Science.gov

Sample records for replication fork progression

  1. Chk1 promotes replication fork progression by controlling replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Woodcock, Mick; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-09-14

    DNA replication starts at initiation sites termed replication origins. Metazoan cells contain many more potential origins than are activated (fired) during each S phase. Origin activation is controlled by the ATR checkpoint kinase and its downstream effector kinase Chk1, which suppresses origin firing in response to replication blocks and during normal S phase by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk2. In addition to increased origin activation, cells deficient in Chk1 activity display reduced rates of replication fork progression. Here we investigate the causal relationship between increased origin firing and reduced replication fork progression. We use the Cdk inhibitor roscovitine or RNAi depletion of Cdc7 to inhibit origin firing in Chk1-inhibited or RNAi-depleted cells. We report that Cdk inhibition and depletion of Cdc7 can alleviate the slow replication fork speeds in Chk1-deficient cells. Our data suggest that increased replication initiation leads to slow replication fork progression and that Chk1 promotes replication fork progression during normal S phase by controlling replication origin activity.

  2. DNA Copy Number Control Through Inhibition of Replication Fork Progression

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jared T.; Kozhevnikova, Elena N.; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Pindyurin, Alexey V.; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N.; Shloma, Victor V.; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Proper control of DNA replication is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic material and to prevent chromosomal aberrations that can drive cancer progression and developmental disorders. DNA replication is regulated primarily at the level of initiation and is under strict cell cycle regulation. Importantly, DNA replication is highly influenced by developmental cues. In Drosophila, specific regions of the genome are repressed for DNA replication during differentiation by the SNF2 domain-containing protein SUUR through an unknown mechanism. We demonstrate that SUUR is recruited to active replication forks and mediates repression of DNA replication by directly inhibiting replication fork progression instead of functioning as a replication fork barrier. Mass-spec identification of SUUR associated proteins identified the replicative helicase member CDC45 as a SUUR-associated protein, supporting a role for SUUR directly at replication forks. Our results reveal that control of eukaryotic DNA copy number can occur through inhibition of replication fork progression. PMID:25437540

  3. TRAIP regulates replication fork recovery and progression via PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wanjuan; Guo, Yingying; Huang, Jun; Deng, Yiqun; Zang, Jianye; Huen, Michael Shing-Yan

    2016-01-01

    PCNA is a central scaffold that coordinately assembles replication and repair machineries at DNA replication forks for faithful genome duplication. Here, we describe TRAIP (RNF206) as a novel PCNA-interacting factor that has important roles during mammalian replicative stress responses. We show that TRAIP encodes a nucleolar protein that migrates to stalled replication forks, and that this is accomplished by its targeting of PCNA via an evolutionarily conserved PIP box on its C terminus. Accordingly, inactivation of TRAIP or its interaction with the PCNA clamp compromised replication fork recovery and progression, and leads to chromosome instability. Together, our findings establish TRAIP as a component of the mammalian replicative stress response network, and implicate the TRAIP-PCNA axis in recovery of stalled replication forks. PMID:27462463

  4. RMI1 Promotes DNA Replication Fork Progression and Recovery from Replication Fork Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jay; O'Donnell, Lara; Durocher, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    RMI1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved complex composed of BLM and topoisomerase IIIα (TopoIIIα). This complex exhibits strand passage activity in vitro, which is likely important for DNA repair and DNA replication in vivo. The inactivation of RMI1 causes genome instability, including elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange and accelerated tumorigenesis. Using molecular combing to analyze DNA replication at the single-molecule level, we show that RMI1 is required to promote normal replication fork progression. The fork progression defect in RMI1-depleted cells is alleviated in cells lacking BLM, indicating that RMI1 functions downstream of BLM in promoting replication elongation. RMI1 localizes to subnuclear foci with BLM and TopoIIIα in response to replication stress. The proper localization of the complex requires a BLM-TopoIIIα-RMI1 interaction and is essential for RMI1 to promote recovery from replication stress. These findings reveal direct roles of RMI1 in DNA replication and the replication stress response, which could explain the molecular basis for its involvement in suppressing sister chromatid exchange and tumorigenesis. PMID:22645306

  5. DNA Replication Origins and Fork Progression at Mammalian Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Mitsunori; Fujita, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Kazumasa

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are essential chromosomal regions that prevent critical shortening of linear chromosomes and genomic instability in eukaryotic cells. The bulk of telomeric DNA is replicated by semi-conservative DNA replication in the same way as the rest of the genome. However, recent findings revealed that replication of telomeric repeats is a potential cause of chromosomal instability, because DNA replication through telomeres is challenged by the repetitive telomeric sequences and specific structures that hamper the replication fork. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the mechanisms by which telomeres are faithfully and safely replicated in mammalian cells. Various telomere-associated proteins ensure efficient telomere replication at different steps, such as licensing of replication origins, passage of replication forks, proper fork restart after replication stress, and dissolution of post-replicative structures. In particular, shelterin proteins have central roles in the control of telomere replication. Through physical interactions, accessory proteins are recruited to maintain telomere integrity during DNA replication. Dormant replication origins and/or homology-directed repair may rescue inappropriate fork stalling or collapse that can cause defects in telomere structure and functions. PMID:28350373

  6. ATR-like kinase Mec1 facilitates both chromatin accessibility at DNA replication forks and replication fork progression during replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for normal cell division and differentiation. In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication takes place on chromatin. This poses the critical question as to how DNA replication can progress through chromatin, which is inhibitory to all DNA-dependent processes. Here, we developed a novel genome-wide method to measure chromatin accessibility to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) that is normalized for nucleosome density, the NCAM (normalized chromatin accessibility to MNase) assay. This method enabled us to discover that chromatin accessibility increases specifically at and ahead of DNA replication forks in normal S phase and during replication stress. We further found that Mec1, a key regulatory ATR-like kinase in the S-phase checkpoint, is required for both normal chromatin accessibility around replication forks and replication fork rate during replication stress, revealing novel functions for the kinase in replication stress response. These results suggest a possibility that Mec1 may facilitate DNA replication fork progression during replication stress by increasing chromatin accessibility around replication forks. PMID:23307868

  7. Multiple pathways cooperate to facilitate DNA replication fork progression through alkylated DNA.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, María Victoria; Rojas, Vanesa; Tercero, José Antonio

    2008-10-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are especially vulnerable to DNA damage during the S phase of the cell cycle, when chromosomes must be duplicated. The stability of DNA replication forks is critical to achieve faithful chromosome replication and is severely compromised when forks encounter DNA lesions. To maintain genome integrity, replication forks need to be protected by the S-phase checkpoint and DNA insults must be repaired. Different pathways help to repair or tolerate the lesions in the DNA, but their contribution to the progression of replication forks through damaged DNA is not well known. Here we show in budding yeast that, when the DNA template is damaged with the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), base excision repair, homologous recombination and DNA damage tolerance pathways, together with a functional S-phase checkpoint, are essential for the efficient progression of DNA replication forks and the maintenance of cell survival. In the absence of base excision repair, replication forks stall reversibly in cells exposed to MMS. This repair reaction is necessary to eliminate the lesions that impede fork progression and has to be coordinated with recombination and damage tolerance activities to avoid fork collapse and allow forks to resume and complete chromosome replication.

  8. The progression of replication forks at natural replication barriers in live bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Moolman, M. Charl; Tiruvadi Krishnan, Sriram; Kerssemakers, Jacob W.J.; de Leeuw, Roy; Lorent, Vincent; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2016-01-01

    Protein–DNA complexes are one of the principal barriers the replisome encounters during replication. One such barrier is the Tus–ter complex, which is a direction dependent barrier for replication fork progression. The details concerning the dynamics of the replisome when encountering these Tus–ter barriers in the cell are poorly understood. By performing quantitative fluorescence microscopy with microfuidics, we investigate the effect on the replisome when encountering these barriers in live Escherichia coli cells. We make use of an E. coli variant that includes only an ectopic origin of replication that is positioned such that one of the two replisomes encounters a Tus–ter barrier before the other replisome. This enables us to single out the effect of encountering a Tus–ter roadblock on an individual replisome. We demonstrate that the replisome remains stably bound after encountering a Tus–ter complex from the non-permissive direction. Furthermore, the replisome is only transiently blocked, and continues replication beyond the barrier. Additionally, we demonstrate that these barriers affect sister chromosome segregation by visualizing specific chromosomal loci in the presence and absence of the Tus protein. These observations demonstrate the resilience of the replication fork to natural barriers and the sensitivity of chromosome alignment to fork progression. PMID:27166373

  9. Impairment of replication fork progression mediates RNA polII transcription-associated recombination.

    PubMed

    Prado, Félix; Aguilera, Andrés

    2005-03-23

    Homologous recombination safeguards genome integrity, but it can also cause genome instability of important consequences for cell proliferation and organism development. Transcription induces recombination, as shown in prokaryotes and eukaryotes for both spontaneous and developmentally regulated events such as those responsible for immunoglobulin class switching. Deciphering the molecular basis of transcription-associated recombination (TAR) is important in understanding genome instability. Using novel plasmid-borne recombination constructs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription induces recombination by impairing replication fork progression. RNAPII transcription concomitant to head-on oncoming replication causes a replication fork pause (RFP) that is linked to a significant increase in recombination. However, transcription that is codirectional with replication has little effect on replication fork progression and recombination. Transcription occurring in the absence of replication does not affect either recombination or replication fork progression. The Rrm3 helicase, which is required for replication fork progression through nucleoprotein complexes, facilitates replication through the transcription-dependent RFP site and reduces recombination. Therefore, our work provides evidence that one mechanism responsible for TAR is RNAP-mediated replication impairment.

  10. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries.

  11. The Werner's Syndrome protein collaborates with REV1 to promote replication fork progression on damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Lara G.; Sale, Julian E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance pathways facilitate the bypass of DNA lesions encountered during replication. These pathways can be mechanistically divided into recombinational damage avoidance and translesion synthesis, in which the lesion is directly bypassed by specialised DNA polymerases. We have recently shown distinct genetic dependencies for lesion bypass at and behind the replication fork in the avian cell line DT40, bypass at the fork requiring REV1 and bypass at post-replicative gaps requiring PCNA ubiquitination by RAD18. The WRN helicase/exonuclease, which is mutated in the progeroid and cancer predisposition disorder Werner's Syndrome, has previously been implicated in a RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathway. However, WRN has also been shown to be required to maintain normal replication fork progression on a damaged DNA template, a defect reminiscent of REV1-deficient cells. Here we use the avian cell line DT40 to demonstrate that WRN assists REV1-dependent translesion synthesis at the replication fork and that PCNA ubiquitination-dependent post-replicative lesion bypass provides an important backup mechanism for damage tolerance in the absence of WRN protein. PMID:20691646

  12. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  13. Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 maintain S-phase chromatin and DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a critical role in the maintenance of genome stability. Class I HDACs, histone deacetylase 1 and 2 (Hdac1 and Hdac2) are recruited to the replication fork by virtue of their interactions with the replication machinery. However, functions for Hdac1 and Hdac2 (Hdacs1,2) in DNA replication are not fully understood. Results Using genetic knockdown systems and novel Hdacs1,2-selective inhibitors, we found that loss of Hdacs1,2 leads to a reduction in the replication fork velocity, and an increase in replication stress response culminating in DNA damage. These observed defects are due to a direct role for Hdacs1,2 in DNA replication, as transcription of genes involved in replication was not affected in the absence of Hdacs1,2. We found that loss of Hdacs1,2 functions increases histone acetylation (ac) on chromatin in S-phase cells and affects nascent chromatin structure, as evidenced by the altered sensitivity of newly synthesized DNA to nuclease digestion. Specifically, H4K16ac, a histone modification involved in chromatin decompaction, is increased on nascent chromatin upon abolishing Hdacs1,2 activities. It was previously shown that H4K16ac interferes with the functions of SMARCA5, an ATP-dependent ISWI family chromatin remodeler. We found SMARCA5 also associates with nascent DNA and loss of SMARCA5 decreases replication fork velocity similar to the loss or inhibition of Hdacs1,2. Conclusions Our studies reveal important roles for Hdacs1,2 in nascent chromatin structure maintenance and regulation of SMARCA5 chromatin-remodeler function, which together are required for proper replication fork progression and genome stability in S-phase. PMID:23947532

  14. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Multiple pathways process stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Michel, Bénédicte; Grompone, Gianfranco; Florès, Maria-Jose; Bidnenko, Vladimir

    2004-08-31

    Impairment of replication fork progression is a serious threat to living organisms and a potential source of genome instability. Studies in prokaryotes have provided evidence that inactivated replication forks can restart by the reassembly of the replication machinery. Several strategies for the processing of inactivated replication forks before replisome reassembly have been described. Most of these require the action of recombination proteins, with different proteins being implicated, depending on the cause of fork arrest. The action of recombination proteins at blocked forks is not necessarily accompanied by a strand-exchange reaction and may prevent rather than repair fork breakage. These various restart pathways may reflect different structures at stalled forks. We review here the different strategies of fork processing elicited by different kinds of replication impairments in prokaryotes and the variety of roles played by recombination proteins in these processes.

  16. Top1- and Top2-mediated topological transitions at replication forks ensure fork progression and stability and prevent DNA damage checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Rodrigo; Doksani, Ylli; Capra, Thelma; Katou, Yuki-Mori; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Foiani, Marco

    2007-08-01

    DNA topoisomerases solve topological problems during chromosome metabolism. We investigated where and when Top1 and Top2 are recruited on replicating chromosomes and how their inactivation affects fork integrity and DNA damage checkpoint activation. We show that, in the context of replicating chromatin, Top1 and Top2 act within a 600-base-pair (bp) region spanning the moving forks. Top2 exhibits additional S-phase clusters at specific intergenic loci, mostly containing promoters. TOP1 ablation does not affect fork progression and stability and does not cause activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. top2 mutants accumulate sister chromatid junctions in S phase without affecting fork progression and activate Rad53 at the M-G1 transition. top1 top2 double mutants exhibit fork block and processing and phosphorylation of Rad53 and gamma H2A in S phase. The exonuclease Exo1 influences fork processing and DNA damage checkpoint activation in top1 top2 mutants. Our data are consistent with a coordinated action of Top1 and Top2 in counteracting the accumulation of torsional stress and sister chromatid entanglement at replication forks, thus preventing the diffusion of topological changes along large chromosomal regions. A failure in resolving fork-related topological constrains during S phase may therefore result in abnormal chromosome transitions, DNA damage checkpoint activation, and chromosome breakage during segregation.

  17. Concerted activities of Mcm4, Sld3, and Dbf4 in control of origin activation and DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Yi-Jun; Kinney, Justin B.; Stillman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes initiate DNA synthesis from multiple replication origins in a temporally specific manner during S phase. The replicative helicase Mcm2-7 functions in both initiation and fork progression and thus is an important target of regulation. Mcm4, a helicase subunit, possesses an unstructured regulatory domain that mediates control from multiple kinase signaling pathways, including the Dbf4-dependent Cdc7 kinase (DDK). Following replication stress in S phase, Dbf4 and Sld3, an initiation factor and essential target of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase (CDK), are targets of the checkpoint kinase Rad53 for inhibition of initiation from origins that have yet to be activated, so-called late origins. Here, whole-genome DNA replication profile analysis is used to access under various conditions the effect of mutations that alter the Mcm4 regulatory domain and the Rad53 targets, Sld3 and Dbf4. Late origin firing occurs under genotoxic stress when the controls on Mcm4, Sld3, and Dbf4 are simultaneously eliminated. The regulatory domain of Mcm4 plays an important role in the timing of late origin firing, both in an unperturbed S phase and in dNTP limitation. Furthermore, checkpoint control of Sld3 impacts fork progression under replication stress. This effect is parallel to the role of the Mcm4 regulatory domain in monitoring fork progression. Hypomorph mutations in sld3 are suppressed by a mcm4 regulatory domain mutation. Thus, in response to cellular conditions, the functions executed by Sld3, Dbf4, and the regulatory domain of Mcm4 intersect to control origin firing and replication fork progression, thereby ensuring genome stability. PMID:26733669

  18. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker–induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress. PMID:27407148

  19. Replication fork instability and the consequences of fork collisions from rereplication

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessica L.; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Replication forks encounter obstacles that must be repaired or bypassed to complete chromosome duplication before cell division. Proteomic analysis of replication forks suggests that the checkpoint and repair machinery travels with unperturbed forks, implying that they are poised to respond to stalling and collapse. However, impaired fork progression still generates aberrations, including repeat copy number instability and chromosome rearrangements. Deregulated origin firing also causes fork instability if a newer fork collides with an older one, generating double-strand breaks (DSBs) and partially rereplicated DNA. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms are used to repair rereplication damage, yet these can have deleterious consequences for genome integrity. PMID:27898391

  20. Chromatin-associated degradation is defined by UBXN-3/FAF1 to safeguard DNA replication fork progression.

    PubMed

    Franz, André; Pirson, Paul A; Pilger, Domenic; Halder, Swagata; Achuthankutty, Divya; Kashkar, Hamid; Ramadan, Kristijan; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-02-04

    The coordinated activity of DNA replication factors is a highly dynamic process that involves ubiquitin-dependent regulation. In this context, the ubiquitin-directed ATPase CDC-48/p97 recently emerged as a key regulator of chromatin-associated degradation in several of the DNA metabolic pathways that assure genome integrity. However, the spatiotemporal control of distinct CDC-48/p97 substrates in the chromatin environment remained unclear. Here, we report that progression of the DNA replication fork is coordinated by UBXN-3/FAF1. UBXN-3/FAF1 binds to the licensing factor CDT-1 and additional ubiquitylated proteins, thus promoting CDC-48/p97-dependent turnover and disassembly of DNA replication factor complexes. Consequently, inactivation of UBXN-3/FAF1 stabilizes CDT-1 and CDC-45/GINS on chromatin, causing severe defects in replication fork dynamics accompanied by pronounced replication stress and eventually resulting in genome instability. Our work identifies a critical substrate selection module of CDC-48/p97 required for chromatin-associated protein degradation in both Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, which is relevant to oncogenesis and aging.

  1. Chromatin-associated degradation is defined by UBXN-3/FAF1 to safeguard DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    Franz, André; Pirson, Paul A.; Pilger, Domenic; Halder, Swagata; Achuthankutty, Divya; Kashkar, Hamid; Ramadan, Kristijan; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated activity of DNA replication factors is a highly dynamic process that involves ubiquitin-dependent regulation. In this context, the ubiquitin-directed ATPase CDC-48/p97 recently emerged as a key regulator of chromatin-associated degradation in several of the DNA metabolic pathways that assure genome integrity. However, the spatiotemporal control of distinct CDC-48/p97 substrates in the chromatin environment remained unclear. Here, we report that progression of the DNA replication fork is coordinated by UBXN-3/FAF1. UBXN-3/FAF1 binds to the licensing factor CDT-1 and additional ubiquitylated proteins, thus promoting CDC-48/p97-dependent turnover and disassembly of DNA replication factor complexes. Consequently, inactivation of UBXN-3/FAF1 stabilizes CDT-1 and CDC-45/GINS on chromatin, causing severe defects in replication fork dynamics accompanied by pronounced replication stress and eventually resulting in genome instability. Our work identifies a critical substrate selection module of CDC-48/p97 required for chromatin-associated protein degradation in both Caenorhabditis elegans and humans, which is relevant to oncogenesis and aging. PMID:26842564

  2. Pfh1 Is an Accessory Replicative Helicase that Interacts with the Replisome to Facilitate Fork Progression and Preserve Genome Integrity

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Karin R.; Pourbozorgi-Langroudi, Parham; Cristea, Ileana M.; Zakian, Virginia A.; Capra, John A.; Sabouri, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Replicative DNA helicases expose the two strands of the double helix to the replication apparatus, but accessory helicases are often needed to help forks move past naturally occurring hard-to-replicate sites, such as tightly bound proteins, RNA/DNA hybrids, and DNA secondary structures. Although the Schizosaccharomyces pombe 5’-to-3’ DNA helicase Pfh1 is known to promote fork progression, its genomic targets, dynamics, and mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we address these questions by integrating genome-wide identification of Pfh1 binding sites, comprehensive analysis of the effects of Pfh1 depletion on replication and DNA damage, and proteomic analysis of Pfh1 interaction partners by immunoaffinity purification mass spectrometry. Of the 621 high confidence Pfh1-binding sites in wild type cells, about 40% were sites of fork slowing (as marked by high DNA polymerase occupancy) and/or DNA damage (as marked by high levels of phosphorylated H2A). The replication and integrity of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, highly transcribed RNA polymerase II genes, and nucleosome depleted regions were particularly Pfh1-dependent. The association of Pfh1 with genomic integrity at highly transcribed genes was S phase dependent, and thus unlikely to be an artifact of high transcription rates. Although Pfh1 affected replication and suppressed DNA damage at discrete sites throughout the genome, Pfh1 and the replicative DNA polymerase bound to similar extents to both Pfh1-dependent and independent sites, suggesting that Pfh1 is proximal to the replication machinery during S phase. Consistent with this interpretation, Pfh1 co-purified with many key replisome components, including the hexameric MCM helicase, replicative DNA polymerases, RPA, and the processivity clamp PCNA in an S phase dependent manner. Thus, we conclude that Pfh1 is an accessory DNA helicase that interacts with the replisome and promotes replication and suppresses DNA damage at hard-to-replicate sites. These

  3. DNA polymerase η modulates replication fork progression and DNA damage responses in platinum-treated human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, Anna M.; Cruet-Hennequart, Séverine; Pasero, Philippe; Carty, Michael P.

    2013-11-01

    Human cells lacking DNA polymerase η (polη) are sensitive to platinum-based cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Using DNA combing to directly investigate the role of polη in bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions in vivo, we demonstrate that nascent DNA strands are up to 39% shorter in human cells lacking polη than in cells expressing polη. This provides the first direct evidence that polη modulates replication fork progression in vivo following cisplatin and carboplatin treatment. Severe replication inhibition in individual platinum-treated polη-deficient cells correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the RPA2 subunit of replication protein A on serines 4 and 8, as determined using EdU labelling and immunofluorescence, consistent with formation of DNA strand breaks at arrested forks in the absence of polη. Polη-mediated bypass of platinum-induced DNA lesions may therefore represent one mechanism by which cancer cells can tolerate platinum-based chemotherapy.

  4. Pathways of mammalian replication fork restart.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Single-molecule analyses of DNA replication have greatly advanced our understanding of mammalian replication restart. Several proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery promote the efficient restart of replication forks that have been stalled by replication inhibitors, suggesting that bona fide fork restart pathways exist in mammalian cells. Different models of replication fork restart can be envisaged, based on the involvement of DNA helicases, nucleases, homologous recombination factors and the importance of DNA double-strand break formation.

  5. ING2 controls the progression of DNA replication forks to maintain genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Delphine; Ythier, Damien; Binet, Romuald; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Sengupta, Sagar; Pedeux, Rémy

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth 2 (ING2) is a candidate tumour suppressor gene the expression of which is frequently lost in tumours. Here, we identified a new function for ING2 in the control of DNA replication and in the maintenance of genome stability. Global replication rate was markedly reduced during normal S-phase in small interfering RNA (siRNA) ING2 cells, as seen in a DNA fibre spreading experiment. Accordingly, we found that ING2 interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and regulates its amount to the chromatin fraction, allowing normal replication progression and normal cell proliferation. Deregulation of DNA replication has been previously associated with genome instability. Hence, a high proportion of siRNA ING2 cells presented endoreduplication of their genome as well as an increased frequency of sister chromatid exchange. Thus, we propose for the first time that ING2 might function as a tumour suppressor gene by directly maintaining DNA integrity. PMID:19730436

  6. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    PubMed

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  7. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-01-01

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress. PMID:26113155

  8. Recombinase and translesion DNA polymerase decrease the speed of replication fork progression during the DNA damage response in Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kang Wei; Pham, Tuan Minh; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji; Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi

    2015-01-01

    The SOS response is a DNA damage response pathway that serves as a general safeguard of genome integrity in bacteria. Extensive studies of the SOS response in Escherichia coli have contributed to establishing the key concepts of cellular responses to DNA damage. However, how the SOS response impacts on the dynamics of DNA replication fork movement remains unknown. We found that inducing the SOS response decreases the mean speed of individual replication forks by 30–50% in E. coli cells, leading to a 20–30% reduction in overall DNA synthesis. dinB and recA belong to a group of genes that are upregulated during the SOS response, and encode the highly conserved proteins DinB (also known as DNA polymerase IV) and RecA, which, respectively, specializes in translesion DNA synthesis and functions as the central recombination protein. Both genes were independently responsible for the SOS-dependent slowdown of replication fork progression. Furthermore, fork speed was reduced when each gene was ectopically expressed in SOS-uninduced cells to the levels at which they are expressed in SOS-induced cells. These results clearly indicate that the increased expression of dinB and recA performs a novel role in restraining the progression of an unperturbed replication fork during the SOS response. PMID:25628359

  9. Recombinase and translesion DNA polymerase decrease the speed of replication fork progression during the DNA damage response in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kang Wei; Pham, Tuan Minh; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji; Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi

    2015-02-18

    The SOS response is a DNA damage response pathway that serves as a general safeguard of genome integrity in bacteria. Extensive studies of the SOS response in Escherichia coli have contributed to establishing the key concepts of cellular responses to DNA damage. However, how the SOS response impacts on the dynamics of DNA replication fork movement remains unknown. We found that inducing the SOS response decreases the mean speed of individual replication forks by 30-50% in E. coli cells, leading to a 20-30% reduction in overall DNA synthesis. dinB and recA belong to a group of genes that are upregulated during the SOS response, and encode the highly conserved proteins DinB (also known as DNA polymerase IV) and RecA, which, respectively, specializes in translesion DNA synthesis and functions as the central recombination protein. Both genes were independently responsible for the SOS-dependent slowdown of replication fork progression. Furthermore, fork speed was reduced when each gene was ectopically expressed in SOS-uninduced cells to the levels at which they are expressed in SOS-induced cells. These results clearly indicate that the increased expression of dinB and recA performs a novel role in restraining the progression of an unperturbed replication fork during the SOS response.

  10. Preventing Replication Fork Collapse to Maintain Genome Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    Billions of base pairs of DNA must be replicated trillions of times in a human lifetime. Complete and accurate replication once and only once per cell division cycle is essential to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. Impediments to replication fork progression including difficult to replicate DNA sequences, conflicts with transcription, and DNA damage further add to the genome maintenance challenge. These obstacles frequently cause fork stalling, but only rarely cause a failure to complete replication. Robust mechanisms ensure that stalled forks remain stable and capable of either resuming DNA synthesis or being rescued by converging forks. However, when failures do happen the fork collapses leading to genome rearrangements, cell death and disease. Despite intense interest, the mechanisms to repair damaged replication forks, stabilize them, and ensure successful replication remain only partly understood. Different models of fork collapse have been proposed with varying descriptions of what happens to the DNA and replisome. Here, I will define fork collapse and describe what is known about how the replication checkpoint prevents it to maintain genome stability. PMID:25957489

  11. Topological locking restrains replication fork reversal

    PubMed Central

    Fierro-Fernández, Marta; Hernández, Pablo; Krimer, Dora B.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Schvartzman, Jorge B.

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, psoralen cross-linking, and electron microscopy were used to study the effects of positive supercoiling on fork reversal in isolated replication intermediates of bacterial DNA plasmids. The results obtained demonstrate that the formation of Holliday-like junctions at both forks of a replication bubble creates a topological constraint that prevents further regression of the forks. We propose that this topological locking of replication intermediates provides a biological safety mechanism that protects DNA molecules against extensive fork reversals. PMID:17242356

  12. Regulation of Replication Fork Advance and Stability by Nucleosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Prado, Felix; Maya, Douglas

    2017-01-24

    The advance of replication forks to duplicate chromosomes in dividing cells requires the disassembly of nucleosomes ahead of the fork and the rapid assembly of parental and de novo histones at the newly synthesized strands behind the fork. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly provides a unique opportunity to regulate fork advance and stability. Through post-translational histone modifications and tightly regulated physical and genetic interactions between chromatin assembly factors and replisome components, chromatin assembly: (1) controls the rate of DNA synthesis and adjusts it to histone availability; (2) provides a mechanism to protect the integrity of the advancing fork; and (3) regulates the mechanisms of DNA damage tolerance in response to replication-blocking lesions. Uncoupling DNA synthesis from nucleosome assembly has deleterious effects on genome integrity and cell cycle progression and is linked to genetic diseases, cancer, and aging.

  13. Regulation of Replication Fork Advance and Stability by Nucleosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Felix; Maya, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    The advance of replication forks to duplicate chromosomes in dividing cells requires the disassembly of nucleosomes ahead of the fork and the rapid assembly of parental and de novo histones at the newly synthesized strands behind the fork. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly provides a unique opportunity to regulate fork advance and stability. Through post-translational histone modifications and tightly regulated physical and genetic interactions between chromatin assembly factors and replisome components, chromatin assembly: (1) controls the rate of DNA synthesis and adjusts it to histone availability; (2) provides a mechanism to protect the integrity of the advancing fork; and (3) regulates the mechanisms of DNA damage tolerance in response to replication-blocking lesions. Uncoupling DNA synthesis from nucleosome assembly has deleterious effects on genome integrity and cell cycle progression and is linked to genetic diseases, cancer, and aging. PMID:28125036

  14. Replication forks reverse at high frequency upon replication stress in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Maric, Chrystelle; Bénard, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    The addition of hydroxyurea after the onset of S phase allows replication to start and permits the successive detecting of replication-dependent joint DNA molecules and chicken foot structures in the synchronous nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. We find evidence for a very high frequency of reversed replication forks upon replication stress. The formation of these reversed forks is dependent on the presence of joint DNA molecules, the impediment of the replication fork progression by hydroxyurea, and likely on the propensity of some replication origins to reinitiate replication to counteract the action of this compound. As hydroxyurea treatment enables us to successively detect the appearance of joint DNA molecules and then of reversed replication forks, we propose that chicken foot structures are formed both from the regression of hydroxyurea-frozen joint DNA molecules and from hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks. These experiments underscore the transient nature of replication fork regression, which becomes detectable due to the hydroxyurea-induced slowing down of replication fork progression.

  15. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  16. Replication fork slowing and stalling are distinct, checkpoint-independent consequences of replicating damaged DNA

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In response to DNA damage during S phase, cells slow DNA replication. This slowing is orchestrated by the intra-S checkpoint and involves inhibition of origin firing and reduction of replication fork speed. Slowing of replication allows for tolerance of DNA damage and suppresses genomic instability. Although the mechanisms of origin inhibition by the intra-S checkpoint are understood, major questions remain about how the checkpoint regulates replication forks: Does the checkpoint regulate the rate of fork progression? Does the checkpoint affect all forks, or only those encountering damage? Does the checkpoint facilitate the replication of polymerase-blocking lesions? To address these questions, we have analyzed the checkpoint in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe using a single-molecule DNA combing assay, which allows us to unambiguously separate the contribution of origin and fork regulation towards replication slowing, and allows us to investigate the behavior of individual forks. Moreover, we have interrogated the role of forks interacting with individual sites of damage by using three damaging agents—MMS, 4NQO and bleomycin—that cause similar levels of replication slowing with very different frequency of DNA lesions. We find that the checkpoint slows replication by inhibiting origin firing, but not by decreasing fork rates. However, the checkpoint appears to facilitate replication of damaged templates, allowing forks to more quickly pass lesions. Finally, using a novel analytic approach, we rigorously identify fork stalling events in our combing data and show that they play a previously unappreciated role in shaping replication kinetics in response to DNA damage. PMID:28806726

  17. Are the SSB-Interacting Proteins RecO, RecG, PriA and the DnaB-Interacting Protein Rep Bound to Progressing Replication Forks in Escherichia coli?

    PubMed Central

    Matelot, Mélody; Allemand, Jean-François; Michel, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms several enzymes that are needed upon replication impediment are targeted to replication forks by interaction with a replication protein. In most cases these proteins interact with the polymerase clamp or with single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB). In Escherichia coli an accessory replicative helicase was also shown to interact with the DnaB replicative helicase. Here we have used cytological observation of Venus fluorescent fusion proteins expressed from their endogenous loci in live E. coli cells to determine whether DNA repair and replication restart proteins that interact with a replication protein travel with replication forks. A custom-made microscope that detects active replisome molecules provided that they are present in at least three copies was used. Neither the recombination proteins RecO and RecG, nor the replication accessory helicase Rep are detected specifically in replicating cells in our assay, indicating that either they are not present at progressing replication forks or they are present in less than three copies. The Venus-PriA fusion protein formed foci even in the absence of replication forks, which prevented us from reaching a conclusion. PMID:26244508

  18. Replication Checkpoint: Tuning and Coordination of Replication Forks in S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Hustedt, Nicole; Gasser, Susan M.; Shimada, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Checkpoints monitor critical cell cycle events such as chromosome duplication and segregation. They are highly conserved mechanisms that prevent progression into the next phase of the cell cycle when cells are unable to accomplish the previous event properly. During S phase, cells also provide a surveillance mechanism called the DNA replication checkpoint, which consists of a conserved kinase cascade that is provoked by insults that block or slow down replication forks. The DNA replication checkpoint is crucial for maintaining genome stability, because replication forks become vulnerable to collapse when they encounter obstacles such as nucleotide adducts, nicks, RNA-DNA hybrids, or stable protein-DNA complexes. These can be exogenously induced or can arise from endogenous cellular activity. Here, we summarize the initiation and transduction of the replication checkpoint as well as its targets, which coordinate cell cycle events and DNA replication fork stability. PMID:24705211

  19. Cancer therapy and replication stress: forks on the road to perdition.

    PubMed

    Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Jones, Rebecca M; Higgs, Martin R; Petermann, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated DNA replication occurs in cancer where it contributes to genomic instability. This process is a target of cytotoxic therapies. Chemotherapies exploit high DNA replication in cancer cells by modifying the DNA template or by inhibiting vital enzymatic activities that lead to slowing or stalling replication fork progression. Stalled replication forks can be converted into toxic DNA double-strand breaks resulting in cell death, i.e., replication stress. While likely crucial for many cancer treatments, replication stress is poorly understood due to its complexity. While we still know relatively little about the role of replication stress in cancer therapy, technical advances in recent years have shed new light on the effect that cancer therapeutics have on replication forks and the molecular mechanisms that lead from obstructed fork progression to cell death. This chapter will give an overview of our current understanding of replication stress in the context of cancer therapy.

  20. Replication patterns and organization of replication forks in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Stokke, Caroline; Waldminghaus, Torsten; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the replication patterns of the two chromosomes of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae grown in four different media. By combining flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR with computer simulations, we show that in rich media, V. cholerae cells grow with overlapping replication cycles of both the large chromosome (ChrI) and the small chromosome (ChrII). In Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, initiation occurs at four copies of the ChrI origin and two copies of the ChrII origin. Replication of ChrII was found to occur at the end of the ChrI replication period in all four growth conditions. Novel cell-sorting experiments with marker frequency analysis support these conclusions. Incubation with protein synthesis inhibitors indicated that the potential for initiation of replication of ChrII was present at the same time as that of ChrI, but was actively delayed until much of ChrI was replicated. Investigations of the localization of SeqA bound to new DNA at replication forks indicated that the forks were co-localized in pairs when cells grew without overlapping replication cycles and in higher-order structures during more rapid growth. The increased degree of fork organization during rapid growth may be a means by which correct segregation of daughter molecules is facilitated.

  1. New histone supply regulates replication fork speed and PCNA unloading

    PubMed Central

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Feng, Yunpeng; Alabert, Constance; Neelsen, Kai J.; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Zhao, Xiaobei; Lees, Michael; Sandelin, Albin; Pasero, Philippe; Lopes, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Correct duplication of DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin is central to genome function and stability. However, it remains unclear how cells coordinate DNA synthesis with provision of new histones for chromatin assembly to ensure chromosomal stability. In this paper, we show that replication fork speed is dependent on new histone supply and efficient nucleosome assembly. Inhibition of canonical histone biosynthesis impaired replication fork progression and reduced nucleosome occupancy on newly synthesized DNA. Replication forks initially remained stable without activation of conventional checkpoints, although prolonged histone deficiency generated DNA damage. PCNA accumulated on newly synthesized DNA in cells lacking new histones, possibly to maintain opportunity for CAF-1 recruitment and nucleosome assembly. Consistent with this, in vitro and in vivo analysis showed that PCNA unloading is delayed in the absence of nucleosome assembly. We propose that coupling of fork speed and PCNA unloading to nucleosome assembly provides a simple mechanism to adjust DNA replication and maintain chromatin integrity during transient histone shortage. PMID:24379417

  2. Recovery of Arrested Replication Forks by Homologous Recombination Is Error-Prone

    PubMed Central

    Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology) indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination. PMID:23093942

  3. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    PubMed

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress.

  4. THE FORK AND THE KINASE: A DNA REPLICATION TALE FROM A CHK1 PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    González Besteiro, Marina A.; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. The checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged-DNA. Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Such findings unveil a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA-lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, the multifaceted and versatile functions of Chk1 at ongoing forks and replication origins determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress. PMID:25795119

  5. Regression of Replication Forks Stalled by Leading-strand Template Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sankalp; Yeeles, Joseph T. P.; Marians, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The orderly progression of replication forks formed at the origin of replication in Escherichia coli is challenged by encounters with template damage, slow moving RNA polymerases, and frozen DNA-protein complexes that stall the fork. These stalled forks are foci for genomic instability and must be reactivated. Many models of replication fork reactivation invoke nascent strand regression as an intermediate in the processing of the stalled fork. We have investigated the replication fork regression activity of RecG and RuvAB, two proteins commonly thought to be involved in the process, using a reconstituted DNA replication system where the replisome is stalled by collision with leading-strand template damage. We find that both RecG and RuvAB can regress the stalled fork in the presence of the replisome and SSB; however, RuvAB generates a completely unwound product consisting of the paired nascent leading and lagging strands, whereas RuvC cleaves the Holliday junction generated by RecG-catalyzed fork regression. We also find that RecG stimulates RuvAB-catalyzed regression, presumably because it is more efficient at generating the initial Holliday junction from the stalled fork. PMID:25138216

  6. Human Timeless and Tipin stabilize replication forks and facilitate sister-chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Noguchi, Chiaki; Lee, Candice Y; Noguchi, Eishi

    2010-03-01

    The Timeless-Tipin protein complex has been reported to be important for replication checkpoint and normal DNA replication processes. However, the precise mechanisms by which Timeless-Tipin preserves genomic integrity are largely unclear. Here, we describe the roles of Timeless-Tipin in replication fork stabilization and sister chromatid cohesion. We show in human cells that Timeless is recruited to replication origin regions and dissociate from them as replication proceeds. Cdc45, which is known to be required for replication fork progression, shows similar patterns of origin association to those of Timeless. Depletion of Timeless-Tipin causes chromosome fragmentation and defects in damage repair in response to fork collapse, suggesting that it is required for replication fork maintenance under stress. We also demonstrate that depletion of Timeless-Tipin impairs sister chromatid cohesion and causes a defect in mitotic progression. Consistently, Timeless-Tipin co-purifies with cohesin subunits and is required for their stable association with chromatin during S phase. Timeless associates with the cohesion-promoting DNA helicase ChlR1, which, when overexpressed, partially alleviates the cohesion defect of cells depleted of Timeless-Tipin. These results suggest that Timeless-Tipin functions as a replication fork stabilizer that couples DNA replication with sister chromatid cohesion established at replication forks.

  7. Mechanism of DNA Replication in Drosophila Chromosomes: Structure of Replication Forks and Evidence for Bidirectionality

    PubMed Central

    Kriegstein, Henry J.; Hogness, David S.

    1974-01-01

    The replicating chromosomal DNA in Drosophila melanogaster cleavage nuclei has been visualized in the electron microscope as a serial array of closely spaced replicated regions created by pairs of diverging replication forks. The fine structure of the forks is very similar to that observed for the replication forks of bidirectionally replicating bacteriophage DNAs. However, the mean length of the single-stranded gaps in Drosophila forks is less than 200 nucleotide residues, much shorter than the gaps in phage forks. This difference in gap length corresponds to the observed difference in the size of Okazaki fragments from Drosophila and phage. Images PMID:4204203

  8. RECQ1 is required for cellular resistance to replication stress and catalyzes strand exchange on stalled replication fork structures

    PubMed Central

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Croteau, Deborah L.; Brosh, Jr., Robert M.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    RECQ1 is the most abundant of the five human RecQ helicases, but little is known about its biological significance. Recent studies indicate that RECQ1 is associated with origins of replication, suggesting a possible role in DNA replication. However, the functional role of RECQ1 at damaged or stalled replication forks is still unknown. Here, for the first time, we show that RECQ1 promotes strand exchange on synthetic stalled replication fork-mimicking structures and comparatively analyze RECQ1 with the other human RecQ helicases. RECQ1 actively unwinds the leading strand of the fork, similar to WRN, while RECQ4 and RECQ5β can only unwind the lagging strand of the replication fork. Human replication protein A modulates the strand exchange activity of RECQ1 and shifts the equilibrium more to the unwinding mode, an effect also observed for WRN. Stable depletion of RECQ1 affects cell proliferation and renders human cells sensitive to various DNA damaging agents that directly or indirectly block DNA replication fork progression. Consequently, loss of RECQ1 activates DNA damage response signaling, leads to hyper-phosphorylation of RPA32 and activation of CHK1, indicating replication stress. Furthermore, depletion of RECQ1 leads to chromosomal condensation defects and accumulation of under-condensed chromosomes. Collectively, our observations provide a new insight into the role of RECQ1 in replication fork stabilization and its role in the DNA damage response to maintain genomic stability. PMID:23095637

  9. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Da-Ré, Caterina; Huber, Florian; Padayachy, Laura; Tardy, Sebastien; Nicati, Noemie L; Barriot, Samia; Ochs, Fena; Lukas, Claudia; Lukas, Jiri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Scapozza, Leonardo; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2016-12-15

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depletion inhibited G1 to S phase progression when oncogenic cyclin E was overexpressed. RAD52, a gene dispensable for normal development in mice, was among the top hits. In cells in which fork collapse was induced by oncogenes or chemicals, the Rad52 protein localized to DRS foci. Depletion of Rad52 by siRNA or knockout of the gene by CRISPR/Cas9 compromised restart of collapsed forks and led to DNA damage in cells experiencing DRS. Furthermore, in cancer-prone, heterozygous APC mutant mice, homozygous deletion of the Rad52 gene suppressed tumor growth and prolonged lifespan. We therefore propose that mammalian RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells.

  10. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A.; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  11. Forks on the Run: Can the Stalling of DNA Replication Promote Epigenetic Changes?

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Hollie; Dhavarasa, Piriththiv; Cheng, Ashley; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    Built of DNA polymerases and multiple associated factors, the replication fork steadily progresses along the DNA template and faithfully replicates DNA. This model can be found in practically every textbook of genetics, with the more complex situation of chromatinized DNA in eukaryotes often viewed as a variation. However, the replication-coupled disassembly/reassembly of chromatin adds significant complexity to the whole replication process. During the course of eukaryotic DNA replication the forks encounter various conditions and numerous impediments. These include nucleosomes with a variety of post-translational modifications, euchromatin and heterochromatin, differentially methylated DNA, tightly bound proteins, active gene promoters and DNA loops. At such positions the forks slow down or even stall. Dedicated factors stabilize the fork and prevent its rotation or collapse, while other factors resolve the replication block and facilitate the resumption of elongation. The fate of histones during replication stalling and resumption is not well understood. In this review we briefly describe recent advances in our understanding of histone turnover during DNA replication and focus on the possible mechanisms of nucleosome disassembly/reassembly at paused replication forks. We propose that replication pausing provides opportunities for an epigenetic change of the associated locus.

  12. Forks on the Run: Can the Stalling of DNA Replication Promote Epigenetic Changes?

    PubMed Central

    Rowlands, Hollie; Dhavarasa, Piriththiv; Cheng, Ashley; Yankulov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    Built of DNA polymerases and multiple associated factors, the replication fork steadily progresses along the DNA template and faithfully replicates DNA. This model can be found in practically every textbook of genetics, with the more complex situation of chromatinized DNA in eukaryotes often viewed as a variation. However, the replication-coupled disassembly/reassembly of chromatin adds significant complexity to the whole replication process. During the course of eukaryotic DNA replication the forks encounter various conditions and numerous impediments. These include nucleosomes with a variety of post-translational modifications, euchromatin and heterochromatin, differentially methylated DNA, tightly bound proteins, active gene promoters and DNA loops. At such positions the forks slow down or even stall. Dedicated factors stabilize the fork and prevent its rotation or collapse, while other factors resolve the replication block and facilitate the resumption of elongation. The fate of histones during replication stalling and resumption is not well understood. In this review we briefly describe recent advances in our understanding of histone turnover during DNA replication and focus on the possible mechanisms of nucleosome disassembly/reassembly at paused replication forks. We propose that replication pausing provides opportunities for an epigenetic change of the associated locus. PMID:28690636

  13. Reduced rate of DNA replication fork movement in megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wickremasinghe, R G; Hoffbrand, A V

    1980-01-01

    Chromatography on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose has been used to fractionate fully double-stranded from partially single-stranded DNA molecules. DNA was extracted from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes from patients with megaloblastic anemia resulting from vitamin B12 or folate deficiency after pulse-labeling the cells with [3H]thymidine for 5 min and chasing in unlabeled medium for 24 h. No gross accumulation of partially single-stranded material was observed in the DNA of these cells when compared with DNA from similarly labeled control cells obtained by the addition of 5-formyl tetrahydrofolic acid to the culture medium. When DNA from lymphocytes labeled with a 5-min pulse of [3H]thymidine and sheared to fragments of an average length of 18 micrometer was chromatographed on benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose, approximately 80% of the label was recovered in the partially single-stranded fraction. After chasing in unlabeled medium the label was progressively transferred to the double-stranded fraction over a period of 2--3 h. The rate of transfer was slower in megaloblastic lymphocytes than in controls. The difference in rate suggested a slower rate of replication fork movement in megaloblastic lymphocytes and so the density shift technique of Painter and schaeffer (J. Mol. Biol. 45: 467--479, 1969) was used to measure the fork rate directly. [3H]Deoxycytidine was used as the labeled nucleoside to avoid possible complications arising from [3H]thymidine labeling of megaloblastic cells. Investigations on the lymphocytes from four patients showed that the replication fork rate in vitamin-treated control lyphocytes was about 1 micrometer/min. The fork rates in the corresponding untreated cells were invariably lower and rates ranging from 40 to 92% of those of controls were observed. Normal lymphocytes treated with the deoxynucleotide pool-depleting drugs methotrexate or hydroxyurea displayed defects in DNA synthesis similar to those of

  14. HLTF's Ancient HIRAN Domain Binds 3' DNA Ends to Drive Replication Fork Reversal.

    PubMed

    Kile, Andrew C; Chavez, Diana A; Bacal, Julien; Eldirany, Sherif; Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Bezsonova, Irina; Eichman, Brandt F; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2015-06-18

    Stalled replication forks are a critical problem for the cell because they can lead to complex genome rearrangements that underlie cell death and disease. Processes such as DNA damage tolerance and replication fork reversal protect stalled forks from these events. A central mediator of these DNA damage responses in humans is the Rad5-related DNA translocase, HLTF. Here, we present biochemical and structural evidence that the HIRAN domain, an ancient and conserved domain found in HLTF and other DNA processing proteins, is a modified oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide (OB) fold that binds to 3' ssDNA ends. We demonstrate that the HIRAN domain promotes HLTF-dependent fork reversal in vitro through its interaction with 3' ssDNA ends found at forks. Finally, we show that HLTF restrains replication fork progression in cells in a HIRAN-dependent manner. These findings establish a mechanism of HLTF-mediated fork reversal and provide insight into the requirement for distinct fork remodeling activities in the cell.

  15. Unprotected Replication Forks Are Converted into Mitotic Sister Chromatid Bridges.

    PubMed

    Ait Saada, Anissia; Teixeira-Silva, Ana; Iraqui, Ismail; Costes, Audrey; Hardy, Julien; Paoletti, Giulia; Fréon, Karine; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2017-05-04

    Replication stress and mitotic abnormalities are key features of cancer cells. Temporarily paused forks are stabilized by the intra-S phase checkpoint and protected by the association of Rad51, which prevents Mre11-dependent resection. However, if a fork becomes dysfunctional and cannot resume, this terminally arrested fork is rescued by a converging fork to avoid unreplicated parental DNA during mitosis. Alternatively, dysfunctional forks are restarted by homologous recombination. Using fission yeast, we report that Rad52 and the DNA binding activity of Rad51, but not its strand-exchange activity, act to protect terminally arrested forks from unrestrained Exo1-nucleolytic activity. In the absence of recombination proteins, large ssDNA gaps, up to 3 kb long, occur behind terminally arrested forks, preventing efficient fork merging and leading to mitotic sister chromatid bridging. Thus, Rad52 and Rad51 prevent temporarily and terminally arrested forks from degrading and, despite the availability of converging forks, converting to anaphase bridges causing aneuploidy and cell death. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Chromatin Controls DNA Replication Origin Selection, Lagging-Strand Synthesis, and Replication Fork Rates.

    PubMed

    Kurat, Christoph F; Yeeles, Joseph T P; Patel, Harshil; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2017-01-05

    The integrity of eukaryotic genomes requires rapid and regulated chromatin replication. How this is accomplished is still poorly understood. Using purified yeast replication proteins and fully chromatinized templates, we have reconstituted this process in vitro. We show that chromatin enforces DNA replication origin specificity by preventing non-specific MCM helicase loading. Helicase activation occurs efficiently in the context of chromatin, but subsequent replisome progression requires the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription). The FACT-associated Nhp6 protein, the nucleosome remodelers INO80 or ISW1A, and the lysine acetyltransferases Gcn5 and Esa1 each contribute separately to maximum DNA synthesis rates. Chromatin promotes the regular priming of lagging-strand DNA synthesis by facilitating DNA polymerase α function at replication forks. Finally, nucleosomes disrupted during replication are efficiently re-assembled into regular arrays on nascent DNA. Our work defines the minimum requirements for chromatin replication in vitro and shows how multiple chromatin factors might modulate replication fork rates in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mus81 and converging forks limit the mutagenicity of replication fork breakage

    PubMed Central

    Mayle, Ryan; Campbell, Ian M.; Beck, Christine R.; Yu, Yang; Wilson, Marenda; Shaw, Chad A.; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Lupski, James R.; Ira, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Most spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) result from replication-fork breakage. Break-induced replication (BIR), a genome rearrangement-prone repair mechanism that requires the Pol32/POLD3 subunit of eukaryotic DNA Polδ, was proposed to repair broken forks, but how genome destabilization is avoided was unknown. We show that broken fork repair initially uses error-prone Pol32-dependent synthesis, but that mutagenic synthesis is limited to within a few kilobases from the break by Mus81 endonuclease and a converging fork. Mus81 suppresses template switches between both homologous sequences and diverged human Alu repetitive elements, highlighting its importance for stability of highly repetitive genomes. We propose that lack of a timely converging fork or Mus81 may propel genome instability observed in cancer. PMID:26273056

  18. DNA REPAIR. Mus81 and converging forks limit the mutagenicity of replication fork breakage.

    PubMed

    Mayle, Ryan; Campbell, Ian M; Beck, Christine R; Yu, Yang; Wilson, Marenda; Shaw, Chad A; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Lupski, James R; Ira, Grzegorz

    2015-08-14

    Most spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) result from replication-fork breakage. Break-induced replication (BIR), a genome rearrangement-prone repair mechanism that requires the Pol32/POLD3 subunit of eukaryotic DNA Polδ, was proposed to repair broken forks, but how genome destabilization is avoided was unknown. We show that broken fork repair initially uses error-prone Pol32-dependent synthesis, but that mutagenic synthesis is limited to within a few kilobases from the break by Mus81 endonuclease and a converging fork. Mus81 suppresses template switches between both homologous sequences and diverged human Alu repetitive elements, highlighting its importance for stability of highly repetitive genomes. We propose that lack of a timely converging fork or Mus81 may propel genome instability observed in cancer. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. THE WERNER AND BLOOM SYNDROME PROTEINS HELP RESOLVE REPLICATION BLOCKAGE BY CONVERTING (REGRESSED) HOLLIDAY JUNCTIONS TO FUNCTIONAL REPLICATION FORKS

    PubMed Central

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner so that DNA synthesis can be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and postulated to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examined the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction is optimal in low MgCl2, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells. PMID:21736299

  20. A model for DNA replication showing how dormant origins safeguard against replication fork failure

    PubMed Central

    Blow, J Julian; Ge, Xin Quan

    2009-01-01

    Replication origins are ‘licensed' for a single initiation event before entry into S phase; however, many licensed replication origins are not used, but instead remain dormant. The use of these dormant origins helps cells to survive replication stresses that block replication fork movement. Here, we present a computer model of the replication of a typical metazoan origin cluster in which origins are assigned a certain initiation probability per unit time and are then activated stochastically during S phase. The output of this model is in good agreement with experimental data and shows how inefficient dormant origins can be activated when replication forks are inhibited. The model also shows how dormant origins can allow replication to complete even if some forks stall irreversibly. This provides a simple explanation for how replication origin firing is regulated, which simultaneously provides protection against replicative stress while minimizing the cost of using large numbers of replication forks. PMID:19218919

  1. Directionality of replication fork movement determined by two-dimensional native-native DNA agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ivessa, Andreas S

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of replication intermediates by the neutral-neutral two-dimensional agarose gel technique allows determining the chromosomal positions where DNA replication initiates, whether replication forks pause or stall at specific sites, or whether two DNA molecules undergo DNA recombination events. This technique does not, however, immediately tell in which direction replication forks migrate through the DNA region under investigation. Here, we describe the procedure to determine the direction of replication fork progression by carrying out a restriction enzyme digest of DNA imbedded in agarose after the completion of the first dimension of a 2D gel.

  2. A Novel Rrm3 Function in Restricting DNA Replication via an Orc5-Binding Domain Is Genetically Separable from Rrm3 Function as an ATPase/Helicase in Facilitating Fork Progression

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Salahuddin; Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene J.; Schmidt, Kristina H.

    2016-01-01

    In response to replication stress cells activate the intra-S checkpoint, induce DNA repair pathways, increase nucleotide levels, and inhibit origin firing. Here, we report that Rrm3 associates with a subset of replication origins and controls DNA synthesis during replication stress. The N-terminal domain required for control of DNA synthesis maps to residues 186–212 that are also critical for binding Orc5 of the origin recognition complex. Deletion of this domain is lethal to cells lacking the replication checkpoint mediator Mrc1 and leads to mutations upon exposure to the replication stressor hydroxyurea. This novel Rrm3 function is independent of its established role as an ATPase/helicase in facilitating replication fork progression through polymerase blocking obstacles. Using quantitative mass spectrometry and genetic analyses, we find that the homologous recombination factor Rdh54 and Rad5-dependent error-free DNA damage bypass act as independent mechanisms on DNA lesions that arise when Rrm3 catalytic activity is disrupted whereas these mechanisms are dispensable for DNA damage tolerance when the replication function is disrupted, indicating that the DNA lesions generated by the loss of each Rrm3 function are distinct. Although both lesion types activate the DNA-damage checkpoint, we find that the resultant increase in nucleotide levels is not sufficient for continued DNA synthesis under replication stress. Together, our findings suggest a role of Rrm3, via its Orc5-binding domain, in restricting DNA synthesis that is genetically and physically separable from its established catalytic role in facilitating fork progression through replication blocks. PMID:27923055

  3. Homologous recombination as a replication fork escort: fork-protection and recovery.

    PubMed

    Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-12-27

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  4. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes. PMID:24970156

  5. Maintaining replication fork integrity in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Christian J; Upton, Amy L; Lloyd, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    In dividing cells, the stalling of replication fork complexes by impediments to DNA unwinding or by template imperfections that block synthesis by the polymerase subunits is a serious threat to genomic integrity and cell viability. What happens to stalled forks depends on the nature of the offending obstacle. In UV-irradiated Escherichia coli cells DNA synthesis is delayed for a considerable period, during which forks undergo extensive processing before replication can resume. Thus, restart depends on factors needed to load the replicative helicase, indicating that the replisome may have dissociated. It also requires the RecFOR proteins, which are known to load RecA recombinase on single-stranded DNA, implying that template strands are exposed. To gain a further understanding of how UV irradiation affects replication and how replication resumes after a block, we used fluorescence microscopy and BrdU or radioisotope labelling to examine chromosome replication and cell cycle progression. Our studies confirm that RecFOR promote efficient reactivation of stalled forks and demonstrate that they are also needed for productive replication initiated at the origin, or triggered elsewhere by damage to the DNA. Although delayed, all modes of replication do recover in the absence of these proteins, but nascent DNA strands are degraded more extensively by RecJ exonuclease. However, these strands are also degraded in the presence of RecFOR when restart is blocked by other means, indicating that RecA loading is not sufficient to stabilise and protect the fork. This is consistent with the idea that RecA actively promotes restart. Thus, in contrast to eukaryotic cells, there may be no factor in bacterial cells acting specifically to stabilise stalled forks. Instead, nascent strands may be protected by the simple expedient of promoting restart. We also report that the efficiency of fork reactivation is not affected in polB mutants.

  6. Triplex structures induce DNA double strand breaks via replication fork collapse in NER deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik Tiwari, Meetu; Adaku, Nneoma; Peart, Natoya; Rogers, Faye A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural alterations in DNA can serve as natural impediments to replication fork stability and progression, resulting in DNA damage and genomic instability. Naturally occurring polypurine mirror repeat sequences in the human genome can create endogenous triplex structures evoking a robust DNA damage response. Failures to recognize or adequately process these genomic lesions can result in loss of genomic integrity. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) proteins have been found to play a prominent role in the recognition and repair of triplex structures. We demonstrate using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that chromosomal triplexes perturb DNA replication fork progression, eventually resulting in fork collapse and the induction of double strand breaks (DSBs). We find that cells deficient in the NER damage recognition proteins, XPA and XPC, accumulate more DSBs in response to chromosomal triplex formation than NER-proficient cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that XPC-deficient cells are particularly prone to replication-associated DSBs in the presence of triplexes. In the absence of XPA or XPC, deleterious consequences of triplex-induced genomic instability may be averted by activating apoptosis via dual phosphorylation of the H2AX protein. Our results reveal that damage recognition by XPC and XPA is critical to maintaining replication fork integrity and preventing replication fork collapse in the presence of triplex structures. PMID:27298253

  7. Single strand transposition at the host replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Lavatine, Laure; He, Susu; Caumont-Sarcos, Anne; Guynet, Catherine; Marty, Brigitte; Chandler, Mick; Ton-Hoang, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Members of the IS200/IS605 insertion sequence family differ fundamentally from classical IS essentially by their specific single-strand (ss) transposition mechanism, orchestrated by the Y1 transposase, TnpA, a small HuH enzyme which recognizes and processes ss DNA substrates. Transposition occurs by the ‘peel and paste’ pathway composed of two steps: precise excision of the top strand as a circular ss DNA intermediate; and subsequent integration into a specific ssDNA target. Transposition of family members was experimentally shown or suggested by in silico high-throughput analysis to be intimately coupled to the lagging strand template of the replication fork. In this study, we investigated factors involved in replication fork targeting and analysed DNA-binding properties of the transposase which can assist localization of ss DNA substrates on the replication fork. We showed that TnpA interacts with the β sliding clamp, DnaN and recognizes DNA which mimics replication fork structures. We also showed that dsDNA can facilitate TnpA targeting ssDNA substrates. We analysed the effect of Ssb and RecA proteins on TnpA activity in vitro and showed that while RecA does not show a notable effect, Ssb inhibits integration. Finally we discuss the way(s) in which integration may be directed into ssDNA at the replication fork. PMID:27466393

  8. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Shen, Huahao; Helleday, Thomas; Hickson, Ian D.; Ying, Songmin

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81 is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity. PMID:26415217

  9. RecD2 Helicase Limits Replication Fork Stress in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Brian W.; Bolz, Samantha A.; Wessel, Sarah R.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Keck, James L.

    2014-01-01

    DNA helicases have important roles in genome maintenance. The RecD helicase has been well studied as a component of the heterotrimeric RecBCD helicase-nuclease enzyme important for double-strand break repair in Escherichia coli. Interestingly, many bacteria lack RecBC and instead contain a RecD2 helicase, which is not known to function as part of a larger complex. Depending on the organism studied, RecD2 has been shown to provide resistance to a broad range of DNA-damaging agents while also contributing to mismatch repair (MMR). Here we investigated the importance of Bacillus subtilis RecD2 helicase to genome integrity. We show that deletion of recD2 confers a modest increase in the spontaneous mutation rate and that the mutational signature in ΔrecD2 cells is not consistent with an MMR defect, indicating a new function for RecD2 in B. subtilis. To further characterize the role of RecD2, we tested the deletion strain for sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. We found that loss of RecD2 in B. subtilis sensitized cells to several DNA-damaging agents that can block or impair replication fork movement. Measurement of replication fork progression in vivo showed that forks collapse more frequently in ΔrecD2 cells, supporting the hypothesis that RecD2 is important for normal replication fork progression. Biochemical characterization of B. subtilis RecD2 showed that it is a 5′-3′ helicase and that it directly binds single-stranded DNA binding protein. Together, our results highlight novel roles for RecD2 in DNA replication which help to maintain replication fork integrity during normal growth and when forks encounter DNA damage. PMID:24443534

  10. Tumor Suppression by BRCA-1: A Critical Role at DNA Replication Forks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    free extracts derived from Xenopus laevis eggs that support: 1. Semi-conservative, cell-cycle regulated DNA replication; 2. Many facets of the DNA...extracts derived from Xenopus laevis eggs that support: 1. Semi-conservative, cell-cycle regulated DNA replication; 2. Many facets of the DNA damage...assess the consequences of complete loss of BRCA1/BARD1 on fork progression and stalling. BODY Cell-free systems derived from Xenopus eggs can

  11. Termination of DNA replication forks: "Breaking up is hard to do".

    PubMed

    Bailey, Rachael; Priego Moreno, Sara; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    To ensure duplication of the entire genome, eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from thousands of replication origins. The replication forks move through the chromatin until they encounter forks from neighboring origins. During replication fork termination forks converge, the replisomes disassemble and topoisomerase II resolves the daughter DNA molecules. If not resolved efficiently, terminating forks result in genomic instability through the formation of pathogenic structures. Our recent findings shed light onto the mechanism of replisome disassembly upon replication fork termination. We have shown that termination-specific polyubiquitylation of the replicative helicase component - Mcm7, leads to dissolution of the active helicase in a process dependent on the p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase. The inhibition of terminating helicase disassembly resulted in a replication termination defect. In this extended view we present hypothetical models of replication fork termination and discuss remaining and emerging questions in the DNA replication termination field.

  12. Replication Termination: Containing Fork Fusion-Mediated Pathologies in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Dimude, Juachi U.; Midgley-Smith, Sarah L.; Stein, Monja; Rudolph, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Duplication of bacterial chromosomes is initiated via the assembly of two replication forks at a single defined origin. Forks proceed bi-directionally until they fuse in a specialised termination area opposite the origin. This area is flanked by polar replication fork pause sites that allow forks to enter but not to leave. The precise function of this replication fork trap has remained enigmatic, as no obvious phenotypes have been associated with its inactivation. However, the fork trap becomes a serious problem to cells if the second fork is stalled at an impediment, as replication cannot be completed, suggesting that a significant evolutionary advantage for maintaining this chromosomal arrangement must exist. Recently, we demonstrated that head-on fusion of replication forks can trigger over-replication of the chromosome. This over-replication is normally prevented by a number of proteins including RecG helicase and 3’ exonucleases. However, even in the absence of these proteins it can be safely contained within the replication fork trap, highlighting that multiple systems might be involved in coordinating replication fork fusions. Here, we discuss whether considering the problems associated with head-on replication fork fusion events helps us to better understand the important role of the replication fork trap in cellular metabolism. PMID:27463728

  13. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  14. Nucleoid occlusion prevents cell division during replication fork arrest in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Remi; Marquis, Kathleen A.; Rudner, David Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary How bacteria respond to chromosome replication stress has been traditionally studied using temperature-sensitive mutants and chemical inhibitors. These methods inevitably arrest all replication and lead to induction of transcriptional responses and inhibition of cell division. Here, we used repressor proteins bound to operator arrays to generate a single stalled replication fork. These replication roadblocks impeded replisome progression on one arm, leaving replication of the other arm and re-initiation unaffected. Remarkably, despite robust generation of RecA-GFP filaments and a strong block to cell division during the roadblock, patterns of gene expression were not significantly altered. Consistent with these findings, division inhibition was not mediated by the SOS-induced regulator YneA nor by RecA-independent repression of ftsL. In support of the idea that nucleoid occlusion prevents inappropriate cell division during fork arrest, immature FtsZ-rings formed adjacent to the DNA mass but rarely on top of it. Furthermore, mild alterations in chromosome compaction resulted in cell division that guillotined the DNA. Strikingly, the nucleoid occlusion protein Noc had no discernable role in division inhibition. Our data indicate that Noc-independent nucleoid occlusion prevents inappropriate cell division during replication fork arrest. They further suggest that Bacillus subtilis normally manages replication stress rather than inducing a stress-response. PMID:20807205

  15. Endonuclease EEPD1 Is a Gatekeeper for Repair of Stressed Replication Forks*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Suk; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Wu, Yuehan; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Sidhu, Gurjit Singh; Reinert, Brian L.; Jaiswal, Aruna S.; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Kong, Kimi; Burma, Sandeep; Lee, Suk-Hee; Hromas, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Replication is not as continuous as once thought, with DNA damage frequently stalling replication forks. Aberrant repair of stressed replication forks can result in cell death or genome instability and resulting transformation to malignancy. Stressed replication forks are most commonly repaired via homologous recombination (HR), which begins with 5′ end resection, mediated by exonuclease complexes, one of which contains Exo1. However, Exo1 requires free 5′-DNA ends upon which to act, and these are not commonly present in non-reversed stalled replication forks. To generate a free 5′ end, stalled replication forks must therefore be cleaved. Although several candidate endonucleases have been implicated in cleavage of stalled replication forks to permit end resection, the identity of such an endonuclease remains elusive. Here we show that the 5′-endonuclease EEPD1 cleaves replication forks at the junction between the lagging parental strand and the unreplicated DNA parental double strands. This cleavage creates the structure that Exo1 requires for 5′ end resection and HR initiation. We observed that EEPD1 and Exo1 interact constitutively, and Exo1 repairs stalled replication forks poorly without EEPD1. Thus, EEPD1 performs a gatekeeper function for replication fork repair by mediating the fork cleavage that permits initiation of HR-mediated repair and restart of stressed forks. PMID:28049724

  16. Functional Analysis of DNA Replication Fork Reversal Catalyzed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis RuvAB Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Khanduja, Jasbeer Singh; Muniyappa, K.

    2012-01-01

    Initially discovered in Escherichia coli, RuvAB proteins are ubiquitous in bacteria and play a dual role as molecular motor proteins responsible for branch migration of the Holliday junction(s) and reversal of stalled replication forks. Despite mounting genetic evidence for a crucial role of RuvA and RuvB proteins in reversal of stalled replication forks, the mechanistic aspects of this process are still not fully understood. Here, we elucidate the ability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RuvAB (MtRuvAB) complex to catalyze the reversal of replication forks using a range of DNA replication fork substrates. Our studies show that MtRuvAB, unlike E. coli RuvAB, is able to drive replication fork reversal via the formation of Holliday junction intermediates, suggesting that RuvAB-catalyzed fork reversal involves concerted unwinding and annealing of nascent leading and lagging strands. We also demonstrate the reversal of replication forks carrying hemi-replicated DNA, indicating that MtRuvAB complex-catalyzed fork reversal is independent of symmetry at the fork junction. The fork reversal reaction catalyzed by MtRuvAB is coupled to ATP hydrolysis, is processive, and culminates in the formation of an extended reverse DNA arm. Notably, we found that sequence heterology failed to impede the fork reversal activity of MtRuvAB. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of recognition and processing of varied types of replication fork structures by RuvAB proteins. PMID:22094465

  17. HLTF’s Ancient HIRAN Domain Binds 3′-DNA Ends to Drive Replication Fork Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Andrew C.; Chavez, Diana A.; Bacal, Julien; Eldirany, Sherif; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Bezsonova, Irina; Eichman, Brandt F.; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stalled replication forks are a critical problem for the cell because they can lead to complex genome rearrangements that underlie cell death and disease. Processes such as DNA damage tolerance and replication fork reversal protect stalled forks from these events. A central mediator of these DNA damage responses in humans is the Rad5-related DNA translocase, HLTF. Here, we present biochemical and structural evidence that the HIRAN domain, an ancient and conserved domain found in HLTF and other DNA processing proteins, is a modified oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide (OB) fold that binds to 3′-ssDNA ends. We demonstrate that the HIRAN domain promotes HLTF-dependent fork reversal in vitro, through its interaction with 3′-ssDNA ends found at forks. Finally, we show that HLTF restrains replication fork progression in cells in a HIRAN-dependent manner. These findings establish a mechanism of HLTF-mediated fork reversal and provide insight into the requirement for distinct fork remodeling activities in the cell. PMID:26051180

  18. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel MA; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin AM; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-01-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication, and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify DONSON as a novel fork protection factor, and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilises forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATR-dependent signalling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity, and potentiating chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in patient cells, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we identify mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism, and establish DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:28191891

  19. Staphylococcus aureus gyrase-quinolone-DNA ternary complexes fail to arrest replication fork progression in vitro. Effects of salt on the DNA binding mode and the catalytic activity of S. aureus gyrase.

    PubMed

    Hiasa, Hiroshi; Shea, Molly E; Richardson, Christine M; Gwynn, Michael N

    2003-03-07

    Type II topoisomerases bind to DNA at the catalytic domain across the DNA gate. DNA gyrases also bind to DNA at the non-homologous C-terminal domain of the GyrA subunit, which causes the wrapping of DNA about itself. This unique mode of DNA binding allows gyrases to introduce the negative supercoils into DNA molecules. We have investigated the biochemical characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) gyrase. S. aureus gyrase is known to require high concentrations of potassium glutamate (K-Glu) for its supercoiling activity. However, high concentrations of K-Glu are not required for its relaxation and decatenation activities. This is due to the requirement of high concentrations of K-Glu for S. aureus gyrase-mediated wrapping of DNA. These results suggest that S. aureus gyrase can bind to DNA at the catalytic domain independent of K-Glu concentration, but high concentrations of K-Glu are required for the binding of the C-terminal domain of GyrA to DNA and the wrapping of DNA. Thus, salt modulates the DNA binding mode and the catalytic activity of S. aureus gyrase. Quinolone drugs can stimulate the formation of covalent S. aureus gyrase-DNA complexes, but high concentrations of K-Glu inhibit the formation of S. aureus gyrase-quinolone-DNA ternary complexes. In the absence of K-Glu, ternary complexes formed with S. aureus gyrase cannot arrest replication fork progression in vitro, demonstrating that the formation of a wrapped ternary complex is required for replication fork arrest by a S. aureus gyrase-quinolone-DNA ternary complex.

  20. Brca2, Rad51 and Mre11: performing balancing acts on replication forks.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2011-10-10

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for faithful repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) and is believed to be important for DNA replication under stressful conditions in unicellular organisms. However, its role during DNA replication in high eukaryotes has always been elusive. In particular, due to the essential nature of its main players it has been difficult to dissect the direct role of HR in DNA replication. Recent studies revealed that some key HR factors such as Rad51 and BRCA2 play unexpected functions during DNA replication by protecting nascent DNA from Mre11 mediated degradation, which takes place at stalled replication forks. These novel functions appear to be essential to ensure smooth progression of DNA replication and to promote maintenance of genome stability.

  1. Replication Fork Slowing and Reversal upon DNA Damage Require PCNA Polyubiquitination and ZRANB3 DNA Translocase Activity.

    PubMed

    Vujanovic, Marko; Krietsch, Jana; Raso, Maria Chiara; Terraneo, Nastassja; Zellweger, Ralph; Schmid, Jonas A; Taglialatela, Angelo; Huang, Jen-Wei; Holland, Cory L; Zwicky, Katharina; Herrador, Raquel; Jacobs, Heinz; Cortez, David; Ciccia, Alberto; Penengo, Lorenza; Lopes, Massimo

    2017-09-07

    DNA damage tolerance during eukaryotic replication is orchestrated by PCNA ubiquitination. While monoubiquitination activates mutagenic translesion synthesis, polyubiquitination activates an error-free pathway, elusive in mammals, enabling damage bypass by template switching. Fork reversal is driven in vitro by multiple enzymes, including the DNA translocase ZRANB3, shown to bind polyubiquitinated PCNA. However, whether this interaction promotes fork remodeling and template switching in vivo was unknown. Here we show that damage-induced fork reversal in mammalian cells requires PCNA ubiquitination, UBC13, and K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, previously involved in error-free damage tolerance. Fork reversal in vivo also requires ZRANB3 translocase activity and its interaction with polyubiquitinated PCNA, pinpointing ZRANB3 as a key effector of error-free DNA damage tolerance. Mutations affecting fork reversal also induced unrestrained fork progression and chromosomal breakage, suggesting fork remodeling as a global fork slowing and protection mechanism. Targeting these fork protection systems represents a promising strategy to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lsd1 and lsd2 control programmed replication fork pauses and imprinting in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Allyson; Roseaulin, Laura; Schurra, Catherine; Waxin, Herve; Lambert, Sarah; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Martienssen, Robert A; Arcangioli, Benoit

    2012-12-27

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a chromosomal imprinting event controls the asymmetric pattern of mating-type switching. The orientation of DNA replication at the mating-type locus is instrumental in this process. However, the factors leading to imprinting are not fully identified and the mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we show that the replication fork pause at the mat1 locus (MPS1), essential for imprint formation, depends on the lysine-specific demethylase Lsd1. We demonstrate that either Lsd1 or Lsd2 amine oxidase activity is required for these processes, working upstream of the imprinting factors Swi1 and Swi3 (homologs of mammalian Timeless and Tipin, respectively). We also show that the Lsd1/2 complex controls the replication fork terminators, within the rDNA repeats. These findings reveal a role for the Lsd1/2 demethylases in controlling polar replication fork progression, imprint formation, and subsequent asymmetric cell divisions. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Replication fork movement sets chromatin loop size and origin choice in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Courbet, Sylvain; Gay, Sophie; Arnoult, Nausica; Wronka, Gerd; Anglana, Mauro; Brison, Olivier; Debatisse, Michelle

    2008-09-25

    Genome stability requires one, and only one, DNA duplication at each S phase. The mechanisms preventing origin firing on newly replicated DNA are well documented, but much less is known about the mechanisms controlling the spacing of initiation events(2,3), namely the completion of DNA replication. Here we show that origin use in Chinese hamster cells depends on both the movement of the replication forks and the organization of chromatin loops. We found that slowing the replication speed triggers the recruitment of latent origins within minutes, allowing the completion of S phase in a timely fashion. When slowly replicating cells are shifted to conditions of fast fork progression, although the decrease in the overall number of active origins occurs within 2 h, the cells still have to go through a complete cell cycle before the efficiency specific to each origin is restored. We observed a strict correlation between replication speed during a given S phase and the size of chromatin loops in the next G1 phase. Furthermore, we found that origins located at or near sites of anchorage of chromatin loops in G1 are activated preferentially in the following S phase. These data suggest a mechanism of origin programming in which replication speed determines the spacing of anchorage regions of chromatin loops, that, in turn, controls the choice of initiation sites.

  4. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart

    PubMed Central

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:26354865

  5. Replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes have limited stability in vitro.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Peter; Guy, Colin P

    2008-08-29

    There are many barriers that replication forks must overcome in order to duplicate a genome in vivo. These barriers include damage to the template DNA and proteins bound to this template. If replication is halted by such a block, then the block must be either removed or bypassed for replication to continue. If continuation of replication employs the original fork, avoiding the need to reload the replication apparatus, then the blocked replisome must retain functionality. In vivo studies of Escherichia coli replication forks suggest that replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes retain the ability to resume replication upon removal of the block for several hours. Here we tested the functional stability of replication forks reconstituted in vitro and blocked by lac repressor-operator complexes. Once a fork comes to a halt at such a block, it cannot continue subsequently to translocate through the block until addition of IPTG induces repressor dissociation. However, the ability to resume replication is retained only for 4-6 min regardless of the topological state of the template DNA. Comparison of our in vitro data with previous in vivo data suggests that either accessory factors that stabilise blocked forks are present in vivo or the apparent stability of blocked forks in vivo is due to continual reloading of the replication apparatus at the site of the block.

  6. Mcm10: A Dynamic Scaffold at Eukaryotic Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Baxley, Ryan M.; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2017-01-01

    To complete the duplication of large genomes efficiently, mechanisms have evolved that coordinate DNA unwinding with DNA synthesis and provide quality control measures prior to cell division. Minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) is a conserved component of the eukaryotic replisome that contributes to this process in multiple ways. Mcm10 promotes the initiation of DNA replication through direct interactions with the cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45)-minichromosome maintenance complex proteins 2-7 (Mcm2-7)-go-ichi-ni-san GINS complex proteins, as well as single- and double-stranded DNA. After origin firing, Mcm10 controls replication fork stability to support elongation, primarily facilitating Okazaki fragment synthesis through recruitment of DNA polymerase-α and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Based on its multivalent properties, Mcm10 serves as an essential scaffold to promote DNA replication and guard against replication stress. Under pathological conditions, Mcm10 is often dysregulated. Genetic amplification and/or overexpression of MCM10 are common in cancer, and can serve as a strong prognostic marker of poor survival. These findings are compatible with a heightened requirement for Mcm10 in transformed cells to overcome limitations for DNA replication dictated by altered cell cycle control. In this review, we highlight advances in our understanding of when, where and how Mcm10 functions within the replisome to protect against barriers that cause incomplete replication. PMID:28218679

  7. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L; Downs, Jessica A; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-08-18

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein-DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein-DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin.

  8. Fork rotation and DNA precatenation are restricted during DNA replication to prevent chromosomal instability

    PubMed Central

    Schalbetter, Stephanie A.; Mansoubi, Sahar; Chambers, Anna L.; Downs, Jessica A.; Baxter, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication and inheritance require the complete resolution of all intertwines within the parental DNA duplex. This is achieved by topoisomerase action ahead of the replication fork or by fork rotation and subsequent resolution of the DNA precatenation formed. Although fork rotation predominates at replication termination, in vitro studies have suggested that it also occurs frequently during elongation. However, the factors that influence fork rotation and how rotation and precatenation may influence other replication-associated processes are unknown. Here we analyze the causes and consequences of fork rotation in budding yeast. We find that fork rotation and precatenation preferentially occur in contexts that inhibit topoisomerase action ahead of the fork, including stable protein–DNA fragile sites and termination. However, generally, fork rotation and precatenation are actively inhibited by Timeless/Tof1 and Tipin/Csm3. In the absence of Tof1/Timeless, excessive fork rotation and precatenation cause extensive DNA damage following DNA replication. With Tof1, damage related to precatenation is focused on the fragile protein–DNA sites where fork rotation is induced. We conclude that although fork rotation and precatenation facilitate unwinding in hard-to-replicate contexts, they intrinsically disrupt normal chromosome duplication and are therefore restricted by Timeless/Tipin. PMID:26240319

  9. Local and global functions of Timeless and Tipin in replication fork protection

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Adam R.; Noguchi, Eishi

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell replicates its chromosomal DNA with almost absolute fidelity in the course of every cell cycle. This accomplishment is remarkable considering that the conditions for DNA replication are rarely ideal. The replication machinery encounters a variety of obstacles on the chromosome, including damaged template DNA. In addition, a number of chromosome regions are considered to be difficult to replicate owing to DNA secondary structures and DNA binding proteins required for various transactions on the chromosome. Under these conditions, replication forks stall or break, posing grave threats to genomic integrity. How does the cell combat such stressful conditions during DNA replication? The replication fork protection complex (FPC) may help answer this question. Recent studies have demonstrated that the FPC is required for the smooth passage of replication forks at difficult-to-replicate genomic regions and plays a critical role in coordinating multiple genome maintenance processes at the replication fork. PMID:22987152

  10. Local and global functions of Timeless and Tipin in replication fork protection.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Noguchi, Eishi

    2012-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell replicates its chromosomal DNA with almost absolute fidelity in the course of every cell cycle. This accomplishment is remarkable considering that the conditions for DNA replication are rarely ideal. The replication machinery encounters a variety of obstacles on the chromosome, including damaged template DNA. In addition, a number of chromosome regions are considered to be difficult to replicate owing to DNA secondary structures and DNA binding proteins required for various transactions on the chromosome. Under these conditions, replication forks stall or break, posing grave threats to genomic integrity. How does the cell combat such stressful conditions during DNA replication? The replication fork protection complex (FPC) may help answer this question. Recent studies have demonstrated that the FPC is required for the smooth passage of replication forks at difficult-to-replicate genomic regions and plays a critical role in coordinating multiple genome maintenance processes at the replication fork.

  11. Homologous recombination restarts blocked replication forks at the expense of genome rearrangements by template exchange.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sarah; Mizuno, Ken'ichi; Blaisonneau, Joël; Martineau, Sylvain; Chanet, Roland; Fréon, Karine; Murray, Johanne M; Carr, Antony M; Baldacci, Giuseppe

    2010-08-13

    Template switching induced by stalled replication forks has recently been proposed to underlie complex genomic rearrangements. However, the resulting models are not supported by robust physical evidence. Here, we analyzed replication and recombination intermediates in a well-defined fission yeast system that blocks replication forks. We show that, in response to fork arrest, chromosomal rearrangements result from Rad52-dependent nascent strand template exchange occurring during fork restart. This template exchange occurs by both Rad51-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We demonstrate that Rqh1, the BLM homolog, limits Rad51-dependent template exchange without affecting fork restart. In contrast, we report that the Srs2 helicase promotes both fork restart and template exchange. Our data demonstrate that template exchange occurs during recombination-dependent fork restart at the expense of genome rearrangements.

  12. Replication Fork Stability Confers Chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia; Gogola, Ewa; Duarte, Alexandra A.; Lee, Ji-Eun; Wong, Nancy; Lafarga, Vanessa; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Panzarino, Nicholas J.; John, Sam; Day, Amanda; Crespo, Anna Vidal; Shen, Binghui; Starnes, Linda M.; de Ruiter, Julian R.; Daniel, Jeremy A.; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Cortez, David; Cantor, Sharon B.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Ge, Kai; Jonkers, Jos; Rottenberg, Sven; Sharan, Shyam K.; Nussenzweig, André

    2016-01-01

    Brca1- and Brca2-deficient cells have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3/4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore HR activity at DSBs. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11 nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARPi and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork (RF) protection in Brca2-deficient tumor cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations. Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of RF protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumor cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance. PMID:27443740

  13. UV stalled replication forks restart by re-priming in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Elvers, Ingegerd; Johansson, Fredrik; Groth, Petra; Erixon, Klaus; Helleday, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Restarting stalled replication forks is vital to avoid fatal replication errors. Previously, it was demonstrated that hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks rescue replication either by an active restart mechanism or by new origin firing. To our surprise, using the DNA fibre assay, we only detect a slightly reduced fork speed on a UV-damaged template during the first hour after UV exposure, and no evidence for persistent replication fork arrest. Interestingly, no evidence for persistent UV-induced fork stalling was observed even in translesion synthesis defective, Polη(mut) cells. In contrast, using an assay to measure DNA molecule elongation at the fork, we observe that continuous DNA elongation is severely blocked by UV irradiation, particularly in UV-damaged Polη(mut) cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that UV-blocked replication forks restart effectively through re-priming past the lesion, leaving only a small gap opposite the lesion. This allows continuation of replication on damaged DNA. If left unfilled, the gaps may collapse into DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired by a recombination pathway, similar to the fate of replication forks collapsed after hydroxyurea treatment.

  14. UV stalled replication forks restart by re-priming in human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Elvers, Ingegerd; Johansson, Fredrik; Groth, Petra; Erixon, Klaus; Helleday, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Restarting stalled replication forks is vital to avoid fatal replication errors. Previously, it was demonstrated that hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks rescue replication either by an active restart mechanism or by new origin firing. To our surprise, using the DNA fibre assay, we only detect a slightly reduced fork speed on a UV-damaged template during the first hour after UV exposure, and no evidence for persistent replication fork arrest. Interestingly, no evidence for persistent UV-induced fork stalling was observed even in translesion synthesis defective, Polηmut cells. In contrast, using an assay to measure DNA molecule elongation at the fork, we observe that continuous DNA elongation is severely blocked by UV irradiation, particularly in UV-damaged Polηmut cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that UV-blocked replication forks restart effectively through re-priming past the lesion, leaving only a small gap opposite the lesion. This allows continuation of replication on damaged DNA. If left unfilled, the gaps may collapse into DNA double-strand breaks that are repaired by a recombination pathway, similar to the fate of replication forks collapsed after hydroxyurea treatment. PMID:21646340

  15. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    PubMed

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  16. Rad53-Mediated Regulation of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA Helicases Contributes to Prevention of Aberrant Fork Transitions under Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Silvia Emma; Ajazi, Arta; Carotenuto, Walter; Foiani, Marco; Giannattasio, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary Replication stress activates the Mec1ATR and Rad53 kinases. Rad53 phosphorylates nuclear pores to counteract gene gating, thus preventing aberrant transitions at forks approaching transcribed genes. Here, we show that Rrm3 and Pif1, DNA helicases assisting fork progression across pausing sites, are detrimental in rad53 mutants experiencing replication stress. Rrm3 and Pif1 ablations rescue cell lethality, chromosome fragmentation, replisome-fork dissociation, fork reversal, and processing in rad53 cells. Through phosphorylation, Rad53 regulates Rrm3 and Pif1; phospho-mimicking rrm3 mutants ameliorate rad53 phenotypes following replication stress without affecting replication across pausing elements under normal conditions. Hence, the Mec1-Rad53 axis protects fork stability by regulating nuclear pores and DNA helicases. We propose that following replication stress, forks stall in an asymmetric conformation by inhibiting Rrm3 and Pif1, thus impeding lagging strand extension and preventing fork reversal; conversely, under unperturbed conditions, the peculiar conformation of forks encountering pausing sites would depend on active Rrm3 and Pif1. PMID:26411679

  17. Remodeling of RecG Helicase at the DNA Replication Fork by SSB Protein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqiang; Tan, Hui Yin; Bianco, Piero R; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2015-04-29

    The RecG DNA helicase a key player in stalled replication fork rescue. The single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) participates in this process, but its role in the interaction of RecG with the fork remains unclear. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the interaction of RecG with a fork DNA in the presence of SSB. We discovered that SSB enhances RecG loading efficiency onto the DNA fork by threefold. Additionally, SSB interacts with RecG leading to the RecG remodeling. As a result, RecG separates from the fork, but remains bound to the DNA duplex. Moreover, in this new binding mode RecG is capable of translocation along the parental duplex DNA. We propose a model of RecG interaction with the replication fork involving two RecG binding modes. SSB plays the role of a remodeling factor defining the mode of RecG binding to the fork mediated by the SSB C-terminus. In the translocating mode, RecG remains in the vicinity of the fork and is capable of initiating the fork regression. Our results afford novel mechanistic insights into RecG interaction with the replication fork and provide the basis for further structural studies.

  18. Active Control of Repetitive Structural Transitions between Replication Forks and Holliday Junctions by Werner Syndrome Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soochul; Lee, Jinwoo; Yoo, Sangwoon; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Bohr, Vilhelm A.; Ahn, Byungchan; Hohng, Sungchul

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The reactivation of stalled DNA replication via fork regression invokes Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and the recovery of the replication fork after DNA repair or error-free DNA synthesis. The coordination mechanism for these DNA structural transitions by molecular motors, however, remains unclear. Here we perform single-molecule fluorescence experiments with Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and model replication forks. The Holliday junction is readily formed once the lagging arm is unwound, and migrated unidirectionally with 3.2 ± 0.03 bases/s velocity. The recovery of the replication fork was controlled by branch migration reversal of WRN, resulting in repetitive fork regression. The Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and migration direction reversal are all ATP dependent, revealing that WRN uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to actively coordinate the structural transitions of DNA. PMID:27427477

  19. Active Control of Repetitive Structural Transitions between Replication Forks and Holliday Junctions by Werner Syndrome Helicase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soochul; Lee, Jinwoo; Yoo, Sangwoon; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Ahn, Byungchan; Hohng, Sungchul

    2016-08-02

    The reactivation of stalled DNA replication via fork regression invokes Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and the recovery of the replication fork after DNA repair or error-free DNA synthesis. The coordination mechanism for these DNA structural transitions by molecular motors, however, remains unclear. Here we perform single-molecule fluorescence experiments with Werner syndrome protein (WRN) and model replication forks. The Holliday junction is readily formed once the lagging arm is unwound, and migrated unidirectionally with 3.2 ± 0.03 bases/s velocity. The recovery of the replication fork was controlled by branch migration reversal of WRN, resulting in repetitive fork regression. The Holliday junction formation, branch migration, and migration direction reversal are all ATP dependent, revealing that WRN uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to actively coordinate the structural transitions of DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. RNA polymerase II contributes to preventing transcription-mediated replication fork stalls

    PubMed Central

    Felipe-Abrio, Irene; Lafuente-Barquero, Juan; García-Rubio, María L; Aguilera, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Transcription is a major contributor to genome instability. A main cause of transcription-associated instability relies on the capacity of transcription to stall replication. However, we know little of the possible role, if any, of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) in this process. Here, we analyzed 4 specific yeast RNAPII mutants that show different phenotypes of genetic instability including hyper-recombination, DNA damage sensitivity and/or a strong dependency on double-strand break repair functions for viability. Three specific alleles of the RNAPII core, rpb1-1, rpb1-S751F and rpb9Δ, cause a defect in replication fork progression, compensated for by additional origin firing, as the main action responsible for instability. The transcription elongation defects of rpb1-S751F and rpb9Δ plus our observation that rpb1-1 causes RNAPII retention on chromatin suggest that RNAPII could participate in facilitating fork progression upon a transcription-replication encounter. Our results imply that the RNAPII or ancillary factors actively help prevent transcription-associated genome instability. PMID:25452497

  1. FANCD2 influences replication fork processes and genome stability in response to clustered DSBs.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayun; Su, Fengtao; Mukherjee, Shibani; Mori, Eiichiro; Hu, Burong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome and the factors defective in FA are involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and tumor suppression. Here, we show that FANCD2 is critical for genome stability maintenance in response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. We found that FANCD2 is monoubiquitinated and recruited to the sites of clustered DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) specifically in S/G2 cells after high-LET radiation. Further, FANCD2 facilitated the repair of clustered DSBs in S/G2 cells and proper progression of S-phase. Furthermore, lack of FANCD2 led to a reduced rate of replication fork progression and elevated levels of both replication fork stalling and new origin firing in response to high-LET radiation. Mechanistically, FANCD2 is required for correct recruitment of RPA2 and Rad51 to the sites of clustered DSBs and that is critical for proper processing of clustered DSBs. Significantly, FANCD2-decifient cells exhibited defective chromosome segregation, elevated levels of chromosomal aberrations, and anchorage-independent growth in response to high-LET radiation. These findings establish FANCD2 as a key factor in genome stability maintenance in response to high-LET radiation and as a promising target to improve cancer therapy.

  2. FANCD2 influences replication fork processes and genome stability in response to clustered DSBs

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiayun; Su, Fengtao; Mukherjee, Shibani; Mori, Eiichiro; Hu, Burong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome and the factors defective in FA are involved in DNA replication, DNA damage repair and tumor suppression. Here, we show that FANCD2 is critical for genome stability maintenance in response to high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. We found that FANCD2 is monoubiquitinated and recruited to the sites of clustered DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) specifically in S/G2 cells after high-LET radiation. Further, FANCD2 facilitated the repair of clustered DSBs in S/G2 cells and proper progression of S-phase. Furthermore, lack of FANCD2 led to a reduced rate of replication fork progression and elevated levels of both replication fork stalling and new origin firing in response to high-LET radiation. Mechanistically, FANCD2 is required for correct recruitment of RPA2 and Rad51 to the sites of clustered DSBs and that is critical for proper processing of clustered DSBs. Significantly, FANCD2-decifient cells exhibited defective chromosome segregation, elevated levels of chromosomal aberrations, and anchorage-independent growth in response to high-LET radiation. These findings establish FANCD2 as a key factor in genome stability maintenance in response to high-LET radiation and as a promising target to improve cancer therapy. PMID:26083937

  3. RNA polymerase II contributes to preventing transcription-mediated replication fork stalls.

    PubMed

    Felipe-Abrio, Irene; Lafuente-Barquero, Juan; García-Rubio, María L; Aguilera, Andrés

    2015-01-13

    Transcription is a major contributor to genome instability. A main cause of transcription-associated instability relies on the capacity of transcription to stall replication. However, we know little of the possible role, if any, of the RNA polymerase (RNAP) in this process. Here, we analyzed 4 specific yeast RNAPII mutants that show different phenotypes of genetic instability including hyper-recombination, DNA damage sensitivity and/or a strong dependency on double-strand break repair functions for viability. Three specific alleles of the RNAPII core, rpb1-1, rpb1-S751F and rpb9∆, cause a defect in replication fork progression, compensated for by additional origin firing, as the main action responsible for instability. The transcription elongation defects of rpb1-S751F and rpb9∆ plus our observation that rpb1-1 causes RNAPII retention on chromatin suggest that RNAPII could participate in facilitating fork progression upon a transcription-replication encounter. Our results imply that the RNAPII or ancillary factors actively help prevent transcription-associated genome instability.

  4. The replication checkpoint prevents two types of fork collapse without regulating replisome stability

    PubMed Central

    Dungrawala, Huzefa; Rose, Kristie L.; Bhat, Kamakoti P.; Mohni, Kareem N.; Glick, Gloria G.; Couch, Frank B.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary The ATR replication checkpoint ensures that stalled forks remain stable when replisome movement is impeded. Using an improved iPOND protocol combined with SILAC mass spectrometry, we characterized human replisome dynamics in response to fork stalling. Our data provide a quantitative picture of the replisome and replication stress response proteomes in 32 experimental conditions. Importantly, rather than stabilize the replisome, the checkpoint prevents two distinct types of fork collapse. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of protein abundance on nascent DNA is sufficient to identify protein complexes and place newly identified replisome-associated proteins into functional pathways. As an example, we demonstrate that ZNF644 complexes with the G9a/GLP methyltransferase at replication forks and is needed to prevent replication-associated DNA damage. Our data reveal how the replication checkpoint preserves genome integrity, provide insights into the mechanism of action of ATR inhibitors, and will be a useful resource for replication, DNA repair, and chromatin investigators. PMID:26365379

  5. CtIP mediates replication fork recovery in a FANCD2-regulated manner

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jung Eun; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosome instability syndrome characterized by increased cancer predisposition. Within the FA pathway, an upstream FA core complex mediates monoubiquitination and recruitment of the central FANCD2 protein to sites of stalled replication forks. Once recruited, FANCD2 fulfills a dual role towards replication fork recovery: (i) it cooperates with BRCA2 and RAD51 to protect forks from nucleolytic degradation and (ii) it recruits the BLM helicase to promote replication fork restart while suppressing new origin firing. Intriguingly, FANCD2 and its interaction partners are also involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks, hinting that FANCD2 utilizes HR proteins to mediate replication fork recovery. One such candidate is CtIP (CtBP-interacting protein), a key HR repair factor that functions in complex with BRCA1 and MRE11, but has not been investigated as putative player in the replication stress response. Here, we identify CtIP as a novel interaction partner of FANCD2. CtIP binds and stabilizes FANCD2 in a DNA damage- and FA core complex-independent manner, suggesting that FANCD2 monoubiquitination is dispensable for its interaction with CtIP. Following cellular treatment with a replication inhibitor, aphidicolin, FANCD2 recruits CtIP to transiently stalled, as well as collapsed, replication forks on chromatin. At stalled forks, CtIP cooperates with FANCD2 to promote fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Both functions are dependent on BRCA1 that controls the step-wise recruitment of MRE11, FANCD2 and finally CtIP to stalled replication forks, followed by their concerted actions to promote fork recovery. PMID:24556218

  6. CtIP mediates replication fork recovery in a FANCD2-regulated manner.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jung Eun; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2014-07-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a chromosome instability syndrome characterized by increased cancer predisposition. Within the FA pathway, an upstream FA core complex mediates monoubiquitination and recruitment of the central FANCD2 protein to sites of stalled replication forks. Once recruited, FANCD2 fulfills a dual role towards replication fork recovery: (i) it cooperates with BRCA2 and RAD51 to protect forks from nucleolytic degradation and (ii) it recruits the BLM helicase to promote replication fork restart while suppressing new origin firing. Intriguingly, FANCD2 and its interaction partners are also involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of DNA double-strand breaks, hinting that FANCD2 utilizes HR proteins to mediate replication fork recovery. One such candidate is CtIP (CtBP-interacting protein), a key HR repair factor that functions in complex with BRCA1 and MRE11, but has not been investigated as putative player in the replication stress response. Here, we identify CtIP as a novel interaction partner of FANCD2. CtIP binds and stabilizes FANCD2 in a DNA damage- and FA core complex-independent manner, suggesting that FANCD2 monoubiquitination is dispensable for its interaction with CtIP. Following cellular treatment with a replication inhibitor, aphidicolin, FANCD2 recruits CtIP to transiently stalled, as well as collapsed, replication forks on chromatin. At stalled forks, CtIP cooperates with FANCD2 to promote fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Both functions are dependent on BRCA1 that controls the step-wise recruitment of MRE11, FANCD2 and finally CtIP to stalled replication forks, followed by their concerted actions to promote fork recovery.

  7. CDK1 phosphorylates WRN at collapsed replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Valentina; Rinalducci, Sara; Sanchez, Massimo; Grillini, Francesca; Sommers, Joshua A.; Brosh, Robert M.; Zolla, Lello; Franchitto, Annapaola; Pichierri, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of end-processing is critical for accurate repair and to switch between homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). End resection is a two-stage process but very little is known about regulation of the long-range resection, especially in humans. WRN participates in one of the two alternative long-range resection pathways mediated by DNA2 or EXO1. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of WRN by CDK1 is essential to perform DNA2-dependent end resection at replication-related DSBs, promoting HR, replication recovery and chromosome stability. Mechanistically, S1133 phosphorylation of WRN is dispensable for relocalization in foci but is involved in the interaction with the MRE11 complex. Loss of WRN phosphorylation negatively affects MRE11 foci formation and acts in a dominant negative manner to prevent long-range resection altogether, thereby licensing NHEJ at collapsed forks. Collectively, we unveil a CDK1-dependent regulation of the WRN-DNA2-mediated resection and identify an undescribed function of WRN as a DSB repair pathway switch. PMID:27634057

  8. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Nicholas A.; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases1–3. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes4–8. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks9. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing10–12, direct evidence that BRCA genes regulate HR at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. We report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex13–16 can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mammalian cells. Tus/Ter-induced HR entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the BRCA1 C-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of BRCA1 encoded by exon 11—two BRCA1 elements implicated in tumor suppression—control Tus/Ter-induced HR. Inactivation of either BRCA1 or BRCA2 increases the absolute frequency of “long-tract” gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks—an outcome not observed in response to a restriction endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double strand break (DSB). Therefore, HR at stalled forks is regulated differently from HR at DSBs arising independently of a fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract HR at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells. PMID:24776801

  9. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel M A; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin A M; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-04-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify downstream neighbor of SON (DONSON) as a novel fork protection factor and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilizes forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR)-dependent signaling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity and the potentiation of chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations in DONSON substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in cells from patients, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we have identified mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism and established DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability.

  10. Replication Terminator Protein-Based Replication Fork-Arrest Systems in Various Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, A. A.; Andersen, P. A.; Wake, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    The replication terminator protein (RTP) of Bacillus subtilis interacts with its cognate DNA terminators to cause replication fork arrest, thereby ensuring that the forks approaching one another at the conclusion of a round of replication meet within a restricted terminus region. A similar situation exists in Escherichia coli, but it appears that the fork-arrest systems in these two organisms have evolved independently of one another. In the present work, RTP homologs in four species closely related to B. subtilis (B. atrophaeus, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. mojavensis, and B. vallismortis) have been identified and characterized. An RTP homolog could not be identified in another closely related species, B. licheniformis. The nucleotide and amino acid changes from B. subtilis among the four homologs are consistent with the recently established phylogenetic tree for these species. The GC contents of the rtp genes raise the possibility that these organisms arose within this branch of the tree by horizontal transfer into a common ancestor after their divergence from B. licheniformis. Only 5 amino acid residue positions were changed among the four homologs, despite an up to 17.2% change in the nucleotide sequence, a finding that highlights the importance of the precise folded structure to the functioning of RTP. The absence of any significant change in the proposed DNA-binding region of RTP emphasizes the importance of its high affinity for the DNA terminator in its functioning. By coincidence, the single change (E30K) found in the B. mojavensis RTP corresponds exactly to that purposefully introduced by others into B. subtilis RTP to implicate a crucial role for E30 in the fork-arrest mechanism. The natural occurrence of this variant is difficult to reconcile with such an implication, and it was shown directly that RTP.E30K functions normally in fork arrest in B. subtilis in vivo. Additional DNA terminators were identified in the new RTP homolog-containing strains, allowing

  11. Methylated DNA causes a physical block to replication forks independently of damage signalling, O(6)-methylguanine or DNA single-strand breaks and results in DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Groth, Petra; Ausländer, Simon; Majumder, Muntasir Mamun; Schultz, Niklas; Johansson, Fredrik; Petermann, Eva; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-09-10

    Even though DNA alkylating agents have been used for many decades in the treatment of cancer, it remains unclear what happens when replication forks encounter alkylated DNA. Here, we used the DNA fibre assay to study the impact of alkylating agents on replication fork progression. We found that the alkylator methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) inhibits replication elongation in a manner that is dose dependent and related to the overall alkylation grade. Replication forks seem to be completely blocked as no nucleotide incorporation can be detected following 1 h of MMS treatment. A high dose of 5 mM caffeine, inhibiting most DNA damage signalling, decreases replication rates overall but does not reverse MMS-induced replication inhibition, showing that the replication block is independent of DNA damage signalling. Furthermore, the block of replication fork progression does not correlate with the level of DNA single-strand breaks. Overexpression of O(6)-methylguanine (O6meG)-DNA methyltransferase protein, responsible for removing the most toxic alkylation, O6meG, did not affect replication elongation following exposure to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. This demonstrates that O6meG lesions are efficiently bypassed in mammalian cells. In addition, we find that MMS-induced gammaH2AX foci co-localise with 53BP1 foci and newly replicated areas, suggesting that DNA double-strand breaks are formed at MMS-blocked replication forks. Altogether, our data suggest that N-alkylations formed during exposure to alkylating agents physically block replication fork elongation in mammalian cells, causing formation of replication-associated DNA lesions, likely double-strand breaks. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. DNA2 drives processing and restart of reversed replication forks in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Berti, Matteo; Levikova, Maryna; Pinto, Cosimo; Gomathinayagam, Shivasankari; Vujanovic, Marko; Zellweger, Ralph; Moore, Hayley; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Cejka, Petr; Stewart, Sheila; Lopes, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Accurate processing of stalled or damaged DNA replication forks is paramount to genomic integrity and recent work points to replication fork reversal and restart as a central mechanism to ensuring high-fidelity DNA replication. Here, we identify a novel DNA2- and WRN-dependent mechanism of reversed replication fork processing and restart after prolonged genotoxic stress. The human DNA2 nuclease and WRN ATPase activities functionally interact to degrade reversed replication forks with a 5′-to-3′ polarity and promote replication restart, thus preventing aberrant processing of unresolved replication intermediates. Unexpectedly, EXO1, MRE11, and CtIP are not involved in the same mechanism of reversed fork processing, whereas human RECQ1 limits DNA2 activity by preventing extensive nascent strand degradation. RAD51 depletion antagonizes this mechanism, presumably by preventing reversed fork formation. These studies define a new mechanism for maintaining genome integrity tightly controlled by specific nucleolytic activities and central homologous recombination factors. PMID:25733713

  13. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  14. Artemis-dependent DNA double-strand break formation at stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Unno, Junya; Takagi, Masatoshi; Piao, Jinhua; Sugimoto, Masataka; Honda, Fumiko; Maeda, Daisuke; Masutani, Mitsuko; Kiyono, Tohru; Watanabe, Fumiaki; Morio, Tomohiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi; Mizutani, Shuki

    2013-06-01

    Stalled replication forks undergo DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) under certain conditions. However, the precise mechanism underlying DSB induction and the cellular response to persistent replication fork stalling are not fully understood. Here we show that, in response to hydroxyurea exposure, DSBs are generated in an Artemis nuclease-dependent manner following prolonged stalling with subsequent activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling pathway. The kinase activity of the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase, a prerequisite for stimulation of the endonuclease activity of Artemis, is also required for DSB generation and subsequent ATM activation. Our findings indicate a novel function of Artemis as a molecular switch that converts stalled replication forks harboring single-stranded gap DNA lesions into DSBs, thereby activating the ATM signaling pathway following prolonged replication fork stalling. © 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Strand-Specific Analysis Shows Protein Binding at Replication Forks and PCNA Unloading from Lagging Strands when Forks Stall

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chuanhe; Gan, Haiyun; Han, Junhong; Zhou, Zhi-Xiong; Jia, Shaodong; Chabes, Andrei; Farrugia, Gianrico; Ordog, Tamas; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication proceeds with continuous synthesis of leading-strand DNA and discontinuous synthesis of lagging-strand DNA. Here we describe a method, eSPAN (enrichment and sequencing of protein-associated nascent DNA), which reveals the genome-wide association of proteins with leading and lagging strands of DNA replication forks. Using this approach in budding yeast, we confirm the strand specificities of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon and show that the PCNA clamp is enriched at lagging strands compared with leading-strand replication. Surprisingly, at stalled forks, PCNA is unloaded specifically from lagging strands. PCNA unloading depends on the Elg1-containing alternative RFC complex, ubiquitination of PCNA, and the checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Rad53. Cells deficient in PCNA unloading exhibit increased chromosome breaks. Our studies provide a tool for studying replication-related processes and reveal a mechanism whereby checkpoint kinases regulate strand-specific unloading of PCNA from stalled replication forks to maintain genome stability. PMID:25449133

  16. FANCD2 regulates BLM complex functions independently of FANCI to promote replication fork recovery.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Sareen, Archana; Raghunandan, Maya; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2013-07-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Bloom Syndrome share overlapping phenotypes including spontaneous chromosomal abnormalities and increased cancer predisposition. The FA protein pathway comprises an upstream core complex that mediates recruitment of two central players, FANCD2 and FANCI, to sites of stalled replication forks. Successful fork recovery depends on the Bloom's helicase BLM that participates in a larger protein complex ('BLMcx') containing topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1, RMI2 and replication protein A. We show that FANCD2 is an essential regulator of BLMcx functions: it maintains BLM protein stability and is crucial for complete BLMcx assembly; moreover, it recruits BLMcx to replicating chromatin during normal S-phase and mediates phosphorylation of BLMcx members in response to DNA damage. During replication stress, FANCD2 and BLM cooperate to promote restart of stalled replication forks while suppressing firing of new replication origins. In contrast, FANCI is dispensable for FANCD2-dependent BLMcx regulation, demonstrating functional separation of FANCD2 from FANCI.

  17. Cooperation of the N-terminal Helicase and C-terminal endonuclease activities of Archaeal Hef protein in processing stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kayoko; Hidaka, Masumi; Horiuchi, Takashi; Fujikane, Ryosuke; Shinagawa, Hideo; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2004-12-17

    Blockage of replication fork progression often occurs during DNA replication, and repairing and restarting stalled replication forks are essential events in all organisms for the maintenance of genome integrity. The repair system employs processing enzymes to restore the stalled fork. In Archaea Hef is a well conserved protein that specifically cleaves nicked, flapped, and fork-structured DNAs. This enzyme contains two distinct domains that are similar to the DEAH helicase family and XPF nuclease superfamily proteins. Analyses of truncated mutant proteins consisting of each domain revealed that the C-terminal nuclease domain independently recognized and incised fork-structured DNA. The N-terminal helicase domain also specifically unwound fork-structured DNA and Holliday junction DNA in the presence of ATP. Moreover, the endonuclease activity of the whole Hef protein was clearly stimulated by ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the N-terminal domain. These enzymatic properties suggest that Hef efficiently resolves stalled replication forks by two steps, which are branch point transfer to the 5'-end of the nascent lagging strand by the N-terminal helicase followed by template strand incision for leading strand synthesis by the C-terminal endonuclease.

  18. A short G1 phase imposes constitutive replication stress and fork remodelling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Akshay K.; Jodkowska, Karolina; Teloni, Federico; Bizard, Anna H.; Zellweger, Ralph; Herrador, Raquel; Ortega, Sagrario; Hickson, Ian D.; Altmeyer, Matthias; Mendez, Juan; Lopes, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) represent a transient biological state, where pluripotency is coupled with fast proliferation. ESCs display a constitutively active DNA damage response (DDR), but its molecular determinants have remained elusive. Here we show in cultured ESCs and mouse embryos that H2AX phosphorylation is dependent on Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related (ATR) and is associated with chromatin loading of the ssDNA-binding proteins RPA and RAD51. Single-molecule analysis of replication intermediates reveals massive ssDNA gap accumulation, reduced fork speed and frequent fork reversal. All these marks of replication stress do not impair the mitotic process and are rapidly lost at differentiation onset. Delaying the G1/S transition in ESCs allows formation of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and suppresses ssDNA accumulation, fork slowing and reversal in the following S-phase. Genetic inactivation of fork slowing and reversal leads to chromosomal breakage in unperturbed ESCs. We propose that rapid cell cycle progression makes ESCs dependent on effective replication-coupled mechanisms to protect genome integrity. PMID:26876348

  19. Regulating telomere length from the inside out: the replication fork model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length is regulated around an equilibrium set point. Telomeres shorten during replication and are lengthened by telomerase. Disruption of the length equilibrium leads to disease; thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms that regulate length at the molecular level. The prevailing protein-counting model for regulating telomerase access to elongate the telomere does not explain accumulating evidence of a role of DNA replication in telomere length regulation. Here I present an alternative model: the replication fork model that can explain how passage of a replication fork and regulation of origin firing affect telomere length. PMID:27401551

  20. NEK8 regulates DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation and replication fork protection

    PubMed Central

    Abeyta, Antonio; Castella, Maria; Jacquemont, Celine; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins essential for homologous recombination play a pivotal role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks, DNA inter-strand crosslinks and replication fork stability. Defects in homologous recombination also play a critical role in the development of cancer and the sensitivity of these cancers to chemotherapy. RAD51, an essential factor for homologous recombination and replication fork protection, accumulates and forms immunocytochemically detectable nuclear foci at sites of DNA damage. To identify kinases that may regulate RAD51 localization to sites of DNA damage, we performed a human kinome siRNA library screen, using DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation as readout. We found that NEK8, a NIMA family kinase member, is required for efficient DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation. Interestingly, knockout of Nek8 in murine embryonic fibroblasts led to cellular sensitivity to the replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea, and inhibition of the ATR kinase. Furthermore, NEK8 was required for proper replication fork protection following replication stall with hydroxyurea. Loading of RAD51 to chromatin was decreased in NEK8-depleted cells and Nek8-knockout cells. Single-molecule DNA fiber analyses revealed that nascent DNA tracts were degraded in the absence of NEK8 following treatment with hydroxyurea. Consistent with this, Nek8-knockout cells showed increased chromosome breaks following treatment with hydroxyurea. Thus, NEK8 plays a critical role in replication fork stability through its regulation of the DNA repair and replication fork protection protein RAD51. PMID:27892797

  1. Replication Fork Protection Factors Controlling R-Loop Bypass and Suppression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Stirling, Peter C

    2017-01-14

    Replication-transcription conflicts have been a well-studied source of genome instability for many years and have frequently been linked to defects in RNA processing. However, recent characterization of replication fork-associated proteins has revealed that defects in fork protection can directly or indirectly stabilize R-loop structures in the genome and promote transcription-replication conflicts that lead to genome instability. Defects in essential DNA replication-associated activities like topoisomerase, or the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complex, as well as fork-associated protection factors like the Fanconi anemia pathway, both appear to mitigate transcription-replication conflicts. Here, we will highlight recent advances that support the concept that normal and robust replisome function itself is a key component of mitigating R-loop coupled genome instability.

  2. A rotary pumping model for helicase function of MCM proteins at a distance from replication forks.

    PubMed

    Laskey, Ronald A; Madine, Mark A

    2003-01-01

    We propose an integrated model for eukaryotic DNA replication to explain the following problems: (1) How is DNA spooled through fixed sites of replication? (2) What and where are the helicases that unwind replicating DNA? (3) Why are the best candidates for replicative helicases, namely mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins, not concentrated at the replication fork? (4) How do MCM proteins spread away from loading sites at origins of replication? We draw on recent discoveries to argue that the MCM hexameric ring is a rotary motor that pumps DNA along its helical axis by simple rotation, such that the movement resembles that of a threaded bolt through a nut, and we propose that MCM proteins act at a distance from the replication fork to unwind DNA. This model would place DNA replication in a growing list of processes, such as recombination and virus packaging, that are mediated by ring-shaped ATPases pumping DNA by helical rotation.

  3. Risks at the DNA Replication Fork: Effects upon Carcinogenesis and Tumor Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Tony M.; Harcy, Victoria; Roberts, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of all organisms to copy their genetic information via DNA replication is a prerequisite for cell division and a biological imperative of life. In multicellular organisms, however, mutations arising from DNA replication errors in the germline and somatic cells are the basis of genetic diseases and cancer, respectively. Within human tumors, replication errors additionally contribute to mutator phenotypes and tumor heterogeneity, which are major confounding factors for cancer therapeutics. Successful DNA replication involves the coordination of many large-scale, complex cellular processes. In this review, we focus on the roles that defects in enzymes that normally act at the replication fork and dysregulation of enzymes that inappropriately damage single-stranded DNA at the fork play in causing mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. We focus on tumor data and experimental evidence that error-prone variants of replicative polymerases promote carcinogenesis and on research indicating that the primary target mutated by APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like) cytidine deaminases is ssDNA present at the replication fork. Furthermore, we discuss evidence from model systems that indicate replication stress and other cancer-associated metabolic changes may modulate mutagenic enzymatic activities at the replication fork. PMID:28117753

  4. Methods to study the coupling between replicative helicase and leading-strand DNA polymerase at the replication fork.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Divya; Patel, Smita S

    2016-10-01

    Replicative helicases work closely with the replicative DNA polymerases to ensure that the genomic DNA is copied in a timely and error free manner. In the replisomes of prokaryotes, mitochondria, and eukaryotes, the helicase and DNA polymerase enzymes are functionally and physically coupled at the leading strand replication fork and rely on each other for optimal DNA strand separation and synthesis activities. In this review, we describe pre-steady state kinetic methods to quantify the base pair unwinding-synthesis rate constant, a fundamental parameter to understand how the helicase and polymerase help each other during leading strand replication. We describe a robust method to measure the chemical step size of the helicase-polymerase complex that determines how the two motors are energetically coupled while tracking along the DNA. The 2-aminopurine fluorescence-based method provide structural information on the leading strand helicase-polymerase complex, such as the distance between the two enzymes, their relative positions at the replication fork, and their roles in fork junction melting. The combined information garnered from these methods informs on the mutual dependencies between the helicase and DNA polymerase enzymes, their stepping mechanism, and their individual functions at the replication fork during leading strand replication. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Chromatin dynamics at the replication fork: there's more to life than histones.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Iestyn; Smith, Duncan J

    2013-04-01

    Before each division, eukaryotic cells face the daunting task of completely and accurately replicating a heterogeneous, chromatinized genome and repackaging both resulting daughters. Because replication requires strand separation, interactions between the DNA and its many associated proteins--including histones--must be transiently broken to allow the passage of the replication fork. Here, we will discuss the disruption and re-establishment of chromatin structure during replication, and the consequences of these processes for epigenetic inheritance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Replication Fork Protection Factors Controlling R-Loop Bypass and Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Emily Yun-Chia; Stirling, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Replication–transcription conflicts have been a well-studied source of genome instability for many years and have frequently been linked to defects in RNA processing. However, recent characterization of replication fork-associated proteins has revealed that defects in fork protection can directly or indirectly stabilize R-loop structures in the genome and promote transcription–replication conflicts that lead to genome instability. Defects in essential DNA replication-associated activities like topoisomerase, or the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase complex, as well as fork-associated protection factors like the Fanconi anemia pathway, both appear to mitigate transcription–replication conflicts. Here, we will highlight recent advances that support the concept that normal and robust replisome function itself is a key component of mitigating R-loop coupled genome instability. PMID:28098815

  7. The Replication Fork: Understanding the Eukaryotic Replication Machinery and the Challenges to Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Leman, Adam R.; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells must accurately and efficiently duplicate their genomes during each round of the cell cycle. Multiple linear chromosomes, an abundance of regulatory elements, and chromosome packaging are all challenges that the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery must successfully overcome. The replication machinery, the “replisome” complex, is composed of many specialized proteins with functions in supporting replication by DNA polymerases. Efficient replisome progression relies on tight coordination between the various factors of the replisome. Further, replisome progression must occur on less than ideal templates at various genomic loci. Here, we describe the functions of the major replisome components, as well as some of the obstacles to efficient DNA replication that the replisome confronts. Together, this review summarizes current understanding of the vastly complicated task of replicating eukaryotic DNA. PMID:23599899

  8. The replication fork: understanding the eukaryotic replication machinery and the challenges to genome duplication.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells must accurately and efficiently duplicate their genomes during each round of the cell cycle. Multiple linear chromosomes, an abundance of regulatory elements, and chromosome packaging are all challenges that the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery must successfully overcome. The replication machinery, the "replisome" complex, is composed of many specialized proteins with functions in supporting replication by DNA polymerases. Efficient replisome progression relies on tight coordination between the various factors of the replisome. Further, replisome progression must occur on less than ideal templates at various genomic loci. Here, we describe the functions of the major replisome components, as well as some of the obstacles to efficient DNA replication that the replisome confronts. Together, this review summarizes current understanding of the vastly complicated task of replicating eukaryotic DNA.

  9. ruvA Mutants that resolve Holliday junctions but do not reverse replication forks.

    PubMed

    Baharoglu, Zeynep; Bradley, Alison Sylvia; Le Masson, Marie; Tsaneva, Irina; Michel, Bénédicte

    2008-03-07

    RuvAB and RuvABC complexes catalyze branch migration and resolution of Holliday junctions (HJs) respectively. In addition to their action in the last steps of homologous recombination, they process HJs made by replication fork reversal, a reaction which occurs at inactivated replication forks by the annealing of blocked leading and lagging strand ends. RuvAB was recently proposed to bind replication forks and directly catalyze their conversion into HJs. We report here the isolation and characterization of two separation-of-function ruvA mutants that resolve HJs, based on their capacity to promote conjugational recombination and recombinational repair of UV and mitomycin C lesions, but have lost the capacity to reverse forks. In vivo and in vitro evidence indicate that the ruvA mutations affect DNA binding and the stimulation of RuvB helicase activity. This work shows that RuvA's actions at forks and at HJs can be genetically separated, and that RuvA mutants compromised for fork reversal remain fully capable of homologous recombination.

  10. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-08-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing.

  11. A ruthenium polypyridyl intercalator stalls DNA replication forks, radiosensitizes human cancer cells and is enhanced by Chk1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Martin R.; Harun, Siti Norain; Halder, Swagata; Boghozian, Ramon A.; Ramadan, Kristijan; Ahmad, Haslina; Vallis, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes can intercalate DNA with high affinity and prevent cell proliferation; however, the direct impact of ruthenium-based intercalation on cellular DNA replication remains unknown. Here we show the multi-intercalator [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ (dppz = dipyridophenazine, PIP = 2-(phenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) immediately stalls replication fork progression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells. In response to this replication blockade, the DNA damage response (DDR) cell signalling network is activated, with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation indicating prolonged replication-associated DNA damage, and cell proliferation is inhibited by G1-S cell-cycle arrest. Co-incubation with a Chk1 inhibitor achieves synergistic apoptosis in cancer cells, with a significant increase in phospho(Ser139) histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) levels and foci indicating increased conversion of stalled replication forks to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Normal human epithelial cells remain unaffected by this concurrent treatment. Furthermore, pre-treatment of HeLa cells with [Ru(dppz)2(PIP)]2+ before external beam ionising radiation results in a supra-additive decrease in cell survival accompanied by increased γ-H2AX expression, indicating the compound functions as a radiosensitizer. Together, these results indicate ruthenium-based intercalation can block replication fork progression and demonstrate how these DNA-binding agents may be combined with DDR inhibitors or ionising radiation to achieve more efficient cancer cell killing. PMID:27558808

  12. Replication fork stability is essential for the maintenance of centromere integrity in the absence of heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Li, Pao-Chen; Petreaca, Ruben C; Jensen, Amanda; Yuan, Ji-Ping; Green, Marc D; Forsburg, Susan L

    2013-03-28

    The centromere of many eukaryotes contains highly repetitive sequences marked by methylation of histone H3K9 by Clr4(KMT1). This recruits multiple heterochromatin proteins, including Swi6 and Chp1, to form a rigid centromere and ensure accurate chromosome segregation. In the absence of heterochromatin, cells show an increased rate of recombination in the centromere, as well as chromosome loss. These defects are severely aggravated by loss of replication fork stability. Thus, heterochromatin proteins and replication fork protection mechanisms work in concert to prevent abnormal recombination, preserve centromere integrity, and ensure faithful chromosome segregation. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  14. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  15. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    DOE PAGES

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; ...

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteinsmore » retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.« less

  16. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    SciTech Connect

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, Česlovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-09-08

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteins retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. We suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal.

  17. Human HLTF mediates postreplication repair by its HIRAN domain-dependent replication fork remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Neculai, Dante; Juhasz, Szilvia; Morocz, Monika; Gali, Himabindu; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Venclovas, Česlovas; Haracska, Lajos

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the ability to respond properly to an unrepaired DNA lesion blocking replication promote genomic instability and cancer. Human HLTF, implicated in error-free replication of damaged DNA and tumour suppression, exhibits a HIRAN domain, a RING domain, and a SWI/SNF domain facilitating DNA-binding, PCNA-polyubiquitin-ligase, and dsDNA-translocase activities, respectively. Here, we investigate the mechanism of HLTF action with emphasis on its HIRAN domain. We found that in cells HLTF promotes the filling-in of gaps left opposite damaged DNA during replication, and this postreplication repair function depends on its HIRAN domain. Our biochemical assays show that HIRAN domain mutant HLTF proteins retain their ubiquitin ligase, ATPase and dsDNA translocase activities but are impaired in binding to a model replication fork. These data and our structural study indicate that the HIRAN domain recruits HLTF to a stalled replication fork, and it also provides the direction for the movement of the dsDNA translocase motor domain for fork reversal. In more general terms, we suggest functional similarities between the HIRAN, the OB, the HARP2, and other domains found in certain motor proteins, which may explain why only a subset of DNA translocases can carry out fork reversal. PMID:26350214

  18. Replication Fork Polarity Gradients Revealed by Megabase-Sized U-Shaped Replication Timing Domains in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Antoine; Audit, Benjamin; Chen, Chun-Long; Moindrot, Benoit; Leleu, Antoine; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Vaillant, Cédric; Goldar, Arach; Mongelard, Fabien; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Hyrien, Olivier; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain

    2012-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, replication program specification in different cell types remains to be fully understood. We show for seven human cell lines that about half of the genome is divided in domains that display a characteristic U-shaped replication timing profile with early initiation zones at borders and late replication at centers. Significant overlap is observed between U-domains of different cell lines and also with germline replication domains exhibiting a N-shaped nucleotide compositional skew. From the demonstration that the average fork polarity is directly reflected by both the compositional skew and the derivative of the replication timing profile, we argue that the fact that this derivative displays a N-shape in U-domains sustains the existence of large-scale gradients of replication fork polarity in somatic and germline cells. Analysis of chromatin interaction (Hi-C) and chromatin marker data reveals that U-domains correspond to high-order chromatin structural units. We discuss possible models for replication origin activation within U/N-domains. The compartmentalization of the genome into replication U/N-domains provides new insights on the organization of the replication program in the human genome. PMID:22496629

  19. Smc5/6 maintains stalled replication forks in a recombination-competent conformation

    PubMed Central

    Irmisch, Anja; Ampatzidou, Eleni; Mizuno, Ken'ichi; O'Connell, Matthew J; Murray, Johanne M

    2009-01-01

    The Smc5/6 structural maintenance of chromosomes complex is required for efficient homologous recombination (HR). Defects in Smc5/6 result in chromosome mis-segregation and fragmentation. By characterising two Schizosaccharomyces pombe smc6 mutants, we define two separate functions for Smc5/6 in HR. The first represents the previously described defect in processing recombination-dependent DNA intermediates when replication forks collapse, which leads to increased rDNA recombination. The second novel function defines Smc5/6 as a positive regulator of recombination in the rDNA and correlates mechanistically with a requirement to load RPA and Rad52 onto chromatin genome-wide when replication forks are stably stalled by nucleotide depletion. Rad52 is required for all HR repair, but Rad52 loading in response to replication fork stalling is unexpected and does not correlate with damage-induced foci. We propose that Smc5/6 is required to maintain stalled forks in a stable recombination-competent conformation primed for replication restart. PMID:19158664

  20. Pif1-family helicases cooperate to suppress widespread replication fork arrest at tRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Osmundson, Joseph S.; Kumar, Jayashree; Yeung, Rani; Smith, Duncan J.

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes two distinct Pif1-family helicases – Pif1 and Rrm3 – which have been reported to play distinct roles in numerous nuclear processes. Here, we systematically characterize the roles of Pif1 helicases in replisome progression and lagging-strand synthesis in S. cerevisiae. We demonstrate that either Pif1 or Rrm3 redundantly stimulate strand-displacement by DNA polymerase δ during lagging-strand synthesis. By analyzing replisome mobility in pif1 and rrm3 mutants, we show that Rrm3, with a partially redundant contribution from Pif1, suppresses widespread terminal arrest of the replisome at tRNA genes. Although both head-on and codirectional collisions induce replication fork arrest at tRNA genes, head-on collisions arrest a higher proportion of replisomes. Consistent with this observation, we find that head-on collisions between tRNA transcription and replication are under-represented in the S. cerevisiae genome. We demonstrate that tRNA-mediated arrest is R-loop independent, and propose that replisome arrest and DNA damage are mechanistically separable. PMID:27991904

  1. FANCD2 regulates BLM complex functions independently of FANCI to promote replication fork recovery

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Sareen, Archana; Raghunandan, Maya; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Bloom Syndrome share overlapping phenotypes including spontaneous chromosomal abnormalities and increased cancer predisposition. The FA protein pathway comprises an upstream core complex that mediates recruitment of two central players, FANCD2 and FANCI, to sites of stalled replication forks. Successful fork recovery depends on the Bloom’s helicase BLM that participates in a larger protein complex (‘BLMcx’) containing topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1, RMI2 and replication protein A. We show that FANCD2 is an essential regulator of BLMcx functions: it maintains BLM protein stability and is crucial for complete BLMcx assembly; moreover, it recruits BLMcx to replicating chromatin during normal S-phase and mediates phosphorylation of BLMcx members in response to DNA damage. During replication stress, FANCD2 and BLM cooperate to promote restart of stalled replication forks while suppressing firing of new replication origins. In contrast, FANCI is dispensable for FANCD2-dependent BLMcx regulation, demonstrating functional separation of FANCD2 from FANCI. PMID:23658231

  2. Recombination occurs within minutes of replication blockage by RTS1 producing restarted forks that are prone to collapse

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Michael O; Jalan, Manisha; Morrow, Carl A; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    The completion of genome duplication during the cell cycle is threatened by the presence of replication fork barriers (RFBs). Following collision with a RFB, replication proteins can dissociate from the stalled fork (fork collapse) rendering it incapable of further DNA synthesis unless recombination intervenes to restart replication. We use time-lapse microscopy and genetic assays to show that recombination is initiated within ∼10 min of replication fork blockage at a site-specific barrier in fission yeast, leading to a restarted fork within ∼60 min, which is only prevented/curtailed by the arrival of the opposing replication fork. The restarted fork is susceptible to further collapse causing hyper-recombination downstream of the barrier. Surprisingly, in our system fork restart is unnecessary for maintaining cell viability. Seemingly, the risk of failing to complete replication prior to mitosis is sufficient to warrant the induction of recombination even though it can cause deleterious genetic change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04539.001 PMID:25806683

  3. Structure of the replication fork in ultraviolet light-irradiated human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro-Stone, M; Schumacher, R I; Meneghini, R

    1979-01-01

    The DNA extracted from xeroderma pigmentosum human fibroblasts previously irradiated with 12.5 J/m2 of UV light and pulse-labeled for 45 min with radioactive and (or) heavy precursors, was used to determine the structural characteristics of the replication fork. Density equilibrium centrifugation experiments showed that a fork moved 6 micrometer in 45 min and bypassed 3 pyrimidine dimers in both strands. The same length was covered in 15-20 min in control cells. The delay in irradiated cells was apparently due to pyrimidine dimers acting as temporary blocks to the fork movement. Evidence for this interpretation comes from kinetics of incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, which show that the time necessary to attain a new stable level of DNA synthesis in irradiated cells is equivalent to that required for the replication fork to cover the interdimer distance in one strand. On the other hand, the action of S1 nuclease on DNA synthesized soon after irradiation gives rise to a bimodal distribution in neutral sucrose gradients, one peak corresponding to 43 X 10(6) daltons and the other to 3 X 10(6) daltons. These two DNA species are generated by the attack of the S1 nuclease on single-stranded regions associated with the replication fork. A possible explanation for these results is given by a model according to which there is a delayed bypass of the dimer in the leading strand and the appearance of gaps opposite pyrimidine dimers in the lagging strand, as a direct consequence of the discontinuous mode of DNA replication. In terms of the model, the DNA of 43 X 10(6) daltons corresponds to the leading strand, linked to the unreplicated branch of the forks, whereas the piece of 3 X 10(6) daltons is the intergap DNA coming from the lagging strand. Pulse and chase experiments reveal that the low molecular weight DNA grows in a pattern that suggests that more than one gap may be formed per replication fork. PMID:233582

  4. EEPD1 Rescues Stressed Replication Forks and Maintains Genome Stability by Promoting End Resection and Homologous Recombination Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuehan; Lee, Suk-Hee; Williamson, Elizabeth A.; Reinert, Brian L.; Cho, Ju Hwan; Xia, Fen; Jaiswal, Aruna Shanker; Srinivasan, Gayathri; Patel, Bhavita; Brantley, Alexis; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Pathak, Rupak; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Singh, Sudha; Kong, Kimi; Wu, Xaiohua; Kim, Hyun-Suk; Beissbarth, Timothy; Gaedcke, Jochen; Burma, Sandeep; Nickoloff, Jac A.; Hromas, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling and collapse is a major source of genome instability leading to neoplastic transformation or cell death. Such stressed replication forks can be conservatively repaired and restarted using homologous recombination (HR) or non-conservatively repaired using micro-homology mediated end joining (MMEJ). HR repair of stressed forks is initiated by 5’ end resection near the fork junction, which permits 3’ single strand invasion of a homologous template for fork restart. This 5’ end resection also prevents classical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ), a competing pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Unopposed NHEJ can cause genome instability during replication stress by abnormally fusing free double strand ends that occur as unstable replication fork repair intermediates. We show here that the previously uncharacterized Exonuclease/Endonuclease/Phosphatase Domain-1 (EEPD1) protein is required for initiating repair and restart of stalled forks. EEPD1 is recruited to stalled forks, enhances 5’ DNA end resection, and promotes restart of stalled forks. Interestingly, EEPD1 directs DSB repair away from cNHEJ, and also away from MMEJ, which requires limited end resection for initiation. EEPD1 is also required for proper ATR and CHK1 phosphorylation, and formation of gamma-H2AX, RAD51 and phospho-RPA32 foci. Consistent with a direct role in stalled replication fork cleavage, EEPD1 is a 5’ overhang nuclease in an obligate complex with the end resection nuclease Exo1 and BLM. EEPD1 depletion causes nuclear and cytogenetic defects, which are made worse by replication stress. Depleting 53BP1, which slows cNHEJ, fully rescues the nuclear and cytogenetic abnormalities seen with EEPD1 depletion. These data demonstrate that genome stability during replication stress is maintained by EEPD1, which initiates HR and inhibits cNHEJ and MMEJ. PMID:26684013

  5. The Replication Initiation Protein Sld3/Treslin Orchestrates the Assembly of the Replication Fork Helicase during S Phase*

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated process in eukaryotic cells, and central to the process of initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase. The replication fork helicase is comprised of CMG (Cdc45, Mcm2–7, and GINS) in eukaryotic cells, and the mechanism underlying assembly of the CMG during S phase was studied in this article. We identified a point mutation of Sld3 that is specifically defective for Mcm3 and Mcm5 interaction (sld3-m10), and also identified a point mutation of Sld3 that is specifically defective for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) interaction (sld3-m9). Expression of wild-type levels of sld3-m9 resulted in a severe DNA replication defect with no recruitment of GINS to Mcm2–7, whereas expression of wild-type levels of sld3-m10 resulted in a severe replication defect with no Cdc45 recruitment to Mcm2–7. We propose a model for Sld3-mediated control of replication initiation, wherein Sld3 manages the proper assembly of the CMG during S phase. We also find that the biochemical functions identified for Sld3 are conserved in human Treslin, suggesting that Treslin orchestrates assembly of the CMG in human cells. PMID:26405041

  6. Replication-fork stalling and processing at a single psoralen interstrand crosslink in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Cyrille; Hennion, Magali; Arimondo, Paola B; Hyrien, Olivier

    2011-04-15

    Interstrand crosslink (ICL)-inducing agents block the separation of the two DNA strands. They prevent transcription and replication and are used in clinics for the treatment of cancer and skin diseases. Here, we have introduced a single psoralen ICL at a specific site in plasmid DNA using a triplex-forming-oligonucleotide (TFO)-psoralen conjugate and studied its repair in Xenopus egg extracts that support nuclear assembly and replication of plasmid DNA. Replication forks arriving from either side stalled at the psoralen ICL. In contrast to previous observations with other ICL-inducing agents, the leading strands advanced up to the lesion without any prior pausing. Subsequently, incisions were introduced on one parental strand on both sides of the ICL. These incisions could be detected whether one or both forks reached the ICL. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that the ATR-Chk1 pathway, but not the ATM-Chk2 pathway, stimulated both the incision step and the subsequent processing of the broken replication intermediates. Our results highlight both similarities and differences in fork stalling and repair induced by psoralen and by other ICL-forming agents.

  7. A chloroplast DNA helicase II from pea that prefers fork-like replication structures

    PubMed

    Tuteja; Phan

    1998-11-01

    A DNA helicase, called chloroplast DNA (ctDNA) helicase II, was purified to apparent homogeneity from pea (Pisum sativum). The enzyme contained intrinsic, single-stranded, DNA-dependent ATPase activity and an apparent molecular mass of 78 kD on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The DNA helicase was markedly stimulated by DNA substrates with fork-like replication structures. A 5'-tailed fork was more active than the 3'-tailed fork, which itself was more active than substrates without a fork. The direction of unwinding was 3' to 5' along the bound strand, and it failed to unwind blunt-ended duplex DNA. DNA helicase activity required only ATP or dATP hydrolysis. The enzyme also required a divalent cation (Mg2+>Mn2+>Ca2+) for its unwinding activity and was inhibited at 200 mM KCl or NaCl. This enzyme could be involved in the replication of ctDNA. The DNA major groove-intercalating ligands nogalamycin and daunorubicin were inhibitory to unwinding (Ki approximately 0.85 &mgr;M and 2.2 &mgr;M, respectively) and ATPase (Ki approximately 1.3 &mgr;M and 3.0 &mgr;M, respectively) activities of pea ctDNA helicase II, whereas ellipticine, etoposide (VP-16), and camptothecin had no effect on the enzyme activity. These ligands may be useful in further studies of the mechanisms of chloroplast helicase activities.

  8. Roles of Replication Protein-a Subunits 2 and 3 in DNA Replication Fork Movement in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Maniar, H. S.; Wilson, R.; Brill, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    Replication Protein-A, the eukaryotic SSB, consists of a large subunit (RPA1) with strong ssDNA binding activity and two smaller subunits (RPA2 and 3) that may cooperate with RPA1 to bind ssDNA in a higher-order mode. To determine the in vivo function of the two smaller subunits and the potential role of higher-order ssDNA binding, we isolated an assortment of heat-lethal mutations in the genes encoding RPA2 and RPA3. At the permissive temperature, the mutants show a range of effects on DNA replication fidelity and sensitivities to UV and MMS. At the nonpermissive temperature, four out of five RPA2 mutants show a fast-stop DNA synthesis phenotype typical of a replication fork block. In contrast, the fifth RPA2 mutant and all RPA3 mutants are able to complete at least one round of DNA replication at the nonpermissive temperature. The effect of these mutations on the stability of the RPA complex was tested using a coprecipitation assay. At the nonpermissive temperature, we find that RPA1 and RPA2 are dissociated in the fast-stop mutants, but not in the slow-stop mutants. Thus, replication fork movement in vivo requires the association of at least two subunits of RPA. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that RPA functions in vivo by binding ssDNA in a higher-order mode. PMID:9093844

  9. Ultrafine anaphase bridges, broken DNA and illegitimate recombination induced by a replication fork barrier

    PubMed Central

    Sofueva, Sevil; Osman, Fekret; Lorenz, Alexander; Steinacher, Roland; Castagnetti, Stefania; Ledesma, Jennifer; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Most DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in S- and G2-phase cells are repaired accurately by Rad51-dependent sister chromatid recombination. However, a minority give rise to gross chromosome rearrangements (GCRs), which can result in disease/death. What determines whether a DSB is repaired accurately or inaccurately is currently unclear. We provide evidence that suggests that perturbing replication by a non-programmed protein–DNA replication fork barrier results in the persistence of replication intermediates (most likely regions of unreplicated DNA) into mitosis, which results in anaphase bridge formation and ultimately to DNA breakage. However, unlike previously characterised replication-associated DSBs, these breaks are repaired mainly by Rad51-independent processes such as single-strand annealing, and are therefore prone to generate GCRs. These data highlight how a replication-associated DSB can be predisposed to give rise to genome rearrangements in eukaryotes. PMID:21576223

  10. Endonuclease cleavage of blocked replication forks: An indirect pathway of DNA damage from antitumor drug-topoisomerase complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, George; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2003-04-01

    The cytotoxicity of several important antitumor drugs depends on formation of the covalent topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. However, cellular processes such as DNA replication are necessary to convert the cleavage complex into a cytotoxic lesion, but the molecular mechanism of this conversion and the precise nature of the cytotoxic lesion are unknown. Using a bacteriophage T4 model system, we have previously shown that antitumor drug-induced cleavage complexes block replication forks in vivo. In this report, we show that these blocked forks can be cleaved by T4 endonuclease VII to create overt DNA breaks. The accumulation of blocked forks increased in endonuclease VII-deficient infections, suggesting that endonuclease cleavage contributes to fork processing in vivo. Furthermore, purified endonuclease VII cleaved the blocked forks in vitro close to the branch points. These results suggest that an indirect pathway of branched-DNA cleavage contributes to the cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs that target DNA topoisomerases.

  11. Monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of proteins at replication forks and in assembled chromatin using isolation of proteins on nascent DNA.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Bianca M; Couch, Frank B; Cortez, David

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the processes of DNA replication, chromatin assembly and maturation, and the replication stress response requires the ability to monitor protein dynamics at active and damaged replication forks. Detecting protein accumulation at replication forks or damaged sites has primarily relied on immunofluorescence imaging, which is limited in resolution and antibody sensitivity. Here we describe a procedure to isolate proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) that permits a high-resolution spatiotemporal analysis of proteins at replication forks or on chromatin following DNA replication in cultured cells. iPOND relies on labeling of nascent DNA with the nucleoside analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Biotin conjugation to EdU-labeled DNA using click chemistry facilitates a single-step streptavidin purification of proteins bound to the nascent DNA. iPOND permits an interrogation of any cellular process linked to DNA synthesis using a 3- to 4-d protocol.

  12. Archaeal Hel308 helicase targets replication forks in vivo and in vitro and unwinds lagging strands.

    PubMed

    Guy, Colin P; Bolt, Edward L

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in mammalian and Drosophila Hel308 and PolQ paralogues cause genome instability but their helicase functions are mysterious. By in vivo and in vitro analysis, we show that Hel308 from archaea (Hel308a) may act at stalled replication forks. Introducing hel308a into Escherichia coli dnaE strains that conditionally accumulate stalled forks caused synthetic lethality, an effect indistinguishable from E.coli RecQ. Further analysis in vivo indicated that the effect of hel308a is exerted independently of homologous recombination. The minimal biochemical properties of Hel308a protein were the same as human Hel308. We describe how helicase actions of Hel308a at fork structures lead specifically to displacement of lagging strands. The invading strand of D-loops is also targeted. Using archaeal Hel308, we propose models of action for the helicase domain of PolQ, promoting loading of the translesion polymerase domain. We speculate that removal of lagging strands at stalled forks by Hel308 promotes the formation of initiation zones, priming restart of lagging strand synthesis.

  13. Moonlighting at replication forks - a new life for homologous recombination proteins BRCA1, BRCA2 and RAD51.

    PubMed

    Kolinjivadi, Arun Mouli; Sannino, Vincenzo; de Antoni, Anna; Técher, Hervé; Baldi, Giorgio; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2017-01-12

    Coordination between DNA replication and DNA repair ensures maintenance of genome integrity, which is lost in cancer cells. Emerging evidence has linked homologous recombination (HR) proteins RAD51, BRCA1 and BRCA2 to the stability of nascent DNA. This function appears to be distinct from double-strand break (DSB) repair and is in part due to the prevention of MRE11-mediated degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. The role of RAD51 in fork protection resembles the activity described for its prokaryotic orthologue RecA, which prevents nuclease-mediated degradation of DNA and promotes replication fork restart in cells challenged by DNA-damaging agents. Here, we examine the mechanistic aspects of HR-mediated fork protection, addressing the crosstalk between HR and replication proteins.

  14. Histone H3K56 Acetylation, CAF1, and Rtt106 Coordinate Nucleosome Assembly and Stability of Advancing Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; González-Prieto, Román; Prado, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Chromatin assembly mutants accumulate recombinogenic DNA damage and are sensitive to genotoxic agents. Here we have analyzed why impairment of the H3K56 acetylation-dependent CAF1 and Rtt106 chromatin assembly pathways, which have redundant roles in H3/H4 deposition during DNA replication, leads to genetic instability. We show that the absence of H3K56 acetylation or the simultaneous knock out of CAF1 and Rtt106 increases homologous recombination by affecting the integrity of advancing replication forks, while they have a minor effect on stalled replication fork stability in response to the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. This defect in replication fork integrity is not due to defective checkpoints. In contrast, H3K56 acetylation protects against replicative DNA damaging agents by DNA repair/tolerance mechanisms that do not require CAF1/Rtt106 and are likely subsequent to the process of replication-coupled nucleosome deposition. We propose that the tight connection between DNA synthesis and histone deposition during DNA replication mediated by H3K56ac/CAF1/Rtt106 provides a mechanism for the stabilization of advancing replication forks and the maintenance of genome integrity, while H3K56 acetylation has an additional, CAF1/Rtt106-independent function in the response to replicative DNA damage. PMID:22102830

  15. Histone H2B mono-ubiquitylation maintains genomic integrity at stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Northam, Matthew R; Trujillo, Kelly M

    2016-11-02

    Histone modifications play an important role in regulating access to DNA for transcription, DNA repair and DNA replication. A central player in these events is the mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B (H2Bub1), which has been shown to regulate nucleosome dynamics. Previously, it was shown that H2Bub1 was important for nucleosome assembly onto nascent DNA at active replication forks. In the absence of H2Bub1, incomplete chromatin structures resulted in several replication defects. Here, we report new evidence, which shows that loss of H2Bub1 contributes to genomic instability in yeast. Specifically, we demonstrate that H2Bub1-deficient yeast accumulate mutations at a high frequency under conditions of replicative stress. This phenotype is due to an aberrant DNA Damage Tolerance (DDT) response upon fork stalling. We show that H2Bub1 normally functions to promote error-free translesion synthesis (TLS) mediated by DNA polymerase eta (Polη). Without H2Bub1, DNA polymerase zeta (Polζ) is responsible for a highly mutagenic alternative mechanism. While H2Bub1 does not appear to regulate other DDT pathways, error-free DDT mechanisms are employed by H2Bub1-deficient cells as another means for survival. However, in these instances, the anti-recombinase, Srs2, is essential to prevent the accumulation of toxic HR intermediates that arise in an unconstrained chromatin environment.

  16. Histone H2B mono-ubiquitylation maintains genomic integrity at stalled replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Northam, Matthew R.; Trujillo, Kelly M.

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications play an important role in regulating access to DNA for transcription, DNA repair and DNA replication. A central player in these events is the mono-ubiquitylation of histone H2B (H2Bub1), which has been shown to regulate nucleosome dynamics. Previously, it was shown that H2Bub1 was important for nucleosome assembly onto nascent DNA at active replication forks. In the absence of H2Bub1, incomplete chromatin structures resulted in several replication defects. Here, we report new evidence, which shows that loss of H2Bub1 contributes to genomic instability in yeast. Specifically, we demonstrate that H2Bub1-deficient yeast accumulate mutations at a high frequency under conditions of replicative stress. This phenotype is due to an aberrant DNA Damage Tolerance (DDT) response upon fork stalling. We show that H2Bub1 normally functions to promote error-free translesion synthesis (TLS) mediated by DNA polymerase eta (Polη). Without H2Bub1, DNA polymerase zeta (Polζ) is responsible for a highly mutagenic alternative mechanism. While H2Bub1 does not appear to regulate other DDT pathways, error-free DDT mechanisms are employed by H2Bub1-deficient cells as another means for survival. However, in these instances, the anti-recombinase, Srs2, is essential to prevent the accumulation of toxic HR intermediates that arise in an unconstrained chromatin environment. PMID:27458205

  17. Norfloxacin-induced DNA gyrase cleavage complexes block Escherichia coli replication forks, causing double-stranded breaks in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pohlhaus, Jennifer Reineke; Kreuzer, Kenneth N.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Antibacterial quinolones inhibit type II DNA topoisomerases by stabilizing covalent topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complexes, which are apparently transformed into double-stranded breaks by cellular processes such as replication. We used plasmid pBR322 and two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis to examine the collision of replication forks with quinolone-induced gyrase-DNA cleavage complexes in Escherichia coli. Restriction endonuclease-digested DNA exhibited a bubble arc with discrete spots, indicating that replication forks had been stalled. The most prominent spot depended upon the strong gyrase binding site of pBR322, providing direct evidence that quinolone-induced cleavage complexes block bacterial replication forks in vivo. We differentiated between stalled forks that do or do not contain bound cleavage complex by extracting DNA under different conditions. Resealing conditions allow gyrase to efficiently reseal the transient breaks within cleavage complexes, while cleavage conditions cause the latent breaks to be revealed. These experiments showed that some stalled forks did not contain a cleavage complex, implying that gyrase had dissociated in vivo and yet the fork had not restarted at the time of DNA isolation. Additionally, some branched plasmid DNA isolated under resealing conditions nonetheless contained broken DNA ends. We discuss a model for the creation of double-stranded breaks by an indirect mechanism after quinolone treatment. PMID:15916595

  18. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3′ single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks. PMID:26957021

  19. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2016-03-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3' single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks.

  20. Xenopus Mcm10 is a CDK-substrate required for replication fork stability

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Gaganmeet Singh; Gambus, Agnieszka; Gillespie, Peter J.; Blow, J. Julian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During S phase, following activation of the S phase CDKs and the DBF4-dependent kinases (DDK), double hexamers of Mcm2-7 at licensed replication origins are activated to form the core replicative helicase. Mcm10 is one of several proteins that have been implicated from work in yeasts to play a role in forming a mature replisome during the initiation process. Mcm10 has also been proposed to play a role in promoting replisome stability after initiation has taken place. The role of Mcm10 is particularly unclear in metazoans, where conflicting data has been presented. Here, we investigate the role and regulation of Mcm10 in Xenopus egg extracts. We show that Xenopus Mcm10 is recruited to chromatin late in the process of replication initiation and this requires prior action of DDKs and CDKs. We also provide evidence that Mcm10 is a CDK substrate but does not need to be phosphorylated in order to associate with chromatin. We show that in extracts depleted of more than 99% of Mcm10, the bulk of DNA replication still occurs, suggesting that Mcm10 is not required for the process of replication initiation. However, in extracts depleted of Mcm10, the replication fork elongation rate is reduced. Furthermore, the absence of Mcm10 or its phosphorylation by CDK results in instability of replisome proteins on DNA, which is particularly important under conditions of replication stress. PMID:27327991

  1. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Dembowski, Jill A.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4–6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome. PMID:28095497

  2. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes.

    PubMed

    Dembowski, Jill A; Dremel, Sarah E; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4-6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome.

  3. Differential regulation of the anti-crossover and replication fork regression activities of Mph1 by Mte1

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Papusha, Alma; Choi, Koyi; Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Kumar, Sandeep; Niu, Hengyao; Kaur, Hardeep; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Donnianni, Roberto A.; Lu, Lucy; Lichten, Michael; Zhao, Xiaolan; Ira, Grzegorz; Sung, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We identified Mte1 (Mph1-associated telomere maintenance protein 1) as a multifunctional regulator of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1, a member of the FANCM family of DNA motor proteins important for DNA replication fork repair and crossover suppression during homologous recombination. We show that Mte1 interacts with Mph1 and DNA species that resemble a DNA replication fork and the D loop formed during recombination. Biochemically, Mte1 stimulates Mph1-mediated DNA replication fork regression and branch migration in a model substrate. Consistent with this activity, genetic analysis reveals that Mte1 functions with Mph1 and the associated MHF complex in replication fork repair. Surprisingly, Mte1 antagonizes the D-loop-dissociative activity of Mph1–MHF and exerts a procrossover role in mitotic recombination. We further show that the influence of Mte1 on Mph1 activities requires its binding to Mph1 and DNA. Thus, Mte1 differentially regulates Mph1 activities to achieve distinct outcomes in recombination and replication fork repair. PMID:26966246

  4. Double-Strand Break Repair Independent Role For BRCA2 In Blocking Stalled Replication Fork Degradation By MRE11

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Katharina; Christ, Nicole; Siaud, Nicolas; Egashira, Akinori; Wu, Hong; Jasin, Maria

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is critical for maintenance of genomic integrity and resistance to agents that damage DNA or collapse replication forks, presumably through homology-directed repair of double-strand breaks (HDR). Using single-molecule DNA fiber analysis, we show here that nascent replication tracts created before fork stalling with hydroxyurea are degraded in the absence of BRCA2 but are stable in wild-type cells. BRCA2 mutational analysis reveals that a conserved C-terminal site, involved in stabilizing RAD51 filaments but not in loading RAD51 onto DNA, is essential for this fork protection but dispensable for HDR. RAD51 filament disruption in wild-type cells phenocopies BRCA2 deficiency. BRCA2 prevents chromosomal aberrations upon replication stalling, which are alleviated by inhibition of MRE11, the nuclease responsible for this novel fork instability. Thus, BRCA2 prevents rather than repairs nucleolytic lesions at stalled replication forks to maintain genomic integrity, and hence likely suppresses tumorigenesis through this novel replication-specific function. PMID:21565612

  5. Gap-filling and bypass at the replication fork are both active mechanisms for tolerance of low-dose ultraviolet-induced DNA damage in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Quinet, Annabel; Vessoni, Alexandre T; Rocha, Clarissa R R; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Biard, Denis; Sarasin, Alain; Menck, Carlos F M; Stary, Anne

    2014-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage are removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) or can be tolerated by specialized translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerases, such as Polη. TLS may act at stalled replication forks or through an S-phase independent gap-filling mechanism. After UVC irradiation, Polη-deficient (XP-V) human cells were arrested in early S-phase and exhibited both single-strand DNA (ssDNA) and prolonged replication fork stalling, as detected by DNA fiber assay. In contrast, NER deficiency in XP-C cells caused no apparent defect in S-phase progression despite the accumulation of ssDNA and a G2-phase arrest. These data indicate that while Polη is essential for DNA synthesis at ongoing damaged replication forks, NER deficiency might unmask the involvement of tolerance pathway through a gap-filling mechanism. ATR knock down by siRNA or caffeine addition provoked increased cell death in both XP-V and XP-C cells exposed to low-dose of UVC, underscoring the involvement of ATR/Chk1 pathway in both DNA damage tolerance mechanisms. We generated a unique human cell line deficient in XPC and Polη proteins, which exhibited both S- and G2-phase arrest after UVC irradiation, consistent with both single deficiencies. In these XP-C/Polη(KD) cells, UVC-induced replicative intermediates may collapse into double-strand breaks, leading to cell death. In conclusion, both TLS at stalled replication forks and gap-filling are active mechanisms for the tolerance of UVC-induced DNA damage in human cells and the preference for one or another pathway depends on the cellular genotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Modulation of mutagenesis in eukaryotes by DNA replication fork dynamics and quality of nucleotide pools

    PubMed Central

    Waisertreiger, Irina S.-R.; Liston, Victoria G.; Menezes, Miriam R.; Kim, Hyun-Min; Lobachev, Kirill S.; Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri. I.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of mutations in eukaryotes depends on a plethora of factors and is not immediately derived from the fidelity of DNA polymerases (Pols). Replication of chromosomes containing the anti-parallel strands of duplex DNA occurs through the copying of leading and lagging strand templates by a trio of Pols α, δ and ε, with the assistance of Pol ζ and Y-family Pols at difficult DNA template structures or sites of DNA damage. The parameters of the synthesis at a given location are dictated by the quality and quantity of nucleotides in the pools, replication fork architecture, transcription status, regulation of Pol switches, and structure of chromatin. The result of these transactions is a subject of survey and editing by DNA repair. PMID:23055184

  7. A Distinct Replication Fork Protection Pathway Connects Fanconi Anemia Tumor Suppressors to RAD51-BRCA1/2

    PubMed Central

    Schlacher, Katharina; Wu, Hong; Jasin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Genes mutated in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) interact with the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1 to suppress tumorigenesis, but the molecular functions ascribed to them cannot fully explain all of their cellular roles. Here, we show a repair-independent requirement for FA genes, including FANCD2, and BRCA1 in protecting stalled replication forks from degradation. Fork protection is surprisingly rescued in FANCD2-deficient cells by elevated RAD51 levels or stabilized RAD51 filaments. Moreover, FANCD2-mediated fork protection is epistatic with RAD51 functions, revealing an unanticipated fork protection pathway that connects FA genes to RAD51 and the BRCA1/2 breast cancer suppressors. Collective results imply a unified molecular mechanism for repair-independent functions of FA, RAD51, and BRCA1/2 proteins in preventing genomic instability and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:22789542

  8. A distinct replication fork protection pathway connects Fanconi anemia tumor suppressors to RAD51-BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Katharina; Wu, Hong; Jasin, Maria

    2012-07-10

    Genes mutated in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) interact with the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1 to suppress tumorigenesis, but the molecular functions ascribed to them cannot fully explain all of their cellular roles. Here, we show a repair-independent requirement for FA genes, including FANCD2, and BRCA1 in protecting stalled replication forks from degradation. Fork protection is surprisingly rescued in FANCD2-deficient cells by elevated RAD51 levels or stabilized RAD51 filaments. Moreover, FANCD2-mediated fork protection is epistatic with RAD51 functions, revealing an unanticipated fork protection pathway that connects FA genes to RAD51 and the BRCA1/2 breast cancer suppressors. Collective results imply a unified molecular mechanism for repair-independent functions of FA, RAD51, and BRCA1/2 proteins in preventing genomic instability and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  9. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine; Mankouri, Hocine W; Hickson, Ian D

    2014-04-07

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus, to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it is neither Tof1-dependent nor counteracted by the Rrm3 helicase. Although the yeast replisome can overcome RF pausing at Tus-Ter modules, this event triggers site-specific homologous recombination that requires the RecQ helicase, Sgs1, for its timely resolution. We propose that Tus-Ter can be utilized as a versatile, site-specific, heterologous DNA replication-perturbing system, with a variety of potential applications.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG Protein but Not RuvAB or RecA Protein Is Efficient at Remodeling the Stalled Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Khanduja, Jasbeer Singh; Muniyappa, K.; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA replication, defects in the protection, and restart of stalled replication forks are major causes of genome instability in all organisms. Replication fork reversal is emerging as an evolutionarily conserved physiological response for restart of stalled forks. Escherichia coli RecG, RuvAB, and RecA proteins have been shown to reverse the model replication fork structures in vitro. However, the pathways and the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a slow growing human pathogen, responds to different types of replication stress and DNA damage are unclear. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis RecG rescues E. coli ΔrecG cells from replicative stress. The purified M. tuberculosis RecG (MtRecG) and RuvAB (MtRuvAB) proteins catalyze fork reversal of model replication fork structures with and without a leading strand single-stranded DNA gap. Interestingly, single-stranded DNA-binding protein suppresses the MtRecG- and MtRuvAB-mediated fork reversal with substrates that contain lagging strand gap. Notably, our comparative studies with fork structures containing template damage and template switching mechanism of lesion bypass reveal that MtRecG but not MtRuvAB or MtRecA is proficient in driving the fork reversal. Finally, unlike MtRuvAB, we find that MtRecG drives efficient reversal of forks when fork structures are tightly bound by protein. These results provide direct evidence and valuable insights into the underlying mechanism of MtRecG-catalyzed replication fork remodeling and restart pathways in vivo. PMID:26276393

  11. DNA repair and replication fork helicases are differentially affected by alkyl phosphotriester lesion.

    PubMed

    Suhasini, Avvaru N; Sommers, Joshua A; Yu, Stephen; Wu, Yuliang; Xu, Ting; Kelman, Zvi; Kaplan, Daniel L; Brosh, Robert M

    2012-06-01

    DNA helicases are directly responsible for catalytically unwinding duplex DNA in an ATP-dependent and directionally specific manner and play essential roles in cellular nucleic acid metabolism. It has been conventionally thought that DNA helicases are inhibited by bulky covalent DNA adducts in a strand-specific manner. However, the effects of highly stable alkyl phosphotriester (PTE) lesions that are induced by chemical mutagens and refractory to DNA repair have not been previously studied for their effects on helicases. In this study, DNA repair and replication helicases were examined for unwinding a forked duplex DNA substrate harboring a single isopropyl PTE specifically positioned in the helicase-translocating or -nontranslocating strand within the double-stranded region. A comparison of SF2 helicases (RecQ, RECQ1, WRN, BLM, FANCJ, and ChlR1) with a SF1 DNA repair helicase (UvrD) and two replicative helicases (MCM and DnaB) demonstrates unique differences in the effect of the PTE on the DNA unwinding reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. All of the SF2 helicases tested were inhibited by the PTE lesion, whereas UvrD and the replication fork helicases were fully tolerant of the isopropyl backbone modification, irrespective of strand. Sequestration studies demonstrated that RECQ1 helicase was trapped by the PTE lesion only when it resided in the helicase-translocating strand. Our results are discussed in light of the current models for DNA unwinding by helicases that are likely to encounter sugar phosphate backbone damage during biological DNA transactions.

  12. Nucleolytic processing of aberrant replication intermediates by an Exo1-Dna2-Sae2 axis counteracts fork collapse-driven chromosome instability

    PubMed Central

    Colosio, Arianna; Frattini, Camilla; Pellicanò, Grazia; Villa-Hernández, Sara; Bermejo, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Problems during DNA replication underlie genomic instability and drive malignant transformation. The DNA damage checkpoint stabilizes stalled replication forks thus counteracting aberrant fork transitions, DNA breaks and chromosomal rearrangements. We analyzed fork processing in checkpoint deficient cells by coupling psoralen crosslinking with replication intermediate two-dimensional gel analysis. This revealed a novel role for Exo1 nuclease in resecting reversed replication fork structures and counteracting the accumulation of aberrant intermediates resembling fork cleavage products. Genetic analyses demonstrated a functional interplay of Exo1 with Mus81, Dna2 and Sae2 nucleases in promoting cell survival following replication stress, suggestive of concerted nucleolytic processing of stalled forks. While Mus81 and other Structure Specific Endonucleases do not contribute to obvious collapsed fork transitions, Dna2 promotes reversed fork resection likely by facilitating Exo1 access to nascent strands. Instead, Sae2 cooperates with Exo1 in counteracting putative fork cleavage events linked to double strand breaks formation and increased gross chromosomal rearrangement rates. Our data indicate that in checkpoint deficient cells diverse nuclease activities interface to eliminate aberrant replication intermediates and prevent chromosome instability. PMID:27672038

  13. Nucleolytic processing of aberrant replication intermediates by an Exo1-Dna2-Sae2 axis counteracts fork collapse-driven chromosome instability.

    PubMed

    Colosio, Arianna; Frattini, Camilla; Pellicanò, Grazia; Villa-Hernández, Sara; Bermejo, Rodrigo

    2016-12-15

    Problems during DNA replication underlie genomic instability and drive malignant transformation. The DNA damage checkpoint stabilizes stalled replication forks thus counteracting aberrant fork transitions, DNA breaks and chromosomal rearrangements. We analyzed fork processing in checkpoint deficient cells by coupling psoralen crosslinking with replication intermediate two-dimensional gel analysis. This revealed a novel role for Exo1 nuclease in resecting reversed replication fork structures and counteracting the accumulation of aberrant intermediates resembling fork cleavage products. Genetic analyses demonstrated a functional interplay of Exo1 with Mus81, Dna2 and Sae2 nucleases in promoting cell survival following replication stress, suggestive of concerted nucleolytic processing of stalled forks. While Mus81 and other Structure Specific Endonucleases do not contribute to obvious collapsed fork transitions, Dna2 promotes reversed fork resection likely by facilitating Exo1 access to nascent strands. Instead, Sae2 cooperates with Exo1 in counteracting putative fork cleavage events linked to double strand breaks formation and increased gross chromosomal rearrangement rates. Our data indicate that in checkpoint deficient cells diverse nuclease activities interface to eliminate aberrant replication intermediates and prevent chromosome instability.

  14. The Deubiquitinase USP9X Maintains DNA Replication Fork Stability and DNA Damage Checkpoint Responses by Regulating CLASPIN during S-Phase.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Edel; Gaboriau, David; Rainey, Michael D; Restuccia, Umberto; Bachi, Angela; Santocanale, Corrado

    2016-04-15

    Coordination of the multiple processes underlying DNA replication is key for maintaining genome stability and preventing tumorigenesis. CLASPIN, a critical player in replication fork stabilization and checkpoint responses, must be tightly regulated during the cell cycle to prevent the accumulation of DNA damage. In this study, we used a quantitative proteomics approach and identified USP9X as a novel CLASPIN-interacting protein. USP9X is a deubiquitinase involved in multiple signaling and survival pathways whose tumor suppressor or oncogenic activity is highly context dependent. We found that USP9X regulated the expression and stability of CLASPIN in an S-phase-specific manner. USP9X depletion profoundly impairs the progression of DNA replication forks, causing unscheduled termination events with a frequency similar to CLASPIN depletion, resulting in excessive endogenous DNA damage. Importantly, restoration of CLASPIN expression in USP9X-depleted cells partially suppressed the accumulation of DNA damage. Furthermore, USP9X depletion compromised CHK1 activation in response to hydroxyurea and UV, thus promoting hypersensitivity to drug-induced replication stress. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for USP9X in the maintenance of genomic stability during DNA replication and provide potential mechanistic insights into its tumor suppressor role in certain malignancies. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2384-93. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2–FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM–BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. PMID:28058110

  16. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2-FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM-BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs.

  17. FANCD2, FANCJ and BRCA2 cooperate to promote replication fork recovery independently of the Fanconi Anemia core complex.

    PubMed

    Raghunandan, Maya; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Kelich, Stephanie L; Hanenberg, Helmut; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an inherited multi-gene cancer predisposition syndrome that is characterized on the cellular level by a hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). To repair these lesions, the FA pathway proteins are thought to act in a linear hierarchy: Following ICL detection, an upstream FA core complex monoubiquitinates the central FA pathway members FANCD2 and FANCI, followed by their recruitment to chromatin. Chromatin-bound monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI subsequently coordinate DNA repair factors including the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 to repair the DNA ICL. Importantly, we recently showed that FANCD2 has additional independent roles: it binds chromatin and acts in concert with the BLM helicase complex to promote the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks, while suppressing the firing of new replication origins. Here, we show that FANCD2 fulfills these roles independently of the FA core complex-mediated monoubiquitination step. Following APH treatment, nonubiquitinated FANCD2 accumulates on chromatin, recruits the BLM complex, and promotes robust replication fork recovery regardless of the absence or presence of a functional FA core complex. In contrast, the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and BRCA2 share FANCD2's role in replication fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Our results support a non-linear FA pathway model at stalled replication forks, where the nonubiquitinated FANCD2 isoform - in concert with FANCJ and BRCA2 - fulfills a specific function in promoting efficient replication fork recovery independently of the FA core complex.

  18. FANCD2, FANCJ and BRCA2 cooperate to promote replication fork recovery independently of the Fanconi Anemia core complex

    PubMed Central

    Raghunandan, Maya; Chaudhury, Indrajit; Kelich, Stephanie L.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an inherited multi-gene cancer predisposition syndrome that is characterized on the cellular level by a hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). To repair these lesions, the FA pathway proteins are thought to act in a linear hierarchy: Following ICL detection, an upstream FA core complex monoubiquitinates the central FA pathway members FANCD2 and FANCI, followed by their recruitment to chromatin. Chromatin-bound monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI subsequently coordinate DNA repair factors including the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 to repair the DNA ICL. Importantly, we recently showed that FANCD2 has additional independent roles: it binds chromatin and acts in concert with the BLM helicase complex to promote the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks, while suppressing the firing of new replication origins. Here, we show that FANCD2 fulfills these roles independently of the FA core complex-mediated monoubiquitination step. Following APH treatment, nonubiquitinated FANCD2 accumulates on chromatin, recruits the BLM complex, and promotes robust replication fork recovery regardless of the absence or presence of a functional FA core complex. In contrast, the downstream FA pathway members FANCJ and BRCA2 share FANCD2's role in replication fork restart and the suppression of new origin firing. Our results support a non-linear FA pathway model at stalled replication forks, where the nonubiquitinated FANCD2 isoform – in concert with FANCJ and BRCA2 – fulfills a specific function in promoting efficient replication fork recovery independently of the FA core complex. PMID:25659033

  19. DNA damage response pathway and replication fork stress during oligonucleotide directed gene editing.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Melissa; Strouse, Bryan; Applegate, Mindy; Livingston, Paula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2012-04-03

    Single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) can be used to direct the exchange of nucleotides in the genome of mammalian cells in a process known as gene editing. Once refined, gene editing should become a viable option for gene therapy and molecular medicine. Gene editing is regulated by a number of DNA recombination and repair pathways whose natural activities often lead to single- and double-stranded DNA breaks. It has been previously shown that introduction of a phosphorotioated ODN, designed to direct a gene-editing event, into cells results in the activation of γH2AX, a well-recognized protein biomarker for double-stranded DNA breakage. Using a single copy, integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene as our target, we now demonstrate that several types of ODNs, capable of directing gene editing, also activate the DNA damage response and the post-translational modification of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a signature modification of replication stress. We find that the gene editing reaction itself leads to transient DNA breakage, perhaps through replication fork collapse. Unmodified specific ODNs elicit a lesser degree of replication stress than their chemically modified counterparts, but are also less active in gene editing. Modified phosphothioate oligonucleotides (PTOs) are detrimental irrespective of the DNA sequence. Such collateral damage may prove problematic for proliferation of human cells genetically modified by gene editing.

  20. Hypermutagenesis in mutA cells is mediated by mistranslational corruption of polymerase, and is accompanied by replication fork collapse.

    PubMed

    Al Mamun, Abu Amar M; Gautam, Satyendra; Humayun, M Zafri

    2006-12-01

    Elevated mistranslation induces a mutator response termed translational stress-induced mutagenesis (TSM) that is mediated by an unidentified modification of DNA polymerase III. Here we address two questions: (i) does TSM result from direct polymerase corruption, or from an indirect pathway triggered by increased protein turnover? (ii) Why are homologous recombination functions required for the expression of TSM under certain conditions, but not others? We show that replication of bacteriophage T4 in cells expressing the mutA allele of the glyVtRNA gene (Asp-Gly mistranslation), leads to both increased mutagenesis, and to an altered mutational specificity, results that strongly support mistranslational corruption of DNA polymerase. We also show that expression of mutA, which confers a recA-dependent mutator phenotype, leads to increased lambdoid prophage induction (selectable in vivo expression technology assay), suggesting that replication fork collapse occurs more frequently in mutA cells relative to control cells. No such increase in prophage induction is seen in cells expressing alaVGlu tRNA (Glu-->Ala mistranslation), in which the mutator phenotype is recA-independent. We propose that replication fork collapse accompanies episodic hypermutagenic replication cycles in mutA cells, requiring homologous recombination functions for fork recovery, and therefore, for mutation recovery. These findings highlight hitherto under-appreciated links among translation, replication and recombination, and suggest that translational fidelity, which is affected by genetic and environmental signals, is a key modulator of replication fidelity.

  1. FANCD2-Controlled Chromatin Access of the Fanconi-Associated Nuclease FAN1 Is Crucial for the Recovery of Stalled Replication Forks

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Stroik, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Within the FA pathway, an upstream core complex monoubiquitinates and recruits the FANCD2 protein to ICLs on chromatin. Ensuing DNA repair involves the Fanconi-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), which interacts selectively with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2Ub) at ICLs. Importantly, FANCD2 has additional independent functions: it binds chromatin and coordinates the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks in concert with the BLM helicase, while protecting forks from nucleolytic degradation by MRE11. We identified FAN1 as a new crucial replication fork recovery factor. FAN1 joins the BLM-FANCD2 complex following APH-mediated fork stalling in a manner dependent on MRE11 and FANCD2, followed by FAN1 nuclease-mediated fork restart. Surprisingly, APH-induced activation and chromatin recruitment of FAN1 occur independently of the FA core complex or the FAN1 UBZ domain, indicating that the FANCD2Ub isoform is dispensable for functional FANCD2-FAN1 cross talk during stalled fork recovery. In the absence of FANCD2, MRE11 exonuclease-promoted access of FAN1 to stalled forks results in severe FAN1-mediated nucleolytic degradation of nascent DNA strands. Thus, FAN1 nuclease activity at stalled replication forks requires tight regulation: too little inhibits fork restart, whereas too much causes fork degradation. PMID:25135477

  2. FANCD2-controlled chromatin access of the Fanconi-associated nuclease FAN1 is crucial for the recovery of stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Stroik, Daniel R; Sobeck, Alexandra

    2014-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). Within the FA pathway, an upstream core complex monoubiquitinates and recruits the FANCD2 protein to ICLs on chromatin. Ensuing DNA repair involves the Fanconi-associated nuclease 1 (FAN1), which interacts selectively with monoubiquitinated FANCD2 (FANCD2(Ub)) at ICLs. Importantly, FANCD2 has additional independent functions: it binds chromatin and coordinates the restart of aphidicolin (APH)-stalled replication forks in concert with the BLM helicase, while protecting forks from nucleolytic degradation by MRE11. We identified FAN1 as a new crucial replication fork recovery factor. FAN1 joins the BLM-FANCD2 complex following APH-mediated fork stalling in a manner dependent on MRE11 and FANCD2, followed by FAN1 nuclease-mediated fork restart. Surprisingly, APH-induced activation and chromatin recruitment of FAN1 occur independently of the FA core complex or the FAN1 UBZ domain, indicating that the FANCD2(Ub) isoform is dispensable for functional FANCD2-FAN1 cross talk during stalled fork recovery. In the absence of FANCD2, MRE11 exonuclease-promoted access of FAN1 to stalled forks results in severe FAN1-mediated nucleolytic degradation of nascent DNA strands. Thus, FAN1 nuclease activity at stalled replication forks requires tight regulation: too little inhibits fork restart, whereas too much causes fork degradation.

  3. Quality control mechanisms exclude incorrect polymerases from the eukaryotic replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Grant D.; O’Donnell, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is primarily replicated by two DNA polymerases, Pol ε and Pol δ, that function on the leading and lagging strands, respectively. Previous studies have established recruitment mechanisms whereby Cdc45-Mcm2-7-GINS (CMG) helicase binds Pol ε and tethers it to the leading strand, and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) binds tightly to Pol δ and recruits it to the lagging strand. The current report identifies quality control mechanisms that exclude the improper polymerase from a particular strand. We find that the replication factor C (RFC) clamp loader specifically inhibits Pol ε on the lagging strand, and CMG protects Pol ε against RFC inhibition on the leading strand. Previous studies show that Pol δ is slow and distributive with CMG on the leading strand. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol δ–PCNA is a rapid and processive enzyme, suggesting that CMG may bind and alter Pol δ activity or position it on the lagging strand. Measurements of polymerase binding to CMG demonstrate Pol ε binds CMG with a Kd value of 12 nM, but Pol δ binding CMG is undetectable. Pol δ, like bacterial replicases, undergoes collision release upon completing replication, and we propose Pol δ–PCNA collides with the slower CMG, and in the absence of a stabilizing Pol δ–CMG interaction, the collision release process is triggered, ejecting Pol δ on the leading strand. Hence, by eviction of incorrect polymerases at the fork, the clamp machinery directs quality control on the lagging strand and CMG enforces quality control on the leading strand. PMID:28069954

  4. Replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome in RNase HI-deficient cells: multiple initiation regions and fork dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maduike, Nkabuije Z; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Wang, Jue D; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at a single origin, oriC, dependent on initiation protein DnaA. However, replication can be initiated elsewhere on the chromosome at multiple ectopic oriK sites. Genetic evidence indicates that initiation from oriK depends on RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), which are normally removed by enzymes such as RNase HI to prevent oriK from misfiring during normal growth. Initiation from oriK sites occurs in RNase HI-deficient mutants, and possibly in wild-type cells under certain unusual conditions. Despite previous work, the locations of oriK and their impact on genome stability remain unclear. We combined 2D gel electrophoresis and whole genome approaches to map genome-wide oriK locations. The DNA copy number profiles of various RNase HI-deficient strains contained multiple peaks, often in consistent locations, identifying candidate oriK sites. Removal of RNase HI protein also leads to global alterations of replication fork migration patterns, often opposite to normal replication directions, and presumably eukaryote-like replication fork merging. Our results have implications for genome stability, offering a new understanding of how RNase HI deficiency results in R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflict, as well as inappropriate replication stalling or blockage at Ter sites outside of the terminus trap region and at ribosomal operons.

  5. Replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome in RNase HI-deficient cells: Multiple initiation regions and fork dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Maduike, Nkabuije Z; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Wang, Jue D; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at a single origin, oriC, dependent on initiation protein DnaA. However, replication can be initiated elsewhere on the chromosome at multiple ectopic oriK sites. Genetic evidence indicates that initiation from oriK depends on RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), which are normally removed by enzymes such as RNase HI to prevent oriK from misfiring during normal growth. Initiation from oriK sites occurs in RNase HI-deficient mutants, and possibly in wild-type cells under certain unusual conditions. Despite previous work, the locations of oriK and their impact on genome stability remain unclear. We combined 2D gel electrophoresis and whole genome approaches to map genome-wide oriK locations. The DNA copy number profiles of various RNase HI-deficient strains contained multiple peaks, often in consistent locations, identifying candidate oriK sites. Removal of RNase HI protein also leads to global alterations of replication fork migration patterns, often opposite to normal replication directions, and presumably eukaryote-like replication fork merging. Our results have implications for genome stability, offering a new understanding of how RNase HI deficiency results in R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflict, as well as inappropriate replication stalling or blockage at Ter sites outside of the terminus trap region and at ribosomal operons. PMID:24164596

  6. The Escherichia coli GTPase ObgE modulates hydroxyl radical levels in response to DNA replication fork arrest.

    PubMed

    Kint, Cyrielle I; Verstraeten, Natalie; Wens, Inez; Liebens, Veerle R; Hofkens, Johan; Versées, Wim; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Obg proteins are universally conserved GTP-binding proteins that are essential for viability in bacteria. Homologs in different organisms are involved in various cellular processes, including DNA replication. The goal of this study was to analyse the structure-function relationship of Escherichia coli ObgE with regard to DNA replication in general and sensitivity to stalled replication forks in particular. Defined C-terminal chromosomal deletion mutants of obgE were constructed and tested for sensitivity to the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. The ObgE C-terminal domain was shown to be dispensable for normal growth of E.coli. However, a region within this domain is involved in the cellular response to replication fork stress. In addition, a mutant obgE over-expression library was constructed by error-prone PCR and screened for increased hydroxyurea sensitivity. ObgE proteins with substitutions L159Q, G163V, P168V, G216A or R237C, located within distinct domains of ObgE, display dominant-negative effects leading to hydroxyurea hypersensitivity when over-expressed. These effects are abolished in strains with a single deletion of the iron transporter TonB or combined deletions the toxin/antitoxin modules RelBE/MazEF, strains both of which have been shown to be involved in a pathway that stimulates hydroxyl radical formation following hydroxyurea treatment. Moreover, the observed dominant-negative effects are lost in the presence of the hydroxyl radical scavenger thiourea. Together, these results indicate involvement of hydroxyl radical toxicity in ObgE-mediated protection against replication fork stress.

  7. Nascent DNA processing by RecJ favors lesion repair over translesion synthesis at arrested replication forks in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Courcelle, Charmain T; Chow, Kin-Hoe; Casey, Andrew; Courcelle, Justin

    2006-06-13

    DNA lesions that arrest replication can lead to rearrangements, mutations, or lethality when not processed accurately. After UV-induced DNA damage in Escherichia coli, RecA and several recF pathway proteins are thought to process arrested replication forks and ensure that replication resumes accurately. Here, we show that the RecJ nuclease and RecQ helicase, which partially degrade the nascent DNA at blocked replication forks, are required for the rapid recovery of DNA synthesis and prevent the potentially mutagenic bypass of UV lesions. In the absence of RecJ, or to a lesser extent RecQ, the recovery of replication is significantly delayed, and both the recovery and cell survival become dependent on translesion synthesis by polymerase V. The RecJ-mediated processing is proposed to restore the region containing the lesion to a form that allows repair enzymes to remove the blocking lesion and DNA synthesis to resume. In the absence of nascent DNA processing, polymerase V can synthesize past the lesion to prevent lethality, although this occurs with slower kinetics and a higher frequency of mutagenesis.

  8. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  9. E. coli mismatch repair acts downstream of replication fork stalling to stabilize the expanded (GAA·TTC)n sequence

    PubMed Central

    Bourn, Rebecka L.; Rindler, Paul M.; Pollard, Laura M.; Bidichandani, Sanjay I.

    2008-01-01

    Expanded triplet repeat sequences are known to cause at least 16 inherited neuromuscular diseases. In addition to short length changes, expanded triplet repeat tracts frequently undergo large changes, often amounting to hundreds of base-pairs. Such changes might occur when template or primer slipping creates insertion/deletion loops (IDLs), which are normally repaired by the mismatch repair system (MMR). However, in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, MMR promotes large changes in the length of (CTG·CAG)n sequences, the motif most commonly associated with human disease. We tested the effect of MMR on instability of the expanded (GAA·TTC)n sequence, which causes Friedreich ataxia, by comparing repeat instability in wild-type and MMR-deficient strains of E. coli. As expected, the prevalence of small mutations increased in the MMR-deficient strains. However, the prevalence of large contractions increased in the MMR mutants specifically when GAA was the lagging strand template, the orientation in which replication fork stalling is known to occur. After hydroxyurea-induced stalling, both orientations of replication showed significantly more large contractions in MMR mutants than in the wild-type, suggesting that fork stalling may be responsible for the large contractions. Deficiency of MMR promoted large contractions independently of RecA status, a known determinant of (GAA·TTC)n instability. These data suggest that two independent mechanisms act in response to replication stalling to prevent instability of the (GAA·TTC)n sequence in E. coli, when GAA serves as the lagging strand template: one that is dependent on RecA-mediated restart of stalled forks, and another that is dependent on MMR-mediated repair of IDLs. While MMR destabilizes the (CTG·CAG)n sequence, it is involved in stabilization of the (GAA·TTC)n sequence. The role of MMR in triplet repeat instability therefore depends on the repeat sequence and the orientation of replication. PMID:19046977

  10. The drinking water contaminant dibromoacetonitrile delays G1-S transition and suppresses Chk1 activation at broken replication forks.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Thomas; Dyer, James; Fenner, Nathalie; Dunn, Christian; Freeman, Chris

    2017-10-06

    Chlorination of drinking water protects humans from water-born pathogens, but it also produces low concentrations of dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN), a common disinfectant by-product found in many water supply systems. DBAN is not mutagenic but causes DNA breaks and elevates sister chromatid exchange in mammalian cells. The WHO issued guidelines for DBAN after it was linked with cancer of the liver and stomach in rodents. How this haloacetonitrile promotes malignant cell transformation is unknown. Using fission yeast as a model, we report here that DBAN delays G1-S transition. DBAN does not hinder ongoing DNA replication, but specifically blocks the serine 345 phosphorylation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Chk1 by Rad3 (ATR) at broken replication forks. DBAN is particularly damaging for cells with defects in the lagging-strand DNA polymerase delta. This sensitivity can be explained by the dependency of pol delta mutants on Chk1 activation for survival. We conclude that DBAN targets a process or protein that acts at the start of S phase and is required for Chk1 phosphorylation. Taken together, DBAN may precipitate cancer by perturbing S phase and by blocking the Chk1-dependent response to replication fork damage.

  11. Transcription Termination Factor reb1p Causes Two Replication Fork Barriers at Its Cognate Sites in Fission Yeast Ribosomal DNA In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; López-Estraño, Carlos; Krimer, Dora B.; Schvartzman, Jorge B.; Hernández, Pablo

    2004-01-01

    Polar replication fork barriers (RFBs) near the 3′ end of the rRNA transcriptional unit are a conserved feature of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) replication in eukaryotes. In the mouse, in vivo studies indicate that the cis-acting Sal boxes required for rRNA transcription termination are also involved in replication fork blockage. On the contrary, in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the rRNA transcription termination factors are not required for RFBs. Here we characterized the rDNA RFBs in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe rDNA contains three closely spaced polar replication barriers named RFB1, RFB2, and RFB3 in the 3′ to 5′ order. The transcription termination protein reb1 and its two binding sites, present at the 3′ end of the coding region, were required for fork arrest at RFB2 and RFB3 in vivo. On the other hand, fork arrest at the strongest RFB1 barrier was independent of the above transcription termination factors. Therefore, RFB2 and RFB3 resemble the barriers present in the mouse rDNA, whereas RFB1 is similar to the budding yeast RFBs. These results suggest that during evolution, cis- and trans-acting factors required for rRNA transcription termination became involved in replication fork blockage also. S. pombe is suggested to be a transitional species in which both mechanisms coexist. PMID:14673172

  12. Genome-wide localization of Rrm3 and Pif1 DNA helicases at stalled active and inactive DNA replication forks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Silvia Emma; Carotenuto, Walter; Giannattasio, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is sequenced and the location and dynamic of activation of DNA replication origins are known. G1 synchronized yeast cells can be released into S-phase in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU) (1), which slows down DNA replication and retains replication forks in proximity of DNA replication origins. In this condition, the Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ChIP on chip) (2–4) of replisome components allows the precise localization of all active DNA replication forks. This analysis can be coupled with the ssDNA-BromodeoxyUridine (ssDNA-BrdU) Immuno-Precipitation on chip (ssDNA-BrdU IP on chip) technique (5–7), which detects the location of newly synthesized DNA. Comparison of binding and BrdU incorporation profiles allows to locate a factor of interest at DNA replication forks genome wide. We present datasets deposited in the gene expression omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE68214, which show how the DNA helicases Rrm3 and Pif1 (8) associate to active and inactive DNA replication forks. PMID:26981397

  13. Impairment of lagging strand synthesis triggers the formation of a RuvABC substrate at replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Maria-Jose; Bierne, Hélène; Ehrlich, S.Dusko; Michel, Bénédicte

    2001-01-01

    The holD gene codes for the ψ subunit of the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, a component of the γ complex clamp loader. A holD mutant was isolated for the first time in a screen for mutations that increase the frequency of tandem repeat deletions. In contrast to tandem repeat deletions in wild-type strains, deletion events stimulated by the holD mutation require RecA. They do not require RecF, and hence do not result from the recombinational repair of gaps, arguing against uncoupling of the leading and lagging strand polymerases in the holD mutant. The holD recBC combination of mutations is lethal and holD recBts recCts strains suffer DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at restrictive temperature. DSBs require the presence of the Holliday junction-specific enzymes RuvABC and are prevented in the presence of RecBCD. We propose that impairment of replication due to the holD mutation causes the arrest of the entire replisome; consequently, Holliday junctions are formed by replication fork reversal, and unequal crossing over during RecA- and RecBCD-mediated re-incorporation of reversed forks causes the hyper-recombination phenotype. PMID:11157768

  14. Identification of Proteins at Active, Stalled, and Collapsed Replication Forks Using Isolation of Proteins on Nascent DNA (iPOND) Coupled with Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Sirbu, Bianca M.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Dungrawala, Huzefa; Badu-Nkansah, Akosua; Kavanaugh, Gina M.; Chen, Yaoyi; Tabb, David L.; Cortez, David

    2013-01-01

    Both DNA and chromatin need to be duplicated during each cell division cycle. Replication happens in the context of defects in the DNA template and other forms of replication stress that present challenges to both genetic and epigenetic inheritance. The replication machinery is highly regulated by replication stress responses to accomplish this goal. To identify important replication and stress response proteins, we combined isolation of proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) with quantitative mass spectrometry. We identified 290 proteins enriched on newly replicated DNA at active, stalled, and collapsed replication forks. Approximately 16% of these proteins are known replication or DNA damage response proteins. Genetic analysis indicates that several of the newly identified proteins are needed to facilitate DNA replication, especially under stressed conditions. Our data provide a useful resource for investigators studying DNA replication and the replication stress response and validate the use of iPOND combined with mass spectrometry as a discovery tool. PMID:24047897

  15. Initiation of bacteriophage T4 DNA replication and replication fork dynamics: a review in the Virology Journal series on bacteriophage T4 and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Kenneth N; Brister, J Rodney

    2010-12-03

    Bacteriophage T4 initiates DNA replication from specialized structures that form in its genome. Immediately after infection, RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops) occur on (at least some) replication origins, with the annealed RNA serving as a primer for leading-strand synthesis in one direction. As the infection progresses, replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins in a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR occurs when the replication machinery is assembled onto D-loop recombination intermediates, and in this case, the invading 3' DNA end is used as a primer for leading strand synthesis. Over the last 15 years, these two modes of T4 DNA replication initiation have been studied in vivo using a variety of approaches, including replication of plasmids with segments of the T4 genome, analysis of replication intermediates by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and genomic approaches that measure DNA copy number as the infection progresses. In addition, biochemical approaches have reconstituted replication from origin R-loop structures and have clarified some detailed roles of both replication and recombination proteins in the process of RDR and related pathways. We will also discuss the parallels between T4 DNA replication modes and similar events in cellular and eukaryotic organelle DNA replication, and close with some current questions of interest concerning the mechanisms of replication, recombination and repair in phage T4.

  16. Replication termination at eukaryotic chromosomes is mediated by Top2 and occurs at genomic loci containing pausing elements.

    PubMed

    Fachinetti, Daniele; Bermejo, Rodrigo; Cocito, Andrea; Minardi, Simone; Katou, Yuki; Kanoh, Yutaka; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Azvolinsky, Anna; Zakian, Virginia A; Foiani, Marco

    2010-08-27

    Chromosome replication initiates at multiple replicons and terminates when forks converge. In E. coli, the Tus-TER complex mediates polar fork converging at the terminator region, and aberrant termination events challenge chromosome integrity and segregation. Since in eukaryotes, termination is less characterized, we used budding yeast to identify the factors assisting fork fusion at replicating chromosomes. Using genomic and mechanistic studies, we have identified and characterized 71 chromosomal termination regions (TERs). TERs contain fork pausing elements that influence fork progression and merging. The Rrm3 DNA helicase assists fork progression across TERs, counteracting the accumulation of X-shaped structures. The Top2 DNA topoisomerase associates at TERs in S phase, and G2/M facilitates fork fusion and prevents DNA breaks and genome rearrangements at TERs. We propose that in eukaryotes, replication fork barriers, Rrm3, and Top2 coordinate replication fork progression and fusion at TERs, thus counteracting abnormal genomic transitions.

  17. In front of and behind the replication fork: bacterial type IIA topoisomerases.

    PubMed

    Sissi, Claudia; Palumbo, Manlio

    2010-06-01

    Topoisomerases are vital enzymes specialized in controlling DNA topology, in particular supercoiling and decatenation, to properly handle nucleic acid packing and cell dynamics. The type IIA enzymes act by cleaving both strands of a double helix and having another strand from the same or another molecule cross the DNA gate before a re-sealing event completes the catalytic cycle. Here, we will consider the two types of IIA prokaryotic topoisomerases, DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV, as crucial regulators of bacterial cell cycle progression. Their synergistic action allows control of chromosome packing and grants occurrence of functional transcription and replication processes. In addition to displaying a fascinating molecular mechanism of action, which transduces chemical energy into mechanical energy by means of large conformational changes, these enzymes represent attractive pharmacological targets for antibacterial chemotherapy.

  18. Rad51-dependent DNA structures accumulate at damaged replication forks in sgs1 mutants defective in the yeast ortholog of BLM RecQ helicase.

    PubMed

    Liberi, Giordano; Maffioletti, Giulio; Lucca, Chiara; Chiolo, Irene; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Cotta-Ramusino, Cecilia; Lopes, Massimo; Pellicioli, Achille; Haber, James E; Foiani, Marco

    2005-02-01

    S-phase cells overcome chromosome lesions through replication-coupled recombination processes that seem to be assisted by recombination-dependent DNA structures and/or replication-related sister chromatid junctions. RecQ helicases, including yeast Sgs1 and human BLM, have been implicated in both replication and recombination and protect genome integrity by preventing unscheduled mitotic recombination events. We have studied the RecQ helicase-mediated mechanisms controlling genome stability by analyzing replication forks encountering a damaged template in sgs1 cells. We show that, in sgs1 mutants, recombination-dependent cruciform structures accumulate at damaged forks. Their accumulation requires Rad51 protein, is counteracted by Srs2 DNA helicase, and does not prevent fork movement. Sgs1, but not Srs2, promotes resolution of these recombination intermediates. A functional Rad53 checkpoint kinase that is known to protect the integrity of the sister chromatid junctions is required for the accumulation of recombination intermediates in sgs1 mutants. Finally, top3 and top3 sgs1 mutants accumulate the same structures as sgs1 cells. We suggest that, in sgs1 cells, the unscheduled accumulation of Rad51-dependent cruciform structures at damaged forks result from defective maturation of recombination-dependent intermediates that originate from the replication-related sister chromatid junctions. Our findings might contribute to explaining some of the recombination defects of BLM cells.

  19. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Debra L.; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4Cdt2) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression. PMID:26771714

  20. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  1. Breast cancer proteins PALB2 and BRCA2 stimulate polymerase η in recombination-associated DNA synthesis at blocked replication forks.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Rémi; Niraj, Joshi; Pauty, Joris; Maity, Ranjan; Zhao, Weixing; Coulombe, Yan; Sung, Patrick; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2014-02-13

    One envisioned function of homologous recombination (HR) is to find a template for DNA synthesis from the resected 3'-OH molecules that occur during double-strand break (DSB) repair at collapsed replication forks. However, the interplay between DNA synthesis and HR remains poorly understood in higher eukaryotic cells. Here, we reveal functions for the breast cancer proteins BRCA2 and PALB2 at blocked replication forks and show a role for these proteins in stimulating polymerase η (Polη) to initiate DNA synthesis. PALB2, BRCA2, and Polη colocalize at stalled or collapsed replication forks after hydroxyurea treatment. Moreover, PALB2 and BRCA2 interact with Polη and are required to sustain the recruitment of Polη at blocked replication forks. PALB2 and BRCA2 stimulate Polη-dependent DNA synthesis on D loop substrates. We conclude that PALB2 and BRCA2, in addition to their functions in D loop formation, play crucial roles in the initiation of recombination-associated DNA synthesis by Polη-mediated DNA repair. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. RECQ5 Helicase Cooperates with MUS81 Endonuclease in Processing Stalled Replication Forks at Common Fragile Sites during Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Stefano; Hasanova, Zdenka; Kanagaraj, Radhakrishnan; Chappidi, Nagaraja; Altmannova, Veronika; Menon, Shruti; Sedlackova, Hana; Langhoff, Jana; Surendranath, Kalpana; Hühn, Daniela; Bhowmick, Rahul; Marini, Victoria; Ferrari, Stefano; Hickson, Ian D; Krejci, Lumir; Janscak, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    The MUS81-EME1 endonuclease cleaves late replication intermediates at common fragile sites (CFSs) during early mitosis to trigger DNA-repair synthesis that ensures faithful chromosome segregation. Here, we show that these DNA transactions are promoted by RECQ5 DNA helicase in a manner dependent on its Ser727 phosphorylation by CDK1. Upon replication stress, RECQ5 associates with CFSs in early mitosis through its physical interaction with MUS81 and promotes MUS81-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis. RECQ5 depletion or mutational inactivation of its ATP-binding site, RAD51-interacting domain, or phosphorylation site causes excessive binding of RAD51 to CFS loci and impairs CFS expression. This leads to defective chromosome segregation and accumulation of CFS-associated DNA damage in G1 cells. Biochemically, RECQ5 alleviates the inhibitory effect of RAD51 on 3'-flap DNA cleavage by MUS81-EME1 through its RAD51 filament disruption activity. These data suggest that RECQ5 removes RAD51 filaments stabilizing stalled replication forks at CFSs and hence facilitates CFS cleavage by MUS81-EME1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inactivation of the DnaB helicase leads to the collapse and degradation of the replication fork: a comparison to UV-induced arrest.

    PubMed

    Belle, Jerilyn J; Casey, Andrew; Courcelle, Charmain T; Courcelle, Justin

    2007-08-01

    Replication forks face a variety of structurally diverse impediments that can prevent them from completing their task. The mechanism by which cells overcome these hurdles is likely to vary depending on the nature of the obstacle and the strand in which the impediment is encountered. Both UV-induced DNA damage and thermosensitive replication proteins have been used in model systems to inhibit DNA replication and characterize the mechanism by which it recovers. In this study, we examined the molecular events that occur at replication forks following inactivation of a thermosensitive DnaB helicase and found that they are distinct from those that occur following arrest at UV-induced DNA damage. Following UV-induced DNA damage, the integrity of replication forks is maintained and protected from extensive degradation by RecA, RecF, RecO, and RecR until replication can resume. By contrast, inactivation of DnaB results in extensive degradation of the nascent and leading-strand template DNA and a loss of replication fork integrity as monitored by two-dimensional agarose gel analysis. The degradation that occurs following DnaB inactivation partially depends on several genes, including recF, recO, recR, recJ, recG, and xonA. Furthermore, the thermosensitive DnaB allele prevents UV-induced DNA degradation from occurring following arrest even at the permissive temperature, suggesting a role for DnaB prior to loading of the RecFOR proteins. We discuss these observations in relation to potential models for both UV-induced and DnaB(Ts)-mediated replication inhibition.

  4. Inactivation of the DnaB Helicase Leads to the Collapse and Degradation of the Replication Fork: a Comparison to UV-Induced Arrest▿

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Jerilyn J.; Casey, Andrew; Courcelle, Charmain T.; Courcelle, Justin

    2007-01-01

    Replication forks face a variety of structurally diverse impediments that can prevent them from completing their task. The mechanism by which cells overcome these hurdles is likely to vary depending on the nature of the obstacle and the strand in which the impediment is encountered. Both UV-induced DNA damage and thermosensitive replication proteins have been used in model systems to inhibit DNA replication and characterize the mechanism by which it recovers. In this study, we examined the molecular events that occur at replication forks following inactivation of a thermosensitive DnaB helicase and found that they are distinct from those that occur following arrest at UV-induced DNA damage. Following UV-induced DNA damage, the integrity of replication forks is maintained and protected from extensive degradation by RecA, RecF, RecO, and RecR until replication can resume. By contrast, inactivation of DnaB results in extensive degradation of the nascent and leading-strand template DNA and a loss of replication fork integrity as monitored by two-dimensional agarose gel analysis. The degradation that occurs following DnaB inactivation partially depends on several genes, including recF, recO, recR, recJ, recG, and xonA. Furthermore, the thermosensitive DnaB allele prevents UV-induced DNA degradation from occurring following arrest even at the permissive temperature, suggesting a role for DnaB prior to loading of the RecFOR proteins. We discuss these observations in relation to potential models for both UV-induced and DnaB(Ts)-mediated replication inhibition. PMID:17526695

  5. The Slx4-Dpb11 scaffold complex: coordinating the response to replication fork stalling in S-phase and the subsequent mitosis.

    PubMed

    Princz, Lissa N; Gritenaite, Dalia; Pfander, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling at DNA lesions is a common problem during the process of DNA replication. One way to allow the bypass of these lesions is via specific recombination-based mechanisms that involve switching of the replication template to the sister chromatid. Inherent to these mechanisms is the formation of DNA joint molecules (JMs) between sister chromatids. Such JMs need to be disentangled before chromatid separation in mitosis and the activity of JM resolution enzymes, which is under stringent cell cycle control, is therefore up-regulated in mitosis. An additional layer of control is facilitated by scaffold proteins. In budding yeast, specifically during mitosis, Slx4 and Dpb11 form a cell cycle kinase-dependent complex with the Mus81-Mms4 structure-selective endonuclease, which allows efficient JM resolution by Mus81. Furthermore, Slx4 and Dpb11 interact even prior to joining Mus81 and respond to replication fork stalling in S-phase. This S-phase complex is involved in the regulation of the DNA damage checkpoint as well as in early steps of template switch recombination. Similar interactions and regulatory principles are found in human cells suggesting that Slx4 and Dpb11 may have an evolutionary conserved role organizing the cellular response to replication fork stalling.

  6. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Michel G; Norio, Paolo; Bechhoefer, John

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  7. Structure of eukaryotic CMG helicase at a replication fork and implications to replisome architecture and origin initiation

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Roxana; Yuan, Zuanning; Bai, Lin; de Luna Almeida Santos, Ruda; Sun, Jingchuan; Zhang, Dan; Yurieva, Olga; Li, Huilin; O’Donnell, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic CMG (Cdc45, Mcm2–7, GINS) helicase consists of the Mcm2–7 hexameric ring along with five accessory factors. The Mcm2–7 heterohexamer, like other hexameric helicases, is shaped like a ring with two tiers, an N-tier ring composed of the N-terminal domains, and a C-tier of C-terminal domains; the C-tier contains the motor. In principle, either tier could translocate ahead of the other during movement on DNA. We have used cryo-EM single-particle 3D reconstruction to solve the structure of CMG in complex with a DNA fork. The duplex stem penetrates into the central channel of the N-tier and the unwound leading single-strand DNA traverses the channel through the N-tier into the C-tier motor, 5′-3′ through CMG. Therefore, the N-tier ring is pushed ahead by the C-tier ring during CMG translocation, opposite the currently accepted polarity. The polarity of the N-tier ahead of the C-tier places the leading Pol ε below CMG and Pol α-primase at the top of CMG at the replication fork. Surprisingly, the new N-tier to C-tier polarity of translocation reveals an unforeseen quality-control mechanism at the origin. Thus, upon assembly of head-to-head CMGs that encircle double-stranded DNA at the origin, the two CMGs must pass one another to leave the origin and both must remodel onto opposite strands of single-stranded DNA to do so. We propose that head-to-head motors may generate energy that underlies initial melting at the origin. PMID:28096349

  8. Structure of eukaryotic CMG helicase at a replication fork and implications to replisome architecture and origin initiation.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Roxana; Yuan, Zuanning; Bai, Lin; de Luna Almeida Santos, Ruda; Sun, Jingchuan; Zhang, Dan; Yurieva, Olga; Li, Huilin; O'Donnell, Michael E

    2017-01-31

    The eukaryotic CMG (Cdc45, Mcm2-7, GINS) helicase consists of the Mcm2-7 hexameric ring along with five accessory factors. The Mcm2-7 heterohexamer, like other hexameric helicases, is shaped like a ring with two tiers, an N-tier ring composed of the N-terminal domains, and a C-tier of C-terminal domains; the C-tier contains the motor. In principle, either tier could translocate ahead of the other during movement on DNA. We have used cryo-EM single-particle 3D reconstruction to solve the structure of CMG in complex with a DNA fork. The duplex stem penetrates into the central channel of the N-tier and the unwound leading single-strand DNA traverses the channel through the N-tier into the C-tier motor, 5'-3' through CMG. Therefore, the N-tier ring is pushed ahead by the C-tier ring during CMG translocation, opposite the currently accepted polarity. The polarity of the N-tier ahead of the C-tier places the leading Pol ε below CMG and Pol α-primase at the top of CMG at the replication fork. Surprisingly, the new N-tier to C-tier polarity of translocation reveals an unforeseen quality-control mechanism at the origin. Thus, upon assembly of head-to-head CMGs that encircle double-stranded DNA at the origin, the two CMGs must pass one another to leave the origin and both must remodel onto opposite strands of single-stranded DNA to do so. We propose that head-to-head motors may generate energy that underlies initial melting at the origin.

  9. DNA replication catalyzed by herpes simplex virus type 1 proteins reveals trombone loops at the fork.

    PubMed

    Bermek, Oya; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D

    2015-01-30

    Using purified replication factors encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 and a 70-base minicircle template, we obtained robust DNA synthesis with leading strand products of >20,000 nucleotides and lagging strand fragments from 600 to 9,000 nucleotides as seen by alkaline gel electrophoresis. ICP8 was crucial for the synthesis on both strands. Visualization of the deproteinized products using electron microscopy revealed long, linear dsDNAs, and in 87%, one end, presumably the end with the 70-base circle, was single-stranded. The remaining 13% had multiple single-stranded segments separated by dsDNA segments 500 to 1,000 nucleotides in length located at one end. These features are diagnostic of the trombone mechanism of replication. Indeed, when the products were examined with the replication proteins bound, a dsDNA loop was frequently associated with the replication complex located at one end of the replicated DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of loops correlated with the fraction of DNA undergoing Okazaki fragment synthesis.

  10. Mcm10 coordinates the timely assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Mcm10 is an essential replication factor that is required for DNA replication in eukaryotes. Two key steps in the initiation of DNA replication are the assembly and activation of Cdc45–Mcm2–7-GINS (CMG) replicative helicase. However, it is not known what coordinates helicase assembly with helicase activation. We show in this manuscript, using purified proteins from budding yeast, that Mcm10 directly interacts with the Mcm2–7 complex and Cdc45. In fact, Mcm10 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2–7 complex in vitro. To study the role of Mcm10 in more detail in vivo we used an auxin inducible degron in which Mcm10 is degraded upon addition of auxin. We show in this manuscript that Mcm10 is required for the timely recruitment of Cdc45 and GINS recruitment to the Mcm2–7 complex in vivo during early S phase. We also found that Mcm10 stimulates Mcm2 phosphorylation by DDK in vivo and in vitro. These findings indicate that Mcm10 plays a critical role in coupling replicative helicase assembly with helicase activation. Mcm10 is first involved in the recruitment of Cdc45 to the Mcm2–7 complex. After Cdc45–Mcm2–7 complex assembly, Mcm10 promotes origin melting by stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, which thereby leads to GINS attachment to Mcm2–7. PMID:26582917

  11. Conserved mechanism for coordinating replication fork helicase assembly with phosphorylation of the helicase

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Irina; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) phosphorylates minichromosome maintenance 2 (Mcm2) during S phase in yeast, and Sld3 recruits cell division cycle 45 (Cdc45) to minichromosome maintenance 2-7 (Mcm2-7). We show here DDK-phosphoryled Mcm2 preferentially interacts with Cdc45 in vivo, and that Sld3 stimulates DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2 by 11-fold. We identified a mutation of the replication initiation factor Sld3, Sld3-m16, that is specifically defective in stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. Wild-type expression levels of sld3-m16 result in severe growth and DNA replication defects. Cells expressing sld3-m16 exhibit no detectable Mcm2 phosphorylation in vivo, reduced replication protein A-ChIP signal at an origin, and diminished Go, Ichi, Ni, and San association with Mcm2-7. Treslin, the human homolog of Sld3, stimulates human DDK phosphorylation of human Mcm2 by 15-fold. DDK phosphorylation of human Mcm2 decreases the affinity of Mcm5 for Mcm2, suggesting a potential mechanism for helicase ring opening. These data suggest a conserved mechanism for replication initiation: Sld3/Treslin coordinates Cdc45 recruitment to Mcm2-7 with DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2 during S phase. PMID:26305950

  12. Formation of a stable RuvA protein double tetramer is required for efficient branch migration in vitro and for replication fork reversal in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Alison S; Baharoglu, Zeynep; Niewiarowski, Andrew; Michel, Bénédicte; Tsaneva, Irina R

    2011-06-24

    In bacteria, RuvABC is required for the resolution of Holliday junctions (HJ) made during homologous recombination. The RuvAB complex catalyzes HJ branch migration and replication fork reversal (RFR). During RFR, a stalled fork is reversed to form a HJ adjacent to a DNA double strand end, a reaction that requires RuvAB in certain Escherichia coli replication mutants. The exact structure of active RuvAB complexes remains elusive as it is still unknown whether one or two tetramers of RuvA support RuvB during branch migration and during RFR. We designed an E. coli RuvA mutant, RuvA2(KaP), specifically impaired for RuvA tetramer-tetramer interactions. As expected, the mutant protein is impaired for complex II (two tetramers) formation on HJs, although the binding efficiency of complex I (a single tetramer) is as wild type. We show that although RuvA complex II formation is required for efficient HJ branch migration in vitro, RuvA2(KaP) is fully active for homologous recombination in vivo. RuvA2(KaP) is also deficient at forming complex II on synthetic replication forks, and the binding affinity of RuvA2(KaP) for forks is decreased compared with wild type. Accordingly, RuvA2(KaP) is inefficient at processing forks in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that RuvA2(KaP) is a separation-of-function mutant, capable of homologous recombination but impaired for RFR. RuvA2(KaP) is defective for stimulation of RuvB activity and stability of HJ·RuvA·RuvB tripartite complexes. This work demonstrates that the need for RuvA tetramer-tetramer interactions for full RuvAB activity in vitro causes specifically an RFR defect in vivo.

  13. Mcm4 C-terminal domain of MCM helicase prevents excessive formation of single-stranded DNA at stalled replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Nitani, Naoki; Yadani, Chie; Yabuuchi, Hayato; Masukata, Hisao; Nakagawa, Takuro

    2008-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase, composed of subunits Mcm2–7, is essential for the initiation and elongation phases of DNA replication. Even when DNA synthesis is blocked, MCM continues DNA unwinding to some extent for activation of the replication checkpoint and then stops. However, the mechanism of regulation of MCM-helicase activity remains unknown. Here, we show that truncation of the Mcm4 C-terminal domain (CTD) in fission yeast results in hypersensitivity to replication block caused by dNTP depletion. The truncation mcm4-c84 does not affect the activation of the replication checkpoint pathway but delays its attenuation during recovery from replication block. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that mcm4-c84 delays the disappearance of replication intermediates, indicating that the Mcm4 CTD is required for efficient recovery of stalled replication forks. Remarkably, chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that mcm4-c84 brings about an increase rather than a decrease in the association of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein RPA to stalled forks, and MCM and the accessory complex GINS are unaffected. These results suggest that the Mcm4 CTD is required to suspend MCM-helicase activity after the formation of single-stranded DNA sufficient for checkpoint activation. PMID:18753627

  14. Histone H3 Lysine 56 Acetylation and the Response to DNA Replication Fork Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wurtele, Hugo; Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Bacal, Julien; St-Hilaire, Edlie; Lee, Eun-Hye; Tsao, Sarah; Dorn, Jonas; Maddox, Paul; Lisby, Michael; Pasero, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) occurs in newly synthesized histones that are deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. Defects in H3K56ac sensitize cells to genotoxic agents, suggesting that this modification plays an important role in the DNA damage response. However, the links between histone acetylation, the nascent chromatin structure, and the DNA damage response are poorly understood. Here we report that cells devoid of H3K56ac are sensitive to DNA damage sustained during transient exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or camptothecin but are only mildly affected by hydroxyurea. We demonstrate that, after exposure to MMS, H3K56ac-deficient cells cannot complete DNA replication and eventually segregate chromosomes with intranuclear foci containing the recombination protein Rad52. In addition, we provide evidence that these phenotypes are not due to defects in base excision repair, defects in DNA damage tolerance, or a lack of Rad51 loading at sites of DNA damage. Our results argue that the acute sensitivity of H3K56ac-deficient cells to MMS and camptothecin stems from a failure to complete the repair of specific types of DNA lesions by recombination and/or from defects in the completion of DNA replication. PMID:22025679

  15. Histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation and the response to DNA replication fork damage.

    PubMed

    Wurtele, Hugo; Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Bacal, Julien; St-Hilaire, Edlie; Lee, Eun-Hye; Tsao, Sarah; Dorn, Jonas; Maddox, Paul; Lisby, Michael; Pasero, Philippe; Verreault, Alain

    2012-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac) occurs in newly synthesized histones that are deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. Defects in H3K56ac sensitize cells to genotoxic agents, suggesting that this modification plays an important role in the DNA damage response. However, the links between histone acetylation, the nascent chromatin structure, and the DNA damage response are poorly understood. Here we report that cells devoid of H3K56ac are sensitive to DNA damage sustained during transient exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or camptothecin but are only mildly affected by hydroxyurea. We demonstrate that, after exposure to MMS, H3K56ac-deficient cells cannot complete DNA replication and eventually segregate chromosomes with intranuclear foci containing the recombination protein Rad52. In addition, we provide evidence that these phenotypes are not due to defects in base excision repair, defects in DNA damage tolerance, or a lack of Rad51 loading at sites of DNA damage. Our results argue that the acute sensitivity of H3K56ac-deficient cells to MMS and camptothecin stems from a failure to complete the repair of specific types of DNA lesions by recombination and/or from defects in the completion of DNA replication.

  16. Replication fork collapse is a major cause of the high mutation frequency at three-base lesion clusters

    PubMed Central

    Sedletska, Yuliya; Radicella, J. Pablo; Sage, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Unresolved repair of clustered DNA lesions can lead to the formation of deleterious double strand breaks (DSB) or to mutation induction. Here, we investigated the outcome of clusters composed of base lesions for which base excision repair enzymes have different kinetics of excision/incision. We designed multiply damaged sites (MDS) composed of a rapidly excised uracil (U) and two oxidized bases, 5-hydroxyuracil (hU) and 8-oxoguanine (oG), excised more slowly. Plasmids harboring these U-oG/hU MDS-carrying duplexes were introduced into Escherichia coli cells either wild type or deficient for DNA n-glycosylases. Induction of DSB was estimated from plasmid survival and mutagenesis determined by sequencing of surviving clones. We show that a large majority of MDS is converted to DSB, whereas almost all surviving clones are mutated at hU. We demonstrate that mutagenesis at hU is correlated with excision of the U placed on the opposite strand. We propose that excision of U by Ung initiates the loss of U-oG-carrying strand, resulting in enhanced mutagenesis at the lesion present on the opposite strand. Our results highlight the importance of the kinetics of excision by base excision repair DNA n-glycosylases in the processing and fate of MDS and provide evidence for the role of strand loss/replication fork collapse during the processing of MDS on their mutational consequences. PMID:23945941

  17. During replication stress, non-SMC element 5 (NSE5) is required for Smc5/6 protein complex functionality at stalled forks.

    PubMed

    Bustard, Denise E; Menolfi, Demis; Jeppsson, Kristian; Ball, Lindsay G; Dewey, Sidney Carter; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Sjögren, Camilla; Branzei, Dana; Cobb, Jennifer A

    2012-03-30

    The Smc5/6 complex belongs to the SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) family, which also includes cohesin and condensin. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Smc5/6 complex contains six essential non-Smc elements, Nse1-6. Very little is known about how these additional elements contribute to complex function except for Nse2/Mms21, which is an E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase important for Smc5 sumoylation. Characterization of two temperature-sensitive mutants, nse5-ts1 and nse5-ts2, demonstrated the importance of Nse5 within the Smc5/6 complex for its stability and functionality at forks during hydroxyurea-induced replication stress. Both NSE5 alleles showed a marked reduction in Smc5 sumoylation to levels lower than those observed with mms21-11, a mutant of Mms21 that is deficient in SUMO ligase activity. However, a phenotypic comparison of nse5-ts1 and nse5-ts2 revealed a separation of importance between Smc5 sumoylation and the function of the Smc5/6 complex during replication. Only cells carrying the nse5-ts1 allele exhibited defects such as dissociation of the replisome from stalled forks, formation of fork-associated homologous recombination intermediates, and hydroxyurea sensitivity that is additive with mms21-11. These defects are attributed to a failure in Smc5/6 localization to forks in nse5-ts1 cells. Overall, these data support the premise that Nse5 is important for vital interactions between components within the Smc5/6 complex, and for its functionality during replication stress.

  18. Plasmid DNA replication and topology as visualized by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Schvartzman, J B; Martínez-Robles, M L; Hernández, P; Krimer, D B

    2010-01-01

    During the last 20 years, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis combined with other techniques such as Polymerase Chain Reaction, helicase assay and electron microscopy, helped to characterize plasmid DNA replication and topology. Here we describe some of the most important findings that were made using this method including the characterization of uni-directional replication, replication origin interference, DNA breakage at the forks, replication fork blockage, replication knotting, replication fork reversal, the interplay of supercoiling and catenation and other changes in DNA topology that take place as replication progresses.

  19. Reversible Top1 cleavage complexes are stabilized strand-specifically at the ribosomal replication fork barrier and contribute to ribosomal DNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Claudia; Dion, Vincent; Schär, Primo; Fritsch, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Various topological constraints at the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) locus impose an extra challenge for transcription and DNA replication, generating constant torsional DNA stress. The topoisomerase Top1 is known to release such torsion by single-strand nicking and re-ligation in a process involving transient covalent Top1 cleavage complexes (Top1cc) with the nicked DNA. Here we show that Top1ccs, despite their usually transient nature, are specifically targeted to and stabilized at the ribosomal replication fork barrier (rRFB) of budding yeast, establishing a link with previously reported Top1 controlled nicks. Using ectopically engineered rRFBs, we establish that the rRFB sequence itself is sufficient for induction of DNA strand-specific and replication-independent Top1ccs. These Top1ccs accumulate only in the presence of Fob1 and Tof2, they are reversible as they are not subject to repair by Tdp1- or Mus81-dependent processes, and their presence correlates with Top1 provided rDNA stability. Notably, the targeted formation of these Top1ccs accounts for the previously reported broken replication forks at the rRFB. These findings implicate a novel and physiologically regulated mode of Top1 action, suggesting a mechanism by which Top1 is recruited to the rRFB and stabilized in a reversible Top1cc configuration to preserve the integrity of the rDNA. PMID:24574527

  20. DNA replication: failures and inverted fusions.

    PubMed

    Carr, Antony M; Paek, Andrew L; Weinert, Ted

    2011-10-01

    DNA replication normally follows the rules passed down from Watson and Crick: the chromosome duplicates as dictated by its antiparallel strands, base-pairing and leading and lagging strand differences. Real-life replication is more complicated, fraught with perils posed by chromosome damage for one, and by transcription of genes and by other perils that disrupt progress of the DNA replication machinery. Understanding the replication fork, including DNA structures, associated replisome and its regulators, is key to understanding how cells overcome perils and minimize error. Replication fork error leads to genome rearrangements and, potentially, cell death. Interest in the replication fork and its errors has recently gained added interest by the results of deep sequencing studies of human genomes. Several pathologies are associated with sometimes-bizarre genome rearrangements suggestive of elaborate replication fork failures. To try and understand the links between the replication fork, its failure and genome rearrangements, we discuss here phases of fork behavior (stall, collapse, restart and fork failures leading to rearrangements) and analyze two examples of instability from our own studies; one in fission yeast and the other in budding yeast.

  1. The UL8 subunit of the helicase-primase complex of herpes simplex virus promotes DNA annealing and has a high affinity for replication forks.

    PubMed

    Bermek, Oya; Weller, Sandra K; Griffith, Jack D

    2017-09-22

    During lytic infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA is replicated by a mechanism involving DNA recombination. For instance, replication of the HSV-1 genome produces X- and Y-branched structures, reminiscent of recombination intermediates. HSV-1's replication machinery includes a trimeric helicase-primase composed of helicase (UL5) and primase (UL52) subunits and a third subunit, UL8. UL8 has been reported to stimulate the helicase and primase activities of the complex in the presence of ICP8, an HSV-1 protein that functions as an annealase, a protein that binds complementary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and facilitates its annealing to duplex DNA. UL8 also influences the intracellular localization of the UL5/UL52 subunits, but UL8's catalytic activities are not known. In this study we used a combination of biochemical techniques and transmission electron microscopy. First, we report that UL8 alone forms protein filaments in solution. Moreover, we also found that UL8 binds to ssDNAs >50-nucletides long and promotes the annealing of complementary ssDNA to generate highly branched duplex DNA structures. Finally, UL8 has a very high affinity for replication fork structures containing a gap in the lagging strand as short as 15 nucleotides, suggesting that UL8 may aid in directing or loading the trimeric complex onto a replication fork. The properties of UL8 uncovered here suggest that UL8 may be involved in the generation of the X- and Y-branched structures that are the hallmarks of HSV replication. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. FANC Pathway Promotes UV-Induced Stalled Replication Forks Recovery by Acting Both Upstream and Downstream Polη and Rev1

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Emilie; Rosselli, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    To cope with ultraviolet C (UVC)-stalled replication forks and restart DNA synthesis, cells either undergo DNA translesion synthesis (TLS) by specialised DNA polymerases or tolerate the lesions using homologous recombination (HR)-based mechanisms. To gain insight into how cells manage UVC-induced stalled replication forks, we analysed the molecular crosstalk between the TLS DNA polymerases Polη and Rev1, the double-strand break repair (DSB)-associated protein MDC1 and the FANC pathway. We describe three novel functional interactions that occur in response to UVC-induced DNA lesions. First, Polη and Rev1, whose optimal expression and/or relocalisation depend on the FANC core complex, act upstream of FANCD2 and are required for the proper relocalisation of monoubiquitinylated FANCD2 (Ub-FANCD2) to subnuclear foci. Second, during S-phase, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 relocalise to UVC-damaged nuclear areas or foci simultaneously but independently of each other. Third, Ub-FANCD2 and MDC1 are independently required for optimal BRCA1 relocalisation. While RPA32 phosphorylation (p-RPA32) and RPA foci formation were reduced in parallel with increasing levels of H2AX phosphorylation and MDC1 foci in UVC-irradiated FANC pathway-depleted cells, MDC1 depletion was associated with increased UVC-induced Ub-FANCD2 and FANCD2 foci as well as p-RPA32 levels and p-RPA32 foci. On the basis of the previous observations, we propose that the FANC pathway participates in the rescue of UVC-stalled replication forks in association with TLS by maintaining the integrity of ssDNA regions and by preserving genome stability and preventing the formation of DSBs, the resolution of which would require the intervention of MDC1. PMID:23365640

  3. 3D replicon distributions arise from stochastic initiation and domino-like DNA replication progression.

    PubMed

    Löb, D; Lengert, N; Chagin, V O; Reinhart, M; Casas-Delucchi, C S; Cardoso, M C; Drossel, B

    2016-04-07

    DNA replication dynamics in cells from higher eukaryotes follows very complex but highly efficient mechanisms. However, the principles behind initiation of potential replication origins and emergence of typical patterns of nuclear replication sites remain unclear. Here, we propose a comprehensive model of DNA replication in human cells that is based on stochastic, proximity-induced replication initiation. Critical model features are: spontaneous stochastic firing of individual origins in euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin, inhibition of firing at distances below the size of chromatin loops and a domino-like effect by which replication forks induce firing of nearby origins. The model reproduces the empirical temporal and chromatin-related properties of DNA replication in human cells. We advance the one-dimensional DNA replication model to a spatial model by taking into account chromatin folding in the nucleus, and we are able to reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of the replication foci distribution throughout S-phase.

  4. 3D replicon distributions arise from stochastic initiation and domino-like DNA replication progression

    PubMed Central

    Löb, D.; Lengert, N.; Chagin, V. O.; Reinhart, M.; Casas-Delucchi, C. S.; Cardoso, M. C.; Drossel, B.

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication dynamics in cells from higher eukaryotes follows very complex but highly efficient mechanisms. However, the principles behind initiation of potential replication origins and emergence of typical patterns of nuclear replication sites remain unclear. Here, we propose a comprehensive model of DNA replication in human cells that is based on stochastic, proximity-induced replication initiation. Critical model features are: spontaneous stochastic firing of individual origins in euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin, inhibition of firing at distances below the size of chromatin loops and a domino-like effect by which replication forks induce firing of nearby origins. The model reproduces the empirical temporal and chromatin-related properties of DNA replication in human cells. We advance the one-dimensional DNA replication model to a spatial model by taking into account chromatin folding in the nucleus, and we are able to reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of the replication foci distribution throughout S-phase. PMID:27052359

  5. Replication Forks Stalled at Ultraviolet Lesions Are Rescued via RecA and RuvABC Protein-catalyzed Disintegration in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sharik R.; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is not known to induce chromosomal fragmentation in sublethal doses, and yet UV irradiation causes genetic instability and cancer, suggesting that chromosomes are fragmented. Here we show that UV irradiation induces fragmentation in sublethal doses, but the broken chromosomes are repaired or degraded by RecBCD; therefore, to observe full fragmentation, RecBCD enzyme needs to be inactivated. Using quantitative pulsed field gel electrophoresis and sensitive DNA synthesis measurements, we investigated the mechanisms of UV radiation-induced chromosomal fragmentation in recBC mutants, comparing five existing models of DNA damage-induced fragmentation. We found that fragmentation depends on active DNA synthesis before, but not after, UV irradiation. At low UV irradiation doses, fragmentation does not need excision repair or daughter strand gap repair. Fragmentation absolutely depends on both RecA-catalyzed homologous strand exchange and RuvABC-catalyzed Holliday junction resolution. Thus, chromosomes fragment when replication forks stall at UV lesions and regress, generating Holliday junctions. Remarkably, cells specifically utilize fork breakage to rescue stalled replication and avoid lethality. PMID:22194615

  6. Synergic and opposing activities of thermophilic RecQ-like helicase and topoisomerase 3 proteins in Holliday junction processing and replication fork stabilization.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Anna; De Felice, Mariarita; Perugino, Giuseppe; Bizard, Anna; Nadal, Marc; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2012-08-31

    RecQ family helicases and topoisomerase 3 enzymes form evolutionary conserved complexes that play essential functions in DNA replication, recombination, and repair, and in vitro, show coordinate activities on model recombination and replication intermediates. Malfunctioning of these complexes in humans is associated with genomic instability and cancer-prone syndromes. Although both RecQ-like and topoisomerase 3 enzymes are present in archaea, only a few of them have been studied, and no information about their functional interaction is available. We tested the combined activities of the RecQ-like helicase, Hel112, and the topoisomerase 3, SsTop3, from the thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus. Hel112 showed coordinate DNA unwinding and annealing activities, a feature shared by eukaryotic RecQ homologs, which resulted in processing of synthetic Holliday junctions and stabilization of model replication forks. SsTop3 catalyzed DNA relaxation and annealing. When assayed in combination, SsTop3 inhibited the Hel112 helicase activity on Holliday junctions and stimulated formation and stabilization of such structures. In contrast, Hel112 did not affect the SsTop3 DNA relaxation activity. RecQ-topoisomerase 3 complexes show structural similarity with the thermophile-specific enzyme reverse gyrase, which catalyzes positive supercoiling of DNA and was suggested to play a role in genome stability at high temperature. Despite such similarity and the high temperature of reaction, the SsTop3-Hel112 complex does not induce positive supercoiling and is thus likely to play different roles. We propose that the interplay between Hel112 and SsTop3 might regulate the equilibrium between recombination and anti-recombination activities at replication forks.

  7. Genome-wide alterations of the DNA replication program during tumor progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, A.; Goldar, A.; Argoul, F.; Hyrien, O.; Audit, B.

    2016-08-01

    Oncogenic stress is a major driving force in the early stages of cancer development. Recent experimental findings reveal that, in precancerous lesions and cancers, activated oncogenes may induce stalling and dissociation of DNA replication forks resulting in DNA damage. Replication timing is emerging as an important epigenetic feature that recapitulates several genomic, epigenetic and functional specificities of even closely related cell types. There is increasing evidence that chromosome rearrangements, the hallmark of many cancer genomes, are intimately associated with the DNA replication program and that epigenetic replication timing changes often precede chromosomic rearrangements. The recent development of a novel methodology to map replication fork polarity using deep sequencing of Okazaki fragments has provided new and complementary genome-wide replication profiling data. We review the results of a wavelet-based multi-scale analysis of genomic and epigenetic data including replication profiles along human chromosomes. These results provide new insight into the spatio-temporal replication program and its dynamics during differentiation. Here our goal is to bring to cancer research, the experimental protocols and computational methodologies for replication program profiling, and also the modeling of the spatio-temporal replication program. To illustrate our purpose, we report very preliminary results obtained for the chronic myelogeneous leukemia, the archetype model of cancer. Finally, we discuss promising perspectives on using genome-wide DNA replication profiling as a novel efficient tool for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and personalized treatment.

  8. Structural insight into how the human helicase subunit MCM2 may act as a histone chaperone together with ASF1 at the replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Richet, Nicolas; Liu, Danni; Legrand, Pierre; Velours, Christophe; Corpet, Armelle; Gaubert, Albane; Bakail, May; Moal-Raisin, Gwenaelle; Guerois, Raphael; Compper, Christel; Besle, Arthur; Guichard, Berengère; Almouzni, Genevieve; Ochsenbein, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    MCM2 is a subunit of the replicative helicase machinery shown to interact with histones H3 and H4 during the replication process through its N-terminal domain. During replication, this interaction has been proposed to assist disassembly and assembly of nucleosomes on DNA. However, how this interaction participates in crosstalk with histone chaperones at the replication fork remains to be elucidated. Here, we solved the crystal structure of the ternary complex between the histone-binding domain of Mcm2 and the histones H3-H4 at 2.9 Å resolution. Histones H3 and H4 assemble as a tetramer in the crystal structure, but MCM2 interacts only with a single molecule of H3-H4. The latter interaction exploits binding surfaces that contact either DNA or H2B when H3-H4 dimers are incorporated in the nucleosome core particle. Upon binding of the ternary complex with the histone chaperone ASF1, the histone tetramer dissociates and both MCM2 and ASF1 interact simultaneously with the histones forming a 1:1:1:1 heteromeric complex. Thermodynamic analysis of the quaternary complex together with structural modeling support that ASF1 and MCM2 could form a chaperoning module for histones H3 and H4 protecting them from promiscuous interactions. This suggests an additional function for MCM2 outside its helicase function as a proper histone chaperone connected to the replication pathway. PMID:25618846

  9. A variable fork rate affects timing of origin firing and S phase dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Supady, Adriana; Klipp, Edda; Barberis, Matteo

    2013-10-20

    Activation (in the following referred to as firing) of replication origins is a continuous and irreversible process regulated by availability of DNA replication molecules and cyclin-dependent kinase activities, which are often altered in human cancers. The temporal, progressive origin firing throughout S phase appears as a characteristic replication profile, and computational models have been developed to describe this process. Although evidence from yeast to human indicates that a range of replication fork rates is observed experimentally in order to complete a timely S phase, those models incorporate velocities that are uniform across the genome. Taking advantage of the availability of replication profiles, chromosomal position and replication timing, here we investigated how fork rate may affect origin firing in budding yeast. Our analysis suggested that patterns of origin firing can be observed from a modulation of the fork rate that strongly correlates with origin density. Replication profiles of chromosomes with a low origin density were fitted with a variable fork rate, whereas for the ones with a high origin density a constant fork rate was appropriate. This indeed supports the previously reported correlation between inter-origin distance and fork rate changes. Intriguingly, the calculated correlation between fork rate and timing of origin firing allowed the estimation of firing efficiencies for the replication origins. This approach correctly retrieved origin efficiencies previously determined for chromosome VI and provided testable prediction for other chromosomal origins. Our results gain deeper insights into the temporal coordination of genome duplication, indicating that control of the replication fork rate is required for the timely origin firing during S phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed.

  11. Dpb11 Protein Helps Control Assembly of the Cdc45·Mcm2-7·GINS Replication Fork Helicase*

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Nalini; Bruck, Irina; Smith, Skye; Ning, Boting; Kaplan, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Dpb11 is required for the initiation of DNA replication in budding yeast. Dpb11 binds to S-phase cyclin-dependent kinase-phosphorylated Sld2 and Sld3 to form a ternary complex during S phase. The replication fork helicase in eukaryotes is composed of Cdc45, Mcm2-7, and GINS. We show here, using purified proteins from budding yeast, that Dpb11 alone binds to Mcm2-7 and that Dpb11 also competes with GINS for binding to Mcm2-7. Furthermore, Dpb11 binds directly to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and ssDNA inhibits the Dpb11 interaction with Mcm2-7. We also found that Dpb11 can recruit Cdc45 to Mcm2-7. We identified a mutant of the BRCT4 motif of Dpb11 that remains bound to Mcm2-7 in the presence of ssDNA (dpb11-m1,m2,m3,m5), and this mutant exhibits a DNA replication defect when expressed in budding yeast cells. Expression of this mutant results in increased interaction between Dpb11 and Mcm2-7 during S phase, impaired GINS interaction with Mcm2-7 during S phase, and decreased replication protein A (RPA) interaction with origin DNA during S phase. We propose a model in which Dpb11 first recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2-7. Dpb11, although bound to Cdc45·Mcm2-7, can block the interaction between GINS and Mcm2-7. Upon extrusion of ssDNA from the central channel of Mcm2-7, Dpb11 dissociates from Mcm2-7, and Dpb11 binds to ssDNA, thereby allowing GINS to bind to Cdc45·Mcm2-7. Finally, we propose that Dpb11 functions with Sld2 and Sld3 to help control the assembly of the replication fork helicase. PMID:25659432

  12. Inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics is associated with immune system response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechhoefer, John; Gauthier, Michel G.; Norio, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at ``origins,'' launching ``forks'' that spread bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins and the fork progression velocity form the ``replication program.'' Previous models of DNA replication in eukaryotes have assumed firing rates and replication fork velocities to be homogeneous across the genome. But large variations in origin activity and fork velocity do occur. Here, we generalize our replication model to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities in a given region of the genome. We derive and solve rate equations for the forks and replication probability, to obtain the mean-field replication program. After testing the model on simulations, we analyze the changes in replication program that occur during B cell development in the mouse. B cells play a major role in the adaptive immune system by producing the antibodies. We show that the process of cell differentiation is associated with a change in replication program, where the zones of high origin initiation rates located in the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus shift their position as the locus prepares to undergo the recombination events responsible for generating antibody specificity. This work was funded by HSFP and NSERC-Canada (MGG and JB) and by NIH-NIGMS grant R01GM080606 (PN).

  13. Low doses of ultraviolet radiation and oxidative damage induce dramatic accumulation of mitochondrial DNA replication intermediates, fork regression, and replication initiation shift.

    PubMed

    Torregrosa-Muñumer, Rubén; Goffart, Steffi; Haikonen, Juha A; Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O

    2015-11-15

    Mitochondrial DNA is prone to damage by various intrinsic as well as environmental stressors. DNA damage can in turn cause problems for replication, resulting in replication stalling and double-strand breaks, which are suspected to be the leading cause of pathological mtDNA rearrangements. In this study, we exposed cells to subtle levels of oxidative stress or UV radiation and followed their effects on mtDNA maintenance. Although the damage did not influence mtDNA copy number, we detected a massive accumulation of RNA:DNA hybrid-containing replication intermediates, followed by an increase in cruciform DNA molecules, as well as in bidirectional replication initiation outside of the main replication origin, OH. Our results suggest that mitochondria maintain two different types of replication as an adaptation to different cellular environments; the RNA:DNA hybrid-involving replication mode maintains mtDNA integrity in tissues with low oxidative stress, and the potentially more error tolerant conventional strand-coupled replication operates when stress is high.

  14. Water quality of Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes, western Wyoming; a progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.A.; Averett, R.C.; Mora, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes in the New Fork River drainage of western Wyoming were selected for a comprehensive study of hydrologic processes affecting mountain lakes in the Rocky Mountains. Information is needed about lakes in this area to assess their response to existing and planned development. The concerns include regional issues such as acid precipitation from gas-sweetening plants, coal-fired powerplants, and smelters, as well as local issues, such as shoreline development and raising outlet control structures. Onsite measurements indicated strong thermal stratification in the lakes during the summer. Isothermal conditions occurred during December 1983 and May 1984. Mean phytoplankton concentrations were less than 5,000 cells/ml, and chlorophyll a concentrations were weakly correlated with phytoplankton concentrations. Zooplankton concentrations were small, less than 6 organisms/L. The numbers of benthic invertebrates/unit area in Fremont Lake were extremely small. The lake waters and inflow and outflow streams were chemically dilute solutions. Mean dissolved-solids concentrations were 13 mg/L in Fremont Lake and 24 mg/L in New Fork Lakes. Calcium and bicarbonate were the predominant ions. Concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen usually were less than detection limits. Trace-metals concentrations in the lakes were similar to those in precipitation and generally were small. Dissolved organic-carbon concentrations were about 1 mg/L. Concentrations of fulvic and humic acids were relatively large in the inlet of Fremont Lake during the spring. Pine Creek has deposited 800 metric tons of sediment, on an annual average, to the delta of Fremont Lake. Most sediment is deposited during spring runoff. (USGS)

  15. Water quality of Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes, western Wyoming: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, D.A.; Averett, R.C.; Mora, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Fremont Lake and New Fork Lakes in the New Fork River drainage of western Wyoming were selected for a comprehensive study of hydrologic processes affecting mountain lakes in the Rocky Mountains. Information is needed about lakes in this area to assess their response to existing and planned development. The concerns include regional issues such as acid precipitation from gas-sweetening plants, coal-fired power plants, and smelters, as well as local issues, such as shoreline development and raising outlet control structures. Onsite measurements indicated strong thermal stratification in the lakes during the summer. Isothermal conditions occurred during December 1983 and May 1984. Mean phytoplankton concentrations were less than 5,000 cells/ml, and chlorophyll a concentrations were weakly correlated with phytoplankton concentrations. Zooplankton concentrations were small, less than 6 organisms/L. The numbers of benthic invertebrates/unit area in Fremont Lake were extremely small. The lake waters and inflow and outflow streams were chemically dilute solutions. Mean dissolved-solids concentrations were 13 mg/L in Fremont Lake and 24 mg/L in New Fork Lakes. Calcium and bicarbonate were the predominant ions. Concentrations of phosphorus and nitrogen usually were less than detection limits. Trace-metals concentrations in the lakes were similar to those in precipitation and generally were small. Dissolved organic-carbon concentrations were about 1 mg/L. Concentrations of fulvic and humic acids were relatively large in the inlet of Fremont Lake during the spring. Pine Creek has deposited 800 metric tons of sediment, on an annual average, to the delta of Fremont Lake. Most sediment is deposited during spring runoff. 32 refs., 33 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. The RmInt1 group II intron has two different retrohoming pathways for mobility using predominantly the nascent lagging strand at DNA replication forks for priming

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abarca, Francisco; Barrientos-Durán, Antonio; Fernández-López, Manuel; Toro, Nicolás

    2004-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti RmInt1 is an efficient mobile group II intron that uses an unknown reverse transcriptase priming mechanism as the intron ribonucleoprotein complex can reverse splice into DNA target substrates but cannot carry out site-specific second strand cleavage due to the lack of a C- terminal DNA endonuclease domain. We show here that, like other mobile group II introns, RmInt1 moves around by an efficient RNA-based retrohoming mechanism. We found evidence of two distinct RmInt1 retrohoming pathways for mobility depending on the orientation of the target site relative to the direction of DNA replication. The preferred retrohoming pathway is consistent with reverse splicing of the intron RNA into single-stranded DNA at a replication fork, using a nascent lagging DNA strand as the primer for reverse transcription. This strand bias is the opposite of that reported for mobility of the lactococcal Ll.ltrB intron in the absence of second strand cleavage. The mobility mechanism found here for RmInt1 may be used for dissemination by many bacterial group II introns encoding proteins lacking the DNA endonuclease domain. PMID:15155857

  17. Nuclear insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor phosphorylates proliferating cell nuclear antigen and rescues stalled replication forks after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Waraky, Ahmed; Lin, Yingbo; Warsito, Dudi; Haglund, Felix; Aleem, Eiman; Larsson, Olle

    2017-09-18

    We have previously shown that the insulin like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) translocates to the cell nucleus, where it binds to enhancer like regions and increases gene transcription. Further studies have demonstrated that nuclear IGF1R (nIGF1R) physically and functionally interacts with some nuclear proteins, i.e. the lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (Lef1), histone H3, and Brahma related gene 1 proteins. In the present study, we identified the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) as a nIGF1R binding partner. PCNA is a pivotal component of the replication fork machinery and a main regulator of the DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathway. We found that IGF1R interacts with and phosphorylates PCNA in human embryonic stem cells and other cell lines. In vitro MS analysis of PCNA coincubated with the IGF1R kinase indicated tyrosine residues 60, 133, and 250 in PCNA as IGF1R targets, and PCNA phosphorylation was followed by mono and poly ubiquitination. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments suggested that these ubiquitination events may be mediated by DDT dependent E2/E3 ligases (e.g. RAD18 and SHPRH/HLTF). Absence of IGF1R or mutation of Tyr60, Tyr133, or Tyr250 in PCNA abrogated its ubiquitination. Unlike in cells expressing IGF1R, externally induced DNA damage in IGF1R negative cells caused G1 cell cycle arrest and S phase fork stalling. Taken together, our results suggest a role of IGF1R in DDT. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-08-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3-H4. Our first structure shows an H3-H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3-H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication.

  19. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3–H4 at replication forks

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3–H4. Our first structure shows an H3–H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3–H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2–7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3–H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication. PMID:26167883

  20. Recent Progress in Understanding Coxsackievirus Replication, Dissemination, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Jon; Mangale, Vrushali; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Feuer, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackieviruses (CVs) are relatively common viruses associated with a number of serious human diseases, including myocarditis and meningo-encephalitis. These viruses are considered cytolytic yet can persist for extended periods of time within certain host tissues requiring evasion from the host immune response and a greatly reduced rate of replication. A member of Picornaviridae family, CVs have been historically considered non-enveloped viruses – although recent evidence suggest that CV and other picornaviruses hijack host membranes and acquire an envelope. Acquisition of an envelope might provide distinct benefits to CV virions, such as resistance to neutralizing antibodies and efficient nonlytic viral spread. CV exhibits a unique tropism for progenitor cells in the host which may help to explain the susceptibility of the young host to infection and the establishment of chronic disease in adults. CVs have also been shown to exploit autophagy to maximize viral replication and assist in unconventional release from target cells. In this article, we review recent progress in clarifying virus replication and dissemination within the host cell, identifying determinants of tropism, and defining strategies utilized by the virus to evade the host immune response. Also, we will highlight unanswered questions and provide future perspectives regarding the potential mechanisms of CV pathogenesis. PMID:26142496

  1. Mercury Remediation Technology Development for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - FY 2015 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J.; Brooks, Scott C.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Mayes, Melanie; Johs, Alexander; Watson, David B.; Poteat, Monica D.; Smith, John; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Lester, Brian; Morris, Jesse; Lowe, Kenneth; Dickson, Johnbull O.; Eller, Virginia; DeRolph, Christopher R.

    2016-04-01

    Mercury remediation is a high priority for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) because of large historical losses of mercury within buildings and to soils and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Because of the extent of mercury losses and the complexities of mercury transport and fate in the downstream environment, the success of conventional options for mercury remediation in lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) is uncertain. A phased, adaptive management approach to remediation of surface water includes mercury treatment actions at Y-12 in the short-term and research and technology development (TD) to evaluate longer-term solutions in the downstream environment (US Department of Energy 2014b).

  2. PARP1 inhibition radiosensitizes HNSCC cells deficient in homologous recombination by disabling the DNA replication fork elongation response

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Seelbach, Jasna I.; Mansour, Wael Y.; Zielinski, Alexandra; Petersen, Cordula; Clauditz, Till S.; Münscher, Adrian; Friedl, Anna A.; Borgmann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to develop new, more efficient therapies for head and neck cancer (HNSCC) patients. It is currently unclear whether defects in DNA repair genes play a role in HNSCCs' resistance to therapy. PARP1 inhibitors (PARPi) were found to be “synthetic lethal” in cancers deficient in BRCA1/2 with impaired homologous recombination. Since tumors rarely have these particular mutations, there is considerable interest in finding alternative determinants of PARPi sensitivity. Effectiveness of combined irradiation and PARPi olaparib was evaluated in ten HNSCC cell lines, subdivided into HR-proficient and HR-deficient cell lines using a GFP-based reporter assay. Both groups were equally sensitive to PARPi alone. Combined treatment revealed stronger synergistic interactions in the HR-deficient group. Because HR is mainly active in S-Phase, replication processes were analyzed. A stronger impact of treatment on replication processes (p = 0.04) and an increased number of radial chromosomes (p = 0.003) were observed in the HR-deficient group. We could show that radiosensitization by inhibition of PARP1 strongly correlates with HR competence in a replication-dependent manner. Our observations indicate that PARP1 inhibitors are promising candidates for enhancing the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy via disabling DNA replication processes in HR-deficient HNSCCs. PMID:26799421

  3. Top2 and Sgs1-Top3 Act Redundantly to Ensure rDNA Replication Termination

    PubMed Central

    Fredsøe, Jacob; Nielsen, Ida; Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Bentsen, Iben Bach; Lisby, Michael; Bjergbaek, Lotte; Andersen, Anni H

    2015-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication with correct termination is essential for genome stability and transmission of genetic information. Here we have investigated the potential roles of Topoisomerase II (Top2) and the RecQ helicase Sgs1 during late stages of replication. We find that cells lacking Top2 and Sgs1 (or Top3) display two different characteristics during late S/G2 phase, checkpoint activation and accumulation of asymmetric X-structures, which are both independent of homologous recombination. Our data demonstrate that checkpoint activation is caused by a DNA structure formed at the strongest rDNA replication fork barrier (RFB) during replication termination, and consistently, checkpoint activation is dependent on the RFB binding protein, Fob1. In contrast, asymmetric X-structures are formed independent of Fob1 at less strong rDNA replication fork barriers. However, both checkpoint activation and formation of asymmetric X-structures are sensitive to conditions, which facilitate fork merging and progression of replication forks through replication fork barriers. Our data are consistent with a redundant role of Top2 and Sgs1 together with Top3 (Sgs1-Top3) in replication fork merging at rDNA barriers. At RFB either Top2 or Sgs1-Top3 is essential to prevent formation of a checkpoint activating DNA structure during termination, but at less strong rDNA barriers absence of the enzymes merely delays replication fork merging, causing an accumulation of asymmetric termination structures, which are solved over time. PMID:26630413

  4. Nuclear DNA synthesis in vitro is mediated via stable replication forks assembled in a temporally specific fashion in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, N.H.; Stillman, B.W.

    1988-05-01

    A cell-free nuclear replication system that is S-phase specific, that requires the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, and that is stimulated three- to eightfold by cytoplasmic factors from S-phase cells was used to examine the temporal specificity of chromosomal DNA synthesis in vitro. Temporal specificity of DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei was assessed directly by examining the replication of restriction fragments derived from the amplified 200-kilobase dihydrofolate reductase domain of methotrexate-resistant CHOC 400 cells as a function of the cell cycle. In nuclei prepared from cells collected at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle, synthesis of amplified sequences commenced within the immediate dihydrofolate reductase origin region and elongation continued for 60 to 80 min. The order of synthesis of amplified restriction fragments in nuclei from early S-phase cells in vitro appeared to be indistinguishable from that in vivo. Nuclei prepared from CHOC 400 cells poised at later times in the S phase synthesized characteristic subsets of other amplified fragments. The specificity of fragment labeling patterns was stable to short-term storage at 4/sup 0/C. The occurrence of stimulatory factors in cytosol extracts was cell cycle dependent in that minimal stimulation was observed with early G1-phase extracts, whereas maximal stimulation was observed with cytosol extracts from S-phase cells. Chromosomal synthesis was not observed in nuclei from G1 cells, nor did cytosol extracts from S-phase cells induce chromosomal replication in G1 nuclei. In contrast to chromosomal DNA synthesis, mitochondrial DNA replication in vitro was not stimulated by cytoplasmic factors and occurred at equivalent rates throughout the G1 and S phases.

  5. Direct Evidence for the Formation of Precatenanes during DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Cebrián, Jorge; Castán, Alicia; Martínez, Víctor; Kadomatsu-Hermosa, Maridian J; Parra, Cristina; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Schaerer, Christian; Hernández, Pablo; Krimer, Dora B; Schvartzman, Jorge B

    2015-05-29

    The dynamics of DNA topology during replication are still poorly understood. Bacterial plasmids are negatively supercoiled. This underwinding facilitates strand separation of the DNA duplex during replication. Leading the replisome, a DNA helicase separates the parental strands that are to be used as templates. This strand separation causes overwinding of the duplex ahead. If this overwinding persists, it would eventually impede fork progression. In bacteria, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV act ahead of the fork to keep DNA underwound. However, the processivity of the DNA helicase might overcome DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. It was proposed that the overwinding that builds up ahead of the fork could force it to swivel and diffuse this positive supercoiling behind the fork where topoisomerase IV would also act to maintain replicating the DNA underwound. Putative intertwining of sister duplexes in the replicated region are called precatenanes. Fork swiveling and the formation of precatenanes, however, are still questioned. Here, we used classical genetics and high resolution two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis to examine the torsional tension of replication intermediates of three bacterial plasmids with the fork stalled at different sites before termination. The results obtained indicated that precatenanes do form as replication progresses before termination.

  6. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-04-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  7. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-07-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  8. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Christensen, S.W.; Greeley, M.S.jr; Hill, W.R.; McCarthy, J.F.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J.

    2000-10-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the adjacent floodplain, (5) appropriate habitat distribution, and

  9. Quarterly Progress Report on the Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cicerone, D.S.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.A.

    1996-12-30

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program ( BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  10. Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) uses a hydrogen-bonding fork from Arg668 to the primer terminus and incoming deoxynucleotide triphosphate to catalyze DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Aviva S; Blandino, Maureen; Spratt, Thomas E

    2004-08-06

    Interactions between the minor groove of the DNA and DNA polymerases appear to play a major role in the catalysis and fidelity of DNA replication. In particular, Arg668 of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) makes a critical contact with the N-3-position of guanine at the primer terminus. We investigated the interaction between Arg668 and the ring oxygen of the incoming deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) using a combination of site-specific mutagenesis of the protein and atomic substitution of the DNA and dNTP. Hydrogen bonds from Arg668 were probed with the site-specific mutant R668A. Hydrogen bonds from the DNA were probed with oligodeoxynucleotides containing either guanine or 3-deazaguanine (3DG) at the primer terminus. Hydrogen bonds from the incoming dNTP were probed with (1 'R,3 'R,4 'R)-1-[3-hydroxy-4-(triphosphorylmethyl)cyclopent-1-yl]uracil (dcUTP), an analog of dUTP in which the ring oxygen of the deoxyribose moiety was replaced by a methylene group. We found that the pre-steady-state parameter kpol was decreased 1,600 to 2,000-fold with each of the single substitutions. When the substitutions were combined, there was no additional decrease (R668A and 3DG), a 5-fold decrease (3DG and dcUTP), and a 50-fold decrease (R668A and dcUTP) in kpol. These results are consistent with a hydrogen-bonding fork from Arg668 to the primer terminus and incoming dNTP. These interactions may play an important role in fidelity as well as catalysis of DNA replication.

  11. Recovery from the DNA Replication Checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Koepp, Deanna M

    2016-10-28

    Checkpoint recovery is integral to a successful checkpoint response. Checkpoint pathways monitor progress during cell division so that in the event of an error, the checkpoint is activated to block the cell cycle and activate repair pathways. Intrinsic to this process is that once repair has been achieved, the checkpoint signaling pathway is inactivated and cell cycle progression resumes. We use the term "checkpoint recovery" to describe the pathways responsible for the inactivation of checkpoint signaling and cell cycle re-entry after the initial stress has been alleviated. The DNA replication or S-phase checkpoint monitors the integrity of DNA synthesis. When replication stress is encountered, replication forks are stalled, and the checkpoint signaling pathway is activated. Central to recovery from the S-phase checkpoint is the restart of stalled replication forks. If checkpoint recovery fails, stalled forks may become unstable and lead to DNA breaks or unusual DNA structures that are difficult to resolve, causing genomic instability. Alternatively, if cell cycle resumption mechanisms become uncoupled from checkpoint inactivation, cells with under-replicated DNA might proceed through the cell cycle, also diminishing genomic stability. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that contribute to inactivation of the S-phase checkpoint signaling pathway and the restart of replication forks during recovery from replication stress.

  12. Recovery from the DNA Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Indrajit; Koepp, Deanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Checkpoint recovery is integral to a successful checkpoint response. Checkpoint pathways monitor progress during cell division so that in the event of an error, the checkpoint is activated to block the cell cycle and activate repair pathways. Intrinsic to this process is that once repair has been achieved, the checkpoint signaling pathway is inactivated and cell cycle progression resumes. We use the term “checkpoint recovery” to describe the pathways responsible for the inactivation of checkpoint signaling and cell cycle re-entry after the initial stress has been alleviated. The DNA replication or S-phase checkpoint monitors the integrity of DNA synthesis. When replication stress is encountered, replication forks are stalled, and the checkpoint signaling pathway is activated. Central to recovery from the S-phase checkpoint is the restart of stalled replication forks. If checkpoint recovery fails, stalled forks may become unstable and lead to DNA breaks or unusual DNA structures that are difficult to resolve, causing genomic instability. Alternatively, if cell cycle resumption mechanisms become uncoupled from checkpoint inactivation, cells with under-replicated DNA might proceed through the cell cycle, also diminishing genomic stability. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that contribute to inactivation of the S-phase checkpoint signaling pathway and the restart of replication forks during recovery from replication stress. PMID:27801838

  13. Quarterly Progress Report - Biological Monitoring Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S. M.; Christensen, S. W.; Greeley, M.S. jr; McCracken, M.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth G. R.; Stewart, A. J.

    2001-01-19

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant). As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Complex protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Loar et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Complex on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Complex discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities. Monitoring is currently being conducted at five primary EFPC sites, although sites may be excluded or added depending upon the specific objectives of the various tasks. Criteria used in selecting the sites include: (1) location of sampling sites used in other studies, (2) known or suspected sources of downstream impacts, (3) proximity to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundaries, (4) concentration of mercury in the

  14. Inhibition of uracil DNA glycosylase sensitizes cancer cells to 5-fluorodeoxyuridine through replication fork collapse-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Han, Xiangzi; Qing, Yulan; Condie, Allison G.; Gorityala, Shashank; Yang, Shuming; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Youwei; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2016-01-01

    5-fluorodeoxyuridine (5-FdU, floxuridine) is active against multiple cancers through the inhibition of thymidylate synthase, which consequently introduces uracil and 5-FU incorporation into the genome. Uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) is one of the main enzymes responsible for the removal of uracil and 5-FU. However, how exactly UDG mediates cellular sensitivity to 5-FdU, and if so whether it is through its ability to remove uracil and 5-FU have not been well characterized. In this study, we report that UDG depletion led to incorporation of uracil and 5-FU in DNA following 5-FdU treatment and significantly enhanced 5-FdU's cytotoxicity in cancer cell lines. Co-treatment, but not post-treatment with thymidine prevented cell death of UDG depleted cells by 5-FdU, indicating that the enhanced cytotoxicity is due to the retention of uracil and 5-FU in genomic DNA in the absence of UDG. Furthermore, UDG depleted cells were arrested at late G1 and early S phase by 5-FdU, followed by accumulation of sub-G1 population indicating cell death. Mechanistically, 5-FdU dramatically reduced DNA replication speed in UDG depleted cells. UDG depletion also greatly enhanced DNA damage as shown by γH2AX foci formation. Notably, the increased γH2AX foci formation was not suppressed by caspase inhibitor treatment, suggesting that DNA damage precedes cell death induced by 5-FdU. Together, these data provide novel mechanistic insights into the roles of UDG in DNA replication, damage repair, and cell death in response to 5-FdU and suggest that UDG is a target for improving the anticancer effect of this agent. PMID:27517750

  15. Mammalian DNA polymerase alpha holoenzymes with possible functions at the leading and lagging strand of the replication fork.

    PubMed Central

    Ottiger, H P; Hübscher, U

    1984-01-01

    At an early purification stage, DNA polymerase alpha holoenzyme from calf thymus can be separated into four different forms by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. All four enzyme forms (termed A, B, C, and D) are capable of replicating long single-stranded DNA templates, such as parvoviral DNA or primed M13 DNA. Peak A possesses, in addition to the DNA polymerase alpha, a double-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase, as well as DNA topoisomerase type II, 3'-5' exonuclease, and RNase H activity. Peaks B, C, and D all contain, together with DNA polymerase alpha, activities of primase and DNA topoisomerase type II. Furthermore, peak B is enriched in an RNase H, and peaks C and D are enriched in a 3'-5' exonuclease. DNA methylase (DNA methyltransferase) was preferentially identified in peaks C and D. Velocity sedimentation analyses of the four peaks gave evidence of unexpectedly large forms of DNA polymerase alpha (greater than 11.3 s), indicating that copurification of the above putative replication enzymes is not fortuitous. With moderate and high concentrations of salt, enzyme activities cosedimented with DNA polymerase alpha. Peak C is more resistant to inhibition by salt and spermidine than the other three enzyme forms. These results suggest the existence of a leading strand replicase (peak A) and several lagging strand replicase forms (peaks B, C, and D). Finally, the salt-resistant C form might represent a functional DNA polymerase alpha holoenzyme, possibly fitting in a higher-order structure, such as the replisome or even the chromatin. Images PMID:6588375

  16. Solving the Telomere Replication Problem

    PubMed Central

    Maestroni, Laetitia; Matmati, Samah; Coulon, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem. In this article, different and new aspects of telomere replication, that can threaten the integrity of telomeres, will be reviewed. In particular, we will focus on the functions of shelterin and the replisome for the preservation of telomere integrity. PMID:28146113

  17. Evidence for Sequential and Increasing Activation of Replication Origins along Replication Timing Gradients in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Arneodo, Alain; Goldar, Arach; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Audit, Benjamin; Hyrien, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide replication timing studies have suggested that mammalian chromosomes consist of megabase-scale domains of coordinated origin firing separated by large originless transition regions. Here, we report a quantitative genome-wide analysis of DNA replication kinetics in several human cell types that contradicts this view. DNA combing in HeLa cells sorted into four temporal compartments of S phase shows that replication origins are spaced at 40 kb intervals and fire as small clusters whose synchrony increases during S phase and that replication fork velocity (mean 0.7 kb/min, maximum 2.0 kb/min) remains constant and narrowly distributed through S phase. However, multi-scale analysis of a genome-wide replication timing profile shows a broad distribution of replication timing gradients with practically no regions larger than 100 kb replicating at less than 2 kb/min. Therefore, HeLa cells lack large regions of unidirectional fork progression. Temporal transition regions are replicated by sequential activation of origins at a rate that increases during S phase and replication timing gradients are set by the delay and the spacing between successive origin firings rather than by the velocity of single forks. Activation of internal origins in a specific temporal transition region is directly demonstrated by DNA combing of the IGH locus in HeLa cells. Analysis of published origin maps in HeLa cells and published replication timing and DNA combing data in several other cell types corroborate these findings, with the interesting exception of embryonic stem cells where regions of unidirectional fork progression seem more abundant. These results can be explained if origins fire independently of each other but under the control of long-range chromatin structure, or if replication forks progressing from early origins stimulate initiation in nearby unreplicated DNA. These findings shed a new light on the replication timing program of mammalian genomes and provide a general

  18. Regulation of Unperturbed DNA Replication by Ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Sara Priego; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-06-25

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by means of attachment of a small globular protein ubiquitin (i.e., ubiquitylation) represents one of the most abundant and versatile mechanisms of protein regulation employed by eukaryotic cells. Ubiquitylation influences almost every cellular process and its key role in coordination of the DNA damage response is well established. In this review we focus, however, on the ways ubiquitylation controls the process of unperturbed DNA replication. We summarise the accumulated knowledge showing the leading role of ubiquitin driven protein degradation in setting up conditions favourable for replication origin licensing and S-phase entry. Importantly, we also present the emerging major role of ubiquitylation in coordination of the active DNA replication process: preventing re-replication, regulating the progression of DNA replication forks, chromatin re-establishment and disassembly of the replisome at the termination of replication forks.

  19. Activation of new replication foci under conditions of replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, P; Waligórska, A; Bujnowicz, Ł; Hoang, A; Dobrucki, JW

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage, binding of drugs to DNA or a shortage of nucleotides can decrease the rate or completely halt the progress of replication forks. Although the global rate of replication decreases, mammalian cells can respond to replication stress by activating new replication origins. We demonstrate that a moderate level of stress induced by inhibitors of topoisomerase I, commencing in early, mid or late S-phase, induces activation of new sites of replication located within or in the immediate vicinity of the original replication factories; only in early S some of these new sites are also activated at a distance greater than 300 nm. Under high stress levels very few new replication sites are activated; such sites are located within the original replication regions. There is a large variation in cellular response to stress – while in some cells the number of replication sites increases even threefold, it decreases almost twofold in other cells. Replication stress results in a loss of PCNA from replication factories and a twofold increase in nuclear volume. These observations suggest that activation of new replication origins from the pool of dormant origins within replication cluster under conditions of mild stress is generally restricted to the original replication clusters (factories) active at a time of stress initiation, while activation of distant origins and new replication factories is suppressed. PMID:26212617

  20. Chromatin dynamics during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, Raz; Voichek, Yoav; Barkai, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin is composed of DNA and histones, which provide a unified platform for regulating DNA-related processes, mostly through their post-translational modification. During DNA replication, histone arrangement is perturbed, first to allow progression of DNA polymerase and then during repackaging of the replicated DNA. To study how DNA replication influences the pattern of histone modification, we followed the cell-cycle dynamics of 10 histone marks in budding yeast. We find that histones deposited on newly replicated DNA are modified at different rates: While some marks appear immediately upon replication (e.g., H4K16ac, H3K4me1), others increase with transcription-dependent delays (e.g., H3K4me3, H3K36me3). Notably, H3K9ac was deposited as a wave preceding the replication fork by ∼5–6 kb. This replication-guided H3K9ac was fully dependent on the acetyltransferase Rtt109, while expression-guided H3K9ac was deposited by Gcn5. Further, topoisomerase depletion intensified H3K9ac in front of the replication fork and in sites where RNA polymerase II was trapped, suggesting supercoiling stresses trigger H3K9 acetylation. Our results assign complementary roles for DNA replication and gene expression in defining the pattern of histone modification. PMID:27225843

  1. The Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 Promotes Rad51-Dependent Template Switches at Replication Forks by Counteracting D-Loop Disassembly by the RecQ-Type Helicase Rqh1

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Julien; Costes, Audrey; Iraqui, Ismail; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Lambert, Sarah A.E.

    2014-01-01

    At blocked replication forks, homologous recombination mediates the nascent strands to switch template in order to ensure replication restart, but faulty template switches underlie genome rearrangements in cancer cells and genomic disorders. Recombination occurs within DNA packaged into chromatin that must first be relaxed and then restored when recombination is completed. The chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in DNA synthesis-coupled chromatin assembly during DNA replication and DNA repair. We reveal a novel chromatin factor-dependent step during replication-coupled DNA repair: Fission yeast CAF-1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks, independently of the postreplication repair pathway. We used a physical assay that allows the analysis of the individual steps of template switch, from the recruitment of recombination factors to the formation of joint molecules, combined with a quantitative measure of the resulting rearrangements. We reveal functional and physical interplays between CAF-1 and the RecQ-helicase Rqh1, the BLM homologue, mutations in which cause Bloom's syndrome, a human disease associating genome instability with cancer predisposition. We establish that CAF-1 promotes template switch by counteracting D-loop disassembly by Rqh1. Consequently, the likelihood of faulty template switches is controlled by antagonistic activities of CAF-1 and Rqh1 in the stability of the D-loop. D-loop stabilization requires the ability of CAF-1 to interact with PCNA and is thus linked to the DNA synthesis step. We propose that CAF-1 plays a regulatory role during template switch by assembling chromatin on the D-loop and thereby impacting the resolution of the D-loop. PMID:25313826

  2. The chromatin assembly factor 1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks by counteracting D-loop disassembly by the RecQ-type helicase Rqh1.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Hardy, Julien; Costes, Audrey; Iraqui, Ismail; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2014-10-01

    At blocked replication forks, homologous recombination mediates the nascent strands to switch template in order to ensure replication restart, but faulty template switches underlie genome rearrangements in cancer cells and genomic disorders. Recombination occurs within DNA packaged into chromatin that must first be relaxed and then restored when recombination is completed. The chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in DNA synthesis-coupled chromatin assembly during DNA replication and DNA repair. We reveal a novel chromatin factor-dependent step during replication-coupled DNA repair: Fission yeast CAF-1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks, independently of the postreplication repair pathway. We used a physical assay that allows the analysis of the individual steps of template switch, from the recruitment of recombination factors to the formation of joint molecules, combined with a quantitative measure of the resulting rearrangements. We reveal functional and physical interplays between CAF-1 and the RecQ-helicase Rqh1, the BLM homologue, mutations in which cause Bloom's syndrome, a human disease associating genome instability with cancer predisposition. We establish that CAF-1 promotes template switch by counteracting D-loop disassembly by Rqh1. Consequently, the likelihood of faulty template switches is controlled by antagonistic activities of CAF-1 and Rqh1 in the stability of the D-loop. D-loop stabilization requires the ability of CAF-1 to interact with PCNA and is thus linked to the DNA synthesis step. We propose that CAF-1 plays a regulatory role during template switch by assembling chromatin on the D-loop and thereby impacting the resolution of the D-loop.

  3. RAD18, WRNIP1 and ATMIN promote ATM signalling in response to replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Nnennaya; Zhang, Tianyi; Burrell, Rebecca A.; Chakraborty, Atanu; Cronshaw, Janet; Da Costa, Clive; Grönroos, Eva; Pemberton, Helen N.; Anderton, Emma; Gonzalez, Laure; Sabbioneda, Simone; Ulrich, Helle D.; Swanton, Charles; Behrens, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication machinery invariably encounters obstacles that slow replication fork progression, and threaten to prevent complete replication and faithful segregation of sister chromatids. The resulting replication stress activates ATR, the major kinase involved in resolving impaired DNA replication. In addition, replication stress also activates the related kinase ATM, which is required to prevent mitotic segregation errors. However, the molecular mechanism of ATM activation by replication stress is not defined. Here we show that monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), a marker of stalled replication forks, interacts with the ATM cofactor ATMIN via WRN interacting protein 1 (WRNIP1). ATMIN, WRNIP1 and RAD18, the E3 ligase responsible for PCNA monoubiquitination, are specifically required for ATM signalling and 53BP1 focus formation induced by replication stress, not ionising radiation. Thus, WRNIP1 connects PCNA monoubiquitination with ATMIN/ATM to activate ATM signalling in response to replication stress and contribute to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:26549024

  4. RAD18, WRNIP1 and ATMIN promote ATM signalling in response to replication stress.

    PubMed

    Kanu, N; Zhang, T; Burrell, R A; Chakraborty, A; Cronshaw, J; DaCosta, C; Grönroos, E; Pemberton, H N; Anderton, E; Gonzalez, L; Sabbioneda, S; Ulrich, H D; Swanton, C; Behrens, A

    2016-07-28

    The DNA replication machinery invariably encounters obstacles that slow replication fork progression, and threaten to prevent complete replication and faithful segregation of sister chromatids. The resulting replication stress activates ATR, the major kinase involved in resolving impaired DNA replication. In addition, replication stress also activates the related kinase ATM, which is required to prevent mitotic segregation errors. However, the molecular mechanism of ATM activation by replication stress is not defined. Here, we show that monoubiquitinated Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), a marker of stalled replication forks, interacts with the ATM cofactor ATMIN via WRN-interacting protein 1 (WRNIP1). ATMIN, WRNIP1 and RAD18, the E3 ligase responsible for PCNA monoubiquitination, are specifically required for ATM signalling and 53BP1 focus formation induced by replication stress, not ionising radiation. Thus, WRNIP1 connects PCNA monoubiquitination with ATMIN/ATM to activate ATM signalling in response to replication stress and contribute to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  5. Along Middle Fork Road toward North Fork of the Crazy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Along Middle Fork Road toward North Fork of the Crazy Woman Creek Bridge, view to west - North Fork of Crazy Woman Creek Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Crazy Woman Creek at Middle Fork Road, Buffalo, Johnson County, WY

  6. [Mechanisms of inhibition of viral replication in plants]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Progress is described concerning genetic mapping CMV movement genes for CMV coat protein in squash and ToMV gene in tomato. These gene products appear to be involved in resistance to squash and tomato mosaic viruses respectively.

  7. Chk1 inhibits replication factory activation but allows dormant origin firing in existing factories

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xin Quan

    2010-01-01

    Replication origins are licensed by loading MCM2-7 hexamers before entry into S phase. However, only ∼10% of licensed origins are normally used in S phase, with the others remaining dormant. When fork progression is inhibited, dormant origins initiate nearby to ensure that all of the DNA is eventually replicated. In apparent contrast, replicative stress activates ataxia telangiectasia and rad-3–related (ATR) and Chk1 checkpoint kinases that inhibit origin firing. In this study, we show that at low levels of replication stress, ATR/Chk1 predominantly suppresses origin initiation by inhibiting the activation of new replication factories, thereby reducing the number of active factories. At the same time, inhibition of replication fork progression allows dormant origins to initiate within existing replication factories. The inhibition of new factory activation by ATR/Chk1 therefore redirects replication toward active factories where forks are inhibited and away from regions that have yet to start replication. This minimizes the deleterious consequences of fork stalling and prevents similar problems from arising in unreplicated regions of the genome. PMID:21173116

  8. DNA recombination: the replication connection.

    PubMed

    Haber, J E

    1999-07-01

    Chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) arise after exposure to ionizing radiation or enzymatic cleavage, but especially during the process of DNA replication itself. Homologous recombination plays a critical role in repair of such DSBs. There has been significant progress in our understanding of two processes that occur in DSB repair: gene conversion and recombination-dependent DNA replication. Recent evidence suggests that gene conversion and break-induced replication are related processes that both begin with the establishment of a replication fork in which both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis occur. There has also been much progress in characterization of the biochemical roles of recombination proteins that are highly conserved from yeast to humans.

  9. Dual effect of heat shock on DNA replication and genome integrity.

    PubMed

    Velichko, Artem K; Petrova, Nadezhda V; Kantidze, Omar L; Razin, Sergey V

    2012-09-01

    Heat shock (HS) is one of the better-studied exogenous stress factors. However, little is known about its effects on DNA integrity and the DNA replication process. In this study, we show that in G1 and G2 cells, HS induces a countable number of double-stranded breaks (DSBs) in the DNA that are marked by γH2AX. In contrast, in S-phase cells, HS does not induce DSBs but instead causes an arrest or deceleration of the progression of the replication forks in a temperature-dependent manner. This response also provoked phosphorylation of H2AX, which appeared at the sites of replication. Moreover, the phosphorylation of H2AX at or close to the replication fork rescued the fork from total collapse. Collectively our data suggest that in an asynchronous cell culture, HS might affect DNA integrity both directly and via arrest of replication fork progression and that the phosphorylation of H2AX has a protective effect on the arrested replication forks in addition to its known DNA damage signaling function.

  10. Replication Capacity of Viruses from Acute Infection Drives HIV-1 Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Selhorst, Philippe; Combrinck, Carina; Ndabambi, Nonkululeko; Ismail, Sherazaan D; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Lacerda, Miguel; Samsunder, Natasha; Garrett, Nigel; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Williamson, Carolyn

    2017-04-15

    The viral genotype has been shown to play an important role in HIV pathogenesis following transmission. However, the viral phenotypic properties that contribute to disease progression remain unclear. Most studies have been limited to the evaluation of Gag function in the context of a recombinant virus backbone. Using this approach, important biological information may be lost, making the evaluation of viruses obtained during acute infection, representing the transmitted virus, a more biologically relevant model. Here, we evaluate the roles of viral infectivity and the replication capacity of viruses from acute infection in disease progression in women who seroconverted in the CAPRISA 004 tenofovir microbicide trial. We show that viral replication capacity, but not viral infectivity, correlates with the set point viral load (Spearman r = 0.346; P = 0.045) and that replication capacity (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.52; P = 0.01) can predict CD4 decline independently of the viral load (HR = 2.9; P = 0.004) or protective HLA alleles (HR = 0.61; P = 0.36). We further demonstrate that Gag-Pro is not the main driver of this association, suggesting that additional properties of the transmitted virus play a role in disease progression. Finally, we find that although viruses from the tenofovir arm were 2-fold less infectious, they replicated at rates similar to those of viruses from the placebo arm. This indicates that the use of tenofovir gel did not select for viral variants with higher replication capacity. Overall, this study supports a strong influence of the replication capacity in acute infection on disease progression, potentially driven by interaction of multiple genes rather than a dominant role of the major structural gene gagIMPORTANCE HIV disease progression is known to differ between individuals, and defining which fraction of this variation can be attributed to the virus is important both clinically and epidemiologically. In this study, we show that the replication

  11. Bacteriophage phi29 DNA replication arrest caused by codirectional collisions with the transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Elías-Arnanz, M; Salas, M

    1997-09-15

    The consequences on replication of collisions between phi29 DNA polymerase, a monomeric replicase endowed with strand displacement capacity, and the transcription machinery have been studied in vitro. Codirectional collisions with stalled transcription ternary complexes at four different promoters in the phi29 genome were found to block replication fork progression. Upon collision, the DNA polymerase remained on the template and was able to resume elongation once the RNA polymerase was allowed to move. Collisions with RNA polymerase molecules moving in the same direction also interfered with replication, causing a decrease in the replication rate. These results lead to the proposal that in bacteriophage phi29 a transcription complex physically blocks the progression of a replication fork. We suggest that temporal regulation of transcription and the low probability that the replication and transcription processes colocalize in vivo contribute to achieving minimal interference between the two events.

  12. Bacteriophage phi29 DNA replication arrest caused by codirectional collisions with the transcription machinery.

    PubMed Central

    Elías-Arnanz, M; Salas, M

    1997-01-01

    The consequences on replication of collisions between phi29 DNA polymerase, a monomeric replicase endowed with strand displacement capacity, and the transcription machinery have been studied in vitro. Codirectional collisions with stalled transcription ternary complexes at four different promoters in the phi29 genome were found to block replication fork progression. Upon collision, the DNA polymerase remained on the template and was able to resume elongation once the RNA polymerase was allowed to move. Collisions with RNA polymerase molecules moving in the same direction also interfered with replication, causing a decrease in the replication rate. These results lead to the proposal that in bacteriophage phi29 a transcription complex physically blocks the progression of a replication fork. We suggest that temporal regulation of transcription and the low probability that the replication and transcription processes colocalize in vivo contribute to achieving minimal interference between the two events. PMID:9312035

  13. Cell cycle progression requires the CDC-48UFD-1/NPL-4 complex for efficient DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Mouysset, Julien; Deichsel, Alexandra; Moser, Sandra; Hoege, Carsten; Hyman, Anthony A; Gartner, Anton; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2008-09-02

    Since cdc48 mutants were isolated by the first genetic screens for cell division cycle (cdc) mutants in yeast, the requirement of the chaperone-like ATPase Cdc48/p97 during cell division has remained unclear. Here, we discover an unanticipated function for Caenorhabditis elegans CDC-48 in DNA replication linked to cell cycle control. Our analysis of the CDC-48(UFD-1/NPL-4) complex identified a general role in S phase progression of mitotic cells essential for embryonic cell division and germline development of adult worms. These developmental defects result from activation of the DNA replication checkpoint caused by replication stress. Similar to loss of replication licensing factors, DNA content is strongly reduced in worms depleted for CDC-48, UFD-1, and NPL-4. In addition, these worms show decreased DNA synthesis and hypersensitivity toward replication blocking agents. Our findings identified a role for CDC-48(UFD-1/NPL-4) in DNA replication, which is important for cell cycle progression and genome stability.

  14. Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis for analysis of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Villwock, Sandra K; Aparicio, Oscar M

    2014-01-01

    The initiation, elongation, and termination of DNA replication are each associated with distinct, nonlinear DNA structures that can be resolved and identified by two-dimensional (2D) agarose gel electrophoresis. This method involves: isolation of genomic DNA while preserving fragile replication structures, digestion of the DNA with a restriction enzyme, separation of DNA by size and shape through two distinct stages of agarose gel electrophoresis, and Southern blotting to probe for the specific sequence(s) of interest. The method has been most commonly used to determine the activity level of putative replication origin-containing sequences, and has also been used to analyze replication timing, fork progression, fork pausing, fork stalling and collapse, termination, and recombinational repair.

  15. Bcl2 induces DNA replication stress by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Xie, Maohua; Yen, Yun; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Khuri, Fadlo R; Curran, Walter J; Doetsch, Paul W; Deng, Xingming

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication stress is an inefficient DNA synthesis process that leads replication forks to progress slowly or stall. Two main factors that cause replication stress are alterations in pools of deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) precursors required for DNA synthesis and changes in the activity of proteins required for synthesis of dNTPs. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), containing regulatory hRRM1 and catalytic hRRM2 subunits, is the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of ribonucleoside diphosphates (NDP) to deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates (dNDP) and thereby provides dNTP precursors needed for the synthesis of DNA. Here, we demonstrate that either endogenous or exogenous expression of Bcl2 results in decreases in RNR activity and intracellular dNTP, retardation of DNA replication fork progression, and increased rate of fork asymmetry leading to DNA replication stress. Bcl2 colocalizes with hRRM1 and hRRM2 in the cytoplasm and directly interacts via its BH4 domain with hRRM2 but not hRRM1. Removal of the BH4 domain of Bcl2 abrogates its inhibitory effects on RNR activity, dNTP pool level, and DNA replication. Intriguingly, Bcl2 directly inhibits RNR activity by disrupting the functional hRRM1/hRRM2 complex via its BH4 domain. Our findings argue that Bcl2 reduces intracellular dNTPs by inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase activity, thereby providing insight into how Bcl2 triggers DNA replication stress.

  16. RecA-Dependent Replication in the nrdA101(Ts) Mutant of Escherichia coli under Restrictive Conditions▿

    PubMed Central

    Salguero, Israel; Guarino, Estrella; Guzmán, Elena C.

    2011-01-01

    Cells carrying the thermosensitive nrdA101 allele are able to replicate entire chromosomes at 42°C when new DNA initiation events are inhibited. We investigated the role of the recombination enzymes on the progression of the DNA replication forks in the nrdA101 mutant at 42°C in the presence of rifampin. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), we demonstrated that the replication forks stalled and reversed during the replication progression under this restrictive condition. DNA labeling and flow cytometry experiments supported this finding as the deleterious effects found in the RecB-deficient background were suppressed specifically by the absence of RuvABC; however, this did not occur in a RecG-deficient background. Furthermore, we show that the RecA protein is absolutely required for DNA replication in the nrdA101 mutant at restrictive temperature when the replication forks are reversed. The detrimental effect of the recA deletion is not related to the chromosomal degradation caused by the absence of RecA. The inhibition of DNA replication observed in the nrdA101 recA mutant at 42°C in the presence of rifampin was reverted by the presence of the wild-type RecA protein expressed ectopically but only partially suppressed by the RecA protein with an S25P mutation [RecA(S25P)], deficient in the rescue of the stalled replication forks. We propose that RecA is required to maintain the integrity of the reversed forks in the nrdA101 mutant under certain restrictive conditions, supporting the relationship between DNA replication and recombination enzymes through the stabilization and repair of the stalled replication forks. PMID:21441507

  17. DNA double-strand breaks caused by replication arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Michel, B; Ehrlich, S D; Uzest, M

    1997-01-01

    We report here that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) form in Escherichia coli upon arrest of replication forks due to a defect in, or the inhibition of, replicative DNA helicases. The formation of DSBs was assessed by the appearance of linear DNA detected by pulse-field gel electrophoresis. Processing of DSBs by recombination repair or linear DNA degradation was abolished by mutations in recBCD genes. Two E. coli replicative helicases were tested, Rep, which is essential in recBC mutants, and DnaB. The proportion of linear DNA increased up to 50% upon shift of rep recBTS recCTS cells to restrictive temperature. No increase in linear DNA was observed in the absence of replicating chromosomes, indicating that the formation of DSBs in rep strains requires replication. Inhibition of the DnaB helicase either by a strong replication terminator or by a dnaBTS mutation led to the formation of linear DNA, showing that blocked replication forks are prone to DSB formation. In wild-type E. coli, linear DNA was detected in the absence of RecBC or of both RecA and RecD. This reveals the existence of a significant amount of spontaneous DSBs. We propose that some of them may also result from the impairment of replication fork progression. PMID:9029161

  18. Replication of simian virus 40 DNA after UV irradiation: evidence of growing fork blockage and single-stranded gaps in daughter strands

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzina, M.; Menck, C.F.M.; Courtin, P.; Sarasin, A.

    1988-11-01

    The molecular mechanisms of in vivo inhibition of mammalian DNA replication by exposure to UV light (at 254 nm) was studied in monkey and human cells infected with simian virus 40. Analysis of viral DNA by electron microscopy and sucrose gradients confirmed that the presence of UV-induced lesions severely blocks DNA synthesis, and thus the conversion of replicative intermediates (RIs) into fully replicated form I DNA is inhibited by UV irradiation. These blocked RI molecules present several special features when visualized by electron microscopy. In excision repair-proficient monkey and human cells they are composed of a double-stranded circular DNA with a double-stranded tail whose size corresponds to the average interpyrimidine dimer distance, as determined by the dimer-specific T4 endonuclease V. In excision repair-deficient human cells from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, UV-irradiated RIs present a Carins-like structure similar to that observed for replicating molecules obtained from unirradiated infected cells. Single-stranded gaps are visualized in the replicated portions of UV-irradiated RI molecules; such regions are detected and clearly distinguishable from double-stranded DNA when probed by a specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein such as the bacteriophage T4 gene 32 product. Consistent with the presence of gaps in UV-irradiated RI molecules, single-strand-specific S1 nuclease digestion causes a shift in their sedimentation properties when analyzed in neutral sucrose gradients compared with undamaged molecules.

  19. Replication licensing promotes cyclin D1 expression and G1 progression in untransformed human cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peijun; Slater, Damien M.; Lenburg, Marc; Nevis, Kathleen; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Vaziri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Defects in DNA replication are implicated as early and causal events in malignancy. However, the immediate effects of impaired DNA replication licensing on cell cycle progression of non-malignant human cells are unknown. Therefore, we have investigated the acute effects of Mcm7 ablation using synchronized cultures of untransformed Human Dermal Fibroblasts (HDF). Mcm7 ablation elicited a G1 delay associated with impaired activation of CDK4 and CDK2 and reduced Rb phosphorylation. The cell cycle delay of Mcm7-ablated cells was not associated with a DNA damage response. However, levels of cyclin D1 mRNA were specifically reduced and binding of RNA Polymerase II to the CYCD1 promoter was decreased in Mcm7-depleted cells. Similar to Mcm7-deficiency, Mcm2- or Cdc6-depletion led to impaired cyclin D expression. Ectopic overexpression of Cdc6 in quiescent cells promoted cyclin D1 expression, CDK4 activation and G1 progression. Therefore timely and efficient expression of cyclin D1 during G1 phase requires replication licensing. Reconstitution of cyclin D1 expression was insufficient to correct the G1 delay of Mcm7-depleted cells, indicating that additional cell cycle events during G1 are dependent on replication licensing. However, ectopic expression of the HPV-E7 oncoprotein, and the resulting bypass of the requirement for cyclin D1-Rb signaling enabled Mcm7-depleted cells to enter S-phase. HPV-E7-induced S-phase entry of Mcm7-depleted cells led to a DNA damage response, a hallmark of pre-malignancy. Taken together, our results suggest the existence of a ‘replication licensing restriction point’ that couples pre-RC assembly with G1 progression in normal cells to minimize replication stress, DNA damage and tumorigenesis. PMID:19106611

  20. PTEN Controls the DNA Replication Process through MCM2 in Response to Replicative Stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiawen; Liang, Jing; Li, Jiaju; Li, Yunqiao; Liang, Hui; Zhao, Xuyang; McNutt, Michael A; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-11-17

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor frequently mutated in human cancers. PTEN inhibits the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT cascade, and nuclear PTEN guards the genome by multiple mechanisms. Here, we report that PTEN physically associates with the minichromosome maintenance complex component 2 (MCM2), which is essential for DNA replication. Specifically, PTEN dephosphorylates MCM2 at serine 41 (S41) and restricts replication fork progression under replicative stress. PTEN disruption results in unrestrained fork progression upon replication stalling, which is similar to the phenotype of cells expressing the phosphomimic MCM2 mutant S41D. Moreover, PTEN is necessary for prevention of chromosomal aberrations under replication stress. This study demonstrates that PTEN regulates DNA replication through MCM2 and loss of PTEN function leads to replication defects and genomic instability. We propose that PTEN plays a critical role in maintaining genetic stability through a replication-specific mechanism, and this is a crucial facet of PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human PIF1 helicase supports DNA replication and cell growth under oncogenic-stress

    PubMed Central

    Gagou, Mary E.; Ganesh, Anil; Phear, Geraldine; Robinson, Darren; Petermann, Eva; Cox, Angela; Meuth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Unwinding duplex DNA is a critical processing step during replication, repair and transcription. Pif1 are highly conserved non-processive 5′->3′ DNA helicases with well-established roles in maintenance of yeast genome stability. However, the function of the sole member of Pif1 family in humans remains unclear. Human PIF1 is essential for tumour cell viability, particularly during replication stress, but is dispensable in non-cancerous cells and Pif1 deficient mice. Here we report that suppression of PIF1 function slows replication fork rates and increases arrested forks during normal cycling conditions. Importantly, PIF1-dependent replication impediments impair S-phase progression and reduce proliferation rates of RAS oncogene-transformed fibroblasts, where replication fork slowing is exacerbated, but not parental, non-cancerous cells. Disrupted fork movement upon PIF1-depletion does not enhance double-stranded break formation or DNA damage responses but affects resumption of DNA synthesis after prolonged replication inhibitor exposure, accompanied by diminished new origin firing and mainly S-phase entry. Taken together, we characterised a functional role for human PIF1 in DNA replication that becomes important for cell growth under oncogenic stress. Given that oncogenes induce high levels of replication stress during the early stages of tumorigenesis, this function of PIF1 could become critical during cancer development. PMID:25359767

  2. Building up and breaking down: mechanisms controlling recombination during replication.

    PubMed

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2017-08-01

    The complete and faithful duplication of the genome is an essential prerequisite for proliferating cells to maintain genome integrity. This objective is greatly challenged by DNA damage encountered during replication, which causes fork stalling and in certain cases, fork breakage. DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways mitigate the effects on fork stability induced by replication fork stalling by mediating damage-bypass and replication fork restart. These DDT mechanisms, largely relying on homologous recombination (HR) and specialized polymerases, can however contribute to genome rearrangements and mutagenesis. There is a profound connection between replication and recombination: recombination proteins protect replication forks from nuclease-mediated degradation of the nascent DNA strands and facilitate replication completion in cells challenged by DNA damage. Moreover, in case of fork collapse and formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), the recombination factors present or recruited to the fork facilitate HR-mediated DSB repair, which is primarily error-free. Disruption of HR is inexorably linked to genome instability, but the premature activation of HR during replication often leads to genome rearrangements. Faithful replication necessitates the downregulation of HR and disruption of active RAD51 filaments at replication forks, but upon persistent fork stalling, building up of HR is critical for the reorganization of the replication fork and for filling-in of the gaps associated with discontinuous replication induced by DNA lesions. Here we summarize and reflect on our understanding of the mechanisms that either suppress recombination or locally enhance it during replication, and the principles that underlie this regulation.

  3. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. The Western progression of lyme disease: infectious and Nonclonal Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato populations in Grand Forks County, North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Stone, Brandee L; Russart, Nathan M; Gaultney, Robert A; Floden, Angela M; Vaughan, Jefferson A; Brissette, Catherine A

    2015-01-01

    Scant attention has been paid to Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ixodes scapularis, or reservoirs in eastern North Dakota despite the fact that it borders high-risk counties in Minnesota. Recent reports of B. burgdorferi and I. scapularis in North Dakota, however, prompted a more detailed examination. Spirochetes cultured from the hearts of five rodents trapped in Grand Forks County, ND, were identified as B. burgdorferi sensu lato through sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S rRNA gene-ileT intergenic spacer region, flaB, ospA, ospC, and p66. OspC typing revealed the presence of groups A, B, E, F, L, and I. Two rodents were concurrently carrying multiple OspC types. Multilocus sequence typing suggested the eastern North Dakota strains are most closely related to those found in neighboring regions of the upper Midwest and Canada. BALB/c mice were infected with B. burgdorferi isolate M3 (OspC group B) by needle inoculation or tick bite. Tibiotarsal joints and ear pinnae were culture positive, and B. burgdorferi M3 was detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the tibiotarsal joints, hearts, and ear pinnae of infected mice. Uninfected larval I. scapularis ticks were able to acquire B. burgdorferi M3 from infected mice; M3 was maintained in I. scapularis during the molt from larva to nymph; and further, M3 was transmitted from infected I. scapularis nymphs to naive mice, as evidenced by cultures and qPCR analyses. These results demonstrate that isolate M3 is capable of disseminated infection by both artificial and natural routes of infection. This study confirms the presence of unique (nonclonal) and infectious B. burgdorferi populations in eastern North Dakota.

  5. The Western Progression of Lyme Disease: Infectious and Nonclonal Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Populations in Grand Forks County, North Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Brandee L.; Russart, Nathan M.; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Vaughan, Jefferson A.

    2014-01-01

    Scant attention has been paid to Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, Ixodes scapularis, or reservoirs in eastern North Dakota despite the fact that it borders high-risk counties in Minnesota. Recent reports of B. burgdorferi and I. scapularis in North Dakota, however, prompted a more detailed examination. Spirochetes cultured from the hearts of five rodents trapped in Grand Forks County, ND, were identified as B. burgdorferi sensu lato through sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, the 16S rRNA gene-ileT intergenic spacer region, flaB, ospA, ospC, and p66. OspC typing revealed the presence of groups A, B, E, F, L, and I. Two rodents were concurrently carrying multiple OspC types. Multilocus sequence typing suggested the eastern North Dakota strains are most closely related to those found in neighboring regions of the upper Midwest and Canada. BALB/c mice were infected with B. burgdorferi isolate M3 (OspC group B) by needle inoculation or tick bite. Tibiotarsal joints and ear pinnae were culture positive, and B. burgdorferi M3 was detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR) in the tibiotarsal joints, hearts, and ear pinnae of infected mice. Uninfected larval I. scapularis ticks were able to acquire B. burgdorferi M3 from infected mice; M3 was maintained in I. scapularis during the molt from larva to nymph; and further, M3 was transmitted from infected I. scapularis nymphs to naive mice, as evidenced by cultures and qPCR analyses. These results demonstrate that isolate M3 is capable of disseminated infection by both artificial and natural routes of infection. This study confirms the presence of unique (nonclonal) and infectious B. burgdorferi populations in eastern North Dakota. PMID:25304515

  6. Phosphorylation of CMG helicase and Tof1 is required for programmed fork arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bastia, Deepak; Srivastava, Pankaj; Zaman, Shamsu; Choudhury, Malay; Mohanty, Bidyut K.; Bacal, Julien; Langston, Lance D.; Pasero, Philippe; O’Donnell, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Several important physiological transactions, including control of replicative life span (RLS), prevention of collision between replication and transcription, and cellular differentiation, require programmed replication fork arrest (PFA). However, a general mechanism of PFA has remained elusive. We previously showed that the Tof1–Csm3 fork protection complex is essential for PFA by antagonizing the Rrm3 helicase that displaces nonhistone protein barriers that impede fork progression. Here we show that mutations of Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not other DNA replication factors, greatly reduced PFA at replication fork barriers in the spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA array. A key target of DDK is the mini chromosome maintenance (Mcm) 2–7 complex, which is known to require phosphorylation by DDK to form an active CMG [Cdc45 (cell division cycle gene 45), Mcm2–7, GINS (Go, Ichi, Ni, and San)] helicase. In vivo experiments showed that mutational inactivation of DDK caused release of Tof1 from the chromatin fractions. In vitro binding experiments confirmed that CMG and/or Mcm2–7 had to be phosphorylated for binding to phospho-Tof1–Csm3 but not to its dephosphorylated form. Suppressor mutations that bypass the requirement for Mcm2–7 phosphorylation by DDK restored PFA in the absence of the kinase. Retention of Tof1 in the chromatin fraction and PFA in vivo was promoted by the suppressor mcm5-bob1, which bypassed DDK requirement, indicating that under this condition a kinase other than DDK catalyzed the phosphorylation of Tof1. We propose that phosphorylation regulates the recruitment and retention of Tof1–Csm3 by the replisome and that this complex antagonizes the Rrm3 helicase, thereby promoting PFA, by preserving the integrity of the Fob1–Ter complex. PMID:27298353

  7. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M.; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81 deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81 deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  8. The DNA replication program is altered at the FMR1 locus in fragile X embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Tomishima, Mark J; Zaninovic, Nikica; Colak, Dilek; Yan, Zi; Zhan, Qiansheng; Rosenwaks, Zev; Jaffrey, Samie R; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2014-01-09

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by a CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene that appears to occur during oogenesis and during early embryogenesis. One model proposes that repeat instability depends on the replication fork direction through the repeats such that (CNG)n hairpin-like structures form, causing DNA polymerase to stall and slip. Examining DNA replication fork progression on single DNA molecules at the endogenous FMR1 locus revealed that replication forks stall at CGG repeats in human cells. Furthermore, replication profiles of FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) compared to nonaffected hESCs showed that fork direction through the repeats is altered at the FMR1 locus in FXS hESCs, such that predominantly the CCG strand serves as the lagging-strand template. This is due to the absence of replication initiation that would typically occur upstream of FMR1, suggesting that altered replication origin usage combined with fork stalling promotes repeat instability during early embryonic development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The XNA world: progress towards replication and evolution of synthetic genetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Vitor B; Holliger, Philipp

    2012-08-01

    Life's diversity is built on the wide range of properties and functions that can be encoded in natural biopolymers such as polypeptides and nucleic acids. However, despite their versatility, the range of chemical functionalities is limited, particularly in the case of nucleic acids. Chemical modification of nucleic acids can greatly increase their functional diversity but access to the full phenotypic potential of such polymers requires a system of replication. Here we review progress in the chemical and enzymatic synthesis, replication and evolution of unnatural nucleic acid polymers, which promises to enable the exploration of a vast sequence space not accessible to nature and deliver ligands, catalysts and materials based on this new class of biopolymers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Candidate blood proteome markers of Alzheimer's disease onset and progression: a systematic review and replication study.

    PubMed

    Kiddle, Steven J; Sattlecker, Martina; Proitsi, Petroula; Simmons, Andrew; Westman, Eric; Bazenet, Chantal; Nelson, Sally K; Williams, Stephen; Hodges, Angela; Johnston, Caroline; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Newhouse, Stephen; Lovestone, Simon; Dobson, Richard J B

    2014-01-01

    A blood-based protein biomarker, or set of protein biomarkers, that could predict onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) would have great utility; potentially clinically, but also for clinical trials and especially in the selection of subjects for preventative trials. We reviewed a comprehensive list of 21 published discovery or panel-based (> 100 proteins) blood proteomics studies of AD, which had identified a total of 163 candidate biomarkers. Few putative blood-based protein biomarkers replicate in independent studies but we found that some proteins do appear in multiple studies; for example, four candidate biomarkers are found to associate with AD-related phenotypes in five independent research cohorts in these 21 studies: α-1-antitrypsin, α-2-macroglobulin, apolipoprotein E, and complement C3. Using SomaLogic's SOMAscan proteomics technology, we were able to conduct a large-scale replication study for 94 of the 163 candidate biomarkers from these 21 published studies in plasma samples from 677 subjects from the AddNeuroMed (ANM) and the Alzheimer's Research UK/Maudsley BRC Dementia Case Registry at King's Health Partners (ARUK/DCR) research cohorts. Nine of the 94 previously reported candidates were found to associate with AD-related phenotypes (False Discovery Rate (FDR) q-value < 0.1). These proteins show sufficient replication to be considered for further investigation as a biomarker set. Overall, we show that there are some signs of a replicable signal in the range of proteins identified in previous studies and we are able to further replicate some of these. This suggests that AD pathology does affect the blood proteome with some consistency.

  11. Break-induced replication: functions and molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Malkova, Anna; Ira, Grzegorz

    2013-06-01

    Break-induced replication (BIR) is the pathway of homologous recombination (HR) conserved from phages to eukaryotes that serves to repair DNA breaks that have only one end. BIR contributes to the repair of broken replication forks and allows telomere lengthening in the absence of telomerase. Nonallelic BIR may lead to translocations and other chromosomal rearrangements. In addition, BIR initiated at sites of microhomology can generate copy number variations (CNVs) and complex chromosomal changes. The level of mutagenesis associated with DNA synthesis in BIR is significantly higher than during normal replication. These features make BIR a likely pathway to promote bursts of genetic changes that fuel cancer progression and evolution.

  12. Mechanisms of DNA replication termination.

    PubMed

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2017-08-01

    Genome duplication is carried out by pairs of replication forks that assemble at origins of replication and then move in opposite directions. DNA replication ends when converging replication forks meet. During this process, which is known as replication termination, DNA synthesis is completed, the replication machinery is disassembled and daughter molecules are resolved. In this Review, we outline the steps that are likely to be common to replication termination in most organisms, namely, fork convergence, synthesis completion, replisome disassembly and decatenation. We briefly review the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in simian virus 40 (SV40) and also focus on recent advances in eukaryotic replication termination. In particular, we discuss the recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases that control replisome disassembly in yeast and higher eukaryotes, and how their activity is regulated to avoid genome instability.

  13. Timeless preserves telomere length by promoting efficient DNA replication through human telomeres.

    PubMed

    Leman, Adam R; Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Deng, Zhong; Lee, Seung Woo; Das, Mukund M; Lieberman, Paul M; Noguchi, Eishi

    2012-06-15

    A variety of telomere protection programs are utilized to preserve telomere structure. However, the complex nature of telomere maintenance remains elusive. The Timeless protein associates with the replication fork and is thought to support efficient progression of the replication fork through natural impediments, including replication fork block sites. However, the mechanism by which Timeless regulates such genomic regions is not understood. Here, we report the role of Timeless in telomere length maintenance. We demonstrate that Timeless depletion leads to telomere shortening in human cells. This length maintenance is independent of telomerase, and Timeless depletion causes increased levels of DNA damage, leading to telomere aberrations. We also show that Timeless is associated with Shelterin components TRF1 and TRF2. Timeless depletion slows telomere replication in vitro, and Timeless-depleted cells fail to maintain TRF1-mediated accumulation of replisome components at telomeric regions. Furthermore, telomere replication undergoes a dramatic delay in Timeless-depleted cells. These results suggest that Timeless functions together with TRF1 to prevent fork collapse at telomere repeat DNA and ensure stable maintenance of telomere length and integrity.

  14. PriC-mediated DNA replication restart requires PriC complex formation with the single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Sarah R; Marceau, Aimee H; Massoni, Shawn C; Zhou, Ruobo; Ha, Taekjip; Sandler, Steven J; Keck, James L

    2013-06-14

    Frequent collisions between cellular DNA replication complexes (replisomes) and obstacles such as damaged DNA or frozen protein complexes make DNA replication fork progression surprisingly sporadic. These collisions can lead to the ejection of replisomes prior to completion of replication, which, if left unrepaired, results in bacterial cell death. As such, bacteria have evolved DNA replication restart mechanisms that function to reload replisomes onto abandoned DNA replication forks. Here, we define a direct interaction between PriC, a key Escherichia coli DNA replication restart protein, and the single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), a protein that is ubiquitously associated with DNA replication forks. PriC/SSB complex formation requires evolutionarily conserved residues from both proteins, including a pair of Arg residues from PriC and the C terminus of SSB. In vitro, disruption of the PriC/SSB interface by sequence changes in either protein blocks the first step of DNA replication restart, reloading of the replicative DnaB helicase onto an abandoned replication fork. Consistent with the critical role of PriC/SSB complex formation in DNA replication restart, PriC variants that cannot bind SSB are non-functional in vivo. Single-molecule experiments demonstrate that PriC binding to SSB alters SSB/DNA complexes, exposing single-stranded DNA and creating a platform for other proteins to bind. These data lead to a model in which PriC interaction with SSB remodels SSB/DNA structures at abandoned DNA replication forks to create a DNA structure that is competent for DnaB loading.

  15. Universal Temporal Profile of Replication Origin Activation in Eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldar, Arach

    2011-03-01

    The complete and faithful transmission of eukaryotic genome to daughter cells involves the timely duplication of mother cell's DNA. DNA replication starts at multiple chromosomal positions called replication origin. From each activated replication origin two replication forks progress in opposite direction and duplicate the mother cell's DNA. While it is widely accepted that in eukaryotic organisms replication origins are activated in a stochastic manner, little is known on the sources of the observed stochasticity. It is often associated to the population variability to enter S phase. We extract from a growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae population the average rate of origin activation in a single cell by combining single molecule measurements and a numerical deconvolution technique. We show that the temporal profile of the rate of origin activation in a single cell is similar to the one extracted from a replicating cell population. Taking into account this observation we exclude the population variability as the origin of observed stochasticity in origin activation. We confirm that the rate of origin activation increases in the early stage of S phase and decreases at the latter stage. The population average activation rate extracted from single molecule analysis is in prefect accordance with the activation rate extracted from published micro-array data, confirming therefore the homogeneity and genome scale invariance of dynamic of replication process. All these observations point toward a possible role of replication fork to control the rate of origin activation.

  16. Replicative nature of Indian research, essence of scientific temper, and future of scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajai R; Singh, Shakuntala A

    2004-01-01

    A lot of Indian research is replicative in nature. This is because originality is at a premium here and mediocrity is in great demand. But replication has its merit as well because it helps in corroboration. And that is the bedrock on which many a fancied scientific hypothesis or theory stands, or falls. However, to go from replicative to original research will involve a massive effort to restructure the Indian psyche and an all round effort from numerous quarters.The second part of this paper deals with the essence of scientific temper,which need not have any basic friendship, or animosity, with religion, faith, superstition and other such entities. A true scientist follows two cardinal rules. He is never unwilling to accept the worth of evidence, howsoever damning to the most favourite of his theories. Second, and perhaps more important, for want of evidence, he withholds comment. He says neither yes nor no.Where will Science ultimately lead Man is the third part of this essay. One argument is that the conflict between Man and Science will continue tilleither of them is exhausted or wiped out. The other believes that it is Science which has to be harnessed for Man and not Man used for Science. And with the numerous checks and balances in place, Science will remain an effective tool for man's progress. The essential value-neutrality of Science will have to be supplemented by the values that man has upheld for centuries as fundamental, and which religious thought and moral philosophy have continuously professed.

  17. Replicative Nature of Indian Research, Essence of Scientific Temper, and Future of Scientific Progress*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai R.; Singh, Shakuntala A.

    2004-01-01

    A lot of Indian research is replicative in nature. This is because originality is at a premium here and mediocrity is in great demand. But replication has its merit as well because it helps in corroboration. And that is the bedrock on which many a fancied scientific hypothesis or theory stands, or falls. However, to go from replicative to original research will involve a massive effort to restructure the Indian psyche and an all round effort from numerous quarters. The second part of this paper deals with the essence of scientific temper,which need not have any basic friendship, or animosity, with religion, faith, superstition and other such entities. A true scientist follows two cardinal rules. He is never unwilling to accept the worth of evidence, howsoever damning to the most favourite of his theories. Second, and perhaps more important, for want of evidence, he withholds comment. He says neither yes nor no. Where will Science ultimately lead Man is the third part of this essay. One argument is that the conflict between Man and Science will continue tilleither of them is exhausted or wiped out. The other believes that it is Science which has to be harnessed for Man and not Man used for Science. And with the numerous checks and balances in place, Science will remain an effective tool for man's progress. The essential value-neutrality of Science will have to be supplemented by the values that man has upheld for centuries as fundamental, and which religious thought and moral philosophy have continuously professed. PMID:22815607

  18. High HPgV replication is associated with improved surrogate markers of HIV progression

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; García-Morales, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Escobedo, Galileo; Estrada, Gloria; García-Iglesias, Trinidad; Muñoz-Saucedo, Nayeli; Kershenobich, David; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Human Pegivirus (HPgV) may have a beneficial effect on HIV disease progression in co-infected patients; however, the virologic characteristics of this infection are not well defined. In this study, we determined HPgV viremia prevalence in Mexico and provide new insights to understand HPgV infection and HPgV/HIV co-infection. Methods We analyzed and quantified 7,890 serum samples for HPgV viremia by One-Step RT-Real-Time PCR, 6,484 from healthy blood donors and 1,406 from HIV-infected patients. Data on HIV progression were obtained from patients’ records. HPgV genotyping was performed in 445 samples by nested PCR of the 5’URT region. Finite Mixture Models were used to identify clustering patterns of HPgV viremia in blood donors and co-infected antiretroviral (ART)-naïve patients. Results HPgV was detected in 2.98% of blood donors and 33% of HIV patients, with a wide range of viral loads. The most prevalent genotypes were 3 (58.6%)and 2 (33.7%). HPgV viral loads from healthy blood donors and HPgV/HIV+ ART-naïve co-infected patients were clustered into two component distributions, low and high, with a cut-off point of 5.07log10 and 5.06log10, respectively. High HPgV viremia was associated with improved surrogate markers of HIV infection, independent of the estimated duration of HIV infection or HIV treatment. Conclusions HPgV prevalence in Mexico was similar to that reported for other countries. The prevalent genotypes could be related to Mexico’s geographic location and ethnicity, since genotype 2 is frequent in the United States and Europe and genotype 3 in Asia and Amerindian populations. HPgV viral load demonstrated two patterns of replication, low and high. The more pronounced beneficial response observed in co-infected patients with high HPgV viremia may explain discrepancies found between other studies. Mechanisms explaining high and low HPgV replication should be explored to determine whether the persistently elevated replication depends on

  19. Acute inactivation of the replicative helicase in human cells triggers MCM8-9-dependent DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Nishimura, Kohei; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Bhowmick, Rahul; Hickson, Ian D; Kanemaki, Masato T

    2017-04-15

    DNA replication fork progression can be disrupted at difficult to replicate loci in the human genome, which has the potential to challenge chromosome integrity. This replication fork disruption can lead to the dissociation of the replisome and the formation of DNA damage. To model the events stemming from replisome dissociation during DNA replication perturbation, we used a degron-based system for inducible proteolysis of a subunit of the replicative helicase. We show that MCM2-depleted cells activate a DNA damage response pathway and generate replication-associated DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Remarkably, these cells maintain some DNA synthesis in the absence of MCM2, and this requires the MCM8-9 complex, a paralog of the MCM2-7 replicative helicase. We show that MCM8-9 functions in a homologous recombination-based pathway downstream from RAD51, which is promoted by DSB induction. This RAD51/MCM8-9 axis is distinct from the recently described RAD52-dependent DNA synthesis pathway that operates in early mitosis at common fragile sites. We propose that stalled replication forks can be restarted in S phase via homologous recombination using MCM8-9 as an alternative replicative helicase. © 2017 Natsume et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. An N-terminal acidic region of Sgs1 interacts with Rpa70 and recruits Rad53 kinase to stalled forks

    PubMed Central

    Hegnauer, Anna Maria; Hustedt, Nicole; Shimada, Kenji; Pike, Brietta L; Vogel, Markus; Amsler, Philipp; Rubin, Seth M; van Leeuwen, Fred; Guénolé, Aude; van Attikum, Haico; Thomä, Nicolas H; Gasser, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication fork stalling poses a major threat to genome stability. This is counteracted in part by the intra-S phase checkpoint, which stabilizes arrested replication machinery, prevents cell-cycle progression and promotes DNA repair. The checkpoint kinase Mec1/ATR and RecQ helicase Sgs1/BLM contribute synergistically to fork maintenance on hydroxyurea (HU). Both enzymes interact with replication protein A (RPA). We identified and deleted the major interaction sites on Sgs1 for Rpa70, generating a mutant called sgs1-r1. In contrast to a helicase-dead mutant of Sgs1, sgs1-r1 did not significantly reduce recovery of DNA polymerase α at HU-arrested replication forks. However, the Sgs1 R1 domain is a target of Mec1 kinase, deletion of which compromises Rad53 activation on HU. Full activation of Rad53 is achieved through phosphorylation of the Sgs1 R1 domain by Mec1, which promotes Sgs1 binding to the FHA1 domain of Rad53 with high affinity. We propose that the recruitment of Rad53 by phosphorylated Sgs1 promotes the replication checkpoint response on HU. Loss of the R1 domain increases lethality selectively in cells lacking Mus81, Slx4, Slx5 or Slx8. PMID:22820947

  1. Contrasting roles of checkpoint proteins as recombination modulators at Fob1-Ter complexes with or without fork arrest.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bidyut K; Bairwa, Narendra K; Bastia, Deepak

    2009-04-01

    The replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae specifically interacts with two tandem Ter sites (replication fork barriers) located in the nontranscribed spacer of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) to cause polar fork arrest. The Fob1-Ter complex is multifunctional and controls other DNA transactions such as recombination by multiple mechanisms. Here, we report on the regulatory roles of the checkpoint proteins in the initiation and progression of recombination at Fob1-Ter complexes. The checkpoint adapter proteins Tof1 and Csm3 either positively or negatively controlled recombination depending on whether it was provoked by polar fork arrest or by transcription, respectively. The absolute requirements for these proteins for inducing recombination at an active replication terminus most likely masked their negative modulatory role at a later step of the process. Other checkpoint proteins of the checkpoint adapter/mediator class such as Mrc1 and Rad9, which channel signals from the sensor to the effector kinase, tended to suppress recombination at Fob1-Ter complexes regardless of how it was initiated. We have also discovered that the checkpoint sensor kinase Mec1 and the effector Rad53 were positive modulators of recombination initiated by transcription but had little effect on recombination at Ter. The work also showed that the two pathways were Rad52 dependent but Rad51 independent. Since Ter sites occur in the intergenic spacer of rDNA from yeast to humans, the mechanism is likely to be of widespread occurrence.

  2. Progress report on the effects of highway construction on suspended-sediment discharge in the Coal River and Trace Fork, West Virginia, 1975-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downs, S.C.; Appel, David H.

    1986-01-01

    Construction of the four-lane Appalachian Corridon G highway disturbed about 2 sq mi in the Coal River and 0.35 sq mi of the 4.75 sq mi Trace Fork basin in southern West Virginia. Construction had a negligible effect on runoff and suspended-sediment load in the Coal River and its major tributaries, the Little Coal and Big Coal Rivers. Drainage areas of the mainstem sites in the Coal River basin ranged from 269 to 862 sq mi, and average annual suspended-sediment yields ranged from 535 to 614 tons/sq mi for the 1975-81 water years. Suspended-sediment load in the smaller Trace Fork basin (4.72 sq mi) was significantly affected by the highway construction. Based on data from undisturbed areas upstream from construction, the normal background load at Trace Fork downstream from construction during the period July 1980 to September 1981 was estimated to be 830 tons; the measured load was 2,385 tons. Runoff from the 0.35 sq mi area disturbed by highway construction transported approximately 1,550 tons of sediment. Suspended-sediment loads from the construction zone were also higher than normal background loads during storms. (USGS)

  3. Chromosome length influences replication-induced topological stress.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Andreas; Betts-Lindroos, Hanna; Kanno, Takaharu; Jeppsson, Kristian; Ström, Lena; Katou, Yuki; Itoh, Takehiko; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Sjögren, Camilla

    2011-03-17

    During chromosome duplication the parental DNA molecule becomes overwound, or positively supercoiled, in the region ahead of the advancing replication fork. To allow fork progression, this superhelical tension has to be removed by topoisomerases, which operate by introducing transient DNA breaks. Positive supercoiling can also be diminished if the advancing fork rotates along the DNA helix, but then sister chromatid intertwinings form in its wake. Despite these insights it remains largely unknown how replication-induced superhelical stress is dealt with on linear, eukaryotic chromosomes. Here we show that this stress increases with the length of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes. This highlights the possibility that superhelical tension is handled on a chromosome scale and not only within topologically closed chromosomal domains as the current view predicts. We found that inhibition of type I topoisomerases leads to a late replication delay of longer, but not shorter, chromosomes. This phenotype is also displayed by cells expressing mutated versions of the cohesin- and condensin-related Smc5/6 complex. The frequency of chromosomal association sites of the Smc5/6 complex increases in response to chromosome lengthening, chromosome circularization, or inactivation of topoisomerase 2, all having the potential to increase the number of sister chromatid intertwinings. Furthermore, non-functional Smc6 reduces the accumulation of intertwined sister plasmids after one round of replication in the absence of topoisomerase 2 function. Our results demonstrate that the length of a chromosome influences the need of superhelical tension release in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and allow us to propose a model where the Smc5/6 complex facilitates fork rotation by sequestering nascent chromatid intertwinings that form behind the replication machinery.

  4. The sub-cellular localization of Sulfolobus DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Gristwood, Tamzin; Duggin, Iain G; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja V; Bell, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Analyses of the DNA replication-associated proteins of hyperthermophilic archaea have yielded considerable insight into the structure and biochemical function of these evolutionarily conserved factors. However, little is known about the regulation and progression of DNA replication in the context of archaeal cells. In the current work, we describe the generation of strains of Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that allow the incorporation of nucleoside analogues during DNA replication. We employ this technology, in conjunction with immunolocalization analyses of replisomes, to investigate the sub-cellular localization of nascent DNA and replisomes. Our data reveal a peripheral localization of replisomes in the cell. Furthermore, while the two replication forks emerging from any one of the three replication origins in the Sulfolobus chromosome remain in close proximity, the three origin loci are separated.

  5. BLM helicase facilitates telomere replication during leading strand synthesis of telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Kosiyatrakul, Settapong T.

    2015-01-01

    Based on its in vitro unwinding activity on G-quadruplex (G4) DNA, the Bloom syndrome–associated helicase BLM is proposed to participate in telomere replication by aiding fork progression through G-rich telomeric DNA. Single molecule analysis of replicated DNA (SMARD) was used to determine the contribution of BLM helicase to telomere replication. In BLM-deficient cells, replication forks initiating from origins within the telomere, which copy the G-rich strand by leading strand synthesis, moved slower through the telomere compared with the adjacent subtelomere. Fork progression through the telomere was further slowed in the presence of a G4 stabilizer. Using a G4-specific antibody, we found that deficiency of BLM, or another G4-unwinding helicase, the Werner syndrome-associated helicase WRN, resulted in increased G4 structures in cells. Importantly, deficiency of either helicase led to greater increases in G4 DNA detected in the telomere compared with G4 seen genome-wide. Collectively, our findings are consistent with BLM helicase facilitating telomere replication by resolving G4 structures formed during copying of the G-rich strand by leading strand synthesis. PMID:26195664

  6. A replicator-specific binding protein essential for site-specific initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Huang, Liang; Fu, Haiqing; Smith, Owen K.; Lin, Chii Mei; Utani, Koichi; Rao, Mishal; Reinhold, William C.; Redon, Christophe E.; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; You, Yang; Hanna, Harlington; Boisclair, Yves; Long, Qiaoming; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome replication starts from distinct sites; however, the principles governing initiation site selection are unclear because proteins essential for DNA replication do not exhibit sequence-specific DNA binding. Here we identify a replication-initiation determinant (RepID) protein that binds a subset of replication-initiation sites. A large fraction of RepID-binding sites share a common G-rich motif and exhibit elevated replication initiation. RepID is required for initiation of DNA replication from RepID-bound replication origins, including the origin at the human beta-globin (HBB) locus. At HBB, RepID is involved in an interaction between the replication origin (Rep-P) and the locus control region. RepID-depleted murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibit abnormal replication fork progression and fewer replication-initiation events. These observations are consistent with a model, suggesting that RepID facilitates replication initiation at a distinct group of human replication origins. PMID:27272143

  7. Force regulated dynamics of RPA on a DNA fork

    PubMed Central

    Kemmerich, Felix E.; Daldrop, Peter; Pinto, Cosimo; Levikova, Maryna; Cejka, Petr; Seidel, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA binding protein, involved in most aspects of eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Here, we study the behavior of RPA on a DNA substrate that mimics a replication fork. Using magnetic tweezers we show that both yeast and human RPA can open forked DNA when sufficient external tension is applied. In contrast, at low force, RPA becomes rapidly displaced by the rehybridization of the DNA fork. This process appears to be governed by the binding or the release of an RPA microdomain (toehold) of only few base-pairs length. This gives rise to an extremely rapid exchange dynamics of RPA at the fork. Fork rezipping rates reach up to hundreds of base-pairs per second, being orders of magnitude faster than RPA dissociation from ssDNA alone. Additionally, we show that RPA undergoes diffusive motion on ssDNA, such that it can be pushed over long distances by a rezipping fork. Generally the behavior of both human and yeast RPA homologs is very similar. However, in contrast to yeast RPA, the dissociation of human RPA from ssDNA is greatly reduced at low Mg2+ concentrations, such that human RPA can melt DNA in absence of force. PMID:27016742

  8. Control of replication origin density and firing time in Xenopus egg extracts: role of a caffeine-sensitive, ATR-dependent checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Marheineke, Kathrin; Hyrien, Olivier

    2004-07-02

    A strict control of replication origin density and firing time is essential to chromosomal stability. Replication origins in early frog embryos are located at apparently random sequences, are spaced at close ( approximately 10-kb) intervals, and are activated in clusters that fire at different times throughout a very brief S phase. Using molecular combing of DNA from sperm nuclei replicating in Xenopus egg extracts, we show that the temporal order of origin firing can be modulated by the nucleocytoplasmic ratio and the checkpoint-abrogating agent caffeine in the absence of external challenge. Increasing the concentration of nuclei in the extract increases S phase length. Contrary to a previous interpretation, this does not result from a change in local origin spacing but from a spreading of the time over which distinct origin clusters fire and from a decrease in replication fork velocity. Caffeine addition or ATR inhibition with a specific neutralizing antibody increases origin firing early in S phase, suggesting that a checkpoint controls the time of origin firing during unperturbed S phase. Furthermore, fork progression is impaired when excess forks are assembled after caffeine treatment. We also show that caffeine allows more early origin firing with low levels of aphidicolin treatment but not higher levels. We propose that a caffeine-sensitive, ATR-dependent checkpoint adjusts the frequency of initiation to the supply of replication factors and optimizes fork density for safe and efficient chromosomal replication during normal S phase.

  9. Overcoming a nucleosomal barrier to replication

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Han-Wen; Pandey, Manjula; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Patel, Smita S.; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient overcoming and accurate maintenance of chromatin structure and associated histone marks during DNA replication are essential for normal functioning of the daughter cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of replication through chromatin are unknown. We have studied traversal of uniquely positioned mononucleosomes by T7 replisome in vitro. Nucleosomes present a strong, sequence-dependent barrier for replication, with particularly strong pausing of DNA polymerase at the +(31–40) and +(41–65) regions of the nucleosomal DNA. The exonuclease activity of T7 DNA polymerase increases the overall rate of progression of the replisome through a nucleosome, likely by resolving nonproductive complexes. The presence of nucleosome-free DNA upstream of the replication fork facilitates the progression of DNA polymerase through the nucleosome. After replication, at least 50% of the nucleosomes assume an alternative conformation, maintaining their original positions on the DNA. Our data suggest a previously unpublished mechanism for nucleosome maintenance during replication, likely involving transient formation of an intranucleosomal DNA loop. PMID:27847876

  10. Functions of Ubiquitin and SUMO in DNA Replication and Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, Néstor; Wong, Ronald P.; Ulrich, Helle D.

    2016-01-01

    Complete and faithful duplication of its entire genetic material is one of the essential prerequisites for a proliferating cell to maintain genome stability. Yet, during replication DNA is particularly vulnerable to insults. On the one hand, lesions in replicating DNA frequently cause a stalling of the replication machinery, as most DNA polymerases cannot cope with defective templates. This situation is aggravated by the fact that strand separation in preparation for DNA synthesis prevents common repair mechanisms relying on strand complementarity, such as base and nucleotide excision repair, from working properly. On the other hand, the replication process itself subjects the DNA to a series of hazardous transformations, ranging from the exposure of single-stranded DNA to topological contortions and the generation of nicks and fragments, which all bear the risk of inducing genomic instability. Dealing with these problems requires rapid and flexible responses, for which posttranslational protein modifications that act independently of protein synthesis are particularly well suited. Hence, it is not surprising that members of the ubiquitin family, particularly ubiquitin itself and SUMO, feature prominently in controlling many of the defensive and restorative measures involved in the protection of DNA during replication. In this review we will discuss the contributions of ubiquitin and SUMO to genome maintenance specifically as they relate to DNA replication. We will consider cases where the modifiers act during regular, i.e., unperturbed stages of replication, such as initiation, fork progression, and termination, but also give an account of their functions in dealing with lesions, replication stalling and fork collapse. PMID:27242895

  11. Functions of Ubiquitin and SUMO in DNA Replication and Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Néstor; Wong, Ronald P; Ulrich, Helle D

    2016-01-01

    Complete and faithful duplication of its entire genetic material is one of the essential prerequisites for a proliferating cell to maintain genome stability. Yet, during replication DNA is particularly vulnerable to insults. On the one hand, lesions in replicating DNA frequently cause a stalling of the replication machinery, as most DNA polymerases cannot cope with defective templates. This situation is aggravated by the fact that strand separation in preparation for DNA synthesis prevents common repair mechanisms relying on strand complementarity, such as base and nucleotide excision repair, from working properly. On the other hand, the replication process itself subjects the DNA to a series of hazardous transformations, ranging from the exposure of single-stranded DNA to topological contortions and the generation of nicks and fragments, which all bear the risk of inducing genomic instability. Dealing with these problems requires rapid and flexible responses, for which posttranslational protein modifications that act independently of protein synthesis are particularly well suited. Hence, it is not surprising that members of the ubiquitin family, particularly ubiquitin itself and SUMO, feature prominently in controlling many of the defensive and restorative measures involved in the protection of DNA during replication. In this review we will discuss the contributions of ubiquitin and SUMO to genome maintenance specifically as they relate to DNA replication. We will consider cases where the modifiers act during regular, i.e., unperturbed stages of replication, such as initiation, fork progression, and termination, but also give an account of their functions in dealing with lesions, replication stalling and fork collapse.

  12. Unscheduled DNA replication origin activation at inserted HPV 18 sequences in a HPV-18/MYC amplicon.

    PubMed

    Conti, Chiara; Herrick, John; Bensimon, Aaron

    2007-08-01

    Oncogene amplification is a critical step leading to tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Despite data suggesting that DNA replication is a major source of genomic instability, little is known about replication origin usage and replication fork progression in rearranged regions. Using a single DNA molecule approach, we provide here the first study of replication kinetics on a previously characterized MYC/papillomavirus (HPV18) amplicon in a cervical cancer. Using this amplicon as a model, we investigated the role DNA replication control plays in generating amplifications in human cancers. The data reveal severely perturbed DNA replication kinetics in the amplified region when compared with other regions of the same genome. It was found that DNA replication is initiated from both genomic and viral sequences, resulting in a higher median frequency of origin firings. In addition, it was found that the higher initiation frequency was associated with an equivalent increase in the number of stalled replication forks. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that unscheduled replication origin activation at inserted HPV-18 viral DNA sequences triggers DNA amplification in this cancer cell line and the subsequent overexpression of the MYC oncogene.

  13. Replication intermediates that escape Dna2 activity are processed by Holliday junction resolvase Yen1

    PubMed Central

    Ölmezer, Gizem; Levikova, Maryna; Klein, Dominique; Falquet, Benoît; Fontana, Gabriele Alessandro; Cejka, Petr; Rass, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells have evolved mechanisms to protect, restart and repair perturbed replication forks, allowing full genome duplication, even under replication stress. Interrogating the interplay between nuclease-helicase Dna2 and Holliday junction (HJ) resolvase Yen1, we find the Dna2 helicase activity acts parallel to homologous recombination (HR) in promoting DNA replication and chromosome detachment at mitosis after replication fork stalling. Yen1, but not the HJ resolvases Slx1-Slx4 and Mus81-Mms4, safeguards chromosome segregation by removing replication intermediates that escape Dna2. Post-replicative DNA damage checkpoint activation in Dna2 helicase-defective cells causes terminal G2/M arrest by precluding Yen1-dependent repair, whose activation requires progression into anaphase. These findings explain the exquisite replication stress sensitivity of Dna2 helicase-defective cells, and identify a non-canonical role for Yen1 in the processing of replication intermediates that is distinct from HJ resolution. The involvement of Dna2 helicase activity in completing replication may have implications for DNA2-associated pathologies, including cancer and Seckel syndrome. PMID:27779184

  14. Replication stress: getting back on track

    PubMed Central

    Berti, Matteo; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The replication stress response enables the DNA replication machinery to overcome DNA lesions or intrinsic replication fork obstacles, and is essential to ensure faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells. Multiple replication stress response pathways have been identified in recent years, raising questions about their specific and possibly redundant functions. Here, we review the emerging mechanisms of the replication stress response in mammalian cells, and consider how they may influence the dynamics of the core DNA replication complex. PMID:26840898

  15. Interactions between SIVNef, SIVGagPol and Alix correlate with viral replication and progression to AIDS in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luciana Jesus da; Santos, Adriana Lopes dos; Mandic, Robert; Shaw, Karen; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Tanuri, Amilcar; Luciw, Paul A.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2009-01-01

    Infection with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) leads to high viral loads and progression to Simian AIDS (SAIDS) in rhesus macaques. The viral accessory protein Nef is required for this phenotype in monkeys as well as in HIV-infected humans. Previously, we determined that HIVNef binds HIVGagPol and Alix for optimal viral replication in cells. In this study, we demonstrated that these interactions could correlate with high viral loads leading to SAIDS in the infected host. By infecting rhesus macaques with a mutant SIVmac239, where sequences in the nef gene that are required for these interactions were mutated, we observed robust viral replication and disease in two out of four monkeys, where they reverted to the wild type genotype and phenotype. These two rhesus macaques also died of SAIDS. Two other monkeys did not progress to disease and continued to harbor mutant nef sequences. We conclude that interactions between Nef, GagPol and Alix contribute to optimal viral replication and progression to disease in the infected host. PMID:19748111

  16. Direct Visualization of DNA Replication Dynamics in Zebrafish Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2015-12-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of DNA replication in the S-phase nucleus has been extensively studied in mammalian cells because it is tightly coupled with the regulation of other nuclear processes such as transcription. However, little is known about the replication dynamics in nonmammalian cells. Here, we analyzed the DNA replication processes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cells through the direct visualization of replicating DNA in the nucleus and on DNA fiber molecules isolated from the nucleus. We found that zebrafish chromosomal DNA at the nuclear interior was replicated first, followed by replication of DNA at the nuclear periphery, which is reminiscent of the spatiotemporal regulation of mammalian DNA replication. However, the relative duration of interior DNA replication in zebrafish cells was longer compared to mammalian cells, possibly reflecting zebrafish-specific genomic organization. The rate of replication fork progression and ori-to-ori distance measured by the DNA combing technique were ∼ 1.4 kb/min and 100 kb, respectively, which are comparable to those in mammalian cells. To our knowledge, this is a first report that measures replication dynamics in zebrafish cells.

  17. Causes and Consequences of Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Michelle K.; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication stress is a complex phenomenon which has serious implications for genome stability, cell survival, and human disease. Generation of aberrant replication fork structures containing single-stranded DNA activates the replication stress response, primarily mediated by the kinase ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). ATR and its downstream effectors stabilize and help to restart stalled replication forks, avoiding the generation of DNA damage and genome instability. Understanding these pathways may be key to diagnosis and treatment of human diseases caused by defective responses to replication stress. PMID:24366029

  18. Myc and Ras oncogenes engage different energy metabolism programs and evoke distinct patterns of oxidative and DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Ostrakova, Jitka; Kosar, Martin; Hall, Arnaldur; Duskova, Pavlina; Mistrik, Martin; Merchut-Maya, Joanna Maria; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartkova, Jirina; Christensen, Claus; Bartek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Both Myc and Ras oncogenes impact cellular metabolism, deregulate redox homeostasis and trigger DNA replication stress (RS) that compromises genomic integrity. However, how are such oncogene-induced effects evoked and temporally related, to what extent are these kinetic parameters shared by Myc and Ras, and how are these cellular changes linked with oncogene-induced cellular senescence in different cell context(s) remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the above-mentioned open questions by multifaceted comparative analyses of human cellular models with inducible expression of c-Myc and H-RasV12 (Ras), two commonly deregulated oncoproteins operating in a functionally connected signaling network. Our study of DNA replication parameters using the DNA fiber approach and time-course assessment of perturbations in glycolytic flux, oxygen consumption and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed the following results. First, overabundance of nuclear Myc triggered RS promptly, already after one day of Myc induction, causing slow replication fork progression and fork asymmetry, even before any metabolic changes occurred. In contrast, Ras overexpression initially induced a burst of cell proliferation and increased the speed of replication fork progression. However, after several days of induction Ras caused bioenergetic metabolic changes that correlated with slower DNA replication fork progression and the ensuing cell cycle arrest, gradually leading to senescence. Second, the observed oncogene-induced RS and metabolic alterations were cell-type/context dependent, as shown by comparative analyses of normal human BJ fibroblasts versus U2-OS sarcoma cells. Third, the energy metabolic reprogramming triggered by Ras was more robust compared to impact of Myc. Fourth, the detected oncogene-induced oxidative stress was due to ROS (superoxide) of non-mitochondrial origin and mitochondrial OXPHOS was reduced (Crabtree effect). Overall, our study provides novel

  19. The causes of replication stress and their consequences on genome stability and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Magdalou, Indiana; Lopez, Bernard S; Pasero, Philippe; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2014-06-01

    Alterations of the dynamics of DNA replication cause genome instability. These alterations known as "replication stress" have emerged as a major source of genomic instability in pre-neoplasic lesions, contributing to cancer development. The concept of replication stress covers a wide variety of events that distort the temporal and spatial DNA replication program. These events have endogenous or exogenous origins and impact globally or locally on the dynamics of DNA replication. They may arise within a short window of time (acute stress) or during each S phase (chronic stress). Here, we review the known situations in which the dynamics of DNA replication is distorted. We have united them in four main categories: (i) inadequate firing of replication origins (deficiency or excess), (ii) obstacles to fork progression, (iii) conflicts between replication and transcription and (iv) DNA replication under inappropriate metabolic conditions (unbalanced DNA replication). Because the DNA replication program is a process tightly regulated by many factors, replication stress often appears as a cascade of events. A local stress may prevent the completion of DNA replication at a single locus and subsequently compromise chromosome segregation in mitosis and therefore have a global effect on genome integrity. Finally, we discuss how replication stress drives genome instability and to what extent it is relevant to cancer biology.

  20. DNA topoisomerase IIα controls replication origin cluster licensing and firing time in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Gaggioli, Vincent; Le Viet, Barbara; Germe, Thomas; Hyrien, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Sperm chromatin incubated in Xenopus egg extracts undergoes origin licensing and nuclear assembly before DNA replication. We found that depletion of DNA topoisomerase IIα (topo IIα), the sole topo II isozyme of eggs and its inhibition by ICRF-193, which clamps topo IIα around DNA have opposite effects on these processes. ICRF-193 slowed down replication origin cluster activation and fork progression in a checkpoint-independent manner, without altering replicon size. In contrast, topo IIα depletion accelerated origin cluster activation, and topo IIα add-back negated overinitiation. Therefore, topo IIα is not required for DNA replication, but topo IIα clamps slow replication, probably by forming roadblocks. ICRF-193 had no effect on DNA synthesis when added after nuclear assembly, confirming that topo IIα activity is dispensable for replication and revealing that topo IIα clamps formed on replicating DNA do not block replication, presumably because topo IIα acts behind and not in front of forks. Topo IIα depletion increased, and topo IIα addition reduced, chromatin loading of MCM2-7 replicative helicase, whereas ICRF-193 did not affect MCM2-7 loading. Therefore, topo IIα restrains MCM2-7 loading in an ICRF-193-resistant manner during origin licensing, suggesting a model for establishing the sequential firing of origin clusters. PMID:23757188

  1. Human RECQ1 and RECQ4 helicases play distinct roles in DNA replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Tissino, Erika; Sidorova, Julia M; Yin, Jinhu; Wang, Weidong; Monnat, Raymond J; Falaschi, Arturo; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    Cellular and biochemical studies support a role for all five human RecQ helicases in DNA replication; however, their specific functions during this process are unclear. Here we investigate the in vivo association of the five human RecQ helicases with three well-characterized human replication origins. We show that only RECQ1 (also called RECQL or RECQL1) and RECQ4 (also called RECQL4) associate with replication origins in a cell cycle-regulated fashion in unperturbed cells. RECQ4 is recruited to origins at late G(1), after ORC and MCM complex assembly, while RECQ1 and additional RECQ4 are loaded at origins at the onset of S phase, when licensed origins begin firing. Both proteins are lost from origins after DNA replication initiation, indicating either disassembly or tracking with the newly formed replisome. Nascent-origin DNA synthesis and the frequency of origin firing are reduced after RECQ1 depletion and, to a greater extent, after RECQ4 depletion. Depletion of RECQ1, though not that of RECQ4, also suppresses replication fork rates in otherwise unperturbed cells. These results indicate that RECQ1 and RECQ4 are integral components of the human replication complex and play distinct roles in DNA replication initiation and replication fork progression in vivo.

  2. A new role for Holliday junction resolvase Yen1 in processing DNA replication intermediates exposes Dna2 as an accessory replicative helicase.

    PubMed

    Falquet, Benoît; Rass, Ulrich

    2017-01-02

    DNA replication is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the replisome. With the hexameric MCM (minichromosome maintenance) replicative helicase at its core, the replisome splits the parental DNA strands, forming replication forks (RFs), where it catalyses coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis. While replication is a highly effective process, intrinsic and oncogene-induced replication stress impedes the progression of replisomes along chromosomes. As a consequence, RFs stall, arrest, and collapse, jeopardizing genome stability. In these instances, accessory fork progression and repair factors, orchestrated by the replication checkpoint, promote RF recovery, ensuring the chromosomes are fully replicated and can be safely segregated at cell division. Homologous recombination (HR) proteins play key roles in negotiating replication stress, binding at stalled RFs and shielding them from inappropriate processing. In addition, HR-mediated strand exchange reactions restart stalled or collapsed RFs and mediate error-free post-replicative repair. DNA transactions at stalled RFs further involve various DNA editing factors, notably helicases and nucleases. A study by Ölmezer et al. (2016) has recently identified a role for the structure-specific nuclease Yen1 (GEN1 in human) in the resolution of dead-end DNA replication intermediates after RF arrest. This new function of Yen1 is distinct from its previously known role as a Holliday junction resolvase, mediating the removal of branched HR intermediates, and it becomes essential for viable chromosome segregation in cells with a defective Dna2 helicase. These findings have revealed greater complexity in the tasks mediated by Yen1 and expose a replicative role for the elusive helicase activity of the conserved Dna2 nuclease-helicase.

  3. A new role for Holliday junction resolvase Yen1 in processing DNA replication intermediates exposes Dna2 as an accessory replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Falquet, Benoît; Rass, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication is mediated by a multi-protein complex known as the replisome. With the hexameric MCM (minichromosome maintenance) replicative helicase at its core, the replisome splits the parental DNA strands, forming replication forks (RFs), where it catalyses coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis. While replication is a highly effective process, intrinsic and oncogene-induced replication stress impedes the progression of replisomes along chromosomes. As a consequence, RFs stall, arrest, and collapse, jeopardizing genome stability. In these instances, accessory fork progression and repair factors, orchestrated by the replication checkpoint, promote RF recovery, ensuring the chromosomes are fully replicated and can be safely segregated at cell division. Homologous recombination (HR) proteins play key roles in negotiating replication stress, binding at stalled RFs and shielding them from inappropriate processing. In addition, HR-mediated strand exchange reactions restart stalled or collapsed RFs and mediate error-free post-replicative repair. DNA transactions at stalled RFs further involve various DNA editing factors, notably helicases and nucleases. A study by Ölmezer et al. (2016) has recently identified a role for the structure-specific nuclease Yen1 (GEN1 in human) in the resolution of dead-end DNA replication intermediates after RF arrest. This new function of Yen1 is distinct from its previously known role as a Holliday junction resolvase, mediating the removal of branched HR intermediates, and it becomes essential for viable chromosome segregation in cells with a defective Dna2 helicase. These findings have revealed greater complexity in the tasks mediated by Yen1 and expose a replicative role for the elusive helicase activity of the conserved Dna2 nuclease-helicase. PMID:28357386

  4. Rtt107 Is a Multi-functional Scaffold Supporting Replication Progression with Partner SUMO and Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Hang, Lisa E; Peng, Jie; Tan, Wei; Szakal, Barnabas; Menolfi, Demis; Sheng, Ziwei; Lobachev, Kirill; Branzei, Dana; Feng, Wenyi; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-10-15

    Elucidating the individual and collaborative functions of genome maintenance factors is critical for understanding how genome duplication is achieved. Here, we investigate a conserved scaffold in budding yeast, Rtt107, and its three partners: a SUMO E3 complex, a ubiquitin E3 complex, and Slx4. Biochemical and genetic findings show that Rtt107 interacts separately with these partners and contributes to their individual functions, including a role in replisome sumoylation. We also provide evidence that Rtt107 associates with replisome components, and both itself and its associated E3s are important for replicating regions far from initiation sites. Corroborating these results, replication defects due to Rtt107 loss and genotoxic sensitivities in mutants of Rtt107 and its associated E3s are rescued by increasing replication initiation events through mutating two master repressors of late origins, Mrc1 and Mec1. These findings suggest that Rtt107 functions as a multi-functional platform to support replication progression with its partner E3 enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nearby inverted repeats fuse to generate acentric and dicentric palindromic chromosomes by a replication template exchange mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ken'Ichi; Lambert, Sarah; Baldacci, Giuseppe; Murray, Johanne M; Carr, Antony M

    2009-12-15

    Gene amplification plays important roles in the progression of cancer and contributes to acquired drug resistance during treatment. Amplification can initiate via dicentric palindromic chromosome production and subsequent breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Here we show that, in fission yeast, acentric and dicentric palindromic chromosomes form by homologous recombination protein-dependent fusion of nearby inverted repeats, and that these fusions occur frequently when replication forks arrest within the inverted repeats. Genetic and molecular analyses suggest that these acentric and dicentric palindromic chromosomes arise not by previously described mechanisms, but by a replication template exchange mechanism that does not involve a DNA double-strand break. We thus propose an alternative mechanism for the generation of palindromic chromosomes dependent on replication fork arrest at closely spaced inverted repeats.

  6. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  7. Replication domains are self-interacting structural chromatin units of human chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneodo, Alain

    2011-03-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the initiation and the maintenance of the replication program in different cell types. In silico analysis of nucleotide compositional skew has predicted the existence, in the germline, of replication N-domains bordered by putative replication origins and where the skew decreases rather linearly as the signature of a progressive inversion of the average fork polarity. Here, from the demonstration that the average fork polarity can be directly extracted from the derivative of replication timing profiles, we develop a wavelet-based pattern recognition methodology to delineate replication U-domains where the replication timing profile is shaped as a U and its derivative as a N. Replication U-domains are robustly found in seven cell lines as covering a significant portion (40-50%) of the human genome where the replication timing data actually displays some plasticity between cell lines. The early replication initiation zones at U-domains borders are found to be hypersensitive to DNase I cleavage, to be associated with transcriptional activity and to present a significant enrichment in insular-binding proteins CTCF, the hallmark of an open chromatin structure. A comparative analysis of genome-wide chromatin interaction (HiC) data shows that replication-U domains correspond to self-interacting structural high order chromatin units of megabase characteristic size. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that the epigenetic compartmentalization of the human genome into autonomous replication U-domains comes along with an extensive remodelling of the threedimensional chromosome architecture during development or in specific diseases. The observed cell specific conservation of the replication timing between the human and mouse genomes strongly suggests that this chromosome organization into

  8. 1. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Panorama ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Panorama showing the entire span of bridge from north shore of the Clark Fork River. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  9. 3. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Bridge from north shore of Clark Fork River. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  10. 7. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Bridge from south shore of Clark Fork River showing 4 1/2 spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  11. 4. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge from south shoreof Clark Fork River showing 4 spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  12. 2. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northeast. Bridge from south shore of Clark Fork River showing 4 1/2 spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  13. Progress in the Pipeline: Replication of the Minority Training Program in Cancer Control Research

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, Antronette K.; Kagawa-Singer, Marjorie; Ratliff, Pamela; Valdez, Annalyn; Jiménez, Laura; Banks, Priscilla; Stewart, Susan; Roe, Kathleen M.; Pasick, Rena J.

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper evaluates the replicability of an NCI-funded didactic/experiential program to increase the diversity of doctorally-prepared cancer disparities investigators. Methods The program was developed and operated successfully for three years in Northern California when a replication was established at UCLA. Feasibility, process, impact, and outcome measures on UCSF and UCLA summer-institute participants were compared. Results Average participant rankings of the influence of the program on intention to apply for a doctorate were 9.1/10 (UCSF) and 8.6/10 (UCLA). A total of 22.5% of UCSF and 10% of UCLA participants have enrolled in, been accepted by, or completed doctoral programs. Among these alumni, 68% (21/31) of UCSF and 60% (3/5) of UCLA participants plan to conduct their doctoral research in cancer control. Conclusions This program has been successfully replicated and has met its objective to increase the pipeline of ethnically diverse doctoral-level public health researchers. Expansion of the program to other regions of the US is feasible and indicated. PMID:17542715

  14. Slx5/Slx8 promotes replication stress tolerance by facilitating mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Thu, Yee Mon; Van Riper, Susan Kaye; Higgins, LeeAnn; Zhang, Tianji; Becker, Jordan Robert; Markowski, Todd William; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Griffin, Timothy Jon; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) causes replication stress. We uncovered that S. cerevisiae mcm10-1 mutants rely on the E3 SUMO ligase Mms21 and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase complex Slx5/8 for survival. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified changes in the SUMO proteome of mcm10-1 mutants and revealed candidates regulated by Slx5/8. Such candidates included subunits of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC), Bir1 and Sli15, known to facilitate spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation. We show here that Slx5 counteracts SAC activation in mcm10-1 mutants under conditions of moderate replication stress. This coincides with the proteasomal degradation of sumoylated Bir1. Importantly, Slx5-dependent mitotic relief was not only triggered by Mcm10 deficiency but also by treatment with low doses of the alkylating drug methyl methanesulfonate. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which Slx5/8 allows for passage through mitosis when replication stress is tolerable. PMID:27134171

  15. Slx5/Slx8 Promotes Replication Stress Tolerance by Facilitating Mitotic Progression.

    PubMed

    Thu, Yee Mon; Van Riper, Susan Kaye; Higgins, LeeAnn; Zhang, Tianji; Becker, Jordan Robert; Markowski, Todd William; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Griffin, Timothy Jon; Bielinsky, Anja Katrin

    2016-05-10

    Loss of minichromosome maintenance protein 10 (Mcm10) causes replication stress. We uncovered that S. cerevisiae mcm10-1 mutants rely on the E3 SUMO ligase Mms21 and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase complex Slx5/8 for survival. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified changes in the SUMO proteome of mcm10-1 mutants and revealed candidates regulated by Slx5/8. Such candidates included subunits of the chromosome passenger complex (CPC), Bir1 and Sli15, known to facilitate spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation. We show here that Slx5 counteracts SAC activation in mcm10-1 mutants under conditions of moderate replication stress. This coincides with the proteasomal degradation of sumoylated Bir1. Importantly, Slx5-dependent mitotic relief was triggered not only by Mcm10 deficiency but also by treatment with low doses of the alkylating drug methyl methanesulfonate. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which Slx5/8 allows for passage through mitosis when replication stress is tolerable.

  16. Choreography of the Mycobacterium replication machinery during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Trojanowski, Damian; Ginda, Katarzyna; Pióro, Monika; Hołówka, Joanna; Skut, Partycja; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2015-02-17

    It has recently been demonstrated that bacterial chromosomes are highly organized, with specific positioning of the replication initiation region. Moreover, the positioning of the replication machinery (replisome) has been shown to be variable and dependent on species-specific cell cycle features. Here, we analyzed replisome positions in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a slow-growing bacterium that exhibits characteristic asymmetric polar cell extension. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that the replisome is slightly off-center in mycobacterial cells, a feature that is likely correlated with the asymmetric growth of Mycobacterium cell poles. Estimates of the timing of chromosome replication in relation to the cell cycle, as well as cell division and chromosome segregation events, revealed that chromosomal origin-of-replication (oriC) regions segregate soon after the start of replication. Moreover, our data demonstrate that organization of the chromosome by ParB determines the replisome choreography. Despite significant progress in elucidating the basic processes of bacterial chromosome replication and segregation, understanding of chromosome dynamics during the mycobacterial cell cycle remains incomplete. Here, we provide in vivo experimental evidence that replisomes in Mycobacterium smegmatis are highly dynamic, frequently splitting into two distinct replication forks. However, unlike in Escherichia coli, the forks do not segregate toward opposite cell poles but remain in relatively close proximity. In addition, we show that replication cycles do not overlap. Finally, our data suggest that ParB participates in the positioning of newly born replisomes in M. smegmatis cells. The present results broaden our understanding of chromosome segregation in slow-growing bacteria. In view of the complexity of the mycobacterial cell cycle, especially for pathogenic representatives of the genus, understanding the mechanisms and factors that affect chromosome

  17. G-quadruplex-interacting compounds alter latent DNA replication and episomal persistence of KSHV

    PubMed Central

    Madireddy, Advaitha; Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Loosbroock, Christopher P.; Robertson, Erle S.; Schildkraut, Carl L.; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes life-long latent infection by persisting as an extra-chromosomal episome in the infected cells and by maintaining its genome in dividing cells. KSHV achieves this by tethering its epigenome to the host chromosome by latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA), which binds in the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Sequence analysis of the TR, a GC-rich DNA element, identified several potential Quadruplex G-Rich Sequences (QGRS). Since quadruplexes have the tendency to obstruct DNA replication, we used G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds to examine their effect on latent DNA replication and the persistence of viral episomes. Our results showed that these G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds led to the activation of dormant origins of DNA replication, with preferential bi-directional pausing of replications forks moving out of the TR region, implicating the role of the G-rich TR in the perturbation of episomal DNA replication. Over time, treatment with PhenDC3 showed a loss of viral episomes in the infected cells. Overall, these data show that G-quadruplex stabilizing compounds retard the progression of replication forks leading to a reduction in DNA replication and episomal maintenance. These results suggest a potential role for G-quadruplex stabilizers in the treatment of KSHV-associated diseases. PMID:26837574

  18. Needs assessment for the Greenway Grand Forks-East Grand Forks development and public education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munski, Laura

    Following the flood of 1997, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers included the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks (the Greenway) as a flood control measure for Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. It extends along both the Red River of the North and the Red Lake River, encompassing 2200 acres of land. The cities of Grand Forks and East Grand Forks hired consultants to assist with the postflood planning process. The planning process culminated with the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report (Flink, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine if the development of the Greenway addressed the objectives of the planning report. The history of the land adjacent to the rivers was reviewed to document the progression of riverfront development. Anecdotal evidence was collected, field observations were made, city council minutes were reviewed, Greenway Technical Committee members were interviewed, Greenway Technical Committee minutes were reviewed, and the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks survey results were reviewed to determine if the objectives of the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report were addressed. A cross section survey was designed by Laura Munski for this dissertation research. The survey was approved by the Greenway Technical Committee. The survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data from the community. The purpose of the survey portion of the research project was to ascertain how residents were kept informed of activities on the Greenway and what amenities residents were using on the Greenway and to solicit their comments regarding the Greenway. The results of the survey research were used in both marketing and event planning for the Greenway. The singular qualitative survey question gave respondents an opportunity to share their comments regarding the Greenway. The qualitative data analysis provided insight to the amenities and educational programs desired by respondents, their concerns regarding the

  19. Analysis of DNA Replication by Optical Mapping in Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Joris; Pélofy, Sandrine; Blatché, Charline; Pillaire, Marie-Jeanne; Huet, Sébastien; Chapuis, Catherine; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2016-11-01

    DNA replication is essential to maintain genome integrity in S phase of the cell division cycle. Accumulation of stalled replication forks is a major source of genetic instability, and likely constitutes a key driver of tumorigenesis. The mechanisms of regulation of replication fork progression have therefore been extensively investigated, in particular with DNA combing, an optical mapping technique that allows the stretching of single molecules and the mapping of active region for DNA synthesis by fluorescence microscopy. DNA linearization in nanochannels has been successfully used to probe genomic information patterns along single chromosomes, and has been proposed to be a competitive alternative to DNA combing. Yet this conjecture remains to be confirmed experimentally. Here, two complementary techniques are established to detect the genomic distribution of tracks of newly synthesized DNA in human cells by optical mapping in nanochannels. Their respective advantages and limitations are compared, and applied them to detect deregulations of the replication program induced by the antitumor drug hydroxyurea. The developments here thus broaden the field of applications accessible to nanofluidic technologies, and can be used in the future as part for molecular diagnostics in the context of high throughput cancer drug screening.

  20. DNA Replication Fading As Proliferating Cells Advance in Their Commitment to Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Estefanía, Monturus Ma.; Ganier, Olivier; Hernández, Pablo; Schvartzman, Jorge B.; Mechali, Marcel; Krimer, Dora B.

    2012-01-01

    Terminal differentiation is the process by which cycling cells stop proliferating to start new specific functions. It involves dramatic changes in chromatin organization as well as gene expression. In the present report we used cell flow cytometry and genome wide DNA combing to investigate DNA replication during murine erythroleukemia-induced terminal cell differentiation. The results obtained indicated that the rate of replication fork movement slows down and the inter-origin distance becomes shorter during the precommitment and commitment periods before cells stop proliferating and accumulate in G1. We propose this is a general feature caused by the progressive heterochromatinization that characterizes terminal cell differentiation. PMID:22359734

  1. Alterations in DNA replication and histone levels promote histone gene amplification in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Libuda, Diana E; Winston, Fred

    2010-04-01

    Gene amplification, a process that increases the copy number of a gene or a genomic region to two or more, is utilized by many organisms in response to environmental stress or decreased levels of a gene product. Our previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified the amplification of a histone H2A-H2B gene pair, HTA2-HTB2, in response to the deletion of the other H2A-H2B gene pair, HTA1-HTB1. This amplification arises from a recombination event between two flanking Ty1 elements to form a new, stable circular chromosome and occurs at a frequency higher than has been observed for other Ty1-Ty1 recombination events. To understand the regulation of this amplification event, we screened the S. cerevisiae nonessential deletion set for mutations that alter the amplification frequency. Among the deletions that increase HTA2-HTB2 amplification frequency, we identified those that either decrease DNA replication fork progression (rrm3Delta, dpb3Delta, dpb4Delta, and clb5Delta) or that reduce histone H3-H4 levels (hht2-hhf2Delta). These two classes are related because reduced histone H3-H4 levels increase replication fork pauses, and impaired replication forks cause a reduction in histone levels. Consistent with our mutant screen, we found that the introduction of DNA replication stress by hydroxyurea induces the HTA2-HTB2 amplification event. Taken together, our results suggest that either reduced histone levels or slowed replication forks stimulate the HTA2-HTB2 amplification event, contributing to the restoration of normal chromatin structure.

  2. Discordant Impact of HLA on Viral Replicative Capacity and Disease Progression in Pediatric and Adult HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Adland, Emily; Paioni, Paolo; Thobakgale, Christina; Laker, Leana; Mori, Luisa; Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Csala, Anna; Clapson, Margaret; Flynn, Jacquie; Novelli, Vas; Hurst, Jacob; Naidoo, Vanessa; Shapiro, Roger; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang Gary; Frater, John; Prendergast, Andrew; Prado, Julia G.; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D.; Carrington, Mary; Jooste, Pieter; Goulder, Philip J. R.

    2015-01-01

    HLA class I polymorphism has a major influence on adult HIV disease progression. An important mechanism mediating this effect is the impact on viral replicative capacity (VRC) of the escape mutations selected in response to HLA-restricted CD8+ T-cell responses. Factors that contribute to slow progression in pediatric HIV infection are less well understood. We here investigate the relationship between VRC and disease progression in pediatric infection, and the effect of HLA on VRC and on disease outcome in adult and pediatric infection. Studying a South African cohort of >350 ART-naïve, HIV-infected children and their mothers, we first observed that pediatric disease progression is significantly correlated with VRC. As expected, VRCs in mother-child pairs were strongly correlated (p = 0.004). The impact of the protective HLA alleles, HLA-B*57, HLA-B*58:01 and HLA-B*81:01, resulted in significantly lower VRCs in adults (p<0.0001), but not in children. Similarly, in adults, but not in children, VRCs were significantly higher in subjects expressing the disease-susceptible alleles HLA-B*18:01/45:01/58:02 (p = 0.007). Irrespective of the subject, VRCs were strongly correlated with the number of Gag CD8+ T-cell escape mutants driven by HLA-B*57/58:01/81:01 present in each virus (p = 0.0002). In contrast to the impact of VRC common to progression in adults and children, the HLA effects on disease outcome, that are substantial in adults, are small and statistically insignificant in infected children. These data further highlight the important role that VRC plays both in adult and pediatric progression, and demonstrate that HLA-independent factors, yet to be fully defined, are predominantly responsible for pediatric non-progression. PMID:26076345

  3. Progress on systems of DNA modified colloidal particles for self-replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikin, Paul; Leunissen, Mirjam; Dreyfus, Remi; Sha, Roujie; Seeman, Nadrian; Grier, David; Pine, David

    2008-03-01

    Our goal is to create new materials that can self-replicate and self-assemble. For this, we modify the interactions between micrometer-sized colloids by coating them with single-stranded DNA `sticky ends', which specifically recognize complementary sequences on other colloids. We find that the aggregation-dissociation behavior is fully reversible for at least tens of temperature cycles. Using magnetic beads or optical tweezers, we form a chain-like `seed' structure, which acts as a template to assemble copies of itself from a soup of singlets. To determine what are the preferred binding sites, we studied the interactions between the singlets and their complementary particles in the seed. Important in our replication scheme is that each particle has two different types of sticky ends: one for `longitudinal' bonding along the chain and another for `transverse' bonding between seed and daughter chains. Contrary to the transverse linkers, the longitudinal linkers form AT/TA bonds, which can be crosslinked with an intercalator and UV irradiation. In this way, we permanently fix the seed and its copies.

  4. Single-molecule FRET studies of the cooperative and non-cooperative binding kinetics of the bacteriophage T4 single-stranded DNA binding protein (gp32) to ssDNA lattices at replication fork junctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonbae; Gillies, John P.; Jose, Davis; Israels, Brett A.; von Hippel, Peter H.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Gene 32 protein (gp32) is the single-stranded (ss) DNA binding protein of the bacteriophage T4. It binds transiently and cooperatively to ssDNA sequences exposed during the DNA replication process and regulates the interactions of the other sub-assemblies of the replication complex during the replication cycle. We here use single-molecule FRET techniques to build on previous thermodynamic studies of gp32 binding to initiate studies of the dynamics of the isolated and cooperative binding of gp32 molecules within the replication complex. DNA primer/template (p/t) constructs are used as models to determine the effects of ssDNA lattice length, gp32 concentration, salt concentration, binding cooperativity and binding polarity at p/t junctions. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) and transition density plots (TDPs) are used to characterize the dynamics of the multi-step assembly pathway of gp32 at p/t junctions of differing polarity, and show that isolated gp32 molecules bind to their ssDNA targets weakly and dissociate quickly, while cooperatively bound dimeric or trimeric clusters of gp32 bind much more tightly, can ‘slide’ on ssDNA sequences, and exhibit binding dynamics that depend on p/t junction polarities. The potential relationships of these binding dynamics to interactions with other components of the T4 DNA replication complex are discussed. PMID:27694621

  5. The 2008 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP): A Visual Arts Replication Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Arts Assessment was administered to selected 8th grade students throughout the nation, and in 2009 the results from that administration were publicly reported. In the spring of 2010, building on the format and structure of the 2008 national assessment, the researcher administered a…

  6. The 2008 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP): A Visual Arts Replication Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Arts Assessment was administered to selected 8th grade students throughout the nation, and in 2009 the results from that administration were publicly reported. In the spring of 2010, building on the format and structure of the 2008 national assessment, the researcher administered a…

  7. A replication study and meta-analysis of mitochondrial DNA variants in the radiographic progression of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Soto-Hermida, Angel; Vázquez-Mosquera, María E; Cortés-Pereira, Estefanía; Pértega, Sonia; Relaño, Sara; Oreiro-Villar, Natividad; Fernández-López, Carlos; Blanco, Francisco J; Rego-Pérez, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    To conduct a replication study and meta-analysis involving the study of mtDNA variants in the radiographic progression of OA in different cohorts worldwide, including Cohort Hip and Cohort Knee (CHECK), the OA Initiative and a cohort from Spain. The influence of the haplogroups in the rate of radiographic progression at 96 months in 431 subjects from CHECK was assessed in terms of Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) grade. Progression was defined as a change from KL ⩾ 1 at baseline to any higher grade during the follow-up. Extended Cox proportional hazard models were used to analyse the influence of mtDNA variants in the rate of radiographic knee OA progression. A subsequent meta-analysis of 1603 subjects following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines was conducted to combine the data of individual studies. A sensitivity analysis was performed to validate the stability of the results. CHECK subjects carrying the haplogroup T showed the lowest rate of radiographic knee OA progression [hazard ratio (HR) 0.645 (95% CI 0.419, 0.978); P < 0.05]. When pooled, subjects within the superhaplogroup JT showed the same trend [HR 0.707 (95% CI 0.501, 0.965); P < 0.05]. BMI [HR 1.046 (95% CI 1.018, 1.073); P < 0.05] and bilateral OA [HR 2.266 (95% CI 1.733, 2.954); P < 0.05] at baseline are risk factors for radiographic knee OA progression as well. In the meta-analysis there was a reduced rate of radiographic progression in subjects with haplogroup T [HR 0.612 (95% CI 0.454, 0.824); P = 0.001] or in the superhaplogroup JT [HR 0.765 (95% CI 0.624, 0.938); P = 0.009]. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the results were robust. The mtDNA variants in the superhaplogroup JT associate with a reduced rate of radiographic OA progression. The mtDNA polymorphisms in the superhaplogroup JT emerge as potential complementary genetic biomarkers for disease progression. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  8. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    PubMed

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bending Forks and Wagging Dogs--It's about the DNA 3' Tail.

    PubMed

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Tainer, John A

    2015-06-18

    Protecting, reversing, and remodeling stalled replication forks are critical to genome stability and require coordinating DNA replication, remodeling, and repair. In this issue, Kile et al. (2015) find that unexpected HLTF specificity for DNA's 3'-hydroxyl tail helps control these biological functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bending forks and wagging dogs – it’s about the DNA 3′ tail

    PubMed Central

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Tainer, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Protecting, reversing, and remodeling stalled replication forks are critical to genome stability and require coordinating DNA replication, remodeling, and repair. In this issue, Kile et al. (2015) find unexpected HLTF specificity for DNA’s 3′-hydroxyl tail helps control these biological functions. PMID:26091346

  11. Stepwise Activation of the ATR Signaling Pathway upon Increasing Replication Stress Impacts Fragile Site Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Koundrioukoff, Stéphane; Carignon, Sandra; Técher, Hervé; Letessier, Anne; Brison, Olivier; Debatisse, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Breaks at common fragile sites (CFS) are a recognized source of genome instability in pre-neoplastic lesions, but how such checkpoint-proficient cells escape surveillance and continue cycling is unknown. Here we show, in lymphocytes and fibroblasts, that moderate replication stresses like those inducing breaks at CFSs trigger chromatin loading of sensors and mediators of the ATR pathway but fail to activate Chk1 or p53. Consistently, we found that cells depleted of ATR, but not of Chk1, accumulate single-stranded DNA upon Mre11-dependent resection of collapsed forks. Partial activation of the pathway under moderate stress thus takes steps against fork disassembly but tolerates S-phase progression and mitotic onset. We show that fork protection by ATR is crucial to CFS integrity, specifically in the cell type where a given site displays paucity in backup replication origins. Tolerance to mitotic entry with under-replicated CFSs therefore results in chromosome breaks, providing a pool of cells committed to further instability. PMID:23874235

  12. DNA-damage accumulation and replicative arrest in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2011-12-01

    A common feature of progeria syndromes is a premature aging phenotype and an enhanced accumulation of DNA damage arising from a compromised repair system. HGPS (Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome) is a severe form of progeria in which patients accumulate progerin, a mutant lamin A protein derived from a splicing variant of the lamin A/C gene (LMNA). Progerin causes chromatin perturbations which result in the formation of DSBs (double-strand breaks) and abnormal DDR (DNA-damage response). In the present article, we review recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how progerin may disrupt DDR pathways in HGPS cells. We propose that progerin accumulation results in disruption of functions of some replication and repair factors, causing the mislocalization of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A) protein to the replication forks, replication fork stalling and, subsequently, DNA DSBs. The binding of XPA to the stalled forks excludes normal binding by repair proteins, leading to DSB accumulation, which activates ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related) checkpoints, and arresting cell-cycle progression.

  13. An Engineered Breast Cancer Model on a Chip to Replicate ECM-Activation In Vitro during Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Gioiella, Filomena; Urciuolo, Francesco; Imparato, Giorgia; Brancato, Virginia; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a new model of breast cancer is proposed featuring both epithelial and stromal tissues arranged on a microfluidic chip. The main task of the work is the in vitro replication of the stromal activation during tumor epithelial invasion. The activation of tumor stroma and its morphological/compositional changes play a key role in tumor progression. Despite emerging evidences, to date the activation of tumor stroma in vitro has not been achieved yet. The tumor-on-chip proposed in this work is built in order to replicate the features of its native counterpart: multicellularity (tumor epithelial cell and stromal cell); 3D engineered stroma compartment composed of cell-assembled extracellular matrix (ECM); reliable 3D tumor architecture. During tumor epithelial invasion the stroma displayed an activation process at both cellular and ECM level. Similarly of what repeated in vivo, ECM remodeling is found in terms of hyaluronic acid and fibronectin overexpression in the stroma compartment. Furthermore, the cell-assembled ECM featuring the stromal tissue, allowed on-line monitoring of collagen remodeling during stroma activation process via real time multiphoton microscopy. Also, trafficking of macromolecules within the stromal compartment has been monitored in real time.

  14. Midbrain-to-pons ratio in autopsy-confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy: replication in an independent cohort.

    PubMed

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Kangassalo, Noora; Gardberg, Maria; Isotalo, Juuso; Karhu, Jari; Parkkola, Riitta; Sonninen, Pirkko

    2015-07-01

    Recent neuropathologically confirmed clinical data suggest that the midbrain-to-pons ratio, as calculated from conventional brain MRI, has high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Here, we aimed to replicate these findings in an independent autopsy-confirmed cohort of 6 PSP patients and 23 non-PSP patients. Patients with confirmed PSP had clearly lower midbrain-to-pons ratios compared to non-PSP patients (p < 0.0001). All non-PSP patients had midbrain-to-pons ratios higher than 0.50, whereas all but one PSP patient had a ratio lower than 0.50. The positive predictive value (PPV) of the ratio (<0.50) was 100% and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 95.8 %. The results of this second autopsy-confirmed sample confirm that midbrain-to-brain ratios constitute reliable and clinically useful estimates of diagnostic midbrain atrophy in relation to PSP pathology.

  15. Gene organization inside replication domains in mammalian genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaghloul, Lamia; Baker, Antoine; Audit, Benjamin; Arneodo, Alain

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the large-scale organization of human genes with respect to "master" replication origins that were previously identified as bordering nucleotide compositional skew domains. We separate genes in two categories depending on their CpG enrichment at the promoter which can be considered as a marker of germline DNA methylation. Using expression data in mouse, we confirm that CpG-rich genes are highly expressed in germline whereas CpG-poor genes are in a silent state. We further show that, whether tissue-specific or broadly expressed (housekeeping genes), the CpG-rich genes are over-represented close to the replication skew domain borders suggesting some coordination of replication and transcription. We also reveal that the transcription of the longest CpG-rich genes is co-oriented with replication fork progression so that the promoter of these transcriptionally active genes be located into the accessible open chromatin environment surrounding the master replication origins that border the replication skew domains. The observation of a similar gene organization in the mouse genome confirms the interplay of replication, transcription and chromatin structure as the cornerstone of mammalian genome architecture.

  16. Replication protein a links cell cycle progression and the onset of neurogenesis in Drosophila optic lobe development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liya; Luo, Hong

    2013-02-13

    Stem cell self-renewal and differentiation must be carefully controlled during development and tissue homeostasis. In the Drosophila optic lobe, neuroepithelial cells first divide symmetrically to expand the stem cell population and then transform into asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts, which generate medulla neurons. The mechanisms underlying this cell fate transition are not well understood. Here, we show a crucial role of some cell cycle regulators in this transition. We find that loss of function in replication protein A (RPA), which consists of three highly conserved protein subunits and functions in DNA replication, leads to disintegration of the optic lobe neuroepithelium and premature differentiation of neuroepithelial cells into medulla neuroblasts. Clonal analyses of RPA loss-of-function alleles indicate that RPA is required to prevent neuroepithelial cells from differentiating into medulla neuroblasts. Inactivation of the core cell cycle regulators, including the G1/S regulators E2F1, Cyclin E, Cdk2, and PCNA, and the G2/M regulators Cyclin A, Cyclin B, and Cdk1, mimic RPA loss-of-function phenotypes, suggesting that cell cycle progression is required for both maintaining neuroepithelial cell identity and suppressing neuroblast formation. We further find that RPA or E2F1 inactivation in the neuroepithelial cells correlates with downregulation of Notch signaling activity, which appears to result from Numb mislocalization. Thus, we have shown that the transition from neuroepithelial cells to neuroblasts is directly regulated by cell cycle regulators and propose a model in which the inhibition of neuroepithelial cell cycle progression downregulates Notch signaling activity through Numb, which leads to the onset of neurogenesis.

  17. Break-Induced DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith P.; Lovett, Susan T.; Haber, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Recombination-dependent DNA replication, often called break-induced replication (BIR), was initially invoked to explain recombination events in bacteriophage but it has recently been recognized as a fundamentally important mechanism to repair double-strand chromosome breaks in eukaryotes. This mechanism appears to be critically important in the restarting of stalled and broken replication forks and in maintaining the integrity of eroded telomeres. Although BIR helps preserve genome integrity during replication, it also promotes genome instability by the production of loss of heterozygosity and the formation of nonreciprocal translocations, as well as in the generation of complex chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:23881940

  18. Tuning Forks and Monitor Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, M. A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Defines the vibrations of a tuning fork against a computer monitor screen as a pattern that can illustrate or explain physical concepts like wave vibrations, wave forms, and phase differences. Presents background information and demonstrates the experiment. (Author/YDS)

  19. Tuning Forks and Monitor Screens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, M. A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Defines the vibrations of a tuning fork against a computer monitor screen as a pattern that can illustrate or explain physical concepts like wave vibrations, wave forms, and phase differences. Presents background information and demonstrates the experiment. (Author/YDS)

  20. How dormant origins promote complete genome replication

    PubMed Central

    Blow, J. Julian; Ge, Xin Quan; Jackson, Dean A.

    2012-01-01

    Many replication origins that are licensed by loading MCM2-7 complexes in G1 are not normally used. Activation of these dormant origins during S phase provides a first line of defence for the genome if replication is inhibited. When replication forks fail, dormant origins are activated within regions of the genome currently engaged in replication. At the same time, DNA damage response kinases activated by the stalled forks preferentially suppress the assembly of new replication factories, thereby ensuring that chromosomal regions experiencing replicative stress complete synthesis before new regions of the genome are replicated. Mice expressing reduced levels of MCM2-7 have fewer dormant origins, are cancer prone and are genetically unstable, thus demonstrating the importance of dormant origins for preserving genome integrity. Here we review the function of dormant origins, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and their physiological implications. PMID:21641805

  1. Replisome Function During Replicative Stress Is Modulated by Histone H3 Lysine 56 Acetylation Through Ctf4

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Pierre; Dehé, Pierre-Marie; Audebert, Stéphane; Géli, Vincent; Corda, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the maintenance of genome stability under normal conditions and upon DNA replication stress. Here we show that in the absence of H3 lysine 56 acetylation replisome components become deleterious when replication forks collapse at natural replication block sites. This lethality is not a direct consequence of chromatin assembly defects during replication fork progression. Rather, our genetic analyses suggest that in the presence of replicative stress H3 lysine 56 acetylation uncouples the Cdc45–Mcm2-7–GINS DNA helicase complex and DNA polymerases through the replisome component Ctf4. In addition, we discovered that the N-terminal domain of Ctf4, necessary for the interaction of Ctf4 with Mms22, an adaptor protein of the Rtt101-Mms1 E3 ubiquitin ligase, is required for the function of the H3 lysine 56 acetylation pathway, suggesting that replicative stress promotes the interaction between Ctf4 and Mms22. Taken together, our results indicate that Ctf4 is an essential member of the H3 lysine 56 acetylation pathway and provide novel mechanistic insights into understanding the role of H3 lysine 56 acetylation in maintaining genome stability upon replication stress. PMID:25697176

  2. Mre11 Complex and DNA Replication: Linkage to E2F and Sites of DNA Synthesis†

    PubMed Central

    Maser, Richard S.; Mirzoeva, Olga K.; Wells, Julie; Olivares, Heidi; Williams, Bret R.; Zinkel, Robert A.; Farnham, Peggy J.; Petrini, John H. J.

    2001-01-01

    We show that the Mre11 complex associates with E2F family members via the Nbs1 N terminus. This association and Nbs1 phosphorylation are correlated with S-phase checkpoint proficiency, whereas neither is sufficient individually for checkpoint activation. The Nbs1 E2F interaction occurred near the Epstein-Barr virus origin of replication as well as near a chromosomal replication origin in the c-myc promoter region and was restricted to S-phase cells. The Mre11 complex colocalized with PCNA at replication forks throughout S phase, both prior to and coincident with the appearance of nascent DNA. These data suggest that the Mre11 complex suppresses genomic instability through its influence on both the regulation and progression of DNA replication. PMID:11486038

  3. Distinct functions of human RecQ helicases during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Urban, Vaclav; Dobrovolna, Jana; Janscak, Pavel

    2016-11-15

    DNA replication is the most vulnerable process of DNA metabolism in proliferating cells and therefore it is tightly controlled and coordinated with processes that maintain genomic stability. Human RecQ helicases are among the most important factors involved in the maintenance of replication fork integrity, especially under conditions of replication stress. RecQ helicases promote recovery of replication forks being stalled due to different replication roadblocks of either exogenous or endogenous source. They prevent generation of aberrant replication fork structures and replication fork collapse, and are involved in proper checkpoint signaling. The essential role of human RecQ helicases in the genome maintenance during DNA replication is underlined by association of defects in their function with cancer predisposition.

  4. Function of the Plant DNA Polymerase Epsilon in Replicative Stress Sensing, a Genetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-García, José-Antonio; Mazubert, Christelle; Del Olmo, Ivan; Bourge, Mickael; Domenichini, Séverine; Bounon, Rémi; Tariq, Zakia; Delannoy, Etienne; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    Faithful transmission of the genetic information is essential in all living organisms. DNA replication is therefore a critical step of cell proliferation, because of the potential occurrence of replication errors or DNA damage when progression of a replication fork is hampered causing replicative stress. Like other types of DNA damage, replicative stress activates the DNA damage response, a signaling cascade allowing cell cycle arrest and repair of lesions. The replicative DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) was shown to activate the S-phase checkpoint in yeast in response to replicative stress, but whether this mechanism functions in multicellular eukaryotes remains unclear. Here, we explored the genetic interaction between Pol ε and the main elements of the DNA damage response in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that mutations affecting the polymerase domain of Pol ε trigger ATR-dependent signaling leading to SOG1 activation, WEE1-dependent cell cycle inhibition, and tolerance to replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea, but result in enhanced sensitivity to a wide range of DNA damaging agents. Using knock-down lines, we also provide evidence for the direct role of Pol ε in replicative stress sensing. Together, our results demonstrate that the role of Pol ε in replicative stress sensing is conserved in plants, and provide, to our knowledge, the first genetic dissection of the downstream signaling events in a multicellular eukaryote. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. From structure to mechanism—understanding initiation of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Alberto; Barbon, Marta; Noguchi, Yasunori; Reuter, L. Maximilian; Schneider, Sarah; Speck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication results in the doubling of the genome prior to cell division. This process requires the assembly of 50 or more protein factors into a replication fork. Here, we review recent structural and biochemical insights that start to explain how specific proteins recognize DNA replication origins, load the replicative helicase on DNA, unwind DNA, synthesize new DNA strands, and reassemble chromatin. We focus on the minichromosome maintenance (MCM2–7) proteins, which form the core of the eukaryotic replication fork, as this complex undergoes major structural rearrangements in order to engage with DNA, regulate its DNA-unwinding activity, and maintain genome stability. PMID:28717046

  6. 22. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing downwest side. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing down-west side. Looking at road deck and vertical laced channel. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  7. 8. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing southwest. Looking at understructure of northernmost span. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  8. 11. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Southernmost ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing northwest. Southernmost span. Plaque was originally located where striped traffic sign is posted. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  9. 21. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing west. Looking at bridge deck, guard rail, juncture of two bridge spans. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  10. 12. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Approach ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Approach from the north road. Plaque was originally located where striped traffic sign is posted. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  11. 18. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking at north concrete abutment and timber stringers. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  12. 20. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing up. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing up. Looking at understructure of northernmost span. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  13. 19. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Looking at north abutment and underside of northernmost span. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  14. Deep-Sequence Identification and Role in Virus Replication of a JC Virus Quasispecies in Patients with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenta; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Fukumoto, Hitomi; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kuroda, Makoto; Katano, Harutaka

    2017-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is a DNA virus causing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in immunodeficient patients. In the present study, 22 genetic quasispecies with more than 1.5% variant frequency were detected in JCV genomes from six clinical samples of PML by next-generation sequencing. A mutation from A to C at nucleotide (nt) 3495 in JCV Mad1 resulting in a V-to-G amino acid substitution at amino acid (aa) position 392 of the large T antigen (TAg) was identified in all six cases of PML at 3% to 19% variant frequencies. Transfection of JCV Mad1 DNA possessing the V392G substitution in TAg into IMR-32 and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells resulted in dramatically decreased production of JCV-encoded proteins. The virus DNA copy number was also reduced in supernatants of the mutant virus-transfected cells. Transfection of the IMR-32 and HEK293 cells with a virus genome containing a revertant mutation recovered viral production and protein expression. Cotransfection with equal amounts of wild-type genome and mutated JCV genome did not reduce the expression of viral proteins or viral replication, suggesting that the mutation did not have any dominant-negative function. Finally, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TAg was expressed in all six pathological samples in which the quasispecies were detected. In conclusion, the V392G amino acid substitution in TAg identified frequently in PML lesions has a function in suppressing JCV replication, but the frequency of the mutation was restricted and its role in PML lesions was limited.

  15. Sequential steps in DNA replication are inhibited to ensure reduction of ploidy in meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hui; Namdar, Mandana; Ganier, Olivier; Gregan, Juraj; Méchali, Marcel; Kearsey, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Meiosis involves two successive rounds of chromosome segregation without an intervening S phase. Exit from meiosis I is distinct from mitotic exit, in that replication origins are not licensed by Mcm2-7 chromatin binding, but spindle disassembly occurs during a transient interphase-like state before meiosis II. The absence of licensing is assumed to explain the block to DNA replication, but this has not been formally tested. Here we attempt to subvert this block by expressing the licensing control factors Cdc18 and Cdt1 during the interval between meiotic nuclear divisions. Surprisingly, this leads only to a partial round of DNA replication, even when these factors are overexpressed and effect clear Mcm2-7 chromatin binding. Combining Cdc18 and Cdt1 expression with modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase activity, activation of Dbf4-dependent kinase, or deletion of the Spd1 inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase has little additional effect on the extent of DNA replication. Single-molecule analysis indicates this partial round of replication results from inefficient progression of replication forks, and thus both initiation and elongation replication steps may be inhibited in late meiosis. In addition, DNA replication or damage during the meiosis I–II interval fails to arrest meiotic progress, suggesting absence of checkpoint regulation of meiosis II entry. PMID:23303250

  16. Sequential steps in DNA replication are inhibited to ensure reduction of ploidy in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Hui; Namdar, Mandana; Ganier, Olivier; Gregan, Juraj; Méchali, Marcel; Kearsey, Stephen E

    2013-03-01

    Meiosis involves two successive rounds of chromosome segregation without an intervening S phase. Exit from meiosis I is distinct from mitotic exit, in that replication origins are not licensed by Mcm2-7 chromatin binding, but spindle disassembly occurs during a transient interphase-like state before meiosis II. The absence of licensing is assumed to explain the block to DNA replication, but this has not been formally tested. Here we attempt to subvert this block by expressing the licensing control factors Cdc18 and Cdt1 during the interval between meiotic nuclear divisions. Surprisingly, this leads only to a partial round of DNA replication, even when these factors are overexpressed and effect clear Mcm2-7 chromatin binding. Combining Cdc18 and Cdt1 expression with modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase activity, activation of Dbf4-dependent kinase, or deletion of the Spd1 inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase has little additional effect on the extent of DNA replication. Single-molecule analysis indicates this partial round of replication results from inefficient progression of replication forks, and thus both initiation and elongation replication steps may be inhibited in late meiosis. In addition, DNA replication or damage during the meiosis I-II interval fails to arrest meiotic progress, suggesting absence of checkpoint regulation of meiosis II entry.

  17. Replication-Associated Recombinational Repair: Lessons from Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Jaclyn N.; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinational repair processes multiple types of DNA lesions. Though best understood in the repair of DNA breaks, recombinational repair is intimately linked to other situations encountered during replication. As DNA strands are decorated with many types of blocks that impede the replication machinery, a great number of genomic regions cannot be duplicated without the help of recombinational repair. This replication-associated recombinational repair employs both the core recombination proteins used for DNA break repair and the specialized factors that couple replication with repair. Studies from multiple organisms have provided insights into the roles of these specialized factors, with the findings in budding yeast being advanced through use of powerful genetics and methods for detecting DNA replication and repair intermediates. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in this organism, ranging from our understanding of the classical template switch mechanisms to gap filling and replication fork regression pathways. As many of the protein factors and biological principles uncovered in budding yeast are conserved in higher eukaryotes, these findings are crucial for stimulating studies in more complex organisms. PMID:27548223

  18. The Consequences of Replicating in the Wrong Orientation: Bacterial Chromosome Duplication without an Active Replication Origin.

    PubMed

    Dimude, Juachi U; Stockum, Anna; Midgley-Smith, Sarah L; Upton, Amy L; Foster, Helen A; Khan, Arshad; Saunders, Nigel J; Retkute, Renata; Rudolph, Christian J

    2015-11-03

    Chromosome replication is regulated in all organisms at the assembly stage of the replication machinery at specific origins. In Escherichia coli, the DnaA initiator protein regulates the assembly of replication forks at oriC. This regulation can be undermined by defects in nucleic acid metabolism. In cells lacking RNase HI, replication initiates independently of DnaA and oriC, presumably at persisting R-loops. A similar mechanism was assumed for origin-independent synthesis in cells lacking RecG. However, recently we suggested that this synthesis initiates at intermediates resulting from replication fork fusions. Here we present data suggesting that in cells lacking RecG or RNase HI, origin-independent synthesis arises by different mechanisms, indicative of these two proteins having different roles in vivo. Our data support the idea that RNase HI processes R-loops, while RecG is required to process replication fork fusion intermediates. However, regardless of how origin-independent synthesis is initiated, a fraction of forks will proceed in an orientation opposite to normal. We show that the resulting head-on encounters with transcription threaten cell viability, especially if taking place in highly transcribed areas. Thus, despite their different functions, RecG and RNase HI are both important factors for maintaining replication control and orientation. Their absence causes severe replication problems, highlighting the advantages of the normal chromosome arrangement, which exploits a single origin to control the number of forks and their orientation relative to transcription, and a defined termination area to contain fork fusions. Any changes to this arrangement endanger cell cycle control, chromosome dynamics, and, ultimately, cell viability. Cell division requires unwinding of millions of DNA base pairs to generate the template for RNA transcripts as well as chromosome replication. As both processes use the same template, frequent clashes are unavoidable. To

  19. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Harley, Margaret E; Murina, Olga; Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R; Bicknell, Louise S; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A M; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P; Hurles, Matthew E; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S; Jackson, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage, where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions.

  20. TRAIP promotes DNA damage response during genome replication and is mutated in primordial dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Andrea; Higgs, Martin R.; Bicknell, Louise S.; Yigit, Gökhan; Blackford, Andrew N.; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Mackenzie, Karen J.; Reddy, Kaalak; Halachev, Mihail; McGlasson, Sarah; Reijns, Martin A. M.; Fluteau, Adeline; Martin, Carol-Anne; Sabbioneda, Simone; Elcioglu, Nursel H.; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Chessa, Luciana; Maghnie, Mohamad; Salim, Mahmoud; Bober, Michael B.; Nürnberg, Peter; Jackson, Stephen P.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Wollnik, Bernd; Stewart, Grant S.; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA lesions encountered by replicative polymerases threaten genome stability and cell cycle progression. Here we report the identification of mutations in TRAIP, encoding an E3 RING ubiquitin ligase, in patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism/Seckel syndrome. We establish that TRAIP relocalizes to sites of DNA damage where it is required for optimal phosphorylation of H2AX and RPA2 during S-phase in response to UV irradiation, as well as fork progression through UV-induced DNA lesions. TRAIP is necessary for efficient cell cycle progression and mutations in TRAIP therefore limit cellular proliferation, providing a potential mechanism for microcephaly and dwarfism phenotypes. Human genetics thus identifies TRAIP as a novel component of the DNA damage response to replication-blocking DNA lesions. PMID:26595769

  1. Centromere Stability: The Replication Connection

    PubMed Central

    Forsburg, Susan L.; Shen, Kuo-Fang

    2017-01-01

    The fission yeast centromere, which is similar to metazoan centromeres, contains highly repetitive pericentromere sequences that are assembled into heterochromatin. This is required for the recruitment of cohesin and proper chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, the pericentromere replicates early in the S phase. Loss of heterochromatin causes this domain to become very sensitive to replication fork defects, leading to gross chromosome rearrangements. This review examines the interplay between components of DNA replication, heterochromatin assembly, and cohesin dynamics that ensures maintenance of genome stability and proper chromosome segregation. PMID:28106789

  2. Multiple mechanisms contribute to double-strand break repair at rereplication forks in Drosophila follicle cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jessica L.; Beagan, Kelly; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.; McVey, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    Rereplication generates double-strand breaks (DSBs) at sites of fork collisions and causes genomic damage, including repeat instability and chromosomal aberrations. However, the primary mechanism used to repair rereplication DSBs varies across different experimental systems. In Drosophila follicle cells, developmentally regulated rereplication is used to amplify six genomic regions, two of which contain genes encoding eggshell proteins. We have exploited this system to test the roles of several DSB repair pathways during rereplication, using fork progression as a readout for DSB repair efficiency. Here we show that a null mutation in the microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ) component, polymerase θ/mutagen-sensitive 308 (mus308), exhibits a sporadic thin eggshell phenotype and reduced chorion gene expression. Unlike other thin eggshell mutants, mus308 displays normal origin firing but reduced fork progression at two regions of rereplication. We also find that MMEJ compensates for loss of nonhomologous end joining to repair rereplication DSBs in a site-specific manner. Conversely, we show that fork progression is enhanced in the absence of both Drosophila Rad51 homologs, spindle-A and spindle-B, revealing homologous recombination is active and actually impairs fork movement during follicle cell rereplication. These results demonstrate that several DSB repair pathways are used during rereplication in the follicle cells and their contribution to productive fork progression is influenced by genomic position and repair pathway competition. Furthermore, our findings illustrate that specific rereplication DSB repair pathways can have major effects on cellular physiology, dependent upon genomic context. PMID:27849606

  3. Smarcal1-Mediated Fork Reversal Triggers Mre11-Dependent Degradation of Nascent DNA in the Absence of Brca2 and Stable Rad51 Nucleofilaments.

    PubMed

    Kolinjivadi, Arun Mouli; Sannino, Vincenzo; De Antoni, Anna; Zadorozhny, Karina; Kilkenny, Mairi; Técher, Hervé; Baldi, Giorgio; Shen, Rong; Ciccia, Alberto; Pellegrini, Luca; Krejci, Lumir; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2017-09-07

    Brca2 deficiency causes Mre11-dependent degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks, leading to cell lethality. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this process, we isolated Xenopus laevis Brca2. We demonstrated that Brca2 protein prevents single-stranded DNA gap accumulation at replication fork junctions and behind them by promoting Rad51 binding to replicating DNA. Without Brca2, forks with persistent gaps are converted by Smarcal1 into reversed forks, triggering extensive Mre11-dependent nascent DNA degradation. Stable Rad51 nucleofilaments, but not RPA or Rad51(T131P) mutant proteins, directly prevent Mre11-dependent DNA degradation. Mre11 inhibition instead promotes reversed fork accumulation in the absence of Brca2. Rad51 directly interacts with the Pol α N-terminal domain, promoting Pol α and δ binding to stalled replication forks. This interaction likely promotes replication fork restart and gap avoidance. These results indicate that Brca2 and Rad51 prevent formation of abnormal DNA replication intermediates, whose processing by Smarcal1 and Mre11 predisposes to genome instability. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dormant origins licensed by excess Mcm2–7 are required for human cells to survive replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xin Quan; Jackson, Dean A.; Blow, J. Julian

    2007-01-01

    In late mitosis and early G1, Mcm2–7 complexes are loaded onto DNA to license replication origins for use in the upcoming S phase. However, the amount of Mcm2–7 loaded is in significant excess over the number of origins normally used. We show here that in human cells, excess chromatin-bound Mcm2–7 license dormant replication origins that do not fire during normal DNA replication, in part due to checkpoint activity. Dormant origins were activated within active replicon clusters if replication fork progression was inhibited, despite the activation of S-phase checkpoints. After lowering levels of chromatin-bound Mcm2–7 in human cells by RNA interference (RNAi), the use of dormant origins was suppressed in response to replicative stress. Although cells with lowered chromatin-bound Mcm2–7 replicated at normal rates, when challenged with replication inhibitors they had dramatically reduced rates of DNA synthesis and reduced viability. These results suggest that the use of dormant origins licensed by excess Mcm2–7 is a new and physiologically important mechanism that cells utilize to maintain DNA replication rates under conditions of replicative stress. We propose that checkpoint kinase activity can preferentially suppress initiation within inactive replicon clusters, thereby directing new initiation events toward active clusters that are experiencing replication problems. PMID:18079179

  5. 5. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing east. Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing east. Bridge from south shore of Clark Fork River-southernmost span. 1900-era Northern Pacific Railway Bridge in background. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  6. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  7. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet...

  8. 2. PLANK COVERED BRANCH FLUME ON THE SOUTH FORK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PLANK COVERED BRANCH FLUME ON THE SOUTH FORK OF THE TULE RIVER MIDDLE FORK AND CONCRETE DIVERSION DAM SPILLING WATER. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Tule River Hydroelectric Project, Water Conveyance System, Middle Fork Tule River, Springville, Tulare County, CA

  9. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet this...

  10. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet this...

  11. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet this...

  12. 16 CFR 1512.13 - Requirements for front fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Regulations § 1512.13 Requirements for front fork. The front fork shall... fork test, § 1512.18(k)(1), without visible evidence of fracture. Sidewalk bicycles need not meet this...

  13. Xenopus egg extract to study regulation of genome-wide and locus-specific DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Raspelli, Erica; Falbo, Lucia; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Faithful DNA replication, coupled with accurate repair of DNA damage, is essential to maintain genome stability and relies on different DNA metabolism genes. Many of these genes are involved in the assembly of replication origins, in the coordination of DNA repair to protect replication forks progression in the presence of DNA damage and in the replication of repetitive chromatin regions. Some DNA metabolism genes are essential in higher eukaryotes, suggesting the existence of specialized mechanisms of repair and replication in organisms with complex genomes. The impact on cell survival of many of these genes has so far precluded in depth molecular analysis of their function. The cell-free Xenopus laevis egg extract represents an ideal system to overcome survival issues and to facilitate the biochemical study of replication-associated functions of essential proteins in vertebrate organisms. Here, we will discuss how Xenopus egg extracts have been used to study cellular and molecular processes, such as DNA replication and DNA repair. In particular, we will focus on innovative imaging and proteomic-based experimental approaches to characterize the molecular function of a number of essential DNA metabolism factors involved in the duplication of complex vertebrate genomes.

  14. Structural basis for DNA binding by replication initiator Mcm10

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Eric M.; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Haworth, Justin; Greer, Briana; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-06-30

    Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic DNA replication protein required for assembly and progression of the replication fork. The highly conserved internal domain (Mcm10-ID) has been shown to physically interact with single-stranded (ss) DNA, DNA polymerase alpha, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The crystal structure of Xenopus laevis Mcm10-ID presented here reveals a DNA binding architecture composed of an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-fold followed in tandem by a variant and highly basic zinc finger. NMR chemical shift perturbation and mutational studies of DNA binding activity in vitro reveal how Mcm10 uses this unique surface to engage ssDNA. Corresponding mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae result in increased sensitivity to replication stress, demonstrating the functional importance of DNA binding by this region of Mcm10 to replication. In addition, mapping Mcm10 mutations known to disrupt PCNA, polymerase alpha, and DNA interactions onto the crystal structure provides insight into how Mcm10 might coordinate protein and DNA binding within the replisome.

  15. Timeless Links Replication Termination to Mitotic Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L.; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication. PMID:21573113

  16. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-05-06

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  17. The Causes and Consequences of Topological Stress during DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Keszthelyi, Andrea; Minchell, Nicola E.; Baxter, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The faithful replication of sister chromatids is essential for genomic integrity in every cell division. The replication machinery must overcome numerous difficulties in every round of replication, including DNA topological stress. Topological stress arises due to the double-stranded helical nature of DNA. When the strands are pulled apart for replication to occur, the intertwining of the double helix must also be resolved or topological stress will arise. This intrinsic problem is exacerbated by specific chromosomal contexts encountered during DNA replication. The convergence of two replicons during termination, the presence of stable protein-DNA complexes and active transcription can all lead to topological stresses being imposed upon DNA replication. Here we describe how replication forks respond to topological stress by replication fork rotation and fork reversal. We also discuss the genomic contexts where topological stress is likely to occur in eukaryotes, focusing on the contribution of transcription. Finally, we describe how topological stress, and the ways forks respond to it, may contribute to genomic instability in cells. PMID:28009828

  18. The Causes and Consequences of Topological Stress during DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Keszthelyi, Andrea; Minchell, Nicola E; Baxter, Jonathan

    2016-12-21

    The faithful replication of sister chromatids is essential for genomic integrity in every cell division. The replication machinery must overcome numerous difficulties in every round of replication, including DNA topological stress. Topological stress arises due to the double-stranded helical nature of DNA. When the strands are pulled apart for replication to occur, the intertwining of the double helix must also be resolved or topological stress will arise. This intrinsic problem is exacerbated by specific chromosomal contexts encountered during DNA replication. The convergence of two replicons during termination, the presence of stable protein-DNA complexes and active transcription can all lead to topological stresses being imposed upon DNA replication. Here we describe how replication forks respond to topological stress by replication fork rotation and fork reversal. We also discuss the genomic contexts where topological stress is likely to occur in eukaryotes, focusing on the contribution of transcription. Finally, we describe how topological stress, and the ways forks respond to it, may contribute to genomic instability in cells.

  19. Replication Protein A Prohibits Diffusion of the PCNA Sliding Clamp along Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The replicative polymerases cannot accommodate distortions to the native DNA sequence such as modifications (lesions) to the native template bases from exposure to reactive metabolites and environmental mutagens. Consequently, DNA synthesis on an afflicted template abruptly stops upon encountering these lesions, but the replication fork progresses onward, exposing long stretches of the damaged template before eventually stalling. Such arrests may be overcome by translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) in which specialized TLS polymerases bind to the resident proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and replicate the damaged DNA. Hence, a critical aspect of TLS is maintaining PCNA at or near a blocked primer/template (P/T) junction upon uncoupling of fork progression from DNA synthesis by the replicative polymerases. The single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, replication protein A (RPA), coats the exposed template and might prohibit diffusion of PCNA along the single-stranded DNA adjacent to a blocked P/T junction. However, this idea had yet to be directly tested. We recently developed a unique Cy3-Cy5 Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair that directly reports on the occupancy of DNA by PCNA. In this study, we utilized this FRET pair to directly and continuously monitor the retention of human PCNA at a blocked P/T junction. Results from extensive steady state and pre-steady state FRET assays indicate that RPA binds tightly to the ssDNA adjacent to a blocked P/T junction and restricts PCNA to the upstream duplex region by physically blocking diffusion of PCNA along ssDNA. PMID:28177605

  20. Rinne revisited: steel versus aluminum tuning forks.

    PubMed

    MacKechnie, Cheryl A; Greenberg, Jesse J; Gerkin, Richard C; McCall, Andrew A; Hirsch, Barry E; Durrant, John D; Raz, Yael

    2013-12-01

    (1) Determine whether tuning fork material (aluminum vs stainless steel) affects Rinne testing in the clinical assessment of conductive hearing loss (CHL). (2) Determine the relative acoustic and mechanical outputs of 512-Hz tuning forks made of aluminum and stainless steel. Prospective, observational. Outpatient otology clinic. Fifty subjects presenting May 2011 to May 2012 with negative or equivocal Rinne in at least 1 ear and same-day audiometry. Rinne test results using aluminum and steel forks were compared and correlated with the audiometric air-bone gap. Bench top measurements using sound-level meter, microphone, and artificial mastoid. Patients with CHL were more likely to produce a negative Rinne test with a steel fork than with an aluminum fork. Logistic regression revealed that the probability of a negative Rinne reached 50% at a 19 dB air-bone gap for stainless steel versus 27 dB with aluminum. Bench top testing revealed that steel forks demonstrate, in effect, more comparable air and bone conduction efficiencies while aluminum forks have relatively lower bone conduction efficiency. We have found that steel tuning forks can detect a lesser air-bone gap compared to aluminum tuning forks. This is substantiated by observations of clear differences in the relative acoustic versus mechanical outputs of steel and aluminum forks, reflecting underlying inevitable differences in acoustic versus mechanical impedances of these devices, and thus efficiency of coupling sound/vibratory energy to the auditory system. These findings have clinical implications for using tuning forks to determine candidacy for stapes surgery.

  1. DNA replication through hard-to-replicate sites, including both highly transcribed RNA Pol II and Pol III genes, requires the S. pombe Pfh1 helicase.

    PubMed

    Sabouri, Nasim; McDonald, Karin R; Webb, Christopher J; Cristea, Ileana M; Zakian, Virginia A

    2012-03-15

    Replication forks encounter impediments as they move through the genome, including natural barriers due to stable protein complexes and highly transcribed genes. Unlike lesions generated by exogenous damage, natural barriers are encountered in every S phase. Like humans, Schizosaccharomyces pombe encodes a single Pif1 family DNA helicase, Pfh1. Here, we show that Pfh1 is required for efficient fork movement in the ribosomal DNA, the mating type locus, tRNA, 5S ribosomal RNA genes, and genes that are highly transcribed by RNA polymerase II. In addition, converged replication forks accumulated at all of these sites in the absence of Pfh1. The effects of Pfh1 on DNA replication are likely direct, as it had high binding to sites whose replication was impaired in its absence. Replication in the absence of Pfh1 resulted in DNA damage specifically at those sites that bound high levels of Pfh1 in wild-type cells and whose replication was slowed in its absence. Cells depleted of Pfh1 were inviable if they also lacked the human TIMELESS homolog Swi1, a replisome component that stabilizes stalled forks. Thus, Pfh1 promotes DNA replication and separation of converged replication forks and suppresses DNA damage at hard-to-replicate sites.

  2. Phosphorylated Rad18 directs DNA Polymerase η to sites of stalled replication

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tovah A.; Palle, Komariah; Barkley, Laura R.; Kakusho, Naoko; Zou, Ying; Tateishi, Satoshi; Verreault, Alain; Masai, Hisao

    2010-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase Rad18 guides DNA Polymerase eta (Polη) to sites of replication fork stalling and mono-ubiquitinates proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) to facilitate binding of Y family trans-lesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases during TLS. However, it is unclear exactly how Rad18 is regulated in response to DNA damage and how Rad18 activity is coordinated with progression through different phases of the cell cycle. Here we identify Rad18 as a novel substrate of the essential protein kinase Cdc7 (also termed Dbf4/Drf1-dependent Cdc7 kinase [DDK]). A serine cluster in the Polη-binding motif of Rad18 is phosphorylated by DDK. Efficient association of Rad18 with Polη is dependent on DDK and is necessary for redistribution of Polη to sites of replication fork stalling. This is the first demonstration of Rad18 regulation by direct phosphorylation and provides a novel mechanism for integration of S phase progression with postreplication DNA repair to maintain genome stability. PMID:21098111

  3. Research reactor fork users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Hsue, S.T.; Menlove, H.O.; Bosler, G.E.; Dye, H.R.; Walton, G.; Halbig, J.K.; Siebelist, R.

    1993-11-01

    This manual describes the design features and operating characteristics of the research reactor fork. The system includes an ion chamber for gross gamma-ray counting, fission chambers for neutron counting, and a collimated high-resolution spectroscopy system for gamma-ray measurements. The neutron and ion chamber measurements are designed to be made underwater in spent-fuel cooling ponds. The neutron and gamma-ray detectors have been designed with high efficiencies to accommodate the relatively low emission rates of neutrons and gamma rays from low-burnup, research-type reactor fuel. This manual presents the design, performance, and test results for the system.

  4. An ADAM33 polymorphism associates with progression of preschool wheeze into childhood asthma: a prospective case-control study with replication in a birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Ester M M; Penders, John; Jöbsis, Quirijn; van de Kant, Kim D G; Thijs, Carel; Mommers, Monique; van Schayck, Constant P; van Eys, Guillaume; Koppelman, Gerard H; Dompeling, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The influence of asthma candidate genes on the development from wheeze to asthma in young children still needs to be defined. To link genetic variants in asthma candidate genes to progression of wheeze to persistent wheeze into childhood asthma. In a prospective study, children with recurrent wheeze from the ADEM (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring) study were followed until the age of six. At that age a classification (transient wheeze or asthma) was based on symptoms, lung function and medication use. In 198 children the relationship between this classification and 30 polymorphisms in 16 asthma candidate genes was assessed by logistic regression. In case of an association based on a p<0.10, replication analysis was performed in an independent birth cohort study (KOALA study, n = 248 included for the present analysis). In the ADEM study, the minor alleles of ADAM33 rs511898 and rs528557 and the ORMDL3/GSDMB rs7216389 polymorphisms were negatively associated, whereas the minor alleles of IL4 rs2243250 and rs2070874 polymorphisms were positively associated with childhood asthma. When replicated in the KOALA study, ADAM33 rs528557 showed a negative association of the CG/GG-genotype with progression of recurrent wheeze into childhood asthma (0.50 (0.26-0.97) p = 0.04) and no association with preschool wheeze. Polymorphisms in ADAM33, ORMDL3/GSDMB and IL4 were associated with childhood asthma in a group of children with recurrent wheeze. The replication of the negative association of the CG/GG-genotype of rs528557 ADAM33 with childhood asthma in an independent birth cohort study confirms that a compromised ADAM33 gene may be implicated in the progression of wheeze into childhood asthma.

  5. An ADAM33 Polymorphism Associates with Progression of Preschool Wheeze into Childhood Asthma: A Prospective Case-Control Study with Replication in a Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, Ester M. M.; Penders, John; Jöbsis, Quirijn; van de Kant, Kim D. G.; Thijs, Carel; Mommers, Monique; van Schayck, Constant P.; van Eys, Guillaume; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Dompeling, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Background The influence of asthma candidate genes on the development from wheeze to asthma in young children still needs to be defined. Objective To link genetic variants in asthma candidate genes to progression of wheeze to persistent wheeze into childhood asthma. Materials and Methods In a prospective study, children with recurrent wheeze from the ADEM (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring) study were followed until the age of six. At that age a classification (transient wheeze or asthma) was based on symptoms, lung function and medication use. In 198 children the relationship between this classification and 30 polymorphisms in 16 asthma candidate genes was assessed by logistic regression. In case of an association based on a p<0.10, replication analysis was performed in an independent birth cohort study (KOALA study, n = 248 included for the present analysis). Results In the ADEM study, the minor alleles of ADAM33 rs511898 and rs528557 and the ORMDL3/GSDMB rs7216389 polymorphisms were negatively associated, whereas the minor alleles of IL4 rs2243250 and rs2070874 polymorphisms were positively associated with childhood asthma. When replicated in the KOALA study, ADAM33 rs528557 showed a negative association of the CG/GG-genotype with progression of recurrent wheeze into childhood asthma (0.50 (0.26-0.97) p = 0.04) and no association with preschool wheeze. Conclusion Polymorphisms in ADAM33, ORMDL3/GSDMB and IL4 were associated with childhood asthma in a group of children with recurrent wheeze. The replication of the negative association of the CG/GG-genotype of rs528557 ADAM33 with childhood asthma in an independent birth cohort study confirms that a compromised ADAM33 gene may be implicated in the progression of wheeze into childhood asthma. PMID:25768087

  6. Training Guidelines: Fork Lift Truck Driving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceramics, Glass, and Mineral Products Industry Training Board, Harrow (England).

    This manual of operative training guidelines for fork lift truck driving has been developed by the Ceramics, Glass and Mineral Products Industry Training Board (Great Britain) in consultation with a number of firms which manufacture fork lift trucks or which already have training--programs for their use. The purpose of the guidelines is to assist…

  7. Fifth-wheel fork truck adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.

    1969-01-01

    Standard fifth wheel mounted on a rectangular steel structure adapted for use with a fork lift truck provides a fast, safe, and economical way of maneuvering semitrailers in close quarters at plants and warehouses. One operator can move and locate a semitrailer without dismounting from a fork lift truck.

  8. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  10. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1525 - Tuning fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tuning fork. 882.1525 Section 882.1525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1525 Tuning fork. (a) Identification. A tuning...

  13. S-phase-dependent p50/NF-кB1 phosphorylation in response to ATR and replication stress acts to maintain genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Crawley, Clayton D; Kang, Shijun; Bernal, Giovanna M; Wahlstrom, Joshua S; Voce, David J; Cahill, Kirk E; Garofalo, Andrea; Raleigh, David R; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Yamini, Bakhtiar

    2015-01-01

    The apical damage kinase, ATR, is activated by replication stress (RS) both in response to DNA damage and during normal S-phase. Loss of function studies indicates that ATR acts to stabilize replication forks, block cell cycle progression and promote replication restart. Although checkpoint failure and replication fork collapse can result in cell death, no direct cytotoxic pathway downstream of ATR has previously been described. Here, we show that ATR directly reduces survival by inducing phosphorylation of the p50 (NF-κB1, p105) subunit of NF-кB and moreover, that this response is necessary for genome maintenance independent of checkpoint activity. Cell free and in vivo studies demonstrate that RS induces phosphorylation of p50 in an ATR-dependent but DNA damage-independent manner that acts to modulate NF-кB activity without affecting p50/p65 nuclear translocation. This response, evident in human and murine cells, occurs not only in response to exogenous RS but also during the unperturbed S-phase. Functionally, the p50 response results in inhibition of anti-apoptotic gene expression that acts to sensitize cells to DNA strand breaks independent of damage repair. Ultimately, loss of this pathway causes genomic instability due to the accumulation of chromosomal breaks. Together, the data indicate that during S-phase ATR acts via p50 to ensure that cells with elevated levels of replication-associated DNA damage are eliminated.

  14. Grand Forks - East Grand Forks Urban Water Resources Study. East Grand Forks Flood Fight Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    STATION LOCATIONS 3-10 APPENDIX III- 3 - FLOOD FIGHT EQUIPMENT 3-16 APPENDIX III- 4 - INVENTORY LIST OF FLOOD 3-17 FIGHT MATERIALS iii...FLOOD/E4ERGENCY ACTIVITIES 11-5 3C RECOVERY/POSTFLOOD ACTIVITIES 11-6 APPENDIX IX-1 - EAST GRAND FORKS CIVIL DEFENSE FLOOD 11-8 FIGHT MATERIALS INVENTORY...These materials were utilized to build 960 feet of new levee and upgrade 18,480 feet of temporaty diking. 0- 1 -A 4 1- -- .- The Corps facilitated and

  15. Enhanced SIV replication and accelerated progression to AIDS in macaques primed to mount a CD4 T cell response to the SIV envelope protein

    PubMed Central

    Staprans, Silvija I.; Barry, Ashley P.; Silvestri, Guido; Safrit, Jeffrey T.; Kozyr, Natalia; Sumpter, Beth; Nguyen, Hanh; McClure, Harold; Montefiori, David; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Feinberg, Mark B.

    2004-01-01

    Given the dual role of CD4 T cells as both immune effectors and targets for HIV infection, the balance of CD4 versus CD8 T cell-mediated responses induced by candidate AIDS vaccines may be critical in determining postvaccination infection outcomes. An attenuated recombinant varicella-zoster virus vaccine expressing the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope (Env) elicited nonneutralizing Env-binding antibodies and little if any cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). After challenge with SIV, Env vaccinees manifested increased levels of SIV replication, more rapid CD4 depletion, and accelerated progression to AIDS compared with controls. Enhanced SIV replication correlated with increased CD4 T cell proliferation soon after SIV challenge, apparently the result of an anamnestic response to SIV antigens. Thus activation of virus-specific CD4 T cells at the time of exposure to a CD4 T cell-tropic lentivirus, in the absence of an effective CD8 response, may enhance virus replication and disease. These data suggest suggest that candidate AIDS vaccines may not simply be either efficacious or neutral; they may also have the potential to be harmful. PMID:15326293

  16. Eukaryotic genome instability in light of asymmetric DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Scott A; Williams, Jessica S; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic nuclear genome is replicated asymmetrically, with the leading strand replicated continuously and the lagging strand replicated as discontinuous Okazaki fragments that are subsequently joined. Both strands are replicated with high fidelity, but the processes used to achieve high fidelity are likely to differ. Here we review recent studies of similarities and differences in the fidelity with which the three major eukaryotic replicases, DNA polymerases α, δ, and ɛ, replicate the leading and lagging strands with high nucleotide selectivity and efficient proofreading. We then relate the asymmetric fidelity at the replication fork to the efficiency of DNA mismatch repair, ribonucleotide excision repair and topoisomerase 1 activity.

  17. Direct non transcriptional role of NF-Y in DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Paolo; Belluti, Silvia; Miotto, Benoit; Neusiedler, Julia; Dolfini, Diletta; Drac, Marjorie; Basile, Valentina; Schwob, Etienne; Mantovani, Roberto; Blow, J Julian; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-04-01

    NF-Y is a heterotrimeric transcription factor, which plays a pioneer role in the transcriptional control of promoters containing the CCAAT-box, among which genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and DNA damage response. The knock-down of the sequence-specific subunit NF-YA triggers defects in S-phase progression, which lead to apoptotic cell death. Here, we report that NF-Y has a critical function in DNA replication progression, independent from its transcriptional activity. NF-YA colocalizes with early DNA replication factories, its depletion affects the loading of replisome proteins to DNA, among which Cdc45, and delays the passage from early to middle-late S phase. Molecular combing experiments are consistent with a role for NF-Y in the control of fork progression. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrate a direct non-transcriptional role of NF-Y in the overall efficiency of DNA replication, specifically in the DNA elongation process, using a Xenopus cell-free system. Our findings broaden the activity of NF-Y on a DNA metabolism other than transcription, supporting the existence of specific TFs required for proper and efficient DNA replication. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 23. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing upwest side. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing up-west side. Looking at structural connection of top chord, vertical laced channel and diagonal bars. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  19. 13. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Concrete barrier blocks access. Plaque was originally located where strioed traffic sign is posted at right. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  20. 14. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Approach ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing north. Approach from the south. Concrete barrier blocks access. Plaque was originally located where striped traffic sign is posted at right. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  1. 24. View of one of the plaques from Clark Fork ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. View of one of the plaques from Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge. Presently located at the Bonner County Historical Museum in Sandpoint, Idaho. A plaque was attached at each end of the bridge. Only one remains. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  2. South Fork Holston River basin 1988 biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, C.F.; Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1990-06-01

    There is concern over the effects of shifts in land use use practices on the aquatic fauna of streams in the South Fork Holston River basin in northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. Trout reproduction has noticeably declined in the Watauga River subbasin. The Watauga River and Elk River subbasins have been subjected to commercial and resort development. The Middle fork Holston River and the upper South Fork Holston River subbasins have been affected by agricultural and mining activities, respectively (Cox, 1986). To aid reclamation and management of the South Fork Holston basin, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) biologists conducted biomonitoring--including index of biotic integrity and macroinvertebrate sampling--on the Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston, Watauga, and Elk Rivers to assess cumulative impairment related to changes in habitat and pollutant loading in these subbasins. Biomonitoring can detect environmental degradation, help document problem areas, and assist in development of strategies for managing water quality. This report discusses the methods and materials and results of the biomonitoring of South Fork Holston River Basin. 13 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. At the centre of the tuning fork

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-02

    This galaxy is known as Mrk 820 and is classified as a lenticular galaxy — type S0 on the Hubble Tuning Fork. The Hubble Tuning Fork is used to classify galaxies according to their morphology. Elliptical galaxies look like smooth blobs in the sky and lie on the handle of the fork. They are arranged along the handle based on how elliptical they are, with the more spherical galaxies furthest from the tines of the fork, and the more egg-shaped ones closest to the end of the handle where it divides. The two prongs of the tuning fork represent types of unbarred and barred spiral galaxies. Lenticular galaxies like Mrk 820 are in the transition zone between ellipticals and spirals and lie right where the fork divides. A closer look at the appearance of Mrk 820 reveals hints of a spiral structure embedded in a circular halo of stars. Surrounding Mrk 820 in this image is good sampling of other galaxy types, covering almost every type found on the Hubble Tuning Fork, both elliptical and spiral. Most of the smears and specks are distant galaxies, but the prominent bright object at the bottom is a foreground star called TYC 4386-787-1. A version of this image was entered into the Hubble's Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.

  4. Characterizing and Targeting Replication Stress Response Defects in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    significantly higher than that expected from a normal replication process (25). To further confirm that DNA2-knockdown induced replication- dependent DSBs, we... induces phos- phorylation of RPA by DNA- dependent protein kinase and dissociates RPA:DNA-PK complexes. EMBO J 1999;18:1397–406. 35. Sakasai R...to oncogene activation or loss of tumor suppressor genes induces stalling and collapse of DNA replication forks, which in turn activates the

  5. Replication in the amplified dihydrofolate reductase domain in CHO cells may initiate at two distinct sites, one of which is a repetitive sequence element.

    PubMed

    Anachkova, B; Hamlin, J L

    1989-02-01

    To study initiation of DNA replication in mammalian chromosomes, we have established a methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line (CHOC 400) that contains approximately 1,000 copies of the early replicating dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) domain. We have previously shown that DNA replication in the prevalent 243-kilobase (kb) amplicon type in this cell line initiates somewhere within a 28-kb region located downstream from the DHFR gene. In an attempt to localize the origin of replication with more precision, we blocked the progress of replication forks emanating from origins at the beginning of the S phase by the introduction of trioxsalen cross-links at 1- to 5-kb intervals in the parental double-stranded DNA. The small DNA fragments synthesized under these conditions (which should be centered around replication origins) were then used as hybridization probes on digests of cosmids and plasmids from the DHFR domain. These studies suggested that in cells synchronized by this regimen, DNA replication initiates at two separate sites within the previously defined 28-kb replication initiation locus, in general agreement with results described in the accompanying paper (T.-H. Leu and J. L. Hamlin, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:523-531, 1989). One of these sites contains a repeated DNA sequence element that is found at or near many other initiation sites in the genome, since it was also highly enriched in the early replicating DNA isolated from cross-linked CHO cells that contain only two copies of the DHFR domain.

  6. Eukaryotic replisome components cooperate to process histones during chromosome replication.

    PubMed

    Foltman, Magdalena; Evrin, Cecile; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Rick D; Katou, Yuki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Labib, Karim

    2013-03-28

    DNA unwinding at eukaryotic replication forks displaces parental histones, which must be redeposited onto nascent DNA in order to preserve chromatin structure. By screening systematically for replisome components that pick up histones released from chromatin into a yeast cell extract, we found that the Mcm2 helicase subunit binds histones cooperatively with the FACT (facilitiates chromatin transcription) complex, which helps to re-establish chromatin during transcription. FACT does not associate with the Mcm2-7 helicase at replication origins during G1 phase but is subsequently incorporated into the replisome progression complex independently of histone binding and uniquely among histone chaperones. The amino terminal tail of Mcm2 binds histones via a conserved motif that is dispensable for DNA synthesis per se but helps preserve subtelomeric chromatin, retain the 2 micron minichromosome, and support growth in the absence of Ctf18-RFC. Our data indicate that the eukaryotic replication and transcription machineries use analogous assemblies of multiple chaperones to preserve chromatin integrity. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2-7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2-7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2-7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2-7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2-7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2-7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted.

  8. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2–7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2–7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2–7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2–7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2–7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2–7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted. PMID:26710261

  9. Polycomb proteins control proliferation and transformation independently of cell cycle checkpoints by regulating DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Piunti, Andrea; Rossi, Alessandra; Cerutti, Aurora; Albert, Mareike; Jammula, Sriganesh; Scelfo, Andrea; Cedrone, Laura; Fragola, Giulia; Olsson, Linda; Koseki, Haruhiko; Testa, Giuseppe; Casola, Stefano; Helin, Kristian; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio; Pasini, Diego

    2014-04-14

    The ability of PRC1 and PRC2 to promote proliferation is a main feature that links polycomb (PcG) activity to cancer. PcGs silence the expression of the tumour suppressor locus Ink4a/Arf, whose products positively regulate pRb and p53 functions. Enhanced PcG activity is a frequent feature of human tumours, and PcG inhibition has been proposed as a strategy for cancer treatment. However, the recurrent inactivation of pRb/p53 responses in human cancers raises a question regarding the ability of PcG proteins to affect cellular proliferation independently from this checkpoint. Here we demonstrate that PRCs regulate cellular proliferation and transformation independently of the Ink4a/Arf-pRb-p53 pathway. We provide evidence that PRCs localize at replication forks, and that loss of their function directly affects the progression and symmetry of DNA replication forks. Thus, we have identified a novel activity by which PcGs can regulate cell proliferation independently of major cell cycle restriction checkpoints.

  10. Loss of the RNA helicase SKIV2L2 impairs mitotic progression and replication-dependent histone mRNA turnover in murine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Onderak, Alexis M; Anderson, James T

    2017-06-01

    RNA surveillance via the nuclear exosome requires cofactors such as the helicase SKIV2L2 to process and degrade certain noncoding RNAs. This research aimed to characterize the phenotype associated with RNAi knockdown of Skiv2l2 in two murine cancer cell lines: Neuro2A and P19. SKIV2L2 depletion in Neuro2A and P19 cells induced changes in gene expression indicative of cell differentiation and reduced cellular proliferation by 30%. Propidium iodide-based cell-cycle analysis of Skiv2l2 knockdown cells revealed defective progression through the G2/M phase and an accumulation of mitotic cells, suggesting SKIV2L2 contributes to mitotic progression. Since SKIV2L2 targets RNAs to the nuclear exosome for processing and degradation, we identified RNA targets elevated in cells depleted of SKIV2L2 that could account for the observed twofold increase in mitotic cells. Skiv2l2 knockdown cells accumulated replication-dependent histone mRNAs, among other RNAs, that could impede mitotic progression and indirectly trigger differentiation. © 2017 Onderak and Anderson; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. The North Fork of Caspar Creek: a cooperative venture between CDF and USFS

    Treesearch

    Pete Cafferata

    1984-01-01

    The Caspar Creek Watershed Study on JDSF has taken a new direction in the last two years, as our work progresses towards full instrumentation of the North Fork phase. When most of the equipment has been installed by the end of the summer, this 1195-acre watershed will become the most intensively sampled drainage ever studied by hydrologists.

  12. Replicative fitness of transmitted HIV-1 drives acute immune activation, proviral load in memory CD4+ T cells, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Claiborne, Daniel T; Prince, Jessica L; Scully, Eileen; Macharia, Gladys; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Kopycinski, Jakub; Deymier, Martin J; Vanderford, Thomas H; Nganou-Makamdop, Krystelle; Ende, Zachary; Brooks, Kelsie; Tang, Jianming; Yu, Tianwei; Lakhi, Shabir; Kilembe, William; Silvestri, Guido; Douek, Daniel; Goepfert, Paul A; Price, Matthew A; Allen, Susan A; Paiardini, Mirko; Altfeld, Marcus; Gilmour, Jill; Hunter, Eric

    2015-03-24

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by varying degrees of chronic immune activation and disruption of T-cell homeostasis, which impact the rate of disease progression. A deeper understanding of the factors that influence HIV-1-induced immunopathology and subsequent CD4(+) T-cell decline is critical to strategies aimed at controlling or eliminating the virus. In an analysis of 127 acutely infected Zambians, we demonstrate a dramatic and early impact of viral replicative capacity (vRC) on HIV-1 immunopathogenesis that is independent of viral load (VL). Individuals infected with high-RC viruses exhibit a distinct inflammatory cytokine profile as well as significantly elevated T-cell activation, proliferation, and CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion, during the earliest months of infection. Moreover, the vRC of the transmitted virus is positively correlated with the magnitude of viral burden in naive and central memory CD4(+) T-cell populations, raising the possibility that transmitted viral phenotypes may influence the size of the initial latent viral reservoir. Taken together, these findings support an unprecedented role for the replicative fitness of the founder virus, independent of host protective genes and VL, in influencing multiple facets of HIV-1-related immunopathology, and that a greater focus on this parameter could provide novel approaches to clinical interventions.

  13. CDC44: a putative nucleotide-binding protein required for cell cycle progression that has homology to subunits of replication factor C.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, E A; McAlear, M A; Rose, D; Holm, C

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the means by which a cell regulates the progression of the mitotic cell cycle, we characterized cdc44, a mutation that causes Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to arrest before mitosis. CDC44 encodes a 96-kDa basic protein with significant homology to a human protein that binds DNA (PO-GA) and to three subunits of human replication factor C (also called activator 1). The hypothesis that Cdc44p is involved in DNA metabolism is supported by the observations that (i) levels of mitotic recombination suggest elevated rates of DNA damage in cdc44 mutants and (ii) the cell cycle arrest observed in cdc44 mutants is alleviated by the DNA damage checkpoint mutations rad9, mec1, and mec2. The predicted amino acid sequence of Cdc44p contains GTPase consensus sites, and mutations in these regions cause a conditional cell cycle arrest. Taken together, these observations suggest that the essential CDC44 gene may encode the large subunit of yeast replication factor C. Images PMID:8264593

  14. From structure to mechanism-understanding initiation of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Riera, Alberto; Barbon, Marta; Noguchi, Yasunori; Reuter, L Maximilian; Schneider, Sarah; Speck, Christian

    2017-06-01

    DNA replication results in the doubling of the genome prior to cell division. This process requires the assembly of 50 or more protein factors into a replication fork. Here, we review recent structural and biochemical insights that start to explain how specific proteins recognize DNA replication origins, load the replicative helicase on DNA, unwind DNA, synthesize new DNA strands, and reassemble chromatin. We focus on the minichromosome maintenance (MCM2-7) proteins, which form the core of the eukaryotic replication fork, as this complex undergoes major structural rearrangements in order to engage with DNA, regulate its DNA-unwinding activity, and maintain genome stability. © 2017 Riera et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Dynamic look at DNA unwinding by a replicative helicase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Syed, Salman; Enemark, Eric J; Schuck, Stephen; Stenlund, Arne; Ha, Taekjip; Joshua-Tor, Leemor

    2014-03-04

    A prerequisite for DNA replication is the unwinding of duplex DNA catalyzed by a replicative hexameric helicase. Despite a growing body of research, key elements of helicase mechanism remain under substantial debate. In particular, the number of DNA strands encircled by the helicase ring during unwinding and the ring orientation at the replication fork completely contrast in contemporary mechanistic models. Here we use single-molecule and ensemble assays to address these questions for the papillomavirus E1 helicase. We find that E1 unwinds DNA with a strand-exclusion mechanism, with the N-terminal side of the helicase ring facing the replication fork. We show that E1 generates strikingly heterogeneous unwinding patterns stemming from varying degrees of repetitive movements, which is modulated by the DNA-binding domain. Together, our studies reveal previously unrecognized dynamic facets of replicative helicase unwinding mechanisms.

  16. Single-stranded DNA transposition is coupled to host replication

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Bao Ton; Pasternak, Cécile; Siguier, Patricia; Guynet, Catherine; Hickman, Alison Burgess; Dyda, Fred; Sommer, Suzanne; Chandler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    DNA transposition has contributed significantly to evolution of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Insertion sequences (IS) are the simplest prokaryotic transposons and are divided into families based on their organization and transposition mechanism. Here, we describe a link between transposition of IS608 and ISDra2, both members of the IS200/IS605 family which uses obligatory single-stranded (ss) DNA intermediates, and the host replication fork. Replication direction through the IS plays a crucial role in excision: activity is maximal when the “top” IS strand is located on the lagging-strand template. Excision is stimulated upon transient inactivation of replicative helicase function or inhibition of Okazaki fragment synthesis. IS608 insertions also exhibit an orientation preference for the lagging-strand template and insertion can be specifically directed to stalled replication forks. An in silico genomic approach provides evidence that dissemination of other IS200/IS605 family members is also linked to host replication. PMID:20691900

  17. MRX protects fork integrity at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence causes checkpoint activation dependent on chromatin context

    PubMed Central

    Bentsen, Iben B.; Nielsen, Ida; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Helena B.; Gupta, Souvik Sen; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Andersen, Anni H.; Bjergbaek, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    To address how eukaryotic replication forks respond to fork stalling caused by strong non-covalent protein–DNA barriers, we engineered the controllable Fob-block system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This system allows us to strongly induce and control replication fork barriers (RFB) at their natural location within the rDNA. We discover a pivotal role for the MRX (Mre11, Rad50, Xrs2) complex for fork integrity at RFBs, which differs from its acknowledged function in double-strand break processing. Consequently, in the absence of the MRX complex, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) accumulates at the rDNA. Based on this, we propose a model where the MRX complex specifically protects stalled forks at protein–DNA barriers, and its absence leads to processing resulting in ssDNA. To our surprise, this ssDNA does not trigger a checkpoint response. Intriguingly, however, placing RFBs ectopically on chromosome VI provokes a strong Rad53 checkpoint activation in the absence of Mre11. We demonstrate that proper checkpoint signalling within the rDNA is restored on deletion of SIR2. This suggests the surprising and novel concept that chromatin is an important player in checkpoint signalling. PMID:23376930

  18. CENTRIOLE REPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Joseph G.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes the replication of centrioles during spermatogenesis in the Prosobranch snail, Viviparus malleatus Reeve. Sections for electron microscopy were cut from pieces of testis fixed in OsO4 and embedded in the polyester resin Vestopal W. Two kinds of spermatocytes are present. These give rise to typical uniflagellate sperm carrying the haploid number of 9 chromosomes, and atypical multiflagellate sperm with only one chromosome. Two centrioles are present in the youngest typical spermatocyte. Each is a hollow cylinder about 160 mµ in diameter and 330 mµ long. The wall consists of 9 sets of triplet fibers arranged in a characteristic pattern. Sometime before pachytene an immature centriole, or procentriole as it will be called, appears next to each of the mature centrioles. The procentriole resembles a mature centriole in most respects except length: it is more annular than tubular. The daughter procentriole lies with its axis perpendicular to that of its parent. It presumably grows to full size during the late prophase, although the maturation stages have not been observed with the electron microscope. It is suggested that centrioles possess a constant polarization. The distal end forms the flagellum or other centriole products, while the proximal end represents the procentriole and is concerned with replication. The four centrioles of prophase (two parents and two daughters) are distributed by the two meiotic divisions to the four typical spermatids, in which they function as the basal bodies of the flagella. Atypical spermatocytes at first contain two normal centrioles. Each of these becomes surrounded by a cluster of procentrioles, which progressively elongate during the late prophase. After two aberrant meiotic divisions the centriole clusters give rise to the basal bodies of the multiflagellate sperm. These facts are discussed in the light of the theory, first proposed by Pollister, that the supernumerary centrioles in the atypical cells are

  19. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  20. High-resolution genomic assays provide insight into the division of labor between TLS and HDR in mammalian replication of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Zvi; Cohen, Isadora S; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Davidovsky, Dana; Carmi, Dalit; Swain, Umakanta; Mirlas-Neisberg, Nataly

    2016-08-01

    The multitude of DNA lesions that continuously form in DNA cannot all be detected and removed prior to replication. Thus, encounters of the replication fork with DNA damage become inevitable. Such encounters inhibit fork progression, leading to replication fork arrest or to replication re-priming downstream of the damage site. Either of these events will result in the formation of gap-lesion structures, in which a damaged base is located in a single stranded stretch of DNA, that is vulnerable to subsequent nicking. The double strand break that would ensue if ssDNA becomes nicked constitutes escalation of the damage from nucleotide(s)-specific to chromosomal scale. Cells employ two universal DNA damage tolerance (DDT) strategies to resolve these situations, by converting the gap-lesion structures into dsDNA without repairing the damage. The first is translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), in which a specialized low-fidelity DNA polymerase inserts a nucleotide opposite the damaged one. TLS is inherently mutagenic, due to the miscoding nature of most damaged nucleotides. The second strategy is homology-dependent repair (HDR), which relies on the presence of an identical intact sister chromatid. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the division of labor between these pathways are poorly understood. This review focuses on the balance between TLS and HDR in mammalian cells, discussing recent findings that were made possible thanks to newly developed high resolution genomic assays, and highlighting the role of the DNA lesion's properties in DDT pathway choice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. FANCD2 Facilitates Replication through Common Fragile Sites.

    PubMed

    Madireddy, Advaitha; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong T; Boisvert, Rebecca A; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; García-Rubio, María L; Gerhardt, Jeannine; Vuono, Elizabeth A; Owen, Nichole; Yan, Zi; Olson, Susan; Aguilera, Andrés; Howlett, Niall G; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2016-10-20

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are genomic regions that are unstable under conditions of replicative stress. Although the characteristics of CFSs that render them vulnerable to stress are associated mainly with replication, the cellular pathways that protect CFSs during replication remain unclear. Here, we identify and describe a role for FANCD2 as a trans-acting facilitator of CFS replication, in the absence of exogenous replicative stress. In the absence of FANCD2, replication forks stall within the AT-rich fragility core of CFS, leading to dormant origin activation. Furthermore, FANCD2 deficiency is associated with DNA:RNA hybrid formation at CFS-FRA16D, and inhibition of DNA:RNA hybrid formation suppresses replication perturbation. In addition, we also found that FANCD2 reduces the number of potential sites of replication initiation. Our data demonstrate that FANCD2 protein is required to ensure efficient CFS replication and provide mechanistic insight into how FANCD2 regulates CFS stability.

  2. Histone lysine methylation and chromatin replication.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Carlos; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Almouzni, Geneviève; Loyola, Alejandra

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, the replication of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are critical to maintain genome integrity. Chromatin components, such as histone variants and histone post-translational modifications, along with the higher-order chromatin structure, impact several DNA metabolic processes, including replication, transcription, and repair. In this review we focus on lysine methylation and the relationships between this histone mark and chromatin replication. We first describe studies implicating lysine methylation in regulating early steps in the replication process. We then discuss chromatin reassembly following replication fork passage, where the incorporation of a combination of newly synthesized histones and parental histones can impact the inheritance of lysine methylation marks on the daughter strands. Finally, we elaborate on how the inheritance of lysine methylation can impact maintenance of the chromatin landscape, using heterochromatin as a model chromatin domain, and we discuss the potential mechanisms involved in this process.

  3. Cis-acting DNA sequence at a replication origin promotes repeat expansion to fragile X full mutation.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Zaninovic, Nikica; Zhan, Qiansheng; Madireddy, Advaitha; Nolin, Sarah L; Ersalesi, Nicole; Yan, Zi; Rosenwaks, Zev; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2014-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by CGG repeat expansion that leads to FMR1 silencing. Women with a premutation allele are at risk of having a full mutation child with FXS. To investigate the mechanism of repeat expansion, we examined the relationship between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant that is linked to repeat expansion in haplogroup D and a replication origin located ∼53 kb upstream of the repeats. This origin is absent in FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have the SNP variant C, but present in the nonaffected hESCs, which have a T variant. The SNP maps directly within the replication origin. Interestingly, premutation hESCs have a replication origin and the T variant similar to nonaffected hESCs. These results suggest that a T/C SNP located at a replication origin could contribute to the inactivation of this replication origin in FXS hESCs, leading to altered replication fork progression through the repeats, which could result in repeat expansion to the FXS full mutation. © 2014 Gerhardt et al.

  4. Cis-acting DNA sequence at a replication origin promotes repeat expansion to fragile X full mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zaninovic, Nikica; Zhan, Qiansheng; Madireddy, Advaitha; Nolin, Sarah L.; Ersalesi, Nicole; Yan, Zi; Rosenwaks, Zev

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by CGG repeat expansion that leads to FMR1 silencing. Women with a premutation allele are at risk of having a full mutation child with FXS. To investigate the mechanism of repeat expansion, we examined the relationship between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant that is linked to repeat expansion in haplogroup D and a replication origin located ∼53 kb upstream of the repeats. This origin is absent in FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have the SNP variant C, but present in the nonaffected hESCs, which have a T variant. The SNP maps directly within the replication origin. Interestingly, premutation hESCs have a replication origin and the T variant similar to nonaffected hESCs. These results suggest that a T/C SNP located at a replication origin could contribute to the inactivation of this replication origin in FXS hESCs, leading to altered replication fork progression through the repeats, which could result in repeat expansion to the FXS full mutation. PMID:25179629

  5. DNA replication meets genetic exchange: chromosomal damage and its repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kuzminov, A

    2001-07-17

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on the roles of homologous recombination in DNA replication are summarized. Current findings in experimental systems ranging from bacteriophages to mammalian cell lines substantiate the idea that homologous recombination is a system supporting DNA replication when either the template DNA is damaged or the replication machinery malfunctions. There are several lines of supporting evidence: (i) DNA replication aggravates preexisting DNA damage, which then blocks subsequent replication; (ii) replication forks abandoned by malfunctioning replisomes become prone to breakage; (iii) mutants with malfunctioning replisomes or with elevated levels of DNA damage depend on homologous recombination; and (iv) homologous recombination primes DNA replication in vivo and can restore replication fork structures in vitro. The mechanisms of recombinational repair in bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. In vitro properties of the eukaryotic recombinases suggest a bigger role for single-strand annealing in the eukaryotic recombinational repair.

  6. Proteasome-dependent degradation of replisome components regulates faithful DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Roseaulin, Laura C; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-08-15

    The replication machinery, or the replisome, collides with a variety of obstacles during the normal process of DNA replication. In addition to damaged template DNA, numerous chromosome regions are considered to be difficult to replicate owing to the presence of DNA secondary structures and DNA-binding proteins. Under these conditions, the replication fork stalls, generating replication stress. Stalled forks are prone to collapse, posing serious threats to genomic integrity. It is generally thought that the replication checkpoint functions to stabilize the replisome and replication fork structure upon replication stress. This is important in order to allow DNA replication to resume once the problem is solved. However, our recent studies demonstrated that some replisome components undergo proteasome-dependent degradation during DNA replication in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our investigation has revealed the involvement of the SCF(Pof3) (Skp1-Cullin/Cdc53-F-box) ubiquitin ligase in replisome regulation. We also demonstrated that forced accumulation of the replisome components leads to abnormal DNA replication upon replication stress. Here we review these findings and present additional data indicating the importance of replisome degradation for DNA replication. Our studies suggest that cells activate an alternative pathway to degrade replisome components in order to preserve genomic integrity.

  7. SMARCAL1 maintains telomere integrity during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Poole, Lisa A; Zhao, Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G; Lovejoy, Courtney A; Eischen, Christine M; Cortez, David

    2015-12-01

    The SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent, regulator of chromatin, subfamily A-like 1) DNA translocase is one of several related enzymes, including ZRANB3 (zinc finger, RAN-binding domain containing 3) and HLTF (helicase-like transcription factor), that are recruited to stalled replication forks to promote repair and restart replication. These enzymes can perform similar biochemical reactions such as fork reversal; however, genetic studies indicate they must have unique cellular activities. Here, we present data showing that SMARCAL1 has an important function at telomeres, which present an endogenous source of replication stress. SMARCAL1-deficient cells accumulate telomere-associated DNA damage and have greatly elevated levels of extrachromosomal telomere DNA (C-circles). Although these telomere phenotypes are often found in tumor cells using the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway for telomere elongation, SMARCAL1 deficiency does not yield other ALT phenotypes such as elevated telomere recombination. The activity of SMARCAL1 at telomeres can be separated from its genome-maintenance activity in bulk chromosomal replication because it does not require interaction with replication protein A. Finally, this telomere-maintenance function is not shared by ZRANB3 or HLTF. Our results provide the first identification, to our knowledge, of an endogenous source of replication stress that requires SMARCAL1 for resolution and define differences between members of this class of replication fork-repair enzymes.

  8. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling.

  9. 12. PLANK BRIDGE ON OLD ROAD NEAR NORTH FORK VIRGIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. PLANK BRIDGE ON OLD ROAD NEAR NORTH FORK VIRGIN RIVER BRIDGE, FACING EAST - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Virgin River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Virgin River on Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  10. 11. OLD BRIDGE AND ROADBED NEAR NORTH FORK VIRGIN RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. OLD BRIDGE AND ROADBED NEAR NORTH FORK VIRGIN RIVER BRIDGE, FACING NORTH - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Virgin River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Virgin River on Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  11. 13. ORIGINAL NORTH FORK VIRGIN RIVER BRIDGE, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ORIGINAL NORTH FORK VIRGIN RIVER BRIDGE, FACING NORTHWEST - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Virgin River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Virgin River on Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  12. 15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INSIDE VIEW OF FLUME, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM, LEFT FORK TO SETTLING BASIN, SHOWING RIGHT FORK WITH GATE IN PLACE AND A FEW NEEDLES IN PLACE - Electron Hydroelectric Project, Along Puyallup River, Electron, Pierce County, WA

  13. 12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, place of a thousand drips, view from road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  14. 11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, boulders along road after stop 13. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  15. 1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, entrance sign. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  16. 6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view after stop four. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  17. 9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Reagan House. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  18. 3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, view between second and third stops - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  19. 5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, vista at stop three. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  20. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet Great Smoky ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Title Sheet - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  1. 8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, handbuilt rock pile. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, hand-built rock pile. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  2. 2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, road view before first stop. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  3. 7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, rocks along edge of road. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  4. South Fork Latrine showing north and west sides, general view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine showing north and west sides, general view to southeast - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  5. South Fork Latrine, east elevation showing structure in context, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine, east elevation showing structure in context, view west - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  6. South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South Fork Latrine, oblique view showing south and east sides; view northwest - Fort McKinley, South Fork Latrine, West side of East Side Drive, approximately 225 feet south of Weymouth Way, Great Diamond Island, Portland, Cumberland County, ME

  7. 33 CFR 117.1063 - Willapa River South Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1063 Willapa River South Fork. (a) The draw of the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission bridge across the South Fork...

  8. 33 CFR 117.1063 - Willapa River South Fork.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1063 Willapa River South Fork. (a) The draw of the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission bridge across the South Fork...

  9. Alterations to the expression level of mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, modify the mode of mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Goffart, Steffi; Holt, Ian J.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an abundant mitochondrial protein of the HMG superfamily, with various putative roles in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) metabolism. In this study we have investigated the effects on mtDNA replication of manipulating TFAM expression in cultured human cells. Mammalian mtDNA replication intermediates (RIs) fall into two classes, whose mechanistic relationship is not properly understood. One class is characterized by extensive RNA incorporation on the lagging strand, whereas the other has the structure of products of conventional, strand-coupled replication. TFAM overexpression increased the overall abundance of RIs and shifted them substantially towards those of the conventional, strand-coupled type. The shift was most pronounced in the rDNA region and at various replication pause sites and was accompanied by a drop in the relative amount of replication-termination intermediates, a substantial reduction in mitochondrial transcripts, mtDNA decatenation and progressive copy number depletion. TFAM overexpression could be partially phenocopied by treatment of cells with dideoxycytidine, suggesting that its effects are partially attributable to a decreased rate of fork progression. TFAM knockdown also resulted in mtDNA depletion, but RIs remained mainly of the ribosubstituted type, although termination intermediates were enhanced. We propose that TFAM influences the mode of mtDNA replication via its combined effects on different aspects of mtDNA metabolism. PMID:17062618

  10. Resonant tuning fork detector for electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Pohlkötter, Andreas; Willer, Ulrike; Bauer, Christoph; Schade, Wolfgang

    2009-02-01

    A mechanical quartz microresonator (tuning fork) is used to detect electromagnetic radiation. The detection scheme is based on forces created due to the incident electromagnetic radiation on the piezoelectric tuning fork