Science.gov

Sample records for replicated metadata catalogue

  1. Creating and using the urgent metadata catalogue and thesaurus.

    PubMed

    Tindall, C Isabella; Moore, Roger V; Bosley, John D; Swetnam, Ruth D; Bowie, Rod; De Rudder, Anne

    2006-05-01

    The Urban Regeneration and the Environment Research Programme (URGENT) required a system for cataloguing its datasets and enabling its scientific community to discover what data were available to it. This community was multidisciplinary in nature and therefore needed a range of facilities for searching. Of particular importance were facilities to help those unfamiliar with specialist terminology. To meet these needs, four applications were designed and developed: a Metadata Capture Tool for describing datasets in compliance with the National Geospatial Data Framework (NGDF) standard, a Term Entry Tool for creating an ISO compliant thesaurus, a Thesaurus Builder for merging thesauri and a Search Tool. To encourage users to help in cataloguing data, the capture tools were written as stand alone applications, which users could keep and use to build their own metadatabases. The tools contained export and import facilities that allowed the URGENT Data Centre to build a central database and publish it upon the web. During the development work, it was found necessary to extend the NGDF standard as it could not adequately describe time variant or 3-D atmospheric datasets. The four applications met their design objectives. However, a number of ergonomic issues will need to be addressed if the system is to meet the needs of the much larger up coming programmes. The main challenges will be moving from the NGDF standard to the ISO standard, hence bringing the work into line with the recommendations of the INSPIRE Project, and merging the metadatabase with the scientific database, which enable metadata maintenance to be semi-automated.

  2. The eGenVar data management system--cataloguing and sharing sensitive data and metadata for the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Razick, Sabry; Močnik, Rok; Thomas, Laurent F; Ryeng, Einar; Drabløs, Finn; Sætrom, Pål

    2014-01-01

    Systematic data management and controlled data sharing aim at increasing reproducibility, reducing redundancy in work, and providing a way to efficiently locate complementing or contradicting information. One method of achieving this is collecting data in a central repository or in a location that is part of a federated system and providing interfaces to the data. However, certain data, such as data from biobanks or clinical studies, may, for legal and privacy reasons, often not be stored in public repositories. Instead, we describe a metadata cataloguing system and a software suite for reporting the presence of data from the life sciences domain. The system stores three types of metadata: file information, file provenance and data lineage, and content descriptions. Our software suite includes both graphical and command line interfaces that allow users to report and tag files with these different metadata types. Importantly, the files remain in their original locations with their existing access-control mechanisms in place, while our system provides descriptions of their contents and relationships. Our system and software suite thereby provide a common framework for cataloguing and sharing both public and private data. Database URL: http://bigr.medisin.ntnu.no/data/eGenVar/.

  3. The eGenVar data management system—cataloguing and sharing sensitive data and metadata for the life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Razick, Sabry; Močnik, Rok; Thomas, Laurent F.; Ryeng, Einar; Drabløs, Finn; Sætrom, Pål

    2014-01-01

    Systematic data management and controlled data sharing aim at increasing reproducibility, reducing redundancy in work, and providing a way to efficiently locate complementing or contradicting information. One method of achieving this is collecting data in a central repository or in a location that is part of a federated system and providing interfaces to the data. However, certain data, such as data from biobanks or clinical studies, may, for legal and privacy reasons, often not be stored in public repositories. Instead, we describe a metadata cataloguing system and a software suite for reporting the presence of data from the life sciences domain. The system stores three types of metadata: file information, file provenance and data lineage, and content descriptions. Our software suite includes both graphical and command line interfaces that allow users to report and tag files with these different metadata types. Importantly, the files remain in their original locations with their existing access-control mechanisms in place, while our system provides descriptions of their contents and relationships. Our system and software suite thereby provide a common framework for cataloguing and sharing both public and private data. Database URL: http://bigr.medisin.ntnu.no/data/eGenVar/ PMID:24682735

  4. Coordinated Earth Science Data Replication Enabled Through ISO Metadata, Version Control, and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, K. K.; Gollberg, G.; Sheneman, L.; Dascalu, S.

    2011-12-01

    The richness and flexibility of the ISO 19115 metadata standard for documenting Earth Science data has the potential to provide support for numeroius applications beyond the traditional discovery and use scenarios commonly associated with metadata. The Tri-State (Nevada, New Mexico, Idaho) NSF EPSCoR project is pursuing such an alternative application of the ISO Metadata content model - one in which targeted data replication between individual data repositories in the three states is enabled through a specifically defined collection and granule metadata content model. The developed metadata model includes specific ISO 19115 elements that enable: - "flagging" of specific collections or granules for replication - documenting lineage (the relationship between "authoritative" source data and data replicas) - verification of data fidelity through standard cryptographic methods - extension of collection and granual metadata to reflect additonal data download and services provided by distributed data replicas While the mechanics of the replication model within each state are dependent upon the specific systems, software, and storage capabilities within the individual repositories, the adoption of a common XML metadata model (ISO 19139) and the use of a broadly supported version control system (Subversion) as the core storage system for the shared metadata provides a long-term platform upon which each state in the consortium can build. This paper presents the preliminary results of the implementation of the system across all three states, and will include a discussion of the specific ISO 19115 elements that contribute to the system, experience in using Subversion as a metadata versioning system, and lessons learned in the development of this loosely-coupled data replication system.

  5. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, François; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jérôme; Nord, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is an initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories belonging to various French research institutions (CNRS, Universities, INRA, IRSTEA, IRD) that study river and drainage basins. RBV is a part of a global initiative to create a network of observatories for investigating Earth's surface processes. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims to give an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person involved in this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other catalogues through the compliance with the ISO19115 standard and the INSPIRE directive and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories. The catalogue is designed to face this situation with the following main features: -Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. -Three hierachical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory in general, one of its experimental site or a dataset produced by instruments. -Multilingualism: Metadata can be entered in several configurable languages. The catalogue provides many other feature such as search and browse mechanisms to find or discover records. The RBV metadata catalogue associates a CSW metadata server (Geosource) and a JEE application. The CSW server is in charge of the persistence of the metadata while the JEE application both wraps CSW calls and define the user interface. The latter is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. The catalogue is accessible at the following address: http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/ Next steps will target the following points: -Description of sensors in accordance

  6. Sensor Catalogue Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usländer, Thomas; Kunz, Siegbert; Stumpp, Jörg; Watson, Kym

    2010-05-01

    The Fraunhofer has realized a sensor aware catalogue service capable of bridging the OGC Sensor Web and INSPIRE. The available network resources (observed features, sensors, data sources) are registered in a semantic catalogue server along with meta-data to support resource discovery by client applications. Clients can find, for example, information sources for a given region and observable phenomenon of interest. The Catalogue Harvester harvests meta-information from the capabilities of OGC SWE services and maps them to INSPIRE metadata. The semantic functions support the principles of query expansion and query refinements via the use of ontologies. The catalogue client provides means for the management of harvested SWE services and supports the formulation of enhanced search queries using the semantic functionality of the catalogue.

  7. The RBV metadata catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Francois; Fleury, Laurence; Gaillardet, Jerome; Nord, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    RBV (Réseau des Bassins Versants) is a French initiative to consolidate the national efforts made by more than 15 elementary observatories funded by various research institutions (CNRS, INRA, IRD, IRSTEA, Universities) that study river and drainage basins. The RBV Metadata Catalogue aims at giving an unified vision of the work produced by every observatory to both the members of the RBV network and any external person interested by this domain of research. Another goal is to share this information with other existing metadata portals. Metadata management is heterogeneous among observatories ranging from absence to mature harvestable catalogues. Here, we would like to explain the strategy used to design a state of the art catalogue facing this situation. Main features are as follows : - Multiple input methods: Metadata records in the catalog can either be entered with the graphical user interface, harvested from an existing catalogue or imported from information system through simplified web services. - Hierarchical levels: Metadata records may describe either an observatory, one of its experimental site or a single dataset produced by one instrument. - Multilingualism: Metadata can be easily entered in several configurable languages. - Compliance to standards : the backoffice part of the catalogue is based on a CSW metadata server (Geosource) which ensures ISO19115 compatibility and the ability of being harvested (globally or partially). On going tasks focus on the use of SKOS thesaurus and SensorML description of the sensors. - Ergonomy : The user interface is built with the GWT Framework to offer a rich client application with a fully ajaxified navigation. - Source code sharing : The work has led to the development of reusable components which can be used to quickly create new metadata forms in other GWT applications You can visit the catalogue (http://portailrbv.sedoo.fr/) or contact us by email rbv@sedoo.fr.

  8. Metadata (MD)

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Keane

    2006-01-01

    The Metadata (MD) table in the FIREMON database is used to record any information about the sampling strategy or data collected using the FIREMON sampling procedures. The MD method records metadata pertaining to a group of FIREMON plots, such as all plots in a specific FIREMON project. FIREMON plots are linked to metadata using a unique metadata identifier that is...

  9. Digital Initiatives and Metadata Use in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SuKantarat, Wichada

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide information about various digital initiatives in libraries in Thailand and especially use of Dublin Core metadata in cataloguing digitized objects in academic and government digital databases. Design/methodology/approach: The author began researching metadata use in Thailand in 2003 and 2004 while on sabbatical…

  10. BASINS Metadata

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Metadata or data about data describes the content, quality, condition, and other characteristics of data. Geospatial metadata are critical to data discovery and serves as the fuel for the Geospatial One-Stop data portal.

  11. NetCDF4/HDF5 and Linked Data in the Real World - Enriching Geoscientific Metadata without Bloat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Alex; Car, Nicholas; Druken, Kelsey; Poudjom-Djomani, Yvette; Butcher, Stirling; Evans, Ben; Wyborn, Lesley

    2017-04-01

    NetCDF4 has become the dominant generic format for many forms of geoscientific data, leveraging (and constraining) the versatile HDF5 container format, while providing metadata conventions for interoperability. However, the encapsulation of detailed metadata within each file can lead to metadata "bloat", and difficulty in maintaining consistency where metadata is replicated to multiple locations. Complex conceptual relationships are also difficult to represent in simple key-value netCDF metadata. Linked Data provides a practical mechanism to address these issues by associating the netCDF files and their internal variables with complex metadata stored in Semantic Web vocabularies and ontologies, while complying with and complementing existing metadata conventions. One of the stated objectives of the netCDF4/HDF5 formats is that they should be self-describing: containing metadata sufficient for cataloguing and using the data. However, this objective can be regarded as only partially-met where details of conventions and definitions are maintained externally to the data files. For example, one of the most widely used netCDF community standards, the Climate and Forecasting (CF) Metadata Convention, maintains standard vocabularies for a broad range of disciplines across the geosciences, but this metadata is currently neither readily discoverable nor machine-readable. We have previously implemented useful Linked Data and netCDF tooling (ncskos) that associates netCDF files, and individual variables within those files, with concepts in vocabularies formulated using the Simple Knowledge Organization System (SKOS) ontology. NetCDF files contain Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) links to terms represented as SKOS Concepts, rather than plain-text representations of those terms, so we can use simple, standardised web queries to collect and use rich metadata for the terms from any Linked Data-presented SKOS vocabulary. Geoscience Australia (GA) manages a large volume of diverse

  12. Networking environmental metadata: a pilot project for the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, N.; Benito, M.; Abou El-Magd, I.; Mazzetti, P.; Ndong, C.

    2012-04-01

    To better exploit any environmental dataset it is necessary to provide detailed information (metadata) capable to furnish the best data description. Operating environmental data and information networking requires the long-term investment of financial and human resources. As these resources are scarce, ensuring sustainability can be a struggle. Then, to use more effectively human and economic resources and to avoid duplication, it is essential to test existing models and, where appropriate, replicate strategies and experiences. For the above reasons, it has been programmed to pilot a project to implement and test a metadata catalogue's networking, involving Countries afferent the Mediterranean Region, to demonstrate that the adoption of open source and free software and international interoperability standards can contribute to the alignment of I&TC resources to achieve environmental information sharing. This pilot, planned in the frame of the EGIDA FP7 European Project, aims to support the implementation of a replication methodology for the establishment of national/regional environmental information nodes on the bases of the System of Systems architecture concept, to support the exchange of environmental information in the frame of the Barcelona Convention and to incept a Mediterranean scale joint contribution to GEOSS focusing on partnership, infrastructures and products. To establish the partnership and to conduce interoperability tests, this pilot project build on the Info-RAC (Information and Communication Activity Centre of the United Nation Environmental Programme - Mediterranean Action Plan) and GEO (Group on Earth Observations) networks.

  13. GEOSS Clearinghouse Quality Metadata Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masó, J.; Díaz, P.; Ninyerola, M.; Sevillano, E.; Pons, X.

    2012-04-01

    The proliferation of similar Earth observation digital data products increases the relevance of data quality information of those datasets. GEOSS is investing important efforts in promoting the acknowledgment of the data quality in Earth observation. Activities, such as the regular meeting of QA4EO and projects as GeoViQua have the aim to make the data quality available and visible in the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI). The clearinghouse is one of the main components of the GCI, which catalogues all the known Earth observation resources and provide it via the GEO Portal. Actually, after several initiatives to stimulate that (such as AIP4) most of the relevant international data providers referenced their data in the GEOSS Component and Service Registry, therefore, the GEOSS clearinghouse can be considered a global catalogue of the main Earth observation products. However, there are some important catalogues still in the process of being integrated. We developed an exhaustive study of the data quality elements available on the metadata catalogue in the GEOSS clearinghouse, to elaborate a state-of-the-art report on data quality. The clearinghouse is harvested using the OGC CSW port. Metadata following the standard ISO 19115 is saved in XML-ISO 19139 files. The semi-automatic methodology, previously applied in regional SDIs studies, generates a big metadata database that can be further analyzed. The number of metadata records harvested was 97203 (October 2011). The two main metadata nodes studied are directly related with data quality information package (DQ_DataQuality) in ISO. These are the quality indicators (DQ_Element) and the lineage information (LI_Lineage). Moreover, we also considered the usage information (MD_Usage). The results reveal 19107 (19.66%) metadata records containing quality indicators; which include a total of 52187 quality indicators. The results show also a main representation of the positional accuracy, with 37.19% of the total

  14. ESO Catalogue Facility Design and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moins, C.; Retzlaff, J.; Arnaboldi, M.; Zampieri, S.; Delmotte, N.; Forchí, V.; Klein Gebbinck, M.; Lockhart, J.; Micol, A.; Vera Sequeiros, I.; Bierwirth, T.; Peron, M.; Romaniello, M.; Suchar, D.

    2013-10-01

    The ESO Phase 3 Catalogue Facility provides investigators with the possibility to ingest catalogues resulting from ESO public surveys and large programs and to query and download their content according to positional and non-positional criteria. It relies on a chain of tools that covers the complete workflow from submission to validation and ingestion into the ESO archive and catalogue repository and a web application to browse and query catalogues. This repository consists of two components. One is a Sybase ASE relational database where catalogue meta-data are stored. The second one is a Sybase IQ data warehouse where the content of each catalogue is ingested in a specific table that returns all records matching a user's query. Spatial indexing has been implemented in Sybase IQ to speed up positional queries and relies on the Spherical Geometry Toolkit from the Johns Hopkins University which implements the Hierarchical Triangular Mesh (HTM) algorithm. It is based on a recursive decomposition of the celestial sphere in spherical triangles and the assignment of an index to each of them. It has been complemented with the use of optimized indexes on the non-positional columns that are likely to be frequently used as query constraints. First tests performed on catalogues such as 2MASS have confirmed that this approach provides a very good level of performance and a smooth user experience that are likely to facilitate the scientific exploitation of catalogues.

  15. Metadata Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Libraries must increasingly accommodate bibliographic records encoded with a variety of standards and emerging standards, including Dublin Core, MODS, and VRA Core. The problem is that many libraries still rely solely on MARC and AACR2. The best-trained professionals to lead librarians through the metadata maze are catalogers. Catalogers…

  16. CMR Metadata Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, Dana; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2017-01-01

    This talk explains the ongoing metadata curation activities in the Common Metadata Repository. It explores tools that exist today which are useful for building quality metadata and also opens up the floor for discussions on other potentially useful tools.

  17. Mining the Metadata Quarries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Stuart A., Ed.; Guenther, Rebecca; McCallum, Sally; Greenberg, Jane; Tennis, Joseph T.; Jun, Wang

    2003-01-01

    This special section of the "Bulletin" includes an introduction and the following articles: "New Metadata Standards for Digital Resources: MODS (Metadata Object and Description Schema) and METS (Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard)"; "Metadata Generation: Processes, People and Tools"; "Data Collection for…

  18. Mining the Metadata Quarries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Stuart A., Ed.; Guenther, Rebecca; McCallum, Sally; Greenberg, Jane; Tennis, Joseph T.; Jun, Wang

    2003-01-01

    This special section of the "Bulletin" includes an introduction and the following articles: "New Metadata Standards for Digital Resources: MODS (Metadata Object and Description Schema) and METS (Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard)"; "Metadata Generation: Processes, People and Tools"; "Data Collection for…

  19. Document Classification in Support of Automated Metadata Extraction Form Heterogeneous Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    A number of federal agencies, universities, laboratories, and companies are placing their documents online and making them searchable via metadata fields such as author, title, and publishing organization. To enable this, every document in the collection must be catalogued using the metadata fields. Though time consuming, the task of identifying…

  20. Document Classification in Support of Automated Metadata Extraction Form Heterogeneous Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    A number of federal agencies, universities, laboratories, and companies are placing their documents online and making them searchable via metadata fields such as author, title, and publishing organization. To enable this, every document in the collection must be catalogued using the metadata fields. Though time consuming, the task of identifying…

  1. Evolutions in Metadata Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J.

    2016-12-01

    Metadata Quality is one of the chief drivers of discovery and use of NASA EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) data. Issues with metadata such as lack of completeness, inconsistency, and use of legacy terms directly hinder data use. As the central metadata repository for NASA Earth Science data, the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) has a responsibility to its users to ensure the quality of CMR search results. This talk will cover how we encourage metadata authors to improve the metadata through the use of integrated rubrics of metadata quality and outreach efforts. In addition we'll demonstrate Humanizers, a technique for dealing with the symptoms of metadata issues. Humanizers allow CMR administrators to identify specific metadata issues that are fixed at runtime when the data is indexed. An example Humanizer is the aliasing of processing level "Level 1" to "1" to improve consistency across collections. The CMR currently indexes 35K collections and 300M granules.

  2. Interpreting the ASTM 'content standard for digital geospatial metadata'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nebert, Douglas D.

    1996-01-01

    ASTM and the Federal Geographic Data Committee have developed a content standard for spatial metadata to facilitate documentation, discovery, and retrieval of digital spatial data using vendor-independent terminology. Spatial metadata elements are identifiable quality and content characteristics of a data set that can be tied to a geographic location or area. Several Office of Management and Budget Circulars and initiatives have been issued that specify improved cataloguing of and accessibility to federal data holdings. An Executive Order further requires the use of the metadata content standard to document digital spatial data sets. Collection and reporting of spatial metadata for field investigations performed for the federal government is an anticipated requirement. This paper provides an overview of the draft spatial metadata content standard and a description of how the standard could be applied to investigations collecting spatially-referenced field data.

  3. Map Metadata: Essential Elements for Search and Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamer, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the issues surrounding the cataloguing of maps in archives and libraries. An investigation into appropriate metadata formats, such as MARC21, EAD and Dublin Core with RDF, shows how particular map data can be stored. Mathematical map elements, specifically co-ordinates, are…

  4. Map Metadata: Essential Elements for Search and Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beamer, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of the issues surrounding the cataloguing of maps in archives and libraries. An investigation into appropriate metadata formats, such as MARC21, EAD and Dublin Core with RDF, shows how particular map data can be stored. Mathematical map elements, specifically co-ordinates, are…

  5. Predicting structured metadata from unstructured metadata

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Lisa; Panahiazar, Maryam; Dumontier, Michel; Gevaert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Enormous amounts of biomedical data have been and are being produced by investigators all over the world. However, one crucial and limiting factor in data reuse is accurate, structured and complete description of the data or data about the data—defined as metadata. We propose a framework to predict structured metadata terms from unstructured metadata for improving quality and quantity of metadata, using the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray database. Our framework consists of classifiers trained using term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) features and a second approach based on topics modeled using a Latent Dirichlet Allocation model (LDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the unstructured data. Our results on the GEO database show that structured metadata terms can be the most accurately predicted using the TF-IDF approach followed by LDA both outperforming the majority vote baseline. While some accuracy is lost by the dimensionality reduction of LDA, the difference is small for elements with few possible values, and there is a large improvement over the majority classifier baseline. Overall this is a promising approach for metadata prediction that is likely to be applicable to other datasets and has implications for researchers interested in biomedical metadata curation and metadata prediction. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:28637268

  6. Predicting structured metadata from unstructured metadata.

    PubMed

    Posch, Lisa; Panahiazar, Maryam; Dumontier, Michel; Gevaert, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Enormous amounts of biomedical data have been and are being produced by investigators all over the world. However, one crucial and limiting factor in data reuse is accurate, structured and complete description of the data or data about the data-defined as metadata. We propose a framework to predict structured metadata terms from unstructured metadata for improving quality and quantity of metadata, using the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray database. Our framework consists of classifiers trained using term frequency-inverse document frequency (TF-IDF) features and a second approach based on topics modeled using a Latent Dirichlet Allocation model (LDA) to reduce the dimensionality of the unstructured data. Our results on the GEO database show that structured metadata terms can be the most accurately predicted using the TF-IDF approach followed by LDA both outperforming the majority vote baseline. While some accuracy is lost by the dimensionality reduction of LDA, the difference is small for elements with few possible values, and there is a large improvement over the majority classifier baseline. Overall this is a promising approach for metadata prediction that is likely to be applicable to other datasets and has implications for researchers interested in biomedical metadata curation and metadata prediction. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Visualization of Metadata.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagle, Donald

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the potential for visualization of metadata and metadata-based surrogates, including a command interface for metadata viewing, site mapping and data aggregation tools, dynamic derivation of surrogates, and a reintroduction of transient hypergraphs from the tradition of cocitation networking. Addresses digital library research into…

  8. Grid computing enhances standards-compatible geospatial catalogue service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aijun; Di, Liping; Bai, Yuqi; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Yang

    2010-04-01

    A catalogue service facilitates sharing, discovery, retrieval, management of, and access to large volumes of distributed geospatial resources, for example data, services, applications, and their replicas on the Internet. Grid computing provides an infrastructure for effective use of computing, storage, and other resources available online. The Open Geospatial Consortium has proposed a catalogue service specification and a series of profiles for promoting the interoperability of geospatial resources. By referring to the profile of the catalogue service for Web, an innovative information model of a catalogue service is proposed to offer Grid-enabled registry, management, retrieval of and access to geospatial resources and their replicas. This information model extends the e-business registry information model by adopting several geospatial data and service metadata standards—the International Organization for Standardization (ISO)'s 19115/19119 standards and the US Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) and US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) metadata standards for describing and indexing geospatial resources. In order to select the optimal geospatial resources and their replicas managed by the Grid, the Grid data management service and information service from the Globus Toolkits are closely integrated with the extended catalogue information model. Based on this new model, a catalogue service is implemented first as a Web service. Then, the catalogue service is further developed as a Grid service conforming to Grid service specifications. The catalogue service can be deployed in both the Web and Grid environments and accessed by standard Web services or authorized Grid services, respectively. The catalogue service has been implemented at the George Mason University/Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems (GMU/CSISS), managing more than 17 TB of geospatial data and geospatial Grid services. This service makes it easy to share and

  9. A Pan-European and Cross-Discipline Metadata Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, Heinrich; Thiemann, Hannes; Lautenschlager, Michael

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, significant investments have been made to create a pan-European e-infrastructure supporting multiple and diverse research communities. This led to the establishment of the community-driven European Data Infrastructure (EUDAT) project that implements services to tackle the specific challenges of international and interdisciplinary research data management. The EUDAT metadata service B2FIND plays a central role in this context as a repository and a search portal for the diverse metadata collected from heterogeneous sources. For this we built up a comprehensive joint metadata catalogue and an open data portal and offer support for new communities interested in publishing their data within EUDAT. The implemented metadata ingestion workflow consists in three steps. First the metadata records - provided either by various research communities or via other EUDAT services - are harvested. Afterwards the raw metadata records are converted and mapped to unified key-value dictionaries. The semantic mapping of the non-uniform community specific metadata to homogenous structured datasets is hereby the most subtle and challenging task. Finally the mapped records are uploaded as datasets to the catalogue and displayed in the portal. The homogenisation of the different community specific data models and vocabularies enables not only the unique presentation of these datasets as tables of field-value pairs but also the faceted, spatial and temporal search in the B2FIND metadata portal. Furthermore the service provides transparent access to the scientific data objects through the given references in the metadata. We present here the functionality and the features of the B2FIND service and give an outlook of further developments.

  10. Academic Libraries and the Semantic Web: What the Future May Hold for Research-Supporting Library Catalogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, D. Grant; Fast, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines how future metadata capabilities could enable academic libraries to exploit information on the emerging Semantic Web in their library catalogues. Whereas current metadata architectures treat the Web as a simple means of interchanging bibliographic data that have been created by libraries, this paper suggests that academic…

  11. Grid Enabled Geospatial Catalogue Web Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ai-Jun; Di, Li-Ping; Wei, Ya-Xing; Liu, Yang; Bui, Yu-Qi; Hu, Chau-Min; Mehrotra, Piyush

    2004-01-01

    Geospatial Catalogue Web Service is a vital service for sharing and interoperating volumes of distributed heterogeneous geospatial resources, such as data, services, applications, and their replicas over the web. Based on the Grid technology and the Open Geospatial Consortium (0GC) s Catalogue Service - Web Information Model, this paper proposes a new information model for Geospatial Catalogue Web Service, named as GCWS which can securely provides Grid-based publishing, managing and querying geospatial data and services, and the transparent access to the replica data and related services under the Grid environment. This information model integrates the information model of the Grid Replica Location Service (RLS)/Monitoring & Discovery Service (MDS) with the information model of OGC Catalogue Service (CSW), and refers to the geospatial data metadata standards from IS0 19115, FGDC and NASA EOS Core System and service metadata standards from IS0 191 19 to extend itself for expressing geospatial resources. Using GCWS, any valid geospatial user, who belongs to an authorized Virtual Organization (VO), can securely publish and manage geospatial resources, especially query on-demand data in the virtual community and get back it through the data-related services which provide functions such as subsetting, reformatting, reprojection etc. This work facilitates the geospatial resources sharing and interoperating under the Grid environment, and implements geospatial resources Grid enabled and Grid technologies geospatial enabled. It 2!so makes researcher to focus on science, 2nd not cn issues with computing ability, data locztic, processir,g and management. GCWS also is a key component for workflow-based virtual geospatial data producing.

  12. A standard for measuring metadata quality in spectral libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasaiah, B.; Jones, S. D.; Bellman, C.

    2013-12-01

    A standard for measuring metadata quality in spectral libraries Barbara Rasaiah, Simon Jones, Chris Bellman RMIT University Melbourne, Australia barbara.rasaiah@rmit.edu.au, simon.jones@rmit.edu.au, chris.bellman@rmit.edu.au ABSTRACT There is an urgent need within the international remote sensing community to establish a metadata standard for field spectroscopy that ensures high quality, interoperable metadata sets that can be archived and shared efficiently within Earth observation data sharing systems. Metadata are an important component in the cataloguing and analysis of in situ spectroscopy datasets because of their central role in identifying and quantifying the quality and reliability of spectral data and the products derived from them. This paper presents approaches to measuring metadata completeness and quality in spectral libraries to determine reliability, interoperability, and re-useability of a dataset. Explored are quality parameters that meet the unique requirements of in situ spectroscopy datasets, across many campaigns. Examined are the challenges presented by ensuring that data creators, owners, and data users ensure a high level of data integrity throughout the lifecycle of a dataset. Issues such as field measurement methods, instrument calibration, and data representativeness are investigated. The proposed metadata standard incorporates expert recommendations that include metadata protocols critical to all campaigns, and those that are restricted to campaigns for specific target measurements. The implication of semantics and syntax for a robust and flexible metadata standard are also considered. Approaches towards an operational and logistically viable implementation of a quality standard are discussed. This paper also proposes a way forward for adapting and enhancing current geospatial metadata standards to the unique requirements of field spectroscopy metadata quality. [0430] BIOGEOSCIENCES / Computational methods and data processing [0480

  13. Metadata for Web Resources: How Metadata Works on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Martin

    This paper discusses bibliographic control of knowledge resources on the World Wide Web. The first section sets the context of the inquiry. The second section covers the following topics related to metadata: (1) definitions of metadata, including metadata as tags and as descriptors; (2) metadata on the Web, including general metadata systems,…

  14. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  15. USGIN ISO metadata profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    The USGIN project has drafted and is using a specification for use of ISO 19115/19/39 metadata, recommendations for simple metadata content, and a proposal for a URI scheme to identify resources using resolvable http URI's(see http://lab.usgin.org/usgin-profiles). The principal target use case is a catalog in which resources can be registered and described by data providers for discovery by users. We are currently using the ESRI Geoportal (Open Source), with configuration files for the USGIN profile. The metadata offered by the catalog must provide sufficient content to guide search engines to locate requested resources, to describe the resource content, provenance, and quality so users can determine if the resource will serve for intended usage, and finally to enable human users and sofware clients to obtain or access the resource. In order to achieve an operational federated catalog system, provisions in the ISO specification must be restricted and usage clarified to reduce the heterogeneity of 'standard' metadata and service implementations such that a single client can search against different catalogs, and the metadata returned by catalogs can be parsed reliably to locate required information. Usage of the complex ISO 19139 XML schema allows for a great deal of structured metadata content, but the heterogenity in approaches to content encoding has hampered development of sophisticated client software that can take advantage of the rich metadata; the lack of such clients in turn reduces motivation for metadata producers to produce content-rich metadata. If the only significant use of the detailed, structured metadata is to format into text for people to read, then the detailed information could be put in free text elements and be just as useful. In order for complex metadata encoding and content to be useful, there must be clear and unambiguous conventions on the encoding that are utilized by the community that wishes to take advantage of advanced metadata

  16. Descriptive Metadata: Emerging Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahronheim, Judith R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses metadata, digital resources, cross-disciplinary activity, and standards. Highlights include Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML); Extensible Markup Language (XML); Dublin Core; Resource Description Framework (RDF); Text Encoding Initiative (TEI); Encoded Archival Description (EAD); art and cultural-heritage metadata initiatives;…

  17. Metadata requirements for portals.

    PubMed

    Benson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Consensus around the requirements for metadata in patient and clinical portals would provide a sound basis for the adoption of standards. We propose a set of requirements for metadata in a way that is generic and platform independent. These requirements cover both Clinical Documents and Clinical Statements, addressing the what, who, when and where of each item.

  18. Descriptive Metadata: Emerging Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahronheim, Judith R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses metadata, digital resources, cross-disciplinary activity, and standards. Highlights include Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML); Extensible Markup Language (XML); Dublin Core; Resource Description Framework (RDF); Text Encoding Initiative (TEI); Encoded Archival Description (EAD); art and cultural-heritage metadata initiatives;…

  19. Metadata management staging system

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    Django application providing a user-interface for building a file and metadata management system. An evolution of our Node.js and CouchDb metadata management system. This one focuses on server functionality and uses a well-documented, rational and REST-ful API for data access.

  20. Visualization of JPEG Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik Mohamad, Kamaruddin; Deris, Mustafa Mat

    There are a lot of information embedded in JPEG image than just graphics. Visualization of its metadata would benefit digital forensic investigator to view embedded data including corrupted image where no graphics can be displayed in order to assist in evidence collection for cases such as child pornography or steganography. There are already available tools such as metadata readers, editors and extraction tools but mostly focusing on visualizing attribute information of JPEG Exif. However, none have been done to visualize metadata by consolidating markers summary, header structure, Huffman table and quantization table in a single program. In this paper, metadata visualization is done by developing a program that able to summarize all existing markers, header structure, Huffman table and quantization table in JPEG. The result shows that visualization of metadata helps viewing the hidden information within JPEG more easily.

  1. Multi-facetted Metadata - Describing datasets with different metadata schemas at the same time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, Damian; Klump, Jens; Bertelmann, Roland

    2013-04-01

    Inspired by the wish to re-use research data a lot of work is done to bring data systems of the earth sciences together. Discovery metadata is disseminated to data portals to allow building of customized indexes of catalogued dataset items. Data that were once acquired in the context of a scientific project are open for reappraisal and can now be used by scientists that were not part of the original research team. To make data re-use easier, measurement methods and measurement parameters must be documented in an application metadata schema and described in a written publication. Linking datasets to publications - as DataCite [1] does - requires again a specific metadata schema and every new use context of the measured data may require yet another metadata schema sharing only a subset of information with the meta information already present. To cope with the problem of metadata schema diversity in our common data repository at GFZ Potsdam we established a solution to store file-based research data and describe these with an arbitrary number of metadata schemas. Core component of the data repository is an eSciDoc infrastructure that provides versioned container objects, called eSciDoc [2] "items". The eSciDoc content model allows assigning files to "items" and adding any number of metadata records to these "items". The eSciDoc items can be submitted, revised, and finally published, which makes the data and metadata available through the internet worldwide. GFZ Potsdam uses eSciDoc to support its scientific publishing workflow, including mechanisms for data review in peer review processes by providing temporary web links for external reviewers that do not have credentials to access the data. Based on the eSciDoc API, panMetaDocs [3] provides a web portal for data management in research projects. PanMetaDocs, which is based on panMetaWorks [4], is a PHP based web application that allows to describe data with any XML-based schema. It uses the eSciDoc infrastructures

  2. No More Metadata!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    For well-known technologically motivated reasons, communities have developed the distinction between data and metadata. Mainly this was because data were too big to analyze, and often too complex as well. Therefore, metadata were established as a kind of summaries which allow browsing and search, albeit only on the criteria preselected by the metadata provider. The result is that metadata are considered smart, queryable, and agile whereas the underlying data typically are seen as big, difficult to understand and interpret, unavailable for analysis. Common sense has it that in general data should be touched upon only once a meaningful focusing and downsizing of the topical dataset has been achieved through elaborate metadata retrieval. With the advent of Big Data technology we are in a position ot overcome this age-old digital divide. Utilizing NewSQL concepts, query techniques go beyond the classical set paradigm and can also handle large graphs and arrays. Access and retrieval can be accomplished on a high semantic level. In our presentation we show, on the example of array data, how the data/metadata divide can be effectively eliminated today. We will do so by showing queries combining metadata and ground-truth data retrieval will be shown for SQL and XQuery.

  3. ATLAS Metadata Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    ATLAS Collaboration; Costanzo, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Gadomski, S.; Jezequel, S.; Klimentov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Malon, D.; Mornacchi, G.; Nemethy, P.; Pauly, T.; von der Schmitt, H.; Barberis, D.; Gianotti, F.; Hinchliffe, I.; Mapelli, L.; Quarrie, D.; Stapnes, S.

    2007-04-04

    This document provides an overview of the metadata, which are needed to characterizeATLAS event data at different levels (a complete run, data streams within a run, luminosity blocks within a run, individual events).

  4. Metadata, PICS and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses PICS (Platform for Internet Content Selection), the Centre for Information Quality Management (CIQM), and metadata. Highlights include filtering networked information; the quality of information; and standardizing search engines. (LRW)

  5. The 3XMM Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mike

    2012-09-01

    Preparation of the 3XMM source catalogue is in progress by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) and it is expected to be released by the end of 2012. 3XMM will be based on a uniform reprocessing of all publicly available XMM EPIC data, with ~30% more observations than its immediate predecessor (2XMM-DR3) and nearly a factor two more than the 2XMM catalogue published in 2009 (the last bulk reprocessing of the database; Watson et al 2009). We expect ~460k detections associated with ~340k unique sources, from a (non-overlapping) sky area of ~650 square degrees. The 3XMM catalogue will thus ensure that the XMM serendipitous source survey continues to provide the largest available catalogue of celestial X-ray sources; this will remain true until the completion of the first part of the e-ROSITA survey in several years' time. The 3XMM data processing incorporates several additions and enhancements relative to the previous versions, including: S:N-optimised extraction of source spectra and time series, optimised removal of time periods of high background and several other enhancements, eg. the use of a higher-accuracy PSF to reduce the number of spurious sources and improved astrometric rectification. This talk will outline these improvements, summarise the catalogue statistics, and give a few preliminary highlights of individual sources and of other associated analyses.

  6. Discovering Physical Samples Through Identifiers, Metadata, and Brokering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctur, D. K.; Hills, D. J.; Jenkyns, R.

    2015-12-01

    Physical samples, particularly in the geosciences, are key to understanding the Earth system, its history, and its evolution. Our record of the Earth as captured by physical samples is difficult to explain and mine for understanding, due to incomplete, disconnected, and evolving metadata content. This is further complicated by differing ways of classifying, cataloguing, publishing, and searching the metadata, especially when specimens do not fit neatly into a single domain—for example, fossils cross disciplinary boundaries (mineral and biological). Sometimes even the fundamental classification systems evolve, such as the geological time scale, triggering daunting processes to update existing specimen databases. Increasingly, we need to consider ways of leveraging permanent, unique identifiers, as well as advancements in metadata publishing that link digital records with physical samples in a robust, adaptive way. An NSF EarthCube Research Coordination Network (RCN) called the Internet of Samples (iSamples) is now working to bridge the metadata schemas for biological and geological domains. We are leveraging the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) that provides a versatile system of registering physical samples, and working to harmonize this with the DataCite schema for Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). A brokering approach for linking disparate catalogues and classification systems could help scale discovery and access to the many large collections now being managed (sometimes millions of specimens per collection). This presentation is about our community building efforts, research directions, and insights to date.

  7. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  8. Revealing Library Collections: NSLA Re-Imagining Libraries Project 8--Description and Cataloguing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatenby, Pam

    2010-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments to occur within the library profession in recent years has been the re-evaluation of library's role in resource discovery in the web environment. This has involved recognition of short-comings of online library catalogues, a re-affirmation of the importance of metadata and a new focus on the wealth of…

  9. Outdoor Education: Resource Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    Compiled to serve as a reference to help teachers locate outdoor education materials available from Canadian government and private agencies, this catalogue lists services and publications which can be utilized by educators in planning and implementing outdoor education programs. Among the services listed is a sampling of organizations,…

  10. Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The palaearctic weevils of the subfamily Baridinae are catalogued. Two subgenera are raised to full generic rank, 12 genera are transferred from incertae sedis to tribes and subtribes, 25 species names are transferred to other genera and nine are synonymized. A total of 215 primary references were c...

  11. Catalogue of Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts Univ., Medford, MA. Lincoln Filene Center for Citizenship and Public Affairs.

    This catalogue lists resource materials available to secondary social studies teachers using an inductive approach and multi-media techniques to create a variety of learning experiences. Seven supplemental classroom instructional programs were developed by the Center: 1) Dimensions of Citizenship; 2) Politics and Policy Making; 3) Urban Problems…

  12. Marine Science Film Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Frank L.

    Forty-eight motion picture films and filmstrips in the field of marine science are catalogued in this booklet. Following the alphabetical index, one page is devoted to each film indicating its type, producer, recommended grade level, running time, and presence of color and/or sound. A summary of film content, possible uses, and outstanding…

  13. SCOPE in Cataloguing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tom, Ellen; Reed, Sue

    This report describes the Systematic Computerized Processing in Cataloguing system (SCOPE), an automated system for the catalog department of a university library. The system produces spine labels, pocket labels, book cards for the circulation system, catalog cards including shelf list, main entry, subject and added entry cards, statistics, an…

  14. An early TYCHO astrometric catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høg, E.; Bässgen, G.; Bastian, U.; Egret, D.; Halbwachs, J. L.

    The TICR catalogue is a revision of the TYCHO Input Catalogue, TIC, containing positions derived from the first 12 months of TYCHO observations. Its properties, its role in TYCHO data analysis, and other possible uses are discussed.

  15. Mercury Metadata Toolset

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source software and software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was originally developed for NASA, and the Mercury development consortium now includes funding from NASA, USGS, and DOE. A major new version of Mercury (version 3.0) was developed during 2007 and released in early 2008. This Mercury 3.0 version provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS delivery of search results, and ready customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects which use Mercury. For the end users, Mercury provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data.

  16. Mercury Metadata Toolset

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source software and software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was originally developed for NASA, and the Mercury development consortium now includes funding from NASA, USGS, and DOE. A major new version of Mercury (version 3.0) was developed during 2007 and released in early 2008. This Mercury 3.0 version provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS delivery of search results, and ready customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects which use Mercury. For the end users, Mercury provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data.

  17. Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piironen, J.; Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Torppa, J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Warner, B.

    2001-12-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (APC) is now in its fifth update with over 8600 lightcurves of more than 1000 asteroids in the database. The APC also has references of over one thousand lightcurves not in digital format. The catalogue has been published by Uppsala University Observatory and is distributed by request (contact: classe@astro.uu.se). The new update also includes a list of known asteroid rotational periods and a CD-ROM containing all the existing digital data in the APC. The total number of observed lightcurves is growing rapidly, not the least because of the new state-of-the-art equipment and growing interest among amateur astronomers. The photometric database is now so large that the present format must be altered to facilitate a user-friendly on-line service for the down- and uploading of data. We are proposing (and have started to construct) a new Internet-based Standard Asteroid Photometric Catalogue (SAPC). The website is planned to open during the first half of the year 2002. In addition to the data files, the site would contain the index and guide to the catalogue, a web-form for reporting observations, and some general observing guidelines (e.g., on filters, timing, etc.). There would also be a list of asteroids for which more observations are needed, together with recommended observing periods. This would be accompanied by an up-to-date collection of physical asteroid models based on photometric data, as well as links to observer network pages and other sites that work in collaboration with the catalogue project. Our aim is to develop this site into a global standard service used by everyone involved in asteroid photometry.

  18. A Metadata Action Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Keith; Clancy, Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The data management problem comprises data processing and data tracking. Data processing is the creation of new data based on existing data sources. Data tracking consists of storing metadata descriptions of available data. This paper addresses the data management problem by casting it as an AI planning problem. Actions are data-processing commands, plans are dataflow programs and goals are metadata descriptions of desired data products. Data manipulation is simply plan generation and execution, and a key component of data tracking is inferring the effects of an observed plan. We introduce a new action language for data management domains, called ADILM. We discuss the connection between data processing and information integration and show how a language for the latter must be modified to support the former. The paper also discusses information gathering within a data-processing framework, and show how ADILM metadata expressions are a generalization of Local Completeness.

  19. Simplified Metadata Curation via the Metadata Management Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, D.; Pilone, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Metadata Management Tool (MMT) is the newest capability developed as part of NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System's (EOSDIS) efforts to simplify metadata creation and improve metadata quality. The MMT was developed via an agile methodology, taking into account inputs from GCMD's science coordinators and other end-users. In its initial release, the MMT uses the Unified Metadata Model for Collections (UMM-C) to allow metadata providers to easily create and update collection records in the ISO-19115 format. Through a simplified UI experience, metadata curators can create and edit collections without full knowledge of the NASA Best Practices implementation of ISO-19115 format, while still generating compliant metadata. More experienced users are also able to access raw metadata to build more complex records as needed. In future releases, the MMT will build upon recent work done in the community to assess metadata quality and compliance with a variety of standards through application of metadata rubrics. The tool will provide users with clear guidance as to how to easily change their metadata in order to improve their quality and compliance. Through these features, the MMT allows data providers to create and maintain compliant and high quality metadata in a short amount of time.

  20. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  1. A Generic Metadata Query Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, B.; Duval, E.; Olivie, H.

    This paper discusses a generic query tool that enables an end user to query a metadata store through filters that impose search criteria on attributes. The Metadata Query Tool (MQT) is generic in the sense that it dynamically creates its user interface, based on configuration files that define the metadata scheme and the query functionalities.…

  2. Merged infrared catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, M.; Brown, L. W.; Mead, J. M.; Nagy, T. A.

    1978-01-01

    A compilation of equatorial coordinates, spectral types, magnitudes, and fluxes from five catalogues of infrared observations is presented. This first edition of the Merged Infrared Catalogue contains 11,201 oservations from the Two-Micron Sky Survey, Observations of Infrared Radiation from Cool Stars, the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory four Color Infrared Sky Survey and its Supplemental Catalog, and from Catalog of 10 micron Celestial Objects (HALL). This compilation is a by-product of a computerized infrared data base under development at Goddard Space Flight Center; the objective is to maintain a complete and current record of all infrared observations from 1 micron m to 1000 micron m of nonsolar system objects. These observations are being placed into a standardized system.

  3. Technology Catalogue. First edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is responsible for remediating its contaminated sites and managing its waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste management programs within EM`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Office of Waste Management. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers assessing and recommending technical solutions within the Department`s clean-up and waste management programs, as well as to industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. OTD`s applied research and demonstration activities are conducted in programs referred to as Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and Integrated Programs (IPs). The IDs test and evaluate.systems, consisting of coupled technologies, at specific sites to address generic problems, such as the sensing, treatment, and disposal of buried waste containers. The IPs support applied research activities in specific applications areas, such as in situ remediation, efficient separations processes, and site characterization. The Technology Catalogue is a means for communicating the status. of the development of these innovative technologies. The FY93 Technology Catalogue features technologies successfully demonstrated in the field through IDs and sufficiently mature to be used in the near-term. Technologies from the following IDs are featured in the FY93 Technology Catalogue: Buried Waste ID (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho); Mixed Waste Landfill ID (Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico); Underground Storage Tank ID (Hanford, Washington); Volatile organic compound (VOC) Arid ID (Richland, Washington); and VOC Non-Arid ID (Savannah River Site, South Carolina).

  4. The 3XMM catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, N.; XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre

    2014-07-01

    The 3XMM X-ray catalogue produced by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) contains 531261 X-ray detections across 794 square degrees of sky and 372728 unique X-ray sources. This catalogue realeased on 23rd July 2013 contains almost 50% more sources than the previous version (2XMMi-DR3) and uses significant improvements to the XMM-Newton Science Analysis Software as well as incorporating developments with the calibration. Improvements include better source characterisation, a reduced number of spurious source detections, better astrometric precision, greater net sensitivity and spectra and timeseries for fainter sources, with improved signal-to-noise. The median flux is ~2.4e-14 erg/cm²/s and the data taken span 12 years. It is therefore the ideal resource to search for faint/distant sources as well as variable objects. We summarise the 3XMM catalogue and present some of the rare and interesting objects discovered within it, including accreting stellar mass compact objects, tidal disruption events and extreme AGN.

  5. The ATLAS Eventlndex: data flow and inclusion of other metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberis, D.; Cárdenas Zárate, S. E.; Favareto, A.; Fernandez Casani, A.; Gallas, E. J.; Garcia Montoro, C.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Hrivnac, J.; Malon, D.; Prokoshin, F.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, J.; Toebbicke, R.; Yuan, R.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The ATLAS EventIndex is the catalogue of the event-related metadata for the information collected from the ATLAS detector. The basic unit of this information is the event record, containing the event identification parameters, pointers to the files containing this event as well as trigger decision information. The main use case for the EventIndex is event picking, as well as data consistency checks for large production campaigns. The EventIndex employs the Hadoop platform for data storage and handling, as well as a messaging system for the collection of information. The information for the EventIndex is collected both at Tier-0, when the data are first produced, and from the Grid, when various types of derived data are produced. The EventIndex uses various types of auxiliary information from other ATLAS sources for data collection and processing: trigger tables from the condition metadata database (COMA), dataset information from the data catalogue AMI and the Rucio data management system and information on production jobs from the ATLAS production system. The ATLAS production system is also used for the collection of event information from the Grid jobs. EventIndex developments started in 2012 and in the middle of 2015 the system was commissioned and started collecting event metadata, as a part of ATLAS Distributed Computing operations.

  6. Metadata Means Communication: The Challenges of Producing Useful Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P. N.; Batcheller, A. L.

    2010-12-01

    Metadata are increasingly perceived as an important component of data sharing systems. For instance, metadata accompanying atmospheric model output may indicate the grid size, grid type, and parameter settings used in the model configuration. We conducted a case study of a data portal in the atmospheric sciences using in-depth interviews, document review, and observation. OUr analysis revealed a number of challenges in producing useful metadata. First, creating and managing metadata required considerable effort and expertise, yet responsibility for these tasks was ill-defined and diffused among many individuals, leading to errors, failure to capture metadata, and uncertainty about the quality of the primary data. Second, metadata ended up stored in many different forms and software tools, making it hard to manage versions and transfer between formats. Third, the exact meanings of metadata categories remained unsettled and misunderstood even among a small community of domain experts -- an effect we expect to be exacerbated when scientists from other disciplines wish to use these data. In practice, we found that metadata problems due to these obstacles are often overcome through informal, personal communication, such as conversations or email. We conclude that metadata serve to communicate the context of data production from the people who produce data to those who wish to use it. Thus while formal metadata systems are often public, critical elements of metadata (those embodied in informal communication) may never be recorded. Therefore, efforts to increase data sharing should include ways to facilitate inter-investigator communication. Instead of tackling metadata challenges only on the formal level, we can improve data usability for broader communities by better supporting metadata communication.

  7. Metadata and the Future of Cataloging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Sherbini, Magda

    2001-01-01

    Surveys ongoing metadata projects to identify the types of metadata that exist and how they are used; compares and analyzes selected metadata elements to illustrate how they are related to MARC 21 metadata format elements; and discusses metadata standards, Dublin Core, diversity in classification, and the role of the Library of Congress.…

  8. Partnerships To Mine Unexploited Sources of Metadata.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Regina Romano

    This paper discusses the metadata created for other purposes as a potential source of bibliographic data. The first section addresses collecting metadata by means of templates, including the Nordic Metadata Project's Dublin Core Metadata Template. The second section considers potential partnerships for re-purposing metadata for bibliographic use,…

  9. Metazen - metadata capture for metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Glass, Elizabeth; Wilke, Andreas; Meyer, Folker

    2014-01-01

    As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. Unfortunately, these tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.

  10. EUDAT B2FIND : A Cross-Discipline Metadata Service and Discovery Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, Heinrich; Thiemann, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    The European Data Infrastructure (EUDAT) project aims at a pan-European environment that supports a variety of multiple research communities and individuals to manage the rising tide of scientific data by advanced data management technologies. This led to the establishment of the community-driven Collaborative Data Infrastructure that implements common data services and storage resources to tackle the basic requirements and the specific challenges of international and interdisciplinary research data management. The metadata service B2FIND plays a central role in this context by providing a simple and user-friendly discovery portal to find research data collections stored in EUDAT data centers or in other repositories. For this we store the diverse metadata collected from heterogeneous sources in a comprehensive joint metadata catalogue and make them searchable in an open data portal. The implemented metadata ingestion workflow consists of three steps. First the metadata records - provided either by various research communities or via other EUDAT services - are harvested. Afterwards the raw metadata records are converted and mapped to unified key-value dictionaries as specified by the B2FIND schema. The semantic mapping of the non-uniform, community specific metadata to homogenous structured datasets is hereby the most subtle and challenging task. To assure and improve the quality of the metadata this mapping process is accompanied by • iterative and intense exchange with the community representatives, • usage of controlled vocabularies and community specific ontologies and • formal and semantic validation. Finally the mapped and checked records are uploaded as datasets to the catalogue, which is based on the open source data portal software CKAN. CKAN provides a rich RESTful JSON API and uses SOLR for dataset indexing that enables users to query and search in the catalogue. The homogenization of the community specific data models and vocabularies enables not

  11. Towards Dynamic Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheers, B.; Groffen, F.; TKP Team

    2012-09-01

    The International LOFAR Telescope is designed to carry out unique science in the spatial, spectral, polarisation and temporal domains. The Transients Key Science Project aims to study all transient and variable sources detected by LOFAR. One of its products will be an up-to-date catalogue of all sources detected by LOFAR, i.e. a spectral light-curve database, with real-time capabilities, and expected to grow gradually with 50-100 TB/yr. The response time to transient and variable events depends strongly on the query execution plans of the algorithms that search the LOFAR light-curve database for previous (non-)detections in the spatial, spectral, polarisation and temporal domains. Here we show how the Transients Key Science Project of LOFAR approaches these challenges by using column-stores, sharded databases and implementing the new array query language SciQL (pronounced as ‘cycle’).

  12. Binary catalogue of exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard; Bazso, Akos; Zechner, Renate; Funk, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Since 1995 there is a database which list most of the known exoplanets (The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia at http://exoplanet.eu/). With the growing number of detected exoplanets in binary and multiple star systems it became more important to mark and to separate them into a new database, which is not available in the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. Therefore we established an online database (which can be found at: http://www.univie.ac.at/adg/schwarz/multiple.html) for all known exoplanets in binary star systems and in addition for multiple star systems, which will be updated regularly and linked to the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. The binary catalogue of exoplanets is available online as data file and can be used for statistical purposes. Our database is divided into two parts: the data of the stars and the planets, given in a separate list. We describe also the different parameters of the exoplanetary systems and present some applications.

  13. Technology catalogue. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for remediating DOE contaminated sites and managing the DOE waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste-management programs within EM. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to: (a) provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers responsible for preparing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) and other compliance documents for the DOE`s clean-up and waste-management programs; and (b) identify partnering and commercialization opportunities with industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community.

  14. Metadata Realities for Cyberinfrastructure: Data Authors as Metadata Creators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayernik, Matthew Stephen

    2011-01-01

    As digital data creation technologies become more prevalent, data and metadata management are necessary to make data available, usable, sharable, and storable. Researchers in many scientific settings, however, have little experience or expertise in data and metadata management. In this dissertation, I explore the everyday data and metadata…

  15. Metadata Realities for Cyberinfrastructure: Data Authors as Metadata Creators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayernik, Matthew Stephen

    2011-01-01

    As digital data creation technologies become more prevalent, data and metadata management are necessary to make data available, usable, sharable, and storable. Researchers in many scientific settings, however, have little experience or expertise in data and metadata management. In this dissertation, I explore the everyday data and metadata…

  16. Cytometry metadata in XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Stephanie H.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: The International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) has created a standard for the Minimum Information about a Flow Cytometry Experiment (MIFlowCyt 1.0). CytometryML will serve as a common metadata standard for flow and image cytometry (digital microscopy). Methods: The MIFlowCyt data-types were created, as is the rest of CytometryML, in the XML Schema Definition Language (XSD1.1). The datatypes are primarily based on the Flow Cytometry and the Digital Imaging and Communication (DICOM) standards. A small section of the code was formatted with standard HTML formatting elements (p, h1, h2, etc.). Results:1) The part of MIFlowCyt that describes the Experimental Overview including the specimen and substantial parts of several other major elements has been implemented as CytometryML XML schemas (www.cytometryml.org). 2) The feasibility of using MIFlowCyt to provide the combination of an overview, table of contents, and/or an index of a scientific paper or a report has been demonstrated. Previously, a sample electronic publication, EPUB, was created that could contain both MIFlowCyt metadata as well as the binary data. Conclusions: The use of CytometryML technology together with XHTML5 and CSS permits the metadata to be directly formatted and together with the binary data to be stored in an EPUB container. This will facilitate: formatting, data- mining, presentation, data verification, and inclusion in structured research, clinical, and regulatory documents, as well as demonstrate a publication's adherence to the MIFlowCyt standard, promote interoperability and should also result in the textual and numeric data being published using web technology without any change in composition.

  17. Federating Metadata Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Lin, K.

    2009-04-01

    The Geosciences Network project (www.geongrid.org) has been developing cyberinfrastructure for data sharing in the Earth Science community based on a service-oriented architecture. The project defines a standard "software stack", which includes a standardized set of software modules and corresponding service interfaces. The system employs Grid certificates for distributed user authentication. The GEON Portal provides online access to these services via a set of portlets. This service-oriented approach has enabled the GEON network to easily expand to new sites and deploy the same infrastructure in new projects. To facilitate interoperation with other distributed geoinformatics environments, service standards are being defined and implemented for catalog services and federated search across distributed catalogs. The need arises because there may be multiple metadata catalogs in a distributed system, for example, for each institution, agency, geographic region, and/or country. Ideally, a geoinformatics user should be able to search across all such catalogs by making a single search request. In this paper, we describe our implementation for such a search capability across federated metadata catalogs in the GEON service-oriented architecture. The GEON catalog can be searched using spatial, temporal, and other metadata-based search criteria. The search can be invoked as a Web service and, thus, can be imbedded in any software application. The need for federated catalogs in GEON arises because, (i) GEON collaborators at the University of Hyderabad, India have deployed their own catalog, as part of the iGEON-India effort, to register information about local resources for broader access across the network, (ii) GEON collaborators in the GEO Grid (Global Earth Observations Grid) project at AIST, Japan have implemented a catalog for their ASTER data products, and (iii) we have recently deployed a search service to access all data products from the EarthScope project in the US

  18. Java Metadata Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, D J

    2008-03-06

    The Java Metadata Facility is introduced by Java Specification Request (JSR) 175 [1], and incorporated into the Java language specification [2] in version 1.5 of the language. The specification allows annotations on Java program elements: classes, interfaces, methods, and fields. Annotations give programmers a uniform way to add metadata to program elements that can be used by code checkers, code generators, or other compile-time or runtime components. Annotations are defined by annotation types. These are defined the same way as interfaces, but with the symbol {at} preceding the interface keyword. There are additional restrictions on defining annotation types: (1) They cannot be generic; (2) They cannot extend other annotation types or interfaces; (3) Methods cannot have any parameters; (4) Methods cannot have type parameters; (5) Methods cannot throw exceptions; and (6) The return type of methods of an annotation type must be a primitive, a String, a Class, an annotation type, or an array, where the type of the array is restricted to one of the four allowed types. See [2] for additional restrictions and syntax. The methods of an annotation type define the elements that may be used to parameterize the annotation in code. Annotation types may have default values for any of its elements. For example, an annotation that specifies a defect report could initialize an element defining the defect outcome submitted. Annotations may also have zero elements. This could be used to indicate serializability for a class (as opposed to the current Serializability interface).

  19. Applied Parallel Metadata Indexing

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Michael R

    2012-08-01

    The GPFS Archive is parallel archive is a parallel archive used by hundreds of users in the Turquoise collaboration network. It houses 4+ petabytes of data in more than 170 million files. Currently, users must navigate the file system to retrieve their data, requiring them to remember file paths and names. A better solution might allow users to tag data with meaningful labels and searach the archive using standard and user-defined metadata, while maintaining security. last summer, I developed the backend to a tool that adheres to these design goals. The backend works by importing GPFS metadata into a MongoDB cluster, which is then indexed on each attribute. This summer, the author implemented security and developed the user interfae for the search tool. To meet security requirements, each database table is associated with a single user, which only stores records that the user may read, and requires a set of credentials to access. The interface to the search tool is implemented using FUSE (Filesystem in USErspace). FUSE is an intermediate layer that intercepts file system calls and allows the developer to redefine how those calls behave. In the case of this tool, FUSE interfaces with MongoDB to issue queries and populate output. A FUSE implementation is desirable because it allows users to interact with the search tool using commands they are already familiar with. These security and interface additions are essential for a usable product.

  20. The New Online Metadata Editor for Generating Structured Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, R.; Shrestha, B.; Palanisamy, G.; Hook, L.; Killeffer, T.; Boden, T.; Cook, R. B.; Zolly, L.; Hutchison, V.; Frame, M. T.; Cialella, A. T.; Lazer, K.

    2014-12-01

    Nobody is better suited to "describe" data than the scientist who created it. This "description" about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [1] [2]. Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. How is OME helping Big Data Centers like ORNL DAAC? The ORNL DAAC is one of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the ESDIS Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological components of the Earth's environment. Typically data produced, archived and analyzed is at a scale of multiple petabytes, which makes the discoverability of the data very challenging. Without proper metadata associated with the data, it is difficult to find the data you are looking for and equally difficult to use and understand the data. OME will allow data centers like the ORNL DAAC to produce meaningful, high quality, standards-based, descriptive information about their data products in-turn helping with the data discoverability and

  1. Creating preservation metadata from XML-metadata profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, Damian; Bertelmann, Roland; Gebauer, Petra; Hasler, Tim; Klump, Jens; Kirchner, Ingo; Peters-Kottig, Wolfgang; Mettig, Nora; Rusch, Beate

    2014-05-01

    Registration of dataset DOIs at DataCite makes research data citable and comes with the obligation to keep data accessible in the future. In addition, many universities and research institutions measure data that is unique and not repeatable like the data produced by an observational network and they want to keep these data for future generations. In consequence, such data should be ingested in preservation systems, that automatically care for file format changes. Open source preservation software that is developed along the definitions of the ISO OAIS reference model is available but during ingest of data and metadata there are still problems to be solved. File format validation is difficult, because format validators are not only remarkably slow - due to variety in file formats different validators return conflicting identification profiles for identical data. These conflicts are hard to resolve. Preservation systems have a deficit in the support of custom metadata. Furthermore, data producers are sometimes not aware that quality metadata is a key issue for the re-use of data. In the project EWIG an university institute and a research institute work together with Zuse-Institute Berlin, that is acting as an infrastructure facility, to generate exemplary workflows for research data into OAIS compliant archives with emphasis on the geosciences. The Institute for Meteorology provides timeseries data from an urban monitoring network whereas GFZ Potsdam delivers file based data from research projects. To identify problems in existing preservation workflows the technical work is complemented by interviews with data practitioners. Policies for handling data and metadata are developed. Furthermore, university teaching material is created to raise the future scientists awareness of research data management. As a testbed for ingest workflows the digital preservation system Archivematica [1] is used. During the ingest process metadata is generated that is compliant to the

  2. The Unification of Astrometric Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J.; Abad, C.

    1988-06-01

    RESUMEN Se desarrolla un metodo de interpolaci6n para detectar diferencias sistematicas entre catalogos de posiciones y movimientos propios y se aplica a los catalogos AGK3 y Santiago 67, usando los cata'logos No. 1 y No. 2 del Cfrculo Meridiano Carlsberg como sistema de referencia. ABSTRACT An interpolation mechanism is developed for the detection of systematic differences between position and proper motion catalogues and is applied to the AGK3 and Santiago 67 catalogues, using the Carlsberg Meridian Circle catalogues No. 1 and No. 2 as reference sources. Key words: ASTROMETRY

  3. The revised Flat Galaxy Catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachentsev, I. D.; Karachentseva, V. E.; Kudrya, Yu. N.; Sharina, M. E.; Parnovskij, S. L.

    The authors present a new improved and completed version of the Flat Galaxy Catalogue (FGC) named the Revised Flat Galaxy Catalogue (RFGC) containing 4236 thin edge-on spiral galaxies and covering the whole sky. The Catalogue is intended to study large-scale cosmic streamings as well as other problems of observational cosmology. The dipole moment of distribution of the RFGC galaxies (l = 273°, b = +19°) lies within statistical errors (±10°) in the direction of the Local Group motion towards the Microwave Background Radiation.

  4. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giri; Green, James; Wilson, Bruce; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris

    2010-06-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily)harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  5. Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Bruce E.; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris; Green, James

    2010-01-01

    Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily) harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

  6. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrún; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdóttir, Sigrún; Bergsveinsson, Sölvi; Oddsdóttir, Thorarna

    2017-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes (CIV) is a newly developed open-access web resource (http://icelandicvolcanoes.is) intended to serve as an official source of information about volcanoes in Iceland for the public and decision makers. CIV contains text and graphic information on all 32 active volcanic systems in Iceland, as well as real-time data from monitoring systems in a format that enables non-specialists to understand the volcanic activity status. The CIV data portal contains scientific data on all eruptions since Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and is an unprecedented endeavour in making volcanological data open and easy to access. CIV forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the European Union funded effort FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. The supersite concept implies integration of space and ground based observations for improved monitoring and evaluation of volcanic hazards, and open data policy. This work is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office, the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere.

  7. The PASTEL catalogue: 2016 version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, Caroline; Le Campion, Jean-François; Brouillet, Nathalie; Chemin, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    The bibliographical compilation of stellar atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) relying on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectroscopy started in the eighties with the so-called [Fe/H] catalogue, and was continued in 2010 with the PASTEL catalogue, which also includes determinations of Teff alone, based on various methods. Here we present an update of the PASTEL catalogue. The main journals and the CDS database have been surveyed to find relevant publications presenting new determinations of atmospheric parameters. As of February 2016, PASTEL includes 64 082 determinations of either Teff or (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) for 31 401 stars, corresponding to 1142 bibliographical references. Some 11 197 stars have a determination of the three parameters (Teff, log g, [Fe/H]) with a high-quality spectroscopic metallicity. The PASTEL catalogue is available in electronic form at the CDS (http://vizier.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/VizieR?-source=B/pastel).

  8. Catalogue of Tephritidae of Colombia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present Catalogue includes 93 species and 23 genera of Tephritidae that have been recorded in Colombia. Four subfamilies (Blepharoneurinae, Dacinae, Trypetinae and Tephritinae), and eight tribes (Acrotaeniini, Carpomyini, Dacini, Eutretini, Myopitini, Noeetini, Tephritini, and Toxotrypanini) are...

  9. NCI's national environmental research data collection: metadata management built on standards and preparing for the semantic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingbo; Bastrakova, Irina; Evans, Ben; Gohar, Kashif; Santana, Fabiana; Wyborn, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) manages national environmental research data collections (10+ PB) as part of its specialized high performance data node of the Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI) program. We manage 40+ data collections using NCI's Data Management Plan (DMP), which is compatible with the ISO 19100 metadata standards. We utilize ISO standards to make sure our metadata is transferable and interoperable for sharing and harvesting. The DMP is used along with metadata from the data itself, to create a hierarchy of data collection, dataset and time series catalogues that is then exposed through GeoNetwork for standard discoverability. This hierarchy catalogues are linked using a parent-child relationship. The hierarchical infrastructure of our GeoNetwork catalogues system aims to address both discoverability and in-house administrative use-cases. At NCI, we are currently improving the metadata interoperability in our catalogue by linking with standardized community vocabulary services. These emerging vocabulary services are being established to help harmonise data from different national and international scientific communities. One such vocabulary service is currently being established by the Australian National Data Services (ANDS). Data citation is another important aspect of the NCI data infrastructure, which allows tracking of data usage and infrastructure investment, encourage data sharing, and increasing trust in research that is reliant on these data collections. We incorporate the standard vocabularies into the data citation metadata so that the data citation become machine readable and semantically friendly for web-search purpose as well. By standardizing our metadata structure across our entire data corpus, we are laying the foundation to enable the application of appropriate semantic mechanisms to enhance discovery and analysis of NCI's national environmental research data information. We expect that this will further

  10. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  11. Collection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Linda L.; Janee, Greg; Dolin, Ron; Frew, James; Larsgaard, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Defines digital library collections and outlines two classes of collection metadata. Describes the Alexandria Digital Library (ADL) Project approach to collection metadata, including the ADL system architecture and collection guidelines and the format and use of the ADL collection metadata. Appendices include ADL collection metadata and example.…

  12. Collection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Linda L.; Janee, Greg; Dolin, Ron; Frew, James; Larsgaard, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Defines digital library collections and outlines two classes of collection metadata. Describes the Alexandria Digital Library (ADL) Project approach to collection metadata, including the ADL system architecture and collection guidelines and the format and use of the ADL collection metadata. Appendices include ADL collection metadata and example.…

  13. Making Metadata Better with CMR and MMT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, Jason Arthur; Shum, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring complete, consistent and high quality metadata is a challenge for metadata providers and curators. The CMR and MMT systems provide providers and curators options to build in metadata quality from the start and also assess and improve the quality of already existing metadata.

  14. Metadata Dictionary Database: A Proposed Tool for Academic Library Metadata Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwick, Silvia B.; Lampert, Cory

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a metadata dictionary (MDD) be used as a tool for metadata management. The MDD is a repository of critical data necessary for managing metadata to create "shareable" digital collections. An operational definition of metadata management is provided. The authors explore activities involved in metadata management in…

  15. Metadata Dictionary Database: A Proposed Tool for Academic Library Metadata Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwick, Silvia B.; Lampert, Cory

    2011-01-01

    This article proposes a metadata dictionary (MDD) be used as a tool for metadata management. The MDD is a repository of critical data necessary for managing metadata to create "shareable" digital collections. An operational definition of metadata management is provided. The authors explore activities involved in metadata management in…

  16. Distributed Multi-interface Catalogue for Geospatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, S.; Bigagli, L.; Mazzetti, P.; Mattia, U.; Boldrini, E.

    2007-12-01

    Several geosciences communities (e.g. atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology) have developed tailored data and metadata models and service protocol specifications for enabling online data discovery, inventory, evaluation, access and download. These specifications are conceived either profiling geospatial information standards or extending the well-accepted geosciences data models and protocols in order to capture more semantics. These artifacts have generated a set of related catalog -and inventory services- characterizing different communities, initiatives and projects. In fact, these geospatial data catalogs are discovery and access systems that use metadata as the target for query on geospatial information. The indexed and searchable metadata provide a disciplined vocabulary against which intelligent geospatial search can be performed within or among communities. There exists a clear need to conceive and achieve solutions to implement interoperability among geosciences communities, in the context of the more general geospatial information interoperability framework. Such solutions should provide search and access capabilities across catalogs, inventory lists and their registered resources. Thus, the development of catalog clearinghouse solutions is a near-term challenge in support of fully functional and useful infrastructures for spatial data (e.g. INSPIRE, GMES, NSDI, GEOSS). This implies the implementation of components for query distribution and virtual resource aggregation. These solutions must implement distributed discovery functionalities in an heterogeneous environment, requiring metadata profiles harmonization as well as protocol adaptation and mediation. We present a catalog clearinghouse solution for the interoperability of several well-known cataloguing systems (e.g. OGC CSW, THREDDS catalog and data services). The solution implements consistent resource discovery and evaluation over a dynamic federation of several well-known cataloguing and

  17. Catalogue of HI PArameters (CHIPA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saponara, J.; Benaglia, P.; Koribalski, B.; Andruchow, I.

    2015-08-01

    The catalogue of HI parameters of galaxies HI (CHIPA) is the natural continuation of the compilation by M.C. Martin in 1998. CHIPA provides the most important parameters of nearby galaxies derived from observations of the neutral Hydrogen line. The catalogue contains information of 1400 galaxies across the sky and different morphological types. Parameters like the optical diameter of the galaxy, the blue magnitude, the distance, morphological type, HI extension are listed among others. Maps of the HI distribution, velocity and velocity dispersion can also be display for some cases. The main objective of this catalogue is to facilitate the bibliographic queries, through searching in a database accessible from the internet that will be available in 2015 (the website is under construction). The database was built using the open source `` mysql (SQL, Structured Query Language, management system relational database) '', while the website was built with ''HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)'' and ''PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor)''.

  18. Evaluating and Evolving Metadata in Multiple Dialects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozimor, J.; Habermann, T.; Powers, L. A.; Gordon, S.

    2016-12-01

    Despite many long-term homogenization efforts, communities continue to develop focused metadata standards along with related recommendations and (typically) XML representations (aka dialects) for sharing metadata content. Different representations easily become obstacles to sharing information because each representation generally requires a set of tools and skills that are designed, built, and maintained specifically for that representation. In contrast, community recommendations are generally described, at least initially, at a more conceptual level and are more easily shared. For example, most communities agree that dataset titles should be included in metadata records although they write the titles in different ways. This situation has led to the development of metadata repositories that can ingest and output metadata in multiple dialects. As an operational example, the NASA Common Metadata Repository (CMR) includes three different metadata dialects (DIF, ECHO, and ISO 19115-2). These systems raise a new question for metadata providers: if I have a choice of metadata dialects, which should I use and how do I make that decision? We have developed a collection of metadata evaluation tools that can be used to evaluate metadata records in many dialects for completeness with respect to recommendations from many organizations and communities. We have applied these tools to over 8000 collection and granule metadata records in four different dialects. This large collection of identical content in multiple dialects enables us to address questions about metadata and dialect evolution and to answer those questions quantitatively. We will describe those tools and results from evaluating the NASA CMR metadata collection.

  19. New Catalogue of Moroccan meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibhi, Abderrahmane

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Abderrahmane Ibhi has documented the meteorite collection of Ibn Zohr exhibited at the “Musée Universitaire de météorites” in his new “Catalogue de Météorites” (Catalogue of meteorites). This museum is the first with exposure over entire Africa and the Arab world. Each piece of the collection is precisely identified with its name, location, GPS coordinates, its classification, its weight and the number of fragments, including a detailed photograph prepared at the University Ibn Zohr.

  20. Master Metadata Repository and Metadata-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Edward; Reed, Nate; Zhang, Wen

    2007-01-01

    A master metadata repository (MMR) software system manages the storage and searching of metadata pertaining to data from national and international satellite sources of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature Pilot Project [GHRSSTPP]. These sources produce a total of hundreds of data files daily, each file classified as one of more than ten data products representing global sea-surface temperatures. The MMR is a relational database wherein the metadata are divided into granulelevel records [denoted file records (FRs)] for individual satellite files and collection-level records [denoted data set descriptions (DSDs)] that describe metadata common to all the files from a specific data product. FRs and DSDs adhere to the NASA Directory Interchange Format (DIF). The FRs and DSDs are contained in separate subdatabases linked by a common field. The MMR is configured in MySQL database software with custom Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) programs to validate and ingest the metadata records. The database contents are converted into the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) standard format by use of the Extensible Markup Language (XML). A Web interface enables users to search for availability of data from all sources.

  1. TOPCAT -- Tool for OPerations on Catalogues And Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    TOPCAT is an interactive graphical viewer and editor for tabular data. It has been designed for use with astronomical tables such as object catalogues, but is not restricted to astronomical applications. It understands a number of different astronomically important formats, and more formats can be added. It is designed to cope well with large tables; a million rows by a hundred columns should not present a problem even with modest memory and CPU resources. It offers a variety of ways to view and analyse the data, including a browser for the cell data themselves, viewers for information about table and column metadata, tools for joining tables using flexible matching algorithms, and visualisation facilities including histograms, 2- and 3-dimensional scatter plots, and density maps. Using a powerful and extensible Java-based expression language new columns can be defined and row subsets selected for separate analysis. Selecting a row can be configured to trigger an action, for instance displaying an image of the catalogue object in an external viewer. Table data and metadata can be edited and the resulting modified table can be written out in a wide range of output formats. A number of options are provided for loading data from external sources, including Virtual Observatory (VO) services, thus providing a gateway to many remote archives of astronomical data. It can also interoperate with other desktop tools using the SAMP protocol. TOPCAT is written in pure Java and is available under the GNU General Public Licence. Its underlying table processing facilities are provided by STIL, the Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library.

  2. Metadata-Centric Discovery Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Chung, N. T.; Gangl, M. E.; Armstrong, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    It is data about data. It is the information describing a picture without looking at the picture. Through the years, the Earth Science community seeks better methods to describe science artifacts to improve the quality and efficiency in information exchange. One the purposes are to provide information to the users to guide them into identifies the science artifacts of their interest. The NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) are the building blocks of a data centric federation, designed for processing and archiving from NASA's Earth Observation missions and their distribution as well as provision of specialized services to users. The Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC), at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, archives and distributes science artifacts pertain to the physical state of the ocean. As part of its high-performance operational Data Management and Archive System (DMAS) is a fast data discovery RESTful web service called the Oceanographic Common Search Interface (OCSI). The web service searches and delivers metadata on all data holdings within PO.DAAC. Currently OCSI supports metadata standards such as ISO-19115, OpenSearch, GCMD, and FGDC, with new metadata standards still being added. While we continue to seek the silver bullet in metadata standard, the Earth Science community is in fact consists of various standards due to the specific needs of its users and systems. This presentation focuses on the architecture behind OCSI as a reference implementation on building a metadata-centric discovery service.

  3. Catalogue of Australian Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A catalogue of all families, subfamilies, genera, and species of Cynipoidea present in Australia is presented here. The Australian cynipoid fauna is very poorly known, with 37 genera cited: one each for Austrocynipidae, Ibaliidae, Liopteridae, two for Cynipidae, and 32 for Figitidae. The first Austr...

  4. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  5. THE NEW ONLINE METADATA EDITOR FOR GENERATING STRUCTURED METADATA

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Shrestha, Biva; Palanisamy, Giri; Hook, Leslie A; Killeffer, Terri S; Boden, Thomas A; Cook, Robert B; Zolly, Lisa; Hutchison, Viv; Frame, Mike; Cialella, Alice; Lazer, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    Nobody is better suited to describe data than the scientist who created it. This description about a data is called Metadata. In general terms, Metadata represents the who, what, when, where, why and how of the dataset [1]. eXtensible Markup Language (XML) is the preferred output format for metadata, as it makes it portable and, more importantly, suitable for system discoverability. The newly developed ORNL Metadata Editor (OME) is a Web-based tool that allows users to create and maintain XML files containing key information, or metadata, about the research. Metadata include information about the specific projects, parameters, time periods, and locations associated with the data. Such information helps put the research findings in context. In addition, the metadata produced using OME will allow other researchers to find these data via Metadata clearinghouses like Mercury [2][4]. OME is part of ORNL s Mercury software fleet [2][3]. It was jointly developed to support projects funded by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). OME s architecture provides a customizable interface to support project-specific requirements. Using this new architecture, the ORNL team developed OME instances for USGS s Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries (CSAS&L), DOE s Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, and the international Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide ATlas (SOCAT). Researchers simply use the ORNL Metadata Editor to enter relevant metadata into a Web-based form. From the information on the form, the Metadata Editor can create an XML file on the server that the editor is installed or to the user s personal computer. Researchers can also use the ORNL Metadata Editor to modify existing XML metadata files. As an example, an NGEE Arctic scientist use OME to register

  6. Transformation of HDF-EOS metadata from the ECS model to ISO 19115-based XML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yaxing; Di, Liping; Zhao, Baohua; Liao, Guangxuan; Chen, Aijun

    2007-02-01

    Nowadays, geographic data, such as NASA's Earth Observation System (EOS) data, are playing an increasing role in many areas, including academic research, government decisions and even in people's every lives. As the quantity of geographic data becomes increasingly large, a major problem is how to fully make use of such data in a distributed, heterogeneous network environment. In order for a user to effectively discover and retrieve the specific information that is useful, the geographic metadata should be described and managed properly. Fortunately, the emergence of XML and Web Services technologies greatly promotes information distribution across the Internet. The research effort discussed in this paper presents a method and its implementation for transforming Hierarchical Data Format (HDF)-EOS metadata from the NASA ECS model to ISO 19115-based XML, which will be managed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Services—Web Profile (CSW). Using XML and international standards rather than domain-specific models to describe the metadata of those HDF-EOS data, and further using CSW to manage the metadata, can allow metadata information to be searched and interchanged more widely and easily, thus promoting the sharing of HDF-EOS data.

  7. Italian Polar Metadata System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, S.; Nativi, S.; Leone, C.; Migliorini, S.; Mazari Villanova, L.

    2012-04-01

    Italian Polar Metadata System C.Leone, S.Longo, S.Migliorini, L.Mazari Villanova, S. Nativi The Italian Antarctic Research Programme (PNRA) is a government initiative funding and coordinating scientific research activities in polar regions. PNRA manages two scientific Stations in Antarctica - Concordia (Dome C), jointly operated with the French Polar Institute "Paul Emile Victor", and Mario Zucchelli (Terra Nova Bay, Southern Victoria Land). In addition National Research Council of Italy (CNR) manages one scientific Station in the Arctic Circle (Ny-Alesund-Svalbard Islands), named Dirigibile Italia. PNRA started in 1985 with the first Italian Expedition in Antarctica. Since then each research group has collected data regarding biology and medicine, geodetic observatory, geophysics, geology, glaciology, physics and atmospheric chemistry, earth-sun relationships and astrophysics, oceanography and marine environment, chemistry contamination, law and geographic science, technology, multi and inter disciplinary researches, autonomously with different formats. In 2010 the Italian Ministry of Research assigned the scientific coordination of the Programme to CNR, which is in charge of the management and sharing of the scientific results carried out in the framework of the PNRA. Therefore, CNR is establishing a new distributed cyber(e)-infrastructure to collect, manage, publish and share polar research results. This is a service-based infrastructure building on Web technologies to implement resources (i.e. data, services and documents) discovery, access and visualization; in addition, semantic-enabled functionalities will be provided. The architecture applies the "System of Systems" principles to build incrementally on the existing systems by supplementing but not supplanting their mandates and governance arrangements. This allows to keep the existing capacities as autonomous as possible. This cyber(e)-infrastructure implements multi-disciplinary interoperability following

  8. Metadata, Identifiers, and Physical Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arctur, D. K.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Hills, D. J.; Jenkyns, R.; Stroker, K. J.; Todd, N. S.; Dassie, E. P.; Bowring, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Physical samples are integral to much of the research conducted by geoscientists. The samples used in this research are often obtained at significant cost and represent an important investment for future research. However, making information about samples - whether considered data or metadata - available for researchers to enable discovery is difficult: a number of key elements related to samples are difficult to characterize in common ways, such as classification, location, sample type, sampling method, repository information, subsample distribution, and instrumentation, because these differ from one domain to the next. Unifying these elements or developing metadata crosswalks is needed. The iSamples (Internet of Samples) NSF-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is investigating ways to develop these types of interoperability and crosswalks. Within the iSamples RCN, one of its working groups, WG1, has focused on the metadata related to physical samples. This includes identifying existing metadata standards and systems, and how they might interoperate with the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) schema (schema.igsn.org) in order to help inform leading practices for metadata. For example, we are examining lifecycle metadata beyond the IGSN `birth certificate.' As a first step, this working group is developing a list of relevant standards and comparing their various attributes. In addition, the working group is looking toward technical solutions to facilitate developing a linked set of registries to build the web of samples. Finally, the group is also developing a comparison of sample identifiers and locators. This paper will provide an overview and comparison of the standards identified thus far, as well as an update on the technical solutions examined for integration. We will discuss how various sample identifiers might work in complementary fashion with the IGSN to more completely describe samples, facilitate retrieval of contextual information, and

  9. Re-using the DataCite Metadata Store as DOI registration proxy and IGSN registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J.; Ulbricht, D.

    2012-12-01

    Currently a lot of work is done to stimulate the reuse of data. In joint efforts research institutions establish infrastructure to facilitate the publication of scientific datasets. To create a citable reference, these datasets must be tagged with persistent identifiers (DOIs) and described with metadata. As most data in the geosciences are derived from samples, it is crucial to be able to uniquely identify the samples from which a set of data were derived. Incomplete documentation of samples in publications, use of ambiguous sample names are major obstacles for synthesis studies and re-use of data. Access to samples for re-analysis and re-appraisal is limited due to the lack of a central catalogue that allows finding a sample's archiving location. The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) [1] provides solutions to the questions of unique sample identification and discovery. Use of the IGSN in digital data systems allows building linkages between the digital representation of samples in sample registries, e.g. SESAR [2], and their related data in the literature and in web accessible digital data repositories. DataCite recently decided to publish their metadata store (DataCite MDS) and accompanying software online [3]. The DataCite software allows registration of handles, deposition of metadata in an XML format, it offers a search interface, and is able to disseminate metadata via OAI-PMH. Its, REST interface allows an easy integration into institutional data work flows. For our applications at GFZ Potsdam we modified the DataCite MDS software for reuse it in two different contexts: as the DOIDB web service for data publications and as the IGSN registry web service for the registration of geological samples. The DOIDB acts as a proxy service to the DataCite Metadata Store and uses its REST-Interface for registration of DataCite DOI and associated DOI metadata. Metadata can be deposited in the DataCite or NASA DIF schema. Both schemata can be disseminated via OAI

  10. An inconvenient truth : file-level metadata and in-file metadata caching in the (file-agnostic) ATLAS event store.

    SciTech Connect

    Malon, D.; van Gemmeren, P.; Hawkings, R.; Schaffer, A.; High Energy Physics; CERN; Univ. Paris-Sud

    2008-01-01

    In the ATLAS event store, files are sometimes 'an inconvenient truth.' From the point of view of the ATLAS distributed data management system, files are too small - datasets are the units of interest. From the point of view of the ATLAS event store architecture, files are simply a physical clustering optimization: the units of interest are event collections - sets of events that satisfy common conditions or selection predicates - and such collections may or may not have been accumulated into files that contain those events and no others. It is nonetheless important to maintain file-level metadata, and to cache metadata in event data files. When such metadata may or may not be present in files, or when values may have been updated after files are written and replicated, a clear and transparent model for metadata retrieval from the file itself or from remote databases is required. In this paper we describe how ATLAS reconciles its file and non-file paradigms, the machinery for associating metadata with files and event collections, and the infrastructure for metadata propagation from input to output for provenance record management and related purposes.

  11. Observing and Cataloguing Nebulae and Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinicke, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. William Herschel's observations and parallel activities; 3. John Herschel's Slough observations; 4. Discoveries made in parallel with John Herschel's Slough; 5. John Herschel at the Cape of Good Hope; 6. The time after Herschel's observations till Auwers' list of new nebulae; 7. Compiling the General Catalogue; 8. Dreyer's first catalogue: the supplement to Herschel's General Catalogue; 9. Compilation of the New General Catalogue 356; 10. The New General Catalogue: publication, analysis and effects; 11. Special topics; 12. Summary; Appendices; Index.

  12. Symmetric Active/Active Metadata Service for High Availability Parallel File Systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Ou, Li; Engelmann, Christian; Chen, Xin; Scott, Stephen L

    2009-01-01

    High availability data storage systems are critical for many applications as research and business become more data-driven. Since metadata management is essential to system availability, multiple metadata services are used to improve the availability of distributed storage systems. Past research focused on the active/standby model, where each active service has at least one redundant idle backup. However, interruption of service and even some loss of service state may occur during a fail-over depending on the used replication technique. In addition, the replication overhead for multiple metadata services can be very high. The research in this paper targets the symmetric active/active replication model, which uses multiple redundant service nodes running in virtual synchrony. In this model, service node failures do not cause a fail-over to a backup and there is no disruption of service or loss of service state. We further discuss a fast delivery protocol to reduce the latency of the needed total order broadcast. Our prototype implementation shows that metadata service high availability can be achieved with an acceptable performance trade-off using our symmetric active/active metadata service solution.

  13. The Common Metadata Repository: A High Performance, High Quality Metadata Engine for Next Generation EOSDIS Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Baynes, K.; Farley, J. D.; Murphy, K. J.; Ritz, S.; Northcutt, R.; Cherry, T. A.; Gokey, C.; Wanchoo, L.

    2013-12-01

    As data archives grow and more data becomes accessible online, cataloging, searching, and extracting relevant data from these archives becomes a critical part of Earth Science research. Current metadata systems such as ECHO, EMS, and GCMD require metadata providers to maintain multiple, disparate systems utilizing different formats and different mechanisms for submitting and updating their entries. As an end user or application developer, this inconsistency reduces the value of the metadata and complicates finding and using earth science data. Building on the results of the ESDIS Metadata Harmony Study of 2012, we completed a Metadata Harmony Study 2 in 2013 to identify specific areas where metadata quality, consistency, and availability could be improved while reducing the burden on metadata providers. In this talk we discuss the results of the Metadata Harmony 2 study and the impacts on the EOSDIS community. Specifically, we'll discuss: - The Unified Metadata Model (UMM) that unifies the ECHO, GCMD, and EMS metadata models - The Common Metadata Repository (CMR) which will provide a high performance common repository for both EOSDIS and non-EOSDIS metadata unifying the ECHO, GCMD, and EMS metadata stores - The CMR's approach to automated metadata assessment and review combined with a dedicated a science support team to significantly improve quality and consistency across Earth Science metadata - Future expandability of the CMR beyond basic science metadata to incorporate multiple metadata concepts including visualization, data attributes, services, documentation, and tool metadata - The CMR's relationship with evolving metadata standards such as work from the MENDS group and ISO19115 NASA Best Practices This talk is targeted at metadata providers, consumers, and Earth Science Data end users to introduce components that will support next generation EOSDIS applications.

  14. Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS)

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Arriaga, Martha O; Wilson, Susan; Williams, Kelly P; Schoeniger, Joseph; Waymire, Russel L; Powell, Amy Jo

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing projects have underappreciated information management tasks requiring detailed attention to specimen curation, nucleic acid sample preparation and sequence production methods required for downstream data processing, comparison, interpretation, sharing and reuse. The few existing metadata management tools for genome-based studies provide weak curatorial frameworks for experimentalists to store and manage idiosyncratic, project-specific information, typically offering no automation supporting unified naming and numbering conventions for sequencing production environments that routinely deal with hundreds, if not thousands of samples at a time. Moreover, existing tools are not readily interfaced with bioinformatics executables, (e.g., BLAST, Bowtie2, custom pipelines). Our application, the Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS), answers both needs, empowering experimentalists to generate intuitive, consistent metadata, and perform analyses and information management tasks via an intuitive web-based interface. Several use cases with short-read sequence datasets are provided to validate installation and integrated function, and suggest possible methodological road maps for prospective users. Provided examples highlight possible OMMS workflows for metadata curation, multistep analyses, and results management and downloading. The OMMS can be implemented as a stand alone-package for individual laboratories, or can be configured for webbased deployment supporting geographically-dispersed projects. The OMMS was developed using an open-source software base, is flexible, extensible and easily installed and executed. The OMMS can be obtained at http://omms.sandia.gov. Availability The OMMS can be obtained at http://omms.sandia.gov PMID:26124554

  15. [Radiological dose and metadata management].

    PubMed

    Walz, M; Kolodziej, M; Madsack, B

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the features of management systems currently available in Germany for extraction, registration and evaluation of metadata from radiological examinations, particularly in the digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) environment. In addition, the probable relevant developments in this area concerning radiation protection legislation, terminology, standardization and information technology are presented.

  16. Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS).

    PubMed

    Perez-Arriaga, Martha O; Wilson, Susan; Williams, Kelly P; Schoeniger, Joseph; Waymire, Russel L; Powell, Amy Jo

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing projects have underappreciated information management tasks requiring detailed attention to specimen curation, nucleic acid sample preparation and sequence production methods required for downstream data processing, comparison, interpretation, sharing and reuse. The few existing metadata management tools for genome-based studies provide weak curatorial frameworks for experimentalists to store and manage idiosyncratic, project-specific information, typically offering no automation supporting unified naming and numbering conventions for sequencing production environments that routinely deal with hundreds, if not thousands of samples at a time. Moreover, existing tools are not readily interfaced with bioinformatics executables, (e.g., BLAST, Bowtie2, custom pipelines). Our application, the Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS), answers both needs, empowering experimentalists to generate intuitive, consistent metadata, and perform analyses and information management tasks via an intuitive web-based interface. Several use cases with short-read sequence datasets are provided to validate installation and integrated function, and suggest possible methodological road maps for prospective users. Provided examples highlight possible OMMS workflows for metadata curation, multistep analyses, and results management and downloading. The OMMS can be implemented as a stand alone-package for individual laboratories, or can be configured for webbased deployment supporting geographically-dispersed projects. The OMMS was developed using an open-source software base, is flexible, extensible and easily installed and executed. The OMMS can be obtained at http://omms.sandia.gov. The OMMS can be obtained at http://omms.sandia.gov.

  17. Log-less metadata management on metadata server for parallel file systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jianwei; Xiao, Guoqiang; Peng, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel metadata management mechanism on the metadata server (MDS) for parallel and distributed file systems. In this technique, the client file system backs up the sent metadata requests, which have been handled by the metadata server, so that the MDS does not need to log metadata changes to nonvolatile storage for achieving highly available metadata service, as well as better performance improvement in metadata processing. As the client file system backs up certain sent metadata requests in its memory, the overhead for handling these backup requests is much smaller than that brought by the metadata server, while it adopts logging or journaling to yield highly available metadata service. The experimental results show that this newly proposed mechanism can significantly improve the speed of metadata processing and render a better I/O data throughput, in contrast to conventional metadata management schemes, that is, logging or journaling on MDS. Besides, a complete metadata recovery can be achieved by replaying the backup logs cached by all involved clients, when the metadata server has crashed or gone into nonoperational state exceptionally.

  18. Log-Less Metadata Management on Metadata Server for Parallel File Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guoqiang; Peng, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel metadata management mechanism on the metadata server (MDS) for parallel and distributed file systems. In this technique, the client file system backs up the sent metadata requests, which have been handled by the metadata server, so that the MDS does not need to log metadata changes to nonvolatile storage for achieving highly available metadata service, as well as better performance improvement in metadata processing. As the client file system backs up certain sent metadata requests in its memory, the overhead for handling these backup requests is much smaller than that brought by the metadata server, while it adopts logging or journaling to yield highly available metadata service. The experimental results show that this newly proposed mechanism can significantly improve the speed of metadata processing and render a better I/O data throughput, in contrast to conventional metadata management schemes, that is, logging or journaling on MDS. Besides, a complete metadata recovery can be achieved by replaying the backup logs cached by all involved clients, when the metadata server has crashed or gone into nonoperational state exceptionally. PMID:24892093

  19. Evolution in Metadata Quality: Common Metadata Repository's Role in NASA Curation Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, Jason; Shum, Dana; Baynes, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metadata Quality is one of the chief drivers of discovery and use of NASA EOSDIS (Earth Observing System Data and Information System) data. Issues with metadata such as lack of completeness, inconsistency, and use of legacy terms directly hinder data use. As the central metadata repository for NASA Earth Science data, the Common Metadata Repository (CMR) has a responsibility to its users to ensure the quality of CMR search results. This poster covers how we use humanizers, a technique for dealing with the symptoms of metadata issues, as well as our plans for future metadata validation enhancements. The CMR currently indexes 35K collections and 300M granules.

  20. EOS ODL Metadata On-line Viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Rabi, M.; Bane, B.; Ullman, R.

    2002-12-01

    We have recently developed and deployed an EOS ODL metadata on-line viewer. The EOS ODL metadata viewer is a web server that takes: 1) an EOS metadata file in Object Description Language (ODL), 2) parameters, such as which metadata to view and what style of display to use, and returns an HTML or XML document displaying the requested metadata in the requested style. This tool is developed to address widespread complaints by science community that the EOS Data and Information System (EOSDIS) metadata files in ODL are difficult to read by allowing users to upload and view an ODL metadata file in different styles using a web browser. Users have the selection to view all the metadata or part of the metadata, such as Collection metadata, Granule metadata, or Unsupported Metadata. Choices of display styles include 1) Web: a mouseable display with tabs and turn-down menus, 2) Outline: Formatted and colored text, suitable for printing, 3) Generic: Simple indented text, a direct representation of the underlying ODL metadata, and 4) None: No stylesheet is applied and the XML generated by the converter is returned directly. Not all display styles are implemented for all the metadata choices. For example, Web style is only implemented for Collection and Granule metadata groups with known attribute fields, but not for Unsupported, Other, and All metadata. The overall strategy of the ODL viewer is to transform an ODL metadata file to a viewable HTML in two steps. The first step is to convert the ODL metadata file to an XML using a Java-based parser/translator called ODL2XML. The second step is to transform the XML to an HTML using stylesheets. Both operations are done on the server side. This allows a lot of flexibility in the final result, and is very portable cross-platform. Perl CGI behind the Apache web server is used to run the Java ODL2XML, and then run the results through an XSLT processor. The EOS ODL viewer can be accessed from either a PC or a Mac using Internet

  1. The Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Luke

    2015-04-01

    Since the launch of the twin STEREO satellites in late 2006, the Heliospheric Imagers have been used, with good results, in tracking transients of solar origin, such as Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), out through the inner heliosphere. A frequently used approach is to build a "J-Map", in which multiple elongation profiles along a constant position angle are stacked in time, building an image in which radially propagating transients form curved tracks in the J-Map. From this the time-elongation profile of a solar transient can be manually identified. This is a time consuming and laborious process, and the results are subjective, depending on the skill and expertise of the investigator. With the Heliospheric Imager data it is possible to follow CMEs from the outer limits of the solar corona all the way to 1AU. Solar Stormwatch is a citizen science project that employs the power of thousands of volunteers to both identify and track CMEs in the Heliospheric Imager data. The CMEs identified by Solar Stormwatch are tracked many times by multiple users and this allows the calculation of consensus time-elongation profiles for each event and also provides an estimate of the error in the consensus profile. Therefore this system does not suffer from the potential subjectivity of individual researchers identifying and tracking CMEs. In this sense, the Solar Stormwatch system can be thought of as providing a middle ground between manually identified CME catalogues, such as the CDAW list, and CME catalogues generated through fully automated algorithms, such as CACtus and ARTEMIS etc. We provide a summary of the reduction of the Solar Stormwatch data into a catalogue of CMEs observed by STEREO-A and STEREO-B through the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and review some key statistical properties of these CMEs. Through some case studies of the propagation of CMEs out into the inner heliosphere we argue that the Solar Stormwatch CME catalogue, which publishes the time

  2. phosphorus retention data and metadata

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    phosphorus retention in wetlands data and metadataThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Lane , C., and B. Autrey. Phosphorus retention of forested and emergent marsh depressional wetlands in differing land uses in Florida, USA. Wetlands Ecology and Management. Springer Science and Business Media B.V;Formerly Kluwer Academic Publishers B.V., GERMANY, 24(1): 45-60, (2016).

  3. Finding Atmospheric Composition (AC) Metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strub, Richard F..; Falke, Stefan; Fiakowski, Ed; Kempler, Steve; Lynnes, Chris; Goussev, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Composition Portal (ACP) is an aggregator and curator of information related to remotely sensed atmospheric composition data and analysis. It uses existing tools and technologies and, where needed, enhances those capabilities to provide interoperable access, tools, and contextual guidance for scientists and value-adding organizations using remotely sensed atmospheric composition data. The initial focus is on Essential Climate Variables identified by the Global Climate Observing System CH4, CO, CO2, NO2, O3, SO2 and aerosols. This poster addresses our efforts in building the ACP Data Table, an interface to help discover and understand remotely sensed data that are related to atmospheric composition science and applications. We harvested GCMD, CWIC, GEOSS metadata catalogs using machine to machine technologies - OpenSearch, Web Services. We also manually investigated the plethora of CEOS data providers portals and other catalogs where that data might be aggregated. This poster is our experience of the excellence, variety, and challenges we encountered.Conclusions:1.The significant benefits that the major catalogs provide are their machine to machine tools like OpenSearch and Web Services rather than any GUI usability improvements due to the large amount of data in their catalog.2.There is a trend at the large catalogs towards simulating small data provider portals through advanced services. 3.Populating metadata catalogs using ISO19115 is too complex for users to do in a consistent way, difficult to parse visually or with XML libraries, and too complex for Java XML binders like CASTOR.4.The ability to search for Ids first and then for data (GCMD and ECHO) is better for machine to machine operations rather than the timeouts experienced when returning the entire metadata entry at once. 5.Metadata harvest and export activities between the major catalogs has led to a significant amount of duplication. (This is currently being addressed) 6.Most (if not all

  4. Evolution of the architecture of the ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odier, J.; Aidel, O.; Albrand, S.; Fulachier, J.; Lambert, F.

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Metadata Interface (AMI) is now a mature application. Over the years, the number of users and the number of provided functions has dramatically increased. It is necessary to adapt the hardware infrastructure in a seamless way so that the quality of service re - mains high. We describe the AMI evolution since its beginning being served by a single MySQL backend database server to the current state having a cluster of virtual machines at French Tier1, an Oracle database at Lyon with complementary replication to the Oracle DB at CERN and AMI back-up server.

  5. Enriched Video Semantic Metadata: Authorization, Integration, and Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mu, Xiangming; Marchionini, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Presents an enriched video metadata framework including video authorization using the Video Annotation and Summarization Tool (VAST)-a video metadata authorization system that integrates both semantic and visual metadata-- metadata integration, and user level applications. Results demonstrated that the enriched metadata were seamlessly…

  6. Enriched Video Semantic Metadata: Authorization, Integration, and Presentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mu, Xiangming; Marchionini, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Presents an enriched video metadata framework including video authorization using the Video Annotation and Summarization Tool (VAST)-a video metadata authorization system that integrates both semantic and visual metadata-- metadata integration, and user level applications. Results demonstrated that the enriched metadata were seamlessly…

  7. Managing Complex Change in Clinical Study Metadata

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Cynthia A.; Gadagkar, Rohit; Rodriguez, Cesar; Nadkarni, Prakash M.

    2004-01-01

    In highly functional metadata-driven software, the interrelationships within the metadata become complex, and maintenance becomes challenging. We describe an approach to metadata management that uses a knowledge-base subschema to store centralized information about metadata dependencies and use cases involving specific types of metadata modification. Our system borrows ideas from production-rule systems in that some of this information is a high-level specification that is interpreted and executed dynamically by a middleware engine. Our approach is implemented in TrialDB, a generic clinical study data management system. We review approaches that have been used for metadata management in other contexts and describe the features, capabilities, and limitations of our system. PMID:15187070

  8. International Metadata Standards and Enterprise Data Quality Metadata Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, T.

    2016-12-01

    Well-documented data quality is critical in situations where scientists and decision-makers need to combine multiple datasets from different disciplines and collection systems to address scientific questions or difficult decisions. Standardized data quality metadata could be very helpful in these situations. Many efforts at developing data quality standards falter because of the diversity of approaches to measuring and reporting data quality. The "one size fits all" paradigm does not generally work well in this situation. The ISO data quality standard (ISO 19157) takes a different approach with the goal of systematically describing how data quality is measured rather than how it should be measured. It introduces the idea of standard data quality measures that can be well documented in a measure repository and used for consistently describing how data quality is measured across an enterprise. The standard includes recommendations for properties of these measures that include unique identifiers, references, illustrations and examples. Metadata records can reference these measures using the unique identifier and reuse them along with details (and references) that describe how the measure was applied to a particular dataset. A second important feature of ISO 19157 is the inclusion of citations to existing papers or reports that describe quality of a dataset. This capability allows users to find this information in a single location, i.e. the dataset metadata, rather than searching the web or other catalogs. I will describe these and other capabilities of ISO 19157 with examples of how they are being used to describe data quality across the NASA EOS Enterprise and also compare these approaches with other standards.

  9. International Metadata Standards and Enterprise Data Quality Metadata Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habermann, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Well-documented data quality is critical in situations where scientists and decision-makers need to combine multiple datasets from different disciplines and collection systems to address scientific questions or difficult decisions. Standardized data quality metadata could be very helpful in these situations. Many efforts at developing data quality standards falter because of the diversity of approaches to measuring and reporting data quality. The one size fits all paradigm does not generally work well in this situation. I will describe these and other capabilities of ISO 19157 with examples of how they are being used to describe data quality across the NASA EOS Enterprise and also compare these approaches with other standards.

  10. Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Jonathan; Mutchler, Patrick; Mitchell, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2013, a stream of disclosures has prompted reconsideration of surveillance law and policy. One of the most controversial principles, both in the United States and abroad, is that communications metadata receives substantially less protection than communications content. Several nations currently collect telephone metadata in bulk, including on their own citizens. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the privacy properties of telephone metadata. Using a crowdsourcing methodology, we demonstrate that telephone metadata is densely interconnected, can trivially be reidentified, and can be used to draw sensitive inferences. PMID:27185922

  11. Metazen – metadata capture for metagenomes

    DOE PAGES

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; ...

    2014-12-08

    Background: As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. These tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack themore » appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results: Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusion: Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.« less

  12. Metazen – metadata capture for metagenomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, Jared; Harrison, Travis; Paczian, Tobias; Glass, Elizabeth; Wilke, Andreas; Meyer, Folker

    2014-12-08

    Background: As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. These tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results: Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusion: Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility.

  13. Evaluating the privacy properties of telephone metadata.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Jonathan; Mutchler, Patrick; Mitchell, John C

    2016-05-17

    Since 2013, a stream of disclosures has prompted reconsideration of surveillance law and policy. One of the most controversial principles, both in the United States and abroad, is that communications metadata receives substantially less protection than communications content. Several nations currently collect telephone metadata in bulk, including on their own citizens. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the privacy properties of telephone metadata. Using a crowdsourcing methodology, we demonstrate that telephone metadata is densely interconnected, can trivially be reidentified, and can be used to draw sensitive inferences.

  14. Metazen – metadata capture for metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As the impact and prevalence of large-scale metagenomic surveys grow, so does the acute need for more complete and standards compliant metadata. Metadata (data describing data) provides an essential complement to experimental data, helping to answer questions about its source, mode of collection, and reliability. Metadata collection and interpretation have become vital to the genomics and metagenomics communities, but considerable challenges remain, including exchange, curation, and distribution. Currently, tools are available for capturing basic field metadata during sampling, and for storing, updating and viewing it. Unfortunately, these tools are not specifically designed for metagenomic surveys; in particular, they lack the appropriate metadata collection templates, a centralized storage repository, and a unique ID linking system that can be used to easily port complete and compatible metagenomic metadata into widely used assembly and sequence analysis tools. Results Metazen was developed as a comprehensive framework designed to enable metadata capture for metagenomic sequencing projects. Specifically, Metazen provides a rapid, easy-to-use portal to encourage early deposition of project and sample metadata. Conclusions Metazen is an interactive tool that aids users in recording their metadata in a complete and valid format. A defined set of mandatory fields captures vital information, while the option to add fields provides flexibility. PMID:25780508

  15. Mitogenome metadata: current trends and proposed standards.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Jeff H T; Gwiazdowski, Rodger A; Hanner, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Mitogenome metadata are descriptive terms about the sequence, and its specimen description that allow both to be digitally discoverable and interoperable. Here, we review a sampling of mitogenome metadata published in the journal Mitochondrial DNA between 2005 and 2014. Specifically, we have focused on a subset of metadata fields that are available for GenBank records, and specified by the Genomics Standards Consortium (GSC) and other biodiversity metadata standards; and we assessed their presence across three main categories: collection, biological and taxonomic information. To do this we reviewed 146 mitogenome manuscripts, and their associated GenBank records, and scored them for 13 metadata fields. We also explored the potential for mitogenome misidentification using their sequence diversity, and taxonomic metadata on the Barcode of Life Datasystems (BOLD). For this, we focused on all Lepidoptera and Perciformes mitogenomes included in the review, along with additional mitogenome sequence data mined from Genbank. Overall, we found that none of 146 mitogenome projects provided all the metadata we looked for; and only 17 projects provided at least one category of metadata across the three main categories. Comparisons using mtDNA sequences from BOLD, suggest that some mitogenomes may be misidentified. Lastly, we appreciate the research potential of mitogenomes announced through this journal; and we conclude with a suggestion of 13 metadata fields, available on GenBank, that if provided in a mitogenomes's GenBank record, would increase their research value.

  16. TOPCAT: Tool for OPerations on Catalogues And Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Mark

    2011-01-01

    TOPCAT is an interactive graphical viewer and editor for tabular data. Its aim is to provide most of the facilities that astronomers need for analysis and manipulation of source catalogues and other tables, though it can be used for non-astronomical data as well. It understands a number of different astronomically important formats (including FITS and VOTable) and more formats can be added. It offers a variety of ways to view and analyse tables, including a browser for the cell data themselves, viewers for information about table and column metadata, and facilities for 1-, 2-, 3- and higher-dimensional visualisation, calculating statistics and joining tables using flexible matching algorithms. Using a powerful and extensible Java-based expression language new columns can be defined and row subsets selected for separate analysis. Table data and metadata can be edited and the resulting modified table can be written out in a wide range of output formats. It is a stand-alone application which works quite happily with no network connection. However, because it uses Virtual Observatory (VO) standards, it can cooperate smoothly with other tools in the VO world and beyond, such as VODesktop, Aladin and ds9. Between 2006 and 2009 TOPCAT was developed within the AstroGrid project, and is offered as part of a standard suite of applications on the AstroGrid web site, where you can find information on several other VO tools. The program is written in pure Java and available under the GNU General Public Licence. It has been developed in the UK within the Starlink and AstroGrid projects, and under PPARC and STFC grants. Its underlying table processing facilities are provided by STIL.

  17. A Catalogue of quasars and active nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron-Cetty, M.-P.; Veron, P.

    General note: A machine readable version of the catalogue is available either via anonymous ftp at ftp.obs-hp.fr (or 192.134.160.100) under directory catalogues or via the OHP WWW server: http://www.obs-hp.fr/ Electronic access: http://www.obs-hp.fr/

  18. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 10000 GHz (i.e., wavelengths longer than 30 micrometers). The catalogue can be used as a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue has been constructed using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (151 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available from the authors as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  19. The 3XMM-DR4 Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.; Watson, M.; Pye, J.; Webb, N.; Schwope, A.; Freyberg, M.; Motch, C.; Ballet, J.; Carrera, F.; Page, M.; Page, C.

    2015-09-01

    The 3XMM-DR4 catalogue is the third generation catalogue of serendipitous X-ray sources from the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton observatory, and has been created by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) on behalf of ESA. Released in July 2013, 3XMM-DR4 contains 531261 detections from 372728 unique sources observed in 7427 XMM-Newton observations, about 50% more than in the preceding 2XMMi-DR3 catalogue, made public in April 2010. We review some of the key science-driven algorithmic and calibration changes to the processing pipeline adopted to enhance the scientific quality of the catalogue, such as the optimised filtering of background flares, improvements to the astrometric analysis and upgrades to the catalogue construction process. Examples of the gains obtained are illustrated.

  20. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  1. The Herschel Point Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Schulz, Bernhard; Altieri, Bruno; Calzoletti, Luca; Kiss, Csaba; Lim, Tanya; Lu, Nanyao; Paladini, Roberta; Papageorgiou, Andreas; Pearson, Chris; Rector, John; Shupe, David; Valtchanov, Ivan; Verebélyi, Erika; Xu, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory was the fourth cornerstone mission in the European Space Agency (ESA) science programme with excellent broad band imaging capabilities in the submillimetre and far-infrared part of the spectrum. Although the spacecraft finished its observations in 2013, it left a large legacy dataset that is far from having been fully scrutinized and still has potential for new scientific discoveries. This is specifically true for the photometric observations of the PACS and SPIRE instruments that scanned >10% of the sky at 70, 100, 160, 250, 350 and 500 microns. Some source catalogs have already been produced by individual observing programs, but there are many observations that would never be analyzed for their full source content. To maximize the science return of the SPIRE and PACS data sets, our international team of instrument experts is in the process of building the Herschel Point Source Catalog (HPSC) from all scan map observations. Our homogeneous source extraction enables a systematic and unbiased comparison of sensitivity across the different Herschel fields that single programs will generally not be able to provide. The extracted point sources will contain individual YSOs of our Galaxy, unresolved YSO clusters in resolved nearby galaxies and unresolved galaxies of the local and distant Universe that are related to star formation. Such a huge dataset will help scientists better understand the evolution from interstellar clouds to individual stars. Furthermore the analysis of stellar clusters and the star formation on galactic scales will add more details to the understanding of star formation laws through time.We present our findings on comparison of different source detection and photometric tools. First results of the extractions are shown along with the description of our pipelines and catalogue entries. We also provide an additional science product, the structure noise map, that is used for the quality assessment of the catalogue in

  2. Logic programming and metadata specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Antonio M., Jr.; Saacks, Marguerite E.

    1992-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) ideas and techniques are critical to the development of intelligent information systems that will be used to collect, manipulate, and retrieve the vast amounts of space data produced by 'Missions to Planet Earth.' Natural language processing, inference, and expert systems are at the core of this space application of AI. This paper presents logic programming as an AI tool that can support inference (the ability to draw conclusions from a set of complicated and interrelated facts). It reports on the use of logic programming in the study of metadata specifications for a small problem domain of airborne sensors, and the dataset characteristics and pointers that are needed for data access.

  3. A Common Metadata System for Marine Data Portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosniok, C.; Breitbach, G.; Lehfeldt, R.

    2012-04-01

    ), Web Feature Service (WFS) and Sensor Observation Service (SOS), which ensures interoperability and extensibility. In addition, metadata as crucial components for searching and finding information in large data infrastructures is provided via the Catalogue Web Service (CS-W). MDI-DE and COSYNA rely on the metadata information system for marine metadata NOKIS, which reflects a metadata profile tailored for marine data according to the specifications of German coastal authorities. In spite of this common software base, interoperability between the two data collections requires constant alignments of the diverse data processed by the two portals. While monitoring data in the MDI-DE is currently rather campaign-based, COSYNA has to fit constantly evolving time series into metadata sets. With all data following the same metadata profile, we now reach full interoperability between the different data collections. The distributed marine information system provides options to search, find and visualise the harmonised results from continuous monitoring, field campaigns, numerical modeling and other data in one web client.

  4. A Metadata-Rich File System

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2009-01-07

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, metadata, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS includes Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the defacto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  5. Leveraging Metadata to Create Better Web Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Libraries have been increasingly concerned with data creation, management, and publication. This increase is partly driven by shifting metadata standards in libraries and partly by the growth of data and metadata repositories being managed by libraries. In order to manage these data sets, libraries are looking for new preservation and discovery…

  6. Leveraging Metadata to Create Better Web Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Libraries have been increasingly concerned with data creation, management, and publication. This increase is partly driven by shifting metadata standards in libraries and partly by the growth of data and metadata repositories being managed by libraries. In order to manage these data sets, libraries are looking for new preservation and discovery…

  7. Some Observations on Metadata and Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arms, Caroline R.

    This paper describes experiences in gathering together metadata from heterogeneous sources for the American Memory project of the Library of Congress, particularly for the collections digitized and cataloged at other institutions. It also reflects on several initiatives to develop rich structured metadata schemes for specific domains and to find…

  8. International Metadata Initiatives: Lessons in Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caplan, Priscilla

    This paper looks at a subset of metadata schemes, including the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) header, the Encoded Archival Description (EAD), the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set (DCMES), and the Visual Resources Association (VRA) Core Categories for visual resources. It examines why they developed as they did, major point of difference from…

  9. Centralized FITS Metadata Handling Framework at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, I.; Dobrzycki, A.; Vuong, M.-H.; Brion, A.

    2011-07-01

    The European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO) headquartered in Garching, Germany, operates three state-of-the-art observatories in Chile: at La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. The observatories produce huge amounts of data, which are transferred to the ESO headquarters and stored in the ESO Archive. The archive also stores the products generated by pipeline processing of raw data by the ESO Quality Control (QC) group. In addition, the Archive also stores science products delivered by the principal investigators. Historically, these three processes were independent from one another which resulted in different metadata handling frameworks for each kind of product. This architecture led to duplicate efforts for building metadata-based services as well as creating challenging scenarios for integrating metadata from different processes. We present the metadata handling framework recently implemented at the European Southern Observatory, in which all metadata from FITS compliant sources are stored in a centralized repository database. The framework allows building metadata-based services in a descriptive way, transparently propagating any modifications/updates performed in the central repository. In addition, through a set of common functions, the framework allows for enrichment of FITS-based metadata with derived values and/or with metadata from other ESO operational databases.

  10. CanCore: Metadata for Learning Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm; Roberts, Anthony; Fisher, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Discusses reusable digital learning resources or objects in distance education and training. Focuses on the pivotal role of metadata and issues relating to classification, description, and meaning, specifically issues of semantics; and describes the CanCore Learning Object Metadata Application Profile. (Author/LRW)

  11. A Metadata Element Set for Project Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Gail; Templeton, Clay; Allen, Robert B.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a large engineering enterprise with many projects. We describe our efforts to develop standard metadata sets across project documentation which we term the "Goddard Core". We also address broader issues for project management metadata.

  12. Integrated Array/Metadata Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misev, Dimitar; Baumann, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Data comes in various forms and types, and integration usually presents a problem that is often simply ignored and solved with ad-hoc solutions. Multidimensional arrays are an ubiquitous data type, that we find at the core of virtually all science and engineering domains, as sensor, model, image, statistics data. Naturally, arrays are richly described by and intertwined with additional metadata (alphanumeric relational data, XML, JSON, etc). Database systems, however, a fundamental building block of what we call "Big Data", lack adequate support for modelling and expressing these array data/metadata relationships. Array analytics is hence quite primitive or non-existent at all in modern relational DBMS. Recognizing this, we extended SQL with a new SQL/MDA part seamlessly integrating multidimensional array analytics into the standard database query language. We demonstrate the benefits of SQL/MDA with real-world examples executed in ASQLDB, an open-source mediator system based on HSQLDB and rasdaman, that already implements SQL/MDA.

  13. Mini Ontologies and Metadata Expressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T. A.; Ritschel, B.

    2013-12-01

    Ontologies come in many forms and with a wide range of detail and specificity. Of particular interest in the realm of science are classification schemes or taxonomies. Within general science domains there may be multiple taxonomies. Each taxonomy can be represented as a very narrowly defined domain ontology. We call such ontologies "mini ontologies". Since mini ontologies are very modular and portable they can be used in a variety of context. To illustrate the generation and use of mini ontologies we show how enumerations which may part of an existing data model, like SPASE *Region enumerations, can be modeled as a mini ontology. We show how such ontologies can be transformed to generate metadata expressions which can be readily used in different operational context, for example in the tag of a web page. We define a set of context specific transforms for commonly used metadata expressions which can preserve the semantic information in a mini ontology and describe how such expressions are reversible. The sharing and adoption of mini ontologies can significantly enhance the discovery and use of related data resources within a community. We look at several cases where this is true with a special focus on the international ESPAS project.

  14. Metadata

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2012-11-29

    Descriptive information pertaining to data sets. This includes data set descriptions in directories, guides, and inventories, plus any additional information that defines the relationships among them.

  15. Collection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Linda L.; Janee, Greg; Dolin, Ron; Frew, James; Larsgaard, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Within a digital library, collections may range from an ad hoc set of objects that serve a temporary purpose to established library collections intended to persist through time. The objects in these collections vary widely, from library and data center holdings to pointers to real-world objects, such as geographic places, and the various metadata schemas that describe them. The key to integrated use of such a variety of collections in a digital library is collection metadata that represents the inherent and contextual characteristics of a collection. The Alexandria Digital Library (ADL) Project has designed and implemented collection metadata for several purposes: in XML form, the collection metadata "registers" the collection with the user interface client; in HTML form, it is used for user documentation; eventually, it will be used to describe the collection to network search agents; and it is used for internal collection management, including mapping the object metadata attributes to the common search parameters of the system.

  16. METADATA REGISTRY, ISO/IEC 11179

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R K; Buttler, D J

    2008-01-03

    ISO/IEC-11179 is an international standard that documents the standardization and registration of metadata to make data understandable and shareable. This standardization and registration allows for easier locating, retrieving, and transmitting data from disparate databases. The standard defines the how metadata are conceptually modeled and how they are shared among parties, but does not define how data is physically represented as bits and bytes. The standard consists of six parts. Part 1 provides a high-level overview of the standard and defines the basic element of a metadata registry - a data element. Part 2 defines the procedures for registering classification schemes and classifying administered items in a metadata registry (MDR). Part 3 specifies the structure of an MDR. Part 4 specifies requirements and recommendations for constructing definitions for data and metadata. Part 5 defines how administered items are named and identified. Part 6 defines how administered items are registered and assigned an identifier.

  17. Collection Metadata Solutions for Digital Library Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Linda L.; Janee, Greg; Dolin, Ron; Frew, James; Larsgaard, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Within a digital library, collections may range from an ad hoc set of objects that serve a temporary purpose to established library collections intended to persist through time. The objects in these collections vary widely, from library and data center holdings to pointers to real-world objects, such as geographic places, and the various metadata schemas that describe them. The key to integrated use of such a variety of collections in a digital library is collection metadata that represents the inherent and contextual characteristics of a collection. The Alexandria Digital Library (ADL) Project has designed and implemented collection metadata for several purposes: in XML form, the collection metadata "registers" the collection with the user interface client; in HTML form, it is used for user documentation; eventually, it will be used to describe the collection to network search agents; and it is used for internal collection management, including mapping the object metadata attributes to the common search parameters of the system.

  18. Incorporating ISO Metadata Using HDF Product Designer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelenak, Aleksandar; Kozimor, John; Habermann, Ted

    2016-01-01

    The need to store in HDF5 files increasing amounts of metadata of various complexity is greatly overcoming the capabilities of the Earth science metadata conventions currently in use. Data producers until now did not have much choice but to come up with ad hoc solutions to this challenge. Such solutions, in turn, pose a wide range of issues for data managers, distributors, and, ultimately, data users. The HDF Group is experimenting on a novel approach of using ISO 19115 metadata objects as a catch-all container for all the metadata that cannot be fitted into the current Earth science data conventions. This presentation will showcase how the HDF Product Designer software can be utilized to help data producers include various ISO metadata objects in their products.

  19. In-field Access to Geoscientific Metadata through GPS-enabled Mobile Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobona, Gobe; Jackson, Mike; Jordan, Colm; Butchart, Ben

    2010-05-01

    Fieldwork is an integral part of much geosciences research. But whilst geoscientists have physical or online access to data collections whilst in the laboratory or at base stations, equivalent in-field access is not standard or straightforward. The increasing availability of mobile internet and GPS-supported mobile phones, however, now provides the basis for addressing this issue. The SPACER project was commissioned by the Rapid Innovation initiative of the UK Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) to explore the potential for GPS-enabled mobile phones to access geoscientific metadata collections. Metadata collections within the geosciences and the wider geospatial domain can be disseminated through web services based on the Catalogue Service for Web(CSW) standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) - a global grouping of over 380 private, public and academic organisations aiming to improve interoperability between geospatial technologies. CSW offers an XML-over-HTTP interface for querying and retrieval of geospatial metadata. By default, the metadata returned by CSW is based on the ISO19115 standard and encoded in XML conformant to ISO19139. The SPACER project has created a prototype application that enables mobile phones to send queries to CSW containing user-defined keywords and coordinates acquired from GPS devices built-into the phones. The prototype has been developed using the free and open source Google Android platform. The mobile application offers views for listing titles, presenting multiple metadata elements and a Google Map with an overlay of bounding coordinates of datasets. The presentation will describe the architecture and approach applied in the development of the prototype.

  20. Earthquake Catalogue of the Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godoladze, T.; Gok, R.; Tvaradze, N.; Tumanova, N.; Gunia, I.; Onur, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Caucasus has a documented historical catalog stretching back to the beginning of the Christian era. Most of the largest historical earthquakes prior to the 19th century are assumed to have occurred on active faults of the Greater Caucasus. Important earthquakes include the Samtskhe earthquake of 1283 (Ms˜7.0, Io=9); Lechkhumi-Svaneti earthquake of 1350 (Ms˜7.0, Io=9); and the Alaverdi earthquake of 1742 (Ms˜6.8, Io=9). Two significant historical earthquakes that may have occurred within the Javakheti plateau in the Lesser Caucasus are the Tmogvi earthquake of 1088 (Ms˜6.5, Io=9) and the Akhalkalaki earthquake of 1899 (Ms˜6.3, Io =8-9). Large earthquakes that occurred in the Caucasus within the period of instrumental observation are: Gori 1920; Tabatskuri 1940; Chkhalta 1963; Racha earthquake of 1991 (Ms=7.0), is the largest event ever recorded in the region; Barisakho earthquake of 1992 (M=6.5); Spitak earthquake of 1988 (Ms=6.9, 100 km south of Tbilisi), which killed over 50,000 people in Armenia. Recently, permanent broadband stations have been deployed across the region as part of the various national networks (Georgia (˜25 stations), Azerbaijan (˜35 stations), Armenia (˜14 stations)). The data from the last 10 years of observation provides an opportunity to perform modern, fundamental scientific investigations. In order to improve seismic data quality a catalog of all instrumentally recorded earthquakes has been compiled by the IES (Institute of Earth Sciences/NSMC, Ilia State University) in the framework of regional joint project (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Turkey, USA) "Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) in the Caucasus. The catalogue consists of more then 80,000 events. First arrivals of each earthquake of Mw>=4.0 have been carefully examined. To reduce calculation errors, we corrected arrivals from the seismic records. We improved locations of the events and recalculate Moment magnitudes in order to obtain unified magnitude

  1. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between O and 3000 GHz (such as; wavelengths longer than 100 m) is discussed. The catalogue was used as a planning guide and as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances.

  2. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 686-692] PMID:23261053

  3. Internet experiments: methods, guidelines, metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2009-02-01

    The Internet experiment is now a well-established and widely used method. The present paper describes guidelines for the proper conduct of Internet experiments, e.g. handling of dropout, unobtrusive naming of materials, and pre-testing. Several methods are presented that further increase the quality of Internet experiments and help to avoid frequent errors. These methods include the "seriousness check", "warm-up," "high hurdle," and "multiple site entry" techniques, control of multiple submissions, and control of motivational confounding. Finally, metadata from sites like WEXTOR (http://wextor.org) and the web experiment list (http://genpsylab-wexlist.uzh.ch/) are reported that show the current state of Internet-based research in terms of the distribution of fields, topics, and research designs used.

  4. Handling Metadata in a Neurophysiology Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Zehl, Lyuba; Jaillet, Florent; Stoewer, Adrian; Grewe, Jan; Sobolev, Andrey; Wachtler, Thomas; Brochier, Thomas G; Riehle, Alexa; Denker, Michael; Grün, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    To date, non-reproducibility of neurophysiological research is a matter of intense discussion in the scientific community. A crucial component to enhance reproducibility is to comprehensively collect and store metadata, that is, all information about the experiment, the data, and the applied preprocessing steps on the data, such that they can be accessed and shared in a consistent and simple manner. However, the complexity of experiments, the highly specialized analysis workflows and a lack of knowledge on how to make use of supporting software tools often overburden researchers to perform such a detailed documentation. For this reason, the collected metadata are often incomplete, incomprehensible for outsiders or ambiguous. Based on our research experience in dealing with diverse datasets, we here provide conceptual and technical guidance to overcome the challenges associated with the collection, organization, and storage of metadata in a neurophysiology laboratory. Through the concrete example of managing the metadata of a complex experiment that yields multi-channel recordings from monkeys performing a behavioral motor task, we practically demonstrate the implementation of these approaches and solutions with the intention that they may be generalized to other projects. Moreover, we detail five use cases that demonstrate the resulting benefits of constructing a well-organized metadata collection when processing or analyzing the recorded data, in particular when these are shared between laboratories in a modern scientific collaboration. Finally, we suggest an adaptable workflow to accumulate, structure and store metadata from different sources using, by way of example, the odML metadata framework.

  5. Handling Metadata in a Neurophysiology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Zehl, Lyuba; Jaillet, Florent; Stoewer, Adrian; Grewe, Jan; Sobolev, Andrey; Wachtler, Thomas; Brochier, Thomas G.; Riehle, Alexa; Denker, Michael; Grün, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    To date, non-reproducibility of neurophysiological research is a matter of intense discussion in the scientific community. A crucial component to enhance reproducibility is to comprehensively collect and store metadata, that is, all information about the experiment, the data, and the applied preprocessing steps on the data, such that they can be accessed and shared in a consistent and simple manner. However, the complexity of experiments, the highly specialized analysis workflows and a lack of knowledge on how to make use of supporting software tools often overburden researchers to perform such a detailed documentation. For this reason, the collected metadata are often incomplete, incomprehensible for outsiders or ambiguous. Based on our research experience in dealing with diverse datasets, we here provide conceptual and technical guidance to overcome the challenges associated with the collection, organization, and storage of metadata in a neurophysiology laboratory. Through the concrete example of managing the metadata of a complex experiment that yields multi-channel recordings from monkeys performing a behavioral motor task, we practically demonstrate the implementation of these approaches and solutions with the intention that they may be generalized to other projects. Moreover, we detail five use cases that demonstrate the resulting benefits of constructing a well-organized metadata collection when processing or analyzing the recorded data, in particular when these are shared between laboratories in a modern scientific collaboration. Finally, we suggest an adaptable workflow to accumulate, structure and store metadata from different sources using, by way of example, the odML metadata framework. PMID:27486397

  6. Submillimeter, millimeter, and microwave spectral line catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poynter, R. L.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer accessible catalogue of submillimeter, millimeter and microwave spectral lines in the frequency range between 0 and 3000 GHZ (i.e., wavelengths longer than 100 mu m) is presented which can be used a planning guide or as an aid in the identification and analysis of observed spectral lines. The information listed for each spectral line includes the frequency and its estimated error, the intensity, lower state energy, and quantum number assignment. The catalogue was constructed by using theoretical least squares fits of published spectral lines to accepted molecular models. The associated predictions and their estimated errors are based upon the resultant fitted parameters and their covariances. Future versions of this catalogue will add more atoms and molecules and update the present listings (133 species) as new data appear. The catalogue is available as a magnetic tape recorded in card images and as a set of microfiche records.

  7. Magnitude systems in old star catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Tomoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    The current system of stellar magnitudes originally introduced by Hipparchus was strictly defined by Norman Pogson in 1856. He based his system on Ptolemy's star catalogue, the Almagest, recorded in about AD137, and defined the magnitude-intensity relationship on a logarithmic scale. Stellar magnitudes observed with the naked eye recorded in seven old star catalogues were analyzed in order to examine the visual magnitude systems. Although psychophysicists have proposed that human visual sensitivity follows a power-law scale, it is shown here that the degree of agreement is far better for a logarithmic scale than for a power-law scale. It is also found that light ratios in each star catalogue are nearly equal to 2.512, if the brightest (1st magnitude) and the faintest (6th magnitude and dimmer) stars are excluded from the study. This means that the visual magnitudes in the old star catalogues agree fully with Pogson's logarithmic scale.

  8. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, E.; Barr, E. D.; Jameson, A.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Kramer, M.; Morello, V.; Tabbara, D.; van Straten, W.

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios, we have re-processed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a Mysql database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the Fast Radio Burst population as it grows.

  9. The History of Ptolemy's Star Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graßhoff, Gerd

    Table of contents

    Contents: Introduction.- The Stars of the Almagest.- Accusations.- The Rehabilitation of Ptolemy.- The Analysis of the Star Catalogue.- Structures in Ptolemy's Star Catalogue.- Theory and Observation.- Appendix A.- Stars and Constellations.- Identifications.- Appendix B.- Transformation Formulae.- Column Headings.- Appendix C.- Column Headings.- Literature.- Index.

  10. The TYCHO Input Catalogue and the Guide Star Catalogue of the Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egret, D.

    1985-08-01

    The identification of the stars observed by TYCHO is based on an a priori catalogue of stars, the TYCHO Input Catalogue (TIC) complete to B = 12.5 and containing some two million stars. The main source for TIC is the Guide Star Catalogue (GSC) presently being produced for the needs of the Space Telescope. The production and the contents of the TIC is presented and the possible use of the GSC for checking the coordinates of the final HIPPARCOS Input Catalogue is discussed.

  11. Evaluating and Evolving Metadata in Multiple Dialects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozimore, John; Habermann, Ted; Gordon, Sean; Powers, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    Despite many long-term homogenization efforts, communities continue to develop focused metadata standards along with related recommendations and (typically) XML representations (aka dialects) for sharing metadata content. Different representations easily become obstacles to sharing information because each representation generally requires a set of tools and skills that are designed, built, and maintained specifically for that representation. In contrast, community recommendations are generally described, at least initially, at a more conceptual level and are more easily shared. For example, most communities agree that dataset titles should be included in metadata records although they write the titles in different ways.

  12. James Dunlop's historical catalogue of southern nebulae and clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozens, Glen; Walsh, Andrew; Orchiston, Wayne

    2010-03-01

    In 1826 James Dunlop compiled the second ever catalogue of southern star clusters, nebulae and galaxies from Parramatta (NSW, Australia) using a 23-cm reflecting telescope. Initially acclaimed, the catalogue and author were later criticised and condemned by others - including Sir John Herschel and both the catalogue and author are now largely unknown. The criticism of the catalogue centred on the large number of fictitious or ‘missing’ objects, yet detailed analysis reveals the remarkable completeness of the catalogue, despite its inherent errors. We believe that James Dunlop was an important early Australian astronomer, and his catalogue should be esteemed as the southern equivalent of Messier's famous northern catalogue.

  13. Canadian Seismicity Catalogue - Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, T.

    2003-04-01

    The first seismograph station in western Canada was installed in Victoria, BC, in 1898, under the Meteorological Service of Canada. By 1940, seismograph installations in Canada were amalgamated under the Dominion Observatory. The first short-period instruments were installed in western Canada in the early 1950's. The first digital instruments were installed in the mid-1970's. To date there are now 54 digital stations in western Canada that are routinely used in analysis as well as 2 paper-record stations. Detection ability has increased significantly over the past 20 years. Magnitude thresholds for locations vary over space and time reflecting seismicity levels, station distribution, and staffing levels. Currently the magnitude thresholds are (these do not necessarily equate to completeness levels): M=2.5-3.0 for western Canada; M=2.0 in the St Elias Mountains, YT, the northern Coast Mountains, BC, most of southern BC, and southwestern Alberta; M=1.0-1.5 in the Queen Charlotte Islands, southern Coast Mountains, and northern Vancouver Island; M=0.7-0.8 in southern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland. Events have been located with a variety of location programs over the years. A number of velocity models have been in use over time, currently resulting in a generic model for all of western Canada, and a model each for offshore, the Queen Charlotte Islands, and Vancouver Island. Recently purchased Antelope software will allow improved ability to maintain and possibly extend current magnitude thresholds as much of the daily analyst housekeeping tasks are decreased. Recent additions to the catalogue are regular computation of P-nodal and moment tensor solutions.

  14. Assessing Metadata Quality of a Federally Sponsored Health Data Repository.

    PubMed

    Marc, David T; Beattie, James; Herasevich, Vitaly; Gatewood, Laël; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Federal Government developed HealthData.gov to disseminate healthcare datasets to the public. Metadata is provided for each datasets and is the sole source of information to find and retrieve data. This study employed automated quality assessments of the HealthData.gov metadata published from 2012 to 2014 to measure completeness, accuracy, and consistency of applying standards. The results demonstrated that metadata published in earlier years had lower completeness, accuracy, and consistency. Also, metadata that underwent modifications following their original creation were of higher quality. HealthData.gov did not uniformly apply Dublin Core Metadata Initiative to the metadata, which is a widely accepted metadata standard. These findings suggested that the HealthData.gov metadata suffered from quality issues, particularly related to information that wasn't frequently updated. The results supported the need for policies to standardize metadata and contributed to the development of automated measures of metadata quality.

  15. Assessing Metadata Quality of a Federally Sponsored Health Data Repository

    PubMed Central

    Marc, David T.; Beattie, James; Herasevich, Vitaly; Gatewood, Laël; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Federal Government developed HealthData.gov to disseminate healthcare datasets to the public. Metadata is provided for each datasets and is the sole source of information to find and retrieve data. This study employed automated quality assessments of the HealthData.gov metadata published from 2012 to 2014 to measure completeness, accuracy, and consistency of applying standards. The results demonstrated that metadata published in earlier years had lower completeness, accuracy, and consistency. Also, metadata that underwent modifications following their original creation were of higher quality. HealthData.gov did not uniformly apply Dublin Core Metadata Initiative to the metadata, which is a widely accepted metadata standard. These findings suggested that the HealthData.gov metadata suffered from quality issues, particularly related to information that wasn’t frequently updated. The results supported the need for policies to standardize metadata and contributed to the development of automated measures of metadata quality. PMID:28269883

  16. Metadata extraction routines for improving infobutton performance.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Nathan C; Haug, Peter J

    2010-11-13

    Infobuttons have been proven as an effective means for providing quick, context-specific links to pertinent information resources at the point of care. Current infobutton manager implementations, however, lack the ability to exchange metadata, are limited to a relatively small set of information providers, and are targeted primarily for a clinician audience. As part of a local effort to implement infobuttons for patient use via a tethered personal health record, we present a series of metadata extraction routines. These routines were constructed to extract key pieces of information from health information providers on the Internet, including content coverage, language availability, and readability scores. The extraction routines were tested using thirty different disease conditions against eight different providers. The routines yielded 183 potential infobutton targets and associated metadata for each. The capabilities of the extraction routines will be expanded to cover new types of metadata in the future.

  17. eXtended MetaData Registry

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  18. The HST Cache: Metadata and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoehr, F.; Haase, J.; Lombardi, M.; Durand, D.; Micol, A.

    2010-12-01

    We present new developments of the HST Cache that are related to the greatly improved metadata now available within the system. This work includes the interface to CAOM, new SSAP and SIAP VO services, the integration of HLA images produced at CADC and STScI into the HST Cache metadata tables as well as work on improved user interfaces. Somewhat more operational details are given by Haase J. et al. 2010 in this volume.

  19. eXtended MetaData Registry

    SciTech Connect

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  20. Hamilton Jeffers and the Double Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers have long tracked double stars in efforts to find those that are gravitationally-bound binaries and then to determine their orbits. Court reporter and amateur astronomer Shelburne Wesley Burnham (1838-1921) published a massive double star catalogue containing more than 13,000 systems in 1906. The next keeper of the double stars was Lick Observatory astronomer Robert Grant Aitken (1864-1951), who produced a much larger catalogue in 1932. Aitken maintained and expanded Burnham’s records of observations on handwritten file cards, eventually turning them over to Lick Observatory astrometrist Hamilton Moore Jeffers (1893-1976). Jeffers further expanded the collection and put all the observations on punched cards. With the aid of Frances M. "Rete" Greeby (1921-2002), he made two catalogues: an Index Catalogue with basic data about each star, and a complete catalogue of observations, with one observation per punched card. He enlisted Willem van den Bos of Johannesburg to add southern stars, and they published the Index Catalogue of Visual Double Stars, 1961.0. As Jeffers approached retirement he became greatly concerned about the disposition of the catalogues. He wanted to be replaced by another "double star man," but Lick Director Albert E. Whitford (1905-2002) had the new 120-inch reflector, the world’s second largest telescope, and he wanted to pursue modern astrophysics instead. Jeffers was vociferously opposed to turning over the card files to another institution, and especially against their coming under the control of Kaj Strand of the U.S. Naval Observatory. In the end the USNO got the files and has maintained the records ever since, first under Charles Worley (1935-1997), and, since 1997, under Brian Mason. Now called the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS), it is completely online and currently contains more than 1,000,000 measures of more than 100,000 pairs.

  1. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Robyn; Stafford, Julia; Pierce, Hannah; Daube, Mike

    2017-07-01

    In Australia, most alcohol is sold as packaged liquor from off-premises retailers, a market increasingly dominated by supermarket chains. Competition between retailers may encourage marketing approaches, for example, discounting, that evidence indicates contribute to alcohol-related harms. This research documented the nature and variety of promotional methods used by two major supermarket retailers to promote alcohol products in their supermarket catalogues. Weekly catalogues from the two largest Australian supermarket chains were reviewed for alcohol-related content over 12 months. Alcohol promotions were assessed for promotion type, product type, number of standard drinks, purchase price and price/standard drink. Each store catalogue included, on average, 13 alcohol promotions/week, with price-based promotions most common. Forty-five percent of promotions required the purchase of multiple alcohol items. Wine was the most frequently promoted product (44%), followed by beer (24%) and spirits (18%). Most (99%) wine cask (2-5 L container) promotions required multiple (two to three) casks to be purchased. The average number of standard drinks required to be purchased to participate in catalogue promotions was 31.7 (SD = 24.9; median = 23.1). The median price per standard drink was $1.49 (range $0.19-$9.81). Cask wines had the lowest cost per standard drink across all product types. Supermarket catalogues' emphasis on low prices/high volumes of alcohol reflects that retailers are taking advantage of limited restrictions on off-premise sales and promotion, which allow them to approach market competition in ways that may increase alcohol-related harms in consumers. Regulation of alcohol marketing should address retailer catalogue promotions. [Johnston R, Stafford J, Pierce H, Daube M. Alcohol promotions in Australian supermarket catalogues. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:456-463]. © 2016 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  2. New Generation of Catalogues for the New Generation of Users: A Comparison of Six Library Catalogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercun, Tanja; Zumer, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe some of the problems and issues faced by online library catalogues. It aims to establish how libraries have undertaken the mission of developing the next generation catalogues and how they compare to new tools such as Amazon. Design/methodology/approach: An expert study was carried out in January…

  3. What Metadata Principles Apply to Scientific Data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayernik, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    Information researchers and professionals based in the library and information science fields often approach their work through developing and applying defined sets of principles. For example, for over 100 years, the evolution of library cataloging practice has largely been driven by debates (which are still ongoing) about the fundamental principles of cataloging and how those principles should manifest in rules for cataloging. Similarly, the development of archival research and practices over the past century has proceeded hand-in-hand with the emergence of principles of archival arrangement and description, such as maintaining the original order of records and documenting provenance. This project examines principles related to the creation of metadata for scientific data. The presentation will outline: 1) how understandings and implementations of metadata can range broadly depending on the institutional context, and 2) how metadata principles developed by the library and information science community might apply to metadata developments for scientific data. The development and formalization of such principles would contribute to the development of metadata practices and standards in a wide range of institutions, including data repositories, libraries, and research centers. Shared metadata principles would potentially be useful in streamlining data discovery and integration, and would also benefit the growing efforts to formalize data curation education.

  4. Science friction: data, metadata, and collaboration.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Paul N; Mayernik, Matthew S; Batcheller, Archer L; Bowker, Geoffrey C; Borgman, Christine L

    2011-10-01

    When scientists from two or more disciplines work together on related problems, they often face what we call 'science friction'. As science becomes more data-driven, collaborative, and interdisciplinary, demand increases for interoperability among data, tools, and services. Metadata--usually viewed simply as 'data about data', describing objects such as books, journal articles, or datasets--serve key roles in interoperability. Yet we find that metadata may be a source of friction between scientific collaborators, impeding data sharing. We propose an alternative view of metadata, focusing on its role in an ephemeral process of scientific communication, rather than as an enduring outcome or product. We report examples of highly useful, yet ad hoc, incomplete, loosely structured, and mutable, descriptions of data found in our ethnographic studies of several large projects in the environmental sciences. Based on this evidence, we argue that while metadata products can be powerful resources, usually they must be supplemented with metadata processes. Metadata-as-process suggests the very large role of the ad hoc, the incomplete, and the unfinished in everyday scientific work.

  5. Tsunami Catalogues for the Eastern Mediterranean - Revisited.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambraseys, N.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2008-12-01

    We critically examine examine tsunami catalogues of tsunamis in the Eastern Mediterranean published in the last decade, by reference to the original sources, see Ambraseys (2008). Such catalogues have been widely used in the aftermath of the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami for probabilistic hazard analysis, even to make projections for a ten year time frame. On occasion, such predictions have caused panic and have reduced the credibility of the scientific community in making hazard assessments. We correct classification and other spurious errors in earlier catalogues and posit a new list. We conclude that for some historic events, any assignment of magnitude, even on a six point intensity scale is inappropriate due to lack of information. Further we assert that any tsunami catalogue, including ours, can only be used in conjunction with sedimentologic evidence to quantitatively infer the return period of larger events. Statistical analyses correlating numbers of tsunami events derived solely from catalogues with their inferred or imagined intensities are meaningless, at least when focusing on specific locales where only a handful of tsunamis are known to have been historically reported. Quantitative hazard assessments based on scenario events of historic tsunamis for which -at best- only the size and approximate location of the parent earthquake is known should be undertaken with extreme caution and only with benefit of geologic studies to enhance the understanding of the local tectonics. Ambraseys N. (2008) Earthquakes in the Eastern Mediterranean and the Middle East: multidisciplinary study of 2000 years of seimicity, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge (ISBN 9780521872928).

  6. A Revised Earthquake Catalogue for South Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, Francesco; Zechar, J. Douglas; Vogfjörd, Kristín S.; Eberhard, David A. J.

    2016-01-01

    In 1991, a new seismic monitoring network named SIL was started in Iceland with a digital seismic system and automatic operation. The system is equipped with software that reports the automatic location and magnitude of earthquakes, usually within 1-2 min of their occurrence. Normally, automatic locations are manually checked and re-estimated with corrected phase picks, but locations are subject to random errors and systematic biases. In this article, we consider the quality of the catalogue and produce a revised catalogue for South Iceland, the area with the highest seismic risk in Iceland. We explore the effects of filtering events using some common recommendations based on network geometry and station spacing and, as an alternative, filtering based on a multivariate analysis that identifies outliers in the hypocentre error distribution. We identify and remove quarry blasts, and we re-estimate the magnitude of many events. This revised catalogue which we consider to be filtered, cleaned, and corrected should be valuable for building future seismicity models and for assessing seismic hazard and risk. We present a comparative seismicity analysis using the original and revised catalogues: we report characteristics of South Iceland seismicity in terms of b value and magnitude of completeness. Our work demonstrates the importance of carefully checking an earthquake catalogue before proceeding with seismicity analysis.

  7. Streamlining geospatial metadata in the Semantic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugazza, Cristiano; Pepe, Monica; Oggioni, Alessandro; Tagliolato, Paolo; Carrara, Paola

    2016-04-01

    In the geospatial realm, data annotation and discovery rely on a number of ad-hoc formats and protocols. These have been created to enable domain-specific use cases generalized search is not feasible for. Metadata are at the heart of the discovery process and nevertheless they are often neglected or encoded in formats that either are not aimed at efficient retrieval of resources or are plainly outdated. Particularly, the quantum leap represented by the Linked Open Data (LOD) movement did not induce so far a consistent, interlinked baseline in the geospatial domain. In a nutshell, datasets, scientific literature related to them, and ultimately the researchers behind these products are only loosely connected; the corresponding metadata intelligible only to humans, duplicated on different systems, seldom consistently. Instead, our workflow for metadata management envisages i) editing via customizable web- based forms, ii) encoding of records in any XML application profile, iii) translation into RDF (involving the semantic lift of metadata records), and finally iv) storage of the metadata as RDF and back-translation into the original XML format with added semantics-aware features. Phase iii) hinges on relating resource metadata to RDF data structures that represent keywords from code lists and controlled vocabularies, toponyms, researchers, institutes, and virtually any description one can retrieve (or directly publish) in the LOD Cloud. In the context of a distributed Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) built on free and open-source software, we detail phases iii) and iv) of our workflow for the semantics-aware management of geospatial metadata.

  8. Large Catalogue Query Performance in Relational Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Robert A.

    2007-05-01

    The performance of the mysql and oracle database systems have been compared for a selection of astronomy queries using large catalogues of up to a billion objects. The queries tested are those expected from the astronomy community: general database queries, cone searches, neighbour finding and cross matching. The catalogue preparation, sql query formulation and database performance is presented. Most of the general queries perform adequately when appropriate indexes are present in the database. Each system performs well for cone search queries when the Hierarchical Triangular Mesh spatial index is used. Neighbour finding and cross matching are not well supported in a database environment when compared to software specifically developed to solve these problems.

  9. Catalogue data system for new metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiura, Hirofumi

    In the event of realizing wide practical use of new metallic material, it is necessary that both manufacture and utilization sides on the material have common understanding and recognition for the performance. As one of the information source for that, a catalogue data system of new metallic material has been developed. In this system, 3000 cases of catalogue information from around 150 domestic companies were recorded into CD-ROM, and the information can easily be searched and processed using a personal computer. Introducing details on 36 kinds of the new metallic material recorded and 26 data items, this report summerizes the search method.

  10. QualityML: a dictionary for quality metadata encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninyerola, Miquel; Sevillano, Eva; Serral, Ivette; Pons, Xavier; Zabala, Alaitz; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan

    2014-05-01

    The scenario of rapidly growing geodata catalogues requires tools focused on facilitate users the choice of products. Having quality fields populated in metadata allow the users to rank and then select the best fit-for-purpose products. In this direction, we have developed the QualityML (http://qualityml.geoviqua.org), a dictionary that contains hierarchically structured concepts to precisely define and relate quality levels: from quality classes to quality measurements. Generically, a quality element is the path that goes from the higher level (quality class) to the lowest levels (statistics or quality metrics). This path is used to encode quality of datasets in the corresponding metadata schemas. The benefits of having encoded quality, in the case of data producers, are related with improvements in their product discovery and better transmission of their characteristics. In the case of data users, particularly decision-makers, they would find quality and uncertainty measures to take the best decisions as well as perform dataset intercomparison. Also it allows other components (such as visualization, discovery, or comparison tools) to be quality-aware and interoperable. On one hand, the QualityML is a profile of the ISO geospatial metadata standards providing a set of rules for precisely documenting quality indicator parameters that is structured in 6 levels. On the other hand, QualityML includes semantics and vocabularies for the quality concepts. Whenever possible, if uses statistic expressions from the UncertML dictionary (http://www.uncertml.org) encoding. However it also extends UncertML to provide list of alternative metrics that are commonly used to quantify quality. A specific example, based on a temperature dataset, is shown below. The annual mean temperature map has been validated with independent in-situ measurements to obtain a global error of 0.5 ° C. Level 0: Quality class (e.g., Thematic accuracy) Level 1: Quality indicator (e.g., Quantitative

  11. Replicating vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  12. Metadata aided run selection at ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, R. M.; Gallas, E. J.; C-L Tseng, J.; Viegas, F.; Vinek, E.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    Management of the large volume of data collected by any large scale scientific experiment requires the collection of coherent metadata quantities, which can be used by reconstruction or analysis programs and/or user interfaces, to pinpoint collections of data needed for specific purposes. In the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, we have collected metadata from systems storing non-event-wise data (Conditions) into a relational database. The Conditions metadata (COMA) database tables not only contain conditions known at the time of event recording, but also allow for the addition of conditions data collected as a result of later analysis of the data (such as improved measurements of beam conditions or assessments of data quality). A new web based interface called "runBrowser" makes these Conditions Metadata available as a Run based selection service. runBrowser, based on PHP and JavaScript, uses jQuery to present selection criteria and report results. It not only facilitates data selection by conditions attributes, but also gives the user information at each stage about the relationship between the conditions chosen and the remaining conditions criteria available. When a set of COMA selections are complete, runBrowser produces a human readable report as well as an XML file in a standardized ATLAS format. This XML can be saved for later use or refinement in a future runBrowser session, shared with physics/detector groups, or used as input to ELSSI (event level Metadata browser) or other ATLAS run or event processing services.

  13. Mercury-metadata data management system

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-03

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source software and software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was originally developed for NASA, USGS, and DOE. A major new version of Mercury (version 3.0) was developed during 2007 and released in early 2008. This Mercury 3.0 version provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS delivery of search results, and ready customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects which use Mercury. For the end users, Mercury provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data.

  14. Operational Support for Instrument Stability through ODI-PPA Metadata Visualization and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. D.; Hayashi, S.; Gopu, A.; Kotulla, R.; Harbeck, D.; Liu, W.

    2015-09-01

    Over long time scales, quality assurance metrics taken from calibration and calibrated data products can aid observatory operations in quantifying the performance and stability of the instrument, and identify potential areas of concern or guide troubleshooting and engineering efforts. Such methods traditionally require manual SQL entries, assuming the requisite metadata has even been ingested into a database. With the ODI-PPA system, QA metadata has been harvested and indexed for all data products produced over the life of the instrument. In this paper we will describe how, utilizing the industry standard Highcharts Javascript charting package with a customized AngularJS-driven user interface, we have made the process of visualizing the long-term behavior of these QA metadata simple and easily replicated. Operators can easily craft a custom query using the powerful and flexible ODI-PPA search interface and visualize the associated metadata in a variety of ways. These customized visualizations can be bookmarked, shared, or embedded externally, and will be dynamically updated as new data products enter the system, enabling operators to monitor the long-term health of their instrument with ease.

  15. Large-Scale Data Collection Metadata Management at the National Computation Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Evans, B. J. K.; Bastrakova, I.; Ryder, G.; Martin, J.; Duursma, D.; Gohar, K.; Mackey, T.; Paget, M.; Siddeswara, G.

    2014-12-01

    Data Collection management has become an essential activity at the National Computation Infrastructure (NCI) in Australia. NCI's partners (CSIRO, Bureau of Meteorology, Australian National University, and Geoscience Australia), supported by the Australian Government and Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI), have established a national data resource that is co-located with high-performance computing. This paper addresses the metadata management of these data assets over their lifetime. NCI manages 36 data collections (10+ PB) categorised as earth system sciences, climate and weather model data assets and products, earth and marine observations and products, geosciences, terrestrial ecosystem, water management and hydrology, astronomy, social science and biosciences. The data is largely sourced from NCI partners, the custodians of many of the national scientific records, and major research community organisations. The data is made available in a HPC and data-intensive environment - a ~56000 core supercomputer, virtual labs on a 3000 core cloud system, and data services. By assembling these large national assets, new opportunities have arisen to harmonise the data collections, making a powerful cross-disciplinary resource.To support the overall management, a Data Management Plan (DMP) has been developed to record the workflows, procedures, the key contacts and responsibilities. The DMP has fields that can be exported to the ISO19115 schema and to the collection level catalogue of GeoNetwork. The subset or file level metadata catalogues are linked with the collection level through parent-child relationship definition using UUID. A number of tools have been developed that support interactive metadata management, bulk loading of data, and support for computational workflows or data pipelines. NCI creates persistent identifiers for each of the assets. The data collection is tracked over its lifetime, and the recognition of the data providers, data owners, data

  16. Learning German: A CAI Program Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Virginia M.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a catalogue of microcomputer courseware specifically designed for use in learning German. Covers four types of software: (1) authoring systems for drill and practice, (2) drill and practice programs that are self-contained, (3) authoring systems that create game-like materials, and (4) game programs. Includes a listing of publishers and…

  17. AWP Catalogue of Writing Programs. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Kathy, Ed.

    New and revised information on workshop and degree programs in creative writing offered at 251 United States and five Canadian colleges is contained in this catalogue. Entries on each institution provide the following: (1) information about the degree offered and about the required course of study, including thesis requirements, number of hours…

  18. Crustal Dynamics Project: Catalogue of site information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This document represents a catalogue of site information for the Crustal Dynamics Project. It contains information and descriptions of those sites used by the Project as observing stations for making the precise geodetic measurements useful for studies of the Earth's crustal movements and deformation.

  19. The British Film Catalogue: 1895-1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Denis

    This reference book catalogues nearly every commercial film produced in Britain for public entertainment from 1895 to 1970. The entries are listed chronologically by year and month. Each entry is limited to a single film and contains a cross index code number, exhibition date, main title, length, color system, production company, distribution…

  20. The Belgian Union Catalogue of Periodicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goedeme, G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes the edition, on computer output microfiche, of the supplement to the 1965 Union catalogue of foreign periodicals in Belgian and Luxemburgian libraries and documentation centers. The microfiches contain location information of 28,000 periodicals in 300 libraries and are edited in a rich typography. (Author)

  1. A Catalogue of Wallcharts. Seventh Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Committee for Audio-Visual Aids in Education, London (England).

    The aim of this catalogue of wallcharts is to provide a list of charts and flannelgraphs suitable for use in schools so that teachers, education authorities, and others may have on hand a concise reference to all charts available on any particular topic. All charts of specific teaching value designed especially for wall display and at least 10…

  2. The Belgian Union Catalogue of Periodicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goedeme, G.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Describes the edition, on computer output microfiche, of the supplement to the 1965 Union catalogue of foreign periodicals in Belgian and Luxemburgian libraries and documentation centers. The microfiches contain location information of 28,000 periodicals in 300 libraries and are edited in a rich typography. (Author)

  3. Gaia Data Release 1. Catalogue validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenou, F.; Luri, X.; Babusiaux, C.; Fabricius, C.; Helmi, A.; Robin, A. C.; Vallenari, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Findeisen, K.; Reylé, C.; Ruiz-Dern, L.; Sordo, R.; Turon, C.; Walton, N. A.; Shih, I.-C.; Antiche, E.; Barache, C.; Barros, M.; Breddels, M.; Carrasco, J. M.; Costigan, G.; Diakité, S.; Eyer, L.; Figueras, F.; Galluccio, L.; Heu, J.; Jordi, C.; Krone-Martins, A.; Lallement, R.; Lambert, S.; Leclerc, N.; Marrese, P. M.; Moitinho, A.; Mor, R.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Sartoretti, P.; Soria, S.; Soubiran, C.; Souchay, J.; Veljanoski, J.; Ziaeepour, H.; Giuffrida, G.; Pancino, E.; Bragaglia, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Before the publication of the Gaia Catalogue, the contents of the first data release have undergone multiple dedicated validation tests. Aims: These tests aim to provide in-depth analysis of the Catalogue content in order to detect anomalies and individual problems in specific objects or in overall statistical properties, and either to filter them before the public release or to describe the different caveats on the release for an optimal exploitation of the data. Methods: Dedicated methods using either Gaia internal data, external catalogues, or models have been developed for the validation processes. They test normal stars as well as various populations such as open or globular clusters, double stars, variable stars, and quasars. Properties of coverage, accuracy, and precision of the data are provided by the numerous tests presented here and are jointly analysed to assess the data release content. Results: This independent validation confirms the quality of the published data, Gaia DR1 being the most precise all-sky astrometric and photometric catalogue to date. However, several limitations in terms of completeness, and astrometric or photometric quality are identified and described. Figures describing the relevant properties of the release are shown, and the testing activities carried out validating the user interfaces are also described. A particular emphasis is made on the statistical use of the data in scientific exploitation.

  4. Omics Metadata Management Software v. 1 (OMMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-09

    Our application, the Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS), answers both needs, empowering experimentalists to generate intuitive, consistent metadata, and to perform bioinformatics analyses and information management tasks via a simple and intuitive web-based interface. Several use cases with short-read sequence datasets are provided to showcase the full functionality of the OMMS, from metadata curation tasks, to bioinformatics analyses and results management and downloading. The OMMS can be implemented as a stand alone-package for individual laboratories, or can be configured for web-based deployment supporting geographically dispersed research teams. Our software was developed with open-source bundles, is flexible, extensible and easily installed and run by operators with general system administration and scripting language literacy.

  5. Mining scientific data archives through metadata generation

    SciTech Connect

    Springmeyer, R.; Werner, N.; Long, J.

    1997-04-01

    Data analysis and management tools typically have not supported the documenting of data, so scientists must manually maintain all information pertaining to the context and history of their work. This metadata is critical to effective retrieval and use of the masses of archived data, yet little of it exists on-line or in an accessible format. Exploration of archived legacy data typically proceeds as a laborious process, using commands to navigate through file structures on several machines. This file-at-a-time approach needs to be replaced with a model that represents data as collections of interrelated objects. The tools that support this model must focus attention on data while hiding the complexity of the computational environment. This problem was addressed by developing a tool for exploring large amounts of data in UNIX directories via automatic generation of metadata summaries. This paper describes the model for metadata summaries of collections and the Data Miner tool for interactively traversing directories and automatically generating metadata that serves as a quick overview and index to the archived data. The summaries include thumbnail images as well as links to the data, related directories, and other metadata. Users may personalize the metadata by adding a title and abstract to the summary, which is presented as an HTML page viewed with a World Wide Web browser. We have designed summaries for 3 types of collections of data: contents of a single directory; virtual directories that represent relations between scattered files; and groups of related calculation files. By focusing on the scientists` view of the data mining task, we have developed techniques that assist in the ``detective work `` of mining without requiring knowledge of mundane details about formats and commands. Experiences in working with scientists to design these tools are recounted.

  6. EPA Metadata Style Guide Keywords and EPA Organization Names

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The following keywords and EPA organization names listed below, along with EPA’s Metadata Style Guide, are intended to provide suggestions and guidance to assist with the standardization of metadata records.

  7. Metadata and data models in the WMO Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandy, Jeremy; Woolf, Andrew; Foreman, Steve; Thomas, David

    2013-04-01

    It is fifty years since the inauguration of the World Weather Watch, through which the WMO (World Meteorological Organization) has coordinated real time exchange of information between national meteorological and hydrological services. At the heart of the data exchange are standard data formats and a dedicated telecommunications system known as the GTS - the Global Telecommunications System. Weather and climate information are now more complex than in the 1960s, and increasingly the information is being used across traditional disciplines. Although the modern GTS still underpins operational weather forecasting, the WMO Information System (WIS) builds on this to make the information more widely visible and more widely accessible. The architecture of WIS is built around three tiers of information provider. National Centres are responsible for sharing information that is gathered nationally, and also for distributing information to users within their country. Many of these are national weather services, but hydrology and oceanography centres have also been designated by some countries. Data Collection or Production Centres have an international role, either collating information from several countries, or generating information that is international in nature (satellite operators are an example). Global Information System Centres have two prime responsibilities: to exchange information between regions, and to publish the global WIS Discovery Metadata Catalogue so that end users can find out what information is available through the WIS. WIS is designed to allow information to be used outside the operational weather community. This means that it has to use protocols and standards that are in general use. The WIS Discovery Metadata records, for example, are expressed using ISO 19115, and in addition to being accessible through the GISCs they are harvested by GEOSS. Weather data are mainly exchanged in formats managed by WMO, but WMO is using GML and the Open Geospatial

  8. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  9. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  10. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional...

  11. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional information...

  12. 32 CFR 575.6 - Catalogue, United States Military Academy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Catalogue, United States Military Academy. 575.6... ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY § 575.6 Catalogue, United States Military Academy. The latest edition of the catalogue, United States Military Academy, contains additional information...

  13. A Comparative Study of the Guo Shoujing Star Catalogue and the Ulugh Beg Star Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    The Chinese Star Catalogue by Guo Shoujing (1231-1316) contained equatorial coordinates of 678 stars, more than doubled the number of stars in previous Chinese star catalogues. In the period 1420-1437, using astronomical instruments at Samarkand Observatory, Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) made independent observations and determined star positions of 1018 stars. An analysis of two star catalogues will show the observational techniques behind them and their accuracies. Both astronomers tried to increase accuracy of measurement by enlarging the astronomical instruments. The Chinese catalogue gives equatorial coordinates of stars. The coordinates were directly read off the armillary sphere, which was mounted equatorially mounted. Sun Xiaochun (1996) suggested that the data of the existent Guo Shoujing catalogue was actually observed around 1380, at the beginning of the Ming dynasty. The Ulugh Beg catalogue gives ecliptic coordinates of stars. Does this mean they were directly measured using an ecliptic instrument? Using Fourier analysis we discover a 3 arc minute systematic error in the declinations, which are derived from the ecliptic coordinates, suggesting the data might be first measured equatorially and then converted to ecliptic coordinates, following Ptolemaic tradition. The 3 arc minute systematic error was caused by the misalignment of the instrument's pole and celestial north pole. And the Our comparative study might throw some light on transmission of astronomical knowledge and techniques between China and Central Asia in medieval times.

  14. Metadata Evaluation: The Road toward Meeting Our Objectives (SIG LAN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy, Colleen

    2000-01-01

    Lists the three presentation titles that were part of this technical session on metadata evaluation, including "An Update on the Dublin Core" (Stuart Weibel; "Metadata Development Update" (Kathleen Burnett and Jeong-Mee Lee); and "Metadata Standards for Discovery and Retrieval of Learning Objects" (Stuart Sutton).…

  15. Metadata Evaluation: The Road toward Meeting Our Objectives (SIG LAN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy, Colleen

    2000-01-01

    Lists the three presentation titles that were part of this technical session on metadata evaluation, including "An Update on the Dublin Core" (Stuart Weibel; "Metadata Development Update" (Kathleen Burnett and Jeong-Mee Lee); and "Metadata Standards for Discovery and Retrieval of Learning Objects" (Stuart Sutton).…

  16. Enhancing SCORM Metadata for Assessment Authoring in E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wen-Chih; Hsu, Hui-Huang; Smith, Timothy K.; Wang, Chun-Chia

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid development of distance learning and the XML technology, metadata play an important role in e-Learning. Nowadays, many distance learning standards, such as SCORM, AICC CMI, IEEE LTSC LOM and IMS, use metadata to tag learning materials. However, most metadata models are used to define learning materials and test problems. Few…

  17. Enhancing SCORM Metadata for Assessment Authoring in E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Wen-Chih; Hsu, Hui-Huang; Smith, Timothy K.; Wang, Chun-Chia

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid development of distance learning and the XML technology, metadata play an important role in e-Learning. Nowadays, many distance learning standards, such as SCORM, AICC CMI, IEEE LTSC LOM and IMS, use metadata to tag learning materials. However, most metadata models are used to define learning materials and test problems. Few…

  18. Multimedia Learning Systems Based on IEEE Learning Object Metadata (LOM).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzinger, Andreas; Kleinberger, Thomas; Muller, Paul

    One of the "hottest" topics in recent information systems and computer science is metadata. Learning Object Metadata (LOM) appears to be a very powerful mechanism for representing metadata, because of the great variety of LOM Objects. This is on of the reasons why the LOM standard is repeatedly cited in projects in the field of eLearning…

  19. Progress in defining a standard for file-level metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Joel; Kobler, Ben

    1996-01-01

    In the following narrative, metadata required to locate a file on tape or collection of tapes will be referred to as file-level metadata. This paper discribes the rationale for and the history of the effort to define a standard for this metadata.

  20. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  1. Centroid moment tensor catalogue for Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, M.; Yamashina, T.; Kumagai, H.; Inoue, H.; Sunarjo

    2010-12-01

    We developed a centroid moment tensor (CMT) catalogue of earthquakes in and around Indonesia (InaCMT) using data from the nationwide broadband seismograph network in Indonesia. We obtained CMT solutions for about 500 earthquakes that occurred in and around Indonesia between 2006 and 2009. The moment magnitudes ranged from 4.5 to 8.3. We examined the accuracy of the CMT solutions of the InaCMT catalogue by comparing them with those obtained by the Global CMT (GCMT) Project. The seismic moments and focal mechanisms of these catalogues were highly consistent with each other, but we found systematic differences between the catalogues in the source centroid locations of earthquakes off Sumatra. The InaCMT source centroid locations were closer to the hypocenter locations in the Preliminary Determination of Earthquakes (PDE) of the U.S. Geological Survey compared to those of GCMT. The systematic deviations in the GCMT source centroid locations may mainly reflect insufficient azimuthal coverage of the stations used for the inversions as well as uncertainties in the Earth model. Using the InaCMT catalogue, we investigated seismic activity related to the off Bengkulu seismic sequence on 12 September 2007 ( Mw = 8.3, 7.9, and 6.8), southwest of Sumatra, and the earthquakes northwest of the island of New Guinea on 3 January 2009 ( Mw = 7.7 and 7.4). In the aftershock activity of the 2007 off Bengkulu seismic sequence, we found that shallow earthquakes were aligned along the eastern coast of Siberut Island, located between the Sunda trench and Sumatra. These earthquakes may have occurred along the Mentawai fault or another unknown fault. The focal mechanisms of the earthquakes were dominantly reverse slip, although the Mentawai fault has been considered to be a strike-slip fault. Shallow large earthquakes along this fault may cause damage above the source region and generate large tsunamis. We found that the 2009 earthquakes northwest of New Guinea occurred along the Manokwari

  2. Metadata: Pure and Simple, or Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, Marilyn

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues concerning metadata in Web pages based on experiences in a vocational education center library in Queensland (Australia). Highlights include Dublin Core elements; search engines; controlled vocabulary; performance measurement to assess usage patterns and provide quality control over the vocabulary; and considerations given the…

  3. MODS: The Metadata Object Description Schema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Rebecca S.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) developed by the Library of Congress' Network Development and MARC Standards Office. Discuses reasons for MODS development; advantages of MODS; features of MODS; prospective uses for MODS; relationship with MARC and MARCXML; comparison with Dublin Core element set; and experimentation with…

  4. Tracking Actual Usage: The Attention Metadata Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolpers, Martin; Najjar, Jehad; Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The information overload in learning and teaching scenarios is a main hindering factor for efficient and effective learning. New methods are needed to help teachers and students in dealing with the vast amount of available information and learning material. Our approach aims to utilize contextualized attention metadata to capture behavioural…

  5. DIRAC File Replica and Metadata Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Poss, S.

    2012-12-01

    File replica and metadata catalogs are essential parts of any distributed data management system, which are largely determining its functionality and performance. A new File Catalog (DFC) was developed in the framework of the DIRAC Project that combines both replica and metadata catalog functionality. The DFC design is based on the practical experience with the data management system of the LHCb Collaboration. It is optimized for the most common patterns of the catalog usage in order to achieve maximum performance from the user perspective. The DFC supports bulk operations for replica queries and allows quick analysis of the storage usage globally and for each Storage Element separately. It supports flexible ACL rules with plug-ins for various policies that can be adopted by a particular community. The DFC catalog allows to store various types of metadata associated with files and directories and to perform efficient queries for the data based on complex metadata combinations. Definition of file ancestor-descendent relation chains is also possible. The DFC catalog is implemented in the general DIRAC distributed computing framework following the standard grid security architecture. In this paper we describe the design of the DFC and its implementation details. The performance measurements are compared with other grid file catalog implementations. The experience of the DFC Catalog usage in the CLIC detector project are discussed.

  6. Digital Preservation and Metadata: History, Theory, Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazinger, Susan S.

    This book addresses critical issues of digital preservation, providing guidelines for protecting resources from dealing with obsolescence, to responsibilities, methods of preservation, cost, and metadata formats. It also shows numerous national and international institutions that provide frameworks for digital libraries and archives. The first…

  7. A Rich Metadata Filesystem for Scientific Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    As scientific research becomes more data intensive, there is an increasing need for scalable, reliable, and high performance storage systems. Such data repositories must provide both data archival services and rich metadata, and cleanly integrate with large scale computing resources. ROARS is a hybrid approach to distributed storage that provides…

  8. Use of Metadata Vocabularies in Data Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez, Edwin M.

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a prototype system for devising and using a metadata vocabulary for data retrieval, based on a project at the United States Department of Agriculture. A unified information-access system called REEIS (Research, Education, Economics, Extension Information System) is being designed to provide a knowledge base of programs, projects, and…

  9. Metadata: Pure and Simple, or Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalmers, Marilyn

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues concerning metadata in Web pages based on experiences in a vocational education center library in Queensland (Australia). Highlights include Dublin Core elements; search engines; controlled vocabulary; performance measurement to assess usage patterns and provide quality control over the vocabulary; and considerations given the…

  10. Digital Preservation and Metadata: History, Theory, Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazinger, Susan S.

    This book addresses critical issues of digital preservation, providing guidelines for protecting resources from dealing with obsolescence, to responsibilities, methods of preservation, cost, and metadata formats. It also shows numerous national and international institutions that provide frameworks for digital libraries and archives. The first…

  11. Metadata Search and Data Discovery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Bruce; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Green, Jim

    2008-05-01

    Mercury is a metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool that provides a single portal to information contained in disparate data management systems. Mercury was originally developed for NASA, with continuing development funded by NASA, USGS, and DOE for a consortium of projects (ORNL DAAC, NBII, DADDI, LBA, LTER, NARSTO, CDIAC, OCEAN, I3N, IAI, ESIP and ARM ).

  12. Tracking Actual Usage: The Attention Metadata Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolpers, Martin; Najjar, Jehad; Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The information overload in learning and teaching scenarios is a main hindering factor for efficient and effective learning. New methods are needed to help teachers and students in dealing with the vast amount of available information and learning material. Our approach aims to utilize contextualized attention metadata to capture behavioural…

  13. Real-time Metadata Capture Implementations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayes, D. N.; Arko, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    The current rate of data acquisition in the ocean sciences precludes the manual generation of appropriate metadata after the fact. Recognizing this fact, we have begun to implement methods for creating metadata and inserting them into relational databases in real-time. We have also created web-based tools for watchstanders and maintenance personnel to enter logbook data in real-time. Several examples will be addressed in this poster. Enhancements to the Hudson Interactive River Observatory (HIRO) real-time data logging system have been made that create metadata records and insert them (as SQL transactions over a secure wireless TCP/IP connection) into a relational database in real-time. These records document the start and stop time of individual data files, of sensor-specific data streams and of the logging system as a whole. An interactive watchstanders logbook has been developed and used on the R/V Maurice Ewing to create and log metadata records associated with upgrades to the Hydrosweep DS2 multibeam system. A similar version of this tool is being used to capture the maintenance and update records associated with the HRIO system.

  14. Educational Metadata and Brokerage for Learning Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anido, Luis E.; Fernandez, Manuel J.; Caeiro, Manuel; Santos, Juan M.; Rodriguez, Judith S.; Llamas, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the need for standardization for learning technologies in computer-based training systems. Highlights include institutions and organizations involved in standardization; a survey of educational metadata; how these data models are applied by actual software systems to facilitate the location of learning resources; and educational…

  15. MODS: The Metadata Object Description Schema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Rebecca S.

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on the Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) developed by the Library of Congress' Network Development and MARC Standards Office. Discuses reasons for MODS development; advantages of MODS; features of MODS; prospective uses for MODS; relationship with MARC and MARCXML; comparison with Dublin Core element set; and experimentation with…

  16. Metadata Exporter for Scientific Photography Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, D.; English, B.; Delaney, R.; Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A.; Hart, S.

    2005-12-01

    Photographs have become an increasingly important medium, especially with the advent of digital cameras. It has become inexpensive to take photographs and quickly post them on a website. However informative photos may be, they still need to be displayed in a convenient way, and be cataloged in such a manner that makes them easily locatable. Managing the great number of photographs that digital cameras allow and creating a format for efficient dissemination of the information related to the photos is a tedious task. Products such as Apple's iPhoto have greatly eased the task of managing photographs, However, they often have limitations. Un-customizable metadata fields and poor metadata extraction tools limit their scientific usefulness. A solution to this persistent problem is a customizable metadata exporter. On the ALIA expedition, we successfully managed the thousands of digital photos we took. We did this with iPhoto and a version of the exporter that is now available to the public under the name "CustomHTMLExport" (http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/27777), currently undergoing formal beta testing This software allows the use of customized metadata fields (including description, time, date, GPS data, etc.), which is exported along with the photo. It can also produce webpages with this data straight from iPhoto, in a much more flexible way than is already allowed. With this tool it becomes very easy to manage and distribute scientific photos.

  17. The International Learning Object Metadata Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, Norm

    2004-01-01

    A wide range of projects and organizations is currently making digital learning resources (learning objects) available to instructors, students, and designers via systematic, standards-based infrastructures. One standard that is central to many of these efforts and infrastructures is known as Learning Object Metadata (IEEE 1484.12.1-2002, or LOM).…

  18. The Metadata Approach to Accessing Government Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, William E.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the articles in this issue, includes a history of the development of GILS (Government Information Locator Service), and offers perspectives on the importance of metadata for resource description and resource discovery. Presents interoperability as a challenge in integrating access to government information locator services.…

  19. Metadata management and semantics in microarray repositories.

    PubMed

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-12-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework.

  20. Metadata Management and Semantics in Microarray Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-01-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  1. A Rich Metadata Filesystem for Scientific Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    As scientific research becomes more data intensive, there is an increasing need for scalable, reliable, and high performance storage systems. Such data repositories must provide both data archival services and rich metadata, and cleanly integrate with large scale computing resources. ROARS is a hybrid approach to distributed storage that provides…

  2. Viewing and Editing Earth Science Metadata MOBE: Metadata Object Browser and Editor in Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, A.; Helly, J.

    2002-12-01

    Metadata is an important, yet often neglected aspect of successful archival efforts. However, to generate robust, useful metadata is often a time consuming and tedious task. We have been approaching this problem from two directions: first by automating metadata creation, pulling from known sources of data, and in addition, what this (paper/poster?) details, developing friendly software for human interaction with the metadata. MOBE and COBE(Metadata Object Browser and Editor, and Canonical Object Browser and Editor respectively), are Java applications for editing and viewing metadata and digital objects. MOBE has already been designed and deployed, currently being integrated into other areas of the SIOExplorer project. COBE is in the design and development stage, being created with the same considerations in mind as those for MOBE. Metadata creation, viewing, data object creation, and data object viewing, when taken on a small scale are all relatively simple tasks. Computer science however, has an infamous reputation for transforming the simple into complex. As a system scales upwards to become more robust, new features arise and additional functionality is added to the software being written to manage the system. The software that emerges from such an evolution, though powerful, is often complex and difficult to use. With MOBE the focus is on a tool that does a small number of tasks very well. The result has been an application that enables users to manipulate metadata in an intuitive and effective way. This allows for a tool that serves its purpose without introducing additional cognitive load onto the user, an end goal we continue to pursue.

  3. Metadata Effectiveness in Internet Discovery: An Analysis of Digital Collection Metadata Elements and Internet Search Engine Keywords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Le

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed digital item metadata and keywords from Internet search engines to learn what metadata elements actually facilitate discovery of digital collections through Internet keyword searching and how significantly each metadata element affects the discovery of items in a digital repository. The study found that keywords from Internet…

  4. Metadata Effectiveness in Internet Discovery: An Analysis of Digital Collection Metadata Elements and Internet Search Engine Keywords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Le

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed digital item metadata and keywords from Internet search engines to learn what metadata elements actually facilitate discovery of digital collections through Internet keyword searching and how significantly each metadata element affects the discovery of items in a digital repository. The study found that keywords from Internet…

  5. NERIES: Seismic Data Gateways and User Composed Datasets Metadata Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Trani, Luca; Kamb, Linus; Frobert, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    One of the NERIES EC project main objectives is to establish and improve the networking of seismic waveform data exchange and access among four main data centers in Europe: INGV, GFZ, ORFEUS and IPGP. Besides the implementation of the data backbone, several investigations and developments have been conducted in order to offer to the users the data available from this network, either programmatically or interactively. One of the challenges is to understand how to enable users` activities such as discovering, aggregating, describing and sharing datasets to obtain a decrease in the replication of similar data queries towards the network, exempting the data centers to guess and create useful pre-packed products. We`ve started to transfer this task more and more towards the users community, where the users` composed data products could be extensively re-used. The main link to the data is represented by a centralized webservice (SeismoLink) acting like a single access point to the whole data network. Users can download either waveform data or seismic station inventories directly from their own software routines by connecting to this webservice, which routes the request to the data centers. The provenance of the data is maintained and transferred to the users in the form of URIs, that identify the dataset and implicitly refer to the data provider. SeismoLink, combined with other webservices (eg EMSC-QuakeML earthquakes catalog service), is used from a community gateway such as the NERIES web portal (http://www.seismicportal.eu). Here the user interacts with a map based portlet which allows the dynamic composition of a data product, binding seismic event`s parameters with a set of seismic stations. The requested data is collected by the back-end processes of the portal, preserved and offered to the user in a personal data cart, where metadata can be generated interactively on-demand. The metadata, expressed in RDF, can also be remotely ingested. They offer rating

  6. Metadata Authoring with Versatility and Extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Olsen, Lola

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) assists the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 13,800 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 700 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information and direct links to the data, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a geographic location of interest, then quickly acquire those data. The GCMD strives to be the preferred data locator for world-wide directory-level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are attracting widespread usage; however, a need for tools that are portable, customizable and versatile still exists. With tool usage directly influencing metadata population, it has become apparent that new tools are needed to fill these voids. As a result, the GCMD has released a new authoring tool allowing for both web-based and stand-alone authoring of descriptions. Furthermore, this tool incorporates the ability to plug-and-play the metadata format of choice, offering users options of DIF, SERF, FGDC, ISO or any other defined standard. Allowing data holders to work with their preferred format, as well as an option of a stand-alone application or web-based environment, docBUlLDER will assist the scientific community in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata.

  7. Making Interoperability Easier with NASA's Metadata Management Tool (MMT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shum, Dana; Reese, Mark; Pilone, Dan; Baynes, Katie

    2016-01-01

    While the ISO-19115 collection level metadata format meets many users' needs for interoperable metadata, it can be cumbersome to create it correctly. Through the MMT's simple UI experience, metadata curators can create and edit collections which are compliant with ISO-19115 without full knowledge of the NASA Best Practices implementation of ISO-19115 format. Users are guided through the metadata creation process through a forms-based editor, complete with field information, validation hints and picklists. Once a record is completed, users can download the metadata in any of the supported formats with just 2 clicks.

  8. Making metadata usable in a multi-national research setting.

    PubMed

    Ellul, Claire; Foord, Joanna; Mooney, John

    2013-11-01

    SECOA (Solutions for Environmental Contrasts in Coastal Areas) is a multi-national research project examining the effects of human mobility on urban settlements in fragile coastal environments. This paper describes the setting up of a SECOA metadata repository for non-specialist researchers such as environmental scientists and tourism experts. Conflicting usability requirements of two groups - metadata creators and metadata users - are identified along with associated limitations of current metadata standards. A description is given of a configurable metadata system designed to grow as the project evolves. This work is of relevance for similar projects such as INSPIRE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparative analysis of Debrecen sunspot catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Győri, L.; Ludmány, A.; Baranyi, T.

    2017-02-01

    Sunspot area data are important for studying solar activity and its long-term variations. At the Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory, we compiled three sunspot catalogues: the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD), the SDO/HMI Debrecen Data (HMIDD) and the SOHO/MDI Debrecen Data. For comparison, we also compiled an additional sunspot catalogue, the Greenwich Photoheliographic Data, from the digitized Royal Greenwich Observatory images for 1974-76. By comparing these catalogues when they overlap in time, we can investigate how various factors influence the measured area of sunspots, and, in addition, we can derive area cross-calibration factors for these catalogues. The main findings are as follows. Poorer seeing increases the individual corrected spot areas and decreases the number of small spots. Interestingly, the net result of these two effects for the total corrected spot area is zero. DPD daily total corrected sunspot areas are 5 per cent smaller than the HMIDD ones. Revised DPD daily total corrected umbra areas are 9 per cent smaller than those of HMIDD. The Greenwich photoheliographic areas are only a few per cent smaller than DPD areas. A 0.2° difference between the north directions of the DPD and MDI images is found. This value is nearly the same as was found (0.22°) by us in a previous paper comparing HMI and MDI images. The area measurement practice (spots smaller than 10 mh were not directly measured but an area of 2 mh was assigned to each) of the Solar Observing Optical Network cannot explain the large area deficit of the Solar Observing Optical Network.

  10. Cosmic web reconstruction through density ridges: catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yen-Chi; Ho, Shirley; Brinkmann, Jon; Freeman, Peter E.; Genovese, Christopher R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Wasserman, Larry

    2016-10-01

    We construct a catalogue for filaments using a novel approach called SCMS (subspace constrained mean shift). SCMS is a gradient-based method that detects filaments through density ridges (smooth curves tracing high-density regions). A great advantage of SCMS is its uncertainty measure, which allows an evaluation of the errors for the detected filaments. To detect filaments, we use data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which consist of three galaxy samples: the NYU main galaxy sample (MGS), the LOWZ sample and the CMASS sample. Each of the three data set covers different redshift regions so that the combined sample allows detection of filaments up to z = 0.7. Our filament catalogue consists of a sequence of two-dimensional filament maps at different redshifts that provide several useful statistics on the evolution cosmic web. To construct the maps, we select spectroscopically confirmed galaxies within 0.050 < z < 0.700 and partition them into 130 bins. For each bin, we ignore the redshift, treating the galaxy observations as a 2-D data and detect filaments using SCMS. The filament catalogue consists of 130 individual 2-D filament maps, and each map comprises points on the detected filaments that describe the filamentary structures at a particular redshift. We also apply our filament catalogue to investigate galaxy luminosity and its relation with distance to filament. Using a volume-limited sample, we find strong evidence (6.1σ-12.3σ) that galaxies close to filaments are generally brighter than those at significant distance from filaments.

  11. Internet resources cataloguing inherited disorders in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Frank W; Crook, Alice; Sargan, David R

    2011-08-01

    Up-to-date annotated catalogues of known inherited disorders in dogs are freely available on the Internet, providing vital information to existing and prospective dog owners, dog breeders, veterinarians, geneticists and others interested in the occurrence and control of inherited disorders. These resources are the Canine Inherited Disorders Database (CIDD), Inherited Diseases in Dogs (IDID) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) the latter associated with Listing of Inherited Disorders in Animals (LIDA). The history and features of these resources are summarised.

  12. Catalogue of UV sources in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitia-Antero, L.; Gómez de Castro, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) ultraviolet (UV) database contains the largest photometric catalogue in the ultraviolet range; as a result GALEX photometric bands, Near UV band (NUV) and the Far UV band (FUV), have become standards. Nevertheless, the GALEX catalogue does not include bright UV sources due to the high sensitivity of its detectors, neither sources in the Galactic plane. In order to extend the GALEX database for future UV missions, we have obtained synthetic FUV and NUV photometry using the database of UV spectra generated by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). This database contains 63,755 spectra in the low dispersion mode (λ / δ λ ˜ 300) obtained during its 18-year lifetime. For stellar sources in the IUE database, we have selected spectra with high Signal-To-NoiseRatio (SNR) and computed FUV and NUV magnitudes using the GALEX transmission curves along with the conversion equations between flux and magnitudes provided by the mission. Besides, we have performed variability tests to determine whether the sources were variable (during the IUE observations). As a result, we have generated two different catalogues: one for non-variable stars and another one for variable sources. The former contains FUV and NUV magnitudes, while the latter gives the basic information and the FUV magnitude for each observation. The consistency of the magnitudes has been tested using White Dwarfs contained in both GALEX and IUE samples. The catalogues are available through the Centre des Donées Stellaires. The sources are distributed throughout the whole sky, with a special coverage of the Galactic plane.

  13. WFCatalog: A catalogue for seismological waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trani, Luca; Koymans, Mathijs; Atkinson, Malcolm; Sleeman, Reinoud; Filgueira, Rosa

    2017-09-01

    This paper reports advances in seismic waveform description and discovery leading to a new seismological service and presents the key steps in its design, implementation and adoption. This service, named WFCatalog, which stands for waveform catalogue, accommodates features of seismological waveform data. Therefore, it meets the need for seismologists to be able to select waveform data based on seismic waveform features as well as sensor geolocations and temporal specifications. We describe the collaborative design methods and the technical solution showing the central role of seismic feature catalogues in framing the technical and operational delivery of the new service. Also, we provide an overview of the complex environment wherein this endeavour is scoped and the related challenges discussed. As multi-disciplinary, multi-organisational and global collaboration is necessary to address today's challenges, canonical representations can provide a focus for collaboration and conceptual tools for agreeing directions. Such collaborations can be fostered and formalised by rallying intellectual effort into the design of novel scientific catalogues and the services that support them. This work offers an example of the benefits generated by involving cross-disciplinary skills (e.g. data and domain expertise) from the early stages of design, and by sustaining the engagement with the target community throughout the delivery and deployment process.

  14. Making Interoperability Easier with the NASA Metadata Management Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, D.; Reese, M.; Pilone, D.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    ISO 19115 has enabled interoperability amongst tools, yet many users find it hard to build ISO metadata for their collections because it can be large and overly flexible for their needs. The Metadata Management Tool (MMT), part of NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS), offers users a modern, easy to use browser based tool to develop ISO compliant metadata. Through a simplified UI experience, metadata curators can create and edit collections without any understanding of the complex ISO-19115 format, while still generating compliant metadata. The MMT is also able to assess the completeness of collection level metadata by evaluating it against a variety of metadata standards. The tool provides users with clear guidance as to how to change their metadata in order to improve their quality and compliance. It is based on NASA's Unified Metadata Model for Collections (UMM-C) which is a simpler metadata model which can be cleanly mapped to ISO 19115. This allows metadata authors and curators to meet ISO compliance requirements faster and more accurately. The MMT and UMM-C have been developed in an agile fashion, with recurring end user tests and reviews to continually refine the tool, the model and the ISO mappings. This process is allowing for continual improvement and evolution to meet the community's needs.

  15. GEO Label Web Services for Dynamic and Effective Communication of Geospatial Metadata Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, Victoria; Nüst, Daniel; Bastin, Lucy; Masó, Joan; Lumsden, Jo

    2014-05-01

    -like label, which are coloured according to metadata availability and are clickable to allow a user to engage with the original metadata and explore specific aspects in more detail. To support this graphical representation and allow for wider deployment architectures we have implemented two Web services, a PHP and a Java implementation, that generate GEO label representations by combining producer metadata (from standard catalogues or other published locations) with structured user feedback. Both services accept encoded URLs of publicly available metadata documents or metadata XML files as HTTP POST and GET requests and apply XPath and XSLT mappings to transform producer and feedback XML documents into clickable SVG GEO label representations. The label and services are underpinned by two XML-based quality models. The first is a producer model that extends ISO 19115 and 19157 to allow fuller citation of reference data, presentation of pixel- and dataset- level statistical quality information, and encoding of 'traceability' information on the lineage of an actual quality assessment. The second is a user quality model (realised as a feedback server and client) which allows reporting and query of ratings, usage reports, citations, comments and other domain knowledge. Both services are Open Source and are available on GitHub at https://github.com/lushv/geolabel-service and https://github.com/52North/GEO-label-java. The functionality of these services can be tested using our GEO label generation demos, available online at http://www.geolabel.net/demo.html and http://geoviqua.dev.52north.org/glbservice/index.jsf.

  16. Towards Data Value-Level Metadata for Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Zozus, Meredith Nahm; Bonner, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    While several standards for metadata describing clinical studies exist, comprehensive metadata to support traceability of data from clinical studies has not been articulated. We examine uses of metadata in clinical studies. We examine and enumerate seven sources of data value-level metadata in clinical studies inclusive of research designs across the spectrum of the National Institutes of Health definition of clinical research. The sources of metadata inform categorization in terms of metadata describing the origin of a data value, the definition of a data value, and operations to which the data value was subjected. The latter is further categorized into information about changes to a data value, movement of a data value, retrieval of a data value, and data quality checks, constraints or assessments to which the data value was subjected. The implications of tracking and managing data value-level metadata are explored.

  17. Efficient processing of MPEG-21 metadata in the binary domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerer, Christian; Frank, Thomas; Hellwagner, Hermann; Heuer, Jörg; Hutter, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    XML-based metadata is widely adopted across the different communities and plenty of commercial and open source tools for processing and transforming are available on the market. However, all of these tools have one thing in common: they operate on plain text encoded metadata which may become a burden in constrained and streaming environments, i.e., when metadata needs to be processed together with multimedia content on the fly. In this paper we present an efficient approach for transforming such kind of metadata which are encoded using MPEG's Binary Format for Metadata (BiM) without additional en-/decoding overheads, i.e., within the binary domain. Therefore, we have developed an event-based push parser for BiM encoded metadata which transforms the metadata by a limited set of processing instructions - based on traditional XML transformation techniques - operating on bit patterns instead of cost-intensive string comparisons.

  18. The star catalogue of Hevelius. Machine-readable version and comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2010-06-01

    The catalogue by Johannes Hevelius with the positions and magnitudes of 1564 entries was published by his wife Elisabeth Koopman in 1690. We provide a machine-readable version of the catalogue, and briefly discuss its accuracy on the basis of comparison with data from the modern Hipparcos Catalogue. We compare our results with an earlier analysis by Rybka (1984), finding good overall agreement. The magnitudes given by Hevelius correlate well with modern values. The accuracy of his position measurements is similar to that of Brahe, with σ = 2´ for longitudes and latitudes, but with more errors >5´ than expected for a Gaussian distribution. The position accuracy decreases slowly with magnitude. The fraction of stars with position errors larger than a degree is 1.5%, rather smaller than the fraction of 5% in the star catalogue of Brahe. Star catalogue of Hevelius is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/516/A29

  19. CENTRIOLE REPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Joseph G.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes the replication of centrioles during spermatogenesis in the Prosobranch snail, Viviparus malleatus Reeve. Sections for electron microscopy were cut from pieces of testis fixed in OsO4 and embedded in the polyester resin Vestopal W. Two kinds of spermatocytes are present. These give rise to typical uniflagellate sperm carrying the haploid number of 9 chromosomes, and atypical multiflagellate sperm with only one chromosome. Two centrioles are present in the youngest typical spermatocyte. Each is a hollow cylinder about 160 mµ in diameter and 330 mµ long. The wall consists of 9 sets of triplet fibers arranged in a characteristic pattern. Sometime before pachytene an immature centriole, or procentriole as it will be called, appears next to each of the mature centrioles. The procentriole resembles a mature centriole in most respects except length: it is more annular than tubular. The daughter procentriole lies with its axis perpendicular to that of its parent. It presumably grows to full size during the late prophase, although the maturation stages have not been observed with the electron microscope. It is suggested that centrioles possess a constant polarization. The distal end forms the flagellum or other centriole products, while the proximal end represents the procentriole and is concerned with replication. The four centrioles of prophase (two parents and two daughters) are distributed by the two meiotic divisions to the four typical spermatids, in which they function as the basal bodies of the flagella. Atypical spermatocytes at first contain two normal centrioles. Each of these becomes surrounded by a cluster of procentrioles, which progressively elongate during the late prophase. After two aberrant meiotic divisions the centriole clusters give rise to the basal bodies of the multiflagellate sperm. These facts are discussed in the light of the theory, first proposed by Pollister, that the supernumerary centrioles in the atypical cells are

  20. Compiling an earthquake catalogue for the Arabian Plate, Western Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deif, Ahmed; Al-Shijbi, Yousuf; El-Hussain, Issa; Ezzelarab, Mohamed; Mohamed, Adel M. E.

    2017-10-01

    The Arabian Plate is surrounded by regions of relatively high seismicity. Accounting for this seismicity is of great importance for seismic hazard and risk assessments, seismic zoning, and land use. In this study, a homogenous earthquake catalogue of moment-magnitude (Mw) for the Arabian Plate is provided. The comprehensive and homogenous earthquake catalogue provided in the current study spatially involves the entire Arabian Peninsula and neighboring areas, covering all earthquake sources that can generate substantial hazard for the Arabian Plate mainland. The catalogue extends in time from 19 to 2015 with a total number of 13,156 events, of which 497 are historical events. Four polygons covering the entire Arabian Plate were delineated and different data sources including special studies, local, regional and international catalogues were used to prepare the earthquake catalogue. Moment magnitudes (Mw) that provided by original sources were given the highest magnitude type priority and introduced to the catalogues with their references. Earthquakes with magnitude differ from Mw were converted into this scale applying empirical relationships derived in the current or in previous studies. The four polygons catalogues were included in two comprehensive earthquake catalogues constituting the historical and instrumental periods. Duplicate events were identified and discarded from the current catalogue. The present earthquake catalogue was declustered in order to contain only independent events and investigated for the completeness with time of different magnitude spans.

  1. Creating context for the experiment record. User-defined metadata: investigations into metadata usage in the LabTrove ELN.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Cerys; Bird, Colin L; Coles, Simon J; Frey, Jeremy G

    2014-12-22

    The drive toward more transparency in research, the growing willingness to make data openly available, and the reuse of data to maximize the return on research investment all increase the importance of being able to find information and make links to the underlying data. The use of metadata in Electronic Laboratory Notebooks (ELNs) to curate experiment data is an essential ingredient for facilitating discovery. The University of Southampton has developed a Web browser-based ELN that enables users to add their own metadata to notebook entries. A survey of these notebooks was completed to assess user behavior and patterns of metadata usage within ELNs, while user perceptions and expectations were gathered through interviews and user-testing activities within the community. The findings indicate that while some groups are comfortable with metadata and are able to design a metadata structure that works effectively, many users are making little attempts to use it, thereby endangering their ability to recover data in the future. A survey of patterns of metadata use in these notebooks, together with feedback from the user community, indicated that while a few groups are comfortable with metadata and are able to design a metadata structure that works effectively, many users adopt a "minimum required" approach to metadata. To investigate whether the patterns of metadata use in LabTrove were unusual, a series of surveys were undertaken to investigate metadata usage in a variety of platforms supporting user-defined metadata. These surveys also provided the opportunity to investigate whether interface designs in these other environments might inform strategies for encouraging metadata creation and more effective use of metadata in LabTrove.

  2. PIMMS tools for capturing metadata about simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, Charlotte; Devine, Gerard; Tourte, Gregory; Pascoe, Stephen; Lawrence, Bryan; Barjat, Hannah

    2013-04-01

    PIMMS (Portable Infrastructure for the Metafor Metadata System) provides a method for consistent and comprehensive documentation of modelling activities that enables the sharing of simulation data and model configuration information. The aim of PIMMS is to package the metadata infrastructure developed by Metafor for CMIP5 so that it can be used by climate modelling groups in UK Universities. PIMMS tools capture information about simulations from the design of experiments to the implementation of experiments via simulations that run models. PIMMS uses the Metafor methodology which consists of a Common Information Model (CIM), Controlled Vocabularies (CV) and software tools. PIMMS software tools provide for the creation and consumption of CIM content via a web services infrastructure and portal developed by the ES-DOC community. PIMMS metadata integrates with the ESGF data infrastructure via the mapping of vocabularies onto ESGF facets. There are three paradigms of PIMMS metadata collection: Model Intercomparision Projects (MIPs) where a standard set of questions is asked of all models which perform standard sets of experiments. Disciplinary level metadata collection where a standard set of questions is asked of all models but experiments are specified by users. Bespoke metadata creation where the users define questions about both models and experiments. Examples will be shown of how PIMMS has been configured to suit each of these three paradigms. In each case PIMMS allows users to provide additional metadata beyond that which is asked for in an initial deployment. The primary target for PIMMS is the UK climate modelling community where it is common practice to reuse model configurations from other researchers. This culture of collaboration exists in part because climate models are very complex with many variables that can be modified. Therefore it has become common practice to begin a series of experiments by using another climate model configuration as a starting

  3. GraphMeta: Managing HPC Rich Metadata in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Dong; Chen, Yong; Carns, Philip; Jenkins, John; Zhang, Wei; Ross, Robert

    2016-01-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems face increasingly critical metadata management challenges, especially in the approaching exascale era. These challenges arise not only from exploding metadata volumes, but also from increasingly diverse metadata, which contains data provenance and arbitrary user-defined attributes in addition to traditional POSIX metadata. This ‘rich’ metadata is becoming critical to supporting advanced data management functionality such as data auditing and validation. In our prior work, we identified a graph-based model as a promising solution to uniformly manage HPC rich metadata due to its flexibility and generality. However, at the same time, graph-based HPC rich metadata anagement also introduces significant challenges to the underlying infrastructure. In this study, we first identify the challenges on the underlying infrastructure to support scalable, high-performance rich metadata management. Based on that, we introduce GraphMeta, a graphbased engine designed for this use case. It achieves performance scalability by introducing a new graph partitioning algorithm and a write-optimal storage engine. We evaluate GraphMeta under both synthetic and real HPC metadata workloads, compare it with other approaches, and demonstrate its advantages in terms of efficiency and usability for rich metadata management in HPC systems.

  4. Molecular replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of our research program is to understand how polynucleotide replication originated on the primitive Earth. This is a central issue in studies of the origins of life, since a process similar to modern DNA and RNA synthesis is likely to have formed the basis for the most primitive system of genetic information transfer. The major conclusion of studies so far is that a preformed polynucleotide template under many different experimental conditions will facilitate the synthesis of a new oligonucleotide with a sequence complementary to that of the template. It has been shown, for example, that poly(C) facilitates the synthesis of long oligo(G)s and that the short template CCGCC facilities the synthesis of its complement GGCGG. Very recently we have shown that template-directed synthesis is not limited to the standard oligonucleotide substrates. Nucleic acid-like molecules with a pyrophosphate group replacing the phosphate of the standard nucleic acid backbone are readily synthesized from deoxynucleotide 3'-5'-diphosphates on appropriate templates.

  5. Molecular replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of our research program is to understand how polynucleotide replication originated on the primitive Earth. This is a central issue in studies of the origins of life, since a process similar to modern DNA and RNA synthesis is likely to have formed the basis for the most primitive system of genetic information transfer. The major conclusion of studies so far is that a preformed polynucleotide template under many different experimental conditions will facilitate the synthesis of a new oligonucleotide with a sequence complementary to that of the template. It has been shown, for example, that poly(C) facilitates the synthesis of long oligo(G)s and that the short template CCGCC facilities the synthesis of its complement GGCGG. Very recently we have shown that template-directed synthesis is not limited to the standard oligonucleotide substrates. Nucleic acid-like molecules with a pyrophosphate group replacing the phosphate of the standard nucleic acid backbone are readily synthesized from deoxynucleotide 3'-5'-diphosphates on appropriate templates.

  6. Evaluating non-relational storage technology for HEP metadata and meta-data catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, M. A.; Golosova, M. V.; Gubin, M. Y.; Klimentov, A. A.; Osipova, V. V.; Ryabinkin, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale scientific experiments produce vast volumes of data. These data are stored, processed and analyzed in a distributed computing environment. The life cycle of experiment is managed by specialized software like Distributed Data Management and Workload Management Systems. In order to be interpreted and mined, experimental data must be accompanied by auxiliary metadata, which are recorded at each data processing step. Metadata describes scientific data and represent scientific objects or results of scientific experiments, allowing them to be shared by various applications, to be recorded in databases or published via Web. Processing and analysis of constantly growing volume of auxiliary metadata is a challenging task, not simpler than the management and processing of experimental data itself. Furthermore, metadata sources are often loosely coupled and potentially may lead to an end-user inconsistency in combined information queries. To aggregate and synthesize a range of primary metadata sources, and enhance them with flexible schema-less addition of aggregated data, we are developing the Data Knowledge Base architecture serving as the intelligence behind GUIs and APIs.

  7. HIS Central and the Hydrologic Metadata Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitenack, T.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    The CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System project maintains a comprehensive workflow for publishing hydrologic observations data and registering them to the common Hydrologic Metadata Catalog. Once the data are loaded into a database instance conformant with the CUAHSI HIS Observations Data Model (ODM), the user configures ODM web service template to point to the new database. After this, the hydrologic data become available via the standard CUAHSI HIS web service interface, that includes both data discovery (GetSites, GetVariables, GetSiteInfo, GetVariableInfo) and data retrieval (GetValues) methods. The observations data then can be further exposed via the global semantics-based search engine called Hydroseek. To register the published observations networks to the global search engine, users can now use the HIS Central application (new in HIS 1.1). With this online application, the WaterML-compliant web services can be submitted to the online catalog of data services, along with network metadata and a desired network symbology. Registering services to the HIS Central application triggers a harvester which uses the services to retrieve additional network metadata from the underlying ODM (information about stations, variables, and periods of record). The next step in HIS Central application is mapping variable names from the newly registered network, to the terms used in the global search ontology. Once these steps are completed, the new observations network is added to the map and becomes available for searching and querying. The number of observations network registered to the Hydrologic Metadata Catalog at SDSC is constantly growing. At the time of submission, the catalog contains 51 registered networks, with estimated 1.7 million stations.

  8. Content standards for medical image metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ornellas, Marcos C.; da Rocha, Rafael P.

    2003-12-01

    Medical images are at the heart of the healthcare diagnostic procedures. They have provided not only a noninvasive mean to view anatomical cross-sections of internal organs but also a mean for physicians to evaluate the patient"s diagnosis and monitor the effects of the treatment. For a Medical Center, the emphasis may shift from the generation of image to post processing and data management since the medical staff may generate even more processed images and other data from the original image after various analyses and post processing. A medical image data repository for health care information system is becoming a critical need. This data repository would contain comprehensive patient records, including information such as clinical data and related diagnostic images, and post-processed images. Due to the large volume and complexity of the data as well as the diversified user access requirements, the implementation of the medical image archive system will be a complex and challenging task. This paper discusses content standards for medical image metadata. In addition it also focuses on the image metadata content evaluation and metadata quality management.

  9. Analyzing handwriting biometrics in metadata context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidat, Tobias; Wolf, Franziska; Vielhauer, Claus

    2006-02-01

    In this article, methods for user recognition by online handwriting are experimentally analyzed using a combination of demographic data of users in relation to their handwriting habits. Online handwriting as a biometric method is characterized by having high variations of characteristics that influences the reliance and security of this method. These variations have not been researched in detail so far. Especially in cross-cultural application it is urgent to reveal the impact of personal background to security aspects in biometrics. Metadata represent the background of writers, by introducing cultural, biological and conditional (changing) aspects like fist language, country of origin, gender, handedness, experiences the influence handwriting and language skills. The goal is the revelation of intercultural impacts on handwriting in order to achieve higher security in biometrical systems. In our experiments, in order to achieve a relatively high coverage, 48 different handwriting tasks have been accomplished by 47 users from three countries (Germany, India and Italy) have been investigated with respect to the relations of metadata and biometric recognition performance. For this purpose, hypotheses have been formulated and have been evaluated using the measurement of well-known recognition error rates from biometrics. The evaluation addressed both: system reliance and security threads by skilled forgeries. For the later purpose, a novel forgery type is introduced, which applies the personal metadata to security aspects and includes new methods of security tests. Finally in our paper, we formulate recommendations for specific user groups and handwriting samples.

  10. Leveraging Metadata to Create Interactive Images... Today!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, Robert L.; Squires, G. K.; Llamas, J.; Rosenthal, C.; Brinkworth, C.; Fay, J.

    2011-01-01

    The image gallery for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has been newly rebuilt to fully support the Astronomy Visualization Metadata (AVM) standard to create a new user experience both on the website and in other applications. We encapsulate all the key descriptive information for a public image, including color representations and astronomical and sky coordinates and make it accessible in a user-friendly form on the website, but also embed the same metadata within the image files themselves. Thus, images downloaded from the site will carry with them all their descriptive information. Real-world benefits include display of general metadata when such images are imported into image editing software (e.g. Photoshop) or image catalog software (e.g. iPhoto). More advanced support in Microsoft's WorldWide Telescope can open a tagged image after it has been downloaded and display it in its correct sky position, allowing comparison with observations from other observatories. An increasing number of software developers are implementing AVM support in applications and an online image archive for tagged images is under development at the Spitzer Science Center. Tagging images following the AVM offers ever-increasing benefits to public-friendly imagery in all its standard forms (JPEG, TIFF, PNG). The AVM standard is one part of the Virtual Astronomy Multimedia Project (VAMP); http://www.communicatingastronomy.org

  11. Ontology-Based Search of Genomic Metadata.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Javier D; Lenzerini, Maurizio; Masseroli, Marco; Venco, Francesco; Ceri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) is a huge and still expanding public repository of more than 4,000 experiments and 25,000 data files, assembled by a large international consortium since 2007; unknown biological knowledge can be extracted from these huge and largely unexplored data, leading to data-driven genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic discoveries. Yet, search of relevant datasets for knowledge discovery is limitedly supported: metadata describing ENCODE datasets are quite simple and incomplete, and not described by a coherent underlying ontology. Here, we show how to overcome this limitation, by adopting an ENCODE metadata searching approach which uses high-quality ontological knowledge and state-of-the-art indexing technologies. Specifically, we developed S.O.S. GeM (http://www.bioinformatics.deib.polimi.it/SOSGeM/), a system supporting effective semantic search and retrieval of ENCODE datasets. First, we constructed a Semantic Knowledge Base by starting with concepts extracted from ENCODE metadata, matched to and expanded on biomedical ontologies integrated in the well-established Unified Medical Language System. We prove that this inference method is sound and complete. Then, we leveraged the Semantic Knowledge Base to semantically search ENCODE data from arbitrary biologists' queries. This allows correctly finding more datasets than those extracted by a purely syntactic search, as supported by the other available systems. We empirically show the relevance of found datasets to the biologists' queries.

  12. The BMW-Chandra Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Campana, S.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.

    We present the BMW-Chandra Source Catalogue drawn from all Chandra ACIS-I pointed observations with an exposure time in excess of 10 ks public as of March 2003 (136 observations). Using the wavelet detection algorithm developed by \\citep{Lazzatiea99} and \\citep{Campanaea99}, which can characterize point-like as well as extended sources, we identified 21325 sources which were visually inspected and verified. Among them, 16758 are not associated with the targets of the pointings and are considered certain; they have a 0.5-10 keV absorption corrected flux distribution median of ˜ 7 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue consists of source positions, count rates, extensions and relative errors in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7 keV; soft, 0.5-2 keV; and hard band, 2-7 keV), as well as the additional information drawn from the headers of the original files. We also extracted source counts in four additional energy bands, (0.5-1.0 keV, 1.0-2.0 keV, 2.0-4.0 keV and 4.0-7.0 keV). We compute the sky coverage in the soft and hard bands. The complete catalogue provides a sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2 keV, S/N =3) of ˜ 8 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ˜ 2 deg2 at a limiting flux of ˜ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. http://www.merate.mi.astro.it/~xanadu/BMC/bmc_home.html

  13. Catalogue of diffuse interstellar band measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, T. P., Jr.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Diffuse-band data have been collected from the literature and reduced statistically to a common measurement system, enabling correlation analyses to be made with a larger quantity of data than previously possible. A full listing of the catalogued data is presented, along with some discussion of the correlations. One important application of such studies is the identification of cases of peculiar diffuse-band behavior, and a table is given showing all cases of band strengths deviating by more than twice the mean dispersion from the best-fit correlations. This table may be useful in planning further observations.

  14. Associations Between the Ancient Star Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dennis W.

    2002-07-01

    There are just two substantial sources of star coordinates preserved for us from antiquity: the star catalogue of Ptolemy's Almagest, and the rising, setting, and culmination phenomena, along with some star declinations and right ascensions, from Hipparchus' Commentary to Aratus. Given the controversy associated with the idea that Ptolemy's catalogue is, in whole or in substantial part, a copy of an earlier but now lost catalogue of Hipparchus, it is of interest to try to establish clear and significant associations, or the lack thereof, between the two sets of ancient star data. There have been two complementary efforts to clarify the possible associations. Vogt used the phenomena and declinations to reconstruct the ecliptical coordinates of some 122 stars in Hipparchus' Commentary that also appear in the Almagest catalogue. Vogt's conclusion was that since his reconstructed coordinates and the Almagest coordinates were, in general, different, Ptolemy did not obtain his data from Hipparchus. Vogt did notice five stars with very similar errors and concluded that Ptolemy probably did copy those from Hipparchus. More recently, however, Grasshoff has pointed out that there are several reasons to doubt Vogt's conclusion. Further, Grasshoff worked in the opposite direction, using the Almagest coordinates to compute the Hipparchan phenomena, and concluded, for two reasons, that the Almagest data and the Commentary data share a common origin. First, there are a number of stars that share large common errors, and it is highly unlikely that these agreements could be coincidental. Second, the correlation coefficients between the various error sets are typically large and statistically significant, and this also suggests a common origin of the two data sets. However, Grasshoff provided no analysis of the correlations to support this second conclusion. In this paper I will (1) analyze the correlations between the errors of the phenomena and the predictions of these phenomena

  15. Broad Absorption Line Quasar catalogues with Supervised Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Scaringi, Simone; Knigge, Christian; Cottis, Christopher E.; Goad, Michael R.

    2008-12-05

    We have applied a Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) algorithm to SDSS DR5 quasar spectra in order to create a large catalogue of broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs). We first discuss the problems with BALQSO catalogues constructed using the conventional balnicity and/or absorption indices (BI and AI), and then describe the supervised LVQ network we have trained to recognise BALQSOs. The resulting BALQSO catalogue should be substantially more robust and complete than BI-or AI-based ones.

  16. The role of metadata in managing large environmental science datasets. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, R.B.; DeVaney, D.M.; French, J. C.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to bring together computer science researchers and environmental sciences data management practitioners to consider the role of metadata in managing large environmental sciences datasets. The objectives included: establishing a common definition of metadata; identifying categories of metadata; defining problems in managing metadata; and defining problems related to linking metadata with primary data.

  17. The First Three Catalogues of Southern Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozens, Glen; Orchiston, W.; Walsh, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nicolas de la Caille, James Dunlop and John Herschel compiled the first three catalogues of southern star clusters and nebulae. Lacaille catalogued 42 objects from Cape Town, South Africa, in 1751 and 1752. Dunlop catalogued 629 objects from Parramatta, Australia, in 1826 and Herschel catalogued 1708 objects between 1834 and 1838 from Cape Town. Many of these objects had not been seen before; In this paper we discuss the new discoveries and the accuracy of the positions supplied by Lacaille, Dunlop and Herschel. Half of Dunlop's 629 objects turned out to be asterisms and faint double stars.

  18. Catalogues of variable stars from Parenago to the present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.

    2006-04-01

    After World War II, the International Astronomical Union made Soviet astronomers responsible for variable-star catalogues. This work has been continued ever since the first edition of the General Catalogue of Variable Stars compiled by the team headed by P.P. Parenago and B.V. Kukarkin and published in 1948. Currently, the catalogue work is a joint project of the Institute of Astronomy (Russian Academy of Sciences) and the Sternberg Astronomical Institute (Moscow University). This paper is a brief review of recent trends in the field of variable-star catalogues. Problems as well as new prospects related to modern large-scale automatic photometric sky surveys are discussed.

  19. An Approach to Metadata Generation for Learning Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez D., Victor; Zapata G., Alfredo; Vidal C., Christian; Segura N., Alejandra; Prieto M., Manuel

    Metadata describe instructional resources and define their nature and use. Metadata are required to guarantee reusability and interchange of instructional resources into e-Learning systems. However, fulfilment of large metadata attributes is a hard and complex task for almost all LO developers. As a consequence many mistakes are made. This can cause the impoverishment of data quality in indexing, searching and recovering process. We propose a methodology to build Learning Objects from digital resources. The first phase includes automatic preprocessing of resources using techniques from information retrieval. Initial metadata obtained in this first phase are then used to search similar LO to propose missed metadata. The second phase considers assisted activities that merge computer advice with human decisions. Suggestions are based on metadata of similar Learning Object using fuzzy logic theory.

  20. Metadata in an Integrated Geo-Climate Data Integration Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, D. L.; Kunicki, T.; Walker, J. I.; Suftin, I.; Booth, N. L.; Habermann, T.; Neufeld, D.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Geo Data Portal (GDP) project established a Data Integration Framework (DIF) for service-oriented access to atmospheric and terrestrial data resources based on established data and web service standards. The GDP DIF is meant to allow generalized server-side processing services for support of interdisciplinary environmental modeling and data analysis. This presentation will focus on the metadata management and access components in use and in development as part of the GDP project. Where possible, the GDP DIF encourages that metadata be stored as attributes of data resources themselves. Tools to introspect and dynamically convert discipline specific metadata, like NetCDF-CF, to interdisciplinary standard metadata formats are used where available and are being developed in cooperation with partner data management groups. Formal data discovery metadata, once cross walked or manually generated, is stored and accessed using ISO content and encoding standards. Strategies for working with ISO metadata being developed by NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center and partner groups with an interest in combining geospatial and data web-service content, are being used and furthered as part of the GDP project. In the GDP DIF, ISO metadata is used for human understanding of metadata and linking to data web-services. Metadata required to allow computer access and manipulation, like precise coordinate reference system information, is derived directly from data web-services. The Open Geospatial Consortium suite of data and web-service standard's metadata requirements provide adequate information for generalized machine access and processing of geographic data types. The NetCDF-CF metadata conventions are used in the case of atmospheric and other data served via OPeNDAP. Integration of these two metadata conventions and associated data models was a major area of development in the GDP project. Of particular interest for this presentation, is the issue of

  1. A metadata-driven approach to data repository design.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Matthew J; McLean, Andrew; Rzepa, Henry S

    2017-01-01

    The design and use of a metadata-driven data repository for research data management is described. Metadata is collected automatically during the submission process whenever possible and is registered with DataCite in accordance with their current metadata schema, in exchange for a persistent digital object identifier. Two examples of data preview are illustrated, including the demonstration of a method for integration with commercial software that confers rich domain-specific data analytics without introducing customisation into the repository itself.

  2. Photometric stellar catalogue for TV meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Photometry for ordinary astrophysics was carefully developed for its own purposes. As stars radiation is very similar to the blackbody radiation, astronomers measure star illumination in wide or narrow calibrated spectral bands. This is enough for star photometry with precise accuracy and for measuring their light flux in these bands in energetic units. Meteors are moving objects and do not allow collection of more photons then they emit. So meteor observers use the whole spectral band that can be covered by sensitivity of their light sensors. This is why measurements of stellar magnitudes of background stars by these sensors are not the same as catalogued star brightness in standard photometric spectral bands. Here we present a special photometric catalogue of 93 bright non-variable stars of the northern hemisphere, that can be used by meteor observers of standard background whose brightness are calculated in energetic units as well as in non-systematic stellar magnitudes in spectral wavelength of the WATEC 902 sensitivity.

  3. HELCATS - Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D.; Harrison, R. A.; Davies, J. A.; Byrne, J.; Perry, C. H.; Moestl, C.; Rouillard, A. P.; Bothmer, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Eastwood, J. P.; Kilpua, E.; Odstrcil, D.; Gallagher, P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of the solar wind is fundamental to advancing our knowledge of energy and mass transport in the Solar System, making it crucial to space weather and its prediction. The advent of truly wide-angle heliospheric imaging has revolutionised the study of both transient (CMEs) and background (IRs) solar wind plasma structures, by enabling their direct and continuous observation out to 1 AU and beyond. The EU-funded FP7 HELCATS project combines European expertise in heliospheric imaging, built up in particular through lead involvement in NASA's STEREO mission, with expertise in solar and coronal imaging as well as in-situ and radio measurements of solar wind phenomena, in a programme of work that will enable a much wider exploitation and understanding of heliospheric imaging observations. The HELCATS project endeavors to catalogue transient and background solar wind structures imaged by STEREO/HI throughout the duration of the mission. This catalogue will include estimates of their kinematic properties using a variety of established and more speculative approaches, which are to be evaluated through comparisons with solar source and in-situ measurements. The potential for driving numerical models from these kinematic properties is to be assessed, as is their complementarity to radio observations, specifically Type II bursts and interplanetary scintillation. This presentation provides an overview of the HELCATS project and its progress in first 18 months of operations.

  4. Towards dynamic light-curve catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheers, Bart; Groffen, Fabian

    2012-09-01

    Time-domain astronomy is becoming a fundamental aspect of the next generation of astronomical instruments. The timing properties will revolutionise the studies of all kinds of astronomical objects. Consequetially, the huge complex data volumes and high cadences of these facilities will force us to overhaul and extend current software solutions. LOFAR, laying the groundwork for this, will produce a continuously updated spectral light-curve catalogue of all detected sources, with real-time capabilities to cope with the growth of 50 - 100TB/yr, making it the largest dynamic astronomical catalogue. Automated pipelines use the column-store MonetDB as their key component. We exploit SciLens, a 300+ node, 4-tier locally distributed cluster focussed on massive I/O. Introduction of the new array-based query language, SciQL, simplifies data exploration and mining. I will demonstrate how MonetDB/SQL & SciQL on its SciLens platform manages the millions of lightcurves for LOFAR. Initial benchmark results confirm the linear scale-up performance over tens of TBs using tens of nodes.

  5. Pan-European catalogue of flood events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajka, Juraj; Mangini, Walter; Viglione, Alberto; Hundecha, Yeshewatesfa; Ceola, Serena

    2016-04-01

    There have been numerous extreme flood events observed in Europe in the past years. One of the way to improve our understanding about causing flood generation mechanisms is to analyse spatial and temporal variability of a large number of flood events. The aim of this study is to present a pan-European catalogue of flood events developed within the SWITCH-ON EU Project. The flood events are identified from daily discharge observations at 1315 stations listed in Global Runoff Data Centre database. The average length of discharge time-series for selected stations is 54 years. For each event, basin boundary and additional hydrological and weather characteristics are extracted. Hydrological characteristics are extracted from the pan-European HYPE model simulations. Precipitation, together with the corresponding proportions of rainfall and snowfall, snowmelt, and evapotranspiration are computed as total amounts between the event start date and event peak date. Soil moisture, soil moisture deficit, and basin accumulated snow water equivalent are computed for the event start date. Weather characteristics are derived from the weather circulation pattern catalogue developed within COST 733 Project. The results are generated in an open data access and tools framework which allows reproduction and extension of results to other regions. More information about the analysis and project are available at: http://www.water-switch-on.eu/lab.html.

  6. CMO: Cruise Metadata Organizer for JAMSTEC Research Cruises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, K.; Saito, H.; Hanafusa, Y.; Vanroosebeke, A.; Kitayama, T.

    2011-12-01

    JAMSTEC's Data Research Center for Marine-Earth Sciences manages and distributes a wide variety of observational data and samples obtained from JAMSTEC research vessels and deep sea submersibles. Generally, metadata are essential to identify data and samples were obtained. In JAMSTEC, cruise metadata include cruise information such as cruise ID, name of vessel, research theme, and diving information such as dive number, name of submersible and position of diving point. They are submitted by chief scientists of research cruises in the Microsoft Excel° spreadsheet format, and registered into a data management database to confirm receipt of observational data files, cruise summaries, and cruise reports. The cruise metadata are also published via "JAMSTEC Data Site for Research Cruises" within two months after end of cruise. Furthermore, these metadata are distributed with observational data, images and samples via several data and sample distribution websites after a publication moratorium period. However, there are two operational issues in the metadata publishing process. One is that duplication efforts and asynchronous metadata across multiple distribution websites due to manual metadata entry into individual websites by administrators. The other is that differential data types or representation of metadata in each website. To solve those problems, we have developed a cruise metadata organizer (CMO) which allows cruise metadata to be connected from the data management database to several distribution websites. CMO is comprised of three components: an Extensible Markup Language (XML) database, an Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) software, and a web-based interface. The XML database is used because of its flexibility for any change of metadata. Daily differential uptake of metadata from the data management database to the XML database is automatically processed via the EAI software. Some metadata are entered into the XML database using the web

  7. Developing Metadata Requirements for NASA Airborne Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, L.; Rinsland, P. L.; Kusterer, J.; Chen, G.; Early, A. B.; Beach, A. L., III; Wang, D.; Typanski, N. D.; Rutherford, M.; Rieflin, E.

    2014-12-01

    The common definition of metadata is "data about data". NASA has developed metadata formats to meet the needs of its satellite missions and emerging users. Coverage of satellite missions is highly predictable based on orbit characteristics. Airborne missions feature complicated flight patterns to maximize science return and changes in the instrument suites. More relevant to the airborne science data holding, the metadata describes the airborne measurements, in terms of measurement location, time, platform, and instruments. The metadata organizes the data holdings and facilitates the data ordering process from the DAAC. Therefore, the metadata requirements will need to fit the type of airborne measurements and sampling strategies as well as leverage current Earth Science and Data Information System infrastructure (ECHO/Reverb, GCMD). Current airborne data is generated/produced in a variety of formats (ICARRT, ASCII, etc) with the metadata information embedded in the data file. Special readers are needed to parse data file to generate metadata needed for search and discovery. With loosely defined standards within the airborne community this process poses challenges to the data providers. It is necessary to assess the suitability of current metadata standards, which have been mostly developed for satellite observations. To be presented are the use case-based assessments of the current airborne metadata standards and suggestions for future changes.

  8. Content Metadata Standards for Marine Science: A Case Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riall, Rebecca L.; Marincioni, Fausto; Lightsom, Frances L.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey developed a content metadata standard to meet the demands of organizing electronic resources in the marine sciences for a broad, heterogeneous audience. These metadata standards are used by the Marine Realms Information Bank project, a Web-based public distributed library of marine science from academic institutions and government agencies. The development and deployment of this metadata standard serve as a model, complete with lessons about mistakes, for the creation of similarly specialized metadata standards for digital libraries.

  9. Syntactic and Semantic Validation without a Metadata Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Gokey, Christopher D.; Kendig, David; Olsen, Lola; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ability to maintain quality information is essential to securing the confidence in any system for which the information serves as a data source. NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), an online Earth science data locator, holds over 9000 data set descriptions and is in a constant state of flux as metadata are created and updated on a daily basis. In such a system, the importance of maintaining the consistency and integrity of these-metadata is crucial. The GCMD has developed a metadata management system utilizing XML, controlled vocabulary, and Java technologies to ensure the metadata not only adhere to valid syntax, but also exhibit proper semantics.

  10. Inheritance rules for Hierarchical Metadata Based on ISO 19115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabala, A.; Masó, J.; Pons, X.

    2012-04-01

    Mainly, ISO19115 has been used to describe metadata for datasets and services. Furthermore, ISO19115 standard (as well as the new draft ISO19115-1) includes a conceptual model that allows to describe metadata at different levels of granularity structured in hierarchical levels, both in aggregated resources such as particularly series, datasets, and also in more disaggregated resources such as types of entities (feature type), types of attributes (attribute type), entities (feature instances) and attributes (attribute instances). In theory, to apply a complete metadata structure to all hierarchical levels of metadata, from the whole series to an individual feature attributes, is possible, but to store all metadata at all levels is completely impractical. An inheritance mechanism is needed to store each metadata and quality information at the optimum hierarchical level and to allow an ease and efficient documentation of metadata in both an Earth observation scenario such as a multi-satellite mission multiband imagery, as well as in a complex vector topographical map that includes several feature types separated in layers (e.g. administrative limits, contour lines, edification polygons, road lines, etc). Moreover, and due to the traditional split of maps in tiles due to map handling at detailed scales or due to the satellite characteristics, each of the previous thematic layers (e.g. 1:5000 roads for a country) or band (Landsat-5 TM cover of the Earth) are tiled on several parts (sheets or scenes respectively). According to hierarchy in ISO 19115, the definition of general metadata can be supplemented by spatially specific metadata that, when required, either inherits or overrides the general case (G.1.3). Annex H of this standard states that only metadata exceptions are defined at lower levels, so it is not necessary to generate the full registry of metadata for each level but to link particular values to the general value that they inherit. Conceptually the metadata

  11. MetaRNA-Seq: An Interactive Tool to Browse and Annotate Metadata from RNA-Seq Studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Halama, Anna; Hayat, Shahina; Billing, Anja M; Gupta, Manish; Yousri, Noha A; Smith, Gregory M; Suhre, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The number of RNA-Seq studies has grown in recent years. The design of RNA-Seq studies varies from very simple (e.g., two-condition case-control) to very complicated (e.g., time series involving multiple samples at each time point with separate drug treatments). Most of these publically available RNA-Seq studies are deposited in NCBI databases, but their metadata are scattered throughout four different databases: Sequence Read Archive (SRA), Biosample, Bioprojects, and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Although the NCBI web interface is able to provide all of the metadata information, it often requires significant effort to retrieve study- or project-level information by traversing through multiple hyperlinks and going to another page. Moreover, project- and study-level metadata lack manual or automatic curation by categories, such as disease type, time series, case-control, or replicate type, which are vital to comprehending any RNA-Seq study. Here we describe "MetaRNA-Seq," a new tool for interactively browsing, searching, and annotating RNA-Seq metadata with the capability of semiautomatic curation at the study level.

  12. Informing and Evaluating a Metadata Initiative: Usability and Metadata Studies in Minnesota's "Foundations" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quam, Eileen

    2001-01-01

    Explains Minnesota's Foundations Project, a multiagency collaboration to improve access to environmental and natural resources information. Discusses the use of the Dublin core metadata standard for Web resources and describes three studies that included needs assessment, Bridges Web site user interface, and usability of controlled vocabulary in…

  13. Informing and Evaluating a Metadata Initiative: Usability and Metadata Studies in Minnesota's "Foundations" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quam, Eileen

    2001-01-01

    Explains Minnesota's Foundations Project, a multiagency collaboration to improve access to environmental and natural resources information. Discusses the use of the Dublin core metadata standard for Web resources and describes three studies that included needs assessment, Bridges Web site user interface, and usability of controlled vocabulary in…

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MHO Catalogue (Davis+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. J.; Gell, R.; Khanzadyan, T.; Smith, M. D.; Jenness, T.

    2010-02-01

    The catalogue contains almost 1000 objects and covers regions on the sky loosely based on the constellations and associated Giant Molecular Clouds (Perseus, Orion A, Orion B, Taurus, etc.); full details are given in the paper. Note also that this catalogue is being maintained (and updated) at a dedicated, search-able website: http://www.jach.hawaii.edu/UKIRT/MHCat/ (2 data files).

  15. Modern Special Collections Cataloguing: A University of London Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar, K. E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on modern special collections (in themselves no new phenomenon), with a dichotomy between guidance for detailed cataloguing in "Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books)" (DCRM(B), 2007) and the value of clearing cataloguing backlogs expeditiously. This article describes the De la Mare…

  16. Modern Special Collections Cataloguing: A University of London Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar, K. E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen a growing emphasis on modern special collections (in themselves no new phenomenon), with a dichotomy between guidance for detailed cataloguing in "Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Books)" (DCRM(B), 2007) and the value of clearing cataloguing backlogs expeditiously. This article describes the De la Mare…

  17. Archaeal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  18. The Metadata Coverage Index (MCI): A standardized metric for quantifying database metadata richness.

    PubMed

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Schriml, Lynn; Hirschman, Lynette; Pagani, Ioanna; Nosrat, Bahador; Sterk, Peter; White, Owen; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sansone, Susanna-Assunta; Taylor, Chris; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Field, Dawn

    2012-07-30

    Variability in the extent of the descriptions of data ('metadata') held in public repositories forces users to assess the quality of records individually, which rapidly becomes impractical. The scoring of records on the richness of their description provides a simple, objective proxy measure for quality that enables filtering that supports downstream analysis. Pivotally, such descriptions should spur on improvements. Here, we introduce such a measure - the 'Metadata Coverage Index' (MCI): the percentage of available fields actually filled in a record or description. MCI scores can be calculated across a database, for individual records or for their component parts (e.g., fields of interest). There are many potential uses for this simple metric: for example; to filter, rank or search for records; to assess the metadata availability of an ad hoc collection; to determine the frequency with which fields in a particular record type are filled, especially with respect to standards compliance; to assess the utility of specific tools and resources, and of data capture practice more generally; to prioritize records for further curation; to serve as performance metrics of funded projects; or to quantify the value added by curation. Here we demonstrate the utility of MCI scores using metadata from the Genomes Online Database (GOLD), including records compliant with the 'Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence' (MIGS) standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium. We discuss challenges and address the further application of MCI scores; to show improvements in annotation quality over time, to inform the work of standards bodies and repository providers on the usability and popularity of their products, and to assess and credit the work of curators. Such an index provides a step towards putting metadata capture practices and in the future, standards compliance, into a quantitative and objective framework.

  19. First Carlsberg Meridian Telescope (CMT) CCD Catalogue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélizon, F.; Muiños, J. L.; Vallejo, M.; Evans, D. W.; Irwin, M.; Helmer, L.

    2003-11-01

    The Carlsberg Meridian Telescope (CMT) is a telescope owned by Copenhagen University Observatory (CUO). It was installed in the Spanish observatory of El Roque de los Muchachos on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands) in 1984. It is operated jointly by the CUO, the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge (IoA) and the Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada of Spain (ROA) in the framework of an international agreement. From 1984 to 1998 the instrument was provided with a moving slit micrometer and with its observations a series of 11 catalogues were published, `Carlsberg Meridian Catalogue La Palma (CMC No 1-11)'. Since 1997, the telescope has been controlled remotely via Internet. The three institutions share this remote control in periods of approximately three months. In 1998, the CMT was upgraded by installing as sensor, a commercial Spectrasource CCD camera as a test of the possibility of performing meridian transits observed in drift-scan mode. Once this was shown possible, in 1999, a second model of CCD camera, built in the CUO workshop with a better performance, was installed. The Spectrasource camera was loaned to ROA by CUO and is now installed in the San Fernando Automatic Meridian Circle in San Juan (CMASF). In 1999, the observations were started of a sky survey from -3deg to +30deg in declination. In July 2002, a first release of the survey was published, with the positions of the observed stars in the band between -3deg and +3deg in declination. This oral communication will present this first release of the survey.

  20. To Teach or Not to Teach: The Ethics of Metadata

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Cynthia; Cavaliere, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Metadata is information about computer-generated documents that is often inadvertently transmitted to others. The problems associated with metadata have become more acute over time as word processing and other popular programs have become more receptive to the concept of collaboration. As more people become involved in the preparation of…

  1. To Teach or Not to Teach: The Ethics of Metadata

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Cynthia; Cavaliere, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Metadata is information about computer-generated documents that is often inadvertently transmitted to others. The problems associated with metadata have become more acute over time as word processing and other popular programs have become more receptive to the concept of collaboration. As more people become involved in the preparation of…

  2. Shared Geospatial Metadata Repository for Ontario University Libraries: Collaborative Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forward, Erin; Leahey, Amber; Trimble, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Successfully providing access to special collections of digital geospatial data in academic libraries relies upon complete and accurate metadata. Creating and maintaining metadata using specialized standards is a formidable challenge for libraries. The Ontario Council of University Libraries' Scholars GeoPortal project, which created a shared…

  3. PoroTomo Subtask 6.3 Nodal Seismometers Metadata

    SciTech Connect

    Lesley Parker

    2016-03-28

    Metadata for the nodal seismometer array deployed at the POROTOMO's Natural Laboratory in Brady Hot Spring, Nevada during the March 2016 testing. Metadata includes location and timing for each instrument as well as file lists of data to be uploaded in a separate submission.

  4. LACE: A Web-Based, Structured Editor for PDS Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, M.; Keller, R.; Sarram, P.

    2015-06-01

    PDS has moved to XML-based metadata, but many scientists are not familiar with XML and find its structure complicated. For these reasons, we have created LACE, an editor for PDS metadata that hides the complexity of XML from the user.

  5. Twiddlenet: Metadata Tagging and Data Dissemination in Mobile Device Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    METADATA TAGGING AND DATA DISSEMINATION IN MOBILE DEVICE NETWORKS by Christopher T. Clotfelter Jonathon E. Towle September 2007 Thesis...Metadata Tagging and Data Dissemination in Mobile Device Networks 6. AUTHOR(S) Clotfelter, Christopher T. Towle , Jonathon E. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7...DISSEMINATION IN MOBILE DEVICE NETWORKS Jonathan E. Towle Captain, United States Maine Corps B.S., California State University Humboldt

  6. A Distributed Architecture for Resource Discovery Using Metadata.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roszkowski, Michael; Lukas, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Describes an approach for linking geographically distributed collections of metadata so that they are searchable as a single collection. Describes the infrastructure, discusses advantages of using linked collections of authoritative metadata as an alternative to using a keyword-indexing search engine for resource discovery, and examines other…

  7. Shared Geospatial Metadata Repository for Ontario University Libraries: Collaborative Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forward, Erin; Leahey, Amber; Trimble, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Successfully providing access to special collections of digital geospatial data in academic libraries relies upon complete and accurate metadata. Creating and maintaining metadata using specialized standards is a formidable challenge for libraries. The Ontario Council of University Libraries' Scholars GeoPortal project, which created a shared…

  8. Metadata in the Collaboratory for Multi-Scale Chemical Science

    SciTech Connect

    Pancerella, Carmen M.; Hewson, John; Koegler, Wendy S.; Leahy, David; Lee, Michael; Rahn, Larry; Yang, Christine; Myers, James D.; Didier, Brett T.; McCoy, Renata; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.; Windus, Theresa L.; Amin, Kaizer; Bittner, Sandra; Lansing, Carina S.; Minkoff, Michael; Nijsure, Sandeep; von Laszewski, Gregor; Pinzon, Reinhardt; Ruscic, Branko; Wagner, Albert F.; Wang, Baoshan; Pitz, William; Ho, Yen-Ling; Montoya, David W.; Xu, Lili; Allison, Thomas C.; Green, William H.; Frenklach, Michael

    2003-10-02

    The goal of the Collaboratory for the Multi-scale Chemical Sciences (CMCS) [1] is to develop an informatics-based approach to synthesizing multi-scale chemistry information to create knowledge in the chemical sciences. CMCS is using a portal and metadata-aware content store as a base for building a system to support inter-domain knowledge exchange in chemical science. Key aspects of the system include configurable metadata extraction and translation, a core schema for scientific pedigree, and a suite of tools for managing data and metadata and visualizing pedigree relationships between data entries. CMCS metadata is represented using Dublin Core with metadata extensions that are useful to both the chemical science community and the science community in general. CMCS is working with several chemistry groups who are using the system to collaboratively assemble and analyze existing data to derive new chemical knowledge. In this paper we discuss the project’s metadata-related requirements, the relevant software infrastructure, core metadata schema, and tools that use the metadata to enhance science

  9. Creating FGDC and NBII metadata with Metavist 2005.

    Treesearch

    David J. Rugg

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a computer program for creating metadata compliant with the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) 1998 metadata standard or the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) 1999 Biological Data Profile for the FGDC standard. The software runs under the Microsoft Windows 2000 and XP operating systems, and requires the presence of...

  10. BioCatalogue: a universal catalogue of web services for the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Jiten; Tanoh, Franck; Nzuobontane, Eric; Laurent, Thomas; Orlowski, Jerzy; Roos, Marco; Wolstencroft, Katy; Aleksejevs, Sergejs; Stevens, Robert; Pettifer, Steve; Lopez, Rodrigo; Goble, Carole A

    2010-07-01

    The use of Web Services to enable programmatic access to on-line bioinformatics is becoming increasingly important in the Life Sciences. However, their number, distribution and the variable quality of their documentation can make their discovery and subsequent use difficult. A Web Services registry with information on available services will help to bring together service providers and their users. The BioCatalogue (http://www.biocatalogue.org/) provides a common interface for registering, browsing and annotating Web Services to the Life Science community. Services in the BioCatalogue can be described and searched in multiple ways based upon their technical types, bioinformatics categories, user tags, service providers or data inputs and outputs. They are also subject to constant monitoring, allowing the identification of service problems and changes and the filtering-out of unavailable or unreliable resources. The system is accessible via a human-readable 'Web 2.0'-style interface and a programmatic Web Service interface. The BioCatalogue follows a community approach in which all services can be registered, browsed and incrementally documented with annotations by any member of the scientific community.

  11. BioCatalogue: a universal catalogue of web services for the life sciences

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Jiten; Tanoh, Franck; Nzuobontane, Eric; Laurent, Thomas; Orlowski, Jerzy; Roos, Marco; Wolstencroft, Katy; Aleksejevs, Sergejs; Stevens, Robert; Pettifer, Steve; Lopez, Rodrigo; Goble, Carole A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of Web Services to enable programmatic access to on-line bioinformatics is becoming increasingly important in the Life Sciences. However, their number, distribution and the variable quality of their documentation can make their discovery and subsequent use difficult. A Web Services registry with information on available services will help to bring together service providers and their users. The BioCatalogue (http://www.biocatalogue.org/) provides a common interface for registering, browsing and annotating Web Services to the Life Science community. Services in the BioCatalogue can be described and searched in multiple ways based upon their technical types, bioinformatics categories, user tags, service providers or data inputs and outputs. They are also subject to constant monitoring, allowing the identification of service problems and changes and the filtering-out of unavailable or unreliable resources. The system is accessible via a human-readable ‘Web 2.0’-style interface and a programmatic Web Service interface. The BioCatalogue follows a community approach in which all services can be registered, browsed and incrementally documented with annotations by any member of the scientific community. PMID:20484378

  12. Astronomy Visualization Metadata (AVM) in Action!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurt, Robert L.; Gauthier, A.; Christensen, L. L.; Wyatt, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Astronomy Visualization Metadata (AVM) standard offers a flexible way of embedding extensive information about an astronomical image, illustration, or photograph within the image file itself. Such information includes a spread of basic info including title, caption, credit, and subject (based on a taxonomy optimized for outreach needs). Astronomical images may also be fully tagged with color assignments (associating wavelengths/observatories to colors in the image) and coordinate projection information. Here we present a status update on current ongoing projects utilizing AVM. Ongoing tagging efforts include a variety of missions and observers (including Spitzer, Chandra, Hubble, and amateurs), and the metadata is serving as a database schema for content-managed website development (Spitzer). Software packages are utilizing AVM coordinate headers to allow images to be tagged (FITS Liberator) and correctly registered against the sky backdrop on import (e.g. WorldWide Telescope, Google Sky). Museums and planetariums are exploring the use of AVM contextual information to enrich the presentation of images (partners include the American Museum of Natural History and the California Academy of Sciences). Astronomical institutions are adopting the AVM standard (e.g. IVOA) and planning services to embed and catalog AVM-tagged images (IRSA/VAMP, Aladin). More information is available at www.virtualastronomy.org

  13. Automated database mediation using ontological metadata mappings.

    PubMed

    Marenco, Luis; Wang, Rixin; Nadkarni, Prakash

    2009-01-01

    To devise an automated approach for integrating federated database information using database ontologies constructed from their extended metadata. One challenge of database federation is that the granularity of representation of equivalent data varies across systems. Dealing effectively with this problem is analogous to dealing with precoordinated vs. postcoordinated concepts in biomedical ontologies. The authors describe an approach based on ontological metadata mapping rules defined with elements of a global vocabulary, which allows a query specified at one granularity level to fetch data, where possible, from databases within the federation that use different granularities. This is implemented in OntoMediator, a newly developed production component of our previously described Query Integrator System. OntoMediator's operation is illustrated with a query that accesses three geographically separate, interoperating databases. An example based on SNOMED also illustrates the applicability of high-level rules to support the enforcement of constraints that can prevent inappropriate curator or power-user actions. A rule-based framework simplifies the design and maintenance of systems where categories of data must be mapped to each other, for the purpose of either cross-database query or for curation of the contents of compositional controlled vocabularies.

  14. Embedding and retrieving private metadata in electrocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Kozat, Suleyman S; Vlachos, Michail; Lucchese, Claudio; Van Herle, Helga; Yu, Philip S

    2009-08-01

    Due to the recent explosion of 'identity theft' cases, the safeguarding of private data has been the focus of many scientific efforts. Medical data contain a number of sensitive attributes, whose access the rightful owner would ideally like to disclose only to authorized personnel. One way of providing limited access to sensitive data is through means of encryption. In this work we follow a different path, by proposing the fusion of the sensitive metadata within the medical data. Our work is focused on medical time-series signals and in particular on Electrocardiograms (ECG). We present techniques that allow the embedding and retrieval of sensitive numerical data, such as the patient's social security number or birth date, within the medical signal. The proposed technique not only allows the effective hiding of the sensitive metadata within the signal itself, but it additionally provides a way of authenticating the data ownership or providing assurances about the origin of the data. Our methodology builds upon watermarking notions, and presents the following desirable characteristics: (a) it does not distort important ECG characteristics, which are essential for proper medical diagnosis, (b) it allows not only the embedding but also the efficient retrieval of the embedded data, (c) it provides resilience and fault tolerance by employing multistage watermarks (both robust and fragile). Our experiments on real ECG data indicate the viability of the proposed scheme.

  15. SPASE, Metadata, and the Heliophysics Virtual Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James; King, Todd; Roberts, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    To provide data search and access capability in the field of Heliophysics (the study of the Sun and its effects on the Solar System, especially the Earth) a number of Virtual Observatories (VO) have been established both via direct funding from the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and through other funding agencies in the U.S. and worldwide. At least 15 systems can be labeled as Virtual Observatories in the Heliophysics community, 9 of them funded by NASA. The problem is that different metadata and data search approaches are used by these VO's and a search for data relevant to a particular research question can involve consulting with multiple VO's - needing to learn a different approach for finding and acquiring data for each. The Space Physics Archive Search and Extract (SPASE) project is intended to provide a common data model for Heliophysics data and therefore a common set of metadata for searches of the VO's. The SPASE Data Model has been developed through the common efforts of the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium (HDMC) representatives over a number of years. We currently have released Version 2.1 of the Data Model. The advantages and disadvantages of the Data Model will be discussed along with the plans for the future. Recent changes requested by new members of the SPASE community indicate some of the directions for further development.

  16. Developing Cyberinfrastructure Tools and Services for Metadata Quality Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecum, B.; Gordon, S.; Habermann, T.; Jones, M. B.; Leinfelder, B.; Powers, L. A.; Slaughter, P.

    2016-12-01

    Metadata and data quality are at the core of reusable and reproducible science. While great progress has been made over the years, much of the metadata collected only addresses data discovery, covering concepts such as titles and keywords. Improving metadata beyond the discoverability plateau means documenting detailed concepts within the data such as sampling protocols, instrumentation used, and variables measured. Given that metadata commonly do not describe their data at this level, how might we improve the state of things? Giving scientists and data managers easy to use tools to evaluate metadata quality that utilize community-driven recommendations is the key to producing high-quality metadata. To achieve this goal, we created a set of cyberinfrastructure tools and services that integrate with existing metadata and data curation workflows which can be used to improve metadata and data quality across the sciences. These tools work across metadata dialects (e.g., ISO19115, FGDC, EML, etc.) and can be used to assess aspects of quality beyond what is internal to the metadata such as the congruence between the metadata and the data it describes. The system makes use of a user-friendly mechanism for expressing a suite of checks as code in popular data science programming languages such as Python and R. This reduces the burden on scientists and data managers to learn yet another language. We demonstrated these services and tools in three ways. First, we evaluated a large corpus of datasets in the DataONE federation of data repositories against a metadata recommendation modeled after existing recommendations such as the LTER best practices and the Attribute Convention for Dataset Discovery (ACDD). Second, we showed how this service can be used to display metadata and data quality information to data producers during the data submission and metadata creation process, and to data consumers through data catalog search and access tools. Third, we showed how the centrally

  17. An Enterprise Ontology Building the Bases for Automatic Metadata Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thönssen, Barbara

    'Information Overload' or 'Document Deluge' is a problem enterprises and Public Administrations alike are still dealing with. Although commercial products for Enterprise Content or Records Management are available since more than two decades, especially in Small and Medium Enterprises and Public Administrations they didn't get through. Because of the wide range of document types and formats full-text indexing is not sufficient, but assigning metadata manually is not possible. Thus, automatic, format-independent generation of metadata for (public) enterprise documents is needed. Using context to infer metadata automatically has been researched for example for web-documents or learning objects. If (public) enterprise objects were modelled 'machine understandable' they could be build the context for automatic metadata generation. The approach introduced in this paper is to model context (the (public) enterprise objects) in an ontology and using that ontology to infer content-related metadata.

  18. EXIF Custom: Automatic image metadata extraction for Scratchpads and Drupal.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ed

    2013-01-01

    Many institutions and individuals use embedded metadata to aid in the management of their image collections. Many deskop image management solutions such as Adobe Bridge and online tools such as Flickr also make use of embedded metadata to describe, categorise and license images. Until now Scratchpads (a data management system and virtual research environment for biodiversity) have not made use of these metadata, and users have had to manually re-enter this information if they have wanted to display it on their Scratchpad site. The Drupal described here allows users to map metadata embedded in their images to the associated field in the Scratchpads image form using one or more customised mappings. The module works seamlessly with the bulk image uploader used on Scratchpads and it is therefore possible to upload hundreds of images easily with automatic metadata (EXIF, XMP and IPTC) extraction and mapping.

  19. Cytoplasmic Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Diaz, Arturo; Ahlquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm compartmentalize their genome replication and transcription in organelle-like structures that enhance replication efficiency and protection from host defenses. In particular, recent studies with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses have further elucidated the ultrastructure of membrane-bounded RNA replication complexes and their close coordination with virion assembly and budding. The structure, function and assembly of some positive-strand RNA virus replication complexes have parallels and potential evolutionary links with the replicative cores of double-strand RNA virus and retrovirus virions, and more general similarities with the replication factories of cytoplasmic DNA viruses. PMID:20638644

  20. A new catalogue of ISM content of normal galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettoni, D.; Galletta, G.; García-Burillo, S.

    2003-07-01

    We have compiled a catalogue of the gas content for a sample of 1916 galaxies, considered to be a fair representation of ``normality''. The definition of a ``normal'' galaxy adopted in this work implies that we have purposely excluded from the catalogue galaxies having distorted morphology (such as interaction bridges, tails or lopsidedness) and/or any signature of peculiar kinematics (such as polar rings, counterrotating disks or other decoupled components). In contrast, we have included systems hosting active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the catalogue. This catalogue revises previous compendia on the ISM content of galaxies published by \\citet{bregman} and \\citet{casoli}, and compiles data available in the literature from several small samples of galaxies. Masses for warm dust, atomic and molecular gas, as well as X-ray luminosities have been converted to a uniform distance scale taken from the Catalogue of Principal Galaxies (PGC). We have used two different normalization factors to explore the variation of the gas content along the Hubble sequence: the blue luminosity (LB) and the square of linear diameter (D225). Our catalogue significantly improves the statistics of previous reference catalogues and can be used in future studies to define a template ISM content for ``normal'' galaxies along the Hubble sequence. The catalogue can be accessed on-line and is also available at the Centre des Données Stellaires (CDS). The catalogue is available in electronic form at http://dipastro.pd.astro.it/galletta/ismcat and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to\\ cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via\\ http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/405/5

  1. The XML Metadata Editor of GFZ Data Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulbricht, Damian; Elger, Kirsten; Tesei, Telemaco; Trippanera, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    Following the FAIR data principles, research data should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reuseable. Publishing data under these principles requires to assign persistent identifiers to the data and to generate rich machine-actionable metadata. To increase the interoperability, metadata should include shared vocabularies and crosslink the newly published (meta)data and related material. However, structured metadata formats tend to be complex and are not intended to be generated by individual scientists. Software solutions are needed that support scientists in providing metadata describing their data. To facilitate data publication activities of 'GFZ Data Services', we programmed an XML metadata editor that assists scientists to create metadata in different schemata popular in the earth sciences (ISO19115, DIF, DataCite), while being at the same time usable by and understandable for scientists. Emphasis is placed on removing barriers, in particular the editor is publicly available on the internet without registration [1] and the scientists are not requested to provide information that may be generated automatically (e.g. the URL of a specific licence or the contact information of the metadata distributor). Metadata are stored in browser cookies and a copy can be saved to the local hard disk. To improve usability, form fields are translated into the scientific language, e.g. 'creators' of the DataCite schema are called 'authors'. To assist filling in the form, we make use of drop down menus for small vocabulary lists and offer a search facility for large thesauri. Explanations to form fields and definitions of vocabulary terms are provided in pop-up windows and a full documentation is available for download via the help menu. In addition, multiple geospatial references can be entered via an interactive mapping tool, which helps to minimize problems with different conventions to provide latitudes and longitudes. Currently, we are extending the metadata editor

  2. The APM Galaxy Survey - V. Catalogues of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, G. B.; Maddox, S. J.; Sutherland, W. J.; Efstathiou, G.

    1997-08-01

    We describe the construction of catalogues of galaxy clusters from the APM Galaxy survey using an automated algorithm based on Abell-like selection criteria. We investigate the effects of varying several parameters in our selection algorithm, including the magnitude range and radius from the cluster centre used to estimate the cluster richnesses. We quantify the accuracy of the photometric distance estimates by comparing them with measured redshifts, and we investigate the stability and completeness of the resulting catalogues. We find that the angular correlation functions for different cluster catalogues are in good agreement with one another, and are also consistent with the observed amplitude of the spatial correlation function of rich clusters.

  3. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    PubMed

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-07-08

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species.

  4. Correlation analysis of objectively defined galaxy and cluster catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, P. R. F.; Fong, R.; Shanks, T.

    1988-10-01

    The authors present further galaxy clustering results from the objective COSMOS/UKST galaxy catalogue of Stevenson et al. They first re-examine the results of SSFM for the galaxy correlation function, wgg(θ), testing the stability of the result against possible systematic effects and extending the analysis to larger angular scales. They then use the method of Turner & Gott to automatically detect groups and clusters in these catalogues. The authors next present the cluster-galaxy cross-correlation function wcg. Finally, the above correlation analyses are carried out on simulated galaxy and cluster catalogues.

  5. Metadata specification in a dynamic geometry software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radaković, Davorka; Herceg, Äńorde

    2017-07-01

    Attributes in C# are a mechanism that provides association of declarative information with C# code such as classes, types, methods, properties, namespaces etc. Once defined and associated with a program entity, an attribute can be queried at run time. However, the attributes have certain restrictions which limit their application to representing complex metadata necessary for development of dynamic geometry software (DGS). We have devised a solution, independent of attributes, which was developed to overcome the limitations, while maintaining the functionality of attributes. Our solution covers a wide range of uses, from providing extensibility to a functional programming language and declaring new data types and operations, to being a foundation for runtime optimizations of expression tree evaluation, and helpful user interface features, such as code completion.

  6. Meta-data based mediator generation

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlaw, T

    1998-06-28

    Mediators are a critical component of any data warehouse; they transform data from source formats to the warehouse representation while resolving semantic and syntactic conflicts. The close relationship between mediators and databases requires a mediator to be updated whenever an associated schema is modified. Failure to quickly perform these updates significantly reduces the reliability of the warehouse because queries do not have access to the most current data. This may result in incorrect or misleading responses, and reduce user confidence in the warehouse. Unfortunately, this maintenance may be a significant undertaking if a warehouse integrates several dynamic data sources. This paper describes a meta-data framework, and associated software, designed to automate a significant portion of the mediator generation task and thereby reduce the effort involved in adapting to schema changes. By allowing the DBA to concentrate on identifying the modifications at a high level, instead of reprogramming the mediator, turnaround time is reduced and warehouse reliability is improved.

  7. Kaiser Permanente's "metadata-driven" national clinical intranet.

    PubMed

    Dolin, R H; Boles, M; Dolin, R; Green, S; Hanifin, S; Hochhalter, B; Inglesis, R; Ivory, M; Levy, D; Nadspal, K; Rae, M A; Rucks, C J; Snyder, A; Stibolt, T; Stiefel, M; Travis, V

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the approach taken to build Kaiser Permanente's national clinical intranet. A primary objective for the site is to facilitate resource discovery, which is enabled by the use of "metadata", or data (fields and field values) that describe the various resources available. Users can perform full text queries and/or fielded searching against the metadata. Metadata serves as the organizing principle of the site--it is used to index documents, sort search results, and structure the site's table of contents. The site's use of metadata--what it is, how it is created, how it is applied to documents, how it is indexed, how it is presented to the user in the search and the search results interface, and how it is used to construct the table of contents for the web site--will be discussed in detail. The result is that KP's national clinical intranet has coupled the power of Internet-like full text search engines with the power of MedLine-like fielded searching in order to maximize search precision and recall. Organizing content on the site in accordance with the metadata promotes overall consistency. Issues currently under investigation include how to better exploit the power of the controlled terminology within the metadata; whether the value gained is worth the cost of collecting metadata; and how automatic classification algorithms might obviate the need for manual document indexing.

  8. Achieving interoperability for metadata registries using comparative object modeling.

    PubMed

    Park, Yu Rang; Kim, Ju Han

    2010-01-01

    Achieving data interoperability between organizations relies upon agreed meaning and representation (metadata) of data. For managing and registering metadata, many organizations have built metadata registries (MDRs) in various domains based on international standard for MDR framework, ISO/IEC 11179. Following this trend, two pubic MDRs in biomedical domain have been created, United States Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and cancer Data Standards Registry and Repository (caDSR), from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and National Cancer Institute (NCI), respectively. Most MDRs are implemented with indiscriminate extending for satisfying organization-specific needs and solving semantic and structural limitation of ISO/IEC 11179. As a result it is difficult to address interoperability among multiple MDRs. In this paper, we propose an integrated metadata object model for achieving interoperability among multiple MDRs. To evaluate this model, we developed an XML Schema Definition (XSD)-based metadata exchange format. We created an XSD-based metadata exporter, supporting both the integrated metadata object model and organization-specific MDR formats.

  9. Design and Implementation of a Metadata-rich File System

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, S; Gokhale, M B; Maltzahn, C

    2010-01-19

    Despite continual improvements in the performance and reliability of large scale file systems, the management of user-defined file system metadata has changed little in the past decade. The mismatch between the size and complexity of large scale data stores and their ability to organize and query their metadata has led to a de facto standard in which raw data is stored in traditional file systems, while related, application-specific metadata is stored in relational databases. This separation of data and semantic metadata requires considerable effort to maintain consistency and can result in complex, slow, and inflexible system operation. To address these problems, we have developed the Quasar File System (QFS), a metadata-rich file system in which files, user-defined attributes, and file relationships are all first class objects. In contrast to hierarchical file systems and relational databases, QFS defines a graph data model composed of files and their relationships. QFS incorporates Quasar, an XPATH-extended query language for searching the file system. Results from our QFS prototype show the effectiveness of this approach. Compared to the de facto standard, the QFS prototype shows superior ingest performance and comparable query performance on user metadata-intensive operations and superior performance on normal file metadata operations.

  10. Semantic Metadata for Heterogeneous Spatial Planning Documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaniak, A.; Kaczmarek, I.; Łukowicz, J.; Strzelecki, M.; Coetzee, S.; Paluszyński, W.

    2016-09-01

    Spatial planning documents contain information about the principles and rights of land use in different zones of a local authority. They are the basis for administrative decision making in support of sustainable development. In Poland these documents are published on the Web according to a prescribed non-extendable XML schema, designed for optimum presentation to humans in HTML web pages. There is no document standard, and limited functionality exists for adding references to external resources. The text in these documents is discoverable and searchable by general-purpose web search engines, but the semantics of the content cannot be discovered or queried. The spatial information in these documents is geographically referenced but not machine-readable. Major manual efforts are required to integrate such heterogeneous spatial planning documents from various local authorities for analysis, scenario planning and decision support. This article presents results of an implementation using machine-readable semantic metadata to identify relationships among regulations in the text, spatial objects in the drawings and links to external resources. A spatial planning ontology was used to annotate different sections of spatial planning documents with semantic metadata in the Resource Description Framework in Attributes (RDFa). The semantic interpretation of the content, links between document elements and links to external resources were embedded in XHTML pages. An example and use case from the spatial planning domain in Poland is presented to evaluate its efficiency and applicability. The solution enables the automated integration of spatial planning documents from multiple local authorities to assist decision makers with understanding and interpreting spatial planning information. The approach is equally applicable to legal documents from other countries and domains, such as cultural heritage and environmental management.

  11. Replication of Tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-08-04

    Tobacco mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses have served as models for studying the mechanisms of viral RNA replication. In tobamoviruses, genomic RNA replication occurs via several steps: (a) synthesis of viral replication proteins by translation of the genomic RNA; (b) translation-coupled binding of the replication proteins to a 5'-terminal region of the genomic RNA; (c) recruitment of the genomic RNA by replication proteins onto membranes and formation of a complex with host proteins TOM1 and ARL8; (d) synthesis of complementary (negative-strand) RNA in the complex; and (e) synthesis of progeny genomic RNA. This article reviews current knowledge on tobamovirus RNA replication, particularly regarding how the genomic RNA is specifically selected as a replication template and how the replication proteins are activated. We also focus on the roles of the replication proteins in evading or suppressing host defense systems.

  12. The SPM Kinematic Catalogue of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J. A.; Richer, M.; Riesgo, H.; Steffen, W.; Meaburn, J.; García-Segura, G.; Escalante, K.

    2006-06-01

    We present a progress report on the San Pedro Mártir Kinematic Catalogue of Planetary Nebulae. Both, galactic PNe from the disk, bulge and halo populations, and PNe from galaxies in the local group from a diverse range of metallicities have been observed. Most of the observations have been made with the 2.1-m SPM telescope and the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer (Meaburn et al. 2003, RevMexAA, 39, 185). The data consists of spatially resoved long slit spectra at resolutions of ˜ 10 km s^{-1}. For most galactic targets more than one slit positions has been observed. The interpretation of the 3D structures and outflows derived from the kinematic data is being performed with the aid of SHAPE (see the contributions by Steffen, López, & Escalante, Steffen & López in this symposium). This unique database of high dispersion spectra will allow a firm characterisation of nebular shell properties in relation to progenitors from diverse stellar populations.

  13. Metadata Creation, Management and Search System for your Scientific Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, R.; Palanisamy, G.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury Search Systems is a set of tools for creating, searching, and retrieving of biogeochemical metadata. Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for any metadata format, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, multi-facetted type search, search suggestions, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. Mercury's metadata editor provides a easy way for creating metadata and Mercury's search interface provides a single portal to search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use any metadata format including FGDC, ISO-19115, Dublin-Core, Darwin-Core, DIF, ECHO, and EML. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury is being used more than 14 different projects across 4 federal agencies. It was originally developed for NASA, with continuing development funded by NASA, USGS, and DOE for a consortium of projects. Mercury search won the NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Software Reuse Award in 2008. References: R. Devarakonda, G. Palanisamy, B.E. Wilson, and J.M. Green, "Mercury: reusable metadata management data discovery and access system", Earth Science Informatics, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 87-94, May 2010. R. Devarakonda, G. Palanisamy, J.M. Green, B.E. Wilson, "Data sharing and retrieval using OAI-PMH", Earth Science Informatics DOI: 10.1007/s12145-010-0073-0, (2010);

  14. The Design of Metadata for the Digital Museum Initiative in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chao-chen; Chen, Hsueh-hua; Chen, Kuang-hua; Hsiang, Jieh

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the development of metadata in Taiwan. Describes the development process of a Chinese metadata system, Metadata Interchange for Chinese Information (MICI), and an XML/metadata management system, Metalogy, both of which were developed under the Digital Museum Initiative sponsored by the National Science Council of…

  15. Forum Guide to Metadata: The Meaning behind Education Data. NFES 2009-805

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to empower people to more effectively use data as information. To accomplish this, the publication explains what metadata are; why metadata are critical to the development of sound education data systems; what components comprise a metadata system; what value metadata bring to data management and use; and how to…

  16. The Design of Metadata for the Digital Museum Initiative in Taiwan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chao-chen; Chen, Hsueh-hua; Chen, Kuang-hua; Hsiang, Jieh

    2002-01-01

    Discusses issues related to the development of metadata in Taiwan. Describes the development process of a Chinese metadata system, Metadata Interchange for Chinese Information (MICI), and an XML/metadata management system, Metalogy, both of which were developed under the Digital Museum Initiative sponsored by the National Science Council of…

  17. Improving Metadata Compliance for Earth Science Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Chang, O.; Foster, D.

    2014-12-01

    One of the recurring challenges of creating earth science data records is to ensure a consistent level of metadata compliance at the granule level where important details of contents, provenance, producer, and data references are necessary to obtain a sufficient level of understanding. These details are important not just for individual data consumers but also for autonomous software systems. Two of the most popular metadata standards at the granule level are the Climate and Forecast (CF) Metadata Conventions and the Attribute Conventions for Dataset Discovery (ACDD). Many data producers have implemented one or both of these models including the Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) for their global SST products and the Ocean Biology Processing Group for NASA ocean color and SST products. While both the CF and ACDD models contain various level of metadata richness, the actual "required" attributes are quite small in number. Metadata at the granule level becomes much more useful when recommended or optional attributes are implemented that document spatial and temporal ranges, lineage and provenance, sources, keywords, and references etc. In this presentation we report on a new open source tool to check the compliance of netCDF and HDF5 granules to the CF and ACCD metadata models. The tool, written in Python, was originally implemented to support metadata compliance for netCDF records as part of the NOAA's Integrated Ocean Observing System. It outputs standardized scoring for metadata compliance for both CF and ACDD, produces an objective summary weight, and can be implemented for remote records via OPeNDAP calls. Originally a command-line tool, we have extended it to provide a user-friendly web interface. Reports on metadata testing are grouped in hierarchies that make it easier to track flaws and inconsistencies in the record. We have also extended it to support explicit metadata structures and semantic syntax for the GHRSST project that can be

  18. Publishing NASA Metadata as Linked Open Data for Semantic Mashups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manipon, G. M.; Wilson, B. D.; Hua, H.

    2013-12-01

    Data providers are now publishing more metadata in more interoperable forms, e.g. Atom/RSS ';casts', as Linked Open Data (LOD), or as ISO Metadata records. A major effort on the part of the NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project is the aggregation of metadata that enables greater data interoperability among scientific data sets regardless of source or application. Both the Earth Observing System (EOS) ClearingHOuse (ECHO) and the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) repositories contain metadata records for NASA (and other) datasets and provided services. These records contain typical fields for each dataset (or software service) such as the source, creation date, cognizant institution, related access URL's, and domain & variable keywords to enable discovery. Under a NASA ACCESS grant, we demonstrated how to publish the ECHO and GCMD dataset and services metadata as LOD in the RDF format. Both sets of metadata are now queryable at SPARQL endpoints and available for integration into 'semantic mashups' in the browser. It is straightforward to transform sets of XML metadata, including ISO 19139, into simple RDF and then later refine and improve the RDF predicates by reusing known namespaces such as Dublin Core, GeoRSS, etc. All scientific metadata should be part of the LOD world. In addition, we developed an 'instant' drill-down and browse interface that provides faceted navigation so that the user can discover and explore the 25,000 datasets and 3000 services. Figure 1 shows the first version of the interface for 'instant drill down' into the ECHO datasets. The available facets and the free-text search box appear in the left panel, and the instantly updated results for the dataset search appear in the right panel. The user can constrain the value of a metadata facet simply by clicking on a word (or phrase) in the 'word cloud' of values for each facet. The display section for each dataset includes the important metadata fields, a full

  19. Publishing NASA Metadata as Linked Open Data for Semantic Mashups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brian; Manipon, Gerald; Hua, Hook

    2014-05-01

    Data providers are now publishing more metadata in more interoperable forms, e.g. Atom or RSS 'casts', as Linked Open Data (LOD), or as ISO Metadata records. A major effort on the part of the NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project is the aggregation of metadata that enables greater data interoperability among scientific data sets regardless of source or application. Both the Earth Observing System (EOS) ClearingHOuse (ECHO) and the Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) repositories contain metadata records for NASA (and other) datasets and provided services. These records contain typical fields for each dataset (or software service) such as the source, creation date, cognizant institution, related access URL's, and domain and variable keywords to enable discovery. Under a NASA ACCESS grant, we demonstrated how to publish the ECHO and GCMD dataset and services metadata as LOD in the RDF format. Both sets of metadata are now queryable at SPARQL endpoints and available for integration into "semantic mashups" in the browser. It is straightforward to reformat sets of XML metadata, including ISO, into simple RDF and then later refine and improve the RDF predicates by reusing known namespaces such as Dublin core, georss, etc. All scientific metadata should be part of the LOD world. In addition, we developed an "instant" drill-down and browse interface that provides faceted navigation so that the user can discover and explore the 25,000 datasets and 3000 services. The available facets and the free-text search box appear in the left panel, and the instantly updated results for the dataset search appear in the right panel. The user can constrain the value of a metadata facet simply by clicking on a word (or phrase) in the "word cloud" of values for each facet. The display section for each dataset includes the important metadata fields, a full description of the dataset, potentially some related URL's, and a "search" button that points to an Open

  20. Metadata Evaluation and Improvement: Evolving Analysis and Reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habermann, Ted; Kozimor, John; Gordon, Sean

    2017-01-01

    ESIP Community members create and manage a large collection of environmental datasets that span multiple decades, the entire globe, and many parts of the solar system. Metadata are critical for discovering, accessing, using and understanding these data effectively and ESIP community members have successfully created large collections of metadata describing these data. As part of the White House Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI), ESDIS has developed a suite of tools for evaluating these metadata in native dialects with respect to recommendations from many organizations. We will describe those tools and demonstrate evolving techniques for sharing results with data providers.

  1. The Liverpool-Edinburgh high proper motion catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R. S.; Jones, H. R. A.; Hambly, N. C.; Pinfield, D. J.

    2004-07-01

    We present a machine selected catalogue of 11 289 objects with proper motions exceeding 0.18 arcsec yr-1 and an R-band faint magnitude limit of 19.5 mag. The catalogue was produced using SuperCOSMOS digitized R-Band ESO and UK Schmidt Plates in 287 Schmidt fields covering almost 7000 square degrees (˜17% of the whole sky) at the South Galactic Cap. The catalogue includes UK Schmidt BJ and I magnitudes for all of the stars as well as 2MASS magnitudes for 10,447 of the catalogue stars. We also show that the NLTT is ˜95% complete for Dec > -32.5°. The full Table \\ref{tab1} is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/421/763

  2. The Astrographic Catalogue and the Carte du Ciel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaschek, C.

    1985-11-01

    Answers to a circular letter concerning the Astrographic Catalogue and the Carte du Ciel from Alger (A. Ghezloun), Catania (C. Blanco), Cordoba (G. Carranza), Greenwich (P. J. Andrews), Paris (J. Delhaye), Sydney (A. E. Vaughan), Toulouse (R. Nadal).

  3. Uccle Carte du Ciel Plate Catalogue Present in the WFPDB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, Katya; Tsvetkov, Milcho; Lampens, Patricia; Duval, David

    2007-08-01

    We present the catalogue of the Carte du Ciel plates collected at the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB) and incorporated in the Wide-Field Plate Database. The catalogue comprises the descriptive information for 682 plates obtained with the Gautier 0.33-m equatorial telescope in the framework of the Carte du Ciel project in the period 1908-1939. The plates were taken using triple exposures with duration of 15 to 30 minutes. An analysis of the ROB CdC catalogue's content is presented. The catalogue, as well as the plate previews taken with a flatbed scanner AGFA (model DUOSCAN HiD) with a resolution of 250 dpi in TIFF format (of size 2.5 MB), are available on-line at http://www.skyarchive.org/.

  4. An All-Sky Portable (ASP) Optical Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, Eric Wim

    2017-06-01

    This optical catalogue combines the all-sky USNO-B1.0/A1.0 and most-sky APM catalogues, plus overlays of SDSS optical data, into a single all-sky map presented in a sparse binary format that is easily downloaded at 9 Gb zipped. Total count is 1 163 237 190 sources and each has J2000 astrometry, red and blue magnitudes with PSFs and variability indicator, and flags for proper motion, epoch, and source survey and catalogue for each of the photometry and astrometry. The catalogue is available on http://quasars.org/asp.html, and additional data for this paper is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.4225/50/5807fbc12595f.

  5. Reduction of micrometer cometary observations to the PPM star catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabryszewski, Ryszard

    1997-12-01

    An adaptation of Bielicki's method of reduction of old cometary micrometer observations of the comet-minus-star type to the PPM star catalogue is presented. A fully automatic utility is described which reduces old positions of stars to the coordinates in the PPM star catalogue for comet-minus-star astrometric observations. The reduction clears observations from systematic errors in old catalogues and decreases the mean error of observations. That may have implications for orbit improvement. The utility predicts new positions of stars in the PPM catalogue as needed and can also restore observations which have been previously rejected due to a selection criterion. It helps to get all data in one, coherent reference frame with maximum possible precision when there are lots of old and new observations of the same object. As an illustration, results of application of the utility to observations of comets 122P/de Vico and 109P/Swift-Tuttle are presented.

  6. Philosophy and updating of the asteroid photometric catalogue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, Per; Barucci, M. Antonietta; Capria, M. T.; Dahlgren, Mats; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Lagerkvist, C. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Asteroid Photometric Catalogue now contains photometric lightcurves for 584 asteroids. We discuss some of the guiding principles behind it. This concerns both observers who offer input to it and users of the product.

  7. A lightcone catalogue from the Millennium-XXL simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alex; Cole, Shaun; Baugh, Carlton; Zheng, Zheng; Angulo, Raúl; Norberg, Peder; Zehavi, Idit

    2017-10-01

    Future galaxy surveys require realistic mock catalogues to understand and quantify systematics in order to make precise cosmological measurements. We present a halo lightcone catalogue and halo occupation distribution (HOD) galaxy catalogue built using the Millennium-XXL simulation. The halo catalogue covers the full sky, extending to z = 2.2 with a mass resolution of ˜1011 h-1 M⊙. We use this to build a galaxy catalogue, which has an r-band magnitude limit of r < 20.0, with a median redshift of z ˜ 0.2. A Monte Carlo HOD method is used to assign galaxies to the halo lightcone catalogue, and we evolve the HODs to reproduce a target luminosity function; by construction, the luminosity function of galaxies in the mock is in agreement with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) at low redshifts and the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey at high redshifts. A Monte Carlo method is used to assign a 0.1(g - r) colour to each galaxy, and the colour distribution of galaxies at different redshifts agrees with measurements from GAMA. The clustering of galaxies in the mock for galaxies in different magnitude and redshift bins is in good agreement with measurements from SDSS and GAMA, and the colour-dependent clustering is in reasonable agreement. We show that the baryon acoustic oscillation can be measured in the mock catalogue, and the redshift-space distortions are in agreement with measurements from SDSS illustrating that this catalogue will be useful for upcoming surveys.

  8. Minimization of biases in galaxy peculiar velocity catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Jenny G.

    2015-07-01

    Galaxy distances and derived radial peculiar velocity catalogues constitute valuable data sets to study the dynamics of the Local Universe. However, such catalogues suffer from biases whose effects increase with the distance. Malmquist biases and lognormal error distribution affect the catalogues. Velocity fields of the Local Universe reconstructed with these catalogues present a spurious overall infall on to the Local Volume if they are not corrected for biases. Such an infall is observed in the reconstructed velocity field obtained when applying the Bayesian Wiener-Filter technique to the raw second radial peculiar velocity catalogue of the Cosmicflows project. In this paper, an iterative method to reduce spurious non-Gaussianities in the radial peculiar velocity distribution, to retroactively derive overall better distance estimates resulting in a minimization of the effects of biases, is presented. This method is tested with mock catalogues. To control the cosmic variance, mocks are built out of different cosmological constrained simulations which resemble the Local Universe. To realistically reproduce the effects of biases, the mocks are constructed to be lookalikes of the second data release of the Cosmicflows project, with respect to the size, distribution of data and distribution of errors. Using a suite of mock catalogues, the outcome of the correction is verified to be affected neither by the added error realization, nor by the data point selection, nor by the constrained simulation. Results are similar for the different tested mocks. After correction, the general infall is satisfactorily suppressed. The method allows us to obtain catalogues which together with the Wiener-Filter technique give reconstructions approximating non-biased velocity fields at 100-150 km s-1 (2-3 h-1 Mpc in terms of linear displacement), the linear theory threshold.

  9. EBM metadata based on Dublin Core better presenting validity of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Okada, Mihoko

    2007-10-01

    To help clinicians find better evidence, a metadata schema for Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is developed. Dublin Core metadata standard (DC) was adopted to help build a metadata schema. An experimental system was developed to test the validity of the metadata and full text papers of clinical therapy on stomach ulcer extracted using PubMed. An EBM metadata schema was developed. Citations were created from original papers using the metadata schema. Three clinicians evaluated papers by utilizing metadata and full texts respectively. Agreement of evaluation was analyzed, and the result on weighted kappa was 0.55 (95% CI, 0.42-0.67). It reveals that there is moderate agreement between evaluation of metadata citations and full texts. It is possible to use the metadata to select papers before reading the full texts. A further study should be made to prove the applicability of the metadata in the real world setting.

  10. An algorithm to build mock galaxy catalogues using MICE simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Gaztañaga, E.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.

    2015-02-01

    We present a method to build mock galaxy catalogues starting from a halo catalogue that uses halo occupation distribution (HOD) recipes as well as the subhalo abundance matching (SHAM) technique. Combining both prescriptions we are able to push the absolute magnitude of the resulting catalogue to fainter luminosities than using just the SHAM technique and can interpret our results in terms of the HOD modelling. We optimize the method by populating with galaxies friends-of-friends dark matter haloes extracted from the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai dark matter simulations and comparing them to observational constraints. Our resulting mock galaxy catalogues manage to reproduce the observed local galaxy luminosity function and the colour-magnitude distribution as observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. They also reproduce the observed galaxy clustering properties as a function of luminosity and colour. In order to achieve that, the algorithm also includes scatter in the halo mass-galaxy luminosity relation derived from direct SHAM and a modified Navarro-Frenk-White mass density profile to place satellite galaxies in their host dark matter haloes. Improving on general usage of the HOD that fits the clustering for given magnitude limited samples, our catalogues are constructed to fit observations at all luminosities considered and therefore for any luminosity subsample. Overall, our algorithm is an economic procedure of obtaining galaxy mock catalogues down to faint magnitudes that are necessary to understand and interpret galaxy surveys.

  11. Reviving legacy clay mineralogy data and metadata through the IEDA-CCNY Data Internship Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, R. V.; Randel, C.; Ismail, A.; Block, K. A.; Cai, Y.; Carter, M.; Hemming, S. R.; Lehnert, K.

    2016-12-01

    Reconstruction of past climate and ocean circulation using ocean sediment cores relies on the use of multiple climate proxies measured on well-studied cores. Preserving all the information collected on a sediment core is crucial for the success of future studies using these unique and important samples. Clay mineralogy is a powerful tool to study weathering processes and sedimentary provenance. In his pioneering dissertation, Pierre Biscaye (1964, Yale University) established the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) method for quantitative clay mineralogy analyses in ocean sediments and presented data for 500 core-top samples throughout the Atlantic Ocean and its neighboring seas. Unfortunately, the data only exists in analog format, which has discouraged scientists from reusing the data, apart from replication of the published maps. Archiving and preserving this dataset and making it publicly available in a digital format, linked with the metadata from the core repository will allow the scientific community to use these data to generate new findings. Under the supervision of Sidney Hemming and members of the Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance (IEDA) team, IEDA-CCNY interns digitized the data and metadata from Biscaye's dissertation and linked them with additional sample metadata using IGSN (International Geo-Sample Number). After compilation and proper documentation of the dataset, it was published in the EarthChem Library where the dataset will be openly accessible, and citable with a persistent DOI (Digital Object Identifier). During this internship, the students read peer-reviewed articles, interacted with active scientists in the field and acquired knowledge about XRD methods and the data generated, as well as its applications. They also learned about existing and emerging best practices in data publication and preservation. Data rescue projects are a fun and interactive way for students to become engaged in the field.

  12. HELCATS - Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard; Davies, Jackie; Perry, Chris; Moestl, Christian; Rouillard, Alexis; Bothmer, Volker; Rodriguez, Luciano; Eastwood, Jonathan; Kilpua, Emilia; Gallagher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the evolution of the solar wind is fundamental to advancing our knowledge of energy and mass transport in the solar system, rendering it crucial to space weather and its prediction. The advent of truly wide-angle heliospheric imaging has revolutionised the study of both transient (CMEs) and background (SIRs/CIRs) solar wind plasma structures, by enabling their direct and continuous observation out to 1 AU and beyond. The EU-funded FP7 HELCATS project combines European expertise in heliospheric imaging, built up in particular through lead involvement in NASA's STEREO mission, with expertise in solar and coronal imaging as well as in-situ and radio measurements of solar wind phenomena, in a programme of work that will enable a much wider exploitation and understanding of heliospheric imaging observations. With HELCATS, we are (1.) cataloguing transient and background solar wind structures imaged in the heliosphere by STEREO/HI, since launch in late October 2006 to date, including estimates of their kinematic properties based on a variety of established techniques and more speculative, approaches; (2.) evaluating these kinematic properties, and thereby the validity of these techniques, through comparison with solar source observations and in-situ measurements made at multiple points throughout the heliosphere; (3.) appraising the potential for initialising advanced numerical models based on these kinematic properties; (4.) assessing the complementarity of radio observations (in particular of Type II radio bursts and interplanetary scintillation) in combination with heliospheric imagery. We will, in this presentation, provide an overview of progress from the first 18 months of the HELCATS project.

  13. The star catalogues of Ptolemaios and Ulugh Beg. Machine-readable versions and comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2012-08-01

    In late antiquity and throughout the middle ages, the positions of stars on the celestial sphere were obtained from the star catalogue of Ptolemaios. A catalogue based on new measurements appeared in 1437, with positions by Ulugh Beg, and magnitudes from the 10th-century astronomer al-Sufi. We provide machine-readable versions of these two star catalogues, based on the editions by Toomer (1998, Ptolemy's Almagest, 2nd edn.) and Knobel (1917, Ulugh Beg's catalogue of stars), and determine their accuracies by comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue. The magnitudes in the catalogues correlate well with modern visual magnitudes; the indication "faint" by Ptolemaios is found to correspond to his magnitudes 5 and 6. Gaussian fits to the error distributions in longitude/latitude give widths σ ≃ 27'/23' in the range |Δλ,Δβ| < 50' for Ptolemaios and σ ≃ 22'/18' in Ulugh Beg. Fits to the range |Δλ,Δβ| < 100' gives 10-15% larger widths, showing that the error distributions are broader than Gaussians. The fraction of stars with positions wrong by more than 150' is about 2% for Ptolemaios and 0.1% in Ulugh Beg; the numbers of unidentified stars are 1 in Ptolemaios and 3 in Ulugh Beg. These numbers testify to the excellent quality of both star catalogues (as edited by Toomer and Knobel). Machine-readable catalogues are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/544/A31

  14. Web Standard: PDF - When to Use, Document Metadata, PDF Sections

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PDF files provide some benefits when used appropriately. PDF files should not be used for short documents ( 5 pages) unless retaining the format for printing is important. PDFs should have internal file metadata and meet section 508 standards.

  15. Metadata and Service at the GFZ ISDC Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritschel, B.

    2008-05-01

    The online service portal of the GFZ Potsdam Information System and Data Center (ISDC) is an access point for all manner of geoscientific geodata, its corresponding metadata, scientific documentation and software tools. At present almost 2000 national and international users and user groups have the opportunity to request Earth science data from a portfolio of 275 different products types and more than 20 Million single data files with an added volume of approximately 12 TByte. The majority of the data and information, the portal currently offers to the public, are global geomonitoring products such as satellite orbit and Earth gravity field data as well as geomagnetic and atmospheric data for the exploration. These products for Earths changing system are provided via state-of-the art retrieval techniques. The data product catalog system behind these techniques is based on the extensive usage of standardized metadata, which are describing the different geoscientific product types and data products in an uniform way. Where as all ISDC product types are specified by NASA's Directory Interchange Format (DIF), Version 9.0 Parent XML DIF metadata files, the individual data files are described by extended DIF metadata documents. Depending on the beginning of the scientific project, one part of data files are described by extended DIF, Version 6 metadata documents and the other part are specified by data Child XML DIF metadata documents. Both, the product type dependent parent DIF metadata documents and the data file dependent child DIF metadata documents are derived from a base-DIF.xsd xml schema file. The ISDC metadata philosophy defines a geoscientific product as a package consisting of mostly one or sometimes more than one data file plus one extended DIF metadata file. Because NASA's DIF metadata standard has been developed in order to specify a collection of data only, the extension of the DIF standard consists of new and specific attributes, which are necessary for

  16. Distributed metadata in a high performance computing environment

    DOEpatents

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Zhang, Zhenhua; Liu, Xuezhao; Tang, Haiying

    2017-07-11

    A computer-executable method, system, and computer program product for managing meta-data in a distributed storage system, wherein the distributed storage system includes one or more burst buffers enabled to operate with a distributed key-value store, the co computer-executable method, system, and computer program product comprising receiving a request for meta-data associated with a block of data stored in a first burst buffer of the one or more burst buffers in the distributed storage system, wherein the meta data is associated with a key-value, determining which of the one or more burst buffers stores the requested metadata, and upon determination that a first burst buffer of the one or more burst buffers stores the requested metadata, locating the key-value in a portion of the distributed key-value store accessible from the first burst buffer.

  17. Precision Pointing Reconstruction and Geometric Metadata Generation for Cassini Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, R. S.; Showalter, M. R.; Gordon, M. K.

    2017-06-01

    We are reconstructing accurate pointing for 400,000 images taken by Cassini at Saturn. The results will be provided to the public along with per-pixel metadata describing precise image contents such as geographical location and viewing geometry.

  18. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Massive Meta-Data: A New Data Mining Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, W.

    2012-04-01

    Worldwide standardisation, and interoperability initiatives such as GBIF, Open Access and GEOSS (to name but three of many) have led to the emergence of interlinked and overlapping meta-data repositories containing, potentially, tens of millions of entries collectively. This forms the backbone of an emerging global scientific data infrastructure that is both driven by changes in the way we work, and opens up new possibilities in management, research, and collaboration. Several initiatives are concentrated on building a generalised, shared, easily available, scalable, and indefinitely preserved scientific data infrastructure to aid future scientific work. This paper deals with the parallel aspect of the meta-data that will be used to support the global scientific data infrastructure. There are obvious practical issues (semantic interoperability and speed of discovery being the most important), but we are here more concerned with some of the less obvious conceptual questions and opportunities: 1. Can we use meta-data to assess, pinpoint, and reduce duplication of meta-data? 2. Can we use it to reduce overlaps of mandates in data portals, research collaborations, and research networks? 3. What possibilities exist for mining the relationships that exist implicitly in very large meta-data collections? 4. Is it possible to define an explicit 'scientific data infrastructure' as a complex, multi-relational network database, that can become self-maintaining and self-organising in true Web 2.0 and 'social networking' fashion? The paper provides a blueprint for a new approach to massive meta-data collections, and how this can be processed using established analysis techniques to answer the questions posed. It assesses the practical implications of working with standard meta-data definitions (such as ISO 19115, Dublin Core, and EML) in a meta-data mining context, and makes recommendations in respect of extension to support self-organising, semantically oriented 'networks of

  20. Metadata Requirements in a Multi-Layered Networked Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-16

    ment of the asset’s applicability of use. The DDMS has become very well aligned with the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative ( DCMI ) [12] specification...with extensions beyond the DCMI to address the particular business needs of the US DOD. As an example of the ex- tensions, the DCMI element...controlled via appropriate security meta- data. The DCMI and DDMS both represent controlled structures to be used for transfer of metadata. However, it is

  1. hFits: From Storing Metadata to Publishing ESO Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vera, I.; Dobrzycki, A.; Vuong, M.; Da Rocha, C.

    2012-09-01

    The ESO Archive holds ca. 20 million FITS files: raw observations taken at the La Silla Paranal Observatory in Chile, data from APEX and UKIRT(WFCAM) telescopes, pipeline-processed data generated by the Quality Control and Data Processing Group in ESO Garching and, since recently, reduced data delivered by the PI's through the ESO Phase 3 infrastructure. A metadata repository has been developed at the ESO Archive (Dobrzycki et al. 2007), (Vera et al. 2011), to hold all the FITS file headers with up-to-date information using data warehouse technology. Presently, the repository contains more that 10 billion keywords from headers of all ESO FITS files. We have added to the repository a mechanism for keeping track of header ingestion and modification, allowing to build incremental applications on top of it. The aim is to provide a framework allowing for creation of fast and good quality metadata query services. We present hFits, a tool for data publishing allowing for metadata enhancement. The tool reads from the metadata repository and inserts the metadata into the conventional relational database systems using a simple configuration framework. It utilises the metadata repository tracking mechanism to incrementally refresh the services and transparently propagate any metadata updates. It supports the use of user defined functions where, for example, WCS coordinates can be calculated or related metadata can be extracted from other information systems, and for each new header file it provides to the archived file the access attributes following ESO data access policy, publishing the data to the community.

  2. The importance of metrological metadata in the environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Márcio A. A.; Guimarães, Patrícia L. O.; Almêida, Eugênio S.; Eklin, Tero

    2016-07-01

    The metrological metadata propagation contributes significantly to improve the data analysis of the meteorological observation systems. An overview of the scenarios data and metadata treatment in environmental monitoring is presented in this article. We also discussed the ways of use of the calibration results on the meteorological measurement systems as well as the convergence of the methods used in the corrections treatment and estimation of the measuring uncertainty in metrological and meteorological areas.

  3. Surviving the Transition from FGDC to ISO Metadata Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, C. G.; Milan, A.; Sylvester, D.; Habermann, T.; Kozimor, J.; Froehlich, D.

    2008-12-01

    The NOAA Metadata Manager and Repository (NMMR) has served a well established group of data managers at NOAA's National Data Centers for over a decade. It provides a web interface for managing FGDC compliant metadata and publishing that metadata to several large data discovery systems (GeoSpatial One-Stop, NASA's Global Change Master Directory, the Comprehensive Large-Array data Stewardship System, and FirstGov). The Data Center's are now faced with migration of these metadata to new International Metadata Standards (ISO 19115, 19115-2, "). We would like to accomplish this migration while minimizing disruption to the current users and supporting significant new capabilities of the ISO standards. Our current approach involves relational ISO views on top of the existing XML database to convert FGDC content into ISO without changing the data manager interface. These views are the foundation for ISO- compliant XML metadata access via REST-like web services. Additionally, new database tables provide information required by ISO that is not included in the FGDC standard. This approach allows us to support the new standard without disrupting the current system.

  4. Maximum likelihood random galaxy catalogues and luminosity function estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Shaun

    2011-09-01

    We present a new algorithm to generate a random (unclustered) version of an magnitude limited observational galaxy redshift catalogue. It takes into account both galaxy evolution and the perturbing effects of large-scale structure. The key to the algorithm is a maximum likelihood (ML) method for jointly estimating both the luminosity function (LF) and the overdensity as a function of redshift. The random catalogue algorithm then works by cloning each galaxy in the original catalogue, with the number of clones determined by the ML solution. Each of these cloned galaxies is then assigned a random redshift uniformly distributed over the accessible survey volume, taking account of the survey magnitude limit(s) and, optionally, both luminosity and number density evolution. The resulting random catalogues, which can be employed in traditional estimates of galaxy clustering, make fuller use of the information available in the original catalogue and hence are superior to simply fitting a functional form to the observed redshift distribution. They are particularly well suited to studies of the dependence of galaxy clustering on galaxy properties as each galaxy in the random catalogue has the same list of attributes as measured for the galaxies in the genuine catalogue. The derivation of the joint overdensity and LF estimator reveals the limit in which the ML estimate reduces to the standard 1/Vmax LF estimate, namely when one makes the prior assumption that the are no fluctuations in the radial overdensity. The new ML estimator can be viewed as a generalization of the 1/Vmax estimate in which Vmax is replaced by a density corrected Vdc, max.

  5. A prototype catalogue: DOE National Laboratory technologies for infrastructure modernization

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, J.W.; Wilfert, G.L.; March, F.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) with information about selected technologies under development in the Department of Energy (DOE) through its National Laboratory System and its Program Office operations. The technologies selected are those that have the potential to improve the performance of the nation's public works infrastructure. The product is a relational database that we refer to as a prototype catalogue of technologies.'' The catalogue contains over 100 entries of DOE-supported technologies having potential application to infrastructure-related problems. The work involved conceptualizing an approach, developing a framework for organizing technology information, and collecting samples of readily available data to be put into a prototype catalogue. In developing the catalogue, our objectives were to demonstrate the concept and provide readily available information to OTA. As such, the catalogue represents a preliminary product. The existing database is not exhaustive and likely represents only a fraction of relevant technologies developed by DOE. In addition, the taxonomy we used to classify technologies is based on the judgment of project staff and has received minimal review by individuals who have been involved in the development and testing of the technologies. Finally, end users will likely identify framework changes and additions that will strengthen the catalogue approach. The framework for the catalogue includes four components: a description of the technology, along with potential uses and other pertinent information; identification of the source of the descriptive information; identification of a person or group knowledgeable about the technology; and a classification of the described technology in terms of its type, application, life-cycle use, function, and readiness.

  6. Evolving Metadata in NASA Earth Science Data Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A.; Cechini, M. F.; Walter, J.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a coordinated series of satellites for long term global observations. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research by providing end-to-end services from EOS instrument data collection to science data processing to full access to EOS and other earth science data. On a daily basis, the EOSDIS ingests, processes, archives and distributes over 3 terabytes of data from NASA's Earth Science missions representing over 3500 data products ranging from various types of science disciplines. EOSDIS is currently comprised of 12 discipline specific data centers that are collocated with centers of science discipline expertise. Metadata is used in all aspects of NASA's Earth Science data lifecycle from the initial measurement gathering to the accessing of data products. Missions use metadata in their science data products when describing information such as the instrument/sensor, operational plan, and geographically region. Acting as the curator of the data products, data centers employ metadata for preservation, access and manipulation of data. EOSDIS provides a centralized metadata repository called the Earth Observing System (EOS) ClearingHouse (ECHO) for data discovery and access via a service-oriented-architecture (SOA) between data centers and science data users. ECHO receives inventory metadata from data centers who generate metadata files that complies with the ECHO Metadata Model. NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project established a Tiger Team to study and make recommendations regarding the adoption of the international metadata standard ISO 19115 in EOSDIS. The result was a technical report recommending an evolution of NASA data systems towards a consistent application of ISO 19115 and related standards including the creation of a NASA-specific convention for core ISO 19115 elements. Part of

  7. Automated metadata--final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Schissel, David

    2016-04-01

    This report summarizes the work of the Automated Metadata, Provenance Cataloging, and Navigable Interfaces: Ensuring the Usefulness of Extreme-Scale Data Project (MPO Project) funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Offices of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Fusion Energy Sciences. Initially funded for three years starting in 2012, it was extended for 6 months with additional funding. The project was a collaboration between scientists at General Atomics, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible, and extended or created new capabilities where required. The MPO project was able to successfully create a suite of software tools that can be used by a scientific community to automatically document their scientific workflows. These tools were integrated into workflows for fusion energy and climate research illustrating the general applicability of the project’s toolkit. Feedback was very positive on the project’s toolkit and the value of such automatic workflow documentation to the scientific endeavor.

  8. Better Living Through Metadata: Examining Archive Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.; Winkelman, S.; Rots, A.

    2013-10-01

    The primary purpose of an observatory's archive is to provide access to the data through various interfaces. User interactions with the archive are recorded in server logs, which can be used to answer basic questions like: Who has downloaded dataset X? When did she do this? Which tools did she use? The answers to questions like these fill in patterns of data access (e.g., how many times dataset X has been downloaded in the past three years). Analysis of server logs provides metrics of archive usage and provides feedback on interface use which can be used to guide future interface development. The Chandra X-ray Observatory is fortunate in that a database to track data access and downloads has been continuously recording such transactions for years; however, it is overdue for an update. We will detail changes we hope to effect and the differences the changes may make to our usage metadata picture. We plan to gather more information about the geographic location of users without compromising privacy; create improved archive statistics; and track and assess the impact of web “crawlers” and other scripted access methods on the archive. With the improvements to our download tracking we hope to gain a better understanding of the dissemination of Chandra's data; how effectively it is being done; and perhaps discover ideas for new services.

  9. Biases in cometary catalogues and Planet X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, J.; Evans, N. W.

    2002-09-01

    catalogues.

  10. Identifying and relating biological concepts in the Catalogue of Life

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this paper we describe our experience of adding globally unique identifiers to the Species 2000 and ITIS Catalogue of Life, an on-line index of organisms which is intended, ultimately, to cover all the world's known species. The scientific species names held in the Catalogue are names that already play an extensive role as terms in the organisation of information about living organisms in bioinformatics and other domains, but the effectiveness of their use is hindered by variation in individuals' opinions and understanding of these terms; indeed, in some cases more than one name will have been used to refer to the same organism. This means that it is desirable to be able to give unique labels to each of these differing concepts within the catalogue and to be able to determine which concepts are being used in other systems, in order that they can be associated with the concepts in the catalogue. Not only is this needed, but it is also necessary to know the relationships between alternative concepts that scientists might have employed, as these determine what can be inferred when data associated with related concepts is being processed. A further complication is that the catalogue itself is evolving as scientific opinion changes due to an increasing understanding of life. Results We describe how we are using Life Science Identifiers (LSIDs) as globally unique identifiers in the Catalogue of Life, explaining how the mapping to species concepts is performed, how concepts are associated with specific editions of the catalogue, and how the Taxon Concept Schema has been adopted in order to express information about concepts and their relationships. We explore the implications of using globally unique identifiers in order to refer to abstract concepts such as species, which incorporate at least a measure of subjectivity in their definition, in contrast with the more traditional use of such identifiers to refer to more tangible entities, events, documents

  11. A catalogue of AKARI FIS BSC extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Toth, L. Viktor; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos

    2015-08-01

    We combined photometric data of about 70 thousand point sources from the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor Bright Source Catalogue with AllWISE catalogue data to identify galaxies. We used Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) to classify our sources. The classification was based on a 6D parameter space that contained AKARI [F65/F90], [F90/F140], [F140/F160] and WISE W1-W2 colours along with WISE W1 magnitudes and AKARI [F140] flux values. Sources were classified into 3 main objects types: YSO candidates, evolved stars and galaxies. The training samples were SIMBAD entries of the input point sources wherever an associated SIMBAD object was found within a 30 arcsecond search radius. The QDA resulted more than 5000 AKARI galaxy candidate sources. The selection was tested cross-correlating our AKARI extragalactic catalogue with the Revised IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (RIFSCz). A very good match was found. A further classification attempt was also made to differentiate between extragalactic subtypes using Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The results of the various methods showed that we can confidently separate cirrus dominated objects (type 1 of RIFSCz). Some of our “galaxy candidate” sources are associated with 2MASS extended objects, and listed in the NASA Extragalactic Database so far without clear proofs of their extragalactic nature. Examples will be presented in our poster. Finally other AKARI extragalactic catalogues will be also compared to our statistical selection.

  12. Catalogue of knowledge and skills for sleep medicine.

    PubMed

    Penzel, Thomas; Pevernagie, Dirk; Dogas, Zoran; Grote, Ludger; de Lacy, Simone; Rodenbeck, Andrea; Bassetti, Claudio; Berg, Søren; Cirignotta, Fabio; d'Ortho, Marie-Pia; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Levy, Patrick; Nobili, Lino; Paiva, Teresa; Peigneux, Philippe; Pollmächer, Thomas; Riemann, Dieter; Skene, Debra J; Zucconi, Marco; Espie, Colin

    2014-04-01

    Sleep medicine is evolving globally into a medical subspeciality in its own right, and in parallel, behavioural sleep medicine and sleep technology are expanding rapidly. Educational programmes are being implemented at different levels in many European countries. However, these programmes would benefit from a common, interdisciplinary curriculum. This 'catalogue of knowledge and skills' for sleep medicine is proposed, therefore, as a template for developing more standardized curricula across Europe. The Board and The Sleep Medicine Committee of the European Sleep Research Society (ESRS) have compiled the catalogue based on textbooks, standard of practice publications, systematic reviews and professional experience, validated subsequently by an online survey completed by 110 delegates specialized in sleep medicine from different European countries. The catalogue comprises 10 chapters covering physiology, pathology, diagnostic and treatment procedures to societal and organizational aspects of sleep medicine. Required levels of knowledge and skills are defined, as is a proposed workload of 60 points according to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). The catalogue is intended to be a basis for sleep medicine education, for sleep medicine courses and for sleep medicine examinations, serving not only physicians with a medical speciality degree, but also PhD and MSc health professionals such as clinical psychologists and scientists, technologists and nurses, all of whom may be involved professionally in sleep medicine. In the future, the catalogue will be revised in accordance with advances in the field of sleep medicine. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  13. Catalogue of Exoplanets in Multiple-Star-Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Bazsó, Ákos; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2017-07-01

    Cataloguing the data of exoplanetary systems becomes more and more important, due to the fact that they conclude the observations and support the theoretical studies. Since 1995 there is a database which list most of the known exoplanets (The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia is available at http://exoplanet.eu/ and described at Schneider et al. 2011). With the growing number of detected exoplanets in binary and multiple star systems it became more important to mark and to separate them into a new database. Therefore we started to compile a catalogue for binary and multiple star systems. Since 2013 the catalogue can be found at http://www.univie.ac.at/adg/schwarz/multiple.html (description can be found at Schwarz et al. 2016) which will be updated regularly and is linked to the Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia. The data of the binary catalogue can be downloaded as a file (.csv) and used for statistical purposes. Our database is divided into two parts: the data of the stars and the planets, given in a separate list. Every columns of the list can be sorted in two directions: ascending, meaning from the lowest value to the highest, or descending. In addition an introduction and help is also given in the menu bar of the catalogue including an example list.

  14. X-ray selected stars in HRC and BHRC catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A joint HRC/BHRC Catalogue has been created based on merging of Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan Hamburg ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both have been made by optical identifications of X-ray sources based on low-dispersion spectra of the Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS) using ROSAT Catalogues. As a result, the largest sample of 8132 (5341+2791) optically identified X-ray sources was created having count rate (CR) of photons ≤ 0.04 ct/s in the area with galactic latitudes |b|≤ 20° and declinations d≤ 0°.There are 4253 AGN, 492 galaxies, 1800 stars and 1587 unknown objects in the sample. All stars have been found in GSC 2.3.2, as well as most of them are in GALEX, USNO-B1.0, 2MASS and WISE catalogues. In addition, 1429 are in SDSS DR9 and 204 have SDSS spectra. For these stars we have carried out spectral classification and along with the bright stars, many new cataclysmic variables (CV), white dwarfs (WD) and late-type stars (K-M and C) have been revealed. For all stars, statistical studies of their multiwavelength properties have been made. An attempt to find a connection between the radiation fluxes in different bands for different types of sources, and identify their characteristics was made as well.

  15. Creating mock catalogues of stellar haloes from cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowing, Ben; Wang, Wenting; Cooper, Andrew; Kennedy, Rachel; Helly, John; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We present a new technique for creating mock catalogues of the individual stars that make up the accreted component of stellar haloes in cosmological simulations and show how the catalogues can be used to test and interpret observational data. The catalogues are constructed from a combination of methods. A semi-analytic galaxy formation model is used to calculate the star formation history in haloes in an N-body simulation and dark matter particles are tagged with this stellar mass. The tags are converted into individual stars using a stellar population synthesis model to obtain the number density and evolutionary stage of the stars, together with a phase-space sampling method that distributes the stars while ensuring that the phase-space structure of the original N-body simulation is maintained. A set of catalogues based on the Λ cold dark matter Aquarius simulations of Milky Way mass haloes have been created and made publicly available on a website. Two example applications are discussed that demonstrate the power and flexibility of the mock catalogues. We show how the rich stellar substructure that survives in the stellar halo precludes a simple measurement of its density profile and demonstrate explicitly how pencil-beam surveys can return almost any value for the slope of the profile. We also show that localized variations in the abundance of particular types of stars, a signature of differences in the composition of stellar populations, allow streams to be easily identified.

  16. Building an automated 100 million+ variable star catalogue for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Berry; Eyer, Laurent; Mowlavi, Nami; Evans, Dafydd W.; Clementini, Gisella; Cuypers, Jan; Lanzafame, Alessandro; De Ridder, Joris; Sarro, Luis; Ordoñez-Blanco, Diego; Nienartowicz, Krzysztof; Charnas, Jonathan; Guy, Leanne; Jévardat de Fombelle, Grégory; Lecoeur-Taïbi, Isabelle; Rimoldini, Lorenzo; Süveges, Maria; Bouchy, François

    2015-08-01

    Gaia is currently monitoring over a billion sources in and around our Galaxy, of which of the order of hundred million are expected to be variable stars. This unmatched sample will revolutionise research on stars and stellar physics not only because of its sheer size, but also because of the availability of simultaneous photometric, astrometric, and, for the brighter stars, radial velocity measurements. The public release of the Gaia data will be accompanied by many catalogues produced by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium, amongst which the variable star catalogue provided by the Coordination Unit 7 (CU7). This catalogue will be the starting point for many stellar studies following the data release and therefore has to be of very high quality.In this presentation we present an initial overview of the information that can be expected to be part of this variable star catalogue. Additionally, we discuss the important aspects of the CU7 automated pipeline that will lead to the production of this catalogue: i) the motivation of its design, ii) the modelling of periodic sources, iii) the synergy of various classifiers, and iv) variable type-specific modelling. Additionally the advantages of combining photometric, spectroscopic and astrometric measurements will be highlighted.

  17. The Spanish National Earthquake Catalogue: Evolution, precision and completeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Álvaro

    2016-10-01

    This paper details the evolution, precision and completeness of the earthquake catalogue compiled by the Spanish National Geographic Institute. Over 100,000 earthquakes are included in this database, occurred in a region embracing Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Andorra and parts of France and Algeria. The catalogue has improved along time, thanks to the development of the seismic network and the upgrades of the routine data acquisition and analysis. The location precision is found to be much better on the Iberian Peninsula than offshore and benefitted especially from the implementation of modern automatic procedures for hypocentral determinations. The different magnitude scales reported in the catalogue, and effects of their changes, are reviewed. In the Iberian Peninsula, Canary Islands and surroundings, detailed successive maps of magnitude of completeness show an overall improvement over the last decades, particularly sudden when the digital broadband network was deployed. Earthquakes are found to be more frequently recorded during nights and weekends, thanks to the lower artificial noise. Despite most blasts have been filtered out of the catalogue, examples of remaining ones are identified by their spatial clustering around mines and quarries, and their timing at the intervals at which blasts are set off (even at night, in contrast to the common assumption that they only occur during daytime). This work highlights the importance of unveiling the spatial and temporal heterogeneities of earthquake catalogues and aims to help future analyses of the seismicity in the region.

  18. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-11-29

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators.

  19. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed Central

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-01-01

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators. PMID:11127914

  20. Enhanced Viral Replication by Cellular Replicative Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Ae; Seong, Rak-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular replicative senescence is a major contributing factor to aging and to the development and progression of aging-associated diseases. In this study, we sought to determine viral replication efficiency of influenza virus (IFV) and Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) infection in senescent cells. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) or human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were allowed to undergo numbers of passages to induce replicative senescence. Induction of replicative senescence in cells was validated by positive senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Increased susceptibility to both IFV and VZV infection was observed in senescent HBE and HDF cells, respectively, resulting in higher numbers of plaque formation, along with the upregulation of major viral antigen expression than that in the non-senescent cells. Interestingly, mRNA fold induction level of virus-induced type I interferon (IFN) was attenuated by senescence, whereas IFN-mediated antiviral effect remained robust and potent in virus-infected senescent cells. Additionally, we show that a longevity-promoting gene, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), has antiviral role against influenza virus infection. In conclusion, our data indicate that enhanced viral replication by cellular senescence could be due to senescence-mediated reduction of virus-induced type I IFN expression. PMID:27799874

  1. Study of the star catalogue (epoch AD 1396.0) recorded in ancient Korean astronomical almanac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Junhyeok; Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Yong-Sam

    2015-11-01

    The study of old star catalogues provides important astrometric data. Most of the researches based on the old star catalogues were manuscript published in Europe and from Arabic/Islam. However, the old star catalogues published in East Asia did not get attention. Therefore, among the East Asian star catalogues we focus on a particular catalogue recorded in a Korean almanac. Its catalogue contains 277 stars that are positioned in a region within 10° of the ecliptic plane. The stars in the catalogue were identified using the modern Hipparcos catalogue. We identified 274 among 277 stars, which is a rate of 98.9 per cent. The catalogue records the epoch of the stars' positions as AD 1396.0. However, by using all of the identified stars we found that the initial epoch of the catalogue is AD 1363.1 ± 3.2. In conclusion, the star catalogue was compiled and edited from various older star catalogues. We assume a correlation with the Almagest by Ptolemaios. This study presents newly analysed results from the historically important astronomical data discovered in East Asia. Therefore, this star catalogue will become important data for comparison with the star catalogues published in Europe and from Arabic/Islam.

  2. Separation of metadata and bulkdata to speed DICOM tag morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mahmoud; Ning, Yu; Philbin, James

    2014-03-01

    Most medical images are archived and transmitted using the DICOM format. The DICOM information model combines image pixel data and associated metadata into a single object. It is not possible to access the metadata separately from the pixel data. However, there are important use cases that only need access to metadata, and the DICOM format increases the running time of those use cases. Tag morphing is an example of one such use case. Tag or attribute morphing includes insertion, deletion, or modification of one or more of the metadata attributes in a study. It is typically used for order reconciliation on study acquisition or to localize the Issuer of Patient ID and the Patient ID attributes when data from one Medical Record Number (MRN) domain is transferred to or displayed in a different domain. This work uses the Multi-Series DICOM (MSD) format to reduce the time required for tag morphing. The MSD format separates metadata from pixel data, and at the same time eliminates duplicate attributes. MSD stores studies using two files rather than in many single frame files typical of DICOM. The first file contains the de-duplicated study metadata, and the second contains pixel data and other bulkdata. A set of experiments were performed where metadata updates were applied to a set of DICOM studies stored in both the traditional Single Frame DICOM (SFD) format and the MSD format. The time required to perform the updates was recorded for each format. The results show that tag morphing is, on average, more than eight times faster in MSD format.

  3. Second ROSAT all-sky survey (2RXS) source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boller, Th.; Freyberg, M. J.; Trümper, J.; Haberl, F.; Voges, W.; Nandra, K.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present the second ROSAT all-sky survey source catalogue, hereafter referred to as the 2RXS catalogue. This is the second publicly released ROSAT catalogue of point-like sources obtained from the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) observations performed with the position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) between June 1990 and August 1991, and is an extended and revised version of the bright and faint source catalogues. Methods: We used the latest version of the RASS processing to produce overlapping X-ray images of 6.4° × 6.4° sky regions. To create a source catalogue, a likelihood-based detection algorithm was applied to these, which accounts for the variable point-spread function (PSF) across the PSPC field of view. Improvements in the background determination compared to 1RXS were also implemented. X-ray control images showing the source and background extraction regions were generated, which were visually inspected. Simulations were performed to assess the spurious source content of the 2RXS catalogue. X-ray spectra and light curves were extracted for the 2RXS sources, with spectral and variability parameters derived from these products. Results: We obtained about 135 000 X-ray detections in the 0.1-2.4 keV energy band down to a likelihood threshold of 6.5, as adopted in the 1RXS faint source catalogue. Our simulations show that the expected spurious content of the catalogue is a strong function of detection likelihood, and the full catalogue is expected to contain about 30% spurious detections. A more conservative likelihood threshold of 9, on the other hand, yields about 71 000 detections with a 5% spurious fraction. We recommend thresholds appropriate to the scientific application. X-ray images and overlaid X-ray contour lines provide an additional user product to evaluate the detections visually, and we performed our own visual inspections to flag uncertain detections. Intra-day variability in the X-ray light curves was quantified based on the

  4. Euclid Star Catalogue Management for the Fine Guidance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The Fine Guidance Sensor is a key element of the AOCS subsystem for the Euclid spacecraft in order to achieve the required absolute pointing accuracy and pointing stability of the telescope Line of Sight. The Fine Guidance Sensor is able to give measure of the relative attitude with respect to the first attitude acquired and the measure of the absolute attitude with respect to the inertial reference frame through the use of an on-board Star Catalogue. The presence of at least 3 star-like objects per FoV is needed to compute the attitude; considering the small FGS FoV (0.1x0.1deg) the Star Catalogue shall be complete up to visual magnitude 19 to allow the correct coverage. The paper describes the implementation of the catalogue in the FGS design and the management of the big amount of data on ground, between ground and spacecraft, and on-board.

  5. The DES Science Verification weak lensing shear catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M.; Sheldon, E.; Zuntz, J.; Kacprzak, T.; Bridle, S. L.; Amara, A.; Armstrong, R.; Becker, M. R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bonnett, C.; Chang, C.; Das, R.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Eifler, T. F.; Gangkofner, C.; Gruen, D.; Hirsch, M.; Huff, E. M.; Jain, B.; Kent, S.; Kirk, D.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Plazas, A. A.; Refregier, A.; Rowe, B.; Rykoff, E. S.; Samuroff, S.; Sánchez, C.; Suchyta, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Clampitt, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Neilsen, E.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We present weak lensing shear catalogues for 139 square degrees of data taken during the Science Verification (SV) time for the new Dark Energy Camera (DECam) being used for the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We describe our object selection, point spread function estimation and shear measurement procedures using two independent shear pipelines, IM3SHAPE and NGMIX, which produce catalogues of 2.12 million and 3.44 million galaxies, respectively. We detail a set of null tests for the shear measurements and find that they pass the requirements for systematic errors at the level necessary for weak lensing science applications using the SV data. We also discuss some of the planned algorithmic improvements that will be necessary to produce sufficiently accurate shear catalogues for the full 5-yr DES, which is expected to cover 5000 square degrees.

  6. Reassessing the BATSE Catalogue of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleinkofer, A. M.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2015-12-01

    Since Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) were discovered by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on NASA's Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) in the 1990s, other observations have increased our knowledge of TGFs. This improved understanding includes characteristics such as the distributions of geographic locations, pulse durations, pulse shapes, and pulse multiplicities. Using this post-BATSE knowledge, we reassessed the BATSE TGF catalogue(http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/batse/tgf/). Some BATSE triggers have features that can easily identify the trigger as a TGF, while others display different features that are unusual for TGFs. The BATSE triggers of the TGF catalogue were classified into five categories: TGFs, Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs), unusual TGFs, uncertain due to insufficient data, and TEB candidates. The triggers with unusual features will be further investigated. A table of our classifications and comments will be added to the online catalogue.

  7. The ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue - II. 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Dong, Subo; Brimacombe, J.; Bishop, D. W.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Bersier, D.; Chen, Ping; Danilet, A. B.; Falco, E.; Godoy-Rivera, D.; Goss, N.; Pojmanski, G.; Simonian, G. V.; Skowron, D. M.; Thompson, Todd A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Ávila, C. G.; Bock, G.; Carballo, J.-L. G.; Conseil, E.; Contreras, C.; Cruz, I.; Andújar, J. M. F.; Guo, Zhen; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kiyota, S.; Koff, R. A.; Krannich, G.; Madore, B. F.; Marples, P.; Masi, G.; Morrell, N.; Monard, L. A. G.; Munoz-Mateos, J. C.; Nicholls, B.; Nicolas, J.; Wagner, R. M.; Wiethoff, W. S.

    2017-05-01

    This manuscript presents information for all supernovae discovered by the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) during 2015, its second full year of operations. The same information is presented for bright (mV ≤ 17), spectroscopically confirmed supernovae discovered by other sources in 2015. As with the first ASAS-SN bright supernova catalogue, we also present redshifts and near-ultraviolet through infrared magnitudes for all supernova host galaxies in both samples. Combined with our previous catalogue, this work comprises a complete catalogue of 455 supernovae from multiple professional and amateur sources, allowing for population studies that were previously impossible. This is the second of a series of yearly papers on bright supernovae and their hosts from the ASAS-SN team.

  8. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata

    PubMed Central

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. Materials and Methods: We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. Results: We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. Conclusions: All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs. PMID:21969921

  9. Using XML to encode TMA DES metadata.

    PubMed

    Lyttleton, Oliver; Wright, Alexander; Treanor, Darren; Lewis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Tissue Microarray Data Exchange Specification (TMA DES) is an XML specification for encoding TMA experiment data. While TMA DES data is encoded in XML, the files that describe its syntax, structure, and semantics are not. The DTD format is used to describe the syntax and structure of TMA DES, and the ISO 11179 format is used to define the semantics of TMA DES. However, XML Schema can be used in place of DTDs, and another XML encoded format, RDF, can be used in place of ISO 11179. Encoding all TMA DES data and metadata in XML would simplify the development and usage of programs which validate and parse TMA DES data. XML Schema has advantages over DTDs such as support for data types, and a more powerful means of specifying constraints on data values. An advantage of RDF encoded in XML over ISO 11179 is that XML defines rules for encoding data, whereas ISO 11179 does not. We created an XML Schema version of the TMA DES DTD. We wrote a program that converted ISO 11179 definitions to RDF encoded in XML, and used it to convert the TMA DES ISO 11179 definitions to RDF. We validated a sample TMA DES XML file that was supplied with the publication that originally specified TMA DES using our XML Schema. We successfully validated the RDF produced by our ISO 11179 converter with the W3C RDF validation service. All TMA DES data could be encoded using XML, which simplifies its processing. XML Schema allows datatypes and valid value ranges to be specified for CDEs, which enables a wider range of error checking to be performed using XML Schemas than could be performed using DTDs.

  10. Three editions of the star catalogue of Tycho Brahe. Machine-readable versions and comparison with the modern Hipparcos Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbunt, F.; van Gent, R. H.

    2010-06-01

    Tycho Brahe completed his catalogue with the positions and magnitudes of 1004 fixed stars in 1598. This catalogue circulated in manuscript form. Brahe edited a shorter version with 777 stars, printed in 1602, and Kepler edited the full catalogue of 1004 stars, printed in 1627. We provide machine-readable versions of the three versions of the catalogue, describe the differences between them and briefly discuss their accuracy on the basis of comparison with modern data from the Hipparcos Catalogue. We also compare our results with earlier analyses by Dreyer (1916, Tychonis Brahe Dani Scripta Astronomica, Vol. II) and Rawlins (1993, DIO, 3, 1), finding good overall agreement. The magnitudes given by Brahe correlate well with modern values, his longitudes and latitudes have error distributions with widths of 2´, with excess numbers of stars with larger errors (as compared to Gaussian distributions), in particular for the faintest stars. Errors in positions larger than ≃10´, which comprise about 15% of the entries, are likely due to computing or copying errors. The full tables KeplerE and Variants (see Table 4) and the table with the latin descriptions of the stars are available in electronic form only at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/516/A28

  11. The PMA Catalogue: 420 million positions and absolute proper motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetov, V. S.; Fedorov, P. N.; Velichko, A. B.; Shulga, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present a catalogue that contains about 420 million absolute proper motions of stars. It was derived from the combination of positions from Gaia DR1 and 2MASS, with a mean difference of epochs of about 15 yr. Most of the systematic zonal errors inherent in the 2MASS Catalogue were eliminated before deriving the absolute proper motions. The absolute calibration procedure (zero-pointing of the proper motions) was carried out using about 1.6 million positions of extragalactic sources. The mean formal error of the absolute calibration is less than 0.35 mas yr-1. The derived proper motions cover the whole celestial sphere without gaps for a range of stellar magnitudes from 8 to 21 mag. In the sky areas where the extragalactic sources are invisible (the avoidance zone), a dedicated procedure was used that transforms the relative proper motions into absolute ones. The rms error of proper motions depends on stellar magnitude and ranges from 2-5 mas yr-1 for stars with 10 mag < G < 17 mag to 5-10 mas yr-1 for faint ones. The present catalogue contains the Gaia DR1 positions of stars for the J2015 epoch. The system of the PMA proper motions does not depend on the systematic errors of the 2MASS positions, and in the range from 14 to 21 mag represents an independent realization of a quasi-inertial reference frame in the optical and near-infrared wavelength range. The Catalogue also contains stellar magnitudes taken from the Gaia DR1 and 2MASS catalogues. A comparison of the PMA proper motions of stars with similar data from certain recent catalogues has been undertaken.

  12. Towards a Next-Generation Catalogue Cross-Match Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineau, F.; Boch, T.; Derriere, S.; Arches Consortium

    2015-09-01

    We have been developing in the past several catalogue cross-match tools. On one hand the CDS XMatch service (Pineau et al. 2011), able to perform basic but very efficient cross-matches, scalable to the largest catalogues on a single regular server. On the other hand, as part of the European project ARCHES1, we have been developing a generic and flexible tool which performs potentially complex multi-catalogue cross-matches and which computes probabilities of association based on a novel statistical framework. Although the two approaches have been managed so far as different tracks, the need for next generation cross-match services dealing with both efficiency and complexity is becoming pressing with forthcoming projects which will produce huge high quality catalogues. We are addressing this challenge which is both theoretical and technical. In ARCHES we generalize to N catalogues the candidate selection criteria - based on the chi-square distribution - described in Pineau et al. (2011). We formulate and test a number of Bayesian hypothesis which necessarily increases dramatically with the number of catalogues. To assign a probability to each hypotheses, we rely on estimated priors which account for local densities of sources. We validated our developments by comparing the theoretical curves we derived with the results of Monte-Carlo simulations. The current prototype is able to take into account heterogeneous positional errors, object extension and proper motion. The technical complexity is managed by OO programming design patterns and SQL-like functionalities. Large tasks are split into smaller independent pieces for scalability. Performances are achieved resorting to multi-threading, sequential reads and several tree data-structures. In addition to kd-trees, we account for heterogeneous positional errors and object's extension using M-trees. Proper-motions are supported using a modified M-tree we developed, inspired from Time Parametrized R-trees (TPR

  13. Prelife catalysts and replicators

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Life is based on replication and evolution. But replication cannot be taken for granted. We must ask what there was prior to replication and evolution. How does evolution begin? We have proposed prelife as a generative system that produces information and diversity in the absence of replication. We model prelife as a binary soup of active monomers that form random polymers. ‘Prevolutionary’ dynamics can have mutation and selection prior to replication. Some sequences might have catalytic activity, thereby enhancing the rates of certain prelife reactions. We study the selection criteria for these prelife catalysts. Their catalytic efficiency must be above certain critical values. We find a maintenance threshold and an initiation threshold. The former is a linear function of sequence length, and the latter is an exponential function of sequence length. Therefore, it is extremely hard to select for prelife catalysts that have long sequences. We compare prelife catalysis with a simple model for replication. Assuming fast template-based elongation reactions, we can show that replicators have selection thresholds that are independent of their sequence length. Our calculation demonstrates the efficiency of replication and provides an explanation of why replication was selected over other forms of prelife catalysis. PMID:19692408

  14. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps : PGCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montier, L.

    The Planck satellite has provided an unprecedented view of the submm sky, allowing us to search for the dust emission of Galactic cold sources. Combining Planck-HFI all-sky maps in the high frequency channels with the IRAS map at 100um, we built the Planck catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC, Planck 2015 results. XXVIII), counting 13188 sources distributed over the whole sky, and following mainly the Galactic structures at low and intermediate latitudes. This is the first all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold sources obtained with a single instrument at this resolution and sensitivity, which opens a new window on star-formation processes in our Galaxy.

  15. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzera, M. R.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Lazzati, D.; Mignani, R. P.; Moretti, A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2003-02-01

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue (BMW-HRI) derived from all ROSAT HRI pointed observations with exposure times longer than 100 s available in the ROSAT public archives. The data were analyzed automatically using a wavelet detection algorithm suited to the detection and characterization of both point-like and extended sources. This algorithm is able to detect and disentangle sources in very crowded fields and/or in the presence of extended or bright sources. Images have been also visually inspected after the analysis to ensure verification. The final catalogue, derived from 4303 observations, consists of 29 089 sources detected with a detection probability of >=4.2 sigma . For each source, the primary catalogue entries provide name, position, count rate, flux and extension along with the relative errors. In addition, results of cross-correlations with existing catalogues at different wavelengths (FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS and GSC2) are also reported. Some information is available on the web via the DIANA Interface. As an external check, we compared our catalogue with the previously available ROSHRICAT catalogue (both in its short and long versions) and we were able to recover, for the short version, ~ 90% of the entries. We computed the sky coverage of the entire HRI data set by means of simulations. The complete BMW-HRI catalogue provides a sky coverage of 732 deg2 down to a limiting flux of ~ 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 and of 10 deg2 down to ~ 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. We were able to compute the cosmological log(N)-log(S) distribution down to a flux of =~ 1.2 x 10-14 erg s-1 cm-2. The catalogue is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/399/351

  16. Generic key and catalogue of Mymaridae (Hymenoptera) of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Larralde, Adriana J; Huber, John T; Martínez, Humberto Quiroz

    2017-04-12

    The Mexican genera of Mymaridae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) are keyed in English and Spanish, and a catalogue of species occurring in Mexico is presented. Thirty-six genera, including 79 named species in 20 of the genera, are reported. These are mentioned in about 100 publications either as original species descriptions or as publications that specifically mention species and/or specimens from Mexico. In the catalogue, species distributions by state are given based on literature records, and collection data are compiled from about 3630 specimens examined in eight collections in Canada, Mexico and USA. Host are listed for specimens reared mainly in Mexico. A few extralimital host records are also given.

  17. The WATCH solar X-ray burst catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.; Lund, N.; Vilmer, N.; Sunyaev, R.

    1998-06-01

    The WATCH experiment aboard the GRANAT satellite provides observations of the Sun in the deka-keV range covering the years 1990 through mid-1992. An introduction to the experiment is given followed by an explanation of how the WATCH solar burst catalogue was created. The different parameters listed for each burst is given and are furthermore explained. The catalogue is available in electronic form only at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  18. Probabilistic multi-catalogue positional cross-match

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineau, F.-X.; Derriere, S.; Motch, C.; Carrera, F. J.; Genova, F.; Michel, L.; Mingo, B.; Mints, A.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Rosen, S. R.; Ruiz Camuñas, A.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Catalogue cross-correlation is essential to building large sets of multi-wavelength data, whether it be to study the properties of populations of astrophysical objects or to build reference catalogues (or timeseries) from survey observations. Nevertheless, resorting to automated processes with limited sets of information available on large numbers of sources detected at different epochs with various filters and instruments inevitably leads to spurious associations. We need both statistical criteria to select detections to be merged as unique sources, and statistical indicators helping in achieving compromises between completeness and reliability of selected associations. Aims: We lay the foundations of a statistical framework for multi-catalogue cross-correlation and cross-identification based on explicit simplified catalogue models. A proper identification process should rely on both astrometric and photometric data. Under some conditions, the astrometric part and the photometric part can be processed separately and merged a posteriori to provide a single global probability of identification. The present paper addresses almost exclusively the astrometrical part and specifies the proper probabilities to be merged with photometric likelihoods. Methods: To select matching candidates in n catalogues, we used the Chi (or, indifferently, the Chi-square) test with 2(n-1) degrees of freedom. We thus call this cross-match a χ-match. In order to use Bayes' formula, we considered exhaustive sets of hypotheses based on combinatorial analysis. The volume of the χ-test domain of acceptance - a 2(n-1)-dimensional acceptance ellipsoid - is used to estimate the expected numbers of spurious associations. We derived priors for those numbers using a frequentist approach relying on simple geometrical considerations. Likelihoods are based on standard Rayleigh, χ and Poisson distributions that we normalized over the χ-test acceptance domain. We validated our theoretical

  19. Streamlining Metadata and Data Management for Evolving Digital Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Miller, S. P.; Peckman, U.; Smith, J.; Aerni, S.; Helly, J.; Sutton, D.; Chase, A.

    2003-12-01

    What began two years ago as an effort to stabilize the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) data archives from more than 700 cruises going back 50 years, has now become the operational fully-searchable "SIOExplorer" digital library, complete with thousands of historic photographs, images, maps, full text documents, binary data files, and 3D visualization experiences, totaling nearly 2 terabytes of digital content. Coping with data diversity and complexity has proven to be more challenging than dealing with large volumes of digital data. SIOExplorer has been built with scalability in mind, so that the addition of new data types and entire new collections may be accomplished with ease. It is a federated system, currently interoperating with three independent data-publishing authorities, each responsible for their own quality control, metadata specifications, and content selection. The IT architecture implemented at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) streamlines the integration of additional projects in other disciplines with a suite of metadata management and collection building tools for "arbitrary digital objects." Metadata are automatically harvested from data files into domain-specific metadata blocks, and mapped into various specification standards as needed. Metadata can be browsed and objects can be viewed onscreen or downloaded for further analysis, with automatic proprietary-hold request management.

  20. Mercury- Distributed Metadata Management, Data Discovery and Access System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, Giri; Wilson, Bruce E.; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Green, James M.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source and ORNL- developed software. It was originally developed for NASA, and the Mercury development consortium now includes funding from NASA, USGS, and DOE. Mercury supports various metadata standards including XML, Z39.50, FGDC, Dublin-Core, Darwin-Core, EML, and ISO-19115 (under development). Mercury provides a single portal to information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury supports various projects including: ORNL DAAC, NBII, DADDI, LBA, NARSTO, CDIAC, OCEAN, I3N, IAI, ESIP and ARM. The new Mercury system is based on a Service Oriented Architecture and supports various services such as Thesaurus Service, Gazetteer Web Service and UDDI Directory Services. This system also provides various search services including: RSS, Geo-RSS, OpenSearch, Web Services and Portlets. Other features include: Filtering and dynamic sorting of search results, book-markable search results, save, retrieve, and modify search criteria.

  1. Interoperable Solar Data and Metadata via LISIRD 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Pankratz, C. K.; Snow, M. A.; Woods, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    LISIRD 3 is a major upgrade of the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center (LISIRD), which serves several dozen space based solar irradiance and related data products to the public. Through interactive plots, LISIRD 3 provides data browsing supported by data subsetting and aggregation. Incorporating a semantically enabled metadata repository, LISIRD 3 users see current, vetted, consistent information about the datasets offered. Users can now also search for datasets based on metadata fields such as dataset type and/or spectral or temporal range. This semantic database enables metadata browsing, so users can discover the relationships between datasets, instruments, spacecraft, mission and PI. The database also enables creation and publication of metadata records in a variety of formats, such as SPASE or ISO, making these datasets more discoverable. The database also enables the possibility of a public SPARQL endpoint, making the metadata browsable in an automated fashion. LISIRD 3's data access middleware, LaTiS, provides dynamic, on demand reformatting of data and timestamps, subsetting and aggregation, and other server side functionality via a RESTful OPeNDAP compliant API, enabling interoperability between LASP datasets and many common tools. LISIRD 3's templated front end design, coupled with the uniform data interface offered by LaTiS, allows easy integration of new datasets. Consequently the number and variety of datasets offered by LISIRD has grown to encompass several dozen, with many more to come. This poster will discuss design and implementation of LISIRD 3, including tools used, capabilities enabled, and issues encountered.

  2. AstroData Descriptors: A Generic Metadata Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K.; Labrie, K.; Simpson, M.; Turner, J.

    2015-09-01

    Gemini Observatory has developed a dataset abstraction framework called AstroData. The framework is generic in that it defines a consistent abstraction layer for any telescope's observational and calibration data. As part of this framework, a system of what are called dataset “descriptors” are implemented to provide a generic and completely consistent interface to metadata of any dataset accommodated by an AstroData package. These descriptors are explicitly defined for a particular type of dataset. AstroData further defines a “built-in” dataset typing system. Because metadata vary across observatories and instruments, AstroData type determination builds the descriptors interface dynamically once the dataset types have been asserted. Descriptors are implemented as logically named methods on an instance of AstroData and as such, may be defined to return, not only metadata directly, but also calculated metadata derivatives. Descriptors always return a DescriptorValue object, a container object with all the pertinent metadata requested, regardless of its initial form or primitive data type.

  3. The ground truth about metadata and community detection in networks.

    PubMed

    Peel, Leto; Larremore, Daniel B; Clauset, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    Across many scientific domains, there is a common need to automatically extract a simplified view or coarse-graining of how a complex system's components interact. This general task is called community detection in networks and is analogous to searching for clusters in independent vector data. It is common to evaluate the performance of community detection algorithms by their ability to find so-called ground truth communities. This works well in synthetic networks with planted communities because these networks' links are formed explicitly based on those known communities. However, there are no planted communities in real-world networks. Instead, it is standard practice to treat some observed discrete-valued node attributes, or metadata, as ground truth. We show that metadata are not the same as ground truth and that treating them as such induces severe theoretical and practical problems. We prove that no algorithm can uniquely solve community detection, and we prove a general No Free Lunch theorem for community detection, which implies that there can be no algorithm that is optimal for all possible community detection tasks. However, community detection remains a powerful tool and node metadata still have value, so a careful exploration of their relationship with network structure can yield insights of genuine worth. We illustrate this point by introducing two statistical techniques that can quantify the relationship between metadata and community structure for a broad class of models. We demonstrate these techniques using both synthetic and real-world networks, and for multiple types of metadata and community structures.

  4. MATCH: Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health Datasets

    DOE Data Explorer

    MATCH is a searchable clearinghouse of publicly available Federal metadata (i.e. data about data) and links to datasets. Most metadata on MATCH pertain to geospatial data sets ranging from local to global scales. The goals of MATCH are to: 1) Provide an easily accessible clearinghouse of relevant Federal metadata on climate and health that will increase efficiency in solving research problems; 2) Promote application of research and information to understand, mitigate, and adapt to the health effects of climate change; 3) Facilitate multidirectional communication among interested stakeholders to inform and shape Federal research directions; 4) Encourage collaboration among traditional and non-traditional partners in development of new initiatives to address emerging climate and health issues. [copied from http://match.globalchange.gov/geoportal/catalog/content/about.page

  5. A Generic Metadata Editor Supporting System Using Drupal CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, J.; Banks, N. G.; Leggott, M.

    2011-12-01

    Metadata handling is a key factor in preserving and reusing scientific data. In recent years, standardized structural metadata has become widely used in Geoscience communities. However, there exist many different standards in Geosciences, such as the current version of the Federal Geographic Data Committee's Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC CSDGM), the Ecological Markup Language (EML), the Geography Markup Language (GML), and the emerging ISO 19115 and related standards. In addition, there are many different subsets within the Geoscience subdomain such as the Biological Profile of the FGDC (CSDGM), or for geopolitical regions, such as the European Profile or the North American Profile in the ISO standards. It is therefore desirable to have a software foundation to support metadata creation and editing for multiple standards and profiles, without re-inventing the wheels. We have developed a software module as a generic, flexible software system to do just that: to facilitate the support for multiple metadata standards and profiles. The software consists of a set of modules for the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), with minimal inter-dependencies to other Drupal modules. There are two steps in using the system's metadata functions. First, an administrator can use the system to design a user form, based on an XML schema and its instances. The form definition is named and stored in the Drupal database as a XML blob content. Second, users in an editor role can then use the persisted XML definition to render an actual metadata entry form, for creating or editing a metadata record. Behind the scenes, the form definition XML is transformed into a PHP array, which is then rendered via Drupal Form API. When the form is submitted the posted values are used to modify a metadata record. Drupal hooks can be used to perform custom processing on metadata record before and after submission. It is trivial to store the metadata record as an actual XML file

  6. Principles of metadata organization at the ENCODE data coordination center

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Eurie L.; Sloan, Cricket A.; Chan, Esther T.; Davidson, Jean M.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Strattan, J. Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C.; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K.; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T.; Rowe, Laurence D.; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Roe, Greg R.; Podduturi, Nikhil R.; Tanaka, Forrest; Hilton, Jason A.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is responsible for organizing, describing and providing access to the diverse data generated by the ENCODE project. The description of these data, known as metadata, includes the biological sample used as input, the protocols and assays performed on these samples, the data files generated from the results and the computational methods used to analyze the data. Here, we outline the principles and philosophy used to define the ENCODE metadata in order to create a metadata standard that can be applied to diverse assays and multiple genomic projects. In addition, we present how the data are validated and used by the ENCODE DCC in creating the ENCODE Portal (https://www.encodeproject.org/). Database URL: www.encodeproject.org PMID:26980513

  7. Principles of metadata organization at the ENCODE data coordination center.

    PubMed

    Hong, Eurie L; Sloan, Cricket A; Chan, Esther T; Davidson, Jean M; Malladi, Venkat S; Strattan, J Seth; Hitz, Benjamin C; Gabdank, Idan; Narayanan, Aditi K; Ho, Marcus; Lee, Brian T; Rowe, Laurence D; Dreszer, Timothy R; Roe, Greg R; Podduturi, Nikhil R; Tanaka, Forrest; Hilton, Jason A; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Data Coordinating Center (DCC) is responsible for organizing, describing and providing access to the diverse data generated by the ENCODE project. The description of these data, known as metadata, includes the biological sample used as input, the protocols and assays performed on these samples, the data files generated from the results and the computational methods used to analyze the data. Here, we outline the principles and philosophy used to define the ENCODE metadata in order to create a metadata standard that can be applied to diverse assays and multiple genomic projects. In addition, we present how the data are validated and used by the ENCODE DCC in creating the ENCODE Portal (https://www.encodeproject.org/). Database URL: www.encodeproject.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Who Needs Replication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the editor of a recent Cambridge University Press book on research methods discusses replicating previous key studies to throw more light on their reliability and generalizability. Replication research is presented as an accepted method of validating previous research by providing comparability between the original and replicated…

  9. Project New Pride: Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, is establishing a new discretionary grant program entitled Replication of Project New Pride: A Serious Offender Youth Treatment Program. Project New Pride was chosen for replication because of its demonstrated effectiveness in Denver, Colorado,…

  10. Thermal Replication Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The hallmark of living matter is the replication of genetic molecules and their active storage against diffusion. We have argued in the past that thermal convection can host the million-fold accumulation even of single nucleotides and at the same time trigger exponential replication. Accumulation is driven by thermophoresis and convection in elongated chambers, replication by the inherent temperature cycling in convection. Optothermal pumping [2,3] allows to implement the thermal trap efficiently in a toroidal or linear geometry. Based on this method, we were in a position to combine accumulation and replication of DNA in the same chamber. As we are missing a solid chemistry of prebiotic replication, we used as a proxy reaction for to replication the polymerase chain reaction. Convective flow both drives the DNA replicating polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while concurrent thermophoresis accumulates the replicated 143 base pair DNA in bulk solution. The time constant for accumulation is 92 s while DNA is doubled every 50 s. The length of the amplified DNA is checked with thermophoresis. Finite element simulations confirm the findings. The experiments explore conditions in pores of hydrothermal rock which can serve as a model environment for the origin of life and has prospects towards the first autonomous evolution, hosting the Darwin process by molecular selection using the thermophoretic trap. On the other side, the implemented continuous evolution will be able to breed well specified DNA or RNA molecules in the future.

  11. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  12. Using URIs to effectively transmit sensor data and metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkinaki, Alexandra; Buck, Justin; Darroch, Louise; Gardner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Autonomous ocean observation is massively increasing the number of sensors in the ocean. Accordingly, the continuing increase in datasets produced, makes selecting sensors that are fit for purpose a growing challenge. Decision making on selecting quality sensor data, is based on the sensor's metadata, i.e. manufacturer specifications, history of calibrations etc. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has developed the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards to facilitate integration and interoperability of sensor data and metadata. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Semantic Web technologies enable machine comprehensibility promoting sophisticated linking and processing of data published on the web. Linking the sensor's data and metadata according to the above-mentioned standards can yield practical difficulties, because of internal hardware bandwidth restrictions and a requirement to constrain data transmission costs. Our approach addresses these practical difficulties by uniquely identifying sensor and platform models and instances through URIs, which resolve via content negotiation to either OGC's sensor meta language, sensorML or W3C's Linked Data. Data transmitted by a sensor incorporate the sensor's unique URI to refer to its metadata. Sensor and platform model URIs and descriptions are created and hosted by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) linked systems service. The sensor owner creates the sensor and platform instance URIs prior and during sensor deployment, through an updatable web form, the Sensor Instance Form (SIF). SIF enables model and instance URI association but also platform and sensor linking. The use of URIs, which are dynamically generated through the SIF, offers both practical and economical benefits to the implementation of SWE and Linked Data standards in near real time systems. Data can be linked to metadata dynamically in-situ while saving on the costs associated to the transmission of long metadata descriptions. The transmission

  13. Serving Fisheries and Ocean Metadata to Communities Around the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meaux, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) assists the oceanographic community in the discovery, access, and sharing of scientific data by serving on-line fisheries and ocean metadata to users around the globe. As of January 2006, the directory holds more than 16,300 Earth Science data descriptions and over 1,300 services descriptions. Of these, nearly 4,000 unique ocean-related metadata records are available to the public, with many having direct links to the data. In 2005, the GCMD averaged over 5 million hits a month, with nearly a half million unique hosts for the year. Through the GCMD portal (http://qcrnd.nasa.qov/), users can search vast and growing quantities of data and services using controlled keywords, free-text searches or a combination of both. Users may now refine a search based on topic, location, instrument, platform, project, data center, spatial and temporal coverage. The directory also offers data holders a means to post and search their data through customized portals, i.e. online customized subset metadata directories. The discovery metadata standard used is the Directory Interchange Format (DIF), adopted in 1994. This format has evolved to accommodate other national and international standards such as FGDC and IS019115. Users can submit metadata through easy-to-use online and offline authoring tools. The directory, which also serves as a coordinating node of the International Directory Network (IDN), has been active at the international, regional and national level for many years through its involvement with the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), federal agencies (such as NASA, NOAA, and USGS), international agencies (such as IOC/IODE, UN, and JAXA) and partnerships (such as ESIP, IOOS/DMAC, GOSIC, GLOBEC, OBIS, and GoMODP), sharing experience, knowledge related to metadata and/or data management and interoperability.

  14. Data warehousing, metadata, and the World Wide Web

    SciTech Connect

    Yow, T.G.; Smith, A.W.; Daugherty, P.F.

    1997-04-16

    The connection between data warehousing and the metadata. used to catalog and locate warehouse data is obvious, but what is the connection between data warehousing, metadata, and the World Wide Web (WWW)? Specifically, the WWW can be used to allow users to search metadata (data about the data) and retrieve data from a warehouse database. In addition, the Internet/Intranet can be used to manage the metadata in archive databases and to streamline the database administration functions of a large archive center. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a data archive and distribution center for the National Air and Space Administration`s (NASA`s) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS); the ORNL DAAC provides access to tabular and imagery datasets used in ecological and environmental research. To support this effort, we have taken advantage of the rather unique and user-friendly features of the WWW to (1) allow users to search for and download the data we archive and (2) provide DAAC developers with effective metadata and data management tools. In particular, the ORNL DAAC has developed the Biogeochemical Information Ordering Management Environment (BIOME), a WWW search-and-order system, as well as a WWW-based database administrator`s (DBA`s) tool suite designed to assist the site`s DBA in the management of archive metadata and databases and several other DBA functions that are essential to site management. This paper is a case study of how the ORNL DAAC uses the WWW to both manage data and allow access to its data warehouse.

  15. In Interactive, Web-Based Approach to Metadata Authoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) serves a growing number of users by assisting the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 8000 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 200 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a particular geographic location, as well as subject of interest. The GCMD strives to be the preeminent data locator for world-wide directory level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are not currently attracting. widespread usage. With usage being the prime indicator of utility, it has become apparent that current tools must be improved. As a result, the GCMD has released a new suite of web-based authoring tools that enable a user to create new data and service entries, as well as modify existing data entries. With these tools, a more interactive approach to metadata authoring is taken, as they feature a visual "checklist" of data/service fields that automatically update when a field is completed. In this way, the user can quickly gauge which of the required and optional fields have not been populated. With the release of these tools, the Earth science community will be further assisted in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata. Keywords: metadata, Earth science, metadata authoring tools

  16. Serving Fisheries and Ocean Metadata to Communities Around the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meaux, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) assists the oceanographic community in the discovery, access, and sharing of scientific data by serving on-line fisheries and ocean metadata to users around the globe. As of January 2006, the directory holds more than 16,300 Earth Science data descriptions and over 1,300 services descriptions. Of these, nearly 4,000 unique ocean-related metadata records are available to the public, with many having direct links to the data. In 2005, the GCMD averaged over 5 million hits a month, with nearly a half million unique hosts for the year. Through the GCMD portal (http://qcrnd.nasa.qov/), users can search vast and growing quantities of data and services using controlled keywords, free-text searches or a combination of both. Users may now refine a search based on topic, location, instrument, platform, project, data center, spatial and temporal coverage. The directory also offers data holders a means to post and search their data through customized portals, i.e. online customized subset metadata directories. The discovery metadata standard used is the Directory Interchange Format (DIF), adopted in 1994. This format has evolved to accommodate other national and international standards such as FGDC and IS019115. Users can submit metadata through easy-to-use online and offline authoring tools. The directory, which also serves as a coordinating node of the International Directory Network (IDN), has been active at the international, regional and national level for many years through its involvement with the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), federal agencies (such as NASA, NOAA, and USGS), international agencies (such as IOC/IODE, UN, and JAXA) and partnerships (such as ESIP, IOOS/DMAC, GOSIC, GLOBEC, OBIS, and GoMODP), sharing experience, knowledge related to metadata and/or data management and interoperability.

  17. In Interactive, Web-Based Approach to Metadata Authoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) serves a growing number of users by assisting the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 8000 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 200 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a particular geographic location, as well as subject of interest. The GCMD strives to be the preeminent data locator for world-wide directory level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are not currently attracting. widespread usage. With usage being the prime indicator of utility, it has become apparent that current tools must be improved. As a result, the GCMD has released a new suite of web-based authoring tools that enable a user to create new data and service entries, as well as modify existing data entries. With these tools, a more interactive approach to metadata authoring is taken, as they feature a visual "checklist" of data/service fields that automatically update when a field is completed. In this way, the user can quickly gauge which of the required and optional fields have not been populated. With the release of these tools, the Earth science community will be further assisted in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata. Keywords: metadata, Earth science, metadata authoring tools

  18. Facilitating the production of ISO-compliant metadata of geospatial datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Gregory; Guigoz, Yaniss; Lacroix, Pierre; Ray, Nicolas; Lehmann, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Metadata are recognized as an essential element to enable efficient and effective discovery of geospatial data published in spatial data infrastructures (SDI). However, metadata production is still perceived as a complex, tedious and time-consuming task. This typically results in little metadata production and can seriously hinder the objective of facilitating data discovery. In response to this issue, this paper presents a proof of concept based on an interoperable workflow between a data publication server and a metadata catalog to automatically generate ISO-compliant metadata. The proposed approach facilitates metadata creation by embedding this task in daily data management workflows; ensures that data and metadata are permanently up-to-date; significantly reduces the obstacles of metadata production; and potentially facilitates contributions to initiatives like the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) by making geospatial resources discoverable.

  19. A novel framework for assessing metadata quality in epidemiological and public health research settings.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christiana; Denaxas, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Metadata are critical in epidemiological and public health research. However, a lack of biomedical metadata quality frameworks and limited awareness of the implications of poor quality metadata renders data analyses problematic. In this study, we created and evaluated a novel framework to assess metadata quality of epidemiological and public health research datasets. We performed a literature review and surveyed stakeholders to enhance our understanding of biomedical metadata quality assessment. The review identified 11 studies and nine quality dimensions; none of which were specifically aimed at biomedical metadata. 96 individuals completed the survey; of those who submitted data, most only assessed metadata quality sometimes, and eight did not at all. Our framework has four sections: a) general information; b) tools and technologies; c) usability; and d) management and curation. We evaluated the framework using three test cases and sought expert feedback. The framework can assess biomedical metadata quality systematically and robustly.

  20. A novel framework for assessing metadata quality in epidemiological and public health research settings

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Christiana; Denaxas, Spiros

    2016-01-01

    Metadata are critical in epidemiological and public health research. However, a lack of biomedical metadata quality frameworks and limited awareness of the implications of poor quality metadata renders data analyses problematic. In this study, we created and evaluated a novel framework to assess metadata quality of epidemiological and public health research datasets. We performed a literature review and surveyed stakeholders to enhance our understanding of biomedical metadata quality assessment. The review identified 11 studies and nine quality dimensions; none of which were specifically aimed at biomedical metadata. 96 individuals completed the survey; of those who submitted data, most only assessed metadata quality sometimes, and eight did not at all. Our framework has four sections: a) general information; b) tools and technologies; c) usability; and d) management and curation. We evaluated the framework using three test cases and sought expert feedback. The framework can assess biomedical metadata quality systematically and robustly. PMID:27570670

  1. Modelling and Implementation of Catalogue Cards Using FreeMarker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radjenovic, Jelen; Milosavljevic, Branko; Surla, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study involving the specification (using Unified Modelling Language (UML) 2.0) of information requirements and implementation of the software components for generating catalogue cards. The implementation in a Java environment is developed using the FreeMarker software.…

  2. Ballistic parameter and lifetime assessment for catalogued objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K. D.; Sdunnus, H.; Mandeville, J. C.; Klinkrad, H.

    2001-10-01

    The LASCO (Lifetime Assessment of Catalogued Objects) tool is dedicated to the computation of the orbital lifetimes of all catalogued objects. It was developed in the course of an upgrade of ESA's DISCOS database. It consists of a graphical user interface, and four separate modules addressing individual tasks. A single-point interface to the DISCOS database is realised by means of a Perl script. It extracts data from DISCOS, initiates the execution of the subordinated modules and writes the results to the database. 1. BaPIT (Ballistic Parameter Iteration Tool) calculates the ballistic parameters of catalogued objects contained in DISCOS. 2. SOLAT (Simple Orbital Lifetime Assessment Tool) calculates the orbital lifetime of catalogued objects using different orbit propagation methods depending on the expected lifetime and the required accuracy. 3. RIO (Risk Object Re-entry Warning Tool) performs detailed decay analysis for all objects identified as hazardous, and having an expected lifetime below a pre-defined time span. The amount and continuity of ballistic parameter and lifetime assessment data provided by LASCO for the DISCOS database is unprecedented. It allows for a global analysis of the currently tracked population. The primary aim of this paper is to give a survey of the capabilities of LASCO. A second aspect will be to provide a first critical review of the results obtained from the LASCO runs performed since the beginning of the operational phase in October 1999.

  3. Eighteenth Century Short Title Catalogue on CD-ROM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Debora J.

    The Eighteenth Century Short Title Catalogue (ESTC) on compact disc provides access to nearly 300,000 printed materials from Britain and the British colonies from 1701 to 1800. The file contains a wide variety of materials (laws, almanacs, posters, catalogs, directories, verses, monographs, advertisements, and flyers) in all languages, and covers…

  4. Catalogue of the Lichenized and Lichenicolous Fungi of Montenegro

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Branka; Mayrhofer, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Summary The catalogue is based on a comprehensive evaluation of 169 published sources. The lichen mycota as currently known from Montenegro includes 681 species (with eight subspecies, nine varieties and one form) of lichenized fungi, 12 species of lichenicolous fungi, and nine non-lichenized fungi traditionally included in lichenological literature. PMID:21423858

  5. Catalogue Use at the State Library of Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hider, Philip

    2008-01-01

    A questionnaire survey conducted at the State Library of Victoria indicates that users in general, and not just scholars, value the standard elements of bibliographic data found in the Library's catalogues, and consider all these elements useful for finding, identifying and selecting items. Rather than making do with less, users wanted more…

  6. Restful Implementation of Catalogue Service for Geospatial Data Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, L. C.; Yue, P.; Lu, X. C.

    2013-10-01

    Provenance, also known as lineage, is important in understanding the derivation history of data products. Geospatial data provenance helps data consumers to evaluate the quality and reliability of geospatial data. In a service-oriented environment, where data are often consumed or produced by distributed services, provenance could be managed by following the same service-oriented paradigm. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Service for the Web (CSW) is used for the registration and query of geospatial data provenance by extending ebXML Registry Information Model (ebRIM). Recent advance of the REpresentational State Transfer (REST) paradigm has shown great promise for the easy integration of distributed resources. RESTful Web Service aims to provide a standard way for Web clients to communicate with servers based on REST principles. The existing approach for provenance catalogue service could be improved by adopting the RESTful design. This paper presents the design and implementation of a catalogue service for geospatial data provenance following RESTful architecture style. A middleware named REST Converter is added on the top of the legacy catalogue service to support a RESTful style interface. The REST Converter is composed of a resource request dispatcher and six resource handlers. A prototype service is developed to demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MEXSAS catalogue (Vagnetti+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnetti, F.; Middei, R.; Antonucci, M.; Paolillo, M.; Serafinelli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present the catalog of the Multi-Epoch XMM Serendipitous AGN Sample (MEXSAS), extracted from the fifth release of the XMM-Newton Serendipitous Source Catalogue (XMMSSC-DR5) and cross-matched with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar catalogs DR7Q and DR12Q. It contains 2700 repeatedly observed AGN, with corrected excess variance information. (1 data file).

  8. COM Catalogues at the University of Guelph Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jean; Brown, Nancy

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the successful introduction, present status, and future outlook of computer output microfilm (COM) catalogues at the University of Guelph Library. A description of the local circumstances and environment includes the user community, library organization, choice of format and other COM characteristics, environmental determinants for…

  9. 12. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary Medicines, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Druggists' Sundries, Etc. Portland, ME: Cook, Everett, and Pennell, 1896.) ca. 1896, photographer unknown 'MAIN OFFICE AND COUNTING ROOM' - Woodman Building, 140 Middle Street, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  10. 11. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of photograph (from Catalogue of Drugs, Chemicals, Proprietary Medicines, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Druggists' Sundries, Etc. Portland, ME: Cook, Everett, and Pennell, 1896.) ca. 1896, photographer unknown 'SECTION OF MAIN FLOOR AND ORDER DEPARTMENT' - Woodman Building, 140 Middle Street, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  11. Catalogue of the Lichenized and Lichenicolous Fungi of Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Knežević, Branka; Mayrhofer, Helmut

    2009-02-09

    The catalogue is based on a comprehensive evaluation of 169 published sources. The lichen mycota as currently known from Montenegro includes 681 species (with eight subspecies, nine varieties and one form) of lichenized fungi, 12 species of lichenicolous fungi, and nine non-lichenized fungi traditionally included in lichenological literature.

  12. Search for New Open Clusters in Huge Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, I.; Koposov, S.; Glushkova, E.

    2006-07-01

    Current catalogues (lists indeed) of open clusters are simply heterogeneous and incomplete compilations. No attempts to search for open clusters through huge photometric catalogues using an homogeneous approach have been done so far. We have developed a method based on the analysis of star densities. Our algorithm finds star density peaks and then builds the color-magnitude diagram. We exploit the fact that only stars lying on the isochrone show a density peak whereas field stars show a flat distribution. An automatic procedure eliminates occasional density peaks and obtains the isochrone and the geometrical parameters of the survived candidates (coordinates, size, distance, age and color excess). A preliminary study of 150 sq. degrees in the Galaxy Anticentre region yielded 10 new clusters. The system will allow us to build, for the first time, an homogeneous catalogue of open clusters on an all-sky basis. Although we have started with 2MASS data, it will be possible to apply the automated pipeline on any multicolor catalogue provided that a VO-compliant way of access (e.g. ADQL + SkyNode) is implemented (SDSS, etc.).

  13. The BMW-Chandra survey. Serendipitous Source Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Mignani, R. P.; Campana, S.; Moretti, A.; Panzera, M. R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Mottini, M.

    2009-07-01

    We present the BMW-Chandra source catalogue derived from Chandra ACIS-I observations (exposure time > 10ks) public as of March 2003 by using a wavelet detection algorithm (Lazzati et al. 1999; Campana et al. 1999). The catalogue contains a total of 21325 sources, 16758 of which are serendipitous. Our sky coverage in the soft band (0.5-2keV, S/N=3) is ~ 8 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1, and ~ 2 deg2 for FX ≥ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1. The catalogue contains information on positions, count rates (and errors) in three energy bands (total, 0.5-7keV; soft, 0.5-2keV; and hard, 2-7keV), and in four additional energy bands, SB1 (0.5-1keV), SB2 (1-2keV), HB1 (2-4keV), and HB2 (4-7keV), as well as information on the source extension, and cross-matches with the FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS, and GSC-2 catalogues.

  14. Modelling and Implementation of Catalogue Cards Using FreeMarker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radjenovic, Jelen; Milosavljevic, Branko; Surla, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study involving the specification (using Unified Modelling Language (UML) 2.0) of information requirements and implementation of the software components for generating catalogue cards. The implementation in a Java environment is developed using the FreeMarker software.…

  15. A Catalogue of Systems for Student Ratings of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrami, Philip C.; Murphy, Vincent

    This catalogue briefly describes the following 12 systems for student ratings of instruction in higher education: (1) Purdue Cafeteria System (Cafeteria); (2) Course Faculty Instrument (CFI); (3) Arizona Course/Instructor Evaluation Questionnaire (CIEQ); (4) Endeavor Instructional Rating System (Endeavor); (5) University of Washington…

  16. A catalogue of quasars and active nuclei: 11th edition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véron-Cetty, M.-P.; Véron, P.

    2003-12-01

    The recent release of the final installement of the 2dF quasar catalogue and of the first part of the Sloan catalogue, almost doubling the number of known QSOs, led us to prepare an updated version of our Catalogue of quasars and active nuclei which now contains 48 921 quasars, 876 BL Lac objects and 15 069 active galaxies (including 11 777 Seyfert 1s). Like the tenth edition, it includes position and redshift as well as photometry (U, B, V) and 6 and 11 cm flux densities when available. We also give a list of all known lensed and double quasars. The catalogue (Table_QSO, Table_BL, Table_AGN and Table_reject) and the list of references are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anomymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/399 or at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (http://www.obs-hp.fr/).

  17. [Publication of biological samples collections catalogues by tumor banks].

    PubMed

    Chabannon, C; Honstettre, A; Daufresne, L-M; Martin, P-M; Bonnetaud, C; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, I; Romain, S; Achache, K; Mery, O; Bordonne, O; Ducord, C; Jacotot, L; Vaglio, P; d'Arnoux, C; Figarella-Branger, D; Hofman, P; Borg, J-P; Atger, V

    2010-02-01

    Biobanks in general, and specifically tumour banks, are considered as essential tools for the development of translational and clinical research in biology and oncology. Biobank tasks include the collection and preservation of biological samples, and their association with information that will be essential for further scientific use ("annotations" that allow for the "qualification" of biological samples in biological resource). A collection is made of a series of biological resource that are representative of a homogeneous group of individuals or patients that are defined on the basis of clinical or biological information. Collections are used by scientists that are aware of their existence. In the absence of a published catalogue, this awareness is most often limited to research teams that are geographically close, or to investigators who already established collaborative projects with medical teams within the hospital that operates the tumour bank. Publications of catalogues, especially digitalized and online catalogues, should foster the development of high-level, large-scale and multicentric scientific projects. In addition, tumour banks will formalize rules that allow publication of collections, and upstream, rules that are used to qualify biological samples in biological resource: this should translate in an improved overall quality of samples and annotations. Tumour bank catalogues remain relatively few; however, some recent achievements established the "proof of concept" and already raise questions regarding rules for publication. It will be important to demonstrate that these high expectations translate into measurable benefits.

  18. Section on Cataloguing: Report of the Activities, 1998/1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Maria

    This paper reports on the activities of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Section on Cataloguing for 1998-99. The first part of the report introduces the aims of the Section. Membership, the standing committee, and officers are detailed in the second part. The third part provides information on the…

  19. GRBs observed with WATCH and BATSE (3B catalogue)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Lund, N.; Brandt, S.; Terekhov, O.; Sunyaev, R.

    1996-08-01

    We have correlated the positions of 44 GRBs observed with WATCH with the 1122 bursts given in the BATSE 3B Catalogue. We conclude that there is no indication of recurrent activity of WATCH bursts in the BATSE data and constrained the number of WATCH repeaters to <=4.

  20. Catalogue of Projects in Electronic Text. User's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardullo, Pamela; Neuman, Michael

    This guide to searching the Georgetown University Catalogue of Projects in Electronic Text database provides information on electronic text projects in the humanities throughout the world as well as a variety of information on the many collections of literary works, historical documents, and linguistic data that are available from commercial…

  1. Applications of the LBA-ECO Metadata Warehouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, L.; Morrell, A.; Griffith, P. C.

    2006-05-01

    The LBA-ECO Project Office has developed a system to harvest and warehouse metadata resulting from the Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia. The harvested metadata is used to create dynamically generated reports, available at www.lbaeco.org, which facilitate access to LBA-ECO datasets. The reports are generated for specific controlled vocabulary terms (such as an investigation team or a geospatial region), and are cross-linked with one another via these terms. This approach creates a rich contextual framework enabling researchers to find datasets relevant to their research. It maximizes data discovery by association and provides a greater understanding of the scientific and social context of each dataset. For example, our website provides a profile (e.g. participants, abstract(s), study sites, and publications) for each LBA-ECO investigation. Linked from each profile is a list of associated registered dataset titles, each of which link to a dataset profile that describes the metadata in a user-friendly way. The dataset profiles are generated from the harvested metadata, and are cross-linked with associated reports via controlled vocabulary terms such as geospatial region. The region name appears on the dataset profile as a hyperlinked term. When researchers click on this link, they find a list of reports relevant to that region, including a list of dataset titles associated with that region. Each dataset title in this list is hyperlinked to its corresponding dataset profile. Moreover, each dataset profile contains hyperlinks to each associated data file at its home data repository and to publications that have used the dataset. We also use the harvested metadata in administrative applications to assist quality assurance efforts. These include processes to check for broken hyperlinks to data files, automated emails that inform our administrators when critical metadata fields are updated, dynamically generated reports of metadata records that link

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PMA Catalogue (Akhmetov+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetov, V. S.; Fedorov, P. N.; Velichko, A. B.; Shulga, V. M.

    2017-06-01

    The idea for creating the catalogue is very simple. The PMA catalogue has been derived from a combination of two catalogues, namely 2MASS and Gaia DR1. The difference of epochs of observations for these catalogues is approximately 15 yr. The positions of objects in the Gaia DR1 catalogue are referred to the reference frame, which is consistent with ICRF to better than 0.1 mas for the J2015.0 epoch. The positions of objects in 2MASS are referred to HCRF, which, as was shown in Kovalevsky et al. (1997A&A...323..620K), is aligned with the ICRF to within ±0.6 mas at the epoch 1991.25 and is non-rotating with respect to distant extragalactic objects to within ±0.25mas/yr. By comparing the positions of the common objects contained in the catalogues, it is possible to determine their proper motions within their common range of stellar magnitudes by dividing differences of positions over the time interval between their observations. Formally, proper motions derived in such a way are given in the ICRF system, because the positions of both Gaia DR1 stars and those of 2MASS objects (through Hipparcos/Tycho-2 stars) are given in the ICRF and cover the whole sphere without gaps. We designate them further in this paper as relative, with the aim of discriminating them from absolute ones, which refer to the reference frame defined by the positions of about 1.6 million galaxies from Gaia DR1. After elimination of the systematic errors, the root-mean-squared deviation of the coordinate differences of extended sources is about 200mas, and the mean number of galaxies inside each pixel is about 1300, so we expect the error of the absolute calibration to be 0.35mas/yr. We compared the proper motions of common objects from PMA and from the TGAS and UCAC4 catalogues. Knowing the mean-square errors of (PMA-TGAS) and (PMA-UCAC4) proper motion differences in each pixel, the appropriate errors in PMA vary from 2 to 10mas/yr, depending on magnitude, which are consistent with the errors

  3. ATLASGAL - compact source catalogue: 330° < ℓ < 21°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Y.; Schuller, F.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Wyrowski, F.; Beuther, H.; Bontemps, S.; Bronfman, L.; Henning, T.; Menten, K. M.; Schilke, P.; Walmsley, C. M.; Wienen, M.; Tackenberg, J.; Linz, H.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the GALaxy (ATLASGAL) is the first systematic survey of the inner Galactic plane in the sub-millimetre. The observations were carried out with the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (LABOCA), an array of 295 bolometers observing at 870 μm (345 GHz). Aims: Here we present a first version of the compact source catalogue extracted from this survey. This catalogue provides an unbiased database of dusty clumps in the inner Galaxy. Methods: The construction of this catalogue was made using the source extraction routine SExtractor. We have cross-associated the obtained sources with the IRAS and MSX catalogues, in order to constrain their nature. Results: We have detected 6639 compact sources in the range from 330 ≤ ℓ ≤ 21 degrees and |b| ≤ 1.5 degrees. The catalogue has a 99% completeness for sources with a peak flux above 6σ, which corresponds to a flux density of ~0.4 Jy beam-1. The parameters extracted for sources with peak fluxes below the 6σ completeness threshold should be used with caution. Tests on simulated data find the uncertainty in the flux measurement to be ~12%, however, in more complex regions the flux values can be overestimated by a factor of 2 due to the additional background emission. Using a search radius of 30'' we found that 40% of ATLASGAL compact sources are associated with an IRAS or MSX point source, but, ~50% are found to be associated with MSX 21 μm fluxes above the local background level, which is probably a lower limit to the actual number of sources associated with star formation. Conclusions: Although infrared emission is found towards the majority of the clumps detected, this catalogue is still likely to include a significant number of clumps that are devoid of star formation activity and therefore excellent candidates for objects in the coldest, earliest stages of (high-mass) star formation. The full catalogue and the calibrated emission maps are only available at the CDS via

  4. The Planck Compact Source Catalogues: present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Caniego, Marcos; Aff002

    The Planck Collaboration has produced catalogues of radio and sub-millimeter compact sources at the nine Planck frequencies in total intensity and polarization. In particular, the 2015 Second Planck Catalogue of Compact Sources (PCCS2) contains over 45.000 sources detected in the Planck full mission maps. Since the Planck instruments have polarization capabilities in seven of its nine detectors, we were able to measure the polarized flux density of over 600 sources between 30 and 353 GHz. But we are searching not only for compact sources in single frequency maps, and we take advantage of the large frequency coverage of Planck to search for objects with specific emission laws. This is the case of the SZ catalogue of cluster of galaxies (PSZ2), that lists 1653 clusters, 1203 of which are confirmed clusters with clear associations in external data-sets, and the Galactic cold clump catalogue (PGCC) with 13188 objects. The Planck Collaboration has also published a list of high-redshift source candidates (see the report by Ludovic Montier here). These objects are rare bright sub-millimeter sources with an spectral energy distribution peaking between 353 and 857 GHz, and have been detected combining Planck and IRAS data. The colours of most of these objects are consistent with redshifts z>2, a fraction of which could be lensed objects with redshifts between 2 and 4. But new catalogues are foreseen. A multi-frequency compact source catalogue is being produced selecting sources at radio frequencies and studying them across all Planck bands. Multi-frequency catalogues can be difficult to produce in experiments like Planck that have a large frequency coverage and very different resolutions across bands. In some cases, a source can be very bright across the whole Planck frequency range and it is easy to do the associations across channels. However, it frequent to find unrelated sub-millimeter sources within the half-degree beam of the 30 GHz low frequency detector, and the

  5. OB association members in the ACT and TRC catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerwerf, Ronnie

    2000-03-01

    The Hipparcos Catalogue contains members of nearby OB associations brighter than 12th magnitude in V. However, membership lists are complete only to magnitude V=7.3. In this paper we discuss whether proper motions listed in the `Astrographic Catalogue+Tycho' reference catalogue (ACT) and the Tycho Reference Catalogue (TRC), which are complete to V~10.5mag, can be used to find additional association members. Proper motions in the ACT/TRC have an average accuracy of ~3masyr-1. We search for ACT/TRC stars which have proper motions consistent with the spatial velocity of the Hipparcos members of the nearby OB associations already identified by de Zeeuw et al. These stars are first selected using a convergent-point method, and then subjected to further constraints on the proper-motion distribution, magnitude and colour to narrow down the final number of candidate members. Monte Carlo simulations show that the proper-motion distribution, magnitude, and colour constraints remove ~97per cent of the field stars, while at the same time retain more than 90per cent of the cluster stars. The procedure has been applied to five nearby associations: the three subgroups of Sco OB2, plus Per OB3 and Cep OB6. In all cases except Cep OB6, we find evidence for new association members fainter than the completeness limit of the Hipparcos Catalogue. However, narrow-band photometry and/or radial velocities are needed to pinpoint the cluster members, and to study their physical characteristics.

  6. The SuperCOSMOS all-sky galaxy catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, J. A.; Hambly, N. C.; Bilicki, M.; MacGillivray, H. T.; Miller, L.; Read, M. A.; Tritton, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    We describe the construction of an all-sky galaxy catalogue, using SuperCOSMOS scans of Schmidt photographic plates from the UK Schmidt Telescope and Second Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. The photographic photometry is calibrated using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, with results that are linear to 2 per cent or better. All-sky photometric uniformity is achieved by matching plate overlaps and also by requiring homogeneity in optical-to-2MASS colours, yielding zero-points that are uniform to 0.03 mag or better. The typical AB depths achieved are BJ < 21, RF < 19.5 and IN < 18.5, with little difference between hemispheres. In practice, the IN plates are shallower than the BJ and RF plates, so for most purposes we advocate the use of a catalogue selected in these two latter bands. At high Galactic latitudes, this catalogue is approximately 90 per cent complete with 5 per cent stellar contamination; we quantify how the quality degrades towards the Galactic plane. At low latitudes, there are many spurious galaxy candidates resulting from stellar blends: these approximately match the surface density of true galaxies at |b| = 30°. Above this latitude, the catalogue limited in BJ and RF contains in total about 20 million galaxy candidates, of which 75 per cent are real. This contamination can be removed, and the sky coverage extended, by matching with additional data sets. This SuperCOSMOS catalogue has been matched with 2MASS and with WISE, yielding quasi-all-sky samples of respectively 1.5 million and 18.5 million galaxies, to median redshifts of 0.08 and 0.20. This legacy data set thus continues to offer a valuable resource for large-angle cosmological investigations.

  7. Characterization of an improved in vitro DNA replication system for Escherichia coli plasmids.

    PubMed

    Conrad, S E; Campbell, J L

    1979-07-25

    A modified in vitro replication system has been characterized and used to catalogue the host proteins required for the replication of plasmid RSF1030. These extracts differ from systems described previously in that endogenous DNA is removed. Replication in vitro therefore requires an exogenouos RSF1030. Synthesis in the in vitro system faithfully mimics in vivo replication with respect to the products synthesized, effects of specific inhibitors, and requirements for RNA polymerase and DNA polymerase I. In addition, we find that proteins encoded by dnaB, dnaC, dnaG, dnaI, dnaP and polC (DNA polymerase III), are required for in vitro plasmid synthesis. The product of dnaA is not required. Extracts prepared from E. coli mutants deficient in in vitro replication can be complemented by addition of purified proteins or of extracts carrying the wild type protein.

  8. The Design of Geo-Spatial Metadata Architecture for Digital Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.-X.; Zhang, J.; Cao, Y.-B.

    2013-11-01

    This paper analyzes the significance of geospatial metadata technology in the "Digital Boundary" project. In the study of boundary data types and characteristics, the architecture framework of geospatial metadata is designed. It lays foundation for establishing detailed content of all kinds of metadata as the next step.

  9. Quality Assurance for Digital Learning Object Repositories: Issues for the Metadata Creation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currier, Sarah; Barton, Jane; O'Beirne, Ronan; Ryan, Ben

    2004-01-01

    Metadata enables users to find the resources they require, therefore it is an important component of any digital learning object repository. Much work has already been done within the learning technology community to assure metadata quality, focused on the development of metadata standards, specifications and vocabularies and their implementation…

  10. A Model for the Creation of Human-Generated Metadata within Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasher, Andrew; McAndrew, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers situations for which detailed metadata descriptions of learning resources are necessary, and focuses on human generation of such metadata. It describes a model which facilitates human production of good quality metadata by the development and use of structured vocabularies. Using examples, this model is applied to single and…

  11. Turning Data into Information: Assessing and Reporting GIS Metadata Integrity Using Integrated Computing Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulrooney, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) serves as the tangible and intangible means by which spatially related phenomena can be created, analyzed and rendered. GIS metadata serves as the formal framework to catalog information about a GIS data set. Metadata is independent of the encoded spatial and attribute information. GIS metadata is a subset of…

  12. Understanding the Protocol for Metadata Harvesting of the Open Archives Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2002-01-01

    Explains the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) Protocol for Metadata Harvesting and its impact on digital libraries and information retrieval by transferring metadata from one server to another in a network of information systems. Highlights include data providers; service providers; value-added services; Dublin Core metadata; data transfer;…

  13. Metadata squared: enhancing its usability for volunteered geographic information and the GeoWeb

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Barbara S.; Wolf, Eric B.; Sui, Daniel Z.; Elwood, Sarah; Goodchild, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has brought many changes to the way geographic information is created and shared. One aspect that has not changed is metadata. Static spatial data quality descriptions were standardized in the mid-1990s and cannot accommodate the current climate of data creation where nonexperts are using mobile phones and other location-based devices on a continuous basis to contribute data to Internet mapping platforms. The usability of standard geospatial metadata is being questioned by academics and neogeographers alike. This chapter analyzes current discussions of metadata to demonstrate how the media shift that is occurring has affected requirements for metadata. Two case studies of metadata use are presented—online sharing of environmental information through a regional spatial data infrastructure in the early 2000s, and new types of metadata that are being used today in OpenStreetMap, a map of the world created entirely by volunteers. Changes in metadata requirements are examined for usability, the ease with which metadata supports coproduction of data by communities of users, how metadata enhances findability, and how the relationship between metadata and data has changed. We argue that traditional metadata associated with spatial data infrastructures is inadequate and suggest several research avenues to make this type of metadata more interactive and effective in the GeoWeb.

  14. Turning Data into Information: Assessing and Reporting GIS Metadata Integrity Using Integrated Computing Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulrooney, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    A Geographic Information System (GIS) serves as the tangible and intangible means by which spatially related phenomena can be created, analyzed and rendered. GIS metadata serves as the formal framework to catalog information about a GIS data set. Metadata is independent of the encoded spatial and attribute information. GIS metadata is a subset of…

  15. 76 FR 48769 - Metadata Standards To Support Nationwide Electronic Health Information Exchange

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary 45 CFR Part 170 RIN 0991-AB78 Metadata Standards To Support... Coordination for Health Information Technology (ONC) is soliciting public comments on metadata standards to... comments on the following categories of metadata recommended by both the HIT Policy Committee and HIT...

  16. Quality Assurance for Digital Learning Object Repositories: Issues for the Metadata Creation Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currier, Sarah; Barton, Jane; O'Beirne, Ronan; Ryan, Ben

    2004-01-01

    Metadata enables users to find the resources they require, therefore it is an important component of any digital learning object repository. Much work has already been done within the learning technology community to assure metadata quality, focused on the development of metadata standards, specifications and vocabularies and their implementation…

  17. A Model for the Creation of Human-Generated Metadata within Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasher, Andrew; McAndrew, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers situations for which detailed metadata descriptions of learning resources are necessary, and focuses on human generation of such metadata. It describes a model which facilitates human production of good quality metadata by the development and use of structured vocabularies. Using examples, this model is applied to single and…

  18. Mining and Utilizing Dataset Relevancy from Oceanographic Dataset (MUDROD) Metadata, Usage Metrics, and User Feedback to Improve Data Discovery and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Oceanographic resource discovery is a critical step for developing ocean science applications. With the increasing number of resources available online, many Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) components (e.g. catalogues and portals) have been developed to help manage and discover oceanographic resources. However, efficient and accurate resource discovery is still a big challenge because of the lack of data relevancy information. In this article, we propose a search engine framework for mining and utilizing dataset relevancy from oceanographic dataset metadata, usage metrics, and user feedback. The objective is to improve discovery accuracy of oceanographic data and reduce time for scientist to discover, download and reformat data for their projects. Experiments and a search example show that the propose engine helps both scientists and general users search for more accurate results with enhanced performance and user experience through a user-friendly interface.

  19. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  20. Poxvirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are large, enveloped viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm and encode proteins for DNA replication and gene expression. Hairpin ends link the two strands of the linear, double-stranded DNA genome. Viral proteins involved in DNA synthesis include a 117-kDa polymerase, a helicase–primase, a uracil DNA glycosylase, a processivity factor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a protein kinase, and a DNA ligase. A viral FEN1 family protein participates in double-strand break repair. The DNA is replicated as long concatemers that are resolved by a viral Holliday junction endonuclease. PMID:23838441

  1. The State of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: April 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Stuart

    1999-01-01

    At the sixth Dublin Core Metadata Workshop convened in Washington, DC, in November 19998, a work plan was developed to address unresolved issues in resource description. This report summarizes that work plan, highlights the progress that has been made on it and identifies a few significant projects that exemplify this progress. (AEF)

  2. The State of the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: April 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Stuart

    1999-01-01

    At the sixth Dublin Core Metadata Workshop convened in Washington, DC, in November 19998, a work plan was developed to address unresolved issues in resource description. This report summarizes that work plan, highlights the progress that has been made on it and identifies a few significant projects that exemplify this progress. (AEF)

  3. Syndicating Rich Bibliographic Metadata Using MODS and RSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Many libraries use RSS to syndicate information about their collections to users. A survey of 65 academic libraries revealed their most common use for RSS is to disseminate information about library holdings, such as lists of new acquisitions. Even though typical RSS feeds are ill suited to the task of carrying rich bibliographic metadata, great…

  4. Training and Best Practice Guidelines: Implications for Metadata Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuttur, Mohammad Y.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the rapid development of digital libraries over the past decade, researchers have focused on the use of metadata as an effective means to support resource discovery within online repositories. With the increasing involvement of libraries in digitization projects and the growing number of institutional repositories, it is anticipated…

  5. Automatic Extraction of Metadata from Scientific Publications for CRIS Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Ivanovic, Dragan; Milosavljevic, Branko; Konjovic, Zora; Surla, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a system for automatic extraction of metadata from scientific papers in PDF format for the information system for monitoring the scientific research activity of the University of Novi Sad (CRIS UNS). Design/methodology/approach: The system is based on machine learning and performs automatic extraction…

  6. Harvesting Cultural Heritage Metadata Using the OAI Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shreeves, Sarah L.; Kaczmarek, Joanne S.; Cole, Timothy W.

    2003-01-01

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign undertook a project to test the efficacy of using the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting to construct a search and discovery service focused on information resources in the domain of cultural heritage. Provides an overview of the Illinois project, with quantitative data about…

  7. A Case Study in Metadata Harvesting: the NSDL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arms, William Y.; Dushay, Naomi; Fulker, Dave; Lagoze, Carl

    2003-01-01

    Describes the use of the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) Protocol for Metadata Harvesting in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) National Science Digital Library (NSDL). Describes the implementation experience and early practical tests. The overall conclusion is optimism that the OAI will be a successful part of the NSDL. (Author/AEF)

  8. ATLAS Metadata Infrastructure Evolution for Run 2 and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemmeren, P.; Cranshaw, J.; Malon, D.; Vaniachine, A.

    2015-12-01

    ATLAS developed and employed for Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider a sophisticated infrastructure for metadata handling in event processing jobs. This infrastructure profits from a rich feature set provided by the ATLAS execution control framework, including standardized interfaces and invocation mechanisms for tools and services, segregation of transient data stores with concomitant object lifetime management, and mechanisms for handling occurrences asynchronous to the control framework's state machine transitions. This metadata infrastructure is evolving and being extended for Run 2 to allow its use and reuse in downstream physics analyses, analyses that may or may not utilize the ATLAS control framework. At the same time, multiprocessing versions of the control framework and the requirements of future multithreaded frameworks are leading to redesign of components that use an incident-handling approach to asynchrony. The increased use of scatter-gather architectures, both local and distributed, requires further enhancement of metadata infrastructure in order to ensure semantic coherence and robust bookkeeping. This paper describes the evolution of ATLAS metadata infrastructure for Run 2 and beyond, including the transition to dual-use tools—tools that can operate inside or outside the ATLAS control framework—and the implications thereof. It further examines how the design of this infrastructure is changing to accommodate the requirements of future frameworks and emerging event processing architectures.

  9. Metadata and Annotations for Multi-scale Electrophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Mark R.; Stead, Matt; Brinkmann, Benjamin H.; Dufendach, Kevin; Worrell, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing use of high-frequency (kHz), long-duration (days) intracranial monitoring from multiple electrodes during pre-surgical evaluation for epilepsy produces large amounts of data that are challenging to store and maintain. Descriptive metadata and clinical annotations of these large data sets also pose challenges to simple, often manual, methods of data analysis. The problems of reliable communication of metadata and annotations between programs, the maintenance of the meanings within that information over long time periods, and the flexibility to re-sort data for analysis place differing demands on data structures and algorithms. Solutions to these individual problem domains (communication, storage and analysis) can be configured to provide easy translation and clarity across the domains. The Multi-scale Annotation Format (MAF) provides an integrated metadata and annotation environment that maximizes code reuse, minimizes error probability and encourages future changes by reducing the tendency to over-fit information technology solutions to current problems. An example of a graphical utility for generating and evaluating metadata and annotations for “big data” files is presented. PMID:19964266

  10. Metadata Harvesting in Regional Digital Libraries in the PIONIER Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurek, Cezary; Stroinski, Maciej; Werla, Marcin; Weglarz, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to present the concept of the functionality of metadata harvesting for regional digital libraries, based on the OAI-PMH protocol. This functionality is a part of regional digital libraries platform created in Poland. The platform was required to reach one of main objectives of the Polish PIONIER Programme--to enrich the…

  11. MMI's Metadata and Vocabulary Solutions: 10 Years and Growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graybeal, J.; Gayanilo, F.; Rueda-Velasquez, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Marine Metadata Interoperability project (http://marinemetadata.org) held its public opening at AGU's 2004 Fall Meeting. For 10 years since that debut, the MMI guidance and vocabulary sites have served over 100,000 visitors, with 525 community members and continuous Steering Committee leadership. Originally funded by the National Science Foundation, over the years multiple organizations have supported the MMI mission: "Our goal is to support collaborative research in the marine science domain, by simplifying the incredibly complex world of metadata into specific, straightforward guidance. MMI encourages scientists and data managers at all levels to apply good metadata practices from the start of a project, by providing the best guidance and resources for data management, and developing advanced metadata tools and services needed by the community." Now hosted by the Harte Research Institute at Texas A&M University at Corpus Christi, MMI continues to provide guidance and services to the community, and is planning for marine science and technology needs for the next 10 years. In this presentation we will highlight our major accomplishments, describe our recent achievements and imminent goals, and propose a vision for improving marine data interoperability for the next 10 years, including Ontology Registry and Repository (http://mmisw.org/orr) advancements and applications (http://mmisw.org/cfsn).

  12. Metadata Harvesting in Regional Digital Libraries in the PIONIER Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazurek, Cezary; Stroinski, Maciej; Werla, Marcin; Weglarz, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to present the concept of the functionality of metadata harvesting for regional digital libraries, based on the OAI-PMH protocol. This functionality is a part of regional digital libraries platform created in Poland. The platform was required to reach one of main objectives of the Polish PIONIER Programme--to enrich the…

  13. Big Earth Data Initiative: Metadata Improvement: Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozimor, John; Habermann, Ted; Farley, John

    2016-01-01

    Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) The Big Earth Data Initiative (BEDI) invests in standardizing and optimizing the collection, management and delivery of U.S. Government's civil Earth observation data to improve discovery, access use, and understanding of Earth observations by the broader user community. Complete and consistent standard metadata helps address all three goals.

  14. Metadata for data rescue and data at risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, William L.; Faundeen, John L.; Greenberg, Jane; Taylor, Fraser

    2011-01-01

    Scientific data age, become stale, fall into disuse and run tremendous risks of being forgotten and lost. These problems can be addressed by archiving and managing scientific data over time, and establishing practices that facilitate data discovery and reuse. Metadata documentation is integral to this work and essential for measuring and assessing high priority data preservation cases. The International Council for Science: Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) has a newly appointed Data-at-Risk Task Group (DARTG), participating in the general arena of rescuing data. The DARTG primary objective is building an inventory of scientific data that are at risk of being lost forever. As part of this effort, the DARTG is testing an approach for documenting endangered datasets. The DARTG is developing a minimal and easy to use set of metadata properties for sufficiently describing endangered data, which will aid global data rescue missions. The DARTG metadata framework supports rapid capture, and easy documentation, across an array of scientific domains. This paper reports on the goals and principles supporting the DARTG metadata schema, and provides a description of the preliminary implementation.

  15. Syndicating Rich Bibliographic Metadata Using MODS and RSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Many libraries use RSS to syndicate information about their collections to users. A survey of 65 academic libraries revealed their most common use for RSS is to disseminate information about library holdings, such as lists of new acquisitions. Even though typical RSS feeds are ill suited to the task of carrying rich bibliographic metadata, great…

  16. Scalable PGAS Metadata Management on Extreme Scale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Agarwal, Khushbu; Straatsma, TP

    2013-05-16

    Programming models intended to run on exascale systems have a number of challenges to overcome, specially the sheer size of the system as measured by the number of concurrent software entities created and managed by the underlying runtime. It is clear from the size of these systems that any state maintained by the programming model has to be strictly sub-linear in size, in order not to overwhelm memory usage with pure overhead. A principal feature of Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) models is providing easy access to global-view distributed data structures. In order to provide efficient access to these distributed data structures, PGAS models must keep track of metadata such as where array sections are located with respect to processes/threads running on the HPC system. As PGAS models and applications become ubiquitous on very large transpetascale systems, a key component to their performance and scalability will be efficient and judicious use of memory for model overhead (metadata) compared to application data. We present an evaluation of several strategies to manage PGAS metadata that exhibit different space/time tradeoffs. We use two real-world PGAS applications to capture metadata usage patterns and gain insight into their communication behavior.

  17. A metadata schema for data objects in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Canham, Steve; Ohmann, Christian

    2016-11-24

    A large number of stakeholders have accepted the need for greater transparency in clinical research and, in the context of various initiatives and systems, have developed a diverse and expanding number of repositories for storing the data and documents created by clinical studies (collectively known as data objects). To make the best use of such resources, we assert that it is also necessary for stakeholders to agree and deploy a simple, consistent metadata scheme. The relevant data objects and their likely storage are described, and the requirements for metadata to support data sharing in clinical research are identified. Issues concerning persistent identifiers, for both studies and data objects, are explored. A scheme is proposed that is based on the DataCite standard, with extensions to cover the needs of clinical researchers, specifically to provide (a) study identification data, including links to clinical trial registries; (b) data object characteristics and identifiers; and (c) data covering location, ownership and access to the data object. The components of the metadata scheme are described. The metadata schema is proposed as a natural extension of a widely agreed standard to fill a gap not tackled by other standards related to clinical research (e.g., Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium, Biomedical Research Integrated Domain Group). The proposal could be integrated with, but is not dependent on, other moves to better structure data in clinical research.

  18. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO.

    PubMed

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R

    2016-03-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge-multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of "final" results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Metadata management for high content screening in OMERO

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simon; Besson, Sébastien; Blackburn, Colin; Carroll, Mark; Ferguson, Richard K.; Flynn, Helen; Gillen, Kenneth; Leigh, Roger; Lindner, Dominik; Linkert, Melissa; Moore, William J.; Ramalingam, Balaji; Rozbicki, Emil; Rustici, Gabriella; Tarkowska, Aleksandra; Walczysko, Petr; Williams, Eleanor; Allan, Chris; Burel, Jean-Marie; Moore, Josh; Swedlow, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) experiments create a classic data management challenge—multiple, large sets of heterogeneous structured and unstructured data, that must be integrated and linked to produce a set of “final” results. These different data include images, reagents, protocols, analytic output, and phenotypes, all of which must be stored, linked and made accessible for users, scientists, collaborators and where appropriate the wider community. The OME Consortium has built several open source tools for managing, linking and sharing these different types of data. The OME Data Model is a metadata specification that supports the image data and metadata recorded in HCS experiments. Bio-Formats is a Java library that reads recorded image data and metadata and includes support for several HCS screening systems. OMERO is an enterprise data management application that integrates image data, experimental and analytic metadata and makes them accessible for visualization, mining, sharing and downstream analysis. We discuss how Bio-Formats and OMERO handle these different data types, and how they can be used to integrate, link and share HCS experiments in facilities and public data repositories. OME specifications and software are open source and are available at https://www.openmicroscopy.org. PMID:26476368

  20. Training and Best Practice Guidelines: Implications for Metadata Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuttur, Mohammad Y.

    2012-01-01

    In response to the rapid development of digital libraries over the past decade, researchers have focused on the use of metadata as an effective means to support resource discovery within online repositories. With the increasing involvement of libraries in digitization projects and the growing number of institutional repositories, it is anticipated…

  1. Automatic Extraction of Metadata from Scientific Publications for CRIS Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Ivanovic, Dragan; Milosavljevic, Branko; Konjovic, Zora; Surla, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a system for automatic extraction of metadata from scientific papers in PDF format for the information system for monitoring the scientific research activity of the University of Novi Sad (CRIS UNS). Design/methodology/approach: The system is based on machine learning and performs automatic extraction…

  2. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  3. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  4. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  5. Metadata Standards in Theory and Practice: The Human in the Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.; Starkweather, S.

    2013-12-01

    Metadata standards are meant to enable interoperability through common, well-defined structures and are a foundation for broader cyberinfrastructure efforts. Standards are central to emerging technologies such as metadata brokering tools supporting distributed data search. However, metadata standards in practice are often poor indicators of standardized, readily interoperable metadata. The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) data portal provides discovery and access tools for aggregated datasets from ten long-term international Arctic atmospheric observing stations. The Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) Arctic Data Explorer brokers metadata to provide distributed data search across Arctic repositories. Both the IASOA data portal and the Arctic Data Explorer rely on metadata and metadata standards to support value-add services. Challenges have included: translating between different standards despite existing crosswalks, diverging implementation practices of the same standard across communities, changing metadata practices over time and associated backwards compatibility, reconciling metadata created by data providers with standards, lack of community-accepted definitions for key terms (e.g. ';project'), integrating controlled vocabularies, and others. Metadata record ';validity' or compliance with a standard has been insufficient for interoperability. To overcome these challenges, both projects committed significant work to integrate and offer services over already 'standards compliant' metadata. Both efforts have shown that the 'human-in-the-loop' is still required to fulfill the lofty theoretical promises of metadata standards. In this talk, we 1) summarize the real-world experiences of two data discovery portals working with metadata in standard form, and 2) offer lessons learned for others who work with and rely on metadata and metadata standards.

  6. ONEMercury: Towards Automatic Annotation of Earth Science Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuarob, S.; Pouchard, L. C.; Noy, N.; Horsburgh, J. S.; Palanisamy, G.

    2012-12-01

    Earth sciences have become more data-intensive, requiring access to heterogeneous data collected from multiple places, times, and thematic scales. For example, research on climate change may involve exploring and analyzing observational data such as the migration of animals and temperature shifts across the earth, as well as various model-observation inter-comparison studies. Recently, DataONE, a federated data network built to facilitate access to and preservation of environmental and ecological data, has come to exist. ONEMercury has recently been implemented as part of the DataONE project to serve as a portal for discovering and accessing environmental and observational data across the globe. ONEMercury harvests metadata from the data hosted by multiple data repositories and makes it searchable via a common search interface built upon cutting edge search engine technology, allowing users to interact with the system, intelligently filter the search results on the fly, and fetch the data from distributed data sources. Linking data from heterogeneous sources always has a cost. A problem that ONEMercury faces is the different levels of annotation in the harvested metadata records. Poorly annotated records tend to be missed during the search process as they lack meaningful keywords. Furthermore, such records would not be compatible with the advanced search functionality offered by ONEMercury as the interface requires a metadata record be semantically annotated. The explosion of the number of metadata records harvested from an increasing number of data repositories makes it impossible to annotate the harvested records manually, urging the need for a tool capable of automatically annotating poorly curated metadata records. In this paper, we propose a topic-model (TM) based approach for automatic metadata annotation. Our approach mines topics in the set of well annotated records and suggests keywords for poorly annotated records based on topic similarity. We utilize the

  7. A Metadata Standard for Hydroinformatic Data Conforming to International Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notay, Vikram; Carstens, Georg; Lehfeldt, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    The affordable availability of computing power and digital storage has been a boon for the scientific community. The hydroinformatics community has also benefitted from the so-called digital revolution, which has enabled the tackling of more and more complex physical phenomena using hydroinformatic models, instruments, sensors, etc. With models getting more and more complex, computational domains getting larger and the resolution of computational grids and measurement data getting finer, a large amount of data is generated and consumed in any hydroinformatics related project. The ubiquitous availability of internet also contributes to this phenomenon with data being collected through sensor networks connected to telecommunications networks and the internet long before the term Internet of Things existed. Although generally good, this exponential increase in the number of available datasets gives rise to the need to describe this data in a standardised way to not only be able to get a quick overview about the data but to also facilitate interoperability of data from different sources. The Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute (BAW) is a federal authority of the German Federal Ministry of Transport and Digital Infrastructure. BAW acts as a consultant for the safe and efficient operation of the German waterways. As part of its consultation role, BAW operates a number of physical and numerical models for sections of inland and marine waterways. In order to uniformly describe the data produced and consumed by these models throughout BAW and to ensure interoperability with other federal and state institutes on the one hand and with EU countries on the other, a metadata profile for hydroinformatic data has been developed at BAW. The metadata profile is composed in its entirety using the ISO 19115 international standard for metadata related to geographic information. Due to the widespread use of the ISO 19115 standard in the existing geodata infrastructure

  8. DNA Replication Origins

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Alan C.; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression. PMID:23838439

  9. Replication of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming Y.; Matson, Lawrence E.; Lee, Heedong; Chen, Chenggang

    2009-08-01

    The fabrication of lightweight mirror assemblages via a replication technique offers great potential for eliminating the high cost and schedule associated with the grinding and polishing steps needed for conventional glass or SiC mirrors. A replication mandrel is polished to an inverse figure shape and to the desired finish quality. It is then, coated with a release layer, the appropriate reflective layer, and followed by a laminate for coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) tailorability and strength. This optical membrane is adhered to a mirror structural substrate with a low shrinkage, CTE tailored adhesive. Afterwards, the whole assembly is separated from the mandrel. The mandrel is then cleaned and reused for the next replication run. The ultimate goal of replication is to preserve the surface finish and figure of the optical membrane upon its release from the mandrel. Successful replication requires a minimization of the residual stresses within the optical coating stack, the curing stresses from the adhesive and the thermal stress resulting from CTE mismatch between the structural substrate, the adhesive, and the optical membrane. In this paper, the results on replicated trials using both metal/metal and ceramic/ceramic laminates adhered to light weighted structural substrates made from syntactic foams (both inorganic and organic) will be discussed.

  10. RESTful Access to NOAA's Space Weather Data and Metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihn, E. A.; Elespuru, P. R.; Zhizhin, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Space Physics Interactive Data Resource (SPIDR) (http://spidr.ngdc.noaa.gov) is a web based application for searching, accessing and interacting with NOAA’s space related data holdings. SPIDR serves as one of several interfaces to the National Geophysical Data Center's archived digital holdings. The SPIDR system while successful in delivering data and visualization to clients was also found to be limited in its ability to interact with other programs, its ability to integrate with alternate work-flows and its support for multiple user interfaces (UI). As such in 2006 the SPIDR development team implemented a SOAP based interface to SPIDR through which outside developers could make use of the resource. It was our finding however that despite our best efforts at documentation, the interface remained elusive to many users. That is to say a few strong programmers were able to format and use the XML messaging but in general it did not make the data more accessible. In response SPIDR has been extended to include a REST style web services API for all time series data. This provides direct, synchronous, simple programmatic access to over 200 individual parameters representing space weather data directly from the NGDC archive. In addition to the data service SPIDR has implemented a metadata service which allows users to get Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC )style metadata records describing all available data and stations. This metadata will migrate to the NASA Space Physics Archive Search and Extract ( SPASE) style in future versions in order to provide further detail. The combination of data, metadata and visualization tools available through SPIDR combine to make it a powerful virtual observatory (VO). When this is combined with a content rich metadata system we have experience vastly greater user response and usage This talk will present details of the development as well as lessons learned from 10 years of SPIDR development.

  11. A Solr Powered Architecture for Scientific Metadata Search Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, S. A.; Billingsley, B. W.; Harper, D.; Kovarik, J.; Brandt, M.

    2014-12-01

    Discovering and obtaining resources for scientific research is increasingly difficult but Open Source tools have been implemented to provide inexpensive solutions for scientific metadata search applications. Common practices used in modern web applications can improve the quality of scientific data as well as increase availability to a wider audience while reducing costs of maintenance. Motivated to improve discovery and access of scientific metadata hosted at NSIDC and the need to aggregate many areas of arctic research, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (ACADIS) contributed to a shared codebase used by the NSIDC Search and Arctic Data Explorer (ADE) portals. We implemented the NSIDC Search and ADE to improve search and discovery of scientific metadata in many areas of cryospheric research. All parts of the applications are available free and open for reuse in other applications and portals. We have applied common techniques that are widely used by search applications around the web and with the goal of providing quick and easy access to scientific metadata. We adopted keyword search auto-suggest which provides a dynamic list of terms and phrases that closely match characters as the user types. Facet queries are another technique we have implemented to filter results based on aspects of the data like the instrument used or temporal duration of the data set. Service APIs provide a layer between the interface and the database and are shared between the NSIDC Search and ACADIS ADE interfaces. We also implemented a shared data store between both portals using Apache Solr (an Open Source search engine platform that stores and indexes XML documents) and leverage many powerful features including geospatial search and faceting. This presentation will discuss the application architecture as well as tools and techniques used to enhance search and discovery of scientific metadata.

  12. Serving Fisheries and Ocean Metadata to Communities Around the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meaux, Melanie F.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) assists the oceanographic community in the discovery, access, and sharing of scientific data by serving on-line fisheries and ocean metadata to users around the globe. As of January 2006, the directory holds more than 16,300 Earth Science data descriptions and over 1,300 services descriptions. Of these, nearly 4,000 unique ocean-related metadata records are available to the public, with many having direct links to the data. In 2005, the GCMD averaged over 5 million hits a month, with nearly a half million unique hosts for the year. Through the GCMD portal (http://gcmd.nasa.gov/), users can search vast and growing quantities of data and services using controlled keywords, free-text searches, or a combination of both. Users may now refine a search based on topic, location, instrument, platform, project, data center, spatial and temporal coverage, and data resolution for selected datasets. The directory also offers data holders a means to advertise and search their data through customized portals, which are subset views of the directory. The discovery metadata standard used is the Directory Interchange Format (DIF), adopted in 1988. This format has evolved to accommodate other national and international standards such as FGDC and IS019115. Users can submit metadata through easy-to-use online and offline authoring tools. The directory, which also serves as the International Directory Network (IDN), has been providing its services and sharing its experience and knowledge of metadata at the international, national, regional, and local level for many years. Active partners include the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), federal agencies (such as NASA, NOAA, and USGS), international agencies (such as IOC/IODE, UN, and JAXA) and organizations (such as ESIP, IOOS/DMAC, GOSIC, GLOBEC, OBIS, and GoMODP).

  13. The ground truth about metadata and community detection in networks

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Leto; Larremore, Daniel B.; Clauset, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Across many scientific domains, there is a common need to automatically extract a simplified view or coarse-graining of how a complex system’s components interact. This general task is called community detection in networks and is analogous to searching for clusters in independent vector data. It is common to evaluate the performance of community detection algorithms by their ability to find so-called ground truth communities. This works well in synthetic networks with planted communities because these networks’ links are formed explicitly based on those known communities. However, there are no planted communities in real-world networks. Instead, it is standard practice to treat some observed discrete-valued node attributes, or metadata, as ground truth. We show that metadata are not the same as ground truth and that treating them as such induces severe theoretical and practical problems. We prove that no algorithm can uniquely solve community detection, and we prove a general No Free Lunch theorem for community detection, which implies that there can be no algorithm that is optimal for all possible community detection tasks. However, community detection remains a powerful tool and node metadata still have value, so a careful exploration of their relationship with network structure can yield insights of genuine worth. We illustrate this point by introducing two statistical techniques that can quantify the relationship between metadata and community structure for a broad class of models. We demonstrate these techniques using both synthetic and real-world networks, and for multiple types of metadata and community structures. PMID:28508065

  14. Serious Games for Health: The Potential of Metadata.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Stefan; Maddison, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    Numerous serious games and health games exist, either as commercial products (typically with a focus on entertaining a broad user group) or smaller games and game prototypes, often resulting from research projects (typically tailored to a smaller user group with a specific health characteristic). A major drawback of existing health games is that they are not very well described and attributed with (machine-readable, quantitative, and qualitative) metadata such as the characterizing goal of the game, the target user group, or expected health effects well proven in scientific studies. This makes it difficult or even impossible for end users to find and select the most appropriate game for a specific situation (e.g., health needs). Therefore, the aim of this article was to motivate the need and potential/benefit of metadata for the description and retrieval of health games and to describe a descriptive model for the qualitative description of games for health. It was not the aim of the article to describe a stable, running system (portal) for health games. This will be addressed in future work. Building on previous work toward a metadata format for serious games, a descriptive model for the formal description of games for health is introduced. For the conceptualization of this model, classification schemata of different existing health game repositories are considered. The classification schema consists of three levels: a core set of mandatory descriptive fields relevant for all games for health application areas, a detailed level with more comprehensive, optional information about the games, and so-called extension as level three with specific descriptive elements relevant for dedicated health games application areas, for example, cardio training. A metadata format provides a technical framework to describe, find, and select appropriate health games matching the needs of the end user. Future steps to improve, apply, and promote the metadata format in the health games

  15. Serving Fisheries and Ocean Metadata to Communities Around the World

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meaux, Melanie F.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) assists the oceanographic community in the discovery, access, and sharing of scientific data by serving on-line fisheries and ocean metadata to users around the globe. As of January 2006, the directory holds more than 16,300 Earth Science data descriptions and over 1,300 services descriptions. Of these, nearly 4,000 unique ocean-related metadata records are available to the public, with many having direct links to the data. In 2005, the GCMD averaged over 5 million hits a month, with nearly a half million unique hosts for the year. Through the GCMD portal (http://gcmd.nasa.gov/), users can search vast and growing quantities of data and services using controlled keywords, free-text searches, or a combination of both. Users may now refine a search based on topic, location, instrument, platform, project, data center, spatial and temporal coverage, and data resolution for selected datasets. The directory also offers data holders a means to advertise and search their data through customized portals, which are subset views of the directory. The discovery metadata standard used is the Directory Interchange Format (DIF), adopted in 1988. This format has evolved to accommodate other national and international standards such as FGDC and IS019115. Users can submit metadata through easy-to-use online and offline authoring tools. The directory, which also serves as the International Directory Network (IDN), has been providing its services and sharing its experience and knowledge of metadata at the international, national, regional, and local level for many years. Active partners include the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), federal agencies (such as NASA, NOAA, and USGS), international agencies (such as IOC/IODE, UN, and JAXA) and organizations (such as ESIP, IOOS/DMAC, GOSIC, GLOBEC, OBIS, and GoMODP).

  16. The National Digital Information Infrastructure Preservation Program; Metadata Principles and Practicalities; Challenges for Service Providers when Importing Metadata in Digital Libraries; Integrated and Aggregated Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Amy; Duval, Erik; Hodgins, Wayne; Sutton, Stuart; Weibel, Stuart L.; McClelland, Marilyn; McArthur, David; Giersch, Sarah; Geisler, Gary; Hodgkin, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Includes 6 articles that discuss the National Digital Information Infrastructure Preservation Program at the Library of Congress; metadata in digital libraries; integrated reference services on the Web. (LRW)

  17. The National Digital Information Infrastructure Preservation Program; Metadata Principles and Practicalities; Challenges for Service Providers when Importing Metadata in Digital Libraries; Integrated and Aggregated Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Amy; Duval, Erik; Hodgins, Wayne; Sutton, Stuart; Weibel, Stuart L.; McClelland, Marilyn; McArthur, David; Giersch, Sarah; Geisler, Gary; Hodgkin, Adam

    2002-01-01

    Includes 6 articles that discuss the National Digital Information Infrastructure Preservation Program at the Library of Congress; metadata in digital libraries; integrated reference services on the Web. (LRW)

  18. The Ontological Perspectives of the Semantic Web and the Metadata Harvesting Protocol: Applications of Metadata for Improving Web Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fast, Karl V.; Campbell, D. Grant

    2001-01-01

    Compares the implied ontological frameworks of the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting and the World Wide Web Consortium's Semantic Web. Discusses current search engine technology, semantic markup, indexing principles of special libraries and online databases, and componentization and the distinction between data and…

  19. The Ontological Perspectives of the Semantic Web and the Metadata Harvesting Protocol: Applications of Metadata for Improving Web Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fast, Karl V.; Campbell, D. Grant

    2001-01-01

    Compares the implied ontological frameworks of the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting and the World Wide Web Consortium's Semantic Web. Discusses current search engine technology, semantic markup, indexing principles of special libraries and online databases, and componentization and the distinction between data and…

  20. Data, Big Data, and Metadata in Anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Levin, Matthew A; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2015-12-01

    The last decade has seen an explosion in the growth of digital data. Since 2005, the total amount of digital data created or replicated on all platforms and devices has been doubling every 2 years, from an estimated 132 exabytes (132 billion gigabytes) in 2005 to 4.4 zettabytes (4.4 trillion gigabytes) in 2013, and a projected 44 zettabytes (44 trillion gigabytes) in 2020. This growth has been driven in large part by the rise of social media along with more powerful and connected mobile devices, with an estimated 75% of information in the digital universe generated by individuals rather than entities. Transactions and communications including payments, instant messages, Web searches, social media updates, and online posts are all becoming part of a vast pool of data that live "in the cloud" on clusters of servers located in remote data centers. The amount of accumulating data has become so large that it has given rise to the term Big Data. In many ways, Big Data is just a buzzword, a phrase that is often misunderstood and misused to describe any sort of data, no matter the size or complexity. However, there is truth to the assertion that some data sets truly require new management and analysis techniques.