ 85- 89). In addition, the ultramafic xenoliths display cumulate textures. Olivine and clinopyroxene from ultramafic xenoliths have Mg# (73-87) similar to the phenocrysts, and lower than typical mantle peridotites. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions of the xenoliths are similar to early PC basalts. Finally, many clinopyroxene phenocrysts and clinopyroxene in xenoliths have trace element abundances in equilibrium with melts that are more enriched than the erupted basalts. These features suggest that the phenocrysts and xenoliths derive from melt that is more fractionated and enriched than erupted PC basalts. Pressure constraints suggest phenocrysts and ultramafic

  4. Characterization of highly and moderately repetitive 500 bp Eco RI fragments from Xenopus laevis DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, S; Meyerhof, W; Korge, E; Knöchel, W

    1984-01-01

    Three different types of repetitive Eco RI fragments, which comigrate within a visible band of approximately 500 bp at gel electrophoresis of Xenopus laevis DNA Eco RI digests have been cloned and sequenced. These sequences are designated as Repetitive Eco RI Monomers: REM 1, REM 2 and REM 3. The sequences contain direct repeats, inverted repeats and palindromic elements. Genomic organization of the most abundant sequence (REM 1; 0.4% of total DNA) is that of an interspersed sequence. REM 2 (0.08%) is partly organized as an interspersed element and partly found in tandem arrangement, whereas REM 3 (0.02%) represents the tandemly repeated monomeric unit of a satellite DNA. In situ hybridization has shown that REM 1 and REM 2 sequences are found on most chromosomes, REM 1 being preferentially located on specific chromosomal loci. REM 3 is located near the centromere region of only one chromosome pair (presumably number 1). Hybridization of Northern blots from RNAs of different developmental stages revealed that REM 1, REM 2 and REM 3 sequences are transcribed and that transcription is under developmental control. Images PMID:6330690

  5. RepPop: A Database for Repetitive Elements in Populus Trichocarpa

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zhou, Fengfeng; Xu, Ying

    The populus was selected as the first tree with the genome to be sequenced, mainly due to its small genome size, the wide deployment worldwide (30+ species), and its short juvenile period. Its rich content of cellulose, which is one of the most important source for biofuel. A female clone of P. trichocarpa was chosen to be sequenced. The current assembly of Populus genome is release 1.0, whose small insert end-sequence coverage is 7.5X, and it was released in June 2004. It consists of 22,012 sequences (including the 19 chromosomes) and the total length is 485,510,911 bps. The data was downloaded from the offical site of the Populus trichocarpa genome sequencing project. The latest version of the genome can be found at the Poplar Genome Project at JGI Eukaryotic Genomics. Duplication regions introduce significant difficulties into the correct assemblying of sequence contigs. We identified all the repetitive elements in the populus genome. We further assign each of them as different classes of repetitive elements, including DNA transposons, RNA retrotransposons, Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE), Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), and Segmental Duplications (SD), etc. We organized the annotations into this easily browsable, searchable, and blastable database, RepPop, for the whole community.[From website for RepPop at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/~ffzhou/RepPop/

  6. Sequence of Colonization Determines the Composition of Mixed Biofilms by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O111:H8 Strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Kalchayanand, Norasak; Bono, James L

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are one of the potential sources of cross-contamination in food processing environments. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 and O111:H8 are important foodborne pathogens capable of forming biofilms, and the coexistence of these two STEC serotypes has been detected in various food samples and in multiple commercial meat plants throughout the United States. Here, we investigated how the coexistence of these two STEC serotypes and their sequence of colonization could affect bacterial growth competition and mixed biofilm development. Our data showed that E. coli O157:H7 strains were able to maintain a higher cell percentage in mixed biofilms with the co-inoculated O111:H8 companion strains, even though the results of planktonic growth competition were strain dependent. On solid surfaces with preexisting biofilms, the sequence of colonization played a critical role in determining the composition of the mixed biofilms because early stage precolonization significantly affected the competition results between the E. coli O157:H7 and O111:H8 strains. The precolonizer of either serotype was able to outgrow the other serotype in both planktonic and biofilm phases. The competitive interactions among the various STEC serotypes would determine the composition and structure of the mixed biofilms as well as their potential risks to food safety and public health, which is largely influenced by the dominant strains in the mixtures. Thus, the analysis of mixed biofilms under various conditions would be of importance to determine the nature of mixed biofilms composed of multiple microorganisms and to help implement the most effective disinfection operations accordingly.

  7. Detection of induced mutations in CaFAD2 genes by next-generation sequencing leading to the production of improved oil composition in Crambe abyssinica.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jihua; Salentijn, Elma M J; Huang, Bangquan; Denneboom, Christel; Qi, Weicong; Dechesne, Annemarie C; Krens, Frans A; Visser, Richard G F; van Loo, Eibertus N

    2015-05-01

    Crambe abyssinica is a hexaploid oil crop for industrial applications. An increase of erucic acid (C22:1) and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) contents in crambe oil is a valuable improvement. An increase in oleic acid (C18:1), a reduction in PUFA and possibly an increase in C22:1 can be obtained by down-regulating the expression of fatty acid desaturase2 genes (CaFAD2), which code for the enzyme that converts C18:1 into C18:2. We conducted EMS-mutagenesis in crambe, followed by Illumina sequencing, to screen mutations in three expressed CaFAD2 genes. Two novel analysis strategies were used to detect mutation sites. In the first strategy, mutation detection targeted specific sequence motifs. In the second strategy, every nucleotide position in a CaFAD2 fragment was tested for the presence of mutations. Seventeen novel mutations were detected in 1100 one-dimensional pools (11 000 individuals) in three expressed CaFAD2 genes, including non-sense mutations and mis-sense mutations in CaFAD2-C1, -C2 and -C3. The homozygous non-sense mutants for CaFAD2-C3 resulted in a 25% higher content of C18:1 and 25% lower content of PUFA compared to the wild type. The mis-sense mutations only led to small changes in oil composition. Concluding, targeted mutation detection using NGS in a polyploid was successfully applied and it was found that a non-sense mutation in even a single CaFAD2 gene can lead to changes in crambe oil composition. Stacking the mutations in different CaFAD2 may gain additional changes in C18:1 and PUFA contents.

  8. Effects of environmental enrichment on repetitive behaviors in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Stacey; Urruela, Meagan; Devine, Darragh P

    2013-10-01

    Lower order and higher order repetitive behaviors have been documented in the BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) mouse strain, a mouse model that exhibits all three core behavioral domains that define autism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of environmental enrichment for reducing repetitive behaviors in BTBR mice. Lower order behaviors were captured by assaying the time and sequence of grooming, while higher order behaviors were measured using pattern analysis of an object exploration task from digital recordings. Baseline scores were established at 7 weeks of age, followed by 30 days of housing in either a standard or enriched cage. As expected, BTBR mice spent significantly more time grooming and had a more rigid grooming sequence than control C57BL/6J mice did at baseline. After 30 days of enrichment housing, BTBR mice demonstrated a significant reduction in time spent grooming, resulting in levels that were lower than those exhibited by BTBR mice in standard housing. However, no changes were noted in the rigidity of their grooming sequence. In contrast to previous findings, there was no difference in repetitive patterns of exploration at baseline between BTBR and C57BL/6J mice in the object exploration test. Subsequently, enrichment did not significantly alter the number of repetitive patterns at posttest. Overall, the results suggest that environmental enrichment may be beneficial for reducing the time spent engaging in lower order repetitive behaviors, but may not change the overall quality of the behaviors when they do manifest.

  9. The Adult Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2A): A Self-Report Measure of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sarah L.; Uljarevic, Mirko; Baker, Emma K.; Richdale, Amanda L.; Jones, Catherine R. G.; Leekam, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies we developed and tested a new self-report measure of restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRB) suitable for adults. In Study 1, The Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 for adults (RBQ-2A) was completed by a sample of 163 neurotypical adults. Principal components analysis revealed two components: Repetitive Motor Behaviours and…

  10. Assessing quality of Medicago sativa silage by monitoring bacterial composition with single molecule, real-time sequencing technology and various physiological parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Weichen; Mi, Zhihui; Xu, Haiyan; Zheng, Yi; Kwok, Lai Yu; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    The present study applied the PacBio single molecule, real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) in evaluating the quality of silage production. Specifically, we produced four types of Medicago sativa silages by using four different lactic acid bacteria-based additives (AD-I, AD-II, AD-III and AD-IV). We monitored the changes in pH, organic acids (including butyric acid, the ratio of acetic acid/lactic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, 4-hyroxy benzoic acid and phenyl lactic acid), mycotoxins, and bacterial microbiota during silage fermentation. Our results showed that the use of the additives was beneficial to the silage fermentation by enhancing a general pH and mycotoxin reduction, while increasing the organic acids content. By SMRT analysis of the microbial composition in eight silage samples, we found that the bacterial species number and relative abundances shifted apparently after fermentation. Such changes were specific to the LAB species in the additives. Particularly, Bacillus megaterium was the initial dominant species in the raw materials; and after the fermentation process, Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus plantarum became the most prevalent species, both of which were intrinsically present in the LAB additives. Our data have demonstrated that the SMRT sequencing platform is applicable in assessing the quality of silage. PMID:27340760

  11. Assessing quality of Medicago sativa silage by monitoring bacterial composition with single molecule, real-time sequencing technology and various physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Bao, Weichen; Mi, Zhihui; Xu, Haiyan; Zheng, Yi; Kwok, Lai Yu; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-06-24

    The present study applied the PacBio single molecule, real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) in evaluating the quality of silage production. Specifically, we produced four types of Medicago sativa silages by using four different lactic acid bacteria-based additives (AD-I, AD-II, AD-III and AD-IV). We monitored the changes in pH, organic acids (including butyric acid, the ratio of acetic acid/lactic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid, 4-hyroxy benzoic acid and phenyl lactic acid), mycotoxins, and bacterial microbiota during silage fermentation. Our results showed that the use of the additives was beneficial to the silage fermentation by enhancing a general pH and mycotoxin reduction, while increasing the organic acids content. By SMRT analysis of the microbial composition in eight silage samples, we found that the bacterial species number and relative abundances shifted apparently after fermentation. Such changes were specific to the LAB species in the additives. Particularly, Bacillus megaterium was the initial dominant species in the raw materials; and after the fermentation process, Pediococcus acidilactici and Lactobacillus plantarum became the most prevalent species, both of which were intrinsically present in the LAB additives. Our data have demonstrated that the SMRT sequencing platform is applicable in assessing the quality of silage.

  12. Sequence variants of BIEC2-808543 near LCORL are associated with body composition in Thoroughbreds under training

    PubMed Central

    TOZAKI, Teruaki; SATO, Fumio; ISHIMARU, Mutsuki; KIKUCHI, Mio; KAKOI, Hironaga; HIROTA, Kei-ichi; NAGATA, Shun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ligand-dependent nuclear receptor compressor-like (LCORL) encodes a transcription factor, and its polymorphisms are associated with measures of skeletal frame size and adult height in several species. Recently, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) BIEC2-808543 located upstream of LCORL was identified as a genetic diagnostic marker associated with withers height in Thoroughbreds. In this study, 322 Thoroughbreds-in-training were genotyped for BIEC2-808543 to evaluate the association between genotype and body composition traits, including body weight, withers height, the ratio of body weight to withers height, chest circumference, and cannon circumference. Of these, withers height and cannon circumference were significantly associated with LCORL genotypes throughout almost the entire training period in males and females. Animals with a C/T genotype had higher withers height (maximum differences of 1.8 cm and 2.1 cm in males and females, respectively) and cannon circumstance (maximum differences of 0.65 cm and 0.48 cm in males and females, respectively) compared with animals with a T/T genotype. These results suggested that the regulation of LCORL expression influences the skeletal frame size in Thoroughbreds and thus, indirectly affects the body weight. Although LCORL and BIEC2-808543 would be useful for selective breeding in Thoroughbreds, the production of genetically modified animals and gene doping based on genetic information should be prohibited in order to maintain racing integrity. PMID:27703405

  13. fMRI repetition suppression: neuronal adaptation or stimulus expectation?

    PubMed

    Larsson, Jonas; Smith, Andrew T

    2012-03-01

    Measurements of repetition suppression with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI adaptation) have been used widely to probe neuronal population response properties in human cerebral cortex. fMRI adaptation techniques assume that fMRI repetition suppression reflects neuronal adaptation, an assumption that has been challenged on the basis of evidence that repetition-related response changes may reflect unrelated factors, such as attention and stimulus expectation. Specifically, Summerfield et al. (Summerfield C, Trittschuh EH, Monti JM, Mesulam MM, Egner T. 2008. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations. Nat Neurosci. 11:1004-1006) reported that the relative frequency of stimulus repetitions and non-repetitions influenced the magnitude of repetition suppression in the fusiform face area, suggesting that stimulus expectation accounted for most of the effect of repetition. We confirm that stimulus expectation can significantly influence fMRI repetition suppression throughout visual cortex and show that it occurs with long as well as short adaptation durations. However, the effect was attention dependent: When attention was diverted away from the stimuli, the effects of stimulus expectation completely disappeared. Nonetheless, robust and significant repetition suppression was still evident. These results suggest that fMRI repetition suppression reflects a combination of neuronal adaptation and attention-dependent expectation effects that can be experimentally dissociated. This implies that with an appropriate experimental design, fMRI adaptation can provide valid measures of neuronal adaptation and hence response specificity.

  14. DNA methylation in repetitive elements and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Bollati, V; Galimberti, D; Pergoli, L; Dalla Valle, E; Barretta, F; Cortini, F; Scarpini, E; Bertazzi, P A; Baccarelli, A

    2011-08-01

    Epigenetics is believed to play a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). DNA methylation, the most investigated epigenetic hallmark, is a reversible mechanism that modifies genome function and chromosomal stability through the addition of methyl groups to cytosine located in CpG dinucleotides to form 5 methylcytosine (5mC). Methylation status of repetitive elements (i.e. Alu, LINE-1 and SAT-α) is a major contributor of global DNA methylation patterns and has been investigated in relation to a variety of human diseases. However, the role of methylation of repetitive elements in blood of AD patients has never been investigated so far. In the present study, a quantitative bisulfite-PCR pyrosequencing method was used to evaluate methylation of Alu, LINE-1 and SAT-α sequences in 43 AD patients and 38 healthy donors. In multivariate analysis adjusting for age and gender, LINE-1 was increased in AD patients compared with healthy volunteers (ADs: 83.6%5mC, volunteers: 83.1%5mC, p-value: 0.05). The group with best performances in mini mental state examination (MMSE) showed higher levels of LINE-1 methylation compared to the group with worst performances (MMSE>22: 83.9%5mC; MMSE≤22: 83.2%5mC; p=0.05). Our data suggest that LINE-1 methylation may lead to a better understanding of AD pathogenesis and course, and may contribute to identify novel markers useful to assess risk stratification. Further prospective investigations are warranted to evaluate the dynamics of DNA methylation from early-stage AD to advanced phases of the disease.

  15. [Guidelines for redesigning jobs with repetitive tasks].

    PubMed

    Colombini, D; Occhipinti, E; Meroni, M; Menoni, O; Bergamasco, R; Girola, C; Grea, V; Vendola, D

    1996-01-01

    Preventive measures aimed at minimising the occurrence of work-related musculo-skeletal disorders of the upper limbs (WMSDs) associated with repetitive tasks can be divided into 3 categories: structural, organisational and educational. Whenever specific risk and injury assessments have shown the need for preventive action, this is most often implemented within the framework of a range of assorted measures. In particular, structural measures pertain to optimising the layout of the work area and furnishings, and the "ergonomic" properties of work tools and equipment. Such measures serve to alleviate the problems caused by the use of excessive force and improper postures. The authors refer to the principles guiding such structural measures, in the light of the extensive literature that has been published on the subject. Organisational (or re-organisational) measures essentially relate to job design (i.e. distribution of tasks, speeds and pauses). They serve to alleviate problems connected with highly repetitive and frequent actions, excessively lengthy tasks and inadequate recovery periods. Very few relevant findings are available: the authors therefore illustrate in some detail a practical trial conducted in a major engineering firm. The objective was to lower to acceptable limits the frequency of certain repetitive tasks performed by workers using their upper limbs. The trial made it possible to identify a suitable plan and schedule of measures taking into due consideration the impact of the plan on production levels (and costs). The fundamental principles guiding the adoption of specific educational and training programmes for the workers and their supervisors are presented and discussed.

  16. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern.

  17. A self-excising beta-recombinase/six cassette for repetitive gene deletion and homokaryon purification in Neurospora crassa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study we developed a cassette employing a bacterial beta-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (beta-rec/six), which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling in Neurospora crassa. However, only one positive selection marker was used in the cassette...

  18. Animal models of restricted repetitive behavior in autism.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark H; Tanimura, Yoko; Lee, Linda W; Bodfish, James W

    2007-01-10

    Restricted, repetitive behavior, along with deficits in social reciprocity and communication, is diagnostic of autism. Animal models relevant to this domain generally fall into three classes: repetitive behavior associated with targeted insults to the CNS; repetitive behavior induced by pharmacological agents; and repetitive behavior associated with restricted environments and experience. The extant literature provides potential models of the repetitive behavioral phenotype in autism rather than attempts to model the etiology or pathophysiology of restricted, repetitive behavior, as these are poorly understood. This review focuses on our work with deer mice which exhibit repetitive behaviors associated with environmental restriction. Repetitive behaviors are the most common category of abnormal behavior observed in confined animals and larger, more complex environments substantially reduce the development and expression of such behavior. Studies with this model, including environmental enrichment effects, suggest alterations in cortical-basal ganglia circuitry in the development and expression of repetitive behavior. Considerably more work needs to be done in this area, particularly in modeling the development of aberrant repetitive behavior. As mutant mouse models continue to proliferate, there should be a number of promising genetic models to pursue.

  19. Interactions between "what" and "when" in the auditory system: temporal predictability enhances repetition suppression.

    PubMed

    Costa-Faidella, Jordi; Baldeweg, Torsten; Grimm, Sabine; Escera, Carles

    2011-12-14

    Neural activity in the auditory system decreases with repeated stimulation, matching stimulus probability in multiple timescales. This phenomenon, known as stimulus-specific adaptation, is interpreted as a neural mechanism of regularity encoding aiding auditory object formation. However, despite the overwhelming literature covering recordings from single-cell to scalp auditory-evoked potential (AEP), stimulation timing has received little interest. Here we investigated whether timing predictability enhances the experience-dependent modulation of neural activity associated with stimulus probability encoding. We used human electrophysiological recordings in healthy participants who were exposed to passive listening of sound sequences. Pure tones of different frequencies were delivered in successive trains of a variable number of repetitions, enabling the study of sequential repetition effects in the AEP. In the predictable timing condition, tones were delivered with isochronous interstimulus intervals; in the unpredictable timing condition, interstimulus intervals varied randomly. Our results show that unpredictable stimulus timing abolishes the early part of the repetition positivity, an AEP indexing auditory sensory memory trace formation, while leaving the later part (≈ >200 ms) unaffected. This suggests that timing predictability aids the propagation of repetition effects upstream the auditory pathway, most likely from association auditory cortex (including the planum temporale) toward primary auditory cortex (Heschl's gyrus) and beyond, as judged by the timing of AEP latencies. This outcome calls for attention to stimulation timing in future experiments regarding sensory memory trace formation in AEP measures and stimulus probability encoding in animal models.

  20. Incidence of shoulder pain in repetitive work

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, A; Chastang, J; Niedhammer, I; Landre, M; Roquelaure, Y

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To determine the predictiveness of personal and occupational factors for the onset of shoulder pain in occupations requiring repetitive work. Methods: A sample of 598 workers in five activity sectors completed a self administered questionnaire in 1993–94 and again three years later. Both questionnaires included questions about shoulder pain. The associations between various factors at baseline and subsequent shoulder pain were studied among subjects free from shoulder pain at baseline. Results: The incidence of shoulder pain was associated with several independent risk factors: depressive symptoms, low level of job control, and biomechanical constraints. After adjustment for other risk factors, the presence of depressive symptoms predicted occurrence of shoulder pain. A low level of job control was also associated with the onset of shoulder pain in both sexes. For men, repetitive use of a tool was a strong predictor, while the two most important biomechanical risk factors for women were use of vibrating tools and working with arms above shoulder level. Conclusion: This study used a longitudinal approach to examine different sets of risk factors for shoulder pain simultaneously. The results confirm the role of several biomechanical constraints. Psychological symptoms and a low level of job control also play a role. PMID:14691271

  1. Investigation of a repetitive pulsed electrothermal thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, R. L.; Fleischer, D.; Goldstein, S. A.; Tidman, D. A.; Winsor, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed electrothermal (PET) thruster with 1000:1 ratio nozzle is tested in a repetitive mode on water propellant. The thruster is driven by a 60J pulse forming network at repetition rates up to 10 Hz (600W). The pulse forming network has a .31 ohm impedance, well matched to the capillary discharge resistance of .40 ohm, and is directly coupled to the thruster electrodes without a switch. The discharge is initiated by high voltage breakdown, typically at 2500V, through the water vapor in the interelectrode gap. Water is injected as a jet through a .37 mm orifice on the thruster axis. Thruster voltage, current and impulse bit are recorded for several seconds at various power supply currents. Thruster to power ratio is typically T/P = .07 N/kW. Tank background pressure precludes direct measurement of exhaust velocity which is inferred from calculated pressure and temperature in the discharge to be about 14 km/sec. Efficiency, based on this velocity and measured T/P is .54 + or - .07. Thruster ablation is zero at the throat and becomes measurable further upstream, indicating that radiative ablation is occurring late in the pulse.

  2. Mermaid, a family of short interspersed repetitive elements, is useful for zebrafish genome mapping.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, N; Chevrette, M; Ekker, M; Kikuchi, Y; Hotta, Y; Okamoto, H

    1996-03-07

    A family of short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs), designated mermaid, is present in the genomes of fish, amphibian and primates, but absent in the mouse genome. We have demonstrated that the sequences of the mermaid family are highly polymorphic in the zebrafish genome as in the human genome. We have also shown that the mermaid sequence can be used to recover zebrafish specific DNA from zebrafish-mouse cell hybrids by using mermaid-specific oligonucleotides as PCR primers. Thus, the mermaid family serves as a valuable genetic tool for the zebrafish genome mapping.

  3. Synergy Repetition Training versus Task Repetition Training in Acquiring New Skill

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vrajeshri; Craig, Jamie; Schumacher, Michelle; Burns, Martin K.; Florescu, Ionut; Vinjamuri, Ramana

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, repetitive practice of a task is used to learn a new skill, exhibiting as immediately improved performance. Research suggests, however, that a more experience-based rather than exposure-based training protocol may allow for better transference of the skill to related tasks. In synergy-based motor control theory, fundamental motor skills, such as hand grasping, are represented with a synergy subspace that captures essential motor patterns. In this study, we propose that motor-skill learning through synergy-based mechanisms may provide advantages over traditional task repetition learning. A new task was designed to highlight the range of motion and dexterity of the human hand. Two separate training strategies were tested in healthy subjects: task repetition training and synergy training versus a control. All three groups showed improvements when retested on the same task. When tested on a similar, but different set of tasks, only the synergy group showed improvements in accuracy (9.27% increase) compared to the repetition (3.24% decline) and control (3.22% decline) groups. A kinematic analysis revealed that although joint angular peak velocities decreased, timing benefits stemmed from the initial feed-forward portion of the task (reaction time). Accuracy improvements may have derived from general improved coordination among the four involved fingers. These preliminary results warrant further investigation of synergy-based motor training in healthy individuals, as well as in individuals undergoing hand-based rehabilitative therapy. PMID:28289680

  4. Contrasting the Chromosomal Organization of Repetitive DNAs in Two Gryllidae Crickets with Highly Divergent Karyotypes

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio M.; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto; Ferrari Soares, Fernanda Aparecida; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C.

    2015-01-01

    A large percentage of eukaryotic genomes consist of repetitive DNA that plays an important role in the organization, size and evolution. In the case of crickets, chromosomal variability has been found using classical cytogenetics, but almost no information concerning the organization of their repetitive DNAs is available. To better understand the chromosomal organization and diversification of repetitive DNAs in crickets, we studied the chromosomes of two Gryllidae species with highly divergent karyotypes, i.e., 2n(♂) = 29,X0 (Gryllus assimilis) and 2n = 9, neo-X1X2Y (Eneoptera surinamensis). The analyses were performed using classical cytogenetic techniques, repetitive DNA mapping and genome-size estimation. Conserved characteristics were observed, such as the occurrence of a small number of clusters of rDNAs and U snDNAs, in contrast to the multiple clusters/dispersal of the H3 histone genes. The positions of U2 snDNA and 18S rDNA are also conserved, being intermingled within the largest autosome. The distribution and base-pair composition of the heterochromatin and repetitive DNA pools of these organisms differed, suggesting reorganization. Although the microsatellite arrays had a similar distribution pattern, being dispersed along entire chromosomes, as has been observed in some grasshopper species, a band-like pattern was also observed in the E. surinamensis chromosomes, putatively due to their amplification and clustering. In addition to these differences, the genome of E. surinamensis is approximately 2.5 times larger than that of G. assimilis, which we hypothesize is due to the amplification of repetitive DNAs. Finally, we discuss the possible involvement of repetitive DNAs in the differentiation of the neo-sex chromosomes of E. surinamensis, as has been reported in other eukaryotic groups. This study provided an opportunity to explore the evolutionary dynamics of repetitive DNAs in two non-model species and will contribute to the understanding of

  5. Construction of a High-Density American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) Composite Map Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing for Multi-pedigree Linkage Mapping.

    PubMed

    Schlautman, Brandon; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Iorizzo, Massimo; Polashock, James; Grygleski, Edward; Vorsa, Nicholi; Zalapa, Juan

    2017-04-03

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a recently domesticated, economically important, fruit crop with limited molecular resources. New genetic resources could accelerate genetic gain in cranberry through characterization of its genomic structure and by enabling molecular-assisted breeding strategies. To increase the availability of cranberry genomic resources, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was used to discover and genotype thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within three interrelated cranberry full-sib populations. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were added to the SNP datasets and used to construct bin maps for the parents of the populations, which were then merged to create the first high-density cranberry composite map containing 6073 markers (5437 SNPs and 636 SSRs) on 12 linkage groups (LGs) spanning 1124 cM. Interestingly, higher rates of recombination were observed in maternal than paternal gametes. The large number of markers in common (mean of 57.3) and the high degree of observed collinearity (mean Pair-wise Spearman rank correlations >0.99) between the LGs of the parental maps demonstrates the utility of GBS in cranberry for identifying polymorphic SNP loci that are transferable between pedigrees and populations in future trait-association studies. Furthermore, the high-density of markers anchored within the component maps allowed identification of segregation distortion regions, placement of centromeres on each of the 12 LGs, and anchoring of genomic scaffolds. Collectively, the results represent an important contribution to the current understanding of cranberry genomic structure and to the availability of molecular tools for future genetic research and breeding efforts in cranberry.

  6. Construction of a High-Density American Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) Composite Map Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing for Multi-pedigree Linkage Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Schlautman, Brandon; Covarrubias-Pazaran, Giovanny; Diaz-Garcia, Luis; Iorizzo, Massimo; Polashock, James; Grygleski, Edward; Vorsa, Nicholi; Zalapa, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a recently domesticated, economically important, fruit crop with limited molecular resources. New genetic resources could accelerate genetic gain in cranberry through characterization of its genomic structure and by enabling molecular-assisted breeding strategies. To increase the availability of cranberry genomic resources, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) was used to discover and genotype thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within three interrelated cranberry full-sib populations. Additional simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were added to the SNP datasets and used to construct bin maps for the parents of the populations, which were then merged to create the first high-density cranberry composite map containing 6073 markers (5437 SNPs and 636 SSRs) on 12 linkage groups (LGs) spanning 1124 cM. Interestingly, higher rates of recombination were observed in maternal than paternal gametes. The large number of markers in common (mean of 57.3) and the high degree of observed collinearity (mean Pair-wise Spearman rank correlations >0.99) between the LGs of the parental maps demonstrates the utility of GBS in cranberry for identifying polymorphic SNP loci that are transferable between pedigrees and populations in future trait-association studies. Furthermore, the high-density of markers anchored within the component maps allowed identification of segregation distortion regions, placement of centromeres on each of the 12 LGs, and anchoring of genomic scaffolds. Collectively, the results represent an important contribution to the current understanding of cranberry genomic structure and to the availability of molecular tools for future genetic research and breeding efforts in cranberry. PMID:28250016

  7. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Provides Insight into the Evolution and Genetic Composition of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Belarus

    PubMed Central

    Wollenberg, Kurt R.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Zalutskaya, Aksana; Slodovnikova, Vervara; Oler, Andrew J.; Quiñones, Mariam; Abeel, Thomas; Chapman, Sinead B.; Tartakovsky, Michael; Gabrielian, Andrei; Hoffner, Sven; Skrahin, Aliaksandr; Birren, Bruce W.; Rosenthal, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (DR-TB) are critical global health issues. Eastern Europe has some of the highest incidences of DR-TB, particularly multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB. To better understand the genetic composition and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in the region, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 138 M. tuberculosis isolates from 97 patients sampled between 2010 and 2013 in Minsk, Belarus. MDR and XDR-TB isolates were significantly more likely to belong to the Beijing lineage than to the Euro-American lineage, and known resistance-conferring loci accounted for the majority of phenotypic resistance to first- and second-line drugs in MDR and XDR-TB. Using a phylogenomic approach, we estimated that the majority of MDR-TB was due to the recent transmission of already-resistant M. tuberculosis strains rather than repeated de novo evolution of resistance within patients, while XDR-TB was acquired through both routes. Longitudinal sampling of M. tuberculosis from 34 patients with treatment failure showed that most strains persisted genetically unchanged during treatment or acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones. HIV+ patients were significantly more likely to have multiple infections over time than HIV− patients, highlighting a specific need for careful infection control in these patients. These data provide a better understanding of the genomic composition, transmission, and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in Belarus and will enable improved diagnostics, treatment protocols, and prognostic decision-making. PMID:27903602

  8. Acute Effects of TiO2 Nanomaterials on the Viability and Taxonomic Composition of Aquatic Bacterial Communities Assessed via High-Throughput Screening and Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A.; Kelly, John J.

    2014-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is growing rapidly, leading to concerns about the potential ecological consequences of the release of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) to the environment. One challenge of assessing the ecological risks of ENMs is the incredible diversity of ENMs currently available and the rapid pace at which new ENMs are being developed. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a popular approach to assessing ENM cytotoxicity that offers the opportunity to rapidly test in parallel a wide range of ENMs at multiple concentrations. However, current HTS approaches generally test one cell type at a time, which limits their ability to predict responses of complex microbial communities. In this study toxicity screening via a HTS platform was used in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS) to assess responses of bacterial communities from two aquatic habitats, Lake Michigan (LM) and the Chicago River (CR), to short-term exposure in their native waters to several commercial TiO2 nanomaterials under simulated solar irradiation. Results demonstrate that bacterial communities from LM and CR differed in their sensitivity to nano-TiO2, with the community from CR being more resistant. NGS analysis revealed that the composition of the bacterial communities from LM and CR were significantly altered by exposure to nano-TiO2, including decreases in overall bacterial diversity, decreases in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Limnohabitans, and Flavobacterium, and a significant increase in Limnobacter. These results suggest that the release of nano-TiO2 to the environment has the potential to alter the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, which could have implications for the stability and function of aquatic ecosystems. The novel combination of HTS and NGS described in this study represents a major advance over current methods for assessing ENM ecotoxicity because the relative toxicities of multiple ENMs to thousands of naturally

  9. Acute effects of TiO2 nanomaterials on the viability and taxonomic composition of aquatic bacterial communities assessed via high-throughput screening and next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Tong, Tiezheng; Gaillard, Jean-François; Gray, Kimberly A; Kelly, John J

    2014-01-01

    The nanotechnology industry is growing rapidly, leading to concerns about the potential ecological consequences of the release of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) to the environment. One challenge of assessing the ecological risks of ENMs is the incredible diversity of ENMs currently available and the rapid pace at which new ENMs are being developed. High-throughput screening (HTS) is a popular approach to assessing ENM cytotoxicity that offers the opportunity to rapidly test in parallel a wide range of ENMs at multiple concentrations. However, current HTS approaches generally test one cell type at a time, which limits their ability to predict responses of complex microbial communities. In this study toxicity screening via a HTS platform was used in combination with next generation sequencing (NGS) to assess responses of bacterial communities from two aquatic habitats, Lake Michigan (LM) and the Chicago River (CR), to short-term exposure in their native waters to several commercial TiO2 nanomaterials under simulated solar irradiation. Results demonstrate that bacterial communities from LM and CR differed in their sensitivity to nano-TiO2, with the community from CR being more resistant. NGS analysis revealed that the composition of the bacterial communities from LM and CR were significantly altered by exposure to nano-TiO2, including decreases in overall bacterial diversity, decreases in the relative abundance of Actinomycetales, Sphingobacteriales, Limnohabitans, and Flavobacterium, and a significant increase in Limnobacter. These results suggest that the release of nano-TiO2 to the environment has the potential to alter the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, which could have implications for the stability and function of aquatic ecosystems. The novel combination of HTS and NGS described in this study represents a major advance over current methods for assessing ENM ecotoxicity because the relative toxicities of multiple ENMs to thousands of naturally

  10. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Provides Insight into the Evolution and Genetic Composition of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, Kurt R; Desjardins, Christopher A; Zalutskaya, Aksana; Slodovnikova, Vervara; Oler, Andrew J; Quiñones, Mariam; Abeel, Thomas; Chapman, Sinead B; Tartakovsky, Michael; Gabrielian, Andrei; Hoffner, Sven; Skrahin, Aliaksandr; Birren, Bruce W; Rosenthal, Alexander; Skrahina, Alena; Earl, Ashlee M

    2017-02-01

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (DR-TB) are critical global health issues. Eastern Europe has some of the highest incidences of DR-TB, particularly multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB. To better understand the genetic composition and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in the region, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 138 M. tuberculosis isolates from 97 patients sampled between 2010 and 2013 in Minsk, Belarus. MDR and XDR-TB isolates were significantly more likely to belong to the Beijing lineage than to the Euro-American lineage, and known resistance-conferring loci accounted for the majority of phenotypic resistance to first- and second-line drugs in MDR and XDR-TB. Using a phylogenomic approach, we estimated that the majority of MDR-TB was due to the recent transmission of already-resistant M. tuberculosis strains rather than repeated de novo evolution of resistance within patients, while XDR-TB was acquired through both routes. Longitudinal sampling of M. tuberculosis from 34 patients with treatment failure showed that most strains persisted genetically unchanged during treatment or acquired resistance to fluoroquinolones. HIV+ patients were significantly more likely to have multiple infections over time than HIV- patients, highlighting a specific need for careful infection control in these patients. These data provide a better understanding of the genomic composition, transmission, and evolution of MDR- and XDR-TB in Belarus and will enable improved diagnostics, treatment protocols, and prognostic decision-making.

  11. Risk Factors for Repetition of Self-Harm: A Systematic Review of Prospective Hospital-Based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Celine; Di Blasi, Zelda; Arensman, Ella

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-harm entails high costs to individuals and society in terms of suicide risk, morbidity and healthcare expenditure. Repetition of self-harm confers yet higher risk of suicide and risk assessment of self-harm patients forms a key component of the health care management of self-harm patients. To date, there has been no systematic review published which synthesises the extensive evidence on risk factors for repetition. Objective This review is intended to identify risk factors for prospective repetition of self-harm after an index self-harm presentation, irrespective of suicidal intent. Data sources PubMed, PsychInfo and Scirus were used to search for relevant publications. We included cohort studies which examining factors associated with prospective repetition among those presenting with self-harm to emergency departments. Journal articles, abstracts, letters and theses in any language published up to June 2012 were considered. Studies were quality-assessed and synthesised in narrative form. Results A total of 129 studies, including 329,001 participants, met our inclusion criteria. Some factors were studied extensively and were found to have a consistent association with repetition. These included previous self-harm, personality disorder, hopelessness, history of psychiatric treatment, schizophrenia, alcohol abuse/dependence, drug abuse/dependence, and living alone. However, the sensitivity values of these measures varied greatly across studies. Psychological risk factors and protective factors have been relatively under-researched but show emerging associations with repetition. Composite risk scales tended to have high sensitivity but poor specificity. Conclusions Many risk factors for repetition of self-harm match risk factors for initiation of self-harm, but the most consistent evidence for increased risk of repetition comes from long-standing psychosocial vulnerabilities, rather than characteristics of an index episode. The current review will

  12. BAC-pool 454-sequencing: A rapid and efficient approach to sequence complex tetraploid cotton genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New and emerging next generation sequencing technologies have been promising in reducing sequencing costs, but not significantly for complex polyploid plant genomes such as cotton. Large and highly repetitive genome of G. hirsutum (~2.5GB) is less amenable and cost-intensive with traditional BAC-by...

  13. Investigation into the structural composition of hydroalcoholic solutions as basis for the development of multiple suppression pulse sequences for NMR measurement of alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Mushtakova, Svetlana P; Kuballa, Thomas; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2014-12-01

    An eight-fold suppression pulse sequence was recently developed to improve sensitivity in (1) H NMR measurements of alcoholic beverages [Magn. Res. Chem. 2011 (49): 734-739]. To ensure that only one combined hydroxyl peak from water and ethanol appears in the spectrum, adjustment to a certain range of ethanol concentrations was required. To explain this observation, the structure of water-ethanol solutions was studied. Hydroalcoholic solutions showed extreme behavior at 25% vol, 46% vol, and 83% vol ethanol according to (1) H NMR experiments. Near-infrared spectroscopy confirmed the occurrence of four significant compounds ('individual' ethanol and water structures as well as two water-ethanol complexes of defined composition - 1 : 1 and 1 : 3). The successful multiple suppression can be achieved for every kind of alcoholic beverage with different alcoholic strengths, when the final ethanol concentration is adjusted to a range between 25% vol and 46% vol (e.g. using dilution or pure ethanol addition). In this optimum region, an individual ethanol peak was not detected, because the 'individual' water structure and the 1 : 1 ethanol-water complex predominate. The nature of molecular association in ethanol-water solutions is essential to elucidate NMR method development for measurement of alcoholic beverages. The presented approach can be used to optimize other NMR suppression protocols for binary water-organic solvent mixtures, where hydrogen bonding plays a dominant role.

  14. A review of neuroimaging findings in repetitive brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Koerte, Inga K; Lin, Alexander P; Willems, Anna; Muehlmann, Marc; Hufschmidt, Jakob; Coleman, Michael J; Green, Isobel; Liao, Huijun; Tate, David F; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Pasternak, Ofer; Bouix, Sylvain; Rathi, Yogesh; Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Robert A; Shenton, Martha E

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease confirmed at postmortem. Those at highest risk are professional athletes who participate in contact sports and military personnel who are exposed to repetitive blast events. All neuropathologically confirmed CTE cases, to date, have had a history of repetitive head impacts. This suggests that repetitive head impacts may be necessary for the initiation of the pathogenetic cascade that, in some cases, leads to CTE. Importantly, while all CTE appears to result from repetitive brain trauma, not all repetitive brain trauma results in CTE. Magnetic resonance imaging has great potential for understanding better the underlying mechanisms of repetitive brain trauma. In this review, we provide an overview of advanced imaging techniques currently used to investigate brain anomalies. We also provide an overview of neuroimaging findings in those exposed to repetitive head impacts in the acute/subacute and chronic phase of injury and in more neurodegenerative phases of injury, as well as in military personnel exposed to repetitive head impacts. Finally, we discuss future directions for research that will likely lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms separating those who recover from repetitive brain trauma vs. those who go on to develop CTE.

  15. Highly proficient bilinguals implement inhibition: Evidence from n-2 language repetition costs.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Mathieu; Thoma, Aniella M; Koch, Iring; Philipp, Andrea M

    2015-11-01

    Several, but not all, models of language control assume that highly proficient bilinguals implement little to no inhibition during bilingual language production. In the current study, we tested this assumption with a less equivocal marker of inhibition (i.e., n-2 language repetition costs) than previous language switching studies have. N-2 language repetition costs denote worse performance when switching back to a recently abandoned language (i.e., worse performance in ABA language sequences than CBA sequences, where A, B, and C refer to different languages). Whereas this marker has solely been used to investigate second-language learners in prior studies, we examined highly proficient bilinguals. The results showed that substantial n-2 language repetition costs can be observed with highly proficient bilinguals. Moreover, this inhibition effect was substantial for all 3 languages, but larger for the 2 dominant languages (Turkish and German) relative to the less proficient language (English). These findings indicate that even highly proficient bilinguals implement inhibition to restrict language production to the target language.

  16. Object color affects identification and repetition priming.

    PubMed

    Uttl, Bob; Graf, Peter; Santacruz, Pilar

    2006-10-01

    We investigated the influence of color on the identification of both non-studied and studied objects. Participants studied black and white and color photos of common objects and memory was assessed with an identification test. Consistent with our meta-analysis of prior research, we found that objects were easier to identify from color than from black and white photos. We also found substantial priming in all conditions, and study-to-test changes in an object's color reduced the magnitude of priming. Color-specific priming effects were large for color-complex objects, but minimal for color-simple objects. The pattern and magnitude of priming effects was not influenced either by the extent to which an object always appears in the same color (i.e., whether a color is symptomatic of an object) or by the object's origin (natural versus fabricated). We discuss the implications of our findings for theoretical accounts of object perception and repetition priming.

  17. Capillary underwater discharges in repetitive pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Baerdemaeker, F.; Monte, M.; Leys, C.

    2004-03-01

    In this study a capillary underwater discharge, that is sustained with AC (50 Hz) voltages up to 7.5 kV, is investigated. In a capillary discharge scheme, the current is, at some point along its path between two submerged electrodes, flowing through a narrow elongated bore in a dielectric material. When the current density is sufficiently high, local boiling and subsequent vapour breakdown results in the formation of a plasma within this capillary. At the same time the capillary emits an intense jet of vapour bubbles. Time-dependent electrical current, voltage and light emission curves are recorded for discharges in solutions of NaCl in distilled water and reveal different discharge regimes, depending on the conductivity and the excitation voltage, ranging from repetitive microsecond discharge pulses to a quasi-continuous discharge with a glow-like voltage-current characteristic.

  18. Low-Intensity Repetitive Exercise Induced Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mina; Hayden, Nicholas; Garcia, Brandon; Tucci, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare condition caused by the proteins of damaged muscle cells entering the bloodstream and damaging the kidneys. Common symptoms of rhabdomyolysis are muscle pain and fatigue in conjunction with dark urine; kidney damage is a common symptom among these patients. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman who displayed myalgia in the upper extremities caused by low-intensity and high-repetition exercise. She was successfully diagnosed and treated for exertional rhabdomyolysis. This patient had no significant medical history that would induce this condition. We urge the emergency medical community to observe and monitor patients that complain of myalgia to ensure they are not suffering from rhabdomyolysis even in atypical cases.

  19. Visual and phonological codes in repetition blindness.

    PubMed

    Bavelier, D; Potter, M C

    1992-02-01

    Repetition blindness (RB) is the inability to detect or recall a repeated word in rapid serial visual presentation. The role of visual versus phonological (name) similarity in RB was examined. RB was found for single letters, whether printed in the same or different cases, and for single digits, whether represented verbally (nine), as arabic numerals (9), or in a mixture of the 2 formats. Hence, visual similarity is not necessary to produce RB. RB was obtained between homophonic pairs (won/one), showing that phonological similarity is sufficient to produce RB, although visual identity also contributes to RB. It is proposed that RB results when the codes used for initial registration of the targets in short-term memory are similar. This initial code may be predominantly visual or predominantly phonological.

  20. Repetitive control of electrically driven robot manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateh, Mohammad Mehdi; Ahsani Tehrani, Hojjat; Karbassi, Seyed Mehdi

    2013-04-01

    This article presents a novel robust discrete repetitive control of electrically driven robot manipulators for tracking of a periodic trajectory. We propose a novel model, which presents the highly non-linear dynamics of robot manipulator in the form of linear discrete-time time-varying system. Based on the proposed model, we develop a two-term control law. The first term is an ordinary time-optimal and minimum-norm (TOMN) control by employing parametric controllers to guarantee stability. The second term is a novel robust control to improve the control performance in the face of uncertainties. The robust control estimates and compensates uncertainties including the parametric uncertainty, unmodelled dynamics and external disturbances. Performance of the proposed method is compared with two discrete methods, namely the TOMN control and an adaptive iterative learning (AIL) control. Simulation results confirm superiority of the proposed method in terms of the convergence speed and precision.

  1. Low-Intensity Repetitive Exercise Induced Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Mina; Hayden, Nicholas; Garcia, Brandon; Tucci, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare condition caused by the proteins of damaged muscle cells entering the bloodstream and damaging the kidneys. Common symptoms of rhabdomyolysis are muscle pain and fatigue in conjunction with dark urine; kidney damage is a common symptom among these patients. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman who displayed myalgia in the upper extremities caused by low-intensity and high-repetition exercise. She was successfully diagnosed and treated for exertional rhabdomyolysis. This patient had no significant medical history that would induce this condition. We urge the emergency medical community to observe and monitor patients that complain of myalgia to ensure they are not suffering from rhabdomyolysis even in atypical cases. PMID:26693360

  2. Efficient sequential repetitive gene deletions in Neurospora crassa employing a self-excising β-recombinase/six cassette.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Edyta; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2013-03-01

    Despite its long-standing history as a model organism, Neurospora crassa has limited tools for repetitive gene deletions utilizing recyclable self-excising marker systems. Here we describe, for the first time, the functionality of a bacterial recombination system employing β-recombinase acting on six recognition sequences (β-rec/six) in N. crassa, which allowed repetitive site-specific gene deletion and marker recycling. We report generating the mus-51 deletion strain using this system, recycling the marker cassette, and subsequently deleting the global transcriptional regulator gene cre-1.

  3. Movement consistency during repetitive tool use action

    PubMed Central

    Baber, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The consistency and repeatability of movement patterns has been of long-standing interest in locomotor biomechanics, but less well explored in other domains. Tool use is one of such a domain; while the complex dynamics of the human-tool-environment system have been approached from various angles, to date it remains unknown how the rhythmicity of repetitive tool-using action emerges. To examine whether the spontaneously adopted movement frequency is a variable susceptible to individual execution approaches or emerges as constant behaviour, we recorded sawing motion across a range of 14 experimental conditions using various manipulations. This was compared to free and pantomimed arm movements. We found that a mean (SD) sawing frequency of 2.0 (0.4) Hz was employed across experimental conditions. Most experimental conditions did not significantly affect the sawing frequency, signifying the robustness of this spontaneously emerging movement. Free horizontal arm translation and miming of sawing was performed at half the movement frequency with more than double the excursion distance, showing that not all arm movements spontaneously emerge at the observed sawing parameters. Observed movement frequencies across all conditions could be closely predicted from movement time reference data for generic arm movements found in the Methods Time Measurement literature, highlighting a generic biomechanical relationship between the time taken for a given distance travelled underlying the observed behaviour. We conclude that our findings lend support to the hypothesis that repetitive movements during tool use are executed according to generic and predictable musculoskeletal mechanics and constraints, albeit in the context of the general task (sawing) and environmental constraints such as friction, rather than being subject to task-specific control or individual cognitive schemata. PMID:28278273

  4. Analysis of transposons and repeat composition of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genome.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia; Zuccolo, Andrea; Giordani, Tommaso; Jurman, Irena; Ferrillo, Veronica; Vitacolonna, Nicola; Sarri, Vania; Cattonaro, Federica; Ceccarelli, Marilena; Cionini, Pier Giorgio; Morgante, Michele

    2010-02-01

    A sample-sequencing strategy combined with slot-blot hybridization and FISH was used to study the composition of the repetitive component of the sunflower genome. One thousand six hundred thirty-eight sequences for a total of 954,517 bp were analyzed. The fraction of sequences that can be classified as repetitive using computational and hybridization approaches amounts to 62% in total. Almost two thirds remain as yet uncharacterized in nature. Of those characterized, most belong to the gypsy superfamily of LTR-retrotransposons. Unlike in other species, where single families can account for large fractions of the genome, it appears that no transposon family has been amplified to very high levels in sunflower. All other known classes of transposable elements were also found. One family of unknown nature (contig 61) was the most repeated in the sunflower genome. The evolution of the repetitive component in the Helianthus genus and in other Asteraceae was studied by comparative analysis of the hybridization of total genomic DNAs from these species to the sunflower small-insert library and compared to gene-based phylogeny. Very little similarity is observed between Helianthus species and two related Asteraceae species outside of the genus. Most repetitive elements are similar in annual and perennial Helianthus species indicating that sequence amplification largely predates such divergence. Gypsy-like elements are more represented in the annuals than in the perennials, while copia-like elements are similarly represented, attesting a different amplification history of the two superfamilies of LTR-retrotransposons in the Helianthus genus.

  5. Recognizing Sequences of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kiebel, Stefan J.; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    The brain's decoding of fast sensory streams is currently impossible to emulate, even approximately, with artificial agents. For example, robust speech recognition is relatively easy for humans but exceptionally difficult for artificial speech recognition systems. In this paper, we propose that recognition can be simplified with an internal model of how sensory input is generated, when formulated in a Bayesian framework. We show that a plausible candidate for an internal or generative model is a hierarchy of ‘stable heteroclinic channels’. This model describes continuous dynamics in the environment as a hierarchy of sequences, where slower sequences cause faster sequences. Under this model, online recognition corresponds to the dynamic decoding of causal sequences, giving a representation of the environment with predictive power on several timescales. We illustrate the ensuing decoding or recognition scheme using synthetic sequences of syllables, where syllables are sequences of phonemes and phonemes are sequences of sound-wave modulations. By presenting anomalous stimuli, we find that the resulting recognition dynamics disclose inference at multiple time scales and are reminiscent of neuronal dynamics seen in the real brain. PMID:19680429

  6. Language repetition and short-term memory: an integrative framework

    PubMed Central

    Majerus, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Short-term maintenance of verbal information is a core factor of language repetition, especially when reproducing multiple or unfamiliar stimuli. Many models of language processing locate the verbal short-term maintenance function in the left posterior superior temporo-parietal area and its connections with the inferior frontal gyrus. However, research in the field of short-term memory has implicated bilateral fronto-parietal networks, involved in attention and serial order processing, as being critical for the maintenance and reproduction of verbal sequences. We present here an integrative framework aimed at bridging research in the language processing and short-term memory fields. This framework considers verbal short-term maintenance as an emergent function resulting from synchronized and integrated activation in dorsal and ventral language processing networks as well as fronto-parietal attention and serial order processing networks. To-be-maintained item representations are temporarily activated in the dorsal and ventral language processing networks, novel phoneme and word serial order information is proposed to be maintained via a right fronto-parietal serial order processing network, and activation in these different networks is proposed to be coordinated and maintained via a left fronto-parietal attention processing network. This framework provides new perspectives for our understanding of information maintenance at the non-word-, word- and sentence-level as well as of verbal maintenance deficits in case of brain injury. PMID:23874280

  7. GRAPE - GIS Repetition Using Audio-Visual Repetition Units and its Leanring Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhuber, M.; Brugger, S.

    2011-09-01

    A new audio-visual learning medium has been developed at the Department of Environmental Sciences at ETH Zurich (Switzerland), for use in geographical information sciences (GIS) courses. This new medium, presented in the form of Repetition Units, allows students to review and consolidate the most important learning concepts on an individual basis. The new material consists of: a) a short enhanced podcast (recorded and spoken slide show) with a maximum duration of 5 minutes, which focuses on only one important aspect of a lecture's theme; b) one or two relevant exercises, covering different cognitive levels of learning, with a maximum duration of 10 minutes; and c), solutions for the exercises. During a pilot phase in 2010, six Repetition Units were produced by the lecturers. Twenty more Repetition Units will be produced by our students during the fall semester of 2011 and 2012. The project is accompanied by a 5-year study (2009 - 2013) that investigates learning success using the new material, focussing on the question, whether or not the new material help to consolidate and refresh basic GIS knowledge. It will be analysed based on longitudinal studies. Initial results indicate that the new medium helps to refresh knowledge as the test groups scored higher than the control group. These results are encouraging and suggest that the new material with its combination of short audio-visual podcasts and relevant exercises help to consolidate students' knowledge.

  8. The golden ratio of gait harmony: repetitive proportions of repetitive gait phases.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Fusco, Augusto; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number φ known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with φ, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from φ (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait.

  9. The Golden Ratio of Gait Harmony: Repetitive Proportions of Repetitive Gait Phases

    PubMed Central

    Iosa, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number ϕ known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with ϕ, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from ϕ (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait. PMID:23862161

  10. Nonparametric Combinatorial Sequence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, Fabian L.; Jordan, Michael I.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This paper presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three sequence datasets which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  11. DNA sequence compression using the burrows-wheeler transform.

    PubMed

    Adjeroh, Don; Zhang, Yong; Mukherjee, Amar; Powell, Matt; Bell, Tim

    2002-01-01

    We investigate off-line dictionary oriented approaches to DNA sequence compression, based on the Burrows-Wheeler Transform (BWT). The preponderance of short repeating patterns is an important phenomenon in biological sequences. Here, we propose off-line methods to compress DNA sequences that exploit the different repetition structures inherent in such sequences. Repetition analysis is performed based on the relationship between the BWT and important pattern matching data structures, such as the suffix tree and suffix array. We discuss how the proposed approach can be incorporated in the BWT compression pipeline.

  12. Primary multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of pyrite in 2.7 Ga shales from the Joy Lake sequence (Superior Province) show felsic volcanic array-like signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianghanyang; Zhang, Zhe; Stern, Richard A.; Hannah, Judith L.; Stein, Holly J.; Yang, Gang; Li, Long

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes provide a powerful tool to study photochemical and biological processes controlling the Archean sulfur cycle and infer related atmospheric and marine environments. However, our understanding of early Earth's environment remains limited by the availability of well-preserved geological samples, as most Archean sedimentary rocks have experienced some degree of metamorphic alteration. To evaluate sulfur isotopic behavior during post-depositional processes and elucidate the sulfur cycle at 2.7 Ga, we use high-resolution in situ analytical techniques (EPMA and SIMS) to determine elemental compositions and multiple sulfur isotopic compositions of large diagenetic pyrite nodules and fine-grained secondary pyrite disseminated in quartz veins (formed during a lower greenschist metamorphic event) in shales from the 2.7 Ga Joy Lake sequence in the southwest Superior Province. Results show that trace metals and sulfur in the secondary pyrite were derived from both metamorphic fluid and pre-existing diagenetic pyrite. Diagenetic pyrite nodules could have been partially dissolved by metamorphic fluid. But the surviving nodules show elemental and isotopic features different from those of the deduced metamorphic fluid endmember, suggesting the nodules were not geochemically altered by metamorphism, and thus preserve primary isotopic signatures acquired during diagenesis. The sulfur isotopic ratios of pyrite nodules show strong variations, with decreasing δ34S values and increasing Δ33S values from cores to rims. This negative Δ33S-δ34S relationship is different from the commonly observed 'Archean reference line' defined by most Archean pyrite data, but similar to the 'felsic volcanic array'. Our observation provides a first possible case from 2.7 Ga, the age of peak crustal growth in the Archean, to support the hypothesis that photochemical pathways could be different under conditions of intense volcanic emission. This study also shows that high

  13. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  14. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  15. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  16. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  17. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  18. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  19. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  20. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  1. 10 CFR 61.21 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 61.21 Section 61.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Licenses § 61.21 Elimination of repetition. In its application, the applicant may incorporate by...

  2. 10 CFR 60.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 60.23 Section 60.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Licenses License Applications § 60.23 Elimination of repetition. In its application,...

  3. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  4. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  5. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  6. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  7. 10 CFR 52.8 - Combining licenses; elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. 52.8 Section 52.8 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.8 Combining licenses; elimination of repetition. (a)...

  8. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  9. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  10. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  11. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  12. 10 CFR 63.23 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 63.23 Section 63.23 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses License Application § 63.23 Elimination of repetition. In...

  13. Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions for Repetitive Behaviors in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Brian A.; McDonough, Stephen G.; Bodfish, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are a core symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There has been an increased research emphasis on repetitive behaviors; however, this research primarily has focused on phenomenology and mechanisms. Thus, the knowledge base on interventions is lagging behind other areas of research. The literature…

  14. Neural Correlates of Restricted, Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Restricted , Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0774 5c... Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Associate Professor of Psychiatry Manoach, Dara CONTRACTING...speech network of individuals with autism spectrum disorder NeuroImage: Clinical. in press. CONCLUSION

  15. 38 CFR 21.132 - Repetition of the course.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Repetition of the course.... Chapter 31 Educational and Vocational Training Services § 21.132 Repetition of the course. (a) Repeating all or part of the course. A veteran, having completed a course under Chapter 31 according to...

  16. A Negative Effect of Repetition in Episodic Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Daniel J.; Mulligan, Neil W.

    2012-01-01

    One of the foundational principles of human memory is that repetition (i.e., being presented with a stimulus multiple times) improves recall. In the current study a group of participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once, a negative repetition effect. Such a…

  17. Iconicity in Discourse: The Case of Repetition in Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishikawa, Minako

    This analysis of repeated utterances in Japanese conversational discourse focuses on repetition as an expression of iconicity. In the analysis of a 30-minute conversation among 4 Japanese speakers, the iconic meanings expressed by both reduplication and conversational repetition are highlighted. The iconicity characteristic of conversational data…

  18. 10 CFR 72.18 - Elimination of repetition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Elimination of repetition. 72.18 Section 72.18 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT... Application, Form, and Contents § 72.18 Elimination of repetition. In any application under this part,...

  19. Varieties of Repetitive Behavior in Autism: Comparisons to Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodfish, James W.; Symons, Frank J.; Parker, Dawn E.; Lewis, Mark H.

    2000-01-01

    A study compared specific repetitive behaviors in 32 adults with autism with 34 controls with mental retardation. The occurrence of each behavior category, except dyskinesias, was higher in individuals with autism and they showed a greater number of topographies of stereotypy and compulsions. Repetitive behavior severity also predicated autism…

  20. Early Grade Repetition and Inattention Associated with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coude, Francois X.; Mignot, Claire; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Munnich, Arnold

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors analyze the occurrence of grade repetition and inattention in children diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Method: The participant group consisted of 310 patients with NF1 and a control group of 242 individuals. The number of grade repetitions for each participant during his or her time in elementary, middle, and…

  1. Pre-Lexical Disorders in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; de Bleser, Ria; Ackermann, Hermann; Preilowski, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    At the level of clinical speech/language evaluation, the repetition type of conduction aphasia is characterized by repetition difficulties concomitant with reduced short-term memory capacities, in the presence of fluent spontaneous speech as well as unimpaired naming and reading abilities. It is still unsettled which dysfunctions of the…

  2. Soliton repetition rate in a silicon-nitride microresonator.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chengying; Xuan, Yi; Wang, Cong; Jaramillo-Villegas, Jose A; Leaird, Daniel E; Qi, Minghao; Weiner, Andrew M

    2017-02-15

    The repetition rate of a Kerr comb composed of a single soliton in an anomalous group velocity dispersion silicon-nitride microcavity is measured as a function of pump frequency. By comparing operation in the soliton and non-soliton states, the contributions from the Raman soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS) and the thermal effects are evaluated; the SSFS is found to dominate the changes in the repetition rate, similar to silica cavities. The relationship between the changes in the repetition rate and the pump frequency detuning is found to be independent of the nonlinearity coefficient and dispersion of the cavity. Modeling of the repetition rate change by using the generalized Lugiato-Lefever equation is discussed; the Kerr shock is found to have only a minor effect on repetition rate for cavity solitons with duration down to ∼50  fs.

  3. Nonword Repetition and Speech Motor Control in Children

    PubMed Central

    Reuterskiöld, Christina; Grigos, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how familiarity of word structures influenced articulatory control in children and adolescents during repetition of real words (RWs) and nonwords (NWs). A passive reflective marker system was used to track articulator movement. Measures of accuracy were obtained during repetition of RWs and NWs, and kinematic analysis of movement duration and variability was conducted. Participants showed greater consonant and vowel accuracy during RW than NW repetition. Jaw movement duration was longer in NWs compared to RWs across age groups, and younger children produced utterances with longer jaw movement duration compared to older children. Jaw movement variability was consistently greater during repetition of NWs than RWs in both groups of participants. The results indicate that increases in phonological short-term memory demands affect articulator movement. This effect is most pronounced in younger children. A range of skills may develop during childhood, which supports NW repetition skills. PMID:26557688

  4. Repetition and Emotive Communication in Music Versus Speech

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Elizabeth Hellmuth

    2013-01-01

    Music and speech are often placed alongside one another as comparative cases. Their relative overlaps and disassociations have been well explored (e.g., Patel, 2008). But one key attribute distinguishing these two domains has often been overlooked: the greater preponderance of repetition in music in comparison to speech. Recent fMRI studies have shown that familiarity – achieved through repetition – is a critical component of emotional engagement with music (Pereira et al., 2011). If repetition is fundamental to emotional responses to music, and repetition is a key distinguisher between the domains of music and speech, then close examination of the phenomenon of repetition might help clarify the ways that music elicits emotion differently than speech. PMID:23576998

  5. Physical Characteristics Underpinning Repetitive Lunging in Fencing.

    PubMed

    Turner, Anthony N; Marshall, Geoff; Phillips, James; Noto, Angelo; Buttigieg, Conor; Chavda, Shyam; Downing, William; Atlay, Nathan; Dimitriou, Lygeri; Kilduff, Laim

    2016-11-01

    Turner, AN, Marshall, G, Phillips, J, Noto, A, Buttigieg, C, Chavda, S, Downing, W, Atlay, N, Dimitriou, L, and Kilduff, L. Physical characteristics underpinning repetitive lunging in fencing. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3134-3139, 2016-Given the repetitive demand to execute lunging and changes in direction within fencing, the ability to sustain these at maximal capacity is fundamental to performance. The aim of this study was threefold. First, to provide normative values for this variable referred to as repeat lunge ability (RLA) and second to identify the physical characteristics that underpin it. Third, was to establish if a cause and effect relationship existed by training the associated characteristics. Assessment of lower-body power, reactive strength, speed, change of direction speed (CODS), and a sport-specific RLA were conducted on senior and junior elite male fencers (n = 36). Fencers were on average (±SD) 18.9 ± 3.2 years of age, 174.35 ± 10.42 cm tall, 70.67 ± 7.35 kg in mass, and 8.5 ± 4.2 years fencing experience. The RLA test had average work times of 16.03 ± 1.40 seconds and demonstrated "large" to "very large" associations with all tested variables, but in particular CODS (r = 0.70) and standing broad jump (SBJ; r = -0.68). Through linear regression analysis, these also provided a 2-predictor model accounting for 61% of the common variance associated with RLA. A cause and effect relationship with SBJ and CODS was confirmed by the training group, where RLA performance in these fencers improved from 15.80 ± 1.07 to 14.90 ± 0.86 seconds, with the magnitude of change reported as "moderate" (effect size (ES) = 0.93). Concurrent improvements were also noted in both SBJ (216.86 ± 17.15 vs. 221.71 ± 17.59 cm) and CODS (4.44 ± 0.29 vs. 4.31 ± 0.09 seconds) and while differences were only significant in SBJ, magnitudes of change were classed as "small" (ES = 0.28) and "moderate" (ES = 0.61), respectively. In conclusion, to improve RLA strength

  6. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  7. Construction and Characterization of a Repetitive DNA Library in Parodontidae (Actinopterygii: Characiformes): A Genomic and Evolutionary Approach to the Degeneration of the W Sex Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jordana Inácio Nascimento; Nogaroto, Viviane; Almeida, Mara Cristina; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Cestari, Marta Margarete; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Repetitive DNA sequences, including tandem and dispersed repeats, comprise a large portion of eukaryotic genomes and are important for gene regulation, sex chromosome differentiation, and karyotype evolution. In Parodontidae, only the repetitive DNAs WAp and pPh2004 and rDNAs were previously studied using fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study aimed to build a library of repetitive DNA in Parodontidae. We isolated 40 clones using Cot-1; 17 of these clones exhibited similarity to repetitive DNA sequences, including satellites, minisatellites, microsatellites, and class I and class II transposable elements (TEs), from Danio rerio and other organisms. The physical mapping of the clones to chromosomes revealed the presence of a satellite DNA, a Helitron element, and degenerate short interspersed element (SINE), long interspersed element (LINE), and tc1-mariner elements on the sex chromosomes. Some clones exhibited dispersed signals; other sequences were not detected. The 5S rDNA was detected on an autosomal pair. These elements likely function in the molecular degeneration of the W chromosome in Parodontidae. Thus, the location of these elements on the chromosomes is important for understanding the function of these repetitive DNAs and for integrative studies with genome sequencing. The presented data demonstrate that an intensive invasion of TEs occurred during W sex chromosome differentiation in the Parodontidae. PMID:25122415

  8. Pulsed laser deposition of SrRuO3 thin-films: The role of the pulse repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schraknepper, H.; Bäumer, C.; Gunkel, F.; Dittmann, R.; De Souza, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    SrRuO3 thin-films were deposited with different pulse repetition rates, fdep, epitaxially on vicinal SrTiO3 substrates by means of pulsed laser deposition. The measurement of several physical properties (e.g., composition by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the out-of-plane lattice parameter, the electric conductivity, and the Curie temperature) consistently reveals that an increase in laser repetition rate results in an increase in ruthenium deficiency in the films. By the same token, it is shown that when using low repetition rates, approaching a nearly stoichiometric cation ratio in SrRuO3 becomes feasible. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism to explain the widely observed Ru deficiency of SrRuO3 thin-films. Our findings demand these theoretical considerations to be based on kinetic rather than widely employed thermodynamic arguments.

  9. Transposon facilitated DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, D.E.; Berg, C.M.; Huang, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop methods that exploit the power of bacterial transposable elements for large scale DNA sequencing: Our premise is that the use of transposons to put primer binding sites randomly in target DNAs should provide access to all portions of large DNA fragments, without the inefficiencies of methods involving random subcloning and attendant repetitive sequencing, or of sequential synthesis of many oligonucleotide primers that are used to match systematically along a DNA molecule. Two unrelated bacterial transposons, Tn5 and {gamma}{delta}, are being used because they have both proven useful for molecular analyses, and because they differ sufficiently in mechanism and specificity of transposition to merit parallel development.

  10. Can the Edinburgh Risk of Repetition Scale Predict Repetition of Deliberate Self-Poisoning in an Australian Clinical Setting?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Gregory Leigh; Clover, Kerrie Ann; Bryant, Jennifer Lynn; Whyte, Ian MacGregor

    2002-01-01

    Tests the ability of the Edinburgh Risk of Repetition Scale (ERRS) to identify patients at high risk for repeat deliberate self-poisoning (DSP). A statistically significant relationship between ERRS scores and repetition was observed; however, sensitivity and specificity were low. The ERRS had limited value in identifying patients at high risk of…

  11. Generation of low-timing-jitter femtosecond pulse trains with 2 GHz repetition rate via external repetition rate multiplication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Sickler, Jason W; Fendel, Peter; Ippen, Erich P; Kärtner, Franz X; Wilken, Tobias; Holzwarth, Ronald; Hänsch, Theodor W

    2008-05-01

    Generation of low-timing-jitter 150 fs pulse trains at 1560 nm with 2 GHz repetition rate is demonstrated by locking a 200 MHz fundamental polarization additive-pulse mode-locked erbium fiber laser to high-finesse external Fabry-Perot cavities. The timing jitter and relative intensity noise of the repetition-rate multiplied pulse train are investigated.

  12. Repetitive switching for an electromagnetic rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruden, J. M.

    1983-12-01

    Previous testing on a repetitive opening switch for inductive energy storage has proved the feasibility of the rotary switch concept. The concept consists of a rotating copper disk (rotor) with a pie-shaped insulator section and brushes which slide along each of the rotor surfaces. While on top of the copper surface, the brushes and rotor conduct current allowing the energy storage inductor to charge. When the brushes slide onto the insulator section, the current cannot pass through the rotor and is diverted into the load. This study investigates two new brush designs and a rotor modification designed to improve the current commutating capabilities of the switch. One brush design (fringe fiber) employs carbon fibers on the leading and trailing edge of the brush to increase the resistive commutating action as the switch opens and closes. The other brush design uses fingers to conduct current to the rotor surface, effectively increasing the number of brush contact points. The rotor modification was the placement of tungsten inserts at the copper-insulator interfaces.

  13. [Rehabilitation Using Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Naoyuki; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    Various novel stroke rehabilitative methods have been developed based on findings in basic science and clinical research. Recently, many reports have shown that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) improves function in stroke patients by altering the excitability of the human cortex. The interhemispheric competition model proposes that deficits in stroke patients are due to reduced output from the affected hemisphere and excessive interhemispheric inhibition from the unaffected hemisphere to the affected hemisphere. The interhemispheric competition model indicates that improvement in deficits can be achieved either by increasing the excitability of the affected hemisphere using excitatory rTMS or by decreasing the excitability of the unaffected hemisphere using inhibitory rTMS. Recovery after stroke is related to neural plasticity, which involves developing new neural connections, acquiring new functions, and compensating for impairments. Artificially modulating the neural network by rTMS may induce a more suitable environment for use-dependent plasticity and also may interfere with maladaptive neural activation, which weakens function and limits recovery. There is potential, therefore, for rTMS to be used as an adjuvant therapy for developed neurorehabilitation techniques in stroke patients.

  14. SI Engine with repetitive NS spark plug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheshniy, Sergey; Nikipelov, Andrey; Anokhin, Eugeny; Starikovskiy, Andrey; Laplase Team; Mipt Team; Pu Team

    2013-09-01

    Now de-facto the only technology for fuel-air mixtures ignition in IC engines exists. It is a spark discharge of millisecond duration in a short discharge gap. The reason for such a small variety of methods of ignition initiation is very specific conditions of the engine operation. First, it is very high-pressure of fuel-air mixture - from 5-7 atmospheres in old-type engines and up to 40-50 atmospheres on the operating mode of HCCI. Second, it is a very wide range of variation of the oxidizer/fuel ratio in the mixture - from almost stoichiometric (0.8-0.9) at full load to very lean (φ = 0.3-0.5) mixtures at idle and/or economical cruising mode. Third, the high velocity of the gas in the combustion chamber (up to 30-50 m/s) resulting in a rapid compression of swirling inlet flow. The paper presents the results of tests of distributed spark ignition system powered by repetitive pulse nanosecond discharge. Dynamic pressure measurements show the increased pressure and frequency stability for nanosecond excitation in comparison with the standard spark plug. Excitation by single nanosecond high-voltage pulse and short train of pulses was examined. In all regimes the nanosecond pulsed excitation demonstrate a better performance.

  15. Repetitive Interrogation of 2-Level Quantum Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.

    2010-01-01

    Trapped ion clocks derive information from a reference atomic transition by repetitive interrogations of the same quantum system, either a single ion or ionized gas of many millions of ions. Atomic beam frequency standards, by contrast, measure reference atomic transitions in a continuously replenished "flow through" configuration where initial ensemble atomic coherence is zero. We will describe some issues and problems that can arise when atomic state selection and preparation of the quantum atomic system is not completed, that is, optical pumping has not fully relaxed the coherence and also not fully transferred atoms to the initial state. We present a simple two-level density matrix analysis showing how frequency shifts during the state-selection process can cause frequency shifts of the measured clock transition. Such considerations are very important when a low intensity lamp light source is used for state selection, where there is relatively weak relaxation and re-pumping of ions to an initial state and much weaker 'environmental' relaxation of the atomic coherence set-up in the atomic sample.

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Barr, Mera S; Farzan, Faranak; Wing, Victoria C; George, Tony P; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2011-10-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that is now being tested for its ability to treat addiction. This review discusses current research approaches and results of studies which measured the therapeutic use of rTMS to treat tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug addiction. The research in this area is limited and therefore all studies evaluating the therapeutic use of rTMS in tobacco, alcohol or illicit drug addiction were retained including case studies through NCBI PubMed ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov ) and manual searches. A total of eight studies were identified that examined the ability of rTMS to treat tobacco, alcohol and cocaine addiction. The results of this review indicate that rTMS is effective in reducing the level of cravings for smoking, alcohol, and cocaine when applied at high frequencies to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Furthermore, these studies suggest that repeated sessions of high frequency rTMS over the DLPFC may be most effective in reducing the level of smoking and alcohol consumption. Although work in this area is limited, this review indicates that rTMS is a promising modality for treating drug addiction.

  17. Inter-specific sequence conservation and intra-individual sequence variation in a spider silk gene.

    PubMed

    Tai, Pei-Ling; Hwang, Guang-Yuh; Tso, I-Min

    2004-10-01

    Currently, studies on major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) genes of non-orb weaving spiders are few, and it is not clear whether genes of these organisms exhibit the same characteristics as those of orb-weavers. In addition, many studies have proposed that MaSp1 might be a single gene with allelic variants, but supporting evidence is still lacking. In this study, we compared partial DNA and amino acid sequences of MaSp1 cloned from different spider guilds. We also cloned partial MaSp1 sequences from genomic DNA and cDNA of the same individuals of spiders using the same primer combination to see if different molecular forms existed. In the repetitive region of partial MaSp1 sequences obtained, GGX, GA and poly-A motifs were present in all Araneomorphae and Mygalomorpae species examined. An extreme similarity in MaSp1 non-repetitive portions was found in sequences of ecribellate, cribellate and Mygalomorphae web-builders and such a result suggested that this sequence might exhibit an important function. A comparison of sequences amplified from the same individual showed that substitutions in amino acids occurred in both repetitive and non-repetitive regions, with a much higher variation in the former. These results suggest that the MaSp1 of Araneomorphae spiders exhibits several forms in an individual spider and it might be either a multiple gene or a single gene with a multiple exon/intron organization.

  18. Repetition reduction during word and concept overlap in bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tuan Q.; Marian, Viorica

    2015-01-01

    In natural conversation, speakers often mention the same referents multiple times. While referents that have been previously mentioned are produced with less prominence than those that have not been mentioned, it is unclear whether prominence reduction is due to repetition of concepts, words, or a combination of the two. In the current study, we dissociate these sources of repetition by examining bilingual speakers, who have more than one word for the same concept across their two languages. Three groups of Korean-English bilinguals (balanced, English-dominant, and Korean-dominant) performed an event description task involving repetition of referents within a single language (i.e., repetition of word and concept) or across languages (i.e., repetition of concept only). While balanced bilinguals reduced prominence both within and across languages, unbalanced bilinguals only reduced prominence when repetition occurred within a language. These patterns suggest that the degree to which words and concepts are linked within a speaker’s language system determines the source of repetition reduction. PMID:26166943

  19. Predict protein structural class for low-similarity sequences by evolutionary difference information into the general form of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lichao; Zhao, Xiqiang; Kong, Liang

    2014-08-21

    Knowledge of protein structural class plays an important role in characterizing the overall folding type of a given protein. At present, it is still a challenge to extract sequence information solely using protein sequence for protein structural class prediction with low similarity sequence in the current computational biology. In this study, a novel sequence representation method is proposed based on position specific scoring matrix for protein structural class prediction. By defined evolutionary difference formula, varying length proteins are expressed as uniform dimensional vectors, which can represent evolutionary difference information between the adjacent residues of a given protein. To perform and evaluate the proposed method, support vector machine and jackknife tests are employed on three widely used datasets, 25PDB, 1189 and 640 datasets with sequence similarity lower than 25%, 40% and 25%, respectively. Comparison of our results with the previous methods shows that our method may provide a promising method to predict protein structural class especially for low-similarity sequences.

  20. Chromosomal organization of repetitive DNAs in Hordeum bogdanii and H. brevisubulatum (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Quanwen; Liu, Ruijuan; Yu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Molecular karyotypes of Hordeum bogdanii Wilensky, 1918 (2n = 14), and Hordeum brevisubulatum Link, 1844 ssp. brevisubulatum (2n = 28), were characterized by physical mapping of several repetitive sequences. A total of 18 repeats, including all possible di- or trinucleotide SSR (simple sequence repeat) motifs and satellite DNAs, such as pAs1, 5S rDNA, 45S rDNA, and pSc119.2, were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization on root-tip metaphase chromosomes. Except for the SSR motifs AG, AT and GC, all the repeats we examined produced detectable hybridization signals on chromosomes of both species. A detailed molecular karyotype of the I genome of Hordeum bogdanii is described for the first time, and each repetitive sequence is physically mapped. A high degree of chromosome variation, including aneuploidy and structural changes, was observed in Hordeum brevisubulatum. Although the distribution of repeats in the chromosomes of Hordeum brevisubulatum is different from that of Hordeum bogdanii, similar patterns between the two species imply that the autopolyploid origin of Hordeum brevisubulatum is from a Hordeum species with an I genome. A comparison of the I genome and the other Hordeum genomes, H, Xa and Xu, shows that colocalization of motifs AAC, ACT and CAT and colocalization of motifs AAG and AGG are characteristic of the I genome. In addition, we discuss the evolutionary significance of repeats in the genome during genome differentiation. PMID:28123672

  1. Detecting Repetitions and Periodicities in Proteins by Tiling the Structural Space

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The notion of energy landscapes provides conceptual tools for understanding the complexities of protein folding and function. Energy landscape theory indicates that it is much easier to find sequences that satisfy the “Principle of Minimal Frustration” when the folded structure is symmetric (Wolynes, P. G. Symmetry and the Energy Landscapes of Biomolecules. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.1996, 93, 14249–14255). Similarly, repeats and structural mosaics may be fundamentally related to landscapes with multiple embedded funnels. Here we present analytical tools to detect and compare structural repetitions in protein molecules. By an exhaustive analysis of the distribution of structural repeats using a robust metric, we define those portions of a protein molecule that best describe the overall structure as a tessellation of basic units. The patterns produced by such tessellations provide intuitive representations of the repeating regions and their association toward higher order arrangements. We find that some protein architectures can be described as nearly periodic, while in others clear separations between repetitions exist. Since the method is independent of amino acid sequence information, we can identify structural units that can be encoded by a variety of distinct amino acid sequences. PMID:23758291

  2. Cloning and genetic variability of a HindIII repetitive DNA in Acrossocheilus paradoxus (Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Wu, W L; Wang, J P; Tseng, M C; Chiang, T Y

    1999-08-01

    Thirty clones of a highly repetitive HindIII fragment of DNA from seven populations of Acrossocheilus paradoxus (Cyprinidae) were isolated and sequenced. The fragment represents a tandemly repeated sequence, with a monomeric unit of 270 bp, amounting to 0.08-0.10% of the fish genome. Higher units of this monomer appear as a ladder in Southern blots. The HindIII satellite DNA family is conserved in three genera of the Cyprinidae. Variation in nucleotide sequences of this repetitive fragment, which is A+T-rich, is distributed both within individuals and among populations. High overall nucleotide divergence (dij = 0.056 +/- 0.001) was detected among clones of the HindIII satellite DNAs of Acrossocheilus paradoxus. Based on the molecular clock hypothesis, the maximum evolutionary rate was estimated to be 5.3 x 10(-7) substitutions per site per year. Lineage sorting may have contributed to the genetic heterogeneity within individuals and populations. Cladistic analyses indicated a closer phylogeographic relationship between populations of the central and south regions in Taiwan.

  3. The molecular basis of the organization of repetitive DNA-containing constitutive heterochromatin in mammals.

    PubMed

    Nishibuchi, Gohei; Déjardin, Jérôme

    2017-03-01

    Constitutive heterochromatin is composed mainly of repetitive elements and represents the typical inert chromatin structure in eukaryotic cells. Approximately half of the mammalian genome is made of repeat sequences, such as satellite DNA, telomeric DNA, and transposable elements. As essential genes are not present in these regions, most of these repeat sequences were considered as junk DNA in the past. However, it is now clear that these regions are essential for chromosome stability and the silencing of neighboring genes. Genetic and biochemical studies have revealed that histone methylation at H3K9 and its recognition by heterochromatin protein 1 represent the fundamental mechanism by which heterochromatin forms. Although this molecular mechanism is highly conserved from yeast to human cells, its detailed epigenetic regulation is more complex and dynamic for each distinct constitutive heterochromatin structure in higher eukaryotes. It can also vary according to the developmental stage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis is a powerful tool to investigate the epigenetic regulation of eukaryote genomes, but non-unique reads are usually discarded during standard ChIP-seq data alignment to reference genome databases. Therefore, specific methods to obtain global epigenetic information concerning repetitive elements are needed. In this review, we focus on such approaches and we summarize the latest molecular models for distinct constitutive heterochromatin types in mammals.

  4. Abstract and concrete repetitive thinking modes in alcohol-dependence.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, Delphine; de Timary, Philippe; Philippot, Pierre; D'Hondt, Fabien; Briane, Yasmine; Devynck, Faustine; Douilliez, Céline; Billieux, Joël; Heeren, Alexandre; Maurage, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Emotional and interpersonal deficits play a crucial role in alcohol-related disorders as they predict alcohol consumption and relapse. Recent models of emotion regulation in psychopathology postulate that these deficits are centrally related to increased abstract/analytic repetitive thinking, combined with reduced concrete/experiential repetitive thinking. As this assumption has not been tested in addictions, this study aimed at investigating repetitive thinking modes in a large sample of alcohol-dependent individuals. One hundred recently detoxified alcohol-dependent individuals (29 females; mean age = 49.51-years-old) recruited during the 3rd week of their treatment in a detoxification center were compared to 100 healthy controls (29 females; mean age = 48.51-years-old) recruited in the experimenters' social network, matched at the group level for age, gender, and educational level. All participants completed the Mini Cambridge Exeter Repetitive Thought Scale measuring abstract/analytic and concrete/experiential repetitive thinking modes as well as complementary psychopathological measures (Beck Depression Inventory and State/Trait Anxiety Inventory). Alcohol-dependent individuals have similar levels of concrete repetitive thinking as controls but report significantly higher levels of abstract repetitive thinking (p < 0.001; d = 1.28). This effect remains significant after controlling for depression and anxiety. Relative to healthy controls, alcohol-dependent patients report more frequent use of abstract/analytic repetitive thinking, with preserved concrete/experiential thinking. Despite the cross-sectional nature of the study, the frequent use of abstract repetitive thinking thus appears to constitute a main feature of alcohol-dependence.

  5. Ear and pitch segregation in Deutsch's octave illusion persist following switch from stimulus alternation to repetition.

    PubMed

    Brancucci, Alfredo; Lugli, Victor; Santucci, Alessandra; Tommasi, Luca

    2011-10-01

    Deutsch's octave illusion occurs when two tones that are spaced an octave apart are repeatedly presented in alternation; the sequence is presented to both ears simultaneously but offset by one tone, so that two dichotic chords are repeatedly presented in alternation. The most common illusory percept consists of an intermittent high tone in one ear alternating with an intermittent low tone in the other ear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether, once the illusory percept has emerged, the illusion will persist when the original sequence is followed by another sequence consisting of the repeated presentation of one of the two dichotic chords. Forty naïve subjects were tested with stimuli consisting first of a priming sequence containing dichotic octaves alternating between ears followed immediately by a test sequence consisting of a single dichotic octave presented repeatedly. The durations of the priming and test sequences were manipulated. The findings showed that the illusory percept is maintained after the switch from alternation to repetition and that the relative length of the priming and test sequences has a negligible influence on the persistence of the illusory percept.

  6. Cumulative effects of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Julian E; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Petraglia, Anthony L; Turner, Ryan C

    2014-01-01

    The majority of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) in the USA are mild in severity. Sports, particularly American football, and military experience are especially associated with repetitive, mild TBI (mTBI). The consequences of repetitive brain injury have garnered increasing scientific and public attention following reports of altered mood and behavior, as well as progressive neurological dysfunction many years after injury. This report provides an up-to-date review of the clinical, pathological, and pathophysiological changes associated with repetitive mTBI, and their potential for cumulative effects in certain individuals.

  7. Clinical application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation☆

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Joonho; Yang, EunJoo; Cho, KyeHee; Barcenas, Carmelo L; Kim, Woo Jin; Min, Yusun; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Proper stimulation to affected cerebral hemisphere would promote the functional recovery of patients with stroke. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical excitability can be can be altered by the stimulation frequency, intensity and duration. There has been no consistent recognition regarding the best stimulation frequency and intensity. This study reviews the intervention effects of repetitive transcranial stimulation on motor impairment, dysphagia, visuospatial neglect and aphasia, and summarizes the stimulation frequency, intensity and area for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to yield the best therapeutic effects. PMID:25745455

  8. Repetitively pulsed cryogenically cooled quasi-sealed-off slab RF discharge first-overtone CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Kozlov, A. Yu.; Rulev, O. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    A slab first-overtone CO laser of improved design excited by repetitively pulsed RF discharge was researched and developed. Its quasi-sealed-off operation appeared to be possible only by using active gas mixture composition with extremely high content of oxygen — up to 50 % with respect to CO concentration. Average output power of the first-overtone CO laser came up to ~2 W with the efficiency of ~2 %. The laser spectrum obtained by using three sets of output couplers consisted of more than 100 vibrational-rotational spectral lines in 28 vibrational first-overtone bands of CO molecule within 2.55÷3.90 μm wavelength range. The number of laser radiation pulses which could be produced by the laser in sealed-off mode of operation (without gas mixture renovation) reached ~5×105 at the averaged output power near its maximum, and ~106 at lower (near its half-maximum) averaged output power. Special features of laser radiation temporal behavior were discussed. Under repetitively pulse pump with repetition rate from 300 up to 7500 Hz, a temporal profile of the CO laser radiation changed from the train of time-separated laser pulses with high peak power to quasi-CW mode of operation.

  9. Muscular endurance repetitions to predict bench press strength in men of different training levels.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, J L; Prinster, J L; Ware, J S; Zimmer, D L; Arabas, J R; Bemben, M G

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of predicting maximal bench press (BP) strength (1-RM) from relative endurance performance in various groups of men. The subjects included untrained students (n = 35), resistance trained students (n = 28), college wrestlers (n = 21), soccer players (n = 22), football players (n = 51), high school students (n = 35), and resistance-trained middle-aged men (n = 24). Each subject performed a 1-RM test according to the same standard procedure. Within 4-10 days, the subject selected a weight to perform as many repetitions as possible to failure. Six relative endurance prediction equations produced validity coefficients of r = 0.86 to 0.98 in each group and r = 0.82 to 0.98 in the composite group (n = 220). In subjects completing < or = 10 repetitions-to-failure, three equations significantly overpredicted and two significantly underpredicted 1-RM scores. The Brzycki equation was the most accurate. In subjects completing > 10 repetitions to failure, three equations significantly overpredicted and three significantly underpredicted 1-RM scores. While caution should be used when employing relative muscular endurance performance to estimate 1-RM strength in the bench press, the average of two equations may reduce the error.

  10. Generation of BAC-end sequences for rainbow trout genome analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For non-sequenced genomes, BAC end sequences (BES) provide a valuable sample of repetitive elements and gene content. Here we report the results of BAC end sequencing of just over half of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Swanson HindIII library. We sequenced 177,860 BAC ends that generated 17...

  11. Characterization of minisatellites in Arabidopsis thaliana with sequence similarity to the human minisatellite core sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Tourmente, S; Deragon, J M; Lafleuriel, J; Tutois, S; Pélissier, T; Cuvillier, C; Espagnol, M C; Picard, G

    1994-01-01

    A strategy based on random PCR amplification was used to isolate new repetitive elements of Arabidopsis thaliana. One of the random PCR product analyzed by this approach contained a tandem repetitive minisatellite sequence composed of 33 bp repeated units. The genomic locus corresponding to this PCR product was isolated by screening a lambda genomic library. New related loci were also isolated from the genomic library by screening with a 14 mer oligonucleotide representing a region conserved among the different repeated units. Alignment of the consensus sequence for each minisatellite locus allowed the definition of an Arabidopsis thaliana core sequence that shows strong sequence similarities with the human core sequence and with the generalized recombination signal Chi of Escherichia coli. The minisatellites were tested for their ability to detect polymorphism, and their chromosomal position was established. Images PMID:8078766

  12. DNA sequences and composition from 12 BAC clones-derived MUSB SSR markers mapped to cotton (Gossypium Hirsutum L. x G. Barbadense L.)chromosomes 11 and 21

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To discover resistance (R) and/or pathogen-induced (PR) genes involved in disease response, 12 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from cv. Acala Maxxa (G. hirsutum) were sequenced at the Clemson University, Genomics Institute, Clemson, SC. These BACs derived MUSB single sequence repeat (SS...

  13. Modified repetition in poems elicited from young children.

    PubMed

    Dowker, A D

    1991-10-01

    Attempts were made to elicit poems from 133 children between the ages of 2;3 and 6;11. Seventy-eight of the children produced 606 poems between them. Forty-five per cent of the poems contained the syntactic device of modified repetition: a substitution exercise where a grammatical frame is repeated and the substitution occurs in part of the grammatical frame. This was so despite the fact that modified repetition was not present in the examples that were used to elicit poems from the children. The frequency and types of modified repetition used by the children did not vary much with age. The question of whether children's use of modified repetition in their rhythmical poems has the function of helping them to practise grammatical forms, or whether it is simply one reflection of a general human tendency towards the use of pattern in language, is discussed.

  14. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  15. Repetitive strain injuries: has the Australian epidemic burnt out?

    PubMed

    Awerbuch, M

    2004-07-01

    In the 1980s Australia experienced an epidemic of medically certified claims for non-specific arm symptoms described as repetitive strain injury. Although a number of factors were mooted as causal of the epidemic, no single factor emerged as a compelling putative candidate. The present paper discusses the results of research which was published only after the epidemic had waned. It provides possible insights into the rise and fall of repetitive strain injury.

  16. Laser nanoablation of diamond surface at high pulse repetition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Pashinin, V. P.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The chemical etching of the surface of a natural diamond single crystal irradiated by subpicosecond laser pulses with a high repetition rate (f ≤slant 500 {\\text{kHz}}) in air is experimentally investigated. The irradiation has been performed by the second-harmonic (515 {\\text{nm}}) radiation of a disk Yb : YAG laser. Dependences of the diamond surface etch rate on the laser energy density and pulse repetition rate are obtained.

  17. Repetitive behaviour in kennelled domestic dog: stereotypical or not?

    PubMed

    Denham, Hamish D C; Bradshaw, John W S; Rooney, Nicola J

    2014-04-10

    Repetitive behaviour is common in kennelled dogs, yet its motivational basis remains relatively unexplored. We examine the repetitive behaviour of 30 kennelled working dogs in ten contexts both coinciding with, and in the absence of, commonly occurring arousing stimuli, such as care staff, other dogs and food preparation. A large proportion (93%) of subjects performed some repetitive behaviour, most commonly bouncing, but only 17% in the absence of the arousing stimuli. Subjects could be divided into four groups according to the stimuli eliciting, and the duration, of their repetitive behaviour, and these groups were compared on the basis of their cortisol response to an acute psychogenic stressor--a veterinary examination. Urinary cortisol/creatinine response curves differed significantly between the groups. In particular, those dogs which performed repetitive behaviour at times of minimal stimulation, showed a distinctly different pattern of response, with cortisol levels decreasing, as compared to increasing, after the veterinary examination. We conclude that dogs showing repetitive behaviours at times of high arousal are motivationally distinct from those "stereotyping" in the absence of stimulation. We suggest that those dogs showing spontaneous repetitive behaviours may have past experiences and/or temperaments that affect both their reactions to a veterinary examination and to long-term kennelling. For example, some dogs may find isolation from humans particularly aversive, hence affecting their reactions both to being left in a kennel and to being taken to the veterinary surgeon. Alternatively, such dogs may have atypical responsiveness of their hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, possibly brought about through chronic stress. High levels of repetitive behaviours in response to inaccessible husbandry events may be explained if such behaviour has inadvertently been reinforced by attention from staff, and therefore may not always be indicative of

  18. Cloning and characterization of a repetitive DNA detected by HindIII in the genome of Raja montagui (Batoidea, Chondrichthyes).

    PubMed

    Rocco, L; Stingo, V; Bellitti, M

    1996-10-17

    A repetitive HindIII fragment of DNA from Raja montagui (Rajiformes) was cloned and sequenced for the first time in cartilaginous fishes. This element, which comprises approximately 5% of the whole genome of the spotted ray, is absent in long tandem arrays, being typical of satellite DNA. It appeared constituted by 311 AT-rich bp (61%). The clone was hybridized to the genomic DNA of species with varying phyletic distances, revealing a high degree of conservation.

  19. Repetitive RNA unwinding by RNA helicase A facilitates RNA annealing.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Xing, Li; Kleiman, Lawrence; Myong, Sua

    2014-07-01

    Helicases contribute to diverse biological processes including replication, transcription and translation. Recent reports suggest that unwinding of some helicases display repetitive activity, yet the functional role of the repetitiveness requires further investigation. Using single-molecule fluorescence assays, we elucidated a unique unwinding mechanism of RNA helicase A (RHA) that entails discrete substeps consisting of binding, activation, unwinding, stalling and reactivation stages. This multi-step process is repeated many times by a single RHA molecule without dissociation, resulting in repetitive unwinding/rewinding cycles. Our kinetic and mutational analysis indicates that the two double stand RNA binding domains at the N-terminus of RHA are responsible for such repetitive unwinding behavior in addition to providing an increased binding affinity to RNA. Further, the repetitive unwinding induces an efficient annealing of a complementary RNA by making the unwound strand more accessible. The complex and unusual mechanism displayed by RHA may help in explaining how the repetitive unwinding of helicases contributes to their biological functions.

  20. Properties of water surface discharge at different pulse repetition rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ruma,; Yoshihara, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R. Sakugawa, T.; Akiyama, H.; Akiyama, M.; Lukeš, P.

    2014-09-28

    The properties of water surface discharge plasma for variety of pulse repetition rates are investigated. A magnetic pulse compression (MPC) pulsed power modulator able to deliver pulse repetition rates up to 1000 Hz, with 0.5 J per pulse energy output at 25 kV, was used as the pulsed power source. Positive pulse with a point-to-plane electrode configuration was used for the experiments. The concentration and production yield of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) were quantitatively measured and orange II organic dye was treated, to evaluate the chemical properties of the discharge reactor. Experimental results show that the physical and chemical properties of water surface discharge are not influenced by pulse repetition rate, very different from those observed for under water discharge. The production yield of H₂O₂ and degradation rate per pulse of the dye did not significantly vary at different pulse repetition rates under a constant discharge mode on water surface. In addition, the solution temperature, pH, and conductivity for both water surface and underwater discharge reactors were measured to compare their plasma properties for different pulse repetition rates. The results confirm that surface discharge can be employed at high pulse repetition rates as a reliable and advantageous method for industrial and environmental decontamination applications.

  1. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1987-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3575113

  2. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  3. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  4. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  5. A genome-wide BAC end-sequence survey of sugarcane elucidates genome composition, and identifies BACs covering much of the euchromatin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changsoo; Lee, Tae-Ho; Compton, Rosana O; Robertson, Jon S; Pierce, Gary J; Paterson, Andrew H

    2013-01-01

    BAC-end sequences (BESs) of hybrid sugarcane cultivar R570 are presented. A total of 66,990 informative BESs were obtained from 43,874 BAC clones. Similarity search using a variety of public databases revealed that 13.5 and 42.8 % of BESs match known gene-coding and repeat regions, respectively. That 11.7 % of BESs are still unmatched to any nucleotide sequences in the current public databases despite the fact that a close relative, sorghum, is fully sequenced, indicates that there may be many sugarcane-specific or lineage-specific sequences. We found 1,742 simple sequence repeat motifs in 1,585 BESs, spanning 27,383 bp in length. As simple sequence repeat markers derived from BESs have some advantages over randomly generated markers, these may be particularly useful for comparing BAC-based physical maps with genetic maps. BES and overgo hybridization information was used for anchoring sugarcane BAC clones to the sorghum genome sequence. While sorghum and sugarcane have extensive similarity in terms of genomic structure, only 2,789 BACs (6.4 %) could be confidently anchored to the sorghum genome at the stringent threshold of having both-end information (BESs or overgos) within 300 Kb. This relatively low rate of anchoring may have been caused in part by small- or large-scale genomic rearrangements in the Saccharum genus after two rounds of whole genome duplication since its divergence from the sorghum lineage about 7.8 million years ago. Limiting consideration to only low-copy matches, 1,245 BACs were placed to 1,503 locations, covering ~198 Mb of the sorghum genome or about 78 % of the estimated 252 Mb of euchromatin. BESs and their analyses presented here may provide an early profile of the sugarcane genome as well as a basis for BAC-by-BAC sequencing of much of the basic gene set of sugarcane.

  6. A simplified soil extraction sequence to monitor the main and trace element speciation in soil after compost and mineral fertilizer additions upon the composition of wheat grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sager, Manfred; Erhart, Eva

    2016-04-01

    High quality biological waste treatment aims at producing compost in order to maintain a clean environment and to sustain soil organic carbon levels. Fertilization with compost as a source of organic carbon, nutrients, and accessory elements, as well as fertilization with mineral N- and PK fertilizer have been tested in a field experiment on a calcaric Fluvisol in the Danube wetlands, at 4 levels each. Yields of wheat were recorded, and grains and soils were sampled from each treatment, and analyzed for main and trace element composition. The corresponding soils were characterized by mobile phases, obtained by leaching with 0,16M acetic acid to cover exchangeables plus carbonates, and subsequently by 0,1M oxalate buffer pH 3 to dissolve the pedogenic oxides. Total amounts were obtained from digests with perchloric- nitric-hydrofluoric acid. For quasi-total amounts, aqua regia was replaced by pressure decomposition with KClO3 in dilute nitric acid. The proposed extraction sequence permits to analyze and interpret soil for main elements, trace elements, nutrients and anions simultaneously. Factor analyses of soil extracts obtained from dilute acetic acid revealed Ba-Be-Cd-Cu-Li-S (traces), Ca-Mg-Mn (main carbonates), Al-Fe-B, Y, and P-K (nutrients) as chemically feasible principal components. Subsequent soil extracts from oxalate contained Al-B-Co-K-Na-Pb-Si-V-S (maybe acid silicate weathering), Cr-Li-Ni-Sr-Ti (maybe basic silicate weathering), Be-Cu-Fe-P, Co-Mg-Mn-Zn (Mn-oxides) and Ba-Sc as principal components. Factor analyses of total element data distinguished the principal components Ce-La-Li-Sc-Y-P (rare earths), Al-Ca-Fe-K-Mg-Na-P (main elements), Cd-Co-Cr-Cu-Ni-Zn (trace elements), As-Pb (contaminants), Ba-Mn-Sr, and Ti, which looks chemically feasible also. Factor analyses of those soil fractions which presumably form the main fractions of exchangeables, carbonates, pedogenic oxides and silicates, showed no cross connections, except for P. Oxalate

  7. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA in Woodpeckers (Aves, Piciformes): Implications for Karyotype and ZW Sex Chromosome Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Rafael; Bertocchi, Natasha Avila; Degrandi, Tiago Marafiga; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Garnero, Analía del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2017-01-01

    Birds are characterized by a low proportion of repetitive DNA in their genome when compared to other vertebrates. Among birds, species belonging to Piciformes order, such as woodpeckers, show a relatively higher amount of these sequences. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of different classes of repetitive DNA—including microsatellites, telomere sequences and 18S rDNA—in the karyotype of three Picidae species (Aves, Piciformes)—Colaptes melanochloros (2n = 84), Colaptes campestris (2n = 84) and Melanerpes candidus (2n = 64)–by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clusters of 18S rDNA were found in one microchromosome pair in each of the three species, coinciding to a region of (CGG)10 sequence accumulation. Interstitial telomeric sequences were found in some macrochromosomes pairs, indicating possible regions of fusions, which can be related to variation of diploid number in the family. Only one, from the 11 different microsatellite sequences used, did not produce any signals. Both species of genus Colaptes showed a similar distribution of microsatellite sequences, with some difference when compared to M. candidus. Microsatellites were found preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of micro and macrochromosomes. However, some sequences produced patterns of interstitial bands in the Z chromosome, which corresponds to the largest element of the karyotype in all three species. This was not observed in the W chromosome of Colaptes melanochloros, which is heterochromatic in most of its length, but was not hybridized by any of the sequences used. These results highlight the importance of microsatellite sequences in differentiation of sex chromosomes, and the accumulation of these sequences is probably responsible for the enlargement of the Z chromosome. PMID:28081238

  8. Genomic Organization of Repetitive DNA in Woodpeckers (Aves, Piciformes): Implications for Karyotype and ZW Sex Chromosome Differentiation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thays Duarte; Kretschmer, Rafael; Bertocchi, Natasha Avila; Degrandi, Tiago Marafiga; de Oliveira, Edivaldo Herculano Corrêa; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Garnero, Analía Del Valle; Gunski, Ricardo José

    2017-01-01

    Birds are characterized by a low proportion of repetitive DNA in their genome when compared to other vertebrates. Among birds, species belonging to Piciformes order, such as woodpeckers, show a relatively higher amount of these sequences. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of different classes of repetitive DNA-including microsatellites, telomere sequences and 18S rDNA-in the karyotype of three Picidae species (Aves, Piciformes)-Colaptes melanochloros (2n = 84), Colaptes campestris (2n = 84) and Melanerpes candidus (2n = 64)-by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization. Clusters of 18S rDNA were found in one microchromosome pair in each of the three species, coinciding to a region of (CGG)10 sequence accumulation. Interstitial telomeric sequences were found in some macrochromosomes pairs, indicating possible regions of fusions, which can be related to variation of diploid number in the family. Only one, from the 11 different microsatellite sequences used, did not produce any signals. Both species of genus Colaptes showed a similar distribution of microsatellite sequences, with some difference when compared to M. candidus. Microsatellites were found preferentially in the centromeric and telomeric regions of micro and macrochromosomes. However, some sequences produced patterns of interstitial bands in the Z chromosome, which corresponds to the largest element of the karyotype in all three species. This was not observed in the W chromosome of Colaptes melanochloros, which is heterochromatic in most of its length, but was not hybridized by any of the sequences used. These results highlight the importance of microsatellite sequences in differentiation of sex chromosomes, and the accumulation of these sequences is probably responsible for the enlargement of the Z chromosome.

  9. Maize Mu transposons are targeted to the 5' untranslated region of the gl8 gene and sequences flanking Mu target-site duplications exhibit nonrandom nucleotide composition throughout the genome.

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Charles R; Cui, Feng; Packila, Mark L; Li, Jin; Ashlock, Daniel A; Nikolau, Basil J; Schnable, Patrick S

    2002-01-01

    The widespread use of the maize Mutator (Mu) system to generate mutants exploits the preference of Mu transposons to insert into genic regions. However, little is known about the specificity of Mu insertions within genes. Analysis of 79 independently isolated Mu-induced alleles at the gl8 locus established that at least 75 contain Mu insertions. Analysis of the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of the inserted transposons defined three new Mu transposons: Mu10, Mu 11, and Mu12. A large percentage (>80%) of the insertions are located in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the gl8 gene. Ten positions within the 5' UTR experienced multiple independent Mu insertions. Analyses of the nucleotide composition of the 9-bp TSD and the sequences directly flanking the TSD reveals that the nucleotide composition of Mu insertion sites differs dramatically from that of random DNA. In particular, the frequencies at which C's and G's are observed at positions -2 and +2 (relative to the TSD) are substantially higher than expected. Insertion sites of 315 RescueMu insertions displayed the same nonrandom nucleotide composition observed for the gl8-Mu alleles. Hence, this study provides strong evidence for the involvement of sequences flanking the TSD in Mu insertion-site selection. PMID:11861572

  10. Compositions for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Further, methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. Still further, the invention provides for automated means to detect and analyse chromosomal abnormalities.

  11. Compositions for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1998-05-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. The methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. The probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods are provided to disable the hybridization capacity of shared, high copy repetitive sequences and/or remove such sequences to provide for useful contrast. Still further methods are provided to produce chromosome-specific staining reagents which are made specific to the targeted chromosomal material, which can be one or more whole chromosomes, one or more regions on one or more chromosomes, subsets of chromosomes and/or the entire genome. Probes and test kits are provided for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, in analysis of structural abnormalities, such as translocations, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and prenatal test kits are provided to stain targeted chromosomal material of fetal cells, including fetal cells obtained from maternal blood. The invention provides for automated means to detect and analyze chromosomal abnormalities. 17 figs.

  12. The Parameterization of All Robust Stabilizing Simple Repetitive Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kou; Sakanushi, Tatsuya; Ando, Yoshinori; Hagiwara, Takaaki; Murakami, Iwanori; Takenaga, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Shun

    The modified repetitive control system is a type of servomechanism for the periodic reference input. That is, the modified repetitive control system follows the periodic reference input with small steady state error, even if a periodic disturbance or an uncertainty exists in the plant. Using previously proposed modified repetitive controllers, even if the plant does not include time-delay, transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output have infinite numbers of poles. When transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output have infinite numbers of poles, it is difficult to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic. From the practical point of view, it is desirable that the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic are easily specified. In order to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic easily, transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output are desirable to have finite numbers of poles. From this viewpoint, Yamada et al. proposed the concept of simple repetitive control systems such that the controller works as a modified repetitive controller and transfer functions from the periodic reference input to the output and from the disturbance to the output have finite numbers of poles. In addition, Yamada et al. clarified the parameterization of all stabilizing simple repetitive controllers. However, the method by Yamada et al. cannot be applied for the plant with uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to propose the parameterization of all robust stabilizing simple repetitive controllers for the plant with uncertainty.

  13. A design method for robust stabilizing simple repetitive control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kou; Takenaga, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2007-12-01

    The modified repetitive control system is a type of servomechanism for the periodic reference input. That is, the modified repetitive control system follows the periodic reference input with small steady state error, even if a periodic disturbance or uncertainty exists in the plant. Using previously proposed modified repetitive controllers, even if the plants does not includes time-delay, the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have an infinite number of poles. When the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have an infinite number of poles, it is difficult to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic. From the practical point of view, it is desirable that the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic are easily specified. In order to specify the input-output characteristic and the disturbance attenuation characteristic easily, the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output are desirable to have a finite number of poles. Yamada et al. proposed the concept of simple repetitive control systems such that the controller works as a modified repetitive controller and the transfer function from the periodic reference input to the output and that from the disturbance to the output have a finite number of poles. In addition, Yamada et al. clarified the parametrization of all stabilizing simple repetitive controllers. However the method by Yamada et al. cannot be applied for the plant with uncertainty. The purpose of this paper is to propose the parametrization of all robust stabilizing simple repetitive controllers for the plant with uncertainty.

  14. Place field repetition and spatial learning in a multicompartment environment.

    PubMed

    Grieves, Roddy M; Jenkins, Bryan W; Harland, Bruce C; Wood, Emma R; Dudchenko, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that place cells in the hippocampus possess firing fields that repeat in physically similar, parallel environments. These results imply that it should be difficult for animals to distinguish parallel environments at a behavioral level. To test this, we trained rats on a novel odor-location task in an environment with four parallel compartments which had previously been shown to yield place field repetition. A second group of animals was trained on the same task, but with the compartments arranged in different directions, an arrangement we hypothesised would yield less place field repetition. Learning of the odor-location task in the parallel compartments was significantly impaired relative to learning in the radially arranged compartments. Fewer animals acquired the full discrimination in the parallel compartments compared to those trained in the radial compartments, and the former also required many more sessions to reach criterion compared to the latter. To confirm that the arrangement of compartments yielded differences in place cell repetition, in a separate group of animals we recorded from CA1 place cells in both environments. We found that CA1 place cells exhibited repeated fields across four parallel local compartments, but did not do so when the same compartments were arranged radially. To confirm that the differences in place field repetition across the parallel and radial compartments depended on their angular arrangement, and not incidental differences in access to an extra-maze visual landmark, we repeated the recordings in a second set of rats in the absence of the orientation landmark. We found, once again, that place fields showed repetition in parallel compartments, and did not do so in radially arranged compartments. Thus place field repetition, or lack thereof, in these compartments was not dependent on extra-maze cues. Together, these results imply that place field repetition constrains spatial learning.

  15. Sequence composition of BAC clones and SSR markers mapped to Upland cotton chromosomes 11 and 21 targeting resistance to soil-borne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congli; Ulloa, Mauricio; Shi, Xinyi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Saski, Christopher; Yu, John Z.; Roberts, Philip A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and physical framework mapping in cotton (Gossypium spp.) were used to discover putative gene sequences involved in resistance to common soil-borne pathogens. Chromosome (Chr) 11 and its homoeologous Chr 21 of Upland cotton (G. hirsutum) are foci for discovery of resistance (R) or pathogen-induced R (PR) genes underlying QTLs involved in response to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita), reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis), Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. vasinfectum), Verticillium wilt (Verticillium dahliae), and black root rot (Thielaviopsis basicola). Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from a BAC library developed from the Upland cotton Acala Maxxa were mapped on Chr 11 and Chr 21. DNA sequence through Gene Ontology (GO) of 99 of 256 Chr 11 and 109 of 239 Chr 21 previously mapped SSRs revealed response elements to internal and external stimulus, stress, signaling process, and cell death. The reconciliation between genetic and physical mapping of gene annotations from new DNA sequences of 20 BAC clones revealed 467 (Chr 11) and 285 (Chr 21) G. hirsutum putative coding sequences, plus 146 (Chr 11) and 98 (Chr 21) predicted genes. GO functional profiling of Unigenes uncovered genes involved in different metabolic functions and stress response elements (SRE). Our results revealed that Chrs 11 and 21 harbor resistance gene rich genomic regions. Sequence comparisons with the ancestral diploid D5 (G. raimondii), A2 (G. arboreum) and domesticated tetraploid TM-1 AD1 (G. hirsutum) genomes revealed abundance of transposable elements and confirmed the richness of resistance gene motifs in these chromosomes. The sequence information of SSR markers and BAC clones and the genetic mapping of BAC clones provide enhanced genetic and physical frameworks of resistance gene-rich regions of the cotton genome, thereby aiding discovery of R and PR genes and breeding for resistance to cotton diseases. PMID

  16. Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mansi; Kulshrestha, Samarth; Puri, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Genome sequencing is an important step toward correlating genotypes with phenotypic characters. Sequencing technologies are important in many fields in the life sciences, including functional genomics, transcriptomics, oncology, evolutionary biology, forensic sciences, and many more. The era of sequencing has been divided into three generations. First generation sequencing involved sequencing by synthesis (Sanger sequencing) and sequencing by cleavage (Maxam-Gilbert sequencing). Sanger sequencing led to the completion of various genome sequences (including human) and provided the foundation for development of other sequencing technologies. Since then, various techniques have been developed which can overcome some of the limitations of Sanger sequencing. These techniques are collectively known as "Next-generation sequencing" (NGS), and are further classified into second and third generation technologies. Although NGS methods have many advantages in terms of speed, cost, and parallelism, the accuracy and read length of Sanger sequencing is still superior and has confined the use of NGS mainly to resequencing genomes. Consequently, there is a continuing need to develop improved real time sequencing techniques. This chapter reviews some of the options currently available and provides a generic workflow for sequencing a genome.

  17. Detection of structural variants involving repetitive regions in the reference genome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heewook; Popodi, Ellen; Foster, Patricia L; Tang, Haixu

    2014-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing techniques are now commonly used to characterize structural variations (SVs) in population genomics and elucidate their associations with phenotypes. Many of the computational tools developed for detecting structural variations work by mapping paired-end reads to a reference genome and identifying the discordant read-pairs whose mapped loci in the reference genome deviate from the expected insert size and orientation. However, repetitive regions in the reference genome represent a major challenge in SV detection, because the paired-end reads from these regions may be mapped to multiple loci in the reference genome, resulting in spuriously discordant read-pairs. To address this issue, we have developed an algorithmic approach for read mapping and SV detection based on the framework of A-Bruijn graphs. Instead of mapping reads to a linear sequence of the reference genome, we propose to map reads onto the A-Bruijn graph constructed from the reference genome in which all instances of the same repeat are collapsed into a single edge. As a result, any given read, either from repetitive regions or not, will be mapped to a unique location in the A-Bruijn graph, and each discordant read-pair in the A-Bruijn graph indicates a potentially true SV event. We also developed a simple clustering algorithm to derive valid clusters of these discordant read-pairs, each supporting a different SV event. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this approach, compared to existing approaches, by identifying transposition events of insertion sequence (IS) elements, a class of simple mobile genetic elements (MGEs), in E. coli by using simulated and real paired-end sequence data acquired from E. coli mutation accumulation lines.

  18. Flexible high-repetition-rate ultrafast fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dong; Liu, Xueming; Sun, Zhipei; Lu, Hua; Han, Dongdong; Wang, Guoxi; Wang, Fengqiu

    2013-01-01

    High-repetition-rate pulses have widespread applications in the fields of fiber communications, frequency comb, and optical sensing. Here, we have demonstrated high-repetition-rate ultrashort pulses in an all-fiber laser by exploiting an intracavity Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) as a comb filter. The repetition rate of the laser can be tuned flexibly from about 7 to 1100 GHz by controlling the optical path difference between the two arms of the MZI. The pulse duration can be reduced continuously from about 10.1 to 0.55 ps with the spectral width tunable from about 0.35 to 5.7 nm by manipulating the intracavity polarization controller. Numerical simulations well confirm the experimental observations and show that filter-driven four-wave mixing effect, induced by the MZI, is the main mechanism that governs the formation of the high-repetition-rate pulses. This all-fiber-based laser is a simple and low-cost source for various applications where high-repetition-rate pulses are necessary. PMID:24226153

  19. Characterising repetitive behaviours in young boys with fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, A.; Thurman, A.J.; McDuffie, A.; Bullard, L.M.; Hagerman, R.J.; Abbeduto, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Repetitive behaviours are frequently observed in individuals with intellectual disability. The present study examined the profile, inter-correlations, and predictive correlates of repetitive behaviours in males with FXS, the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability. Specific child characteristics examined as predictors included: anxiety, nonverbal cognition, and autism social-affective symptomatology. Method Participants were 39 boys with FXS (aged 6–10 years). Repetitive behaviours were measured using the Repetitive Behavior Scale – Revised (RBS-R) – a 43-item caregiver-report measure normed on individuals with intellectual disability. Results Restricted Interests and Sensory Motor behaviours were reported as most problematic for this sample of boys, whereas Self-injurious behaviours were less problematic. All subscales of the RBS-R were significantly inter-correlated. Nonverbal IQ was negatively related, whereas anxiety and social affective symptoms of ASD were positively related, to scores for Restricted Interests. Anxiety was also positively related to scores for Compulsive behaviours and Ritualistic Sameness behaviours. Conclusions This study provides a preliminary description of repetitive behaviours in males with FXS, which may form the groundwork for future research. PMID:26449367

  20. Quantifying repetitive speech in autism spectrum disorders and language impairment.

    PubMed

    van Santen, Jan P H; Sproat, Richard W; Hill, Alison Presmanes

    2013-10-01

    We report on an automatic technique for quantifying two types of repetitive speech: repetitions of what the child says him/herself (self-repeats) and of what is uttered by an interlocutor (echolalia). We apply this technique to a sample of 111 children between the ages of four and eight: 42 typically developing children (TD), 19 children with specific language impairment (SLI), 25 children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) plus language impairment (ALI), and 25 children with ASD with normal, non-impaired language (ALN). The results indicate robust differences in echolalia between the TD and ASD groups as a whole (ALN + ALI), and between TD and ALN children. There were no significant differences between ALI and SLI children for echolalia or self-repetitions. The results confirm previous findings that children with ASD repeat the language of others more than other populations of children. On the other hand, self-repetition does not appear to be significantly more frequent in ASD, nor does it matter whether the child's echolalia occurred within one (immediate) or two turns (near-immediate) of the adult's original utterance. Furthermore, non-significant differences between ALN and SLI, between TD and SLI, and between ALI and TD are suggestive that echolalia may not be specific to ALN or to ASD in general. One important innovation of this work is an objective fully automatic technique for assessing the amount of repetition in a transcript of a child's utterances.