Science.gov

Sample records for replication proteins mcm5

  1. Cellular minichromosome maintenance complex component 5 (MCM5) is incorporated into HIV-1 virions and modulates viral replication in the newly infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Steven; Obukhov, Yuri; Nekhai, Sergei; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael; Iordanskiy, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The post-entry events of HIV-1 infection occur within reverse transcription complexes derived from the viral cores entering the target cell. HIV-1 cores contain host proteins incorporated from virus-producing cells. In this report, we show that MCM5, a subunit of the hexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) DNA helicase complex, associates with Gag polyprotein and is incorporated into HIV-1 virions. The progeny virions depleted of MCM5 demonstrated reduced reverse transcription in newly infected cells, but integration and subsequent replication steps were not affected. Interestingly, increased packaging of MCM5 into the virions also led to reduced reverse transcription, but here viral replication was impaired. Our data suggest that incorporation of physiological amounts of MCM5 promotes aberrant reverse transcription, leading to partial incapacitation of cDNA, whereas increased MCM5 abundance leads to reduced reverse transcription and infection. Therefore, MCM5 has the properties of an inhibitory factor that interferes with production of an integration-competent cDNA product. PMID:27414250

  2. A Genetic Analysis of the Drosophila mcm5 Gene Defines a Domain Specifically Required for Meiotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Cathleen M.; Teeter, Kathy; Page, Scott L.; Nielsen, Rachel; Hawley, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Members of the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) family have pivotal roles in many biological processes. Although originally studied for their role in DNA replication, it is becoming increasingly apparent that certain members of this family are multifunctional and also play roles in transcription, cohesion, condensation, and recombination. Here we provide a genetic dissection of the mcm5 gene in Drosophila that demonstrates an unexpected function for this protein. First, we show that homozygotes for a null allele of mcm5 die as third instar larvae, apparently as a result of blocking those replication events that lead to mitotic divisions without impairing endo-reduplication. However, we have also recovered a viable and fertile allele of mcm5 (denoted mcm5A7) that specifically impairs the meiotic recombination process. We demonstrate that the decrease in recombination observed in females homozygous for mcm5A7 is not due to a failure to create or repair meiotically induced double strand breaks (DSBs), but rather to a failure to resolve those DSBs into meiotic crossovers. Consistent with their ability to repair meiotically induced DSBs, flies homozygous for mcm5A7 are fully proficient in somatic DNA repair. These results strengthen the observation that members of the prereplicative complex have multiple functions and provide evidence that mcm5 plays a critical role in the meiotic recombination pathway. PMID:17565942

  3. MCM5 as a target of BET inhibitors in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mio, Catia; Lavarone, Elisa; Conzatti, Ketty; Baldan, Federica; Toffoletto, Barbara; Puppin, Cinzia; Filetti, Sebastiano; Durante, Cosimo; Russo, Diego; Orlacchio, Arturo; Di Cristofano, Antonio; Di Loreto, Carla; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is an extremely aggressive thyroid cancer subtype, refractory to the current medical treatment. Among various epigenetic anticancer drugs, bromodomain and extra-terminal inhibitors (BETis) are considered to be an appealing novel class of compounds. BETi target the bromodomain and extra-terminal of BET proteins that act as regulators of gene transcription, interacting with histone acetyl groups. The goal of this study is to delineate which pathway underlies the biological effects derived from BET inhibition, in order to find new potential therapeutic targets in ATC. We investigated the effects of BET inhibition on two human anaplastic thyroid cancer-derived cell lines (FRO and SW1736). The treatment with two BETis, JQ1 and I-BET762, decreased cell viability, reduced cell cycle S-phase, and determined cell death. In order to find BETi effectors, FRO and SW1736 were subjected to a global transcriptome analysis after JQ1 treatment. A significant portion of deregulated genes belongs to cell cycle regulators. Among them, MCM5 was decreased at both mRNA and protein levels in both tested cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments indicate that MCM5 is directly bound by the BET protein BRD4. MCM5 silencing reduced cell proliferation, thus underlining its involvement in the block of proliferation induced by BETis. Furthermore, MCM5 immunohistochemical evaluation in human thyroid tumor tissues demonstrated its overexpression in several papillary thyroid carcinomas and in all ATCs. MCM5 was also overexpressed in a murine model of ATC, and JQ1 treatment reduced Mcm5 mRNA expression in two murine ATC cell lines. Thus, MCM5 could represent a new target in the therapeutic approach against ATC. PMID:26911376

  4. Unexpected Accumulation of ncm5U and ncm5s2U in a trm9 Mutant Suggests an Additional Step in the Synthesis of mcm5U and mcm5s2U

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changchun; Huang, Bo; Anderson, James T.; Byström, Anders S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Transfer RNAs are synthesized as a primary transcript that is processed to produce a mature tRNA. As part of the maturation process, a subset of the nucleosides are modified. Modifications in the anticodon region often modulate the decoding ability of the tRNA. At position 34, the majority of yeast cytosolic tRNA species that have a uridine are modified to 5-carbamoylmethyluridine (ncm5U), 5-carbamoylmethyl-2′-O-methyluridine (ncm5Um), 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-uridine (mcm5U) or 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U). The formation of mcm5 and ncm5 side chains involves a complex pathway, where the last step in formation of mcm5 is a methyl esterification of cm5 dependent on the Trm9 and Trm112 proteins. Methodology and Principal Findings Both Trm9 and Trm112 are required for the last step in formation of mcm5 side chains at wobble uridines. By co-expressing a histidine-tagged Trm9p together with a native Trm112p in E. coli, these two proteins purified as a complex. The presence of Trm112p dramatically improves the methyltransferase activity of Trm9p in vitro. Single tRNA species that normally contain mcm5U or mcm5s2U nucleosides were isolated from trm9Δ or trm112Δ mutants and the presence of modified nucleosides was analyzed by HPLC. In both mutants, mcm5U and mcm5s2U nucleosides are absent in tRNAs and the major intermediates accumulating were ncm5U and ncm5s2U, not the expected cm5U and cm5s2U. Conclusions Trm9p and Trm112p function together at the final step in formation of mcm5U in tRNA by using the intermediate cm5U as a substrate. In tRNA isolated from trm9Δ and trm112Δ strains, ncm5U and ncm5s2U nucleosides accumulate, questioning the order of nucleoside intermediate formation of the mcm5 side chain. We propose two alternative explanations for this observation. One is that the intermediate cm5U is generated from ncm5U by a yet unknown mechanism and the other is that cm5U is formed before ncm5U and mcm5U. PMID:21687733

  5. Geminivirus C3 Protein: Replication Enhancement and Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Settlage, Sharon B.; See, Renee G.; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Most dicot-infecting geminiviruses encode a replication enhancer protein (C3, AL3, or REn) that is required for optimal replication of their small, single-stranded DNA genomes. C3 interacts with C1, the essential viral replication protein that initiates rolling circle replication. C3 also homo-oligomerizes and interacts with at least two host-encoded proteins, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and the retinoblastoma-related protein (pRBR). It has been proposed that protein interactions contribute to C3 function. Using the C3 protein of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, we examined the impact of mutations to amino acids that are conserved across the C3 protein family on replication enhancement and protein interactions. Surprisingly, many of the mutations did not affect replication enhancement activity of C3 in tobacco protoplasts. Other mutations either enhanced or were detrimental to C3 replication activity. Analysis of mutated proteins in yeast two-hybrid assays indicated that mutations that inactivate C3 replication enhancement activity also reduce or inactivate C3 oligomerization and interaction with C1 and PCNA. In contrast, mutated C3 proteins impaired for pRBR binding are fully functional in replication assays. Hydrophobic residues in the middle of the C3 protein were implicated in C3 interaction with itself, C1, and PCNA, while polar resides at both the N and C termini of the protein are important for C3-pRBR interaction. These experiments established the importance of C3-C3, C3-C1, and C3-PCNA interactions in geminivirus replication. While C3-pRBR interaction is not required for viral replication in cycling cells, it may play a role during infection of differentiated cells in intact plants. PMID:16014949

  6. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  7. Accessory replicative helicases and the replication of protein-bound DNA.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Jan-Gert; Howard, Jamieson L; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-12-12

    Complete, accurate duplication of the genetic material is a prerequisite for successful cell division. Achieving this accuracy is challenging since there are many barriers to replication forks that may cause failure to complete genome duplication or result in possibly catastrophic corruption of the genetic code. One of the most important types of replicative barriers are proteins bound to the template DNA, especially transcription complexes. Removal of these barriers demands energy input not only to separate the DNA strands but also to disrupt multiple bonds between the protein and DNA. Replicative helicases that unwind the template DNA for polymerases at the fork can displace proteins bound to the template. However, even occasional failures in protein displacement by the replicative helicase could spell disaster. In such circumstances, failure to restart replication could result in incomplete genome duplication. Avoiding incomplete genome duplication via the repair and restart of blocked replication forks also challenges viability since the involvement of recombination enzymes is associated with the risk of genome rearrangements. Organisms have therefore evolved accessory replicative helicases that aid replication fork movement along protein-bound DNA. These helicases reduce the dangers associated with replication blockage by protein-DNA complexes, aiding clearance of blocks and resumption of replication by the same replisome thus circumventing the need for replication repair and restart. This review summarises recent work in bacteria and eukaryotes that has begun to delineate features of accessory replicative helicases and their importance in genome stability.

  8. The Fission Yeast Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM)-binding Protein (MCM-BP), Mcb1, Regulates MCM Function during Prereplicative Complex Formation in DNA Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Venny; Martha, Sabrina; Hirose, Noriaki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is a replicative helicase, which is essential for chromosome DNA replication. In recent years, the identification of a novel MCM-binding protein (MCM-BP) in most eukaryotes has led to numerous studies investigating its function and its relationship to the MCM complex. However, the mechanisms by which MCM-BP functions and associates with MCM complexes are not well understood; in addition, the functional role of MCM-BP remains controversial and may vary between model organisms. The present study aims to elucidate the nature and biological function of the MCM-BP ortholog, Mcb1, in fission yeast. The Mcb1 protein continuously interacts with MCM proteins during the cell cycle in vivo and can interact with any individual MCM subunit in vitro. To understand the detailed characteristics of mcb1+, two temperature-sensitive mcb1 gene mutants (mcb1ts) were isolated. Extensive genetic analysis showed that the mcb1ts mutants were suppressed by a mcm5+ multicopy plasmid and displayed synthetic defects with many S-phase-related gene mutants. Moreover, cyclin-dependent kinase modulation by Cig2 repression or Rum1 overproduction suppressed the mcb1ts mutants, suggesting the involvement of Mcb1 in pre-RC formation during DNA replication. These data are consistent with the observation that Mcm7 loading onto replication origins is reduced and S-phase progression is delayed in mcb1ts mutants. Furthermore, the mcb1ts mutation led to the redistribution of MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution was dependent on an active nuclear export system. These results strongly suggest that Mcb1 promotes efficient pre-RC formation during DNA replication by regulating the MCM complex. PMID:23322785

  9. Regulated Eukaryotic DNA Replication Origin Firing with Purified Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yeeles, Joseph T.P.; Deegan, Tom D.; Janska, Agnieszka; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F. X.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells initiate DNA replication from multiple origins, which must be tightly regulated to promote precise genome duplication in every cell cycle. To accomplish this, initiation is partitioned into two temporally discrete steps: a double hexameric MCM complex is first loaded at replication origins during G1 phase, and then converted to the active CMG (Cdc45, MCM, GINS) helicase during S phase. Here we describe the reconstitution of budding yeast DNA replication initiation with 16 purified replication factors, made from 42 polypeptides. Origin-dependent initiation recapitulates regulation seen in vivo. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibits MCM loading by phosphorylating the origin recognition complex (ORC) and promotes CMG formation by phosphorylating Sld2 and Sld3. Dbf4 dependent kinase (DDK) promotes replication by phosphorylating MCM, and can act either before or after CDK. These experiments define the minimum complement of proteins, protein kinase substrates and co-factors required for regulated eukaryotic DNA replication. PMID:25739503

  10. Regulated eukaryotic DNA replication origin firing with purified proteins.

    PubMed

    Yeeles, Joseph T P; Deegan, Tom D; Janska, Agnieszka; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2015-03-26

    Eukaryotic cells initiate DNA replication from multiple origins, which must be tightly regulated to promote precise genome duplication in every cell cycle. To accomplish this, initiation is partitioned into two temporally discrete steps: a double hexameric minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex is first loaded at replication origins during G1 phase, and then converted to the active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicase during S phase. Here we describe the reconstitution of budding yeast DNA replication initiation with 16 purified replication factors, made from 42 polypeptides. Origin-dependent initiation recapitulates regulation seen in vivo. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibits MCM loading by phosphorylating the origin recognition complex (ORC) and promotes CMG formation by phosphorylating Sld2 and Sld3. Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) promotes replication by phosphorylating MCM, and can act either before or after CDK. These experiments define the minimum complement of proteins, protein kinase substrates and co-factors required for regulated eukaryotic DNA replication. PMID:25739503

  11. The Replicative Consequences of Papillomavirus E2 Protein Binding to the Origin Replication Factor ORC2

    PubMed Central

    DeSmet, Marsha; Kanginakudru, Sriramana; Rietz, Anne; Wu, Wai-Hong; Roden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The origin recognition complex (ORC) coordinates a series of events that lead to initiation of DNA strand duplication. As a nuclear double stranded DNA plasmid, the papillomavirus (PV) genome resembles a mini-chromosome in infected cells. To initiate its replication, the viral E2 protein binds to and recruits the E1 DNA helicase at the viral origin. PV genome replication program exhibits three stages: initial amplification from a single genome upon infection to a few copies per cell, a cell cycle linked maintenance phase, and a differentiation dependent late stage where the genome is amplified to thousands of copies. Involvement of ORC or other pre-replication complex (pre-RC) factors has not been described. We report that human PV (HPV) and bovine PV (BPV-1) E2 proteins bind to ORC2, however, ORC2 was not detected at the viral origin. Depletion of ORC2 enhanced PV replication in a transient replication model and in keratinocytes stably maintaining viral episomes, while there was no effect on copy number in a cell line with integrated HPV genomes. Consistent with this, occupancy of E1 and E2 at the viral origin increased following ORC2 silencing. These data imply that ORC2 is not necessary for activation of the PV origin by E1 and E2 but instead suppresses E2 replicative function. Furthermore, we observed that over-expression of HPV E2 decreased ORC2 occupation at two known mammalian origins of replication, suggesting that E2 restricts pre-ORC assembly that could otherwise compete for host replication complexes necessary for viral genome amplification. We infer that the ORC2 complex with E2 restricts viral replication in the maintenance phase of the viral replication program and that elevated levels of E2 that occur during the differentiation dependent amplification stage subvert ORC loading and hence DNA synthesis at cellular origins. PMID:27701460

  12. Formation of a DNA loop at the replication fork generated by bacteriophage T7 replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Park, K; Debyser, Z; Tabor, S; Richardson, C C; Griffith, J D

    1998-02-27

    Intermediates in the replication of circular and linear M13 double-stranded DNA by bacteriophage T7 proteins have been examined by electron microscopy. Synthesis generated double-stranded DNA molecules containing a single replication fork with a linear duplex tail. A complex presumably consisting of T7 DNA polymerase and gene 4 helicase/primase molecules was present at the fork together with a variable amount of single-stranded DNA sequestered by gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA binding protein. Analysis of the length distribution of Okazaki fragments formed at different helicase/primase concentrations was consistent with coupling of leading and lagging strand replication. Fifteen to forty percent of the templates engaged in replication have a DNA loop at the replication fork. The loops are fully double-stranded with an average length of approximately 1 kilobase. Labeling with biotinylated dCTP showed that the loops consist of newly synthesized DNA, and synchronization experiments using a linear template with a G-less cassette demonstrated that the loops are formed by active displacement of the lagging strand. A long standing feature of models for coupled leading/lagging strand replication has been the presence of a DNA loop at the replication fork. This study provides the first direct demonstration of such loops.

  13. Physical determinants of the self-replication of protein fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šarić, Anđela; Buell, Alexander K.; Meisl, Georg; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Linse, Sara; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-09-01

    The ability of biological molecules to replicate themselves is the foundation of life, requiring a complex cellular machinery. However, a range of aberrant processes involve the self-replication of pathological protein structures without any additional assistance. One example is the autocatalytic generation of pathological protein aggregates, including amyloid fibrils, involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we use computer simulations to identify the necessary requirements for the self-replication of fibrillar assemblies of proteins. We establish that a key physical determinant for this process is the affinity of proteins for the surfaces of fibrils. We find that self-replication can take place only in a very narrow regime of inter-protein interactions, implying a high level of sensitivity to system parameters and experimental conditions. We then compare our theoretical predictions with kinetic and biosensor measurements of fibrils formed from the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Our results show a quantitative connection between the kinetics of self-replication and the surface coverage of fibrils by monomeric proteins. These findings reveal the fundamental physical requirements for the formation of supra-molecular structures able to replicate themselves, and shed light on mechanisms in play in the proliferation of protein aggregates in nature.

  14. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  15. A replicator-specific binding protein essential for site-specific initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Huang, Liang; Fu, Haiqing; Smith, Owen K.; Lin, Chii Mei; Utani, Koichi; Rao, Mishal; Reinhold, William C.; Redon, Christophe E.; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; You, Yang; Hanna, Harlington; Boisclair, Yves; Long, Qiaoming; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome replication starts from distinct sites; however, the principles governing initiation site selection are unclear because proteins essential for DNA replication do not exhibit sequence-specific DNA binding. Here we identify a replication-initiation determinant (RepID) protein that binds a subset of replication-initiation sites. A large fraction of RepID-binding sites share a common G-rich motif and exhibit elevated replication initiation. RepID is required for initiation of DNA replication from RepID-bound replication origins, including the origin at the human beta-globin (HBB) locus. At HBB, RepID is involved in an interaction between the replication origin (Rep-P) and the locus control region. RepID-depleted murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibit abnormal replication fork progression and fewer replication-initiation events. These observations are consistent with a model, suggesting that RepID facilitates replication initiation at a distinct group of human replication origins. PMID:27272143

  16. The origin of DNA genomes and DNA replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick

    2002-10-01

    In recent years, it has became clear that most proteins involved in cellular DNA precursor synthesis or DNA replication have been 'invented' more than once, indicating that the transition from RNA to DNA genomes was more complex than previously thought. Several authors have suggested that DNA viruses, which often encode their own version of these proteins, played an important role in this process. The nature of the genome of the last universal cellular ancestor (LUCA) -- that is, RNA or DNA, prokaryotic-like or eukaryotic-like -- remains in dispute. A hyperthermophilic LUCA would have suggested a circular, double-stranded DNA genome; however, recent data favor a mesophilic or moderately thermophilic LUCA.

  17. Coordinated protein and DNA remodeling by human HLTF on stalled replication fork.

    PubMed

    Achar, Yathish Jagadheesh; Balogh, David; Haracska, Lajos

    2011-08-23

    Human helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF) exhibits ubiquitin ligase activity for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) polyubiquitylation as well as double-stranded DNA translocase activity for remodeling stalled replication fork by fork reversal, which can support damage bypass by template switching. However, a stalled replication fork is surrounded by various DNA-binding proteins which can inhibit the access of damage bypass players, and it is unknown how these proteins become displaced. Here we reveal that HLTF has an ATP hydrolysis-dependent protein remodeling activity, by which it can remove proteins bound to the replication fork. Moreover, we demonstrate that HLTF can displace a broad spectrum of proteins such as replication protein A (RPA), PCNA, and replication factor C (RFC), thereby providing the first example for a protein clearing activity at the stalled replication fork. Our findings clarify how remodeling of a stalled replication fork can occur if it is engaged in interactions with masses of proteins.

  18. Copy-up mutants of the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein are defective in coupling RK2 replication origins.

    PubMed Central

    Blasina, A; Kittell, B L; Toukdarian, A E; Helinski, D R

    1996-01-01

    The broad host range plasmid RK2 replicates and regulates its copy number in a wide range of Gram-negative bacteria. The plasmid-encoded trans-acting replication protein TrfA and the origin of replication oriV are sufficient for controlled replication of the plasmid in all Gram-negative bacteria tested. The TrfA protein binds specifically to direct repeat sequences (iterons) at the origin of replication. A replication control model, designated handcuffing or coupling, has been proposed whereby the formation of coupled TrfA-oriV complexes between plasmid molecules results in hindrance of origin activity and, consequently, a shut-down of plasmid replication under conditions of higher than normal copy number. Therefore, according to this model, the coupling activity of an initiation protein is essential for copy number control and a copy-up initiation protein mutant should have reduced ability to form coupled complexes. To test this model for plasmid RK2, two previously characterized copy-up TrfA mutations, trfA-254D and trfA-267L, were combined and the resulting copy-up double mutant TFrfA protein TrfA-254D/267L was characterized. Despite initiating runaway (uncontrolled) replication in vivo, the copy-up double-mutant TrfA protein exhibited replication kinetics similar to the wild-type protein in vitro. Purified TrfA-254D, TrfA-267L, and TrfA-254D/267L proteins were then examined for binding to the iterons and for coupling activity using an in vitro ligase-catalyzed multimerization assay. It was found that both single and double TrfA mutant proteins exhibited substantially reduced (single mutants) or barely detectable (double mutant) levels of coupling activity while not being diminished in their capacity to bind to the origin of replication. These observations provide direct evidence in support of the coupling model of replication control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8622975

  19. Tombusviruses upregulate phospholipid biosynthesis via interaction between p33 replication protein and yeast lipid sensor proteins during virus replication in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; Sharma, Monika; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-12-15

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses induce new membranous structures and promote membrane proliferation in infected cells to facilitate viral replication. In this paper, the authors show that a plant-infecting tombusvirus upregulates transcription of phospholipid biosynthesis genes, such as INO1, OPI3 and CHO1, and increases phospholipid levels in yeast model host. This is accomplished by the viral p33 replication protein, which interacts with Opi1p FFAT domain protein and Scs2p VAP protein. Opi1p and Scs2p are phospholipid sensor proteins and they repress the expression of phospholipid genes. Accordingly, deletion of OPI1 transcription repressor in yeast has a stimulatory effect on TBSV RNA accumulation and enhanced tombusvirus replicase activity in an in vitro assay. Altogether, the presented data convincingly demonstrate that de novo lipid biosynthesis is required for optimal TBSV replication. Overall, this work reveals that a (+)RNA virus reprograms the phospholipid biosynthesis pathway in a unique way to facilitate its replication in yeast cells. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with FFAT-domain host protein. • Tombusvirus replication leads to upregulation of phospholipids. • Tombusvirus replication depends on de novo lipid synthesis. • Deletion of FFAT-domain host protein enhances TBSV replication. • TBSV rewires host phospholipid synthesis.

  20. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liming; Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Yan, Shicui; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsid proteins (VP5 and VP7), within VIBs in co-transfected or infected cells. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that NS80 could interact with each core protein respectively. In addition, we found that newly synthesized viral RNAs co-localized with VIBs. Furthermore, time-course analysis of viral structural proteins expression showed that the expression of NS80 was detected first, followed by the detection of inner shell protein VP3, and then of other inner-capsid proteins, suggesting that VIBs were essential for the formation of viral core frame or progeny virion. Moreover, knockdown of NS80 by shRNA not only inhibited the expression of aquareovirus structural proteins, but also inhibited viral infection. These results indicated that NS80-based VIBs were formed at earlier stage of infection, and NS80 was able to coordinate the expression of viral structural proteins and viral replication.

  1. Correlation between ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase and three replication proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There has long been evidence supporting the idea that RNR and the dNTP-synthesizing complex must be closely linked to the replication complex or replisome. We contributed to this body of evidence in proposing the hypothesis of the replication hyperstructure. A recently published work called this postulate into question, reporting that NrdB is evenly distributed throughout the cytoplasm. Consequently we were interested in the localization of RNR protein and its relationship with other replication proteins. Results We tagged NrdB protein with 3×FLAG epitope and detected its subcellular location by immunofluorescence microscopy. We found that this protein is located in nucleoid-associated clusters, that the number of foci correlates with the number of replication forks at any cell age, and that after the replication process ends the number of cells containing NrdB foci decreases. We show that the number of NrdB foci is very similar to the number of SeqA, DnaB, and DnaX foci, both in the whole culture and in different cell cycle periods. In addition, interfoci distances between NrdB and three replication proteins are similar to the distances between two replication protein foci. Conclusions NrdB is present in nucleoid-associated clusters during the replication period. These clusters disappear after replication ends. The number of these clusters is closely related to the number of replication forks and the number of three replication protein clusters in any cell cycle period. Therefore we conclude that NrdB protein, and most likely RNR protein, is closely linked to the replication proteins or replisome at the replication fork. These results clearly support the replication hyperstructure model. PMID:20102606

  2. Replication protein A and more: single-stranded DNA-binding proteins in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Huang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) play essential roles in DNA replication, recombinational repair, and maintenance of genome stability. In human, the major SSB, replication protein A (RPA), is a stable heterotrimer composed of subunits of RPA1, RPA2, and RPA3, each of which is conserved not only in mammals but also in all other eukaryotic species. In addition to RPA, other SSBs have also been identified in the human genome, including sensor of single-stranded DNA complexes 1 and 2 (SOSS1/2). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how these SSBs contribute to the maintenance of genome stability.

  3. The adenovirus terminal protein influences binding of replication proteins and changes the origin structure.

    PubMed Central

    Pronk, R; van der Vliet, P C

    1993-01-01

    The adenovirus terminal protein (TP) is covalently linked to the 5' ends of the adenovirus genome and enhances DNA replication in vitro by increasing template activity. To study the effect of TP in more detail we isolated short origin fragments containing functional TP using anion exchange chromatography. These fragments were highly active as templates for DNA replication in a reconstituted system. Employing band-shift assays we found that the affinity of the precursor terminal protein-DNA polymerase complex for the TP-containing origin was increased 2 to 3-fold. Binding affinities of two other replication stimulating proteins, NFI and Oct-1, were not influenced by the terminal protein. Upon DNaseI footprinting we observed, unexpectedly, that the breakdown pattern had changed at various positions in the origin, notably in the area 3-6 and 41-51 by the presence of TP. Some differences in the footprint pattern of NFI and Oct-1 were also found. Our results indicate that TP induces subtle changes in the origin structure that influence the interaction of other replication proteins. Images PMID:8506126

  4. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5' ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3'-5' exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and localization of the

  5. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5′ ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3′–5′ exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and

  6. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5' ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3'-5' exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and localization of the

  7. The Sendai virus V protein interacts with the NP protein to regulate viral genome RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Horikami, S M; Smallwood, S; Moyer, S A

    1996-08-15

    The interactions of Sendai virus proteins required for viral RNA synthesis have been characterized both by the yeast two-hybrid system and through the use of glutathione S-transferase (gst)-viral fusion proteins synthesized in mammalian cells. Using the two-hybrid system we have confirmed the previously identified P-L (RNA polymerase), NPo-P (encapsidation substrate), and P-P complexes and now demonstrate NP-NP and NPo-V protein interactions. Expression of gstP and P proteins and binding to glutathione-Sepharose beads as a measure of complex formation confirmed the P-P interaction. The P-gstP binding occurred only on expression of the proteins in the same cell and was mapped to amino acids 345-411. We also show that full-length and deletion gstV and gstW proteins bound NPo protein when these sets of proteins were coexpressed and have identified one required region from amino acids 78-316. Neither gstV nor gstW bound NP assembled into nucleocapsids. Furthermore, both V and W proteins lacking the N-terminal 77 amino acids inhibited DI-H genome replication in vitro, showing the biological relevance of the remaining region. We propose that the specific inhibition of genome replication by V and W proteins occurs through interference with either the formation or the use of the NPo-P encapsidation substrate.

  8. Coat Protein Activation of Alfalfa Mosaic Virus Replication Is Concentration Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Guogas, Laura M.; Laforest, Siana M.; Gehrke, Lee

    2005-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarvirus RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; therefore, an understanding of coat protein's function is important for defining viral replication mechanisms. Based on in vitro replication experiments, the conformational switch model states that AMV coat protein blocks minus-strand RNA synthesis (R. C. Olsthoorn, S. Mertens, F. T. Brederode, and J. F. Bol, EMBO J. 18:4856-4864, 1999), while another report states that coat protein present in an inoculum is required to permit minus-strand synthesis (L. Neeleman and J. F. Bol, Virology 254:324-333, 1999). Here, we report on experiments that address these contrasting results with a goal of defining coat protein′s function in the earliest stages of AMV replication. To detect coat-protein-activated AMV RNA replication, we designed and characterized a subgenomic luciferase reporter construct. We demonstrate that activation of viral RNA replication by coat protein is concentration dependent; that is, replication was strongly stimulated at low coat protein concentrations but decreased progressively at higher concentrations. Genomic RNA3 mutations preventing coat protein mRNA translation or disrupting coat protein's RNA binding domain diminished replication. The data indicate that RNA binding and an ongoing supply of coat protein are required to initiate replication on progeny genomic RNA transcripts. The data do not support the conformational switch model's claim that coat protein inhibits the initial stages of viral RNA replication. Replication activation may correlate with low local coat protein concentrations and low coat protein occupancy on the multiple binding sites present in the 3′ untranslated regions of the viral RNAs. PMID:15827190

  9. A key role for heat shock protein 70 in the localization and insertion of tombusvirus replication proteins to intracellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Stork, Jozsef; Nagy, Peter D

    2009-04-01

    Plus-stranded RNA viruses coopt host proteins to promote their robust replication in infected hosts. Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) is a model virus that can replicate a small replicon RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in plants. The tombusvirus replicase complex contains heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), an abundant cytosolic chaperone, which is required for TBSV replication. To dissect the function of Hsp70 in TBSV replication, in this paper we use an Hsp70 mutant (ssa1 ssa2) yeast strain that supports a low level of TBSV replication. Using confocal laser microscopy and cellular fractionation experiments, we find that the localization of the viral replication proteins changes to the cytosol in the mutant cells from the peroxisomal membranes in wild-type cells. An in vitro membrane insertion assay shows that Hsp70 promotes the integration of the viral replication proteins into subcellular membranes. This step seems to be critical for the assembly of the viral replicase complex. Using a gene-silencing approach and quercetin as a chemical inhibitor to downregulate Hsp70 levels, we also confirm the significance of cytosolic Hsp70 in the replication of TBSV and other plant viruses in a plant host. Taken together, our results suggest that cytosolic Hsp70 plays multiple roles in TBSV replication, such as affecting the subcellular localization and membrane insertion of the viral replication proteins as well as the assembly of the viral replicase. PMID:19153242

  10. Replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes have limited stability in vitro.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Peter; Guy, Colin P

    2008-08-29

    There are many barriers that replication forks must overcome in order to duplicate a genome in vivo. These barriers include damage to the template DNA and proteins bound to this template. If replication is halted by such a block, then the block must be either removed or bypassed for replication to continue. If continuation of replication employs the original fork, avoiding the need to reload the replication apparatus, then the blocked replisome must retain functionality. In vivo studies of Escherichia coli replication forks suggest that replication forks blocked by protein-DNA complexes retain the ability to resume replication upon removal of the block for several hours. Here we tested the functional stability of replication forks reconstituted in vitro and blocked by lac repressor-operator complexes. Once a fork comes to a halt at such a block, it cannot continue subsequently to translocate through the block until addition of IPTG induces repressor dissociation. However, the ability to resume replication is retained only for 4-6 min regardless of the topological state of the template DNA. Comparison of our in vitro data with previous in vivo data suggests that either accessory factors that stabilise blocked forks are present in vivo or the apparent stability of blocked forks in vivo is due to continual reloading of the replication apparatus at the site of the block.

  11. Membrane attachment activates dnaA protein, the initiation protein of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, B.Y.; Kornberg, A.

    1988-10-01

    ADP and ATP are tightly bound to dnaA protein and are crucial to its function in DNA replication; the exchange of these nucleotides is effected specifically by the acidic phospholipids (cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) present in Escherichia coli membranes. We now find that phospholipids derived from membranes lacking an unsaturated fatty acid (e.g., oleic acid) are unable to promote the exchange. This observation correlates strikingly with the long-known effect of 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a ''suicide analog'' that prevents initiation of a cycle of replication in E. coli by inhibiting the synthesis of oleic acid, an inhibition that can be overcome by providing the cells with oleic acid. Profound influences on the specific binding of dnaA protein to phospholipids by temperature, the content of unsaturated fatty acids, and the inclusion of cholesterol can be explained by the need for the phospholipids to be in fluid-phase vesicles. These findings suggest that membrane attachment of dnaA protein is vital for its function in the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli.

  12. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt's Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Traylen, Chris; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Zuo, Jianmin; Rowe, Martin; Almohammad, Rajaei; Heesom, Kate; Sweet, Steve M M; Matthews, David A; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the OPEN ACCESS Pathogens 2015, 4 740 EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1). An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications. PMID:26529022

  13. Modulation of Hepatitis C Virus Genome Replication by Glycosphingolipids and Four-Phosphate Adaptor Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Irfan; Katikaneni, Divya S.; Han, Qingxia; Sanchez-Felipe, Lorena; Hanada, Kentaro; Ambrose, Rebecca L.; Mackenzie, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembles its replication complex on cytosolic membrane vesicles often clustered in a membranous web (MW). During infection, HCV NS5A protein activates PI4KIIIα enzyme, causing massive production and redistribution of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P) lipid to the replication complex. However, the role of PI4P in the HCV life cycle is not well understood. We postulated that PI4P recruits host effectors to modulate HCV genome replication or virus particle production. To test this hypothesis, we generated cell lines for doxycycline-inducible expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the PI4P effector, four-phosphate adaptor protein 2 (FAPP2). FAPP2 depletion attenuated HCV infectivity and impeded HCV RNA synthesis. Indeed, FAPP2 has two functional lipid-binding domains specific for PI4P and glycosphingolipids. While expression of the PI4P-binding mutant protein was expected to inhibit HCV replication, a marked drop in replication efficiency was observed unexpectedly with the glycosphingolipid-binding mutant protein. These data suggest that both domains are crucial for the role of FAPP2 in HCV genome replication. We also found that HCV significantly increases the level of some glycosphingolipids, whereas adding these lipids to FAPP2-depleted cells partially rescued replication, further arguing for the importance of glycosphingolipids in HCV RNA synthesis. Interestingly, FAPP2 is redistributed to the replication complex (RC) characterized by HCV NS5A, NS4B, or double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) foci. Additionally, FAPP2 depletion disrupts the RC and alters the colocalization of HCV replicase proteins. Altogether, our study implies that HCV coopts FAPP2 for virus genome replication via PI4P binding and glycosphingolipid transport to the HCV RC. IMPORTANCE Like most viruses with a positive-sense RNA genome, HCV replicates its RNA on remodeled host membranes composed of lipids hijacked from various internal membrane compartments

  14. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Arturo; Zhang, Jiantao; Ollwerther, Abigail; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ahlquist, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules). BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  15. Ubiquitination of tombusvirus p33 replication protein plays a role in virus replication and binding to the host Vps23p ESCRT protein

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Post-translational modifications of viral replication proteins could be widespread phenomena during the replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses. In this paper, we identify two lysines in the tombusvirus p33 replication co-factor involved in ubiquitination and show that the same lysines are also important for the p33 to interact with the host Vps23p ESCRT-I factor. We find that the interaction of p33 with Vps23p is also affected by a "late-domain"-like sequence in p33. The combined mutations of the two lysines and the late-domain-like sequences in p33 reduced replication of a replicon RNA of Tomato bushy stunt virus in yeast model host, in plant protoplasts and plant leaves, suggesting that p33-Vps23p ESCRT protein interaction affects tombusvirus replication. Using ubiquitin-mimicking p33 chimeras, we demonstrate that high level of p33 ubiquitination is inhibitory for TBSV replication. These findings argue that optimal level of p33 ubiquitination plays a regulatory role during tombusvirus infections. PMID:20004458

  16. Levels of the E2 interacting protein TopBP1 modulate papillomavirus maintenance stage replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kanginakudru, Sriramana; DeSmet, Marsha; Thomas, Yanique; Morgan, Iain M.; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2015-04-15

    The evolutionarily conserved DNA topoisomerase II beta-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) functions in DNA replication, DNA damage response, and cell survival. We analyzed the role of TopBP1 in human and bovine papillomavirus genome replication. Consistent with prior reports, TopBP1 co-localized in discrete nuclear foci and was in complex with papillomavirus E2 protein. Similar to E2, TopBP1 is recruited to the region of the viral origin of replication during G1/S and early S phase. TopBP1 knockdown increased, while over-expression decreased transient virus replication, without affecting cell cycle. Similarly, using cell lines harboring HPV-16 or HPV-31 genome, TopBP1 knockdown increased while over-expression reduced viral copy number relative to genomic DNA. We propose a model in which TopBP1 serves dual roles in viral replication: it is essential for initiation of replication yet it restricts viral copy number. - Highlights: • Protein interaction study confirmed In-situ interaction between TopBP1 and E2. • TopBP1 present at papillomavirus ori in G1/S and early S phase of cell cycle. • TopBP1 knockdown increased, over-expression reduced virus replication. • TopBP1 protein level change did not influence cell survival or cell cycle. • TopBP1 displaced from papillomavirus ori after initiation of replication.

  17. Protein kinase A-anchoring protein AKAP95 interacts with MCM2, a regulator of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Eide, Turid; Taskén, Kristin A; Carlson, Cathrine; Williams, Gareth; Jahnsen, Tore; Taskén, Kjetil; Collas, Philippe

    2003-07-18

    Protein kinase A (PKA)-anchoring protein AKAP95 is localized to the nucleus in interphase, where it primarily associates with the nuclear matrix. A yeast two-hybrid screen for AKAP95 interaction partners identified the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2 protein, a component of the pre-replication complex. AKAP95-MCM2 interaction was mapped to residues 1-195 of AKAP95 and corroborated by glutathione S-transferase precipitation and immunoprecipitation from chromatin. Disruption of AKAP95-MCM2 interaction with an AKAP95-(1-195) peptide within HeLa cell nuclei abolishes initiation of DNA replication in G1 phase and the elongation phase of replication in vitro without affecting global nuclear organization or import. Disruption of the C-terminal zinc finger of AKAP95 reduces efficiency of replication initiation. Disruption of the PKA-binding domain does not impair replication in G1- or S-phase nuclei, whereas a PKA inhibitor affects the initiation but not the elongation phase of replication. Depleting AKAP95 from nuclei partially depletes MCM2 and abolishes replication. Recombinant AKAP95 restores intranuclear MCM2 and replication in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest a role of AKAP95 in DNA replication by providing a scaffold for MCM2. PMID:12740381

  18. Structural disorder in proteins of the rhabdoviridae replication complex.

    PubMed

    Leyrat, Cédric; Gérard, Francine C A; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Ivanov, Ivan; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc

    2010-08-01

    Rhabdoviridae are single stranded negative sense RNA viruses. The viral RNA condensed by the nucleoprotein (N), the phosphoprotein (P) and the large subunit (L) of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase are the viral components of the transcription/replication machineries. Both P and N contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) that play different roles in the virus life cycle. Here, we describe the modular organization of P based on recent structural, biophysical and bioinformatics data. We show how flexible loops in N participate in the attachment of P to the N-RNA template by an induced-fit mechanism. Finally, we discuss the roles of IDRs in the mechanism of replication/transcription, and propose a new model for the interaction of the L subunit with its N-RNA template.

  19. Peptide Aptamers That Bind to a Geminivirus Replication Protein Interfere with Viral Replication in Plant Cells †

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Ochoa, Luisa; Ramirez-Prado, Jorge; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2006-01-01

    The AL1 protein of tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV), a member of the geminivirus family, is essential for viral replication in plants. Its N terminus contains three conserved motifs that mediate origin recognition and DNA cleavage during the initiation of rolling-circle replication. We used the N-terminal domain of TGMV AL1 as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a random peptide aptamer library constrained in the active site of the thioredoxin A (TrxA) gene. The screen selected 88 TrxA peptides that also bind to the full-length TGMV AL1 protein. Plant expression cassettes corresponding to the TrxA peptides and a TGMV A replicon encoding AL1 were cotransfected into tobacco protoplasts, and viral DNA replication was monitored by semiquantitative PCR. In these assays, 31 TrxA peptides negatively impacted TGMV DNA accumulation, reducing viral DNA levels to 13 to 64% of those of the wild type. All of the interfering aptamers also bound to the AL1 protein of cabbage leaf curl virus. A comparison of the 20-mer peptides revealed that their sequences are not random. The alignments detected seven potential binding motifs, five of which are more highly represented among the interfering peptides. One motif was present in 18 peptides, suggesting that these peptides interact with a hot spot in the AL1 N terminus. The peptide aptamers characterized in these studies represent new tools for studying AL1 function and can serve as the basis for the development of crops with broad-based resistance to single-stranded DNA viruses. PMID:16731923

  20. P1 plasmid replication: measurement of initiator protein concentration in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Swack, J A; Pal, S K; Mason, R J; Abeles, A L; Chattoraj, D K

    1987-01-01

    To study the functions of the mini-P1 replication initiation protein RepA quantitatively, we have developed a method to measure RepA concentration by using immunoblotting. In vivo, there are about 20 RepA dimers per unit-copy plasmid DNA. RepA was deduced to be a dimer from gel filtration of the purified protein. Since there are 14 binding sites of the protein per replicon, the physiological concentration of the protein appears to be sufficiently low to be a rate-limiting factor for replication. Autoregulation is apparently responsible for the low protein level; at the physiological concentration of the protein, the repA promoter retains only 0.1% of its full activity as determined by gene fusions to lacZ. When the concentration is further decreased by a factor of 3 or increased by a factor of 40, replication is no longer detectable. Images PMID:3611028

  1. Reorganization of terminator DNA upon binding replication terminator protein: implications for the functional replication fork arrest complex.

    PubMed

    Kralicek, A V; Wilson, P K; Ralston, G B; Wake, R G; King, G F

    1997-02-01

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. While determination of the crystal structure of RTP has facilitated our understanding of how a single RTP dimer interacts with terminator DNA, additional information is required in order to understand the assembly of a functional fork arrest complex, which requires an interaction between two RTP dimers and the terminator site. In this study, we show that the conformation of the major B.subtilis DNA terminator,TerI, becomes considerably distorted upon binding RTP. Binding of the first dimer of RTP to the B site of TerI causes the DNA to become slightly unwound and bent by approximately 40 degrees. Binding of a second dimer of RTP to the A site causes the bend angle to increase to approximately 60 degrees . We have used this new data to construct two plausible models that might explain how the ternary terminator complex can block DNA replication in a polar manner. In the first model, polarity of action is a consequence of the two RTP-DNA half-sites having different conformations. These different conformations result from different RTP-DNA contacts at each half-site (due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the terminator DNA), as well as interactions (direct or indirect) between the RTP dimers on the DNA. In the second model, polar fork arrest activity is a consequence of the different affinities of RTP for the A and B sites of the terminator DNA, modulated significantly by direct or indirect interactions between the RTP dimers.

  2. Complex of Escherichia coli primary replicative helicase DnaB protein with a replication fork: recognition and structure.

    PubMed

    Jezewska, M J; Rajendran, S; Bujalowski, W

    1998-03-01

    Interactions of the Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB protein, with DNA replication fork substrates, have been studied using rigorous fluorescence titration, fluorescence energy transfer, and analytical ultracentrifugation methods. DnaB binds the 5' single-arm fork, the 3' single-arm fork, and the two-arm fork with stoichiometries of 1, 1, and 2 DnaB hexamers per fork, independent of the length of the duplex part of the fork. Within the structurally heterogeneous binding site, the helicase accesses most of the 20 nucleotide residues of an arm. The dsDNA of the fork does not contribute to the affinity; however, it affects the positioning of the enzyme on the 5' or 3' arm. Fluorescence energy transfer experiments provide direct evidence that the DnaB helicase binds the 5' arm of the fork in a single orientation, with respect to the duplex part of the fork. The 33-kDa domains of the hexamer face the dsDNA, while the small 12-kDa domains face the 5' end of the arm. In the complex with the 3' arm, the helicase is bound in an opposite orientation when compared to the 5' arm. This is the first determination of the strict, single orientation of a helicase in the complex with a replication fork. The 3' arm accommodates a DnaB hexamer, while another hexamer is associated with the 5' arm. The complex of two DnaB hexamers bound in opposite orientations with each arm of the fork may play an important role during bidirectional replication of the E. coli DNA.

  3. Interaction between Brome mosaic virus proteins and RNAs: effects on RNA replication, protein expression, and RNA stability.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, K; Dragnea, B; Kao, C

    2005-11-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication has been examined in a number of systems, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed an efficient T-DNA-based gene delivery system using Agrobacterium tumefaciens to transiently express BMV RNAs in Nicotiana benthamiana. The expressed RNAs can systemically infect plants and provide material to extract BMV replicase that can perform template-dependent RNA-dependent RNA synthesis in vitro. We also expressed the four BMV-encoded proteins from nonreplicating RNAs and analyzed their effects on BMV RNA accumulation. The capsid protein that coinfiltrated with constructs expressing RNA1 and RNA2 suppressed minus-strand levels but increased plus-strand RNA accumulation. The replication proteins 1a and 2a could function in trans to replicate and transcribe the BMV RNAs. None of the BMV proteins or RNA could efficiently suppress posttranscriptional silencing. However, 1a expressed in trans will suppress the production of a recombinant green fluorescent protein expressed from the nontranslated portions of BMV RNA1 and RNA2, suggesting that 1a may regulate translation from BMV RNAs. BMV replicase proteins 1a did not affect the accumulation of the BMV RNAs in the absence of RNA replication, unlike the situation reported for S. cerevisiae. This work demonstrates that the Agrobacterium-mediated gene delivery system can be used to study the cis- and trans-acting requirements for BMV RNA replication in plants and that significant differences can exist for BMV RNA replication in different hosts.

  4. Regulated transport into the nucleus of herpesviridae DNA replication core proteins.

    PubMed

    Gualtiero, Alvisi; Jans, David A; Camozzi, Daria; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Ripalti, Alessandro; Palù, Giorgio

    2013-09-16

    The Herpesvirdae family comprises several major human pathogens belonging to three distinct subfamilies. Their double stranded DNA genome is replicated in the nuclei of infected cells by a number of host and viral products. Among the latter the viral replication complex, whose activity is strictly required for viral replication, is composed of six different polypeptides, including a two-subunit DNA polymerase holoenzyme, a trimeric primase/helicase complex and a single stranded DNA binding protein. The study of herpesviral DNA replication machinery is extremely important, both because it provides an excellent model to understand processes related to eukaryotic DNA replication and it has important implications for the development of highly needed antiviral agents. Even though all known herpesviruses utilize very similar mechanisms for amplification of their genomes, the nuclear import of the replication complex components appears to be a heterogeneous and highly regulated process to ensure the correct spatiotemporal localization of each protein. The nuclear transport process of these enzymes is controlled by three mechanisms, typifying the main processes through which protein nuclear import is generally regulated in eukaryotic cells. These include cargo post-translational modification-based recognition by the intracellular transporters, piggy-back events allowing coordinated nuclear import of multimeric holoenzymes, and chaperone-assisted nuclear import of specific subunits. In this review we summarize these mechanisms and discuss potential implications for the development of antiviral compounds aimed at inhibiting the Herpesvirus life cycle by targeting nuclear import of the Herpesvirus DNA replicating enzymes.

  5. Different roles of the human Orc6 protein in the replication initiation process.

    PubMed

    Thomae, Andreas W; Baltin, Jens; Pich, Dagmar; Deutsch, Manuel J; Ravasz, Máté; Zeller, Krisztina; Gossen, Manfred; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Schepers, Aloys

    2011-11-01

    In eukaryotes, binding of the six-subunit origin recognition complex (ORC) to DNA provides an interactive platform for the sequential assembly of pre-replicative complexes. This process licenses replication origins competent for the subsequent initiation step. Here, we analyze the contribution of human Orc6, the smallest subunit of ORC, to DNA binding and pre-replicative complex formation. We show that Orc6 not only interacts with Orc1-Orc5 but also with the initiation factor Cdc6. Biochemical and imaging experiments reveal that this interaction is required for licensing DNA replication competent. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Orc6 contributes to the interaction of ORC with the chaperone protein HMGA1a (high mobility group protein A1a). Binding of human ORC to replication origins is not specified at the level of DNA sequence and the functional organization of origins is poorly understood. We have identified HMGA1a as one factor that might direct ORC to AT-rich heterochromatic regions. The systematic analysis of the interaction between ORC and HMGA1a revealed that Orc6 interacts with the acidic C-terminus of HMGA1a and also with its AT-hooks. Both domains support autonomous replication if targeted to DNA templates. As such, Orc6 functions at different stages of the replication initiation process. Orc6 can interact with ORC chaperone proteins such as HMGA1a to facilitate chromatin binding of ORC and is also an essential factor for pre-RC formation. PMID:21461783

  6. Homeotic proteins participate in the function of human-DNA replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Laura; Comelli, Laura; D’Innocenzo, Barbara; Puzzi, Luca; Luin, Stefano; Arosio, Daniele; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Peverali, Fiorenzo; Trovato, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Beltram, Fabio; Falaschi, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence points to homeotic proteins as actors in the crosstalk between development and DNA replication. The present work demonstrates that HOXC13, previously identified as a new member of human DNA replicative complexes, is a stable component of early replicating chromatin in living cells: it displays a slow nuclear dynamics due to its anchoring to the DNA minor groove via the arginine-5 residue of the homeodomain. HOXC13 binds in vivo to the lamin B2 origin in a cell-cycle-dependent manner consistent with origin function; the interaction maps with nucleotide precision within the replicative complex. HOXC13 displays in vitro affinity for other replicative complex proteins; it interacts also in vivo with the same proteins in a cell-cycle-dependent fashion. Chromatin-structure modifying treatments, disturbing origin function, reduce also HOXC13–origin interaction. The described interactions are not restricted to a single origin nor to a single homeotic protein (also HOXC10 binds the lamin B2 origin in vivo). Thus, HOX complexes probably contribute in a general, structure-dependent manner, to origin identification and assembly of replicative complexes thereon, in presence of specific chromatin configurations. PMID:20693533

  7. A Unique Role for the Host ESCRT Proteins in Replication of Tomato bushy stunt virus

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Daniel; Jiang, Yi; Nagy, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    Plus-stranded RNA viruses replicate in infected cells by assembling viral replicase complexes consisting of viral- and host-coded proteins. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in a yeast model host revealed the involvement of seven ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) proteins in viral replication. In this paper, we show that the expression of dominant negative Vps23p, Vps24p, Snf7p, and Vps4p ESCRT factors inhibited virus replication in the plant host, suggesting that tombusviruses co-opt selected ESCRT proteins for the assembly of the viral replicase complex. We also show that TBSV p33 replication protein interacts with Vps23p ESCRT-I and Bro1p accessory ESCRT factors. The interaction with p33 leads to the recruitment of Vps23p to the peroxisomes, the sites of TBSV replication. The viral replicase showed reduced activity and the minus-stranded viral RNA in the replicase became more accessible to ribonuclease when derived from vps23Δ or vps24Δ yeast, suggesting that the protection of the viral RNA is compromised within the replicase complex assembled in the absence of ESCRT proteins. The recruitment of ESCRT proteins is needed for the precise assembly of the replicase complex, which might help the virus evade recognition by the host defense surveillance system and/or prevent viral RNA destruction by the gene silencing machinery. PMID:20041173

  8. Protein aggregates are associated with replicative aging without compromising protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Saarikangas, Juha; Barral, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of cellular lineages is facilitated by asymmetric segregation of fate determinants between dividing cells. In budding yeast, various aging factors segregate to the aging (mother)-lineage, with poorly understood consequences. In this study, we show that yeast mother cells form a protein aggregate during early replicative aging that is maintained as a single, asymmetrically inherited deposit over the remaining lifespan. Surprisingly, deposit formation was not associated with stress or general decline in proteostasis. Rather, the deposit-containing cells displayed enhanced degradation of cytosolic proteasome substrates and unimpaired clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates. Deposit formation was dependent on Hsp42, which collected non-random client proteins of the Hsp104/Hsp70-refolding machinery, including the prion Sup35. Importantly, loss of Hsp42 resulted in symmetric inheritance of its constituents and prolonged the lifespan of the mother cell. Together, these data suggest that protein aggregation is an early aging-associated differentiation event in yeast, having a two-faceted role in organismal fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06197.001 PMID:26544680

  9. Detecting the ability of viral, bacterial and eukaryotic replication proteins to track along DNA.

    PubMed

    Tinker, R L; Kassavetis, G A; Geiduschek, E P

    1994-11-15

    The phage T4 gene 45 protein (gp45), Escherichia coli beta and the eukaryotic proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) function in replication as processivity factors of their corresponding DNA polymerases. The T4 gp45 also functions as the transcriptional activator that connects expression of viral late genes to DNA replication. DNA tracking is an essential component of the replication and transcription regulatory functions of T4 gp45. The ability of gp45, beta and PCNA to track along DNA has been analyzed by photocrosslinking. Each of these proteins must be loaded onto DNA by a species-specific assembly factor. For gp45 and beta, the density of traffic along DNA is determined by a dynamic balance between continuous protein loading and unloading, and is also dependent on interaction with the conjugate single-stranded DNA binding protein.

  10. Cyclophilin A Restricts Influenza A Virus Replication through Degradation of the M1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chongfeng; Sun, Lei; Chen, Jilong; Zhang, Lianfeng; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    Cyclophilin A (CypA) is a typical member of the cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases and is involved in the replication of several viruses. Previous studies indicate that CypA interacts with influenza virus M1 protein and impairs the early stage of the viral replication. To further understand the molecular mechanism by which CypA impairs influenza virus replication, a 293T cell line depleted for endogenous CypA was established. The results indicated that CypA inhibited the initiation of virus replication. In addition, the infectivity of influenza virus increased in the absence of CypA. Further studies indicated that CypA had no effect on the stages of virus genome replication or transcription and also did not impair the nuclear export of the viral mRNA. However, CypA decreased the viral protein level. Additional studies indicated that CypA enhanced the degradation of M1 through the ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent pathway. Our results suggest that CypA restricts influenza virus replication through accelerating degradation of the M1 protein. PMID:22347431

  11. A leucine zipper motif determines different functions in a DNA replication protein.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de Viedma, D; Giraldo, R; Rivas, G; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Diaz-Orejas, R

    1996-01-01

    RepA is the replication initiator protein of the Pseudomonas plasmid pPS10 and is also able to autoregulate its own synthesis. Here we report a genetic and functional analysis of a leucine zipper-like (LZ) motif located at the N-terminus of RepA. It is shown that the LZ motif modulates the equilibrium between monomeric and dimeric forms of the protein and that monomers of RepA interact with sequences at the origin of replication, oriV, while dimers are required for interactions of RepA at the repA promoter. Further, different residues of the LZ motif are seen to have different functional roles. Leucines at the d positions of the putative alpha-helix are relevant in the formation of RepA dimers required for transcriptional autoregulation. They also modulate other RepA-RepA interactions that result in cooperative binding of protein monomers to the origin of replication. The residues at the b/f positions of the putative helix play no relevant role in RepA-RepA interactions. These residues do not affect RepA autoregulation but do influence replication, as demonstrated by mutants that, without affecting binding to oriV, either increase the host range of the plasmid or are inactive in replication. It is proposed that residues in b/f positions play a relevant role in interactions between RepA and host replication factors. Images PMID:8631313

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Co-Opts Ras-GTPase-Activating Protein-Binding Protein 1 for Its Genome Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhigang; Pan, Tingting; Wu, Xianfang; Song, Wuhui; Wang, Shanshan; Xu, Yan; Rice, Charles M.; MacDonald, Margaret R.; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that Ras-GTPase-activating protein-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) interacts with hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein (NS)5B and the 5′ end of the HCV minus-strand RNA. In the current study we confirmed these observations using immunoprecipitation and RNA pulldown assays, suggesting that G3BP1 might be an HCV replication complex (RC) component. In replicon cells, transfected G3BP1 interacts with multiple HCV nonstructural proteins. Using immunostaining and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that G3BP1 is colocalized with HCV RCs in replicon cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of G3BP1 moderately reduces established HCV RNA replication in HCV replicon cells and dramatically reduces HCV replication-dependent colony formation and cell-culture-produced HCV (HCVcc) infection. In contrast, knockdown of G3BP2 has no effect on HCVcc infection. Transient replication experiments show that G3BP1 is involved in HCV genome amplification. Thus, G3BP1 is associated with HCV RCs and may be co-opted as a functional RC component for viral replication. These findings may facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HCV genome replication. PMID:21561913

  13. Regulation of SUMO2 target proteins by the proteasome in human cells exposed to replication stress.

    PubMed

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role of the proteasome in determining the fate of proteins conjugated to SUMO2 when cells are treated with DNA replication stress conditions. We conducted a quantitative proteomic analysis in a U2OS cell line stably expressing SUMO2(Q87R) tagged with StrepHA in the presence or absence of epoxomicin (EPOX), a proteasome inhibitor. We identified subgroups of putative SUMO2 targets that were either degraded or stabilized by EPOX upon SUMO2 conjugation in response to replication stress. Interestingly, the subgroup of proteins degraded upon SUMO2 conjugation was enriched in proteins playing roles in DNA damage repair and replication, while the proteins stabilized upon SUMOylation were mainly involved in chromatin maintenance. In addition, we identified 43 SUMOylation sites in target proteins, of which 17 are located in the proximity of phosphorylated residues. Considering that DNA replication stress is a major source of genome instability, which is suggested to drive tumorigenesis and possibly aging, our data will facilitate future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology. PMID:25748227

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr protein kinase B mediates an oxygen-dependent replication switch

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, Corrie; Liao, Reiling; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Rustad, Tige; Ollodart, Anja R.; Wright, Aaron T.; Sherman, David R.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-07

    In the majority of cases, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections are clinically latent, characterized by little or no bacterial replication and drug tolerance. Low oxygen tension is a major host factor inducing bacteriostasis, but the molecular mechanisms driving oxygen-dependent replication are poorly understood. Mtb encodes eleven serine/threonine protein kinases, a family of signaling molecules known to regulate similar replicative adaptations in other bacteria. Here, we tested the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in the Mtb response to altered oxygen status, using an in vitro model of latency (hypoxia) and reactivation (reaeration). Broad kinase inhibition compromised survival of Mtb in hypoxia. Activity-based protein profiling and genetic mutation identified PknB as the kinase critical for surviving hypoxia. Mtb replication was highly sensitive to changes in PknB levels in aerated culture, and even more so in hypoxia. A mutant overexpressing PknB specifically in hypoxia showed a 10-fold loss in viability in low oxygen conditions. In contrast, chemically reducing PknB activity during hypoxia specifically compromised resumption of growth during reaeration. These data support a model in which PknB activity is reduced to achieve bacteriostasis, and elevated when replication resumes. Together, these data show that phosphosignaling controls replicative transitions associated with latency and reactivation, that PknB is a major regulator of these transitions, and that PknB could provide a highly vulnerable therapeutic target at every step of the Mtb life cycle - active disease, latency, and reactivation.

  15. Essential role of protein kinase R antagonism by TRS1 in human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Braggin, Jacquelyn E; Child, Stephanie J; Geballe, Adam P

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lacking TRS1 and IRS1 (HCMV[ΔI/ΔT]) cannot replicate in cell culture. Although both proteins can block the protein kinase R (PKR) pathway, they have multiple other activities and binding partners. It remains unknown which functions are essential for HCMV replication. To investigate this issue, we first identified a TRS1 mutant that is unable to bind to PKR. Like HCMV[ΔI/ΔT], a recombinant HCMV containing this mutant (HCMV[TRS1-Mut 1]) did not replicate in wild-type cells. However, HCMV[ΔI/ΔT] did replicate in cells in which PKR expression was reduced by RNA interference. Moreover, HCMV[ΔI/ΔT] and HCMV[TRS1-Mut 1] replicated to similar levels as virus containing wild-type TRS1 in cell lines in which PKR expression was knocked out by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. These results demonstrate that the sole essential function of TRS1 is to antagonize PKR and that its other activities do not substantially enhance HCMV replication, at least in cultured human fibroblasts.

  16. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein-mediated regulation of hepatocyte metabolic pathways affects viral replication.

    PubMed

    Bagga, Sumedha; Rawat, Siddhartha; Ajenjo, Marcia; Bouchard, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Chronic HBV infection is a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The HBV HBx protein stimulates HBV replication and likely influences the development of HBV-associated HCC. Whether HBx affects regulators of metabolism in normal hepatocytes has not been addressed. We used an ex vivo, cultured primary rat hepatocyte system to assess the interplay between HBV replication and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. HBx activated mTORC1 signaling; however, inhibition of mTORC1 enhanced HBV replication. HBx also decreased ATP levels and activated the energy-sensing factor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inhibition of AMPK decreased HBV replication. Inhibition of AMPK activates mTORC1, and we showed that activated mTORC1 is one factor that reduces HBV replication when AMPK is inhibited. HBx activation of both AMPK and mTORC1 suggests that these activities could provide a balancing mechanism to facilitate persistent HBV replication. HBx activation of mTORC1 and AMPK could also influence HCC development.

  17. ITRACONAZOLE INHIBITS ENTEROVIRUS REPLICATION BY TARGETING THE OXYSTEROL-BINDING PROTEIN

    PubMed Central

    Strating, Jeroen R.P.M.; van der Linden, Lonneke; Albulescu, Lucian; Bigay, Joëlle; Arita, Minetaro; Delang, Leen; Leyssen, Pieter; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Lanke, Kjerstin H.W.; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Ulferts, Rachel; Drin, Guillaume; Schlinck, Nina; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Sever, Navdar; Head, Sarah A.; Liu, Jun O.; Beachy, Philip A.; De Matteis, Maria A.; Shair, Matthew D.; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Itraconazole (ITZ) is a well-known antifungal agent that also has anti-cancer activity. In this study, we identified ITZ as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses (e.g. poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-71, rhinovirus). We demonstrate that ITZ inhibits viral RNA replication by targeting oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and OSBP-related protein 4 (ORP4). Consistently, OSW-1, a specific OSBP/ORP4 antagonist, also inhibits enterovirus replication. Knockdown of OSBP inhibits virus replication whereas overexpression of OSBP or ORP4 counteracts the antiviral effects of ITZ and OSW-1. ITZ binds OSBP and inhibits its function, i.e. shuttling of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate between membranes, thereby likely perturbing the virus-induced membrane alterations essential for viral replication organelle formation. ITZ also inhibits hepatitis C virus replication, which also relies on OSBP. Together, these data implicate OSBP/ORP4 as novel molecular targets of ITZ and point to an essential role of OSBP/ORP4-mediated lipid exchange in virus replication that can be targeted by antiviral drugs. PMID:25640182

  18. Protein import, replication, and inheritance of a vestigial mitochondrion.

    PubMed

    Regoes, Attila; Zourmpanou, Danai; León-Avila, Gloria; van der Giezen, Mark; Tovar, Jorge; Hehl, Adrian B

    2005-08-26

    Mitochondrial remnant organelles (mitosomes) that exist in a range of "amitochondrial" eukaryotic organisms represent ideal models for the study of mitochondrial evolution and for the establishment of the minimal set of proteins required for the biogenesis of an endosymbiosis-derived organelle. Giardia intestinalis, often described as the earliest branching eukaryote, contains double membrane-bounded structures involved in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, an essential function of mitochondria. Here we present evidence that Giardia mitosomes also harbor Cpn60, mtHsp70, and ferredoxin and that despite their advanced state of reductive evolution they have retained vestiges of presequence-dependent and -independent protein import pathways akin to those that operate in mammalian mitochondria. Although import of IscU and ferredoxin is still reliant on their amino-terminal presequences, targeting of Giardia Cpn60, IscS, or mtHsp70 into mitosomes no longer requires cleavable presequences, a derived feature from their mitochondrial homologues. In addition, we found that division and segregation of a single centrally positioned mitosome tightly associated with the microtubular cytoskeleton is coordinated with the cell cycle, whereas peripherally located mitosomes are inherited into daughter cells stochastically. PMID:15985435

  19. Characterization of the nuclear localization signals of duck circovirus replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wu, Z; Xiang, Q; Li, Z; Zhang, R; Chen, J; Xia, L; Lin, S; Yu, W; Ma, Z; Xie, Z; Jiang, S

    2015-12-01

    Duck circovirus (DuCV) possess a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for its replication. Based on the viral genotype, there are two categories of Rep proteins: Rep1 and Rep2. To characterize the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) conferring the nuclear localization of the Rep proteins, defined coding regions of the rep gene of two genotypes of DuCV were cloned and co-expressed with the red fluorescent protein DsRed2. The results showed that deleting the putative N-terminal NLS located at amino acid residues 10-37 of Rep1 and Rep2 abrogated nuclear translocation, while deleting the putative C-terminal NLS located at residues 244-274 of Rep1 did not significantly alter its subcellular localization, confirming that only the NLS located at residues 10-37 in the N-termini of the Rep proteins had nuclear targeting activity.

  20. Characterization of the nuclear localization signals of duck circovirus replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wu, Z; Xiang, Q; Li, Z; Zhang, R; Chen, J; Xia, L; Lin, S; Yu, W; Ma, Z; Xie, Z; Jiang, S

    2015-12-01

    Duck circovirus (DuCV) possess a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for its replication. Based on the viral genotype, there are two categories of Rep proteins: Rep1 and Rep2. To characterize the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) conferring the nuclear localization of the Rep proteins, defined coding regions of the rep gene of two genotypes of DuCV were cloned and co-expressed with the red fluorescent protein DsRed2. The results showed that deleting the putative N-terminal NLS located at amino acid residues 10-37 of Rep1 and Rep2 abrogated nuclear translocation, while deleting the putative C-terminal NLS located at residues 244-274 of Rep1 did not significantly alter its subcellular localization, confirming that only the NLS located at residues 10-37 in the N-termini of the Rep proteins had nuclear targeting activity. PMID:26666192

  1. Discovery of a Potent Inhibitor of Replication Protein A Protein-Protein Interactions Using a Fragment Linking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Andreas O.; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Waterson, Alex G.; Pelz, Nicholas F.; Patrone, James D.; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, DeMarco V.; Rossanese, Olivia W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is involved in nearly all cellular DNA transactions. The RPA N-terminal domain (RPA70N) is a recruitment site for proteins involved in DNA damage response and repair. Selective inhibition of these protein-protein interactions has the potential to inhibit the DNA damage response and sensitize cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents without affecting other functions of RPA. To discover a potent, selective inhibitor of the RPA70N protein-protein interactions to test this hypothesis, we used NMR spectroscopy to identify fragment hits that bind to two adjacent sites in the basic cleft of RPA70N. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures of RPA70N-ligand complexes revealed how these fragments bind to RPA and guided the design of linked compounds that simultaneously occupy both sites. We have synthesized linked molecules that bind to RPA70N with submicromolar affinity and minimal disruption of RPA’s interaction with ssDNA. PMID:24147804

  2. The critical protein interactions and structures that elicit growth deregulation in cancer and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Ou, Horng D; May, Andrew P; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2011-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in biomedicine is to define the critical targets and network interactions that are subverted to elicit growth deregulation in human cells. Understanding and developing rational treatments for cancer requires a definition of the key molecular targets and how they interact to elicit the complex growth deregulation phenotype. Viral proteins provide discerning and powerful probes to understand both how cells work and how they can be manipulated using a minimal number of components. The small DNA viruses have evolved to target inherent weaknesses in cellular protein interaction networks to hijack the cellular DNA and protein replication machinery. In the battle to escape the inevitability of senescence and programmed cell death, cancers have converged on similar mechanisms, through the acquisition and selection of somatic mutations that drive unchecked cellular replication in tumors. Understanding the dynamic mechanisms through which a minimal number of viral proteins promote host cells to undergo unscheduled and pathological replication is a powerful strategy to identify critical targets that are also disrupted in cancer. Viruses can therefore be used as tools to probe the system-wide protein-protein interactions and structures that drive growth deregulation in human cells. Ultimately this can provide a path for developing system context-dependent therapeutics. This review will describe ongoing experimental approaches using viruses to study pathways deregulated in cancer, with a particular focus on viral cellular protein-protein interactions and structures. PMID:21061422

  3. Molecular insights into replication initiation by Qβ replicase using ribosomal protein S1

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Daijiro; Yamashita, Seisuke; Tomita, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1, consisting of six contiguous OB-folds, is the largest ribosomal protein and is essential for translation initiation in Escherichia coli. S1 is also one of the three essential host-derived subunits of Qβ replicase, together with EF-Tu and EF-Ts, for Qβ RNA replication in E. coli. We analyzed the crystal structure of Qβ replicase, consisting of the virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (β-subunit), EF-Tu, EF-Ts and the N-terminal half of S1, which is capable of initiating Qβ RNA replication. Structural and biochemical studies revealed that the two N-terminal OB-folds of S1 anchor S1 onto the β-subunit, and the third OB-fold is mobile and protrudes beyond the surface of the β-subunit. The third OB-fold mainly interacts with a specific RNA fragment derived from the internal region of Qβ RNA, and its RNA-binding ability is required for replication initiation of Qβ RNA. Thus, the third mobile OB-fold of S1, which is spatially anchored near the surface of the β-subunit, primarily recruits the Qβ RNA toward the β-subunit, leading to the specific and efficient replication initiation of Qβ RNA, and S1 functions as a replication initiation factor, beyond its established function in protein synthesis. PMID:25122749

  4. The Escherichia coli Fis protein prevents initiation of DNA replication from oriC in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wold, S; Crooke, E; Skarstad, K

    1996-01-01

    Fis protein participates in the normal control of chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli. However, the mechanism by which it executes its effect is largely unknown. We demonstrate an inhibitory influence of purified Fis protein on replication from oriC in vitro. Fis inhibits DNA synthesis equally well in replication systems either dependent upon or independent of RNA polymerase, even when the latter is stimulated by the presence of HU or IHF. The extent of inhibition by Fis is modulated by the concentrations of DnaA protein and RNA polymerase; the more limiting the amounts of these, the more severe the inhibition by Fis. Thus, the level of inhibition seems to depend on the ease with which the open complex can be formed. Fis-mediated inhibition of DNA replication does not depend on a functional primary Fis binding site between DnaA boxes R2 and R3 in oriC, as mutations that cause reduced binding of Fis to this site do not affect the degree of inhibition. The data presented suggest that Fis prevents formation of an initiation-proficient structure at oriC by forming an alternative, initiation-preventive complex. This indicates a negative role for Fis in the regulation of replication initiation. PMID:8836178

  5. NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of the replication initiator protein DnaA

    SciTech Connect

    Wemmer, David E.; Lowery, Thomas J.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Rosalind; Yokota, Hisao; Wemmer, David E.

    2007-08-07

    DnaA is an essential component in the initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication. DnaA binds to a series of 9 base pair repeats leading to oligomerization, recruitment of the DnaBC helicase, and the assembly of the replication fork machinery. The structure of the N-terminal domain (residues 1-100) of DnaA from Mycoplasma genitalium was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The backbone r.m.s.d. for the first 86 residues was 0.6 +/- 0.2 Angstrom based on 742 NOE, 50 hydrogen bond, 46 backbone angle, and 88 residual dipolar coupling restraints. Ultracentrifugation studies revealed that the domain is monomeric in solution. Features on the protein surface include a hydrophobic cleft flanked by several negative residues on one side, and positive residues on the other. A negatively charged ridge is present on the opposite face of the protein. These surfaces may be important sites of interaction with other proteins involved in the replication process. Together, the structure and NMR assignments should facilitate the design of new experiments to probe the protein-protein interactions essential for the initiation of DNA replication.

  6. Strand specificity in the interactions of Escherichia coli primary replicative helicase DnaB protein with a replication fork.

    PubMed

    Jezewska, M J; Rajendran, S; Bujalowski, W

    1997-08-19

    The interactions of the Escherichia coli primary replicative helicase DnaB protein, with synthetic DNA replication fork substrates, having either a single arm or both arms, have been studied using the thermodynamically rigorous fluorescence titration techniques. This approach allows us to obtain absolute stoichiometries of the formed complexes and interaction parameters without any assumptions about the relationship between the observed signal (fluorescence) and the degree of binding. Subsequently, the formation of the complexes, with different replication fork substrates, has also been characterized using the sedimentation velocity technique. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative characterization of interactions of a hexameric helicase with replication fork substrates. In the presence of the ATP nonhydrolyzable analog, AMP-PNP, the E. coli DnaB helicase preferentially binds to the 5' arm of the single-arm fork substrate with an intrinsic affinity 6-fold higher than its affinity for the 3' arm. ATP hydrolysis is not necessary for formation of the helicase-fork complex. The asymmetric interactions are consistent with the 5' --> 3' directionality of the helicase activity of the DnaB protein and most probably reflects a preferential 5' --> 3' polarity in the helicase binding to ssDNA, with respect to the ssDNA backbone. The double-stranded part of the fork contributes little to the free energy of binding. The data indicate a rather passive role of the duplex part of the fork in the binding of the helicase. This role seems to be limited to impose steric hindrance in the formation of nonproductive complexes of the enzyme with the fork. Quantitative analysis of binding of the helicase to the two-arm fork substrate shows that two DnaB hexamers can bind to the fork, with each single hexamer associated with a single arm of the fork. In this complex, the intrinsic affinity of the DnaB hexamer for the 5' arm in a two-arm fork is not affected by the presence of the

  7. A Dimeric Rep Protein Initiates Replication of a Linear Archaeal Virus Genome: Implications for the Rep Mechanism and Viral Replication ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Oke, Muse; Kerou, Melina; Liu, Huanting; Peng, Xu; Garrett, Roger A.; Prangishvili, David; Naismith, James H.; White, Malcolm F.

    2011-01-01

    The Rudiviridae are a family of rod-shaped archaeal viruses with covalently closed, linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Their replication mechanisms remain obscure, although parallels have been drawn to the Poxviridae and other large cytoplasmic eukaryotic viruses. Here we report that a protein encoded in the 34-kbp genome of the rudivirus SIRV1 is a member of the replication initiator (Rep) superfamily of proteins, which initiate rolling-circle replication (RCR) of diverse viruses and plasmids. We show that SIRV Rep nicks the viral hairpin terminus, forming a covalent adduct between an active-site tyrosine and the 5′ end of the DNA, releasing a 3′ DNA end as a primer for DNA synthesis. The enzyme can also catalyze the joining reaction that is necessary to reseal the DNA hairpin and terminate replication. The dimeric structure points to a simple mechanism through which two closely positioned active sites, each with a single tyrosine residue, work in tandem to catalyze DNA nicking and joining. We propose a novel mechanism for rudivirus DNA replication, incorporating the first known example of a Rep protein that is not linked to RCR. The implications for Rep protein function and viral replication are discussed. PMID:21068244

  8. The deoxyribonucleic acid unwinding protein of Escherichia coli. Properties and functions in replication.

    PubMed

    Weiner, J H; Bertsch, L L; Kornberg, A

    1975-03-25

    The DNA unwinding protein of Escherichia coli (Sigal, N., Delius, H., Kornberg, T., Gefter, M., and Alberts, B. (1972) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 69, 3537-3541) has been purified to homogeneity by a simple procedure which utilizes its stability to heating. The protein is an asymmetric tetramer of 18,500 dalton subunits which binds preferentially to single-stranded DNA at a ratio of one protein molecule per 32 nucleotides. Binding to DNA is complete in less than 10 s at 0 degrees while release of the protein from single-stranded DNA is relatively slow even at 37 degrees. A simple functional assay for unwinding protein depends on its essential role in the conversion of phage G4 single-stranded DNA to the replicative form. Unwinding protein stimulates initiation of replication of all single-stranded phage DNAs. Approximately 300 copies of unwinding protein are present per cell, as estimated by antibody titration, an amount sufficient to cover substantial lengths of DNA in several replicating forks.

  9. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Pavana M.; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K.; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells. PMID:26134572

  10. Cellular Casein Kinase 2 and Protein Phosphatase 2A Modulate Replication Site Assembly of Bluetongue Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    A number of cytoplasmic replicating viruses produce cytoplasmic inclusion bodies or protein aggregates; however, a hallmark of viruses of the Reoviridae family is that they utilize these sites for purposes of replication and capsid assembly, functioning as viral assembly factories. Here we have used bluetongue virus (BTV) as a model system for this broad family of important viruses to understand the mechanisms regulating inclusion body assembly. Newly synthesized viral proteins interact with sequestered viral RNA molecules prior to capsid assembly and double-stranded RNA synthesis within viral inclusion bodies (VIBs). VIBs are predominantly comprised of a BTV-encoded non-structural protein 2 (NS2). Previous in vitro studies indicated that casein kinase 2 (CK2) mediated the phosphorylation of NS2, which regulated the propensity of NS2 to form larger aggregates. Using targeted pharmacological reagents, specific mutation in the viral genome by reverse genetics and confocal microscopy, here we demonstrate that CK2 activity is important for BTV replication. Furthermore, we show that a novel host cell factor, protein phosphatase 2A, is involved in NS2 dephosphorylation and that, together with CK2, it regulates VIB morphology and virus replication. Thus, these two host enzymes influence the dynamic nature of VIB assembly/disassembly, and these concerted activities may be relevant to the assembly and the release of these cores from VIBs. PMID:27226558

  11. Analysis of protein dynamics at active, stalled, and collapsed replication forks.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Bianca M; Couch, Frank B; Feigerle, Jordan T; Bhaskara, Srividya; Hiebert, Scott W; Cortez, David

    2011-06-15

    Successful DNA replication and packaging of newly synthesized DNA into chromatin are essential to maintain genome integrity. Defects in the DNA template challenge genetic and epigenetic inheritance. Unfortunately, tracking DNA damage responses (DDRs), histone deposition, and chromatin maturation at replication forks is difficult in mammalian cells. Here we describe a technology called iPOND (isolation of proteins on nascent DNA) to analyze proteins at active and damaged replication forks at high resolution. Using this methodology, we define the timing of histone deposition and chromatin maturation. Class 1 histone deacetylases are enriched at replisomes and remove predeposition marks on histone H4. Chromatin maturation continues even when decoupled from replisome movement. Furthermore, fork stalling causes changes in the recruitment and phosphorylation of proteins at the damaged fork. Checkpoint kinases catalyze H2AX phosphorylation, which spreads from the stalled fork to include a large chromatin domain even prior to fork collapse and double-strand break formation. Finally, we demonstrate a switch in the DDR at persistently stalled forks that includes MRE11-dependent RAD51 assembly. These data reveal a dynamic recruitment of proteins and post-translational modifications at damaged forks and surrounding chromatin. Furthermore, our studies establish iPOND as a useful methodology to study DNA replication and chromatin maturation.

  12. Replication protein A subunit 3 and the iron efficiency response in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], iron deficiency results in interveinal chlorosis and decreased photosynthetic capacity, leading to stunting and yield loss. In this study, gene expression analyses investigated the role of soybean replication protein A (RPA) subunits during iron stress. Nine RP...

  13. Viperin: a multifunctional, interferon-inducible protein that regulates virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jun-Young; Yaneva, Rakina; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Viperin is an interferon-inducible protein that inhibits the replication of a variety of viruses by apparently diverse mechanisms. In some circumstances it also plays a role in intracellular signaling pathways. Its expression in mitochondria, revealed by infection with human cytomegalovirus, also affects cellular metabolic pathways. We review here the current status of our understanding of this unusual molecule. PMID:22177558

  14. Human Papillomavirus E2 Protein: Linking Replication, Transcription, and RNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Graham, Sheila V

    2016-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is tightly linked to differentiation of the infected epithelium. This means that viral proteins must exert control over epithelial gene expression in order to optimize viral production. The HPV E2 protein controls replication, transcription, and viral genome partitioning during the viral infectious life cycle. It consists of a nucleic acid-binding domain and a protein-protein interaction domain separated by a flexible serine and arginine-rich hinge region. Over the last few years, mounting evidence has uncovered an important new role for E2 in viral and cellular RNA processing. This Gem discusses the role of E2 in controlling the epithelial cellular environment and how E2 might act to coordinate late events in the viral replication cycle.

  15. The Drosophila suppressor of underreplication protein binds to late-replicating regions of polytene chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Makunin, I V; Volkova, E I; Belyaeva, E S; Nabirochkina, E N; Pirrotta, V; Zhimulev, I F

    2002-01-01

    In many late-replicating euchromatic regions of salivary gland polytene chromosomes, DNA is underrepresented. A mutation in the SuUR gene suppresses underreplication and leads to normal levels of DNA polytenization in these regions. We identified the SuUR gene and determined its structure. In the SuUR mutant stock a 6-kb insertion was found in the fourth exon of the gene. A single SuUR transcript is present at all stages of Drosophila development and is most abundant in adult females and embryos. The SuUR gene encodes a protein of 962 amino acids whose putative sequence is similar to the N-terminal part of SNF2/SWI2 proteins. Staining of salivary gland polytene chromosomes with antibodies directed against the SuUR protein shows that the protein is localized mainly in late-replicating regions and in regions of intercalary and pericentric heterochromatin. PMID:11901119

  16. Characteristics of DNA replication in isolated nuclei initiated by an aprotinin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1993-02-01

    Isolated cell nuclei were used as the source of template DNA to investigate the role of a cytosolic aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Computerized image cytometry demonstrated that the DNA content of individual nuclei increased significantly following incubation with ADR-containing preparations, and the extent of DNA synthesis is consistent with that allowed by the limiting concentration of dTTP. Thus, dTTP incorporation into isolated nuclei represents DNA synthesis and not parent strand repair. We found that dTTP incorporation into the isolated nuclei is dependent on DNA polymerase alpha (a principal polymerase in DNA replication) but that DNA polymerase beta (a principal polymerase in DNA repair processes) does not play a significant role in this system. Finally, neither aprotinin nor a previously described cytosolic ADR inhibitor can block the replication of nuclease-treated calf thymus DNA, while both strongly inhibit replication of DNA in isolated nuclei. This result, coupled with the relative ineffectiveness of nuclease-treated DNA compared with nuclear DNA to serve as a replicative template in this assay, argues against a significant contribution from repair or synthesis which initiates at a site of DNA damage. These data indicate that ADR-mediated incorporation of 3H-dTTP into isolated nuclei results from DNA replicative processes that are directly relevant to in vivo S phase events. PMID:7680045

  17. Effect of minichromosome maintenance protein 2 deficiency on the locations of DNA replication origins

    PubMed Central

    Kunnev, Dimiter; Freeland, Amy; Qin, Maochun; Leach, Robert W.; Wang, Jianmin; Shenoy, Rajani M.

    2015-01-01

    Minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins are loaded onto chromatin during G1-phase and define potential locations of DNA replication initiation. MCM protein deficiency results in genome instability and high rates of cancer in mouse models. Here we develop a method of nascent strand capture and release and show that MCM2 deficiency reduces DNA replication initiation in gene-rich regions of the genome. DNA structural properties are shown to correlate with sequence motifs associated with replication origins and with locations that are preferentially affected by MCM2 deficiency. Reduced nascent strand density correlates with sites of recurrent focal CNVs in tumors arising in MCM2-deficient mice, consistent with a direct relationship between sites of reduced DNA replication initiation and genetic damage. Between 10% and 90% of human tumors, depending on type, carry heterozygous loss or mutation of one or more MCM2-7 genes, which is expected to compromise DNA replication origin licensing and result in elevated rates of genome damage at a subset of gene-rich locations. PMID:25762552

  18. Conservation of structure and function of DNA replication protein A in the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, G W; Melendy, T E; Ray, D S

    1992-01-01

    Human replication protein A (RP-A) is a three-subunit protein that is required for simian virus 40 (SV40) replication in vitro. The trypanosome homologue of RP-A has been purified from Crithidia fasciculata. It is a 1:1:1 complex of three polypeptides of 51, 28, and 14 kDa, binds single-stranded DNA via the large subunit, and is localized within the nucleus. C. fasciculata RP-A substitutes for human RP-A in the large tumor antigen-dependent unwinding of the SV40 origin of replication and stimulates both DNA synthesis and DNA priming by human DNA polymerase alpha/primase, but it does not support efficient SV40 DNA replication in vitro. This extraordinary conservation of structure and function between human and trypanosome RP-A suggests that the mechanism of DNA replication, at both the initiation and the elongation level, is conserved in organisms that diverged from the main eukaryotic lineage very early in evolution. Images PMID:1332038

  19. Discovery of a Potent Inhibitor of Replication Protein A Protein-Protein Interactions Using a Fragment-Linking Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Andreas O.; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Kennedy, J. Phillip; Waterson, Alex G.; Pelz, Nicholas F.; Patrone, James D.; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Camper, DeMarco V.; Rossanese, Olivia W.; Chazin, Walter J.; Fesik, Stephen W.

    2013-10-22

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, is involved in nearly all cellular DNA transactions. The RPA N-terminal domain (RPA70N) is a recruitment site for proteins involved in DNA-damage response and repair. Selective inhibition of these protein–protein interactions has the potential to inhibit the DNA-damage response and to sensitize cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents without affecting other functions of RPA. To discover a potent, selective inhibitor of the RPA70N protein–protein interactions to test this hypothesis, we used NMR spectroscopy to identify fragment hits that bind to two adjacent sites in the basic cleft of RPA70N. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures of RPA70N–ligand complexes revealed how these fragments bind to RPA and guided the design of linked compounds that simultaneously occupy both sites. We have synthesized linked molecules that bind to RPA70N with submicromolar affinity and minimal disruption of RPA’s interaction with ssDNA.

  20. Construction of green fluorescent protein-tagged recombinant iridovirus to assess viral replication.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youhua; Huang, Xiaohong; Cai, Jia; Ye, Fuzhou; Guan, Liya; Liu, Hong; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein-tagged recombinant virus has been successfully applied to observing the infective dynamics and evaluating viral replication. Here, we identified soft-shelled turtle iridovirus (STIV) ORF55 as an envelope protein (VP55), and developed a recombinant STIV expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to VP55 (EGFP-STIV). Recombinant EGFP-STIV shared similar single-step growth curves and ultrastructural morphology with wild type STIV (wt-STIV). The green fluorescence distribution during EGFP-STIV infection was consistent with the intracellular distribution of VP55 which was mostly co-localized with virus assembly sites. Furthermore, EGFP-STIV could be used to evaluate viral replication conveniently under drug treatment, and the result showed that STIV replication was significantly inhibited after the addition of antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). Thus, the EGFP-tagged recombinant iridovirus will not only be useful for further investigations on the viral replicative dynamics, but also provide an alternative simple strategy to screen for antiviral substances.

  1. Nuclear Trafficking of Retroviral RNAs and Gag Proteins during Late Steps of Replication

    PubMed Central

    Stake, Matthew S.; Bann, Darrin V.; Kaddis, Rebecca J.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses exploit nuclear trafficking machinery at several distinct stages in their replication cycles. In this review, we will focus primarily on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking events that occur after the completion of reverse transcription and proviral integration. First, we will discuss nuclear export of unspliced viral RNA transcripts, which serves two essential roles: as the mRNA template for the translation of viral structural proteins and as the genome for encapsidation into virions. These full-length viral RNAs must overcome the cell’s quality control measures to leave the nucleus by co-opting host factors or encoding viral proteins to mediate nuclear export of unspliced viral RNAs. Next, we will summarize the most recent findings on the mechanisms of Gag nuclear trafficking and discuss potential roles for nuclear localization of Gag proteins in retrovirus replication. PMID:24253283

  2. RecA protein promotes the regression of stalled replication forks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Robu, M E; Inman, R B; Cox, M M

    2001-07-17

    Replication forks are halted by many types of DNA damage. At the site of a leading-strand DNA lesion, forks may stall and leave the lesion in a single-strand gap. Fork regression is the first step in several proposed pathways that permit repair without generating a double-strand break. Using model DNA substrates designed to mimic one of the known structures of a fork stalled at a leading-strand lesion, we show here that RecA protein of Escherichia coli will promote a fork regression reaction in vitro. The regression process exhibits an absolute requirement for ATP hydrolysis and is enhanced when dATP replaces ATP. The reaction is not affected by the inclusion of the RecO and R proteins. We present this reaction as one of several potential RecA protein roles in the repair of stalled and/or collapsed replication forks in bacteria. PMID:11459955

  3. Leader of the Capsid Protein in Feline Calicivirus Promotes Replication of Norwalk Virus in Cell Culture▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok; George, David W.; Patton, John B.; Green, Kim Y.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.

    2008-01-01

    The inability to grow human noroviruses in cell culture has greatly impeded the studies of their pathogenesis and immunity. Vesiviruses, in the family Caliciviridae, grow efficiently in cell culture and encode a unique protein in the subgenomic region designated as leader of the capsid protein (LC). We hypothesized that LC might be associated with the efficient replication of vesiviruses in cell culture and promote the replication of human norovirus in cells. To test this hypothesis, a recombinant plasmid was engineered in which the LC region of feline calicivirus (FCV) was placed under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter (pCI-LC) so that the LC protein could be provided in trans to replicating calicivirus genomes bearing a reporter gene. We constructed pNV-GFP, a recombinant plasmid containing a full-length NV genome with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the place of VP1. The transfection of pNV-GFP in MVA-T7-infected cells produced few GFP-positive cells detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. When pNV-GFP was cotransfected with pCI-LC in MVA-T7-infected cells, we observed an increase in the number of GFP-positive cells (ca. 3% of the whole-cell population). Using this cotransfection method with mutagenesis study, we identified potential cis-acting elements at the start of subgenomic RNA and the 3′ end of NV genome for the virus replication. We conclude that LC may be a viral factor which promotes the replication of NV in cells, which could provide a clue to growing the fastidious human noroviruses in cell culture. PMID:18632864

  4. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  5. Dissecting the role of the ϕ29 terminal protein DNA binding residues in viral DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Holguera, Isabel; Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Salas, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Phage ϕ29 DNA replication takes place by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral DNA polymerase catalyses the covalent linkage of the initiating nucleotide to a specific serine residue of the terminal protein (TP). The N-terminal domain of the ϕ29 TP has been shown to bind to the host DNA in a sequence-independent manner and this binding is essential for the TP nucleoid localisation and for an efficient viral DNA replication in vivo. In the present work we have studied the involvement of the TP N-terminal domain residues responsible for DNA binding in the different stages of viral DNA replication by assaying the in vitro activity of purified TP N-terminal mutant proteins. The results show that mutation of TP residues involved in DNA binding affects the catalytic activity of the DNA polymerase in initiation, as the Km for the initiating nucleotide is increased when these mutant proteins are used as primers. Importantly, this initiation defect was relieved by using the ϕ29 double-stranded DNA binding protein p6 in the reaction, which decreased the Km of the DNA polymerase for dATP about 130–190 fold. Furthermore, the TP N-terminal domain was shown to be required both for a proper interaction with the DNA polymerase and for an efficient viral DNA amplification. PMID:25722367

  6. ChIP-Seq to Analyze the Binding of Replication Proteins to Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, A Zachary; Viggiani, Christopher J; Aparicio, Jennifer G; Aparicio, Oscar M

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is a widely used method to study interactions between proteins and discrete chromosomal loci in vivo. ChIP was originally developed for in vivo analysis of protein associations with candidate DNA sequences known or suspected to bind the protein of interest. The advent of DNA microarrays enabled the unbiased, genome-scale identification of all DNA sequences enriched by ChIP, providing a genomic map of a protein's chromatin binding. This method, termed ChIP-chip, is broadly applicable and has been particularly valuable in DNA replication studies to map potential replication origins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other organisms based on the specific association of certain replication proteins with these chromosomal elements, which are distributed throughout the genome. More recently, high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies have replaced microarrays as the preferred method for genomic analysis of ChIP experiments, and this combination is termed ChIP-Seq. We present a detailed ChIP-Seq protocol for S. cerevisiae that can be adapted for different HTS platforms and for different organisms. We also outline general schemes for data analysis; however, HTS data analyses usually must be tailored specifically for individual studies, depending on the experimental design, data characteristics, and the genome being analyzed.

  7. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showe...

  8. Structural basis of DNA replication origin recognition by an ORC protein.

    PubMed

    Gaudier, Martin; Schuwirth, Barbara S; Westcott, Sarah L; Wigley, Dale B

    2007-08-31

    DNA replication in archaea and in eukaryotes share many similarities. We report the structure of an archaeal origin recognition complex protein, ORC1, bound to an origin recognition box, a DNA sequence that is found in multiple copies at replication origins. DNA binding is mediated principally by a C-terminal winged helix domain that inserts deeply into the major and minor grooves, widening them both. However, additional DNA contacts are made with the N-terminal AAA+ domain, which inserts into the minor groove at a characteristic G-rich sequence, inducing a 35 degrees bend in the duplex and providing directionality to the binding site. Both contact regions also induce substantial unwinding of the DNA. The structure provides insight into the initial step in assembly of a replication origin and recruitment of minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase to that origin.

  9. Pseudo-replication of [GADV]-proteins and origin of life.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Kenji

    2009-04-02

    The RNA world hypothesis on the origin of life is generally considered as the key to solve the "chicken and egg dilemma" concerning the evolution of genes and proteins as observed in the modern organisms. This hypothesis, however, contains several serious weak points. We have a counterproposal called [GADV]-protein world hypothesis, abbreviated as GADV hypothesis, in which we have suggested that life originated from a [GADV]-protein world, which comprised proteins composed of four amino acids: Gly [G], Ala [A], Asp [D], and Val [V]. A new concept "pseudo-replication" is crucial for the description of the emergence of life. The new hypothesis not only plausibly explains how life originated from the initial chaotic protein world, but also how genes, genetic code, and proteins co-evolved.

  10. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  11. GADD45 proteins inhibit HIV-1 replication through specific suppression of HIV-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhibin; Liu, Ruikang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Suzhen; Hu, Xiaomei; Tan, Juan; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2016-06-01

    GADD45 proteins are a group of stress-induced proteins and participate in various cellular pathways including cell cycle regulation, cell survival and death, DNA repair and demethylation. It was recently shown that HIV-1 infection induces the expression of GADD45 proteins. However, the effect of GADD45 on HIV-1 replication has not been studied. Here, we report that overexpression of GADD45 proteins reduces HIV-1 production through suppressing transcription from the HIV-1 LTR promoter. This inhibitory effect is specific to HIV-1, since GADD45 proteins neither inhibit the LTR promoters from other retroviruses nor reduce the production of these viruses. Knockdown of endogenous GADD45 modestly activates HIV-1 in the J-Lat A72 latency cell line, which suggests GADD45 proteins might play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency.

  12. Preparation and use of Xenopus egg extracts to study DNA replication and chromatin associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Peter J.; Gambus, Agnieszka; Blow, J. Julian

    2012-01-01

    The use of cell-free extracts prepared from eggs of the South African clawed toad, Xenopus laevis, has led to many important discoveries in cell cycle research. These egg extracts recapitulate the key nuclear transitions of the eukaryotic cell cycle in vitro under apparently the same controls that exist in vivo. DNA added to the extract is first assembled into a nucleus and is then efficiently replicated. Progression of the extract into mitosis then allows the separation of paired sister chromatids. The Xenopus cell-free system is therefore uniquely suited to the study of the mechanisms, dynamics and integration of cell cycle regulated processes at a biochemical level. In this article we describe methods currently in use in our laboratory for the preparation of Xenopus egg extracts and demembranated sperm nuclei for the study of DNA replication in vitro. We also detail how DNA replication can be quantified in this system. In addition, we describe methods for isolating chromatin and chromatin-bound protein complexes from egg extracts. These recently developed and revised techniques provide a practical starting point for investigating the function of proteins involved in DNA replication. PMID:22521908

  13. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H.; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA–DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  14. Genomics and structure/function studies of Rhabdoviridae proteins involved in replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Assenberg, R; Delmas, O; Morin, B; Graham, S C; De Lamballerie, X; Laubert, C; Coutard, B; Grimes, J M; Neyts, J; Owens, R J; Brandt, B W; Gorbalenya, A; Tucker, P; Stuart, D I; Canard, B; Bourhy, H

    2010-08-01

    Some mammalian rhabdoviruses may infect humans, and also infect invertebrates, dogs, and bats, which may act as vectors transmitting viruses among different host species. The VIZIER programme, an EU-funded FP6 program, has characterized viruses that belong to the Vesiculovirus, Ephemerovirus and Lyssavirus genera of the Rhabdoviridae family to perform ground-breaking research on the identification of potential new drug targets against these RNA viruses through comprehensive structural characterization of the replicative machinery. The contribution of VIZIER programme was of several orders. First, it contributed substantially to research aimed at understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of rhabdoviruses. This diversity was then used to obtain further structural information on the proteins involved in replication. Two strategies were used to produce recombinant proteins by expression of both full length or domain constructs in either E. coli or insect cells, using the baculovirus system. In both cases, parallel cloning and expression screening at small-scale of multiple constructs based on different viruses including the addition of fusion tags, was key to the rapid generation of expression data. As a result, some progress has been made in the VIZIER programme towards dissecting the multi-functional L protein into components suitable for structural and functional studies. However, the phosphoprotein polymerase co-factor and the structural matrix protein, which play a number of roles during viral replication and drives viral assembly, have both proved much more amenable to structural biology. Applying the multi-construct/multi-virus approach central to protein production processes in VIZIER has yielded new structural information which may ultimately be exploitable in the derivation of novel ways of intervening in viral replication.

  15. Brome mosaic virus capsid protein regulates accumulation of viral replication proteins by binding to the replicase assembly RNA element.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guanghui; Letteney, Ester; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Kao, C Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Viruses provide valuable insights into the regulation of molecular processes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is one of the simplest entities with four viral proteins and three genomic RNAs. Here we report that the BMV capsid protein (CP), which functions in RNA encapsidation and virus trafficking, also represses viral RNA replication in a concentration-dependent manner by inhibiting the accumulation of the RNA replication proteins. Expression of the replication protein 2a in trans can partially rescue BMV RNA accumulation. A mutation in the CP can decrease the repression of translation. Translation repression by the CP requires a hairpin RNA motif named the B Box that contains seven loop nucleotides (nt) within the 5' untranslated regions (UTR) of BMV RNA1 and RNA2. Purified CP can bind directly to the B Box RNA with a K (d) of 450 nM. The secondary structure of the B Box RNA was determined to contain a highly flexible 7-nt loop using NMR spectroscopy, native gel analysis, and thermal denaturation studies. The B Box is also recognized by the BMV 1a protein to assemble the BMV replicase, suggesting that the BMV CP can act to regulate several viral infection processes.

  16. The priA gene encoding the primosomal replicative n' protein of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E H; Masai, H; Allen, G C; Kornberg, A

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gene encoding protein n' has been isolated and named priA for primosomal protein A. Protein n' is absolutely required for the conversion of single-stranded phi X174 DNA to the duplex replicative form in an in vitro-reconstituted system. The gene maps to 88.7 minutes on the chromosome adjacent to the cytR locus. Soluble protein extracts from cells harboring the priA gene on a multicopy plasmid contained 45-fold more n' replication activity than wild-type extracts. Enhanced overproduction of greater than 1000-fold was achieved by replacing the natural Shine-Dalgarno sequence with that of the phage T7 phi 10 gene and placing this priA under the control of the T7 phage promoter and RNA polymerase. The priA sequence reveals a 732-amino acid open reading frame and a nucleotide-binding consensus site consistent with the size and ATPase activity of the purified protein. The gene for protein n has been named priB and the putative gene for protein n", priC. Images PMID:2162050

  17. Escherichia coli PriA protein is essential for inducible and constitutive stable DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Masai, H; Asai, T; Kubota, Y; Arai, K; Kogoma, T

    1994-01-01

    Under certain conditions, Escherichia coli cells exhibit either of two altered modes of chromosomal DNA replication. These are inducible stable DNA replication (iSDR), seen in SOS-induced cells, and constitutive stable DNA replication (cSDR), seen in rnhA mutants. Both iSDR and cSDR can continue to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. They are dependent on RecA protein, but do not require DnaA protein or the oriC site. Here we report the requirement for PriA, a protein essential for assembly of the phi X174-type primosome, for both iSDR and cSDR. In priA1(Null)::kan mutant cells, iSDR is not observed after induction by thymine starvation. Replication from one of the origins (oriM1) specific to iSDR is greatly reduced by the priA1::kan mutation. cSDR in rnhA224 mutant cells deficient in RNase HI is also completely abolished by the same priA mutation. In both cases, SDR is restored by introduction of a plasmid carrying a wild-type priA gene. Furthermore, the viability of an rnhA::cat dnaA46 strain is lost at 42 degrees C upon inactivation of the priA gene, indicating the lethal effect of priA inactivation on those cells whose viability depends on cSDR. These results demonstrate that a function of PriA protein is essential for iSDR and cSDR and suggest the involvement of the PriA-dependent phi X174-type primosome in these DnaA/oriC-independent pathways of chromosome replication. Whereas ColE1-type plasmids, known to be independent of DnaA, absolutely require PriA function for replication, DnaA-dependent plasmid replicons such as pSC101, F, R6K, Rts1 and RK2 are able to transform and to be maintained in the priA1::kan strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7525276

  18. Coxiella burnetii Effector Proteins That Localize to the Parasitophorous Vacuole Membrane Promote Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.; Howe, Dale; Cockrell, Diane C.; Bastidas, Robert J.; Valdivia, Raphael H.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii directs biogenesis of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that acquires host endolysosomal components. Formation of a PV that supports C. burnetii replication requires a Dot/Icm type 4B secretion system (T4BSS) that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytosol. Thus, a subset of T4BSS effectors are presumed to direct PV biogenesis. Recently, the PV-localized effector protein CvpA was found to promote C. burnetii intracellular growth and PV expansion. We predict additional C. burnetii effectors localize to the PV membrane and regulate eukaryotic vesicle trafficking events that promote pathogen growth. To identify these vacuolar effector proteins, a list of predicted C. burnetii T4BSS substrates was compiled using bioinformatic criteria, such as the presence of eukaryote-like coiled-coil domains. Adenylate cyclase translocation assays revealed 13 proteins were secreted in a Dot/Icm-dependent fashion by C. burnetii during infection of human THP-1 macrophages. Four of the Dot/Icm substrates, termed Coxiella vacuolar protein B (CvpB), CvpC, CvpD, and CvpE, labeled the PV membrane and LAMP1-positive vesicles when ectopically expressed as fluorescently tagged fusion proteins. C. burnetii ΔcvpB, ΔcvpC, ΔcvpD, and ΔcvpE mutants exhibited significant defects in intracellular replication and PV formation. Genetic complementation of the ΔcvpD and ΔcvpE mutants rescued intracellular growth and PV generation, whereas the growth of C. burnetii ΔcvpB and ΔcvpC was rescued upon cohabitation with wild-type bacteria in a common PV. Collectively, these data indicate C. burnetii encodes multiple effector proteins that target the PV membrane and benefit pathogen replication in human macrophages. PMID:25422265

  19. A conserved OmpA-like protein in Legionella pneumophila required for efficient intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Ian P; Kumova, Ogan K; Ninio, Shira

    2016-08-01

    The OmpA-like protein domain has been associated with peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and is often found in virulence factors of bacterial pathogens. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes for six proteins that contain the OmpA-like domain, among them the highly conserved uncharacterized protein we named CmpA. Here we set out to characterize the CmpA protein and determine its contribution to intracellular survival of L. pneumophila Secondary structure analysis suggests that CmpA is an inner membrane protein with a peptidoglycan-binding domain at the C-teminus. A cmpA mutant was able to replicate normally in broth, but failed to compete with an isogenic wild-type strain in an intracellular growth competition assay. The cmpA mutant also displayed significant intracellular growth defects in both the protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii and in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, where uptake into the cells was also impaired. The cmpA phenotypes were completely restored upon expression of CmpA in trans The data presented here establish CmpA as a novel virulence factor of L. pneumophila that is required for efficient intracellular replication in both mammalian and protozoan hosts. PMID:27421957

  20. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin.

  1. A prophage-encoded actin-like protein required for efficient viral DNA replication in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Catriona; Heyer, Antonia; Pfeifer, Eugen; Polen, Tino; Wittmann, Anja; Krämer, Reinhard; Frunzke, Julia; Bramkamp, Marc

    2015-05-26

    In host cells, viral replication is localized at specific subcellular sites. Viruses that infect eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells often use host-derived cytoskeletal structures, such as the actin skeleton, for intracellular positioning. Here, we describe that a prophage, CGP3, integrated into the genome of Corynebacterium glutamicum encodes an actin-like protein, AlpC. Biochemical characterization confirms that AlpC is a bona fide actin-like protein and cell biological analysis shows that AlpC forms filamentous structures upon prophage induction. The co-transcribed adaptor protein, AlpA, binds to a consensus sequence in the upstream promoter region of the alpAC operon and also interacts with AlpC, thus connecting circular phage DNA to the actin-like filaments. Transcriptome analysis revealed that alpA and alpC are among the early induced genes upon excision of the CGP3 prophage. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of mutant strains revealed that both AlpA and AlpC are required for efficient phage replication. Altogether, these data emphasize that AlpAC are crucial for the spatio-temporal organization of efficient viral replication. This is remarkably similar to actin-assisted membrane localization of eukaryotic viruses that use the actin cytoskeleton to concentrate virus particles at the egress sites and provides a link of evolutionary conserved interactions between intracellular virus transport and actin. PMID:25916847

  2. In vitro inhibition of the replication of classical swine fever virus by porcine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    He, Dan-ni; Zhang, Xiao-min; Liu, Ke; Pang, Ran; Zhao, Jin; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Pu-yan

    2014-04-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative pathogen of classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease of swine. Mx proteins are interferon-induced dynamin-like GTPases present in all vertebrates with a wide range of antiviral activities. Although Zhao et al. (2011) have reported that human MxA can inhibit CSFV replication, whether porcine Mx1 (poMx1) has anti-CSFV activity remains unknown. In this study, we generated a cell line designated PK-15/EGFP-poMx1 which expressed porcine Mx1 protein constitutively, and we observed that the proliferation of progeny virus in this cell line was significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay, Q-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, when PTD-poMx1 fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli (Zhang et al., 2013) was used to treat CSFV-infected PK-15 cells, the results showed that PTD-poMx1 inhibited CSFV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the proliferation of progeny virus was inhibited as measured by virus titration and Q-PCR. Overall, the results demonstrated that poMx1 effectively inhibited CSFV replication, suggesting that poMx1 may be a valuable therapeutic agent against CSFV infection.

  3. Ku Protein Levels, Localization and Association to Replication Origins in Different Stages of Breast Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaqi, Khalil; Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human origins of DNA replication are specific sequences within the genome whereby DNA replication is initiated. A select group of proteins, known as the pre-replication (pre-RC) complex, in whose formation the Ku protein (Ku70/Ku86) was shown to play a role, bind to replication origins to initiate DNA replication. In this study, we have examined the involvement of Ku in breast tumorigenesis and tumor progression and found that the Ku protein expression levels in human breast metastatic (MCF10AC1a) cells were higher in the chromatin fraction compared to hyperplastic (MCF10AT) and normal (MCF10A) human breast cells, but remained constant in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In contrast, in human intestinal cells, the Ku expression level was relatively constant for all cell fractions. Nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association of Ku70/86 revealed that the c-myc origin activity in MCF10AC1a is 2.5 to 5-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively, and Ku was bound to the c-myc origin more abundantly in MCF10AC1a, by approximately 1.5 to 4.2-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively. In contrast, similar nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association was found for all cell lines for the lamin B2 origin, associated with the constitutively active housekeeping lamin B2 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) performed on the nuclear extracts (NEs) of the three cell types revealed the presence of protein-DNA replication complexes on both the c-myc and lamin B2 origins, but an increase in binding activity was observed from normal, to transformed, to cancer cells for the c-myc origin, whereas no such difference was seen for the lamin B2 origin. Overall, the results suggest that increased Ku chromatin association, beyond wild type levels, alters cellular processes, which have been implicated in tumorigenesis. PMID:23781282

  4. Ku protein levels, localization and association to replication origins in different stages of breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaqi, Khalil; Di Paola, Domenic; Rampakakis, Emmanouil; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Human origins of DNA replication are specific sequences within the genome whereby DNA replication is initiated. A select group of proteins, known as the pre-replication (pre-RC) complex, in whose formation the Ku protein (Ku70/Ku86) was shown to play a role, bind to replication origins to initiate DNA replication. In this study, we have examined the involvement of Ku in breast tumorigenesis and tumor progression and found that the Ku protein expression levels in human breast metastatic (MCF10AC1a) cells were higher in the chromatin fraction compared to hyperplastic (MCF10AT) and normal (MCF10A) human breast cells, but remained constant in both the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In contrast, in human intestinal cells, the Ku expression level was relatively constant for all cell fractions. Nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association of Ku70/86 revealed that the c-myc origin activity in MCF10AC1a is 2.5 to 5-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively, and Ku was bound to the c-myc origin more abundantly in MCF10AC1a, by approximately 1.5 to 4.2-fold higher than in MCF10AT and MCF10A, respectively. In contrast, similar nascent DNA abundance and chromatin association was found for all cell lines for the lamin B2 origin, associated with the constitutively active housekeeping lamin B2 gene. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) performed on the nuclear extracts (NEs) of the three cell types revealed the presence of protein-DNA replication complexes on both the c-myc and lamin B2 origins, but an increase in binding activity was observed from normal, to transformed, to cancer cells for the c-myc origin, whereas no such difference was seen for the lamin B2 origin. Overall, the results suggest that increased Ku chromatin association, beyond wild type levels, alters cellular processes, which have been implicated in tumorigenesis.

  5. The expression of N-terminal deletion DNA pilot proteins inhibits the early stages of phiX174 replication.

    PubMed

    Ruboyianes, Mark V; Chen, Min; Dubrava, Mathew S; Cherwa, James E; Fane, Bentley A

    2009-10-01

    The phiX174 DNA pilot protein H contains four predicted C-terminal coiled-coil domains. The region of the gene encoding these structures was cloned, expressed in vivo, and found to strongly inhibit wild-type replication. DNA and protein synthesis was investigated in the absence of de novo H protein synthesis and in wild-type-infected cells expressing the inhibitory proteins (DeltaH). The expression of the DeltaH proteins interfered with early stages of DNA replication, which did not require de novo H protein synthesis, suggesting that the inhibitory proteins interfere with the wild-type H protein that enters the cell with the penetrating DNA. As transcription and protein synthesis are dependent on DNA replication in positive single-stranded DNA life cycles, viral protein synthesis was also reduced. However, unlike DNA synthesis, efficient viral protein synthesis required de novo H protein synthesis, a novel function for this protein. A single amino acid change in the C terminus of protein H was both necessary and sufficient to confer resistance to the inhibitory DeltaH proteins, restoring both DNA and protein synthesis to wild-type levels. DeltaH proteins derived from the resistant mutant did not inhibit wild-type or resistant mutant replication. The inhibitory effects of the DeltaH proteins were lessened by the coexpression of the internal scaffolding protein, which may suppress H-H protein interactions. While coexpression relieved the block in DNA biosynthesis, viral protein synthesis remained suppressed. These data indicate that protein H's role in DNA replication and stimulating viral protein synthesis can be uncoupled. PMID:19640994

  6. Differential binding kinetics of replication protein A during replication and the pre- and post-incision steps of nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, Audrey M; van Cuijk, Loes; Tresini, Maria; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Nigg, Alex L; Giglia-Mari, Guiseppina; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Vermeulen, Wim; Marteijn, Jurgen A

    2014-12-01

    The ability of replication protein A (RPA) to bind single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) underlines its crucial roles during DNA replication and repair. A combination of immunofluorescence and live cell imaging of GFP-tagged RPA70 revealed that RPA, in contrast to other replication factors, does not cluster into replication foci, which is explained by its short residence time at ssDNA. In addition to replication, RPA also plays a crucial role in both the pre- and post-incision steps of nucleotide excision repair (NER). Pre-incision factors like XPC and TFIIH accumulate rapidly at locally induced UV-damage and remain visible up to 4h. However, RPA did not reach its maximum accumulation level until 3h after DNA damage infliction and a chromatin-bound pool remained detectable up to 8h, probably reflecting its role during the post-incision step of NER. During the pre-incision steps of NER, RPA could only be visualized at DNA lesions in incision deficient XP-F cells, however without a substantial increase in residence time at DNA damage. Together our data show that RPA is an intrinsically highly dynamic ssDNA-binding complex during both replication and distinct steps of NER. PMID:25453469

  7. Flock house virus replicates and expresses green fluorescent protein in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Ranjit; Cheng, Li-Lin; Bartholomay, Lyric C; Christensen, Bruce M

    2003-07-01

    Flock house virus (FHV) is a non-enveloped, positive-sense RNA virus of insect origin that belongs to the family Nodaviridae. FHV has been shown to overcome the kingdom barrier and to replicate in plants, insects, yeast and mammalian cells. Although of insect origin, FHV has not previously been shown to replicate in mosquitoes. We have tested FHV replication in vitro in C6/36 cells (derived from neonatal Aedes albopictus) and in vivo in four different genera of mosquitoes, Aedes, Culex, Anopheles and Armigeres. FHV replicated to high titres in C6/36 cells that had been subcloned to support maximum growth of FHV. When adult mosquitoes were orally fed or injected with the virus, FHV antigen was detected in various tissues and infectious virus was recovered. Vectors developed from an infectious cDNA clone of a defective-interfering RNA, derived from FHV genomic RNA2, expressed green fluorescent protein in Drosophila cells and adult mosquitoes. This demonstrates the potential of FHV-based vectors for expression of foreign genes in mosquitoes and possibly other insects.

  8. Sialylation of the prion protein glycans controls prion replication rate and glycoform ratio.

    PubMed

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2015-01-01

    Prion or PrP(Sc) is a proteinaceous infectious agent that consists of a misfolded and aggregated form of a sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrP(C). PrP(C) has two sialylated N-linked carbohydrates. In PrP(Sc), the glycans are directed outward, with the terminal sialic acid residues creating a negative charge on the surface of prion particles. The current study proposes a new hypothesis that electrostatic repulsion between sialic residues creates structural constraints that control prion replication and PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. In support of this hypothesis, here we show that diglycosylated PrP(C) molecules that have more sialic groups per molecule than monoglycosylated PrP(C) were preferentially excluded from conversion. However, when partially desialylated PrP(C) was used as a substrate, recruitment of three glycoforms into PrP(Sc) was found to be proportional to their respective populations in the substrate. In addition, hypersialylated molecules were also excluded from conversion in the strains with the strongest structural constraints, a strategy that helped reduce electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, as predicted by the hypothesis, partial desialylation of PrP(C) significantly increased the replication rate. This study illustrates that sialylation of N-linked glycans creates a prion replication barrier that controls replication rate and glycoform ratios and has broad implications. PMID:26576925

  9. Sialylation of the prion protein glycans controls prion replication rate and glycoform ratio

    PubMed Central

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2015-01-01

    Prion or PrPSc is a proteinaceous infectious agent that consists of a misfolded and aggregated form of a sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrPC. PrPC has two sialylated N-linked carbohydrates. In PrPSc, the glycans are directed outward, with the terminal sialic acid residues creating a negative charge on the surface of prion particles. The current study proposes a new hypothesis that electrostatic repulsion between sialic residues creates structural constraints that control prion replication and PrPSc glycoform ratio. In support of this hypothesis, here we show that diglycosylated PrPC molecules that have more sialic groups per molecule than monoglycosylated PrPC were preferentially excluded from conversion. However, when partially desialylated PrPC was used as a substrate, recruitment of three glycoforms into PrPSc was found to be proportional to their respective populations in the substrate. In addition, hypersialylated molecules were also excluded from conversion in the strains with the strongest structural constraints, a strategy that helped reduce electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, as predicted by the hypothesis, partial desialylation of PrPC significantly increased the replication rate. This study illustrates that sialylation of N-linked glycans creates a prion replication barrier that controls replication rate and glycoform ratios and has broad implications. PMID:26576925

  10. The N-Terminal of Aquareovirus NS80 Is Required for Interacting with Viral Proteins and Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Hong; Chen, Qingxiu; Zhang, Fuxian; Fang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Reovirus replication and assembly occurs within viral inclusion bodies that formed in specific intracellular compartments of cytoplasm in infected cells. Previous study indicated that aquareovirus NS80 is able to form inclusion bodies, and also can retain viral proteins within its inclusions. To better understand how NS80 performed in viral replication and assembly, the functional regions of NS80 associated with other viral proteins in aquareovirus replication were investigated in this study. Deletion mutational analysis and rotavirus NSP5-based protein association platform were used to detect association regions. Immunofluorescence images indicated that different N-terminal regions of NS80 could associate with viral proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 and NS38. Further co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the interaction between VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 with different regions covering the N-terminal amino acid (aa, 1–471) of NS80, respectively. Moreover, removal of NS80 N-terminal sequences required for interaction with proteins VP1, VP4, VP6 or NS38 not only prevented the capacity of NS80 to support viral replication in NS80 shRNA-based replication complementation assays, but also inhibited the expression of aquareovirus proteins, suggesting that N-terminal regions of NS80 are necessary for viral replication. These results provided a foundational basis for further understanding the role of NS80 in viral replication and assembly during aquareovirus infection. PMID:26871941

  11. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-01-01

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%–99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy. PMID:26114473

  12. RNase P Ribozymes Inhibit the Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus by Targeting Essential Viral Capsid Proteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu; Reeves, Michael; Ye, Jun; Trang, Phong; Zhu, Li; Sheng, Jingxue; Wang, Yu; Zen, Ke; Wu, Jianguo; Liu, Fenyong

    2015-06-24

    An engineered RNase P-based ribozyme variant, which was generated using the in vitro selection procedure, was used to target the overlapping mRNA region of two proteins essential for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication: capsid assembly protein (AP) and protease (PR). In vitro studies showed that the generated variant, V718-A, cleaved the target AP mRNA sequence efficiently and its activity was about 60-fold higher than that of wild type ribozyme M1-A. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of 98%-99% in AP/PR expression and an inhibition of 50,000 fold in viral growth in cells with V718-A, while a 75% reduction in AP/PR expression and a 500-fold inhibition in viral growth was found in cells with M1-A. Examination of the antiviral effects of the generated ribozyme on the HCMV replication cycle suggested that viral DNA encapsidation was inhibited and as a consequence, viral capsid assembly was blocked when the expression of AP and PR was inhibited by the ribozyme. Thus, our study indicates that the generated ribozyme variant is highly effective in inhibiting HCMV gene expression and blocking viral replication, and suggests that engineered RNase P ribozyme can be potentially developed as a promising gene-targeting agent for anti-HCMV therapy.

  13. Foot and mouth disease virus non structural protein 2C interacts with Beclin1 modulating virus replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), is an Apthovirus within the Picornaviridae family. Replication of the virus occurs in association with replication complexes that are formed by host cell membrane rearrangements. The largest viral protein in th...

  14. Phylogeny of replication initiator protein TrfA reveals a highly divergent clade of incompatibility group P1 plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incompatibility group P-1 (incP-1) includes broad host range plasmids of Gram negative bacteria and are classified into five subgroups (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon). The incP-1 replication module consists of the trfA gene, encoding the replication initiator protein TrfA, and the origin o...

  15. Interactome Analysis of the Influenza A Virus Transcription/Replication Machinery Identifies Protein Phosphatase 6 as a Cellular Factor Required for Efficient Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    York, Ashley; Hutchinson, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The negative-sense RNA genome of influenza A virus is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). The viral RdRP is an important host range determinant, indicating that its function is affected by interactions with cellular factors. However, the identities and the roles of most of these factors remain unknown. Here, we employed affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry to identify cellular proteins that interact with the influenza A virus RdRP in infected human cells. We purified RdRPs using a recombinant influenza virus in which the PB2 subunit of the RdRP is fused to a Strep-tag. When this tagged subunit was purified from infected cells, copurifying proteins included the other RdRP subunits (PB1 and PA) and the viral nucleoprotein and neuraminidase, as well as 171 cellular proteins. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry revealed that the most abundant of these host proteins were chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, importins, proteins involved in ubiquitination, kinases and phosphatases, and mitochondrial and ribosomal proteins. Among the phosphatases, we identified three subunits of the cellular serine/threonine protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), including the catalytic subunit PPP6C and regulatory subunits PPP6R1 and PPP6R3. PP6 was found to interact directly with the PB1 and PB2 subunits of the viral RdRP, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the catalytic subunit of PP6 in infected cells resulted in the reduction of viral RNA accumulation and the attenuation of virus growth. These results suggest that PP6 interacts with and positively regulates the activity of the influenza virus RdRP. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are serious clinical and veterinary pathogens, causing substantial health and economic impacts. In addition to annual seasonal epidemics, occasional global pandemics occur when viral strains adapt to humans from other species. To replicate efficiently and cause disease, influenza

  16. Prereplicative repair of oxidized bases in the human genome is mediated by NEIL1 DNA glycosylase together with replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hegde, Pavana M; Bellot, Larry J; Mandal, Santi M; Hazra, Tapas K; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Tomkinson, Alan E; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-08-13

    Base oxidation by endogenous and environmentally induced reactive oxygen species preferentially occurs in replicating single-stranded templates in mammalian genomes, warranting prereplicative repair of the mutagenic base lesions. It is not clear how such lesions (which, unlike bulky adducts, do not block replication) are recognized for repair. Furthermore, strand breaks caused by base excision from ssDNA by DNA glycosylases, including Nei-like (NEIL) 1, would generate double-strand breaks during replication, which are not experimentally observed. NEIL1, whose deficiency causes a mutator phenotype and is activated during the S phase, is present in the DNA replication complex isolated from human cells, with enhanced association with DNA in S-phase cells and colocalization with replication foci containing DNA replication proteins. Furthermore, NEIL1 binds to 5-hydroxyuracil, the oxidative deamination product of C, in replication protein A-coated ssDNA template and inhibits DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase δ. We postulate that, upon encountering an oxidized base during replication, NEIL1 initiates prereplicative repair by acting as a "cowcatcher" and preventing nascent chain growth. Regression of the stalled replication fork, possibly mediated by annealing helicases, then allows lesion repair in the reannealed duplex. This model is supported by our observations that NEIL1, whose deficiency slows nascent chain growth in oxidatively stressed cells, is stimulated by replication proteins in vitro. Furthermore, deficiency of the closely related NEIL2 alone does not affect chain elongation, but combined NEIL1/2 deficiency further inhibits DNA replication. These results support a mechanism of NEIL1-mediated prereplicative repair of oxidized bases in the replicating strand, with NEIL2 providing a backup function.

  17. Apoptosis, autophagy and unfolded protein response pathways in Arbovirus replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iranpour, Mahmoud; Moghadam, Adel Rezaei; Yazdi, Mina; Ande, Sudharsana R; Alizadeh, Javad; Wiechec, Emilia; Lindsay, Robbin; Drebot, Michael; Coombs, Kevin M; Ghavami, Saeid

    2016-01-19

    Arboviruses are pathogens that widely affect the health of people in different communities around the world. Recently, a few successful approaches toward production of effective vaccines against some of these pathogens have been developed, but treatment and prevention of the resulting diseases remain a major health and research concern. The arbovirus infection and replication processes are complex, and many factors are involved in their regulation. Apoptosis, autophagy and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are three mechanisms that are involved in pathogenesis of many viruses. In this review, we focus on the importance of these pathways in the arbovirus replication and infection processes. We provide a brief introduction on how apoptosis, autophagy and the UPR are initiated and regulated, and then discuss the involvement of these pathways in regulation of arbovirus pathogenesis.

  18. Human replication protein A binds single-stranded DNA in two distinct complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, L J; Borowiec, J A

    1994-01-01

    Human replication protein A, a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, is a required factor in eukaryotic DNA replication and DNA repair systems and has been suggested to function during DNA recombination. The protein is also a target of interaction for a variety of proteins that control replication, transcription, and cell growth. To understand the role of hRPA in these processes, we examined the binding of hRPA to defined ssDNA molecules. Employing gel shift assays that "titrated" the length of ssDNA, hRPA was found to form distinct multimeric complexes that could be detected by glutaraldehyde cross-linking. Within these complexes, monomers of hRPA utilized a minimum binding site size on ssDNA of 8 to 10 nucleotides (the hRPA8-10nt complex) and appeared to bind ssDNA cooperatively. Intriguingly, alteration of gel shift conditions revealed the formation of a second, distinctly different complex that bound ssDNA in roughly 30-nucleotide steps (the hRPA30nt complex), a complex similar to that described by Kim et al. (C. Kim, R. O. Snyder, and M. S. Wold, Mol. Cell. Biol. 12:3050-3059, 1992). Both the hRPA8-10nt and hRPA30nt complexes can coexist in solution. We speculate that the role of hRPA in DNA metabolism may be modulated through the ability of hRPA to bind ssDNA in these two modes. Images PMID:8196638

  19. Herpes Simplex Virus Replication: Roles of Viral Proteins and Nucleoporins in Capsid-Nucleus Attachment▿

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.

    2009-01-01

    Replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) involves a step in which a parental capsid docks onto a host nuclear pore complex (NPC). The viral genome then translocates through the nuclear pore into the nucleoplasm, where it is transcribed and replicated to propagate infection. We investigated the roles of viral and cellular proteins in the process of capsid-nucleus attachment. Vero cells were preloaded with antibodies specific for proteins of interest and infected with HSV-1 containing a green fluorescent protein-labeled capsid, and capsids bound to the nuclear surface were quantified by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that nuclear capsid attachment was attenuated by antibodies specific for the viral tegument protein VP1/2 (UL36 gene) but not by similar antibodies specific for UL37 (a tegument protein), the major capsid protein (VP5), or VP23 (a minor capsid protein). Similar studies with antibodies specific for nucleoporins demonstrated attenuation by antibodies specific for Nup358 but not Nup214. The role of nucleoporins was further investigated with the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Capsid attachment to the nucleus was attenuated in cells treated with siRNA specific for either Nup214 or Nup358 but not TPR. The results are interpreted to suggest that VP1/2 is involved in specific attachment to the NPC and/or in migration of capsids to the nuclear surface. Capsids are suggested to attach to the NPC by way of the complex of Nup358 and Nup214, with high-resolution immunofluorescence studies favoring binding to Nup358. PMID:19073727

  20. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Ma Isabel; Pérez-García, Marissa; Terreros-Tinoco, Marisol; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Diegopérez-Ramírez, Jaime; Ramírez-Reyes, Alma Griselda; Aguilera, Penélope; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; García-Flores, María Martha

    2013-01-01

    An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV) pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS), characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA) and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa) from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa) and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa). Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1) that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2) that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2. PMID:24302878

  1. NB protein does not affect influenza B virus replication in vitro and is not required for replication in or transmission between ferrets.

    PubMed

    Elderfield, Ruth A; Koutsakos, Marios; Frise, Rebecca; Bradley, Konrad; Ashcroft, Jonathan; Miah, Shanhjahan; Lackenby, Angie; Barclay, Wendy S

    2016-03-01

    The influenza B virus encodes a unique protein, NB, a membrane protein whose function in the replication cycle is not, as yet, understood. We engineered a recombinant influenza B virus lacking NB expression, with no concomitant difference in expression or activity of viral neuraminidase (NA) protein, an important caveat since NA is encoded on the same segment and initiated from a start codon just 4 nt downstream of NB. Replication of the virus lacking NB was not different to wild-type virus with full-length NB in clonal immortalized or complex primary cell cultures. In the mouse model, virus lacking NB induced slightly lower IFN-α levels in infected lungs, but this did not affect virus titres or weight loss. In ferrets infected with a mixture of viruses that did or did not express NB, there was no fitness advantage for the virus that retained NB. Moreover, virus lacking NB protein was transmitted following respiratory droplet exposure of sentinel animals. These data suggest no role for NB in supporting replication or transmission in vivo in this animal model. The role of NB and the nature of selection to retain it in all natural influenza B viruses remain unclear. PMID:26703440

  2. Involvement of Fis protein in replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Filutowicz, M; Ross, W; Wild, J; Gourse, R L

    1992-01-01

    We report evidence indicating that Fis protein plays a role in initiation of replication at oriC in vivo. At high temperatures, fis null mutants form filamentous cells, show aberrant nucleoid segregation, and are unable to form single colonies. DNA synthesis is inhibited in these fis mutant strains following upshift to 44 degrees C. The pattern of DNA synthesis inhibition upon temperature upshift and the requirement for RNA synthesis, but not protein synthesis, for resumed DNA synthesis upon downshift to 32 degrees C indicate that synthesis is affected in the initiation phase. fis mutations act synergistically with gyrB alleles known to affect initiation. oriC-dependent plasmids are poorly established and maintained in fis mutant strains. Finally, purified Fis protein interacts in vitro with sites in oriC. These interactions could be involved in mediating the effect of Fis on DNA synthesis in vivo. Images PMID:1309527

  3. Cloning of two sea urchin DNA-binding proteins involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Megli, Fiammetta; Di Ponzio, Barbara; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Roberti, Marina

    2002-03-01

    The cloning of the cDNA for two mitochondrial proteins involved in sea urchin mtDNA replication and transcription is reported here. The cDNA for the mitochondrial D-loop binding protein (mtDBP) from the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has been cloned by a polymerase chain reaction-based approach. The protein displays a very high similarity with the Paracentrotus lividus homologue as it contains also the two leucine zipper-like domains which are thought to be involved in intramolecular interactions needed to expose the two DNA binding domains in the correct position for contacting DNA. The cDNA for the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein (mtSSB) from P. lividus has been also cloned by a similar approach. The precursor protein is 146 amino acids long with a presequence of 16 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence shows the highest homology with the Xenopus laevis protein and the lowest with the Drosophila mtSSB. The computer modeling of the tertiary structure of P. lividus mtSSB shows a structure very similar to that experimentally determined for human mtSSB, with the conservation of the main residues involved in protein tetramerization and in DNA binding.

  4. In vivo protein-DNA interactions at human DNA replication origin.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, D S; Giacca, M; Demarchi, F; Biamonti, G; Riva, S; Falaschi, A

    1996-01-01

    Protein-DNA interactions were studied in vivo at the region containing a human DNA replication origin, located at the 3' end of the lamin B2 gene and partially overlapping the promoter of another gene, located downstream. DNase I treatment of nuclei isolated from both exponentially growing and nonproliferating HL-60 cells showed that this region has an altered, highly accessible, chromatin structure. High-resolution analysis of protein-DNA interactions in a 600-bp area encompassing the origin was carried out by the in vivo footprinting technique based on the ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction. In growing HL-60 cells, footprints at sequences homologous to binding sites for known transcription factors (members of the basic-helix-loop-helix family, nuclear respiratory factor 1, transcription factor Sp1, and upstream binding factor) were detected in the region corresponding to the promoter of the downstream gene. Upon conversion of cells to a nonproliferative state, a reduction in the intensity of these footprints was observed that paralleled the diminished transcriptional activity of the genomic area. In addition to these protections, in close correspondence to the replication initiation site, a prominent footprint was detected that extended over 70 nucleotides on one strand only. This footprint was absent from nonproliferating HL-60 cells, indicating that this specific protein-DNA interaction might be involved in the process of origin activation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8643660

  5. Identification of Proteins Bound to Dengue Viral RNA In Vivo Reveals New Host Proteins Important for Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Stacia L.; Soderblom, Erik J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is the most prevalent cause of arthropod-borne infection worldwide. Due to the limited coding capacity of the viral genome and the complexity of the viral life cycle, host cell proteins play essential roles throughout the course of viral infection. Host RNA-binding proteins mediate various aspects of virus replication through their physical interactions with viral RNA. Here we describe a technique designed to identify such interactions in the context of infected cells using UV cross-linking followed by antisense-mediated affinity purification and mass spectrometry. Using this approach, we identified interactions, several of them novel, between host proteins and dengue viral RNA in infected Huh7 cells. Most of these interactions were subsequently validated using RNA immunoprecipitation. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we showed that more than half of these host proteins are likely involved in regulating virus replication, demonstrating the utility of this method in identifying biologically relevant interactions that may not be identified using traditional in vitro approaches. PMID:26733069

  6. Nucleotide and partner-protein control of bacterial replicative helicase structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Strycharska, Melania S.; Arias-Palomo, Ernesto; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Erzberger, Jan P.; O’Shea, Valerie; Bustamante, Carlos J.; Berger, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular replication forks are powered by ring-shaped, hexameric helicases that encircle and unwind DNA. To better understand the molecular mechanisms and control of these enzymes, we used multiple methods to investigate the bacterial replicative helicase, DnaB. A 3.3 Å crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus DnaB complexed with nucleotide reveals a new conformational state for this motor protein. Electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering studies confirm the state seen crystallographically, showing that the DnaB ATPase domains and an associated N-terminal collar transition between two physical states in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Mutant helicases locked in either collar state are active, but display different capacities to support critical activities such as duplex translocation and primase-dependent RNA synthesis. Our findings establish the DnaB collar as an auto-regulatory hub that controls the ability of the helicase to transition between different functional states in response to nucleotide and both replication initiation and elongation factors. PMID:24373746

  7. DNA-Binding Proteins Regulating pIP501 Transfer and Replication.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently detected in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium strains. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual function: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and, in addition, prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII), which indirectly increases RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII). Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including Streptomyces and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter overlapping with the origin of transfer (oriT). The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4-like coupling

  8. DNA-Binding Proteins Regulating pIP501 Transfer and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Goessweiner-Mohr, Nikolaus; Brantl, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    pIP501 is a Gram-positive broad-host-range model plasmid intensively used for studying plasmid replication and conjugative transfer. It is a multiple antibiotic resistance plasmid frequently detected in clinical Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium strains. Replication of pIP501 proceeds unidirectionally by a theta mechanism. The minimal replicon of pIP501 is composed of the repR gene encoding the essential rate-limiting replication initiator protein RepR and the origin of replication, oriR, located downstream of repR. RepR is similar to RepE of related streptococcal plasmid pAMβ1, which has been shown to possess RNase activity cleaving free RNA molecules in close proximity of the initiation site of DNA synthesis. Replication of pIP501 is controlled by the concerted action of a small protein, CopR, and an antisense RNA, RNAIII. CopR has a dual function: It acts as transcriptional repressor at the repR promoter and, in addition, prevents convergent transcription of RNAIII and repR mRNA (RNAII), which indirectly increases RNAIII synthesis. CopR binds asymmetrically as a dimer at two consecutive binding sites upstream of and overlapping with the repR promoter. RNAIII induces transcriptional attenuation within the leader region of the repR mRNA (RNAII). Deletion of either control component causes a 10- to 20-fold increase of plasmid copy number, while simultaneous deletions have no additional effect. Conjugative transfer of pIP501 depends on a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded in a single operon. Its transfer host-range is considerably broad, as it has been transferred to virtually all Gram-positive bacteria including Streptomyces and even the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Expression of the 15 genes encoding the T4SS is tightly controlled by binding of the relaxase TraA, the transfer initiator protein, to the operon promoter overlapping with the origin of transfer (oriT). The T4SS operon encodes the DNA-binding proteins TraJ (VirD4-like coupling

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by the host zinc finger antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Mao, Richeng; Nie, Hui; Cai, Dawei; Zhang, Jiming; Liu, Hongyan; Yan, Ran; Cuconati, Andrea; Block, Timothy M; Guo, Ju-Tao; Guo, Haitao

    2013-01-01

    The zinc finger antiviral protein (ZAP) is a mammalian host restriction factor that inhibits the replication of a variety of RNA viruses, including retroviruses, alphaviruses and filoviruses, through interaction with the ZAP-responsive elements (ZRE) in viral RNA, and recruiting the exosome to degrade RNA substrate. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pararetrovirus that replicates its genomic DNA via reverse transcription of a viral pregenomic (pg) RNA precursor. Here, we demonstrate that the two isoforms of human ZAP (hZAP-L and -S) inhibit HBV replication in human hepatocyte-derived cells through posttranscriptional down-regulation of viral pgRNA. Mechanistically, the zinc finger motif-containing N-terminus of hZAP is responsible for the reduction of HBV RNA, and the integrity of the four zinc finger motifs is essential for ZAP to bind to HBV RNA and fulfill its antiviral function. The ZRE sequences conferring the susceptibility of viral RNA to ZAP-mediated RNA decay were mapped to the terminal redundant region (nt 1820-1918) of HBV pgRNA. In agreement with its role as a host restriction factor and as an innate immune mediator for HBV infection, ZAP was upregulated in cultured primary human hepatocytes and hepatocyte-derived cells upon IFN-α treatment or IPS-1 activation, and in the livers of hepatitis B patients during immune active phase. Knock down of ZAP expression increased the level of HBV RNA and partially attenuated the antiviral effect elicited by IPS-1 in cell cultures. In summary, we demonstrated that ZAP is an intrinsic host antiviral factor with activity against HBV through down-regulation of viral RNA, and that ZAP plays a role in the innate control of HBV replication. Our findings thus shed light on virus-host interaction, viral pathogenesis, and antiviral approaches.

  10. Host APOBEC3G Protein Inhibits HCV Replication through Direct Binding at NS3

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhou-Yi; Li, Jian-Rui; Huang, Meng-Hao; Si, Shu-Yi; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (hA3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts replication of certain viruses. We have previously reported that hA3G was a host restriction factor against hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication, and hA3G stabilizers showed a significant inhibitory activity against HCV. However, the molecular mechanism of hA3G against HCV remains unknown. We show in this study that hA3G’s C-terminal directly binds HCV non-structural protein NS3 at its C-terminus, which is responsible for NS3’s helicase and NTPase activity. Binding of hA3G to the C-terminus of NS3 reduced helicase activity, and therefore inhibited HCV replication. The anti-HCV mechanism of hA3G appeared to be independent of its deamination activity. Although early stage HCV infection resulted in an increase in host hA3G as an intracellular response against HCV replication, hA3G was gradually diminished after a long-term incubation, suggesting an unknown mechanism(s) that protects HCV NS3 from inactivation by hA3G. The process represents, at least partially, a cellular defensive mechanism against HCV and the action is mediated through a direct interaction between host hA3G and HCV NS3. We believe that understanding of the antiviral mechanism of hA3G against HCV might open an interesting avenue to explore hA3G stabilizers as a new class of anti-HCV agents. PMID:25811715

  11. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  12. Staufen1 promotes HCV replication by inhibiting protein kinase R and transporting viral RNA to the site of translation and replication in the cells

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Updesh; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Mishra, Priya; Sengupta, Amitabha; Pandey, Virendra N.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic hepatitis C (CHC), which often progresses to liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The molecular mechanisms that establish CHC and cause its subsequent development into LC and HCC are poorly understood. We have identified a cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA binding protein, Stau1, which is crucial for HCV replication. In this study, Stau1 specifically interacted with the variable-stem-loop region in the 3′ NTR and domain IIId of the HCV-IRES in the 5′ NTR, and promoted HCV replication and translation. Stau1 coimmunoprecipitates HCV NS5B and a cell factor, protein kinase R (PKR), which is critical for interferon-induced cellular antiviral and antiproliferative responses. Like Stau1, PKR displayed binding specificity to domain IIId of HCV-IRES. Stau1 binds to PKR and strongly inhibits PKR-autophosphorylation. We demonstrated that the transport of HCV RNA on the polysomes is Stau1-dependent, being mainly localized in the monosome fractions when Stau1 is downregulated and exclusively localized in the polysomes when Stau1 is overexpressed. Our findings suggest that HCV may appropriate Stau1 to its advantage to prevent PKR-mediated inhibition of eIF2α, which is required for the synthesis of HCV proteins for translocation of viral RNA genome to the polysomes for efficient translation and replication. PMID:27106056

  13. Biological roles and functional mechanisms of arenavirus Z protein in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jialong; Danzy, Shamika; Kumar, Naveen; Ly, Hinh; Liang, Yuying

    2012-09-01

    Arenaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever diseases in humans, with limited prophylactic or therapeutic measures. A small RING-domain viral protein Z has been shown to mediate the formation of virus-like particles and to inhibit viral RNA synthesis, although its biological roles in an infectious viral life cycle have not been directly addressed. By taking advantage of the available reverse genetics system for a model arenavirus, Pichinde virus (PICV), we provide the direct evidence for the essential biological roles of the Z protein's conserved residues, including the G2 myristylation site, the conserved C and H residues of RING domain, and the poorly characterized C-terminal L79 and P80 residues. Dicodon substitutions within the late (L) domain (PSAPPYEP) of the PICV Z protein, although producing viable mutant viruses, have significantly reduced virus growth, a finding suggestive of an important role for the intact L domain in viral replication. Further structure-function analyses of both PICV and Lassa fever virus Z proteins suggest that arenavirus Z proteins have similar molecular mechanisms in mediating their multiple functions, with some interesting variations, such as the role of the G2 residue in blocking viral RNA synthesis. In summary, our studies have characterized the biological roles of the Z protein in an infectious arenavirus system and have shed important light on the distinct functions of its domains in virus budding and viral RNA regulation, the knowledge of which may lead to the development of novel antiviral drugs.

  14. Protein biogenesis machinery is a driver of replicative aging in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Georges E; Meinema, Anne C; González, Javier; Wolters, Justina C; Schmidt, Alexander; Guryev, Victor; Bischoff, Rainer; Wit, Ernst C; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M; Heinemann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    An integrated account of the molecular changes occurring during the process of cellular aging is crucial towards understanding the underlying mechanisms. Here, using novel culturing and computational methods as well as latest analytical techniques, we mapped the proteome and transcriptome during the replicative lifespan of budding yeast. With age, we found primarily proteins involved in protein biogenesis to increase relative to their transcript levels. Exploiting the dynamic nature of our data, we reconstructed high-level directional networks, where we found the same protein biogenesis-related genes to have the strongest ability to predict the behavior of other genes in the system. We identified metabolic shifts and the loss of stoichiometry in protein complexes as being consequences of aging. We propose a model whereby the uncoupling of protein levels of biogenesis-related genes from their transcript levels is causal for the changes occurring in aging yeast. Our model explains why targeting protein synthesis, or repairing the downstream consequences, can serve as interventions in aging. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08527.001 PMID:26422514

  15. The replication initiator protein of plasmid pT181 has sequence-specific endonuclease and topoisomerase-like activities.

    PubMed Central

    Koepsel, R R; Murray, R W; Rosenblum, W D; Khan, S A

    1985-01-01

    Initiation of pT181 DNA replication specifically requires the plasmid-encoded RepC protein. Here we demonstrate that highly purified RepC protein has sequence-specific endonuclease and topoisomerase-like activities. A maximum sequence of 127 base pairs containing the pT181 origin of replication is required for nicking-closing by RepC protein. RepC introduces a single strand break within the pT181 origin. The nick site has been shown by DNA sequencing to lie between nucleotides 70 and 71 in the bottom strand of the DNA within the origin sequence. This nick site probably corresponds to the start site of pT181 replication. The results presented here suggest that, unlike most other plasmids, pT181 replicates by a rolling circle mechanism. Images PMID:2995991

  16. [The role of protein binding with single-stranded DNA (SSB-protein) in DNA replication in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells].

    PubMed

    Koterov, A N; Novoradovskaia, N A; Filippovich, I V

    1990-05-01

    Possible involvement of the single-strand DNA-binding protein (SSB-protein) in DNA replication in Ehrlich ascite tumour (EAT) cells was studied. There was a direct correlation between the content of SSB-protein in chromatin and the intensity of replicative synthesis of DNA in various preparations of EAT in vitro and in vivo (the computed value of the correlation coefficient was equal to 0.9). It was shown that the addition of exogenous SSB-protein to permeable EAT cells increased the replicative synthesis. It was concluded that although eukaryotic SSB-proteins are not complete analogs of prokaryotic ones, they may participate in DNA replication in eukaryotic cells and, possibly, are intracellular regulators of proliferation.

  17. “The Octet”: Eight Protein Kinases that Control Mammalian DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    DePamphilis, Melvin L.; de Renty, Christelle M.; Ullah, Zakir; Lee, Chrissie Y.

    2012-01-01

    Development of a fertilized human egg into an average sized adult requires about 29 trillion cell divisions, thereby producing enough DNA to stretch to the Sun and back 200 times (DePamphilis and Bell, 2011)! Even more amazing is the fact that throughout these mitotic cell cycles, the human genome is duplicated once and only once each time a cell divides. If a cell accidentally begins to re-replicate its nuclear DNA prior to cell division, checkpoint pathways trigger apoptosis. And yet, some cells are developmentally programmed to respond to environmental cues by switching from mitotic cell cycles to endocycles, a process in which multiple S phases occur in the absence of either mitosis or cytokinesis. Endocycles allow production of viable, differentiated, polyploid cells that no longer proliferate. What is surprising is that among the 516 (Manning et al., 2002) to 557 (BioMart web site) protein kinases encoded by the human genome, only eight regulate nuclear DNA replication directly. These are Cdk1, Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6, Cdk7, Cdc7, Checkpoint kinase-1 (Chk1), and Checkpoint kinase-2. Even more remarkable is the fact that only four of these enzymes (Cdk1, Cdk7, Cdc7, and Chk1) are essential for mammalian development. Here we describe how these protein kinases determine when DNA replication occurs during mitotic cell cycles, how mammalian cells switch from mitotic cell cycles to endocycles, and how cancer cells can be selectively targeted for destruction by inducing them to begin a second S phase before mitosis is complete. PMID:23055977

  18. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Promotes Degradation of SMC5/6 to Enhance HBV Replication.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Christopher M; Xu, Yanping; Li, Feng; Nio, Kouki; Reszka-Blanco, Natalia; Li, Xiaodong; Wu, Yaxu; Yu, Yanbao; Xiong, Yue; Su, Lishan

    2016-09-13

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) regulatory protein X (HBx) activates gene expression from the HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) genome. Interaction of HBx with the DDB1-CUL4-ROC1 (CRL4) E3 ligase is critical for this function. Using substrate-trapping proteomics, we identified the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complex proteins SMC5 and SMC6 as CRL4(HBx) substrates. HBx expression and HBV infection degraded the SMC5/6 complex in human hepatocytes in vitro and in humanized mice in vivo. HBx targets SMC5/6 for ubiquitylation by the CRL4(HBx) E3 ligase and subsequent degradation by the proteasome. Using a minicircle HBV (mcHBV) reporter system with HBx-dependent activity, we demonstrate that SMC5/6 knockdown, or inhibition with a dominant-negative SMC6, enhance HBx null mcHBV-Gluc gene expression. Furthermore, SMC5/6 knockdown rescued HBx-deficient HBV replication in human hepatocytes. These results indicate that a primary function of HBx is to degrade SMC5/6, which restricts HBV replication by inhibiting HBV gene expression. PMID:27626656

  19. Replication protein A safeguards genome integrity by controlling NER incision events

    PubMed Central

    Overmeer, René M.; Moser, Jill; Volker, Marcel; Kool, Hanneke; Tomkinson, Alan E.; van Zeeland, Albert A.

    2011-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA gaps that might arise by futile repair processes can lead to mutagenic events and challenge genome integrity. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is an evolutionarily conserved repair mechanism, essential for removal of helix-distorting DNA lesions. In the currently prevailing model, NER operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and post-incision complexes; however, its regulation in vivo is poorly understood. Notably, the transition from dual incision to repair synthesis should be rigidly synchronized as it might lead to accumulation of unprocessed repair intermediates. We monitored NER regulatory events in vivo using sequential UV irradiations. Under conditions that allow incision yet prevent completion of repair synthesis or ligation, preincision factors can reassociate with new damage sites. In contrast, replication protein A remains at the incomplete NER sites and regulates a feedback loop from completion of DNA repair synthesis to subsequent damage recognition, independently of ATR signaling. Our data reveal an important function for replication protein A in averting further generation of DNA strand breaks that could lead to mutagenic and recombinogenic events. PMID:21282463

  20. Cofolding Organizes Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA and Coat Protein for Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guogas, Laura M.; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Gehrke, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus genomic RNAs are infectious only when the viral coat protein binds to the RNA 3´ termini. The crystal structure of an alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-peptide complex reveals that conserved AUGC repeats and Pro-Thr-x-Arg-Ser-x-x-Tyr coat protein amino acids cofold upon interacting. Alternating AUGC residues have opposite orientation, and they base pair in different adjacent duplexes. Localized RNA backbone reversals stabilized by arginine-guanine interactions place the adenosines and guanines in reverse order in the duplex. The results suggest that a uniform, organized 3´ conformation, similar to that found on viral RNAs with transfer RNA-like ends, may be essential for replication. PMID:15604410

  1. Influenza virus NS1 protein interacts with viral transcription-replication complexes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marión, R M; Zürcher, T; de la Luna, S; Ortín, J

    1997-10-01

    The interaction of influenza virus NS1 protein with other viral products in the infected cell was analysed by co-immunoprecipitation studies. The three subunits of the polymerase and the nucleoprotein, but not M1 protein, were co-immunoprecipitated by NS1-specific serum but not when control serum was used. Such co-immunoprecipitation was not sensitive to RNase treatment of the immunoprecipitates. Co-immunoprecipitation was also obtained when the viral transcription-replication system was reconstituted in vivo by transfection of cDNAs and model vRNA template into vaccinia virus-T7-infected cells. Analysis of the RNA pulled-down in the NS1-specific precipitates indicated the presence of both vRNA and mRNA. These results are discussed in the context of the phenotype of virus temperature-sensitive mutants affected in the NS1 gene.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecG protein but not RuvAB or RecA protein is efficient at remodeling the stalled replication forks: implications for multiple mechanisms of replication restart in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Roshan Singh; Basavaraju, Shivakumar; Khanduja, Jasbeer Singh; Muniyappa, K; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant DNA replication, defects in the protection, and restart of stalled replication forks are major causes of genome instability in all organisms. Replication fork reversal is emerging as an evolutionarily conserved physiological response for restart of stalled forks. Escherichia coli RecG, RuvAB, and RecA proteins have been shown to reverse the model replication fork structures in vitro. However, the pathways and the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a slow growing human pathogen, responds to different types of replication stress and DNA damage are unclear. Here, we show that M. tuberculosis RecG rescues E. coli ΔrecG cells from replicative stress. The purified M. tuberculosis RecG (MtRecG) and RuvAB (MtRuvAB) proteins catalyze fork reversal of model replication fork structures with and without a leading strand single-stranded DNA gap. Interestingly, single-stranded DNA-binding protein suppresses the MtRecG- and MtRuvAB-mediated fork reversal with substrates that contain lagging strand gap. Notably, our comparative studies with fork structures containing template damage and template switching mechanism of lesion bypass reveal that MtRecG but not MtRuvAB or MtRecA is proficient in driving the fork reversal. Finally, unlike MtRuvAB, we find that MtRecG drives efficient reversal of forks when fork structures are tightly bound by protein. These results provide direct evidence and valuable insights into the underlying mechanism of MtRecG-catalyzed replication fork remodeling and restart pathways in vivo.

  3. Functions of single-strand DNA-binding proteins in DNA replication, recombination, and repair.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Aimee H

    2012-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) DNA contains all of the necessary genetic information, although practical use of this information requires unwinding of the duplex DNA. DNA unwinding creates single-stranded (ss) DNA intermediates that serve as templates for myriad cellular functions. Exposure of ssDNA presents several problems to the cell. First, ssDNA is thermodynamically less stable than dsDNA, which leads to spontaneous formation of duplex secondary structures that impede genome maintenance processes. Second, relative to dsDNA, ssDNA is hypersensitive to chemical and nucleolytic attacks that can cause damage to the genome. Cells deal with these potential problems by encoding specialized ssDNA-binding proteins (SSBs) that bind to and stabilize ssDNA structures required for essential genomic processes. SSBs are essential proteins found in all domains of life. SSBs bind ssDNA with high affinity and in a sequence-independent manner and, in doing so, SSBs help to form the central nucleoprotein complex substrate for DNA replication, recombination, and repair processes. While SSBs are found in every organism, the proteins themselves share surprisingly little sequence similarity, subunit composition, and oligomerization states. All SSB proteins contain at least one DNA-binding oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) fold, which consists minimally of a five stranded beta-sheet arranged as a beta barrel capped by a single alpha helix. The OB fold is responsible for both ssDNA binding and oligomerization (for SSBs that operate as oligomers). The overall organization of OB folds varies between bacteria, eukaryotes, and archaea. As part of SSB/ssDNA cellular structures, SSBs play direct roles in the DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In many cases, SSBs have been found to form specific complexes with diverse genome maintenance proteins, often helping to recruit SSB/ssDNA-processing enzymes to the proper cellular sites of action. This clustering of genome maintenance

  4. Protein phosphatase 2A and Cdc7 kinase regulate the DNA unwinding element-binding protein in replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanzhe; Yao, Jianhong; Poudel, Sumeet; Romer, Eric; Abu-Niaaj, Lubna; Leffak, Michael

    2014-12-26

    The DNA unwinding element (DUE)-binding protein (DUE-B) binds to replication origins coordinately with the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase and the helicase activator Cdc45 in vivo, and loads Cdc45 onto chromatin in Xenopus egg extracts. Human DUE-B also retains the aminoacyl-tRNA proofreading function of its shorter orthologs in lower organisms. Here we report that phosphorylation of the DUE-B unstructured C-terminal domain unique to higher organisms regulates DUE-B intermolecular binding. Gel filtration analyses show that unphosphorylated DUE-B forms multiple high molecular weight (HMW) complexes. Several aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and Mcm2-7 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry of the HMW complexes. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase binding is RNase A sensitive, whereas interaction with Mcm2-7 is nuclease resistant. Unphosphorylated DUE-B HMW complex formation is decreased by PP2A inhibition or direct DUE-B phosphorylation, and increased by inhibition of Cdc7. These results indicate that the state of DUE-B phosphorylation is maintained by the equilibrium between Cdc7-dependent phosphorylation and PP2A-dependent dephosphorylation, each previously shown to regulate replication initiation. Alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation target sites increases MCM binding but blocks Cdc45 loading in vivo and inhibits cell division. In egg extracts alanine mutation of the DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation sites blocks Cdc45 loading and inhibits DNA replication. The effects of DUE-B C-terminal phosphorylation reveal a novel S phase kinase regulatory mechanism for Cdc45 loading and MCM helicase activation.

  5. Role of V protein RNA binding in inhibition of measles virus minigenome replication.

    PubMed

    Parks, Christopher L; Witko, Susan E; Kotash, Cheryl; Lin, Shuo L; Sidhu, Mohinder S; Udem, Stephen A

    2006-04-25

    Measles virus V protein represses genome replication through a poorly understood mechanism, which led us to investigate whether V protein might be an RNA-binding modulatory factor. Recombinant V protein, expressed from transfected HEp-2 cells or E. coli, formed protein-RNA complexes with poly-guanosine (poly-G) or poly-U linked to agarose beads. RNA binding was not exclusive to ribonucleotide homopolymers as complex formation between V protein and an RNA molecule equivalent to the 3' terminal 107 bases of the measles virus genome was observed with an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The interaction with poly-G was used to further examine the RNA binding properties of V demonstrating that protein-RNA complex formation was dependent upon the unique Cys-rich carboxy terminus, a region also required to induce maximal repression of minireplicon-encoded reporter gene expression in transient assays. Surprisingly, two mutant proteins that contained Cys-to-Ala substitutions in the C-terminus were found to retain their ability to bind poly-G binding and repress minireplicon reporter gene expression indicating that neither activity was dependent on the integrity of all 7 C-terminal Cys residues. Additional genetic analysis revealed that amino acids 238-266 were necessary for efficient RNA binding and overlapped with residues (238-278) required for maximal repression induced by the C-terminal domain. In addition, a 10 amino acid deletion was identified (residues 238-247) that blocked RNA binding and repression indicating that these two activities were related.

  6. Relative, label-free protein quantitation: spectral counting error statistics from nine replicate MudPIT samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine replicate samples of peptides from soybean leaves, each spiked with a different concentration of bovine apotransferrin peptides, were analyzed on a mass spectrometer using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Proteins were detected from the peptide tandem mass spectra a...

  7. A temperature sensitive mutant of heat shock protein 70 reveals an essential role during the early steps of tombusvirus replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Stork, Jozsef; Pogany, Judit; Nagy, Peter D

    2009-11-10

    By co-opting host proteins for their replication, plus-stranded RNA viruses can support robust replication and suppress host anti-viral responses. Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) recruit the cellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), an abundant cytosolic chaperone, into the replicase complex. By taking advantage of yeast model host, we demonstrate that the four-member SSA subfamily of HSP70 genes is essential for TBSV replication. The constitutively expressed SSA1 and SSA2, which are resident proteins in the viral replicase, can be complemented by the heat-inducible SSA3 and/or SSA4 for TBSV replication. Using a yeast strain carrying a temperature sensitive ssa1(ts), but lacking functional SSA2/3/4, we show that inactivation of Ssa1p(ts) led to a defect in membrane localization of the viral replication proteins, resulting in cytosolic distribution of the viral proteins and lack of replicase activity. An in vitro replicase assembly assay with Ssa1p(ts) revealed that functional Ssa1p is required during the replicase assembly process, but not during minus- or plus-strand synthesis. Temperature shift experiments from nonpermissive to permissive in ssa1(ts) yeast revealed that the re-activated Ssa1p(ts) could promote efficient TBSV replication in the absence of other SSA genes. We also demonstrate that the purified recombinant Ssa3p can facilitate the in vitro assembly of the TBSV replicase on yeast membranes, demonstrating that Ssa3p can fully complement the function of Ssa1p. Taken together, the cytosolic SSA subfamily of Hsp70 proteins play essential and multiple roles in TBSV replication. PMID:19748649

  8. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex

    PubMed Central

    Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Alvino, Gina M.; Chang, FuJung; Lian, Hui-yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J.; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M.K.; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism. PMID:24532715

  9. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  10. Leishmania replication protein A-1 binds in vivo single-stranded telomeric DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, J.L. Siqueira; Lira, C.B.B.; Giardini, M.A.; Khater, L.; Perez, A.M.; Peroni, L.A.; Reis, J.R.R. dos; Freitas-Junior, L.H.; Ramos, C.H.I.; Cano, M.I.N. . E-mail: micano@ibb.unesp.br

    2007-06-29

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a highly conserved heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein involved in different events of DNA metabolism. In yeast, subunits 1 (RPA-1) and 2 (RPA-2) work also as telomerase recruiters and, in humans, the complex unfolds G-quartet structures formed by the 3' G-rich telomeric strand. In most eukaryotes, RPA-1 and RPA-2 bind DNA using multiple OB fold domains. In trypanosomatids, including Leishmania, RPA-1 has a canonical OB fold and a truncated RFA-1 structural domain. In Leishmania amazonensis, RPA-1 alone can form a complex in vitro with the telomeric G-rich strand. In this work, we show that LaRPA-1 is a nuclear protein that associates in vivo with Leishmania telomeres. We mapped the boundaries of the OB fold DNA-binding domain using deletion mutants. Since Leishmania and other trypanosomatids lack homologues of known telomere end binding proteins, our results raise questions about the function of RPA-1 in parasite telomeres.

  11. Exploration of compact protein conformations using the guided replication Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Solomon, J E; Liney, D

    1995-11-01

    We have studied the use of a new Monte Carlo (MC) chain generation algorithm, introduced by T. Garel and H. Orland [(1990) Journal of Physics A, Vol. 23, pp. L621-L626], for examining the thermodynamics of protein folding transitions and for generating candidate C(alpha) backbone structures as starting points for a de novo protein structure paradigm. This algorithm, termed the guided replication Monte Carlo method, allows a rational approach to the introduction of known "native" folded characteristics as constraints in the chain generation process . We have shown this algorithm to be computationally very efficient in generating large ensembles of candidate C(alpha) chains on the face centered cubic lattice, and illustrate its use by calculating a number of thermodynamic quantities related to protein folding characteristics. In particular, we have used this static MC algorithm to compare such temperature-dependent quantities as the ensemble mean energy, ensemble mean free energy, the heat capacity, and the mean-square radius of gyration. We also demonstrate the use of several simple "guide fields" for introducing protein-specific constraints into the ensemble generation process. Several extensions to our current model are suggested, and applications of the method to other folding related problems are discussed.

  12. Molecular Evolution and Functional Diversification of Replication Protein A1 in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Aklilu, Behailu B.; Culligan, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric, single-stranded DNA binding complex required for eukaryotic DNA replication, repair, and recombination. RPA is composed of three subunits, RPA1, RPA2, and RPA3. In contrast to single RPA subunit genes generally found in animals and yeast, plants encode multiple paralogs of RPA subunits, suggesting subfunctionalization. Genetic analysis demonstrates that five Arabidopsis thaliana RPA1 paralogs (RPA1A to RPA1E) have unique and overlapping functions in DNA replication, repair, and meiosis. We hypothesize here that RPA1 subfunctionalities will be reflected in major structural and sequence differences among the paralogs. To address this, we analyzed amino acid and nucleotide sequences of RPA1 paralogs from 25 complete genomes representing a wide spectrum of plants and unicellular green algae. We find here that the plant RPA1 gene family is divided into three general groups termed RPA1A, RPA1B, and RPA1C, which likely arose from two progenitor groups in unicellular green algae. In the family Brassicaceae the RPA1B and RPA1C groups have further expanded to include two unique sub-functional paralogs RPA1D and RPA1E, respectively. In addition, RPA1 groups have unique domains, motifs, cis-elements, gene expression profiles, and pattern of conservation that are consistent with proposed functions in monocot and dicot species, including a novel C-terminal zinc-finger domain found only in plant RPA1C-like sequences. These results allow for improved prediction of RPA1 subunit functions in newly sequenced plant genomes, and potentially provide a unique molecular tool to improve classification of Brassicaceae species. PMID:26858742

  13. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine inhibits replication of human enteroviruses B and D by targeting viral protein 2C.

    PubMed

    Ulferts, Rachel; van der Linden, Lonneke; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; Lanke, Kjerstin H W; Leyssen, Pieter; Coutard, Bruno; De Palma, Armando M; Canard, Bruno; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2013-04-01

    Although the genus Enterovirus contains many important human pathogens, there is no licensed drug for either the treatment or the prophylaxis of enterovirus infections. We report that fluoxetine (Prozac)--a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor--inhibits the replication of human enterovirus B (HEV-B) and HEV-D but does not affect the replication of HEV-A and HEV-C or human rhinovirus A or B. We show that fluoxetine interferes with viral RNA replication, and we identified viral protein 2C as the target of this compound. PMID:23335743

  14. CTXφ Replication Depends on the Histone-Like HU Protein and the UvrD Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Eriel; Paly, Evelyne; Barre, François-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The Vibrio cholerae bacterium is the agent of cholera. The capacity to produce the cholera toxin, which is responsible for the deadly diarrhea associated with cholera epidemics, is encoded in the genome of a filamentous phage, CTXφ. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is central to the life cycle of CTXφ because amplification of the phage genome permits its efficient integration into the genome and its packaging into new viral particles. A single phage-encoded HUH endonuclease initiates RCR of the proto-typical filamentous phages of enterobacteriaceae by introducing a nick at a specific position of the double stranded DNA form of the phage genome. The rest of the process is driven by host factors that are either essential or crucial for the replication of the host genome, such as the Rep SF1 helicase. In contrast, we show here that the histone-like HU protein of V. cholerae is necessary for the introduction of a nick by the HUH endonuclease of CTXφ. We further show that CTXφ RCR depends on a SF1 helicase normally implicated in DNA repair, UvrD, rather than Rep. In addition to CTXφ, we show that VGJφ, a representative member of a second family of vibrio integrative filamentous phages, requires UvrD and HU for RCR while TLCφ, a satellite phage, depends on Rep and is independent from HU. PMID:25992634

  15. MicroRNA-23b inhibits enterovirus 71 replication through downregulation of EV71 VPl protein.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bai-ping; Dai, Hong-jian; Yang, Yue-huang; Zhuang, Yu; Sheng, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the causative pathogens of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and effective antiviral agents and vaccines against this virus have, to date, not been available. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered class of RNAs with the function of post-transcriptional gene expression regulation. It has been demonstrated that miRNAs play important roles in the complicated interaction network between virus and host, while few studies have explored the role of miRNAs in EV71 infection. A recent study showed that hsa-miR-23b was downregulated significantly in cell-infected viruses. To address this issue, biological software miRanda was first used to predict possible target sites of miR-23b at EV71 gene sequence, then to confirm it by luciferase assay. miR-23b mimics were transfected to verify its effects on infection of EV71. These results suggest that miR-23b and upregulation of miR-23b inhibited the replication of EV71 by targeting at EV71 3'UTR conserved sequence. Taken together, miR-23b could inhibit EV71 replication through downregulation of EV71 VPl protein. These results may enhance our understanding on the prevention and treatment of hand-foot-and-mouth disease caused by EV71 infection.

  16. Replication-competent influenza A viruses expressing a red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2015-02-01

    Like most animal viruses, studying influenza A in model systems requires secondary methodologies to identify infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, we describe the generation of replication-competent influenza A red fluorescent viruses. These influenza A viruses encode mCherry fused to the viral non-structural 1 (NS1) protein and display comparable growth kinetics to wild-type viruses in vitro. Infection of cells with influenza A mCherry viruses was neutralized with monoclonal antibodies and inhibited with antivirals to levels similar to wild-type virus. Influenza A mCherry viruses were also able to lethally infect mice, and strikingly, dose- and time-dependent kinetics of viral replication were monitored in whole excised mouse lungs using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS). By eliminating the need for secondary labeling of infected cells, influenza A mCherry viruses provide an ideal tool in the ongoing struggle to better characterize the virus and identify new therapeutics against influenza A viral infections.

  17. Neurotoxic Antibodies against the Prion Protein Do Not Trigger Prion Replication

    PubMed Central

    Frontzek, Karl; Pfammatter, Manuela; Sorce, Silvia; Senatore, Assunta; Schwarz, Petra; Moos, Rita; Frauenknecht, Katrin; Hornemann, Simone; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Prions are the infectious agents causing transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), progressive, inexorably lethal neurological diseases. Antibodies targeting the globular domain (GD) of the cellular prion protein PrPC trigger a neurotoxic syndrome morphologically and molecularly similar to prion disease. This phenomenon raises the question whether such antibodies induce infectious prions de novo. Here we exposed cerebellar organotypic cultured slices (COCS) to the neurotoxic antibody, POM1. We then inoculated COCS homogenates into tga20 mice, which overexpress PrPC and are commonly utilized as sensitive indicators of prion infectivity. None of the mice inoculated with COCS-derived lysates developed any signs of disease, and all mice survived for at least 200 days post-inoculation. In contrast, all mice inoculated with bona fide prions succumbed to TSE after 55–95 days. Post-mortem analyses did not reveal any signs of prion pathology in mice inoculated with POM1-COCS lysates. Also, lysates from POM1-exposed COCS were unable to convert PrP by quaking. Hence, anti-GD antibodies do not catalyze the generation of prion infectivity. These data indicate that prion replication can be separated from prion toxicity, and suggest that anti-GD antibodies exert toxicity by acting downstream of prion replication. PMID:27684562

  18. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter; Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  19. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01). The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01). The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle. PMID:27414795

  20. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01). The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01). The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle. PMID:27414795

  1. Role of primary constitutive phosphorylation of Sendai virus P and V proteins in viral replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, C J; Kato, A; Bowman, M C; Kiyotani, K; Yoshida, T; Moyer, S A; Nagai, Y; Gupta, K C

    1999-10-10

    Functional analysis of the primary constitutive phosphorylation of Sendai virus P and V proteins was performed using both in vitro and in vivo systems. Sendai virus minigenome transcription and replication in transfected cells were not significantly affected in the presence of primary phosphorylation deficient P protein (S249A, S249D, P250A) as measured by either the luciferase activity or the Northern blot analysis. Similarly, recombinant Sendai viruses lacking the primary phosphorylation in P grew to titers close to the wild-type virus in cell cultures and in the natural host of Sendai virus, the mouse. Mutant viruses showed no altered pathogenesis in mice lungs. Oligomerization of P by binding WT P or mutant P to GST-P (WT) Sepharose beads revealed that the primary phosphorylation was not crucial for P protein oligomerization. Similar to P protein primary phosphorylation, the V protein primary phosphorylation at serine249 was not essential for minigenome transcription and replication, as both WT and mutant V proteins were found equally inhibitory to the minigenome replication. These results show that the primary phosphorylation of P protein has no essential role in Sendai virus transcription, replication, and pathogenesis.

  2. Analysis of the role of brome mosaic virus 1a protein domains in RNA replication, using linker insertion mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kroner, P A; Young, B M; Ahlquist, P

    1990-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) belongs to a "superfamily" of plant and animal positive-strand RNA viruses that share, among other features, three large domains of conserved sequence in nonstructural proteins involved in RNA replication. Two of these domains reside in the 109-kDa BMV 1a protein. To examine the role of 1a, we used biologically active cDNA clones of BMV RNA1 to construct a series of linker insertion mutants bearing two-codon insertions dispersed throughout the 1a gene. The majority of these mutations blocked BMV RNA replication in protoplasts, indicating that both intervirally conserved domains function in RNA replication. Coinoculation tests with a large number of mutant combinations failed to reveal detectable complementation between mutations in the N- and C-terminal conserved domains, implying that these two domains either function in some directly interdependent fashion or must be present in the same protein. Four widely spaced mutations with temperature-sensitive (ts) defects in RNA replication were identified, including a strongly ts insertion near the nucleotide-binding consensus of the helicaselike C-terminal domain. Temperature shift experiments with this mutant show that 1a protein is required for continued accumulation of all classes of viral RNA (positive strand, negative strand, and subgenomic) and is required for at least the first 10 h of infection. ts mutations were also identified in the 3' noncoding region of RNA1, 5' to conserved sequences previously implicated in cis for replication. Under nonpermissive conditions, the cis-acting partial inhibition of RNA1 accumulation caused by these noncoding mutations was also associated with reduced levels of the other BMV genomic RNAs. Comparison with previous BMV mutant results suggests that RNA replication is more sensitive to reductions in expression of 1a than of 2a, the other BMV-encoded protein involved in replication. Images PMID:2243389

  3. Human MxA protein inhibits the replication of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yicheng; Pang, Daxin; Wang, Tiedong; Yang, Xin; Wu, Rong; Ren, Linzhu; Yuan, Ting; Huang, Yongye; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2011-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) has a spherical enveloped particle with a single stranded RNA genome, the virus belonging to a pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae is the causative agent of an acute contagious disease classical swine fever (CSF). The interferon-induced MxA protein has been widely shown to inhibit the life cycle of certain RNA viruses as members of the Bunyaviridae family and others. Interestingly, it has been reported that expression of MxA in infected cells was blocked by CSFV and whether MxA has an inhibitory effect against CSFV remains unknown to date until present. Here, we report that CSFV replicated poorly in cells stably transfected with human MxA. The proliferation of progeny virus in both PK-15 cell lines and swine fetal fibroblasts (PEF) continuously expressing MxA was shown significantly inhibited as measured by virus titration, indirect immune fluorescence assay and real-time PCR.

  4. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, R.L.; Mackenzie, J.M.

    2015-07-15

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNV{sub KUN} replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNV{sub KUN} replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein.

  5. Replication protein A is required for meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Soustelle, Christine; Vedel, Michèle; Kolodner, Richard; Nicolas, Alain

    2002-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, meiotic recombination is initiated by transient DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). These DSBs undergo a 5' --> 3' resection to produce 3' single-stranded DNA ends that serve to channel DSBs into the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway. In vitro studies strongly suggest that several proteins of this pathway--Rad51, Rad52, Rad54, Rad55, Rad57, and replication protein A (RPA)--play a role in the strand exchange reaction. Here, we report a study of the meiotic phenotypes conferred by two missense mutations affecting the largest subunit of RPA, which are localized in the protein interaction domain (rfa1-t11) and in the DNA-binding domain (rfa1-t48). We find that both mutant diploids exhibit reduced sporulation efficiency, very poor spore viability, and a 10- to 100-fold decrease in meiotic recombination. Physical analyses indicate that both mutants form normal levels of meiosis-specific DSBs and that the broken ends are processed into 3'-OH single-stranded tails, indicating that the RPA complex present in these rfa1 mutants is functional in the initial steps of meiotic recombination. However, the 5' ends of the broken fragments undergo extensive resection, similar to what is observed in rad51, rad52, rad55, and rad57 mutants, indicating that these RPA mutants are defective in the repair of the Spo11-dependent DSBs that initiate homologous recombination during meiosis. PMID:12072452

  6. A novel inhibitor of dengue virus replication that targets the capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Chelsea M; Dai, Dongcheng; Grosenbach, Douglas W; Berhanu, Aklile; Jones, Kevin F; Cardwell, Kara B; Schneider, Christine; Wineinger, Kristin A; Page, Jessica M; Harver, Chris; Stavale, Eric; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Stone, Melialani A; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Scaturro, Pietro; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) infect 50 to 100 million people worldwide per year, of which 500,000 develop severe life-threatening disease. This mosquito-borne illness is endemic in most tropical and subtropical countries and has spread significantly over the last decade. While there are several promising vaccine candidates in clinical trials, there are currently no approved vaccines or therapeutics available for treatment of dengue infection. Here, we describe a novel small-molecule compound, ST-148, that is a potent inhibitor of all four serotypes of DENV in vitro. ST-148 significantly reduced viremia and viral load in vital organs and tended to lower cytokine levels in the plasma in a nonlethal model of DENV infection in AG129 mice. Compound resistance mapped to the DENV capsid (C) gene, and a direct interaction of ST-148 with C protein is suggested by alterations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein in the presence of compound. Thus, ST-148 appears to interact with the DENV C protein and inhibits a distinct step(s) of the viral replication cycle.

  7. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Lynne D.; Asara, John M.; Cheruiyot, Collins K.; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J.; Newstein, Michael C.; Dooner, Mark S.; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A.; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1–infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1–infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1–infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  8. A novel inhibitor of dengue virus replication that targets the capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Chelsea M; Dai, Dongcheng; Grosenbach, Douglas W; Berhanu, Aklile; Jones, Kevin F; Cardwell, Kara B; Schneider, Christine; Wineinger, Kristin A; Page, Jessica M; Harver, Chris; Stavale, Eric; Tyavanagimatt, Shanthakumar; Stone, Melialani A; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Scaturro, Pietro; Hruby, Dennis E; Jordan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) infect 50 to 100 million people worldwide per year, of which 500,000 develop severe life-threatening disease. This mosquito-borne illness is endemic in most tropical and subtropical countries and has spread significantly over the last decade. While there are several promising vaccine candidates in clinical trials, there are currently no approved vaccines or therapeutics available for treatment of dengue infection. Here, we describe a novel small-molecule compound, ST-148, that is a potent inhibitor of all four serotypes of DENV in vitro. ST-148 significantly reduced viremia and viral load in vital organs and tended to lower cytokine levels in the plasma in a nonlethal model of DENV infection in AG129 mice. Compound resistance mapped to the DENV capsid (C) gene, and a direct interaction of ST-148 with C protein is suggested by alterations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein in the presence of compound. Thus, ST-148 appears to interact with the DENV C protein and inhibits a distinct step(s) of the viral replication cycle. PMID:23070172

  9. Interaction of NCOR/SMRT Repressor Complexes with Papillomavirus E8^E2C Proteins Inhibits Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; van de Poel, Saskia; Straub, Elke; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) such as HPV16 and 31 can lead to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers and HPV types from the beta genus have been implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. HPV replicate as nuclear extrachromosomal plasmids at low copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. HPV16 and 31 mutants have indicated that these viruses express an E8^E2C protein which negatively regulates genome replication. E8^E2C shares the DNA-binding and dimerization domain (E2C) with the essential viral replication activator E2 and the E8 domain replaces the replication/transcription activation domain of E2. The HR-HPV E8 domain is required for inhibiting viral transcription and the replication of the viral origin mediated by viral E1 and E2 proteins. We show now that E8^E2C also limits replication of HPV1, a mu-PV and HPV8, a beta-PV, in normal human keratinocytes. Proteomic analyses identified all NCoR/SMRT corepressor complex components (HDAC3, GPS2, NCoR, SMRT, TBL1 and TBLR1) as co-precipitating host cell proteins for HPV16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments revealed that NCoR/SMRT components interact with HPV1, 8, 16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins in an E8-dependent manner. SiRNA knock-down experiments confirm that NCoR/SMRT components are critical for both the inhibition of transcription and HPV origin replication by E8^E2C proteins. Furthermore, a dominant-negative NCoR fragment activates transcription and replication only from HPV16 and 31 wt but not from mutant genomes encoding NCoR/SMRT-binding deficient E8^E2C proteins. In summary, our data suggest that the repressive function of E8^E2C is highly conserved among HPV and that it is mediated by an E8-dependent interaction with NCoR/SMRT complexes. Our data also indicate for the first time that NCoR/SMRT complexes not only are involved in inhibiting cellular and viral transcription but also in controlling the replication of HPV origins

  10. The Bacillus subtilis DnaD protein: a putative link between DNA remodeling and initiation of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Ian J.; Scott, David J.; Allen, Stephanie; Roberts, Clive J.; Soultanas, Panos

    2011-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis DnaD protein is an essential protein and a component of the oriC and PriA primosomal cascades, which are responsible for loading the main replicative ring helicase DnaC onto DNA. We present evidence that DnaD also has a global DNA architectural activity, assembling into large nucleoprotein complexes on a plasmid and counteracting plasmid compaction in a manner analogous to that recently seen for the histone-like Escherichia coli HU proteins. This DNA-remodeling role may be an essential function for initiation of DNA replication in the Gram +ve B. subtilis, thus highlighting DnaD as the link between bacterial nucleoid reorganization and initiation of DNA replication. PMID:15556628

  11. Interferon-inducible protein SCOTIN interferes with HCV replication through the autolysosomal degradation of NS5A

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nari; Kim, Min-Jung; Sung, Pil Soo; Bae, Yong Chul; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Yoo, Joo-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) utilizes autophagy to promote its propagation. Here we show the autophagy-mediated suppression of HCV replication via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein SCOTIN. SCOTIN overexpression inhibits HCV replication and infectious virion production in cells infected with cell culture-derived HCV. HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein, which is a critical factor for HCV RNA replication, interacts with the IFN-β-inducible protein SCOTIN, which transports NS5A to autophagosomes for degradation. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of SCOTIN on HCV replication is impaired in both ATG7-silenced cells and cells treated with autophagy or lysosomal inhibitors. SCOTIN does not affect the overall flow of autophagy; however, it is a substrate for autophagic degradation. The physical association between the transmembrane/proline-rich domain (TMPRD) of SCOTIN and Domain-II of NS5A is essential for autophagosomal trafficking and NS5A degradation. Altogether, our findings suggest that IFN-β-induced SCOTIN recruits the HCV NS5A protein to autophagosomes for degradation, thereby restricting HCV replication. PMID:26868272

  12. Binding of the replication terminator protein Fob1p to the Ter sites of yeast causes polar fork arrest.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bidyut K; Bastia, Deepak

    2004-01-16

    Fob1p protein has been implicated in the termination of replication forks at the two tandem termini present in the non-transcribed spacer region located between the sequences encoding the 35 S and the 5 S RNAs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the biochemistry and mode of action of this protein were previously unknown. We have purified the Fob1p protein to near-homogeneity, and we developed a novel technique to show that it binds specifically to the Ter1 and Ter2 sequences. Interestingly, the two sequences share no detectable homology. We present two lines of evidence showing that the interaction of the Fob1p with the Ter sites causes replication termination. First, a mutant of FOB1, L104S, that significantly reduced the binding of the mutant form of the protein to the tandem Ter sites, also failed to promote replication termination in vivo. The mutant did not diminish nucleolar transport, and interaction of the mutant form of Fob1p with itself and with another protein encoded in the locus YDR026C suggested that the mutation did not cause global misfolding of the protein. Second, DNA site mutations in the Ter sequences that separately and specifically abolished replication fork arrest at Ter1 or Ter2 also eliminated sequence-specific binding of the Fob1p to the two sites. The work presented here definitively established Ter DNA-Fob1p interaction as an important step in fork arrest.

  13. Solution structure, divalent metal and DNA binding of the endonuclease domain from the replication initiation protein from porcine circovirus 2.

    PubMed

    Vega-Rocha, Susana; Byeon, In-Ja L; Gronenborn, Bruno; Gronenborn, Angela M; Campos-Olivas, Ramón

    2007-03-23

    Circoviruses are the smallest circular single-stranded DNA viruses able to replicate in mammalian cells. Essential to their replication is the replication initiator, or Rep protein that initiates the rolling circle replication (RCR) of the viral genome. Here we report the NMR solution three-dimensional structure of the endonuclease domain from the Rep protein of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), the causative agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome in swine. The domain comprises residues 12-112 of the full-length protein and exhibits the fold described previously for the Rep protein of the representative geminivirus tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus. The structure, however, differs significantly in some secondary structure elements that decorate the central five-stranded beta-sheet, including the replacement of a beta-hairpin by an alpha-helix in PCV2 Rep. The identification of the divalent metal binding site was accomplished by following the paramagnetic broadening of NMR amide signals upon Mn(2+) titration. The site comprises three conserved acidic residues on the exposed face of the central beta-sheet. For the 1:1 complex of the PCV2 Rep nuclease domain with a 22mer double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide chemical shift mapping allowed the identification of the DNA binding site on the protein and aided in constructing a model of the protein/DNA complex.

  14. Assembly of the bacteriophage T4 replication machine requires the acidic carboxy terminus of gene 32 protein.

    PubMed

    Hurley, J M; Chervitz, S A; Jarvis, T C; Singer, B S; Gold, L

    1993-01-20

    The acidic carboxy-terminal 89-amino acid fragment of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli to high levels from an inducible plasmid construct. Infection of induced cells by wild-type T4 phage results in impaired phage DNA synthesis. The time at which DNA synthesis begins and the diminution in DNA synthesis rates correlate with the amount of carboxy-terminal peptide that accumulates intracellularly prior to infection. Correspondingly, when induced cells are infected with viable phage containing a small deletion near the carboxy-terminus of 32 protein (delta PR201), the inhibition of phage DNA synthesis was much more severe. The mutant 32 protein competes less well against overproduced wild-type acid peptide than does wild-type 32 protein. The purified acid peptide, when used as the attached ligand for affinity chromatography, binds several T4 proteins from phage-infected cells, including 43 protein (T4 DNA polymerase), Dda protein (a DNA helicase), and UvsX protein (a Rec-like recombination protein). Furthermore, at 50- to 100-fold molar excess of acid peptide over intact 32 protein, phage DNA synthesis was specifically inhibited at the initiation step in an in vitro 5-protein DNA replication experiment. We propose that one or more phage replication proteins are titrated as non-productive protein-protein complexes at a site away from the DNA template. This implies that the carboxy-terminal domain of 32 protein is involved in an obligate step of replication machine assembly when the protein is properly attached to ssDNA in the vicinity of a primer-template junction. The assembly defect we observe is strikingly similar to the repression, or "squelching", of the activity of certain eukaryotic transcriptional activators. PMID:8429554

  15. Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Nonstructural Protein 2C Interacts with Beclin1, Modulating Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Gladue, D. P.; O'Donnell, V.; Baker-Branstetter, R.; Holinka, L. G.; Pacheco, J. M.; Fernandez-Sainz, I.; Lu, Z.; Brocchi, E.; Baxt, B.; Piccone, M. E.; Rodriguez, L.

    2012-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease, is an Apthovirus within the Picornaviridae family. Replication of the virus occurs in association with replication complexes that are formed by host cell membrane rearrangements. The largest viral protein in the replication complex, 2C, is thought to have multiple roles during virus replication. However, studies examining the function of FMDV 2C have been rather limited. To better understand the role of 2C in the process of virus replication, we used a yeast two-hybrid approach to identify host proteins that interact with 2C. We report here that cellular Beclin1 is a specific host binding partner for 2C. Beclin1 is a regulator of the autophagy pathway, a metabolic pathway required for efficient FMDV replication. The 2C-Beclin1 interaction was further confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy to actually occur in FMDV-infected cells. Overexpression of either Beclin1 or Bcl-2, another important autophagy factor, strongly affects virus yield in cell culture. The fusion of lysosomes to autophagosomes containing viral proteins is not seen during FMDV infection, a process that is stimulated by Beclin1; however, in FMDV-infected cells overexpressing Beclin1 this fusion occurs, suggesting that 2C would bind to Beclin1 to prevent the fusion of lysosomes to autophagosomes, allowing for virus survival. Using reverse genetics, we demonstrate here that modifications to the amino acids in 2C that are critical for interaction with Beclin1 are also critical for virus growth. These results suggest that interaction between FMDV 2C and host protein Beclin1 could be essential for virus replication. PMID:22933281

  16. Human DNA helicase B interacts with the replication initiation protein Cdc45 and facilitates Cdc45 binding onto chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Guler, Gulfem D.; Fanning, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal DNA replication in eukaryotic cells begins at replication initation sites, which are marked by the assembly of the pre-replication complexes in early G1. At the G1/S transition, recruitment of additional replication initiation proteins enables origin DNA unwinding and loading of DNA polymerases. We found that depletion of the human DNA helicase B (HDHB) inhibits the initiation of DNA replication, suggesting a role of HDHB in the beginning of the DNA synthesis. To gain insight into the function of HDHB during replication initiation, we examined the physical interactions of purified recombinant HDHB with key initiation proteins. HDHB interacts directly with two initiation factors TopBP1 and Cdc45. In addition we found that both, the N-terminus and helicase domain of HDHB bind to the N-terminus of Cdc45. Furthermore depletion of HDHB from human cells diminishes Cdc45 association with chromatin, suggesting that HDHB may facilitate Cdc45 recruitment at G1/S in human cells. PMID:25933514

  17. Soj/ParA stalls DNA replication by inhibiting helix formation of the initiator protein DnaA.

    PubMed

    Scholefield, Graham; Errington, Jeff; Murray, Heath

    2012-03-21

    Control of DNA replication initiation is essential for normal cell growth. A unifying characteristic of DNA replication initiator proteins across the kingdoms of life is their distinctive AAA+ nucleotide-binding domains. The bacterial initiator DnaA assembles into a right-handed helical oligomer built upon interactions between neighbouring AAA+ domains, that in vitro stretches DNA to promote replication origin opening. The Bacillus subtilis protein Soj/ParA has previously been shown to regulate DnaA-dependent DNA replication initiation; however, the mechanism underlying this control was unknown. Here, we report that Soj directly interacts with the AAA+ domain of DnaA and specifically regulates DnaA helix assembly. We also provide critical biochemical evidence indicating that DnaA assembles into a helical oligomer in vivo and that the frequency of replication initiation correlates with the extent of DnaA oligomer formation. This work defines a significant new regulatory mechanism for the control of DNA replication initiation in bacteria. PMID:22286949

  18. Inhibition of HCV Replication by Oxysterol-Binding Protein-Related Protein 4 (ORP4) through Interaction with HCV NS5B and Alteration of Lipid Droplet Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yahong; Liu, Ziqing; Ridgway, Neale D.; Kao, C. Cheng; He, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication involves complex interactions among the 3’x RNA element within the HCV 3’ untranslated region, viral and host proteins. However, many of the host proteins remain unknown. In this study, we devised an RNA affinity chromatography /2D/MASS proteomics strategy and identified nine putative 3’ X-associated host proteins; among them is oxysterol-binding protein-related protein 4 (ORP4), a cytoplasmic receptor for oxysterols. We determined the relationship between ORP4 expression and HCV replication. A very low level of constitutive ORP4 expression was detected in hepatocytes. Ectopically expressed ORP4 was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and inhibited luciferase reporter gene expression in HCV subgenomic replicon cells and HCV core expression in JFH-1-infected cells. Expression of ORP4S, an ORP4 variant that lacked the N-terminal pleckstrin-homology domain but contained the C-terminal oxysterol-binding domain also inhibited HCV replication, pointing to an important role of the oxysterol-binding domain in ORP4-mediated inhibition of HCV replication. ORP4 was found to associate with HCV NS5B and its expression led to inhibition of the NS5B activity. ORP4 expression had little effect on intracellular lipid synthesis and secretion, but it induced lipid droplet formation in the context of HCV replication. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ORP4 is a negative regulator of HCV replication, likely via interaction with HCV NS5B in the replication complex and regulation of intracellular lipid homeostasis. This work supports the important role of lipids and their metabolism in HCV replication and pathogenesis. PMID:24069433

  19. The TGGCA protein binds to the MMTV-LTR, the adenovirus origin of replication, and the BK virus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Nowock, J; Borgmeyer, U; Püschel, A W; Rupp, R A; Sippel, A E

    1985-01-01

    TGGCA-binding proteins are nuclear proteins with high affinity for double-stranded DNA homologous to the prototype recognition sequence 5'YTGGCANNNTGCCAR 3'. Their ubiquitous tissue distribution in higher vertebrates characterizes them as a class of highly conserved proteins which may exert a basic function. To obtain clues to this function, specific binding sites were mapped on three viral genomes. Recognition sites were identified in the enhancer region of the BK virus, in the LTR of the mouse mammary tumor virus, and in the origin of replication of adenovirus 12. The TGGCA-binding protein from HeLa cells appears to be identical to nuclear factor I described by others, which stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro. However, data from MMTV, BKV, and from cellular genes suggest that this specific protein-DNA interaction may also be involved in the control of gene activity. Images PMID:2987840

  20. Induction of the Bovine Papillomavirus Origin “Onion Skin”-Type DNA Replication at High E1 Protein Concentrations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Andres; Rünkorg, Kertu; Jaanson, Nele; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Ene

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the replication of plasmids composed of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) origin of replication and expression cartridges for viral proteins E1 and E2 in hamster and mouse cells. We found that the replication mode changed dramatically at different expression levels of the E1 protein. At high levels of the E1 protein, overreplication of the origin region of the plasmid was observed. Analysis of the replication products by one-dimensional and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis suggested that initially “onion skin”-type replication intermediates were generated, presumably resulting from initiation of the new replication forks before the leading fork completed the synthesis of the DNA on the episomal plasmid. These replication intermediates served as templates for generation of a heterogeneous set of origin region-containing linear fragments by displacement synthesis at the partially replicated plasmid. Additionally, the linear fragments may have been generated by DNA break-up of the onion skin-type intermediates. Analysis of replication products indicated that generated linear fragments recombined and formed concatemers or circular molecules, which presumably were able to replicate in an E1- and E2-dependent fashion. At moderate and low levels of E1, generated by transcription of the E1 open reading frame using weaker promoters, DNA replication was initiated at much lower levels, which allowed elongation of the replication fork starting from the origin to be more balanced and resulted in the generation of full-sized replication products. PMID:11992014

  1. MCMV-mediated Inhibition of the Pro-apoptotic Bak Protein Is Required for Optimal In Vivo Replication

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Peter; Kvansakul, Marc; Voigt, Valentina; Kile, Benjamin T.; Kluck, Ruth M.; Huang, David C. S.; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A.; Andoniou, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Successful replication and transmission of large DNA viruses such as the cytomegaloviruses (CMV) family of viruses depends on the ability to interfere with multiple aspects of the host immune response. Apoptosis functions as a host innate defence mechanism against viral infection, and the capacity to interfere with this process is essential for the replication of many viruses. The Bcl-2 family of proteins are the principle regulators of apoptosis, with two pro-apoptotic members, Bax and Bak, essential for apoptosis to proceed. The m38.5 protein encoded by murine CMV (MCMV) has been identified as Bax-specific inhibitor of apoptosis. Recently, m41.1, a protein product encoded by the m41 open reading frame (ORF) of MCMV, has been shown to inhibit Bak activity in vitro. Here we show that m41.1 is critical for optimal MCMV replication in vivo. Growth of a m41.1 mutant was attenuated in multiple organs, a defect that was not apparent in Bak−/− mice. Thus, m41.1 promotes MCMV replication by inhibiting Bak-dependent apoptosis during in vivo infection. The results show that Bax and Bak mediate non-redundant functions during MCMV infection and that the virus produces distinct inhibitors for each protein to counter the activity of these proteins. PMID:23468630

  2. The nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 targets Newcastle disease virus matrix protein to the nucleoli and facilitates viral replication.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jian; Xu, Haixu; Zhu, Jie; Li, Qunhui; He, Liang; Liu, Huimou; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-03-01

    The cellular nucleolar proteins are reported to facilitate the replication cycles of some human and animal viruses by interaction with viral proteins. In this study, a nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 was identified to interact with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix (M) protein. We found that NDV M protein accumulated in the nucleolus by binding B23 early in infection, but resulted in the redistribution of B23 from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm later in infection. In vitro binding studies utilizing deletion mutants indicated that amino acids 30-60 of M and amino acids 188-245 of B23 were required for binding. Furthermore, knockdown of B23 by siRNA or overexpression of B23 or M-binding B23-derived polypeptides remarkably reduced cytopathic effect and inhibited NDV replication. Collectively, we show that B23 facilitates NDV replication by targeting M to the nucleolus, demonstrating for the first time a direct role for nucleolar protein B23 in a paramyxovirus replication process.

  3. Cellular COPII Proteins Are Involved in Production of the Vesicles That Form the Poliovirus Replication Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rust, René C.; Landmann, Lukas; Gosert, Rainer; Tang, Bor Luen; Hong, Wanjin; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Egger, Denise; Bienz, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) replicates its genome in association with membranous vesicles in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To elucidate the origin and mode of formation of PV vesicles, immunofluorescence labeling with antibodies against the viral vesicle marker proteins 2B and 2BC, as well as cellular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), anterograde transport vesicles, and the Golgi complex, was performed in BT7-H cells. Optical sections obtained by confocal laser scanning microscopy were subjected to a deconvolution process to enhance resolution and signal-to-noise ratio and to allow for a three-dimensional representation of labeled membrane structures. The mode of formation of the PV vesicles was, on morphological grounds, similar to the formation of anterograde membrane traffic vesicles in uninfected cells. ER-resident membrane markers were excluded from both types of vesicles, and the COPII components Sec13 and Sec31 were both found to be colocalized on the vesicular surface, indicating the presence of a functional COPII coat. PV vesicle formation during early time points of infection did not involve the Golgi complex. The expression of PV protein 2BC or the entire P2 and P3 genomic region led to the production of vesicles carrying a COPII coat and showing the same mode of formation as vesicles produced after PV infection. These results indicate that PV vesicles are formed at the ER by the cellular COPII budding mechanism and thus are homologous to the vesicles of the anterograde membrane transport pathway. PMID:11559814

  4. Archaeal Genome Guardians Give Insights into Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Damage Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shin, David S.; Pratt, Ashley J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    As the third domain of life, archaea, like the eukarya and bacteria, must have robust DNA replication and repair complexes to ensure genome fidelity. Archaea moreover display a breadth of unique habitats and characteristics, and structural biologists increasingly appreciate these features. As archaea include extremophiles that can withstand diverse environmental stresses, they provide fundamental systems for understanding enzymes and pathways critical to genome integrity and stress responses. Such archaeal extremophiles provide critical data on the periodic table for life as well as on the biochemical, geochemical, and physical limitations to adaptive strategies allowing organisms to thrive under environmental stress relevant to determining the boundaries for life as we know it. Specifically, archaeal enzyme structures have informed the architecture and mechanisms of key DNA repair proteins and complexes. With added abilities to temperature-trap flexible complexes and reveal core domains of transient and dynamic complexes, these structures provide insights into mechanisms of maintaining genome integrity despite extreme environmental stress. The DNA damage response protein structures noted in this review therefore inform the basis for genome integrity in the face of environmental stress, with implications for all domains of life as well as for biomanufacturing, astrobiology, and medicine. PMID:24701133

  5. A new structural framework for integrating replication protein A into DNA processing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, Chris; Yan, Chunli; Tsutakawa, Susan; Heller, William; Rambo, Robert; Tainer, John; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Chazin, Walter

    2013-01-17

    By coupling the protection and organization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with recruitment and alignment of DNA processing factors, replication protein A (RPA) lies at the heart of dynamic multi-protein DNA processing machinery. Nevertheless, how RPA coordinates biochemical functions of its eight domains remains unknown. We examined the structural biochemistry of RPA's DNA-binding activity, combining small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the architecture of RPA's DNA-binding core. The scattering data reveal compaction promoted by DNA binding; DNA-free RPA exists in an ensemble of states with inter-domain mobility and becomes progressively more condensed and less dynamic on binding ssDNA. Our results contrast with previous models proposing RPA initially binds ssDNA in a condensed state and becomes more extended as it fully engages the substrate. Moreover, the consensus view that RPA engages ssDNA in initial, intermediate and final stages conflicts with our data revealing that RPA undergoes two (not three) transitions as it binds ssDNA with no evidence for a discrete intermediate state. These results form a framework for understanding how RPA integrates the ssDNA substrate into DNA processing machinery, provides substrate access to its binding partners and promotes the progression and selection of DNA processing pathways.

  6. A new structural framework for integrating replication protein A into DNA processing machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, Chris A; Yan, Chunli; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Heller, William T; Rambo, Robert P; Tainer, John A; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Chazin, Walter J

    2013-01-01

    By coupling the protection and organization of ssDNA with the recruitment and alignment of DNA processing factors, Replication Protein A (RPA) lies at the heart of dynamic multi-protein DNA processing machinery. Nevertheless, how RPA manages to coordinate the biochemical functions of its eight domains remains unknown. We examined the structural biochemistry of RPA s DNA binding activity, combining small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the architecture of RPA s DNA-binding core. It has been long held that RPA engages ssDNA in three stages, but our data reveal that RPA undergoes two rather than three transitions as it binds ssDNA. In contrast to previous models, RPA is more compact when fully engaged on 20-30 nucleotides of ssDNA than when DNA-free, and there is no evidence for significant population of a highly compacted structure in the initial 8-10 nucleotide binding mode. These results provide a new framework for understanding the integration of ssDNA into DNA processing machinery and how binding partners may manipulate RPA architecture to gain access to the substrate.

  7. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (LX) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus LM structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus LE, and also larger complexes with LE:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant LS and LT from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the LE zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on LE must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by LE.

  8. Murine coronavirus nonstructural protein ns2 is not essential for virus replication in transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, B; Routledge, E; Siddell, S G

    1990-01-01

    Two isolates of the murine hepatitis virus (MHV) strain JHM, which differed in their ability to express the nonstructural gene product ns2, were characterized. The MHV Wb3 isolate encodes a 30,000-molecular-weight ns2 protein that can be readily detected in infected cells by using a specific monoclonal antibody, MAb 2A. The MHV Wb1 isolate is a deletion mutant that lacks a functional ns2 gene and the transcriptional signals required for the synthesis of an ns2 mRNA. However, there are no obviously significant differences in the growth of the MHV Wb1 and MHV Wb3 isolates in continuous cell lines or in the synthesis of viral mRNAs or proteins in infected cells. These results demonstrate that the ns2 gene product is not essential for MHV replication in transformed murine cells and suggests that the function of the ns2 gene may only be manifest in vivo. Images PMID:2168966

  9. Production of recombinant snakehead rhabdovirus: the NV protein is not required for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M C; Simon, B E; Kim, C H; Leong, J A

    2000-03-01

    Snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) affects warm water fish in Southeast Asia and belongs to the genus Novirhabdovirus by virtue of its nonvirion gene (NV). Because SHRV grows best at temperatures between 28 and 31 degrees C, we were able to use the T7 expression system to produce viable recombinant SHRV from a cloned cDNA copy of the viral genome. Expression of a positive-strand RNA copy of the 11, 550-nucleotide SHRV genome along with the viral nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P), and polymerase (L) proteins resulted in the generation of infectious SHRV in cells preinfected with a vaccinia virus vector for T7 polymerase expression. Recombinant virus production was verified by detection of a unique restriction site engineered into the SHRV genome between the NV and L genes. Since we were now able to begin examining the function of the NV gene, we constructed a recombinant virus containing a nonsense mutation located 22 codons into the coding sequence of the NV protein. The NV knockout virus was produced at a concentration as high as that of wild-type virus in cultured fish cells, and the resulting virions appeared to be identical to the wild-type virions in electron micrographs. These initial studies suggest that NV has no critical function in SHRV replication in cultured fish cells.

  10. A new structural framework for integrating replication protein A into DNA processing machinery

    PubMed Central

    Brosey, Chris A.; Yan, Chunli; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Heller, William T.; Rambo, Robert P.; Tainer, John A.; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Chazin, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    By coupling the protection and organization of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with recruitment and alignment of DNA processing factors, replication protein A (RPA) lies at the heart of dynamic multi-protein DNA processing machinery. Nevertheless, how RPA coordinates biochemical functions of its eight domains remains unknown. We examined the structural biochemistry of RPA’s DNA-binding activity, combining small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the architecture of RPA’s DNA-binding core. The scattering data reveal compaction promoted by DNA binding; DNA-free RPA exists in an ensemble of states with inter-domain mobility and becomes progressively more condensed and less dynamic on binding ssDNA. Our results contrast with previous models proposing RPA initially binds ssDNA in a condensed state and becomes more extended as it fully engages the substrate. Moreover, the consensus view that RPA engages ssDNA in initial, intermediate and final stages conflicts with our data revealing that RPA undergoes two (not three) transitions as it binds ssDNA with no evidence for a discrete intermediate state. These results form a framework for understanding how RPA integrates the ssDNA substrate into DNA processing machinery, provides substrate access to its binding partners and promotes the progression and selection of DNA processing pathways. PMID:23303776

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus pTRS1 and pIRS1 Antagonize Protein Kinase R To Facilitate Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ziehr, Benjamin; Vincent, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) counteracts host defenses that otherwise act to limit viral protein synthesis. One such defense is the antiviral kinase protein kinase R (PKR), which inactivates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) translation initiation factor upon binding to viral double-stranded RNAs. Previously, the viral TRS1 and IRS1 proteins were found to antagonize the antiviral kinase PKR outside the context of HCMV infection, and the expression of either pTRS1 or pIRS1 was shown to be necessary for HCMV replication. In this study, we found that expression of either pTRS1 or pIRS1 is necessary to prevent PKR activation during HCMV infection and that antagonism of PKR is critical for efficient viral replication. Consistent with a previous study, we observed decreased overall levels of protein synthesis, reduced viral protein expression, and diminished virus replication in the absence of both pTRS1 and pIRS1. In addition, both PKR and eIF2α were phosphorylated during infection when pTRS1 and pIRS1 were absent. We also found that expression of pTRS1 was both necessary and sufficient to prevent stress granule formation in response to eIF2α phosphorylation. Depletion of PKR prevented eIF2α phosphorylation, rescued HCMV replication and protein synthesis, and reversed the accumulation of stress granules in infected cells. Infection with an HCMV mutant lacking the pTRS1 PKR binding domain resulted in PKR activation, suggesting that pTRS1 inhibits PKR through a direct interaction. Together our results show that antagonism of PKR by HCMV pTRS1 and pIRS1 is critical for viral protein expression and efficient HCMV replication. IMPORTANCE To successfully replicate, viruses must counteract host defenses that limit viral protein synthesis. We have identified inhibition of the antiviral kinase PKR by the viral proteins TRS1 and IRS1 and shown that this is a critical step in HCMV replication. Our results suggest that inhibiting pTRS1 and pIRS1 function or

  12. Replication fork arrest and rDNA silencing are two independent and separable functions of the replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bairwa, Narendra K; Zzaman, Shamsu; Mohanty, Bidyut K; Bastia, Deepak

    2010-04-23

    The replication terminator protein Fob1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is multifunctional, and it not only promotes polar replication fork arrest at the tandem Ter sites located in the intergenic spacer region of rDNA but also loads the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase Sir2 at Ter sites via a protein complex called RENT (regulator of nucleolar silencing and telophase exit). Sir2 is a component of the RENT complex, and its loading not only silences intrachromatid recombination in rDNA but also RNA polymerase II-catalyzed transcription. Here, we present three lines of evidence showing that the two aforementioned activities of Fob1 are independent of each other as well as functionally separable. First, a Fob1 ortholog of Saccharomyces bayanus expressed in a fob1Delta strain of S. cerevisiae restored polar fork arrest at Ter but not rDNA silencing. Second, a mutant form (I407T) of S. cerevisiae Fob1 retained normal fork arresting activity but was partially defective in rDNA silencing. We further show that the silencing defect of S. bayanus Fob1 and the Iota407Tau mutant of S. cerevisiae Fob1 were caused by the failure of the proteins to interact with two members of the S. cerevisiae RENT complex, namely S. cerevisiae Sir2 and S. cerevisiae Net1. Third, deletions of the intra-S phase checkpoint proteins Tof1 and Csm3 abolished fork arrest by Fob1 at Ter without causing loss of silencing. Taken together, the data support the conclusion that unlike some other functions of Fob1, rDNA silencing at Ter is independent of fork arrest.

  13. Role of the CM2 Protein in the Influenza C Virus Replication Cycle ▿

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Takatoshi; Muraki, Yasushi; Noda, Takeshi; Takashita, Emi; Sho, Ri; Sugawara, Kanetsu; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Hongo, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    CM2 is the second membrane protein of influenza C virus. Although its biochemical characteristics, coding strategy, and properties as an ion channel have been extensively studied, the role(s) of CM2 in the virus replication cycle remains to be clarified. In order to elucidate this role, in the present study we generated CM2-deficient influenza C virus-like particles (VLPs) and examined the VLP-producing 293T cells, VLPs, and VLP-infected HMV-II cells. Quantification of viral RNA (vRNA) in the VLPs by real-time PCR revealed that the CM2-deficient VLPs contain approximately one-third of the vRNA found in wild-type VLPs although no significant differences were detected in the expression levels of viral components in VLP-producing cells or in the number and morphology of the generated VLPs. This finding suggests that CM2 is involved in the genome packaging process into VLPs. Furthermore, HMV-II cells infected with CM2-deficient VLPs exhibited significantly reduced reporter gene expression. Although CM2-deficient VLPs could be internalized into HMV-II cells as efficiently as wild-type VLPs, a smaller amount of vRNA was detected in the nuclear fraction of CM2-deficient VLP-infected cells than in that of wild-type VLP-infected cells, suggesting that the uncoating process of the CM2-deficient VLPs in the infected cells did not proceed in an appropriate manner. Taken together, the data obtained in the present study indicate that CM2 has a potential role in the genome packaging and uncoating processes of the virus replication cycle. PMID:21106743

  14. DNA curvature in front of the human mitochondrial L-strand replication origin with specific protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Welter, C; Dooley, S; Zang, K D; Blin, N

    1989-01-01

    DNA bending has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of gene expression, initiation of DNA-replication, site specific recombination, and DNA packaging. In the human mitochondrial DNA we have found a DNA curvature structure within the 3'-region of ther URF2 sequence in front of the L-strand origin of replication. This structure interacts specifically with a protein factor isolated from mitochondria. Based on the localization of this DNA curvature structure and the known function of such structures the data suggest a model in which this DNA signal sequence and its specific protein binding is involved in the regulatory initiation event of L-strand replication. Images PMID:2475854

  15. The FIS protein binds and bends the origin of chromosomal DNA replication, oriC, of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gille, H; Egan, J B; Roth, A; Messer, W

    1991-01-01

    The FIS protein (factor for inversion stimulation) is known to stimulate site-specific recombination processes, such as the inversion of the G segment of bacteriophage Mu, by binding to specific enhancer sequences. It has also been shown to activate transcription from rRNA promoters both in vitro and in vivo. We have identified a specific binding site for FIS in the center of the origin of chromosomal DNA replication, oriC. The DNA bends upon FIS binding. Occupation of the FIS site and binding of DnaA, the initiator protein, to its adjacent binding site (R3) are mutually exclusive. A fis mutant strain can not be efficiently transformed with plasmids which carry and replicate from oriC, suggesting that FIS is required for minichromosome replication. Images PMID:1870971

  16. Two homologous host proteins interact with potato virus X RNAs and CPs and affect viral replication and movement

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoseong; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Because viruses encode only a small number of proteins, all steps of virus infection rely on specific interactions between viruses and hosts. We previously screened several Nicotiana benthamiana (Nb) proteins that interact with the stem-loop 1 (SL1) RNA structure located at the 5′ end of the potato virus X (PVX) genome. In this study, we characterized two of these proteins (NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b), which are homologous and are induced upon PVX infection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that both proteins bind to either SL1(+) or SL1(−) RNAs of PVX. The two proteins also interact with the PVX capsid protein (CP) in planta. Overexpression of NbCPIP2a positively regulated systemic movement of PVX in N. benthamiana, whereas NbCPIP2b overexpression did not affect systemic movement of PVX. Transient overexpression and silencing experiments demonstrated that NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b are positive regulators of PVX replication and that the effect on replication was greater for NbCPIP2a than for NbCPIP2b. Although these two host proteins are associated with plasma membranes, PVX infection did not affect their subcellular localization. Taken together, these results indicate that NbCPIP2a and NbCPIP2b specifically bind to PVX SL1 RNAs as well as to CP and enhance PVX replication and movement. PMID:27353522

  17. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C.; Agnes, J. T.; Behrens, N.; Tagawa, Y.; Gershwin, L. J.; Corbeil, L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2) epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS) stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2—RSAD2) and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15—ubiquitin-like modifier) were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT) upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide) but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt) does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo. PMID:26859677

  18. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-09-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA.

  19. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  20. KSHV encoded LANA recruits Nucleosome Assembly Protein NAP1L1 for regulating viral DNA replication and transcription.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Namrata; Thakker, Suhani; Verma, Subhash C

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of latency is an essential for lifelong persistence and pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is the most abundantly expressed protein during latency and is important for viral genome replication and transcription. Replication-coupled nucleosome assembly is a major step in packaging the newly synthesized DNA into chromatin, but the mechanism of KSHV genome chromatinization post-replication is not understood. Here, we show that nucleosome assembly protein 1-like protein 1 (NAP1L1) associates with LANA. Our binding assays revealed an association of LANA with NAP1L1 in KSHV-infected cells, which binds through its amino terminal domain. Association of these proteins confirmed their localization in specific nuclear compartments of the infected cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays from NAP1L1-depleted cells showed LANA-mediated recruitment of NAP1L1 at the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral genome. Presence of NAP1L1 stimulated LANA-mediated DNA replication and persistence of a TR-containing plasmid. Depletion of NAP1L1 led to a reduced nucleosome positioning on the viral genome. Furthermore, depletion of NAP1L1 increased the transcription of viral lytic genes and overexpression decreased the promoter activities of LANA-regulated genes. These results confirmed that LANA recruitment of NAP1L1 helps in assembling nucleosome for the chromatinization of newly synthesized viral DNA. PMID:27599637

  1. Are the SSB-Interacting Proteins RecO, RecG, PriA and the DnaB-Interacting Protein Rep Bound to Progressing Replication Forks in Escherichia coli?

    PubMed

    Bentchikou, Esma; Chagneau, Carine; Long, Emilie; Matelot, Mélody; Allemand, Jean-François; Michel, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms several enzymes that are needed upon replication impediment are targeted to replication forks by interaction with a replication protein. In most cases these proteins interact with the polymerase clamp or with single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB). In Escherichia coli an accessory replicative helicase was also shown to interact with the DnaB replicative helicase. Here we have used cytological observation of Venus fluorescent fusion proteins expressed from their endogenous loci in live E. coli cells to determine whether DNA repair and replication restart proteins that interact with a replication protein travel with replication forks. A custom-made microscope that detects active replisome molecules provided that they are present in at least three copies was used. Neither the recombination proteins RecO and RecG, nor the replication accessory helicase Rep are detected specifically in replicating cells in our assay, indicating that either they are not present at progressing replication forks or they are present in less than three copies. The Venus-PriA fusion protein formed foci even in the absence of replication forks, which prevented us from reaching a conclusion.

  2. Are the SSB-Interacting Proteins RecO, RecG, PriA and the DnaB-Interacting Protein Rep Bound to Progressing Replication Forks in Escherichia coli?

    PubMed Central

    Matelot, Mélody; Allemand, Jean-François; Michel, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms several enzymes that are needed upon replication impediment are targeted to replication forks by interaction with a replication protein. In most cases these proteins interact with the polymerase clamp or with single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB). In Escherichia coli an accessory replicative helicase was also shown to interact with the DnaB replicative helicase. Here we have used cytological observation of Venus fluorescent fusion proteins expressed from their endogenous loci in live E. coli cells to determine whether DNA repair and replication restart proteins that interact with a replication protein travel with replication forks. A custom-made microscope that detects active replisome molecules provided that they are present in at least three copies was used. Neither the recombination proteins RecO and RecG, nor the replication accessory helicase Rep are detected specifically in replicating cells in our assay, indicating that either they are not present at progressing replication forks or they are present in less than three copies. The Venus-PriA fusion protein formed foci even in the absence of replication forks, which prevented us from reaching a conclusion. PMID:26244508

  3. Heat shock protein 90 is essential for replication of porcine circovirus type 2 in PK-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xuliang; Ma, Chang; You, Jinwei; Dong, Min; Yun, Shifeng; Jiang, Ping

    2016-09-15

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is recognized as the causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). However, the mechanism of PCV2 replication has not been understood completely. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) plays an important role in viral genome replication, viral genes expression, and viral particle packaging. In this study, we firstly found that inhibition of Hsp90 by pretreatment of host cells with 17-AAG, a specific inhibitor of Hsp90, or blocking Hsp90α/Hsp90β with siRNA, resulted in significantly reduced viral replication in PK-15 cells. But inhibition of Hsp90 by 17-AAG did not affect PCV2 entry into the host cells. Meanwhile, over-expression of Hsp90α/Hsp90β enhanced PCV2 genome replication and virion production. In addition, Hsp90β was enriched in the nuclear zone in the cells infected with PCV2. But it did not interact with the viral Cap/Rep proteins. It suggested that Hsp90 is required for PCV2 production in PK-15 cells culture. It should be helpful for further evaluating the mechanism of replication and pathogenesis of PCV2 and developing novel antiviral therapies. PMID:27553861

  4. Strand-specific analysis shows protein binding at replication forks and PCNA unloading from lagging strands when forks stall.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanhe; Gan, Haiyun; Han, Junhong; Zhou, Zhi-Xiong; Jia, Shaodong; Chabes, Andrei; Farrugia, Gianrico; Ordog, Tamas; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-11-20

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication proceeds with continuous synthesis of leading-strand DNA and discontinuous synthesis of lagging-strand DNA. Here we describe a method, eSPAN (enrichment and sequencing of protein-associated nascent DNA), which reveals the genome-wide association of proteins with leading and lagging strands of DNA replication forks. Using this approach in budding yeast, we confirm the strand specificities of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon and show that the PCNA clamp is enriched at lagging strands compared with leading-strand replication. Surprisingly, at stalled forks, PCNA is unloaded specifically from lagging strands. PCNA unloading depends on the Elg1-containing alternative RFC complex, ubiquitination of PCNA, and the checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Rad53. Cells deficient in PCNA unloading exhibit increased chromosome breaks. Our studies provide a tool for studying replication-related processes and reveal a mechanism whereby checkpoint kinases regulate strand-specific unloading of PCNA from stalled replication forks to maintain genome stability.

  5. Identification of a new dengue virus inhibitor that targets the viral NS4B protein and restricts genomic RNA replication.

    PubMed

    van Cleef, Koen W R; Overheul, Gijs J; Thomassen, Michael C; Kaptein, Suzanne J F; Davidson, Andrew D; Jacobs, Michael; Neyts, Johan; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; van Rij, Ronald P

    2013-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human arthropod-borne virus with a major impact on public health. Nevertheless, a licensed vaccine or specific treatment is still lacking. We therefore screened the NIH Clinical Collection (NCC), a library of drug-like small molecules, for inhibitors of DENV replication using a cell line that contains a stably replicating DENV serotype 2 (DENV2) subgenomic replicon. The most potent DENV inhibitor in the NCC was δ opioid receptor antagonist SDM25N. This compound showed antiviral activity against wild-type DENV2 in both Hela and BHK-21 cells, but not in the C6/36 cell line derived from the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The structurally related compound naltrindole also inhibited DENV replication, albeit less potently. Using a transient subgenomic replicon, we demonstrate that SDM25N restricts genomic RNA replication rather than translation of the viral genome. We identified a single amino acid substitution (F164L) in the NS4B protein that confers resistance to SDM25N. Remarkably, an NS4B amino acid substitution (P104L), which was previously shown to confer resistance to the DENV inhibitor NITD-618, also provided resistance to SDM25N. In conclusion, we have identified a new DENV inhibitor, SDM25N, which restricts genomic RNA replication by - directly or indirectly - targeting the viral NS4B protein. PMID:23735301

  6. Nuclear Envelope Protein SUN2 Promotes Cyclophilin-A-Dependent Steps of HIV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lahaye, Xavier; Satoh, Takeshi; Gentili, Matteo; Cerboni, Silvia; Silvin, Aymeric; Conrad, Cécile; Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Rodriguez, Elisa C.; Guichou, Jean-François; Bosquet, Nathalie; Piel, Matthieu; Le Grand, Roger; King, Megan C.; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Manel, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the early phase of replication, HIV reverse transcribes its RNA and crosses the nuclear envelope while escaping host antiviral defenses. The host factor Cyclophilin A (CypA) is essential for these steps and binds the HIV capsid; however, the mechanism underlying this effect remains elusive. Here, we identify related capsid mutants in HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVmac that are restricted by CypA. This antiviral restriction of mutated viruses is conserved across species and prevents nuclear import of the viral cDNA. Importantly, the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN2 is required for the antiviral activity of CypA. We show that wild-type HIV exploits SUN2 in primary CD4+ T cells as an essential host factor that is required for the positive effects of CypA on reverse transcription and infection. Altogether, these results establish essential CypA-dependent functions of SUN2 in HIV infection at the nuclear envelope. PMID:27149839

  7. The TPR domain in the host Cyp40-like cyclophilin binds to the viral replication protein and inhibits the assembly of the tombusviral replicase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing-Yi; Mendu, Venugopal; Pogany, Judit; Qin, Jun; Nagy, Peter D

    2012-02-01

    Replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses is greatly affected by numerous host-coded proteins acting either as susceptibility or resistance factors. Previous genome-wide screens and global proteomics approaches with Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in a yeast model host revealed the involvement of cyclophilins, which are a large family of host prolyl isomerases, in TBSV replication. In this paper, we identified those members of the large cyclophilin family that interacted with the viral replication proteins and inhibited TBSV replication. Further characterization of the most effective cyclophilin, the Cyp40-like Cpr7p, revealed that it strongly inhibits many steps during TBSV replication in a cell-free replication assay. These steps include viral RNA recruitment inhibited via binding of Cpr7p to the RNA-binding region of the viral replication protein; the assembly of the viral replicase complex and viral RNA synthesis. Since the TPR (tetratricopeptide repeats) domain, but not the catalytic domain of Cpr7p is needed for the inhibitory effect on TBSV replication, it seems that the chaperone activity of Cpr7p provides the negative regulatory function. We also show that three Cyp40-like proteins from plants can inhibit TBSV replication in vitro and Cpr7p is also effective against Nodamura virus, an insect pathogen. Overall, the current work revealed a role for Cyp40-like proteins and their TPR domains as regulators of RNA virus replication.

  8. Diverse circular replication-associated protein encoding viruses circulating in invertebrates within a lake ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Dayaram, Anisha; Galatowitsch, Mark L; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo R; van Bysterveldt, Katherine; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Harding, Jon S; Roumagnac, Philippe; Martin, Darren P; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Over the last five years next-generation sequencing has become a cost effective and efficient method for identifying known and unknown microorganisms. Access to this technique has dramatically changed the field of virology, enabling a wide range of environmental viral metagenome studies to be undertaken of organisms and environmental samples from polar to tropical regions. These studies have led to the discovery of hundreds of highly divergent single stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus-like sequences encoding replication-associated proteins. Yet, few studies have explored how viruses might be shared in an ecosystem through feeding relationships. Here we identify 169 circular molecules (160 CRESS DNA molecules, nine circular molecules) recovered from a New Zealand freshwater lake, that we have tentatively classified into 51 putatively novel species and five previously described species (DflaCV-3, -5, -6, -8, -10). The CRESS DNA viruses identified in this study were recovered from molluscs (Echyridella menzeisii, Musculium novaezelandiae, Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Physella acuta) and insect larvae (Procordulia grayi, Xanthocnemis zealandica, and Chironomus zealandicus) collected from Lake Sarah, as well as from the lake water and benthic sediments. Extensive diversity was observed across most CRESS DNA molecules recovered. The putative capsid protein of one viral species was found to be most similar to those of members of the Tombusviridae family, thus expanding the number of known RNA-DNA hybrid viruses in nature. We noted a strong association between the CRESS DNA viruses and circular molecules identified in the water and browser organisms (C. zealandicus, P. antipodarum and P. acuta), and between water sediments and undefended prey species (C. zealandicus). However, we were unable to find any significant correlation of viral assemblages to the potential feeding relationships of the host aquatic invertebrates. PMID:26873065

  9. Identification of a large protein network involved in epigenetic transmission in replicating DNA of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Ernfors, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is maintained by transcriptional activities and chromatin modifying complexes highly organized within the chromatin. Although much effort has been focused on identifying genome-binding sites, little is known on their dynamic association with chromatin across cell divisions. Here, we used a modified version of the iPOND (isolation of proteins at nascent DNA) technology to identify a large protein network enriched at nascent DNA in ESCs. This comprehensive and unbiased proteomic characterization in ESCs reveals that, in addition to the core replication machinery, proteins relevant for pluripotency of ESCs are present at DNA replication sites. In particular, we show that the chromatin remodeller HDAC1–NuRD complex is enriched at nascent DNA. Interestingly, an acute block of HDAC1 in ESCs leads to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine 9 at nascent DNA together with a concomitant loss of methylation. Consistently, in contrast to what has been described in tumour cell lines, these chromatin marks were found to be stable during cell cycle progression of ESCs. Our results are therefore compatible with a rapid deacetylation-coupled methylation mechanism during the replication of DNA in ESCs that may participate in the preservation of pluripotency of ESCs during replication. PMID:24852249

  10. FKBP8 interact with classical swine fever virus NS5A protein and promote virus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Helin; Zhang, Chengcheng; Cui, Hongjie; Guo, Kangkang; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Tianyue; Liang, Wulong; Lv, Qizhuang; Zhang, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    The non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is proven to be involved in viral replication and can also modulate cellular signaling and host cellular responses via to its ability to interact with various cellular proteins. FKBP8 is also reported to promote virus replication. Here, we show that NS5A specifically interacts with FKBP8 through coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pulldown studies. Additionally, confocal microscopy study showed that NS5A and FKBP8 colocalized in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of FKBP8 via the eukaryotic expression plasmid pDsRED N1 significantly promoted viral RNA synthesis. The cells knockdown of FKBP8 by lentivirus-mediated shRNA markedly decreased the virus replication when infected with CSFV. These data suggest that FKBP8 plays a critical role in the viral life cycle, particularly during the virus RNA replication period. The investigation of FKBP8 protein functions may be beneficial for developing new strategies to treat CSFV infection. PMID:26748656

  11. Genetic analysis of the Replication Protein A large subunit family in Arabidopsis reveals unique and overlapping roles in DNA repair, meiosis and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Aklilu, Behailu B.; Soderquist, Ryan S.; Culligan, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric protein complex that binds single-stranded DNA. In plants, multiple genes encode the three RPA subunits (RPA1, RPA2 and RPA3), including five RPA1-like genes in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis suggests two distinct groups composed of RPA1A, RPA1C, RPA1E (ACE group) and RPA1B, RPA1D (BD group). ACE-group members are transcriptionally induced by ionizing radiation, while BD-group members show higher basal transcription and are not induced by ionizing radiation. Analysis of rpa1 T-DNA insertion mutants demonstrates that although each mutant line is likely null, all mutant lines are viable and display normal vegetative growth. The rpa1c and rpa1e single mutants however display hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation, and combination of rpa1c and rpa1e results in additive hypersensitivity to a variety of DNA damaging agents. Combination of the partially sterile rpa1a with rpa1c results in complete sterility, incomplete synapsis and meiotic chromosome fragmentation, suggesting an early role for RPA1C in promoting homologous recombination. Combination of either rpa1c and/or rpa1e with atr revealed additive hypersensitivity phenotypes consistent with each functioning in unique repair pathways. In contrast, rpa1b rpa1d double mutant plants display slow growth and developmental defects under non-damaging conditions. We show these defects in the rpa1b rpa1d mutant are likely the result of defective DNA replication leading to reduction in cell division. PMID:24335281

  12. Interaction of HTLV-1 Tax with minichromosome maintenance proteins accelerates the replication timing program.

    PubMed

    Boxus, Mathieu; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Legros, Sébastien; Kettmann, Richard; Willems, Luc

    2012-01-01

    The Tax oncoprotein encoded by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 plays a pivotal role in viral persistence and pathogenesis. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected cells proliferate faster than normal lymphocytes, expand through mitotic division, and accumulate genomic lesions. Here, we show that Tax associates with the minichromosome maintenance MCM2-7 helicase complex and localizes to origins of replication. Tax modulates the spatiotemporal program of origin activation and fires supplementary origins at the onset of S phase. Thereby, Tax increases the DNA replication rate, accelerates S phase progression, but also generates a replicative stress characterized by the presence of genomic lesions. Mechanistically, Tax favors p300 recruitment and histone hyperacetylation at late replication domains, advancing their replication timing in early S phase. PMID:22058115

  13. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  14. Activity-based protein profiling identifies a host enzyme, carboxylesterase 1, which is differentially active during hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Blais, David R; Lyn, Rodney K; Joyce, Michael A; Rouleau, Yanouchka; Steenbergen, Rineke; Barsby, Nicola; Zhu, Lin-Fu; Pegoraro, Adrian F; Stolow, Albert; Tyrrell, David L; Pezacki, John Paul

    2010-08-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on many interactions with host cell proteins for propagation. Successful HCV infection also requires enzymatic activity of host cell enzymes for key post-translational modifications. To identify such enzymes, we have applied activity-based protein profiling to examine the activity of serine hydrolases during HCV replication. Profiling of hydrolases in Huh7 cells replicating HCV identified CES1 (carboxylesterase 1) as a differentially active enzyme. CES1 is an endogenous liver protein involved in processing of triglycerides and cholesterol. We observe that CES1 expression and activity were altered in the presence of HCV. The knockdown of CES1 with siRNA resulted in lower levels of HCV replication, and up-regulation of CES1 was observed to favor HCV propagation, implying an important role for this host cell protein. Experiments in HCV JFH1-infected cells suggest that CES1 facilitates HCV release because less intracellular HCV core protein was observed, whereas HCV titers remained high. CES1 activity was observed to increase the size and density of lipid droplets, which are necessary for the maturation of very low density lipoproteins, one of the likely vehicles for HCV release. In transgenic mice containing human-mouse chimeric livers, HCV infection also correlates with higher levels of endogenous CES1, providing further evidence that CES1 has an important role in HCV propagation. PMID:20530478

  15. Proteomics analysis of EV71-infected cells reveals the involvement of host protein NEDD4L in EV71 replication.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Rei-Lin; Lin, Ya-Han; Wang, Robert Yung-Liang; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Huang, Hsing-I; Kao, Li-Ting; Yu, Jau-Song; Shih, Shin-Ru; Wu, Chih-Ching

    2015-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a human enterovirus that has seriously affected the Asia-Pacific area for the past two decades. EV71 infection can result in mild hand-foot-and-mouth disease and herpangina and may occasionally lead to severe neurological complications in children. However, the specific biological processes that become altered during EV71 infection remain unclear. To further explore host responses upon EV71 infection, we identified proteins differentially expressed in EV71-infected human glioblastoma SF268 cells using isobaric mass tag (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Network analysis of proteins altered in cells infected with EV71 revealed that the changed biological processes are related to protein and ion transport, regulation of protein degradation, and homeostatic processes. We confirmed that the levels of NEDD4L and PSMF1 were increased and reduced, respectively, in EV71-infected cells compared to mock-infected control cells. To determine the physiological relevance of our findings, we investigated the consequences of EV71 infection in cells with NEDD4L or PSMF1 depletion. We found that the depletion of NEDD4L significantly reduced the replication of EV71, whereas PSMF1 knockdown enhanced EV71 replication. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence of proteome-wide dysregulation by EV71 infection and suggest a novel role for the host protein NEDD4L in the replication of this virus.

  16. Host Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein Regulates Replication Complex Assembly and Activity of a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly. PMID:22345450

  17. Host acyl coenzyme A binding protein regulates replication complex assembly and activity of a positive-strand RNA virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiantao; Diaz, Arturo; Mao, Lan; Ahlquist, Paul; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2012-05-01

    All positive-strand RNA viruses reorganize host intracellular membranes to assemble their replication complexes. Similarly, brome mosaic virus (BMV) induces two alternate forms of membrane-bound RNA replication complexes: vesicular spherules and stacks of appressed double-membrane layers. The mechanisms by which these membrane rearrangements are induced, however, remain unclear. We report here that host ACB1-encoded acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) binding protein (ACBP) is required for the assembly and activity of both BMV RNA replication complexes. ACBP is highly conserved among eukaryotes, specifically binds to long-chain fatty acyl-CoA, and promotes general lipid synthesis. Deleting ACB1 inhibited BMV RNA replication up to 30-fold and resulted in formation of spherules that were ∼50% smaller but ∼4-fold more abundant than those in wild-type (wt) cells, consistent with the idea that BMV 1a invaginates and maintains viral spherules by coating the inner spherule membrane. Furthermore, smaller and more frequent spherules were preferentially formed under conditions that induce layer formation in wt cells. Conversely, cellular karmella structures, which are arrays of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes formed upon overexpression of certain cellular ER membrane proteins, were formed normally, indicating a selective inhibition of 1a-induced membrane rearrangements. Restoring altered lipid composition largely complemented the BMV RNA replication defect, suggesting that ACBP was required for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Smaller and more frequent spherules are also induced by 1a mutants with specific substitutions in a membrane-anchoring amphipathic α-helix, implying that the 1a-lipid interactions play critical roles in viral replication complex assembly.

  18. System-wide Analysis of SUMOylation Dynamics in Response to Replication Stress Reveals Novel Small Ubiquitin-like Modified Target Proteins and Acceptor Lysines Relevant for Genome Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chang, Jer-Gung; Hendriks, Ivo A.; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Olsen, Jesper V.; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic agents can cause replication fork stalling in dividing cells because of DNA lesions, eventually leading to replication fork collapse when the damage is not repaired. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers (SUMOs) are known to counteract replication stress, nevertheless, only a small number of relevant SUMO target proteins are known. To address this, we have purified and identified SUMO-2 target proteins regulated by replication stress in human cells. The developed methodology enabled single step purification of His10-SUMO-2 conjugates under denaturing conditions with high yield and high purity. Following statistical analysis on five biological replicates, a total of 566 SUMO-2 targets were identified. After 2 h of hydroxyurea treatment, 10 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation and two proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation, whereas after 24 h, 35 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation, and 13 proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation. A site-specific approach was used to map over 1000 SUMO-2 acceptor lysines in target proteins. The methodology is generic and is widely applicable in the ubiquitin field. A large subset of these identified proteins function in one network that consists of interacting replication factors, transcriptional regulators, DNA damage response factors including MDC1, ATR-interacting protein ATRIP, the Bloom syndrome protein and the BLM-binding partner RMI1, the crossover junction endonuclease EME1, BRCA1, and CHAF1A. Furthermore, centromeric proteins and signal transducers were dynamically regulated by SUMOylation upon replication stress. Our results uncover a comprehensive network of SUMO target proteins dealing with replication damage and provide a framework for detailed understanding of the role of SUMOylation to counteract replication stress. Ultimately, our study reveals how a post-translational modification is able to orchestrate a large variety of different proteins to integrate different nuclear processes with the

  19. DNA Replication Catalyzed by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Proteins Reveals Trombone Loops at the Fork*♦

    PubMed Central

    Bermek, Oya; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D.

    2015-01-01

    Using purified replication factors encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 and a 70-base minicircle template, we obtained robust DNA synthesis with leading strand products of >20,000 nucleotides and lagging strand fragments from 600 to 9,000 nucleotides as seen by alkaline gel electrophoresis. ICP8 was crucial for the synthesis on both strands. Visualization of the deproteinized products using electron microscopy revealed long, linear dsDNAs, and in 87%, one end, presumably the end with the 70-base circle, was single-stranded. The remaining 13% had multiple single-stranded segments separated by dsDNA segments 500 to 1,000 nucleotides in length located at one end. These features are diagnostic of the trombone mechanism of replication. Indeed, when the products were examined with the replication proteins bound, a dsDNA loop was frequently associated with the replication complex located at one end of the replicated DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of loops correlated with the fraction of DNA undergoing Okazaki fragment synthesis. PMID:25471368

  20. The N Terminus of the Retinoblastoma Protein Inhibits DNA Replication via a Bipartite Mechanism Disrupted in Partially Penetrant Retinoblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Borysov, Sergiy I.; Nepon-Sixt, Brook S.

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein (RbN) harbors in-frame exon deletions in partially penetrant hereditary retinoblastomas and is known to impair cell growth and tumorigenesis. However, how such RbN deletions contribute to Rb tumor- and growth-suppressive functions is unknown. Here we establish that RbN directly inhibits DNA replication initiation and elongation using a bipartite mechanism involving N-terminal exons lost in cancer. Specifically, Rb exon 7 is necessary and sufficient to target and inhibit the replicative CMG helicase, resulting in the accumulation of inactive CMGs on chromatin. An independent N-terminal loop domain, which forms a projection, specifically blocks DNA polymerase α (Pol-α) and Ctf4 recruitment without affecting DNA polymerases ε and δ or the CMG helicase. Individual disruption of exon 7 or the projection in RbN or Rb, as occurs in inherited cancers, partially impairs the ability of Rb/RbN to inhibit DNA replication and block G1-to-S cell cycle transit. However, their combined loss abolishes these functions of Rb. Thus, Rb growth-suppressive functions include its ability to block replicative complexes via bipartite, independent, and additive N-terminal domains. The partial loss of replication, CMG, or Pol-α control provides a potential molecular explanation for how N-terminal Rb loss-of-function deletions contribute to the etiology of partially penetrant retinoblastomas. PMID:26711265

  1. Nuclear proteins of quiescent Xenopus laevis cells inhibit DNA replication in intact and permeabilized nuclei

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Quiescent cells from adult vertebrate liver and contact-inhibited or serum-deprived tissue cultures are active metabolically but do not carry out nuclear DNA replication and cell division. Replication of intact nuclei isolated from either quiescent Xenopus liver or cultured Xenopus A6 cells in quiescence was barely detectable in interphase extracts of Xenopus laevis eggs, although Xenopus sperm chromatin was replicated with approximately 100% efficiency in the same extracts. Permeabilization of nuclei from quiescent Xenopus liver or cultured Xenopus epithelial A6 cells did not facilitate efficient replication in egg extracts. Moreover, replication of Xenopus sperm chromatin in egg extracts was strongly inhibited by a soluble extract of isolated Xenopus liver nuclei; in contrast, complementary-strand synthesis on single-stranded DNA templates in egg extracts was not affected. Inhibition was specific to endogenous molecules localized preferentially in quiescent as opposed to proliferating cell nuclei, and was not due to suppression of cdk2 kinase activity. Extracts of Xenopus liver nuclei also inhibited growth of sperm nuclei formed in egg extracts. However, the rate and extent of decondensation of sperm chromatin in egg extracts were not affected. The formation of prereplication centers detected by anti-RP-A antibody was not affected by extracts of liver nuclei, but formation of active replication foci was blocked by the same extracts. Inhibition of DNA replication was alleviated when liver nuclear extracts were added to metaphase egg extracts before or immediately after Ca++ ion-induced transition to interphase. A plausible interpretation of our data is that endogenous inhibitors of DNA replication play an important role in establishing and maintaining a quiescent state in Xenopus cells, both in vivo and in cultured cells, perhaps by negatively regulating positive modulators of the replication machinery. PMID:8655587

  2. Frog virus 3 ORF 53R, a putative myristoylated membrane protein, is essential for virus replication in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Whitley, Dexter S.; Yu, Kwang; Sample, Robert C.; Sinning, Allan; Henegar, Jeffrey; Norcross, Erin; Chinchar, V. Gregory

    2010-09-30

    Although previous work identified 12 complementation groups with possible roles in virus assembly, currently only one frog virus 3 protein, the major capsid protein (MCP), has been linked with virion formation. To identify other proteins required for assembly, we used an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide to target 53R, a putative myristoylated membrane protein, and showed that treatment resulted in marked reductions in 53R levels and a 60% drop in virus titers. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed knock down and showed that 53R was found primarily within viral assembly sites, whereas transmission electron microscopy detected fewer mature virions and, in some cells, dense granular bodies that may represent unencapsidated DNA-protein complexes. Treatment with a myristoylation inhibitor (2-hydroxymyristic acid) resulted in an 80% reduction in viral titers. Collectively, these data indicate that 53R is an essential viral protein that is required for replication in vitro and suggest it plays a critical role in virion formation.

  3. EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, AND SMALL ANGLE X-RAY SCATTERING OF DNA REPLICATION AND REPAIR PROTEINS FROM THE HYPERTHERMOPHILE SULFOLOBUS SOLFATARICUS

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, S.M.; Hatherill, J.R.; Hammel, M.; Hura, G.L.; Tainer, J.A.; Yannone, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Vital molecular processes such as DNA replication, transcription, translation, and maintenance occur through transient protein interactions. Elucidating the mechanisms by which these protein complexes and interactions function could lead to treatments for diseases related to DNA damage and cell division control. In the recent decades since its introduction as a third domain, Archaea have shown to be simpler models for complicated eukaryotic processes such as DNA replication, repair, transcription, and translation. Sulfolobus solfataricus is one such model organism. A hyperthermophile with an optimal growth temperature of 80°C, Sulfolobus protein-protein complexes and transient protein interactions should be more stable at moderate temperatures, providing a means to isolate and study their structure and function. Here we provide the initial steps towards characterizing three DNA-related Sulfolobus proteins with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS): Sso0257, a cell division control and origin recognition complex homolog, Sso0768, the small subunit of the replication factor C, and Sso3167, a Mut-T like protein. SAXS analysis was performed at multiple concentrations for both short and long exposure times. The Sso0257 sample was determined to be either a mixture of monomeric and dimeric states or a population of dynamic monomers in various conformational states in solution, consistent with a fl exible winged helix domain. Sso0768 was found to be a complex mixture of multimeric states in solution. Finally, molecular envelope reconstruction from SAXS data for Sso3167 revealed a novel structural component which may function as a disordered to ordered region in the presence of its substrates and/or protein partners.

  4. The N-terminus of porcine circovirus type 2 replication protein is required for nuclear localization and ori binding activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-L.; Chien, M.-S.; Du, Y.-W.; Wu, P.-C.; Huang Chienjin

    2009-02-20

    Porcine circovirus type 2 possesses a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for virus replication. To characterize the DNA binding potential and the significant region that confers the nuclear localization of the Rep protein, the defined coding regions of rep gene were cloned and expressed. All of the recombinant proteins except for the N-terminal 110 residues deletion mutant could bind to the double-stranded minimal binding site of replication origin (ori). In addition, the N-terminal deletion mutant lacking 110 residues exhibited mainly cytoplasmic staining in the transfected cells in contrast to the others, which localized dominantly in the nucleus, suggesting that this N-terminal domain is essential for nuclear localization. Furthermore, a series of green fluorescence proteins (GFP) containing potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences were tested for their cellular distribution. The ability of the utmost 20 residues of the N-terminal region to target the GFP to the nucleus confirmed its role as a functional NLS.

  5. The N-terminus of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nonstructural protein 2 modulates viral genome RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wu, Rui; Zheng, Fengwei; Zhao, Cheng; Pan, Zishu

    2015-12-01

    Pestivirus nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) is a multifunctional, hydrophobic protein with an important but poorly understood role in viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. In the present study, based on sequence analysis, we mutated several representative conserved residues within the N-terminus of NS2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and investigated how these mutations affected viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. Our results demonstrated that the mutation of two aspartic acids, NS2/D60A or NS2/D60K and NS2/D78K, in the N-terminus of NS2 abolished infectious virus production and that the substitution of arginine for alanine at position 100 (NS2/R100A) resulted in significantly decreased viral titer. The serial passage of cells containing viral genomic RNA molecules generated the revertants NS2/A60D, NS2/K60D and NS2/K78D, leading to the recovery of infectious virus. In the context of the NS2/R100A mutant, the NS2/I90L mutation compensated for infectious virus production. The regulatory roles of the indicated amino acid residues were identified to occur at the viral RNA replication level. These results revealed a novel function for the NS2 N-terminus of CSFV in modulating viral RNA replication. PMID:26232654

  6. Versatile Trans-Replication Systems for Chikungunya Virus Allow Functional Analysis and Tagging of Every Replicase Protein

    PubMed Central

    Utt, Age; Quirin, Tania; Saul, Sirle; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero; Merits, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV; genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae) has recently caused several major outbreaks affecting millions of people. There are no licensed vaccines or antivirals, and the knowledge of the molecular biology of CHIKV, crucial for development of efficient antiviral strategies, remains fragmentary. CHIKV has a 12 kb positive-strand RNA genome, which is translated to yield a nonstructural (ns) or replicase polyprotein. CHIKV structural proteins are expressed from a subgenomic RNA synthesized in infected cells. Here we have developed CHIKV trans-replication systems, where replicase expression and RNA replication are uncoupled. Bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase or cellular RNA polymerase II were used for production of mRNAs for CHIKV ns polyprotein and template RNAs, which are recognized by CHIKV replicase and encode for reporter proteins. CHIKV replicase efficiently amplified such RNA templates and synthesized large amounts of subgenomic RNA in several cell lines. This system was used to create tagged versions of ns proteins including nsP1 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein and nsP4 with an immunological tag. Analysis of these constructs and a matching set of replicon vectors revealed that the replicases containing tagged ns proteins were functional and maintained their subcellular localizations. When cells were co-transfected with constructs expressing template RNA and wild type or tagged versions of CHIKV replicases, formation of characteristic replicase complexes (spherules) was observed. Analysis of mutations associated with noncytotoxic phenotype in CHIKV replicons showed that a low level of RNA replication is not a pre-requisite for reduced cytotoxicity. The CHIKV trans-replicase does not suffer from genetic instability and represents an efficient, sensitive and reliable tool for studies of different aspects of CHIKV RNA replication process. PMID:26963103

  7. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  8. [The effects of TorR protein on initiation of DNA replication in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yao; Jiaxin, Qiao; Jing, Li; Hui, Li; Morigen, Morigen

    2015-03-01

    The two-component systems, which could sense and respond to environmental changes, widely exist in bacteria as a signal transduction pathway. The bacterial CckA/CtrA, ArcA/ArcB and PhoP/PhoQ two-component systems are associated with initiation of DNA replication and cell division, however, the effects of the TorS/TorR system on cell cycle and DNA replication remains unknown. The TorS/TorR system in Escherichia coli can sense changes in trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) concentration around the cells. However, it is unknown if it also affects initiation of DNA replication. We detected DNA replication patterns in ΔtorS and ΔtorR mutant strains by flow cytometry. We found that the average number of replication origins (oriCs) per cell and doubling time in ΔtorS mutants were the same while the average number of oriCs in ΔtorR mutants was increased compared with that in wild-type cells. These results indicated that absence of TorR led to an earlier initiation of DNA replication than that in wild-type cells. Strangely, neither overexpression of TorR nor co-expression of TorR and TorS could restore ΔtorR mutant phenotype to the wild type. However, overexpression of SufD in both wild type and ΔtorR mutants promoted initiation of DNA replication, while mutation of SufD delayed it in ΔtorR mutants. Thus, TorR may affect initiation of DNA replication indirectly through regulating gene expression of sufD.

  9. RNA Replication and Membrane Modification Require the Same Functions of Alphavirus Nonstructural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Katri; Hellström, Kirsi; Jokitalo, Eija

    2015-01-01

    The alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations known as spherules as their RNA replication sites. Here, we show that inactivation of any function (polymerase, helicase, protease, or membrane association) essential for RNA synthesis also prevents the generation of spherule structures in a Semliki Forest virus trans-replication system. Mutants capable of negative-strand synthesis, including those defective in RNA capping, gave rise to spherules. Recruitment of RNA to membranes in the absence of spherule formation was not detected. PMID:26581991

  10. Co-opted oxysterol-binding ORP and VAP proteins channel sterols to RNA virus replication sites via membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Brandizzi, Federica; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D

    2014-10-01

    Viruses recruit cellular membranes and subvert cellular proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis to build viral replicase complexes and replication organelles. Among the lipids, sterols are important components of membranes, affecting the shape and curvature of membranes. In this paper, the tombusvirus replication protein is shown to co-opt cellular Oxysterol-binding protein related proteins (ORPs), whose deletion in yeast model host leads to decreased tombusvirus replication. In addition, tombusviruses also subvert Scs2p VAP protein to facilitate the formation of membrane contact sites (MCSs), where membranes are juxtaposed, likely channeling lipids to the replication sites. In all, these events result in redistribution and enrichment of sterols at the sites of viral replication in yeast and plant cells. Using in vitro viral replication assay with artificial vesicles, we show stimulation of tombusvirus replication by sterols. Thus, co-opting cellular ORP and VAP proteins to form MCSs serves the virus need to generate abundant sterol-rich membrane surfaces for tombusvirus replication.

  11. Host and viral RNA-binding proteins involved in membrane targeting, replication and intercellular movement of plant RNA virus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Hyodo, Kiwamu; Kaido, Masanori; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Many plant viruses have positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] as their genome. Therefore, it is not surprising that RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles during (+)RNA virus infection in host plants. Increasing evidence demonstrates that viral and host RBPs play critical roles in multiple steps of the viral life cycle, including translation and replication of viral genomic RNAs, and their intra- and intercellular movement. Although studies focusing on the RNA-binding activities of viral and host proteins, and their associations with membrane targeting, and intercellular movement of viral genomes have been limited to a few viruses, these studies have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the replication and movement of viral genomic RNAs. In this review, we briefly overview the currently defined roles of viral and host RBPs whose RNA-binding activity have been confirmed experimentally in association with their membrane targeting, and intercellular movement of plant RNA virus genomes. PMID:25071804

  12. Degenerate In Vitro Genetic Selection Reveals Mutations That Diminish Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA Replication without Affecting Coat Protein Binding

    PubMed Central

    Rocheleau, Gail; Petrillo, Jessica; Guogas, Laura; Gehrke, Lee

    2004-01-01

    The alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs are infectious only in the presence of the viral coat protein; however, the mechanisms describing coat protein's role during replication are disputed. We reasoned that mechanistic details might be revealed by identifying RNA mutations in the 3′-terminal coat protein binding domain that increased or decreased RNA replication without affecting coat protein binding. Degenerate (doped) in vitro genetic selection, based on a pool of randomized 39-mers, was used to select 30 variant RNAs that bound coat protein with high affinity. AUGC sequences that are conserved among AMV and ilarvirus RNAs were among the invariant nucleotides in the selected RNAs. Five representative clones were analyzed in functional assays, revealing diminished viral RNA expression resulting from apparent defects in replication and/or translation. These data identify a set of mutations, including G-U wobble pairs and nucleotide mismatches in the 5′ hairpin, which affect viral RNA functions without significant impact on coat protein binding. Because the mutations associated with diminished function were scattered over the 3′-terminal nucleotides, we considered the possibility that RNA conformational changes rather than disruption of a precise motif might limit activity. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments showed that the 3′ RNA conformation was indeed altered by nucleotide substitutions. One interpretation of the data is that coat protein binding to the AUGC sequences determines the orientation of the 3′ hairpins relative to one another, while local structural features within these hairpins are also critical determinants of functional activity. PMID:15254175

  13. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, R L; Mackenzie, J M

    2015-07-01

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNVKUN) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNVKUN replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNVKUN replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication.

  14. Connecting Replication and Repair: YoaA, a Helicase-Related Protein, Promotes Azidothymidine Tolerance through Association with Chi, an Accessory Clamp Loader Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Laura T.; Sutera, Vincent A.; Zhou, Shen; Weitzel, Christopher S.; Cheng, Yisha; Lovett, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    Elongating DNA polymerases frequently encounter lesions or structures that impede progress and require repair before DNA replication can be completed. Therefore, directing repair factors to a blocked fork, without interfering with normal replication, is important for proper cell function, and it is a process that is not well understood. To study this process, we have employed the chain-terminating nucleoside analog, 3’ azidothymidine (AZT) and the E. coli genetic system, for which replication and repair factors have been well-defined. By using high-expression suppressor screens, we identified yoaA, encoding a putative helicase, and holC, encoding the Chi component of the replication clamp loader, as genes that promoted tolerance to AZT. YoaA is a putative Fe-S helicase in the XPD/RAD3 family for which orthologs can be found in most bacterial genomes; E. coli has a paralog to YoaA, DinG, which possesses 5’ to 3’ helicase activity and an Fe-S cluster essential to its activity. Mutants in yoaA are sensitive to AZT exposure; dinG mutations cause mild sensitivity to AZT and exacerbate the sensitivity of yoaA mutant strains. Suppression of AZT sensitivity by holC or yoaA was mutually codependent and we provide evidence here that YoaA and Chi physically interact. Interactions of Chi with single-strand DNA binding protein (SSB) and with Psi were required to aid AZT tolerance, as was the proofreading 3’ exonuclease, DnaQ. Our studies suggest that repair is coupled to blocked replication through these interactions. We hypothesize that SSB, through Chi, recruits the YoaA helicase to replication gaps and that unwinding of the nascent strand promotes repair and AZT excision. This recruitment prevents the toxicity of helicase activity and aids the handoff of repair with replication factors, ensuring timely repair and resumption of replication. PMID:26544712

  15. Opposing roles for DNA replication initiator proteins ORC1 and CDC6 in control of Cyclin E gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Manzar; Stillman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Newly born cells either continue to proliferate or exit the cell division cycle. This decision involves delaying expression of Cyclin E that promotes DNA replication. ORC1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) large subunit, is inherited into newly born cells after it binds to condensing chromosomes during the preceding mitosis. We demonstrate that ORC1 represses Cyclin E gene (CCNE1) transcription, an E2F1 activated gene that is also repressed by the Retinoblastoma (RB) protein. ORC1 binds to RB, the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 and to its repressive histone H3K9me3 mark. ORC1 cooperates with SUV39H1 and RB protein to repress E2F1-dependent CCNE1 transcription. In contrast, the ORC1-related replication protein CDC6 binds Cyclin E-CDK2 kinase and in a feedback loop removes RB from ORC1, thereby hyper-activating CCNE1 transcription. The opposing effects of ORC1 and CDC6 in controlling the level of Cyclin E ensures genome stability and a mechanism for linking directly DNA replication and cell division commitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12785.001 PMID:27458800

  16. Opposing roles for DNA replication initiator proteins ORC1 and CDC6 in control of Cyclin E gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Manzar; Stillman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Newly born cells either continue to proliferate or exit the cell division cycle. This decision involves delaying expression of Cyclin E that promotes DNA replication. ORC1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) large subunit, is inherited into newly born cells after it binds to condensing chromosomes during the preceding mitosis. We demonstrate that ORC1 represses Cyclin E gene (CCNE1) transcription, an E2F1 activated gene that is also repressed by the Retinoblastoma (RB) protein. ORC1 binds to RB, the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 and to its repressive histone H3K9me3 mark. ORC1 cooperates with SUV39H1 and RB protein to repress E2F1-dependent CCNE1 transcription. In contrast, the ORC1-related replication protein CDC6 binds Cyclin E-CDK2 kinase and in a feedback loop removes RB from ORC1, thereby hyper-activating CCNE1 transcription. The opposing effects of ORC1 and CDC6 in controlling the level of Cyclin E ensures genome stability and a mechanism for linking directly DNA replication and cell division commitment. PMID:27458800

  17. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties.

  18. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010-001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010-001-E2 binds at the dimer-dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein-protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010-001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein-protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  19. The nsp2 Replicase Proteins of Murine Hepatitis Virus and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Are Dispensable for Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Rachel L.; Sims, Amy C.; Brockway, Sarah M.; Baric, Ralph S.; Denison, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    The positive-stranded RNA genome of the coronaviruses is translated from ORF1 to yield polyproteins that are proteolytically processed into intermediate and mature nonstructural proteins (nsps). Murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) polyproteins incorporate 16 protein domains (nsps), with nsp1 and nsp2 being the most variable among the coronaviruses and having no experimentally confirmed or predicted functions in replication. To determine if nsp2 is essential for viral replication, MHV and SARS-CoV genome RNA was generated with deletions of the nsp2 coding sequence (MHVΔnsp2 and SARSΔnsp2, respectively). Infectious MHVΔnsp2 and SARSΔnsp2 viruses recovered from electroporated cells had 0.5 to 1 log10 reductions in peak titers in single-cycle growth assays, as well as a reduction in viral RNA synthesis that was not specific for any positive-stranded RNA species. The Δnsp2 mutant viruses lacked expression of both nsp2 and an nsp2-nsp3 precursor, but cleaved the engineered chimeric nsp1-nsp3 cleavage site as efficiently as the native nsp1-nsp2 cleavage site. Replication complexes in MHVΔnsp2-infected cells lacked nsp2 but were morphologically indistinguishable from those of wild-type MHV by immunofluorescence. nsp2 expressed in cells by stable retroviral transduction was specifically recruited to viral replication complexes upon infection with MHVΔnsp2. These results demonstrate that while nsp2 of MHV and SARS-CoV is dispensable for viral replication in cell culture, deletion of the nsp2 coding sequence attenuates viral growth and RNA synthesis. These findings also provide a system for the study of determinants of nsp targeting and function. PMID:16227261

  20. The nsp2 replicase proteins of murine hepatitis virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus are dispensable for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rachel L; Sims, Amy C; Brockway, Sarah M; Baric, Ralph S; Denison, Mark R

    2005-11-01

    The positive-stranded RNA genome of the coronaviruses is translated from ORF1 to yield polyproteins that are proteolytically processed into intermediate and mature nonstructural proteins (nsps). Murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) polyproteins incorporate 16 protein domains (nsps), with nsp1 and nsp2 being the most variable among the coronaviruses and having no experimentally confirmed or predicted functions in replication. To determine if nsp2 is essential for viral replication, MHV and SARS-CoV genome RNA was generated with deletions of the nsp2 coding sequence (MHVDeltansp2 and SARSDeltansp2, respectively). Infectious MHVDeltansp2 and SARSDeltansp2 viruses recovered from electroporated cells had 0.5 to 1 log10 reductions in peak titers in single-cycle growth assays, as well as a reduction in viral RNA synthesis that was not specific for any positive-stranded RNA species. The Deltansp2 mutant viruses lacked expression of both nsp2 and an nsp2-nsp3 precursor, but cleaved the engineered chimeric nsp1-nsp3 cleavage site as efficiently as the native nsp1-nsp2 cleavage site. Replication complexes in MHVDeltansp2-infected cells lacked nsp2 but were morphologically indistinguishable from those of wild-type MHV by immunofluorescence. nsp2 expressed in cells by stable retroviral transduction was specifically recruited to viral replication complexes upon infection with MHVDeltansp2. These results demonstrate that while nsp2 of MHV and SARS-CoV is dispensable for viral replication in cell culture, deletion of the nsp2 coding sequence attenuates viral growth and RNA synthesis. These findings also provide a system for the study of determinants of nsp targeting and function. PMID:16227261

  1. Cryptosporidium parvum possesses a short-type replication protein A large subunit that differs from its host.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G; Marchewka, M J; Keithly, J S

    1999-07-15

    Replication protein A (RPA) consisting of three subunits is a eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein involved in DNA replication, repair and recombination. We report here the identification and characterization of a RPA large subunit (CpRPA1) gene from the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum. The CpRPA1 gene encodes a 53.9-kDa peptide that is remarkably smaller than that from other eukaryotes (i.e. approximately 70 kDa) and is actively expressed in both free sporozoites and parasite intracellular stages. This short-type RPA large subunit has also been characterized from one other protist, Crithidia fasciculata. Three distinct domains have been identified in the RPA large subunit of humans and yeasts: an N-terminal protein interaction domain, a central ssDNA-binding area, and a C-terminal subunit-interacting region. Sequence analysis reveals that the short-type RPA large subunit differs from that of other eukaryotes in that only the domains required for ssDNA binding and heterotrimer formation are present. It lacks the N-terminal domain necessary for the binding of proteins mainly involved in DNA repair and recombination. This major structural difference suggests that the mechanism for DNA repair and recombination in some protists differs from that of other eukaryotes. Since replication proteins play an essential role in the cell cycle, the fact that RPA proteins of C. parvum differ from those of its host suggests that RPA be explored as a potential chemotherapeutic target for controlling cryptosporidiosis and/or diseases caused by other apicomplexans.

  2. A novel immuno-competitive capture mass spectrometry strategy for protein-protein interaction profiling reveals that LATS kinases regulate HCV replication through NS5A phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Meistermann, Hélène; Gao, Junjun; Golling, Sabrina; Lamerz, Jens; Le Pogam, Sophie; Tzouros, Manuel; Sankabathula, Sailaja; Gruenbaum, Lore; Nájera, Isabel; Langen, Hanno; Klumpp, Klaus; Augustin, Angélique

    2014-11-01

    Mapping protein-protein interactions is essential to fully characterize the biological function of a protein and improve our understanding of diseases. Affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (AP-MS) using selective antibodies against a target protein has been commonly applied to study protein complexes. However, one major limitation is a lack of specificity as a substantial part of the proposed binders is due to nonspecific interactions. Here, we describe an innovative immuno-competitive capture mass spectrometry (ICC-MS) method to allow systematic investigation of protein-protein interactions. ICC-MS markedly increases the specificity of classical immunoprecipitation (IP) by introducing a competition step between free and capturing antibody prior to IP. Instead of comparing only one experimental sample with a control, the methodology generates a 12-concentration antibody competition profile. Label-free quantitation followed by a robust statistical analysis of the data is then used to extract the cellular interactome of a protein of interest and to filter out background proteins. We applied this new approach to specifically map the interactome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) in a cellular HCV replication system and uncovered eight new NS5A-interacting protein candidates along with two previously validated binding partners. Follow-up biological validation experiments revealed that large tumor suppressor homolog 1 and 2 (LATS1 and LATS2, respectively), two closely related human protein kinases, are novel host kinases responsible for NS5A phosphorylation at a highly conserved position required for optimal HCV genome replication. These results are the first illustration of the value of ICC-MS for the analysis of endogenous protein complexes to identify biologically relevant protein-protein interactions with high specificity.

  3. A Crystal Structure of the Dengue Virus NS5 Protein Reveals a Novel Inter-domain Interface Essential for Protein Flexibility and Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongqian; Soh, Tingjin Sherryl; Zheng, Jie; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Phoo, Wint Wint; Lee, Chin Chin; Tay, Moon Y. F.; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Cornvik, Tobias C.; Lim, Siew Pheng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Lescar, Julien; Vasudevan, Subhash G.; Luo, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC) that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS) viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase) and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3) at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV), the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS) analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5. PMID:25775415

  4. Characterization of protein-protein interactions critical for poliovirus replication: analysis of 3AB and VPg binding to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Daniel M; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2007-06-01

    Two critical interactions within the poliovirus RNA replication complex are those of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 3D with the viral proteins 3AB and VPg. 3AB is a membrane-binding protein responsible for the localization of the polymerase to the membranous vesicles at which replication occurs. VPg (a peptide comprising the 3B region of 3AB) is the 22-residue soluble product of 3AB cleavage and serves as the protein primer for RNA replication. The detailed interactions of these proteins with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 3D were analyzed to elucidate the precise roles of 3AB and VPg in the viral RNA replication complex. Using a membrane-based pull-down assay, we have identified a binding "hot-spot" spanning residues 100 to 104 in the 3B (VPg) region of 3AB which plays a critical role in mediating the interaction of 3AB with the polymerase. Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that the interaction of VPg with 3D is enthalpically driven, with a dissociation constant of 11 microM. Mutational analyses of VPg indicate that a subset of the residues important for 3AB-3D binding are also important for VPg-3D binding. Two residues in particular, P14 and R17, were shown to be absolutely critical for the binding interaction. This work provides the direct characterization of two binding interactions critical for the replication of this important class of viruses and identifies a conserved polymerase binding sequence responsible for targeting the polymerase.

  5. Genetic and Biochemical Assays Reveal a Key Role for Replication Restart Proteins in Group II Intron Retrohoming

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Truong, David M.; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile group II introns retrohome by an RNP-based mechanism in which the intron RNA reverse splices into a DNA site and is reverse transcribed by the associated intron-encoded protein. The resulting intron cDNA is then integrated into the genome by cellular mechanisms that have remained unclear. Here, we used an Escherichia coli genetic screen and Taqman qPCR assay that mitigate indirect effects to identify host factors that function in retrohoming. We then analyzed mutants identified in these and previous genetic screens by using a new biochemical assay that combines group II intron RNPs with cellular extracts to reconstitute the complete retrohoming reaction in vitro. The genetic and biochemical analyses indicate a retrohoming pathway involving degradation of the intron RNA template by a host RNase H and second-strand DNA synthesis by the host replicative DNA polymerase. Our results reveal ATP-dependent steps in both cDNA and second-strand synthesis and a surprising role for replication restart proteins in initiating second-strand synthesis in the absence of DNA replication. We also find an unsuspected requirement for host factors in initiating reverse transcription and a new RNA degradation pathway that suppresses retrohoming. Key features of the retrohoming mechanism may be used by human LINEs and other non-LTR-retrotransposons, which are related evolutionarily to mobile group II introns. Our findings highlight a new role for replication restart proteins, which function not only to repair DNA damage caused by mobile element insertion, but have also been co-opted to become an integral part of the group II intron retrohoming mechanism. PMID:23637634

  6. Chaperone-Assisted Protein Folding Is Critical for Yellow Fever Virus NS3/4A Cleavage and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Bozzacco, Leonia; Yi, Zhigang; Andreo, Ursula; Conklin, Claire R.; Li, Melody M. H.; Rice, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNAJC14, a heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40) cochaperone, assists with Hsp70-mediated protein folding. Overexpressed DNAJC14 is targeted to sites of yellow fever virus (YFV) replication complex (RC) formation, where it interacts with viral nonstructural (NS) proteins and inhibits viral RNA replication. How RCs are assembled and the roles of chaperones in this coordinated process are largely unknown. We hypothesized that chaperones are diverted from their normal cellular protein quality control function to play similar roles during viral infection. Here, we show that DNAJC14 overexpression affects YFV polyprotein processing and alters RC assembly. We monitored YFV NS2A-5 polyprotein processing by the viral NS2B-3 protease in DNAJC14-overexpressing cells. Notably, DNAJC14 mutants that did not inhibit YFV replication had minimal effects on polyprotein processing, while overexpressed wild-type DNAJC14 affected the NS3/4A and NS4A/2K cleavage sites, resulting in altered NS3-to-NS3-4A ratios. This suggests that DNAJC14's folding activity normally modulates NS3/4A/2K cleavage events to liberate appropriate levels of NS3 and NS4A and promote RC formation. We introduced amino acid substitutions at the NS3/4A site to alter the levels of the NS3 and NS4A products and examined their effects on YFV replication. Residues with reduced cleavage efficiency did not support viral RNA replication, and only revertant viruses with a restored wild-type arginine or lysine residue at the NS3/4A site were obtained. We conclude that DNAJC14 inhibition of RC formation upon DNAJC14 overexpression is likely due to chaperone dysregulation and that YFV probably utilizes DNAJC14's cochaperone function to modulate processing at the NS3/4A site as a mechanism ensuring virus replication. IMPORTANCE Flaviviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses that cause a wide range of illnesses. Upon host cell entry, the viral genome is translated on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes to produce a single

  7. Adenovirus preterminal protein synthesized in COS cells from cloned DNA is active in DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, S C; Horwitz, M S; Engler, J A

    1988-01-01

    Replication of the DNA genome of human adenovirus serotype 2 requires three virus-encoded proteins. Two of these proteins, the preterminal protein (pTP) and the adenovirus DNA polymerase, are transcribed from a single promoter at early times after virus infection. The mRNAs for these proteins share several exons, including one encoded near adenovirus genome coordinate 39. By using plasmids containing DNA fragments postulated to encode the various exons of pTP mRNA, the contributions of each exon to the synthesis of an active pTP have been measured. Only plasmids that contain both the open reading frame for pTP (genome coordinates 29.4 to 23.9) and the HindIII J fragment that contains the exon at genome coordinate 39 can express functional pTP. Images PMID:3336069

  8. Conformational plasticity of RepB, the replication initiator protein of promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158

    PubMed Central

    Boer, D. Roeland; Ruiz-Masó, José Angel; Rueda, Manuel; Petoukhov, Maxim V.; Machón, Cristina; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Orozco, Modesto; del Solar, Gloria; Coll, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication initiation is a vital and tightly regulated step in all replicons and requires an initiator factor that specifically recognizes the DNA replication origin and starts replication. RepB from the promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158 is a hexameric ring protein evolutionary related to viral initiators. Here we explore the conformational plasticity of the RepB hexamer by i) SAXS, ii) sedimentation experiments, iii) molecular simulations and iv) X-ray crystallography. Combining these techniques, we derive an estimate of the conformational ensemble in solution showing that the C-terminal oligomerisation domains of the protein form a rigid cylindrical scaffold to which the N-terminal DNA-binding/catalytic domains are attached as highly flexible appendages, featuring multiple orientations. In addition, we show that the hinge region connecting both domains plays a pivotal role in the observed plasticity. Sequence comparisons and a literature survey show that this hinge region could exists in other initiators, suggesting that it is a common, crucial structural element for DNA binding and manipulation. PMID:26875695

  9. Loading a ring: structure of the Bacillus subtilis DnaB protein, a co-loader of the replicative helicase.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Velten, Marion; Rivas, Germán; Polard, Patrice; Carazo, José María; Donate, Luis Enrique

    2007-03-30

    Loading of the ring-shaped replicative helicase is a critical step in the initiation of DNA replication. Bacillus subtilis has adopted a two-protein strategy to load its hexameric replicative helicase: DnaB and DnaI interact with the helicase and mediate its delivery onto DNA. We present here the 3D electron microscopy structure of the DnaB protein, along with a detailed analysis of both its oligomeric state and its domain organization. DnaB is organized as an asymmetric tetramer that is comprised of two stacked components, one arranged as a closed collar and the other as an open sigma shape. Intriguingly, the 3D map of DnaB exhibits an overall architecture similar to the structure of the Escherichia coli gamma-complex, the loader of the ring-shaped processivity factor. We propose a model whereby each DnaB monomer participates in both stacked components of the tetramer and displays a different overall shape. This asymmetric quaternary organization could be a general feature of ring loaders.

  10. High-resolution crystal structure of a hepatitis B virus replication inhibitor bound to the viral core protein

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Klaus; Lam, Angela M.; Lukacs, Christine; Vogel, Robert; Ren, Suping; Espiritu, Christine; Baydo, Ruth; Atkins, Kateri; Abendroth, Jan; Liao, Guochun; Efimov, Andrey; Hartman, George; Flores, Osvaldo A.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein is essential for HBV replication and an important target for antiviral drug discovery. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution crystal structure of an antiviral compound bound to the HBV core protein. The compound NVR-010–001-E2 can induce assembly of the HBV core wild-type and Y132A mutant proteins and thermostabilize the proteins with a Tm increase of more than 10 °C. NVR-010–001-E2 binds at the dimer–dimer interface of the core proteins, forms a new interaction surface promoting protein–protein interaction, induces protein assembly, and increases stability. The impact of naturally occurring core protein mutations on antiviral activity correlates with NVR-010–001-E2 binding interactions determined by crystallography. The crystal structure provides understanding of a drug efficacy mechanism related to the induction and stabilization of protein–protein interactions and enables structure-guided design to improve antiviral potency and drug-like properties. PMID:26598693

  11. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep' proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep', in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replica...

  12. Three of the four nucleocapsid proteins of Marburg virus, NP, VP35, and L, are sufficient to mediate replication and transcription of Marburg virus-specific monocistronic minigenomes.

    PubMed

    Mühlberger, E; Lötfering, B; Klenk, H D; Becker, S

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes the first reconstituted replication system established for a member of the Filoviridae, Marburg virus (MBGV). MBGV minigenomes containing the leader and trailer regions of the MBGV genome and the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were constructed. In MBGV-infected cells, these minigenomes were replicated and encapsidated and could be passaged. Unlike most other members of the order Mononegavirales, filoviruses possess four proteins presumed to be components of the nucleocapsid (NP, VP35, VP30, and L). To determine the protein requirements for replication and transcription, a reverse genetic system was established for MBGV based on the vaccinia virus T7 expression system. Northern blot analysis of viral RNA revealed that three nucleocapsid proteins (NP, VP35, and L) were essential and sufficient for transcription as well as replication and encapsidation. These data indicate that VP35, rather than VP30, is the functional homologue of rhabdo- and paramyxovirus P proteins. The reconstituted replication system was profoundly affected by the NP-to-VP35 expression ratio. To investigate whether CAT gene expression was achieved entirely by mRNA or in part by full-length plus-strand minigenomes, a copy-back minireplicon containing the CAT gene but lacking MBGV-specific transcriptional start sites was employed in the artificial replication system. This construct was replicated without accompanying CAT activity. It was concluded that the CAT activity reflected MBGV-specific transcription and not replication. PMID:9765419

  13. Improved Method for Rapid and Efficient Determination of Genome Replication and Protein Expression of Clinical Hepatitis B Virus Isolates▿

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yanli; Zhang, Jiming; Garcia, Tamako; Ito, Kiyoaki; Gutelius, Danielle; Li, Jisu; Wands, Jack; Tong, Shuping

    2011-01-01

    Different hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and variants are associated with different clinical outcomes and/or response to antiviral therapy, yet the comparison of the in vitro replication capacity of a large number of clinical isolates remains technically challenging and time-consuming. Although the full-length HBV genome can be amplified from high-titer blood samples by PCR using High Fidelityplus DNA polymerase and primers targeting the conserved precore region, the HBV clones thus generated are replication deficient due to the inability to generate the terminally redundant pregenomic RNA essential for genome replication. The transfection experiment is further complicated by PCR errors and the presence of viral quasispecies. A previous study found that the precise removal of non-HBV sequence by SapI digestion led to HBV replication in transfected cells, possibly due to low-level genome circularization by a cellular enzyme. We released HBV genome from the cloning vector using BspQI, an inexpensive isoschizomer of SapI, and increased the efficiency of genome replication by an extra step of in vitro DNA ligation. The uncut plasmid DNA can be used for transfection if the sole purpose is to study envelope protein expression. We found significant PCR errors associated with the High Fidelityplus DNA polymerase, which could be greatly diminished using Phusion DNA polymerase or masked by the use of a clone pool. The reduced PCR error and modified enzymatic steps prior to transfection should facilitate a more widespread functional characterization of clinical HBV isolates, while the clone pool approach is useful for samples with significant sequence heterogeneity. PMID:21289153

  14. Absence of the BaeR protein leads to the early initiation of DNA replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yao, Y; Wunier, W; Morigen, M

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells have dozens of two-component systems to sense and respond to various stimuli, and thereby cope with changing environments. BaeS/BaeR is one such two-component system, and it deals with a variety of envelope stresses. Interestingly, the ArcA/ArcB and TorS/TorR two-component systems are known to be associated with initiation of DNA replication; however, the effects of BaeS/BaeR on initiation of DNA replication remain unknown. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the average number of replication origins (oriCs) per cell in ΔbaeR mutants was approximately 30% higher than that in wild-type cells. So was the growth rate of ΔbaeR cells. Ectopic expression of BaeR from the pbaeR plasmid reversed the ΔbaeR mutant phenotypes. The results indicate that absence of BaeR leads to the early initiation of DNA replication. Further, deletion of BaeR caused an increase in the amount of DnaA per cell, but did not change concentration of DnaA, which is the initiator protein.The average number of oriCs per cell in Δspy mutants was the same as that found in the wild-type cells although spy gene expression is controlled by BaeR. These results suggest that BaeR may indirectly affect initiation of replication by controlling expression of the dnaA gene. PMID:26681035

  15. Improved method for rapid and efficient determination of genome replication and protein expression of clinical hepatitis B virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yanli; Zhang, Jiming; Garcia, Tamako; Ito, Kiyoaki; Gutelius, Danielle; Li, Jisu; Wands, Jack; Tong, Shuping

    2011-04-01

    Different hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and variants are associated with different clinical outcomes and/or response to antiviral therapy, yet the comparison of the in vitro replication capacity of a large number of clinical isolates remains technically challenging and time-consuming. Although the full-length HBV genome can be amplified from high-titer blood samples by PCR using High Fidelity(plus) DNA polymerase and primers targeting the conserved precore region, the HBV clones thus generated are replication deficient due to the inability to generate the terminally redundant pregenomic RNA essential for genome replication. The transfection experiment is further complicated by PCR errors and the presence of viral quasispecies. A previous study found that the precise removal of non-HBV sequence by SapI digestion led to HBV replication in transfected cells, possibly due to low-level genome circularization by a cellular enzyme. We released HBV genome from the cloning vector using BspQI, an inexpensive isoschizomer of SapI, and increased the efficiency of genome replication by an extra step of in vitro DNA ligation. The uncut plasmid DNA can be used for transfection if the sole purpose is to study envelope protein expression. We found significant PCR errors associated with the High Fidelity(plus) DNA polymerase, which could be greatly diminished using Phusion DNA polymerase or masked by the use of a clone pool. The reduced PCR error and modified enzymatic steps prior to transfection should facilitate a more widespread functional characterization of clinical HBV isolates, while the clone pool approach is useful for samples with significant sequence heterogeneity. PMID:21289153

  16. Identification and Characterization of the Physiological Gene Targets of the Essential Lytic Replicative Epstein-Barr Virus SM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jacob; Verma, Dinesh; Li, DaJiang; Mosbruger, Tim

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) SM protein is an essential lytic cycle protein with multiple posttranscriptional mechanisms of action. SM binds RNA and increases accumulation of specific EBV transcripts. Previous studies using microarrays and PCR have shown that SM-null mutants fail to accumulate several lytic cycle mRNAs and proteins at wild-type levels. However, the complete effect of SM on the EBV transcriptome has been incompletely characterized. Here we precisely identify the effects of SM on all EBV transcripts by high-throughput RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and Northern blotting. The effect of SM on EBV mRNAs was highly skewed and was most evident on 13 late genes, demonstrating why SM is essential for infectious EBV production. EBV DNA replication was also partially impaired in SM mutants, suggesting additional roles for SM in EBV DNA replication. While it has been suggested that SM specificity is based on recognition of either RNA sequence motifs or other sequence properties, no such unifying property of SM-responsive targets was discernible. The binding affinity of mRNAs for SM also did not correlate with SM responsiveness. These data suggest that while target RNA binding by SM may be required for its effect, specific activation by SM is due to differences in inherent properties of individual transcripts. We therefore propose a new model for the mechanism of action and specificity of SM and its homologs in other herpesviruses: that they bind many RNAs but only enhance accumulation of those that are intrinsically unstable and poorly expressed. IMPORTANCE This study examines the mechanism of action of EBV SM protein, which is essential for EBV replication and infectious virus production. Since SM protein is not similar to any cellular protein and has homologs in all other human herpesviruses, it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Here we establish which EBV RNAs are most highly upregulated by SM, allowing us to understand why it

  17. Two single amino acid substitutions in the intervening region of Newcastle disease virus HN protein attenuate viral replication and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Ji, Yanhong; Lin, Zhongqing; Fu, Yuguang; Muhammad Dafallah, Rihab; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Among the proteins encoded by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), the attachment protein (HN) is an important determinant of virulence and pathogenicity. HN has been molecularly characterized at the protein level; however, the relationship between the molecular character of HN and the animal pathotype it causes has not been well explored. Here, we revisited the intervening region (IR) of the HN stalk and extended the known biological functions of HN. Three distinct substitutions (A89Q, P93A, and L94A) in the IR of genotype VII NDV (G7 strain) HN protein were analyzed. The A89Q and L94A mutations weakened the fusion promotion activity of HN to 44% and 41% of that of wild type, respectively, whereas P93A decreased the neuraminidase activity to 21% of the parental level. At the virus level, P93A and L94A-bearing viruses displayed impaired receptor recognition ability, neuraminidase activity, and fusion-promoting activity, all of which led to virus attenuation. In addition, the L94A-mutated virus showed a dramatic decline in replication and was attenuated in cells and in chickens. Our data demonstrate that the HN biological activities and functions modulated by these specific amino acids in the IR are associated with NDV replication and pathogenicity. PMID:26267791

  18. Replication Protein A: Single-stranded DNA's first responder : Dynamic DNA-interactions allow Replication Protein A to direct single-strand DNA intermediates into different pathways for synthesis or repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Wold, Marc S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Replication Protein A (RPA), the major single-stranded DNA-binding protein in eukaryotic cells, is required for processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) intermediates found in replication, repair and recombination. Recent studies have shown that RPA binding to ssDNA is highly dynamic and that more than high-affinity binding is needed for function. Analysis of DNA binding mutants identified forms of RPA with reduced affinity for ssDNA that are fully active, and other mutants with higher affinity that are inactive. Single molecule studies showed that while RPA binds ssDNA with high affinity, the RPA complex can rapidly diffuse along ssDNA and be displaced by other proteins that act on ssDNA. Finally, dynamic DNA binding allows RPA to prevent error-prone repair of double-stranded breaks and promote error-free repair. Together, these findings suggest a new paradigm where RPA acts as a first responder at sites with ssDNA, thereby actively coordinating DNA repair and DNA synthesis. PMID:25171654

  19. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep׳ proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep׳, in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replication) and generates the single-stranded circular (ssc) genome from the displaced DNA strand. In the process, a minus-genome primer (MGP) necessary for complementary-strand synthesis, from ssc to ccc, is synthesized. Rep׳ cleaves the growing nascent-strand to regenerate the parent ccc molecule. In the process, a Rep׳-DNA hybrid containing the right palindromic sequence (at the origin of DNA replication) is generated. Analysis of the virus particle showed that it is composed of four components: ssc, MGP, capsid protein and a novel Rep-related protein (designated Protein-3).

  20. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  1. A nuclear export signal in the matrix protein of Influenza A virus is required for efficient virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuai; Liu, Xiaoling; Yu, Maorong; Li, Jing; Jia, Xiaojuan; Bi, Yuhai; Sun, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-05-01

    The influenza A virus matrix 1 protein (M1) shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus during the viral life cycle and plays an important role in the replication, assembly, and budding of viruses. Here, a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) was identified specifically for the nuclear export of the M1 protein. The predicted NES, designated the Flu-A-M1 NES, is highly conserved among all sequences from the influenza A virus subtype, but no similar NES motifs are found in the M1 sequences of influenza B or C viruses. The biological function of the Flu-A-M1 NES was demonstrated by its ability to translocate an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-NES fusion protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in transfected cells, compared to the even nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of EGFP. The translocation of EGFP-NES from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was not inhibited by leptomycin B. NES mutations in M1 caused a nuclear retention of the protein and an increased nuclear accumulation of NEP during transfection. Indeed, as shown by rescued recombinant viruses, the mutation of the NES impaired the nuclear export of M1 and significantly reduced the virus titer compared to titers of wild-type viruses. The NES-defective M1 protein was retained in the nucleus during infection, accompanied by a lowered efficiency of the nuclear export of viral RNPs (vRNPs). In conclusion, M1 nuclear export was specifically dependent on the Flu-A-M1 NES and critical for influenza A virus replication.

  2. A geminivirus replication protein interacts with the retinoblastoma protein through a novel domain to determine symptoms and tissue specificity of infection in plants

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ling-Jie; Orozco, Beverly M.; Roe, Judith L.; Nagar, Steve; Ou, Sharon; Feiler, Heidi S.; Durfee, Tim; Miller, Ann B.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Robertson, Dominique; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate in nuclei of mature plant cells after inducing the accumulation of host DNA replication machinery. Earlier studies showed that the viral replication factor, AL1, is sufficient for host induction and interacts with the cell cycle regulator, retinoblastoma (pRb). Unlike other DNA virus proteins, AL1 does not contain the pRb binding consensus, LXCXE, and interacts with plant pRb homo logues (pRBR) through a novel amino acid sequence. We mapped the pRBR binding domain of AL1 between amino acids 101 and 180 and identified two mutants that are differentially impacted for AL1–pRBR interactions. Plants infected with the E-N140 mutant, which is wild-type for pRBR binding, developed wild-type symptoms and accumulated viral DNA and AL1 protein in epidermal, mesophyll and vascular cells of mature leaves. Plants inoculated with the KEE146 mutant, which retains 16% pRBR binding activity, only developed chlorosis along the veins, and viral DNA, AL1 protein and the host DNA synthesis factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, were localized to vascular tissue. These results established the importance of AL1–pRBR interactions during geminivirus infection of plants. PMID:10880461

  3. hCLE/C14orf166, a cellular protein required for viral replication, is incorporated into influenza virus particles

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Frandsen, Ariel; de Lucas, Susana; Pérez-González, Alicia; Pérez-Cidoncha, Maite; Roldan-Gomendio, Alejandro; Pazo, Alejandra; Marcos-Villar, Laura; Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Ortín, Juan; Nieto, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    The influenza A virus polymerase associates with a number of cellular transcription-related factors, including the RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We previously described that the cellular protein hCLE/C14orf166 interacts with and stimulates influenza virus polymerase as well as RNAP II activities. Here we show that, despite the considerable cellular shut-off observed in infected cells, which includes RNAP II degradation, hCLE protein levels increase throughout infection in a virus replication-dependent manner. Human and avian influenza viruses of various subtypes increase hCLE levels, but other RNA or DNA viruses do not. hCLE colocalises and interacts with viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNP) in the nucleus, as well as in the cytoplasm late in infection. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of purified virus particles and immunoelectron microscopy of infected cells show hCLE in virions, in close association with viral vRNP. These findings indicate that hCLE, a cellular protein important for viral replication, is one of the very few examples of transcription factors that are incorporated into particles of an RNA-containing virus. PMID:26864902

  4. Inhibition of human papillomavirus DNA replication by small molecule antagonists of the E1-E2 protein interaction.

    PubMed

    White, Peter W; Titolo, Steve; Brault, Karine; Thauvette, Louise; Pelletier, Alex; Welchner, Ewald; Bourgon, Lise; Doyon, Louise; Ogilvie, William W; Yoakim, Christiane; Cordingley, Michael G; Archambault, Jacques

    2003-07-18

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA replication is initiated by recruitment of the E1 helicase by the E2 protein to the viral origin. Screening of our corporate compound collection with an assay measuring the cooperative binding of E1 and E2 to the origin identified a class of small molecule inhibitors of the protein interaction between E1 and E2. Isothermal titration calorimetry and changes in protein fluorescence showed that the inhibitors bind to the transactivation domain of E2, the region that interacts with E1. These compounds inhibit E2 of the low risk HPV types 6 and 11 but not those of high risk HPV types or of cottontail rabbit papillomavirus. Functional evidence that the transactivation domain is the target of inhibition was obtained by swapping this domain between a sensitive (HPV11) and a resistant (cottontail rabbit papillomavirus) E2 type and by identifying an amino acid substitution, E100A, that increases inhibition by approximately 10-fold. This class of inhibitors was found to antagonize specifically the E1-E2 interaction in vivo and to inhibit HPV DNA replication in transiently transfected cells. These results highlight the potential of the E1-E2 interaction as a small molecule antiviral target.

  5. The predominant species of nonstructural protein 4B in hepatitis C virus-replicating cells is not palmitoylated.

    PubMed

    Paul, David; Bartenschlager, Ralf; McCormick, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a significant global health burden. Viral replication is thought to occur in close association with remodelled host cell membranes, with non-structural protein 4B (NS4B) being a key player in this process. NS4B is a poorly characterized integral membrane protein, which has been reported to be palmitoylated at its carboxy-terminal end. In order to extend this observation and to establish a functional role for NS4B palmitoylation, we sought to determine the status of this post-translational modification when the protein was expressed as part of a functional viral replicase. We performed direct metabolic labelling and polyethylene glycol-maleimide palmitoylation reporter assays on NS4B expressed in cells containing subgenomic replicons and infectious viral RNA. In a vaccinia virus-based expression system NS4B palmitoylation was detected in a genotype-dependent manner. However, in spite of the high sensitivity of the methods used, no NS4B palmitoylation was found in physiologically more relevant systems. Thus, NS4B palmitoylation is most likely dispensable for HCV RNA replication. PMID:25740959

  6. The novel murine calmodulin-binding protein Sha1 disrupts mitotic spindle and replication checkpoint functions in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Craig, R; Norbury, C

    1998-12-18

    Entry into mitosis is normally blocked in eukaryotic cells that have not completed replicative DNA synthesis; this 'S-M' checkpoint control is fundamental to the maintenance of genomic integrity. Mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe defective in the S-M checkpoint fail to arrest the cell cycle when DNA replication is inhibited and hence attempt mitosis and cell division with unreplicated chromosomes, resulting in the 'cut' phenotype. In an attempt to identify conserved molecules involved in the S-M checkpoint we have screened a regulatable murine cDNA library in S. pombe and have identified cDNAs that induce the cut phenotype in cells arrested in S phase by hydroxyurea. One such cDNA encodes a novel protein with multiple calmodulin-binding motifs that, in addition to its effects on the S-M checkpoint, perturbed mitotic spindle functions, although spindle pole duplication was apparently normal. Both aspects of the phenotype induced by this cDNA product, which we term Sha1 (for spindle and hydroxyurea checkpoint abnormal), were suppressed by simultaneous overexpression of calmodulin. Sha1 is structurally related to the product of the Drosophila gene abnormal spindle (asp). These data suggest that calmodulin-binding protein(s) are important in the co-ordination of mitotic spindle functions with mitotic entry in fission yeast, and probably also in multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:9819352

  7. The predominant species of nonstructural protein 4B in hepatitis C virus-replicating cells is not palmitoylated

    PubMed Central

    Paul, David

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a significant global health burden. Viral replication is thought to occur in close association with remodelled host cell membranes, with non-structural protein 4B (NS4B) being a key player in this process. NS4B is a poorly characterized integral membrane protein, which has been reported to be palmitoylated at its carboxy-terminal end. In order to extend this observation and to establish a functional role for NS4B palmitoylation, we sought to determine the status of this post-translational modification when the protein was expressed as part of a functional viral replicase. We performed direct metabolic labelling and polyethylene glycol-maleimide palmitoylation reporter assays on NS4B expressed in cells containing subgenomic replicons and infectious viral RNA. In a vaccinia virus-based expression system NS4B palmitoylation was detected in a genotype-dependent manner. However, in spite of the high sensitivity of the methods used, no NS4B palmitoylation was found in physiologically more relevant systems. Thus, NS4B palmitoylation is most likely dispensable for HCV RNA replication. PMID:25740959

  8. The replication initiation protein of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 is activated by the ClpX chaperone.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, I; Helinski, D R

    1997-12-23

    Initiation and control of replication of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 requires two plasmid-encoded elements, the replication origin (oriV) and the initiation protein TrfA. Purified TrfA is largely in the form of a dimer; however, only the monomeric form of the protein can bind specifically to the direct repeats (iterons) at the RK2 origin. The largely dimeric form of wild-type TrfA is inactive in the initiation of replication of RK2 in an in vitro replication system reconstituted from purified components. However, preincubation of the TrfA protein with the ClpX molecular chaperone isolated from Escherichia coli activates the initiator protein for replication in the purified system. We further observed that ClpX, in an ATP-dependent reaction, greatly increases the proportion of TrfA monomers and, therefore, the ability of this protein to bind to iterons localized within RK2 origin. Finally, a copy-up mutant of the TrfA protein which is largely in the monomer form is active in the reconstituted in vitro replication system, and its activity is not affected by ClpX. PMID:9405620

  9. Transient inhibition of foot-and-mouth disease virus replication by siRNAs silencing VP1 protein coding region.

    PubMed

    Lv, Ke; Guo, Yingjun; Zhang, Yiliang; Wang, Kaiyu; Li, Ka; Zhu, Yan; Sun, Shuhan

    2009-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of foot-and-mouth disease, a severe, clinically acute, vesicular disease of cloven-hoofed animals. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mechanism for silencing gene expression post-transcriptionally that is being exploited as a rapid antiviral strategy. To identify efficacious small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to inhibit the replication of FMDV, candidate siRNAs corresponding to FMDV VP1 gene were designed and synthesized in vitro using T7 RNA polymerase. In reporter assays, five siRNAs showed significant sequence-specific silencing effects on the expression of VP1-EGFP fusion protein from plasmid pVP1-EGFP-N1, which was cotransfected with siRNA into 293T cells. Furthermore, using RT-qPCR, viral titration and viability assay, we identified VP1-siRNA517, VP1-siRNA113 and VP1-siRNA519 that transiently acted as potent inhibitors of FMDV replication when BHK-21 cells were infected with FMDV. In addition, variations within multiple regions of the quasispecies of FMDV were retrospectively revealed by sequencing of FMDV genes, and a single nucleotide substitution was identified as the main factor in resistance to RNAi. Our data demonstrated that the three siRNA molecules synthesized with T7 RNA polymerase could have transient inhibitory effects on the replication of FMDV.

  10. HIV-1 replication in human immune cells is independent of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) expression.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Julia; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Floss, Thomas; Schindler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43) was originally identified as a host cell factor binding to the HIV-1 LTR and thereby suppressing HIV-1 transcription and gene expression (Ou et al., J.Virol. 1995, 69(6):3584). TDP-43 is a global regulator of transcription, can influence RNA metabolism in many different ways and is ubiquitously expressed. Thus, TDP-43 could be a major factor restricting HIV-1 replication at the level of LTR transcription and gene expression. These facts prompted us to revisit the role of TDP-43 for HIV-1 replication. We utilized established HIV-1 cell culture systems as well as primary cell models and performed a comprehensive analysis of TDP-43 function and investigated its putative impact on HIV-1 gene expression. In HIV-1 infected cells TDP-43 was neither degraded nor sequestered from the nucleus. Furthermore, TDP-43 overexpression as well as siRNA mediated knockdown did not affect HIV-1 gene expression and virus production in T cells and macrophages. In summary, our experiments argue against a restricting role of TDP-43 during HIV-1 replication in immune cells.

  11. Sequence-specific interactions between a cellular DNA-binding protein and the simian virus 40 origin of DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Traut, W.; Fanning, E.

    1988-02-01

    The core origin of simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA replication is composed of a 64-base-pair sequence encompassing T-antigen-binding site II and adjacent sequences on either side. A 7-base-pair sequence to the early side of T-antigen-binding site II which is conserved among the papovavirus genomes SV40, BK, JC and SA12 was recently shown to be part of a 10-base-pair sequence required for origin activity, but its functional role was not defined. In the present report, the authors used gel retention assays to identify a monkey cell factor that interacts specifically with double-stranded DNA carrying this sequence and also binds to single-stranded DNA. DNA-protein complexes formed with extracts from primate cells are more abundant and display electrophoretic mobilities distinct from those formed with rodent cell extracts. The binding activity of the factor on mutant templates is correlate with the replication activity of the origin. The results suggest that the monkey cell factor may be involved in SV40 DNA replication.

  12. The Salmonella Typhimurium effector protein SopE transiently localizes to the early SCV and contributes to intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Vonaesch, Pascale; Sellin, Mikael E; Cardini, Steven; Singh, Vikash; Barthel, Manja; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-12-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Tm) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that induces entry into non-phagocytic cells by a Type III secretion system (TTSS) and cognate effector proteins. Upon host cell entry, S. Tm expresses a second TTSS and subverts intracellular trafficking to create a replicative niche - the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV). SopE, a guanidyl exchange factor (GEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42, is translocated by the TTSS-1 upon host cell contact and promotes entry through triggering of actin-dependent ruffles. After host cell entry, the bulk of SopE undergoes proteasomal degradation. Here we show that a subfraction is however detectable on the nascent SCV membrane up to ∼ 6 h post infection. Membrane localization of SopE and the closely related SopE2 differentially depend on the Rho-GTPase-binding GEF domain, and to some extent involves also the unstructured N-terminus. SopE localizes transiently to the early SCV, dependent on continuous synthesis and secretion by the TTSS-1 during the intracellular state. Mutant strains lacking SopE or SopE2 are attenuated in early intracellular replication, while complementation restores this defect. Hence, the present study reveals an unanticipated role for SopE and SopE2 in establishing the Salmonella replicative niche, and further emphasizes the importance of entry effectors in later stages of host-cell manipulation.

  13. Blocking of Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP Leads to Reduced Replication of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xinrong; Mei, Feng; Agrawal, Anurodh; Peters, Clarence J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections and diseases represents a potential threat for worldwide spread and requires development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we revealed a novel positive function of an exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP 1 (cAMP-1; Epac-1) on MERS-CoV replication. Specifically, we have shown that Epac-specific inhibitor treatment or silencing Epac-1 gene expression rendered cells resistant to viral infection. We believe Epac-1 inhibitors deserve further study as potential therapeutic agents for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24453361

  14. Mutations in Encephalomyocarditis Virus 3A Protein Uncouple the Dependency of Genome Replication on Host Factors Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase IIIα and Oxysterol-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dorobantu, Cristina M.; Albulescu, Lucian; Lyoo, Heyrhyoung; van Kampen, Mirjam; De Francesco, Raffaele; Lohmann, Volker; Harak, Christian; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Strating, Jeroen R. P. M.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses are true masters of reprogramming host lipid trafficking and synthesis to support virus genome replication. Via their membrane-associated 3A protein, picornaviruses of the genus Enterovirus (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus) subvert Golgi complex-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) to generate “replication organelles” (ROs) enriched in phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). PI4P lipids serve to accumulate oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), which subsequently transfers cholesterol to the ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. Single-point mutations in 3A render enteroviruses resistant to both PI4KB and OSBP inhibition, indicating coupled dependency on these host factors. Recently, we showed that encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a picornavirus that belongs to the Cardiovirus genus, also builds PI4P/cholesterol-enriched ROs. Like the hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the Flaviviridae family, it does so by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα (PI4KA). Here we provide genetic evidence for the critical involvement of EMCV protein 3A in this process. Using a genetic screening approach, we selected EMCV mutants with single amino acid substitutions in 3A, which rescued RNA virus replication upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PI4KA. In the presence of PI4KA inhibitors, the mutants no longer induced PI4P, OSBP, or cholesterol accumulation at ROs, which aggregated into large cytoplasmic clusters. In contrast to the enterovirus escape mutants, we observed little if any cross-resistance of EMCV mutants to OSBP inhibitors, indicating an uncoupled level of dependency of their RNA replication on PI4KA and OSBP activities. This report may contribute to a better understanding of the roles of PI4KA and OSBP in membrane modifications induced by (+)RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses modulate lipid

  15. Mutations in Encephalomyocarditis Virus 3A Protein Uncouple the Dependency of Genome Replication on Host Factors Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase IIIα and Oxysterol-Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Dorobantu, Cristina M; Albulescu, Lucian; Lyoo, Heyrhyoung; van Kampen, Mirjam; De Francesco, Raffaele; Lohmann, Volker; Harak, Christian; van der Schaar, Hilde M; Strating, Jeroen R P M; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA [(+)RNA] viruses are true masters of reprogramming host lipid trafficking and synthesis to support virus genome replication. Via their membrane-associated 3A protein, picornaviruses of the genus Enterovirus (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and rhinovirus) subvert Golgi complex-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ (PI4KB) to generate "replication organelles" (ROs) enriched in phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). PI4P lipids serve to accumulate oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), which subsequently transfers cholesterol to the ROs in a PI4P-dependent manner. Single-point mutations in 3A render enteroviruses resistant to both PI4KB and OSBP inhibition, indicating coupled dependency on these host factors. Recently, we showed that encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a picornavirus that belongs to the Cardiovirus genus, also builds PI4P/cholesterol-enriched ROs. Like the hepatitis C virus (HCV) of the Flaviviridae family, it does so by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα (PI4KA). Here we provide genetic evidence for the critical involvement of EMCV protein 3A in this process. Using a genetic screening approach, we selected EMCV mutants with single amino acid substitutions in 3A, which rescued RNA virus replication upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of PI4KA. In the presence of PI4KA inhibitors, the mutants no longer induced PI4P, OSBP, or cholesterol accumulation at ROs, which aggregated into large cytoplasmic clusters. In contrast to the enterovirus escape mutants, we observed little if any cross-resistance of EMCV mutants to OSBP inhibitors, indicating an uncoupled level of dependency of their RNA replication on PI4KA and OSBP activities. This report may contribute to a better understanding of the roles of PI4KA and OSBP in membrane modifications induced by (+)RNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses modulate lipid homeostasis to

  16. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Djavadian, Reza; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Johannsen, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit “true” late kinetics–their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these “βγ” genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt) was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes. PMID:27348612

  17. Cyclin A Degradation by Primate Cytomegalovirus Protein pUL21a Counters Its Innate Restriction of Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin A is critical for cellular DNA synthesis and S phase progression of the cell cycle. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can reduce cyclin A levels and block cellular DNA synthesis, and cyclin A overexpression can repress HCMV replication. This interaction has only been previously observed in HCMV as murine CMV does not downregulate cyclin A, and the responsible viral factor has not been identified. We previously reported that the HCMV protein pUL21a disrupted the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), but a point mutant abrogating this activity did not phenocopy a UL21a-deficient virus, suggesting that pUL21a has an additional function. Here we identified a conserved arginine-x-leucine (RxL) cyclin-binding domain within pUL21a, which allowed pUL21a to interact with cyclin A and target it for proteasome degradation. Homologous pUL21a proteins from both chimpanzee and rhesus CMVs also contained the RxL domain and similarly degraded cyclin A, indicating that this function is conserved in primate CMVs. The RxL point mutation disabled the virus' ability to block cellular DNA synthesis and resulted in a growth defect similar to pUL21a-deficient virus. Importantly, knockdown of cyclin A rescued growth of UL21a-deficient virus. Together, these data show that during evolution, the pUL21a family proteins of primate CMVs have acquired a cyclin-binding domain that targets cyclin A for degradation, thus neutralizing its restriction on virus replication. Finally, the combined proteasome-dependent degradation of pUL21a and its cellular targets suggests that pUL21a may act as a novel suicide protein, targeting its protein cargos for destruction. PMID:24385906

  18. A sequence of basic residues in the porcine circovirus type 2 capsid protein is crucial for its co-expression and co-localization with the replication protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Renne, Nicolaas Van; Liu, Changming; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) encodes two major proteins: the replication protein (Rep) and the capsid protein (Cap). Cap displays a conserved stretch of basic residues situated on the inside of the capsid, whose role is so far unknown. We used a reverse-genetics approach to investigate its function and found that mutations in these amino acids hindered Cap mRNA translation and hampered Cap/Rep co-localization, yielding unfit viruses. Intriguingly, co-transfection with a WT PCV2 of a different genotype partially rescued mutant Cap expression, showing the importance of this basic pattern for efficient translation of Cap mRNA into protein. Our results show that Cap and Rep are expressed independently of each other, and that this amino acid sequence of Cap is vital for virus propagation. This study provides a method for studying unfit PCV2 virions and offers new insights into the intracellular modus vivendi of PCV2. PMID:26415571

  19. New paradigms in the repair of oxidative damage in human genome: mechanisms ensuring repair of mutagenic base lesions during replication and involvement of accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-05-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mispairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydroxyuracil, produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of the five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1's role in replicating template strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the 'cow-catcher' mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1's non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in reannealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U and Y-box-binding protein 1 as well as high mobility group box 1 protein, whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repairs cross-complementing protein 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and other accessory

  20. In vitro replication of plasmids containing human ribosomal gene sequences: origin localization and dependence on an aprotinin-binding cytosolic protein.

    PubMed

    Coffman, F D; Georgoff, I; Fresa, K L; Sylvester, J; Gonzalez, I; Cohen, S

    1993-11-01

    We previously investigated the role of an aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of DNA replication in isolated quiescent nuclei. In the present study, we have used a cell-free DNA replication system to test the ability of plasmid vectors which contain sequences from the human ribosomal RNA gene to serve as replicative templates in vitro when exposed to ADR-containing preparations. Significant dTTP incorporation was seen using DNA from either a 7-kb sequence in the 5' spacer region (CHE) or a 7-kb sequence which begins near the end of the 28S coding region and extends into the 3' spacer region (ADBB), while sequences from other regions of the rRNA gene mediated little or no dTTP incorporation. The characteristics of plasmid-directed dTTP incorporation indicate that most incorporation is due to DNA replication and not repair or damage-initiated processes. To conclusively demonstrate origin-dependent replication in the plasmid system and to further map replication origins, an approach was developed using ddGTP to restrict the length of daughter strands followed by hybridization of these replication products to restriction fragments spanning the putative origin region. This approach allowed us to identify replication origin activity apart from parent strand repair or synthesis initiated at random damaged sites. One of the origins was localized to a 1375-bp fragment within the 5' spacer region, and this fragment contains sequences homologous to those found in other replication origins. PMID:7693499

  1. Inhibition of Newcastle disease virus replication by RNA interference targeting the matrix protein gene in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Renfu; Ding, Zhuang; Liu, Xinxin; Mu, Lianzhi; Cong, Yanlong; Stoeger, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is an infectious viral disease of birds caused by the Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also known as avian paramyxovirus type 1 (AMPV-1), which leads to severe economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. In this study, the application of RNA interference (RNAi) for inhibiting the replication of NDV in cell culture by targeting the viral matrix protein gene (M) is described. Two M-specific shRNA-expressing plasmid constructs, named pS(M641) and pS(M827), were evaluated for antiviral activity against the NDV strain NA-1 by cytopathic effects (CPE), virus titration and real-time RT-PCR. After 36h of infection, both pS(M641) and pS(M827) reduced virus titers by 79.4- and 31.6-fold, respectively, and they down-regulated mRNA expression levels of the matrix protein gene M by 94.6% and 84.8%, respectively, in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells, while only pS(M641) significantly decreased CPE, compared to the control group. These results indicated that the M gene 641 and 827 sites represent potential antiviral therapy targets, and RNAi targeting of the M gene could not only represent an effective treatment in Newcastle disease but also aid as a method for studying the replication of NDV.

  2. Mutations in the Nonstructural Protein 3A Confer Resistance to the Novel Enterovirus Replication Inhibitor TTP-8307▿

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Armando M.; Thibaut, Hendrik Jan; van der Linden, Lonneke; Lanke, Kjerstin; Heggermont, Ward; Ireland, Stephen; Andrews, Robert; Arimilli, Murty; Al-Tel, Taleb H.; De Clercq, Erik; van Kuppeveld, Frank; Neyts, Johan

    2009-01-01

    A novel compound, TTP-8307, was identified as a potent inhibitor of the replication of several rhino- and enteroviruses. TTP-8307 inhibits viral RNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting polyprotein synthesis and/or processing. Drug-resistant variants of coxsackievirus B3 were all shown to carry at least one amino acid mutation in the nonstructural protein 3A. In particular, three mutations located in a nonstructured region preceding the hydrophobic domain (V45A, I54F, and H57Y) appeared to contribute to the drug-resistant phenotype. This region has previously been identified as a hot sport for mutations that resulted in resistance to enviroxime, the sole 3A-targeting enterovirus inhibitor reported thus far. This was corroborated by the fact that TTP-8307 and enviroxime proved cross-resistant. It is hypothesized that TTP-8307 and enviroxime disrupt proper interactions of 3A(B) with other viral or cellular proteins that are required for efficient replication. PMID:19237651

  3. Induction of necrosis via mitochondrial targeting of Melon necrotic spot virus replication protein p29 by its second transmembrane domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Kanda, Ayami; Ohnishi, Jun; Ohki, Takehiro; Tsuda, Shinya

    2009-08-01

    The virulence factor of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), a virus that induces systemic necrotic spot disease on melon plants, was investigated. When the replication protein p29 was expressed in N. benthamiana using a Cucumber mosaic virus vector, necrotic spots appeared on the leaf tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial aggregation in these tissues. Fractionation of tissues expressing p29 and confocal imaging using GFP-tagged p29 revealed that p29 associated with the mitochondrial membrane as an integral membrane protein. Expression analysis of p29 deletion fragments and prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) in p29 showed that deletion of the second putative TMD from p29 led to deficiencies in both the mitochondrial localization and virulence of p29. Taken together, these results indicated that MNSV p29 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane and that p29 may be a virulence factor causing the observed necrosis.

  4. Werner syndrome protein: functions in the response to DNA damage and replication stress in S-phase.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Muftuoglu, Meltem; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2007-09-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an excellent model system for the study of human aging. WRN, a nuclear protein mutated in WS, plays multiple roles in DNA metabolism. Our understanding about the metabolic regulation and function of this RecQ helicase has advanced greatly during the past decade, largely due to the availability of purified WRN protein, WRN knockdown cells, and WRN knockout mice. Recent biochemical and genetic studies indicate that WRN plays significant roles in DNA replication, DNA repair, and telomere maintenance. Interestingly, many WRN functions require handling of DNA ends during S-phase, and evidence suggests that WRN plays both upstream and downstream roles in the response to DNA damage. Future research should focus on the mechanism(s) of WRN in the regulation of the various DNA metabolism pathways and development of therapeutic approaches to treat premature aging syndromes such as WS.

  5. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth.

    PubMed

    Durante, Ignacio M; Cámara, María de Los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites. PMID:26086767

  6. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth.

    PubMed

    Durante, Ignacio M; Cámara, María de Los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites.

  7. A Novel Trypanosoma cruzi Protein Associated to the Flagellar Pocket of Replicative Stages and Involved in Parasite Growth

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Ignacio M.; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    The flagellar pocket constitutes an active and strategic site in the body of trypanosomatids (i.e. parasitic protozoa that cause important human and/or livestock diseases), which participates in several important processes such as cell polarity, morphogenesis and replication. Most importantly, the flagellar pocket is the unique site of surface protein export and nutrient uptake in trypanosomatids, and thus constitutes a key portal for the interaction with the host. In this work, we identified and characterized a novel Trypanosoma cruzi protein, termed TCLP 1, that accumulates at the flagellar pocket area of parasite replicative forms, as revealed by biochemical, immuno-cytochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. Different in silico analyses revealed that TCLP 1 is the founding member of a family of chimeric molecules restricted to trypanosomatids bearing, in addition to eukaryotic ubiquitin-like and protein-protein interacting domains, a motif displaying significant structural homology to bacterial multi-cargo chaperones involved in the secretion of virulence factors. Using the fidelity of an homologous expression system we confirmed TCLP 1 sub-cellular distribution and showed that TCLP 1-over-expressing parasites display impaired survival and accelerated progression to late stationary phase under starvation conditions. The reduced endocytic capacity of TCLP 1-over-expressors likely underlies (at least in part) this growth phenotype. TCLP 1 is involved in the uptake of extracellular macromolecules required for nutrition and hence in T. cruzi growth. Due to the bacterial origin, sub-cellular distribution and putative function(s), we propose TCLP 1 and related orthologs in trypanosomatids as appealing therapeutic targets for intervention against these health-threatening parasites. PMID:26086767

  8. Zinc Binding Activity of Human Metapneumovirus M2-1 Protein Is Indispensable for Viral Replication and Pathogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Ma, Yuanmei; Sun, Jing; Liang, Xueya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a member of the Pneumovirinae subfamily in the Paramyxoviridae family that causes respiratory tract infections in humans. Unlike members of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily, the polymerase complex of pneumoviruses requires an additional cofactor, the M2-1 protein, which functions as a transcriptional antitermination factor. The M2-1 protein was found to incorporate zinc ions, although the specific role(s) of the zinc binding activity in viral replication and pathogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we found that the third cysteine (C21) and the last histidine (H25) in the zinc binding motif (CCCH) of hMPV M2-1 were essential for zinc binding activity, whereas the first two cysteines (C7 and C15) play only minor or redundant roles in zinc binding. In addition, the zinc binding motif is essential for the oligomerization of M2-1. Subsequently, recombinant hMPVs (rhMPVs) carrying mutations in the zinc binding motif were recovered. Interestingly, rhMPV-C21S and -H25L mutants, which lacked zinc binding activity, had delayed replication in cell culture and were highly attenuated in cotton rats. In contrast, rhMPV-C7S and -C15S strains, which retained 60% of the zinc binding activity, replicated as efficiently as rhMPV in cotton rats. Importantly, rhMPVs that lacked zinc binding activity triggered high levels of neutralizing antibody and provided complete protection against challenge with rhMPV. Taken together, these results demonstrate that zinc binding activity is indispensable for viral replication and pathogenesis in vivo. These results also suggest that inhibition of zinc binding activity may serve as a novel approach to rationally attenuate hMPV and perhaps other pneumoviruses for vaccine purposes. IMPORTANCE The pneumoviruses include many important human and animal pathogens, such as human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), hMPV, bovine RSV, and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV). Among these viruses, hRSV and hMPV are the

  9. At the crossroads of autophagy and infection: Noncanonical roles for ATG proteins in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Solvik, Tina; Debnath, Jayanta

    2016-08-29

    Autophagy-related (ATG) proteins have increasingly demonstrated functions other than cellular self-eating. In this issue, Mauthe et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602046) conduct an unbiased RNA interference screen of the ATG proteome to reveal numerous noncanonical roles for ATG proteins during viral infection. PMID:27573461

  10. Baculovirus replication induces the expression of heat shock proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent handful of studies have linked baculovirus infection with the induction of heat shock proteins, a highly conserved family of cytoprotective proteins. Here, we demonstrate baculovirus-stimulated upregulation of hsp70 transcription in the natural host, Helicoverpa zea. Larvae lethally infec...

  11. Activation of budding yeast replication origins and suppression of lethal DNA damage effects on origin function by ectopic expression of the co-chaperone protein Mge1.

    PubMed

    Trabold, Peter A; Weinberger, Martin; Feng, Li; Burhans, William C

    2005-04-01

    Initiation of DNA replication in eukaryotes requires the origin recognition complex (ORC) and other proteins that interact with DNA at origins of replication. In budding yeast, the temperature-sensitive orc2-1 mutation alters these interactions in parallel with defects in initiation of DNA replication and in checkpoints that depend on DNA replication forks. Here we show that DNA-damaging drugs modify protein-DNA interactions at budding yeast replication origins in association with lethal effects that are enhanced by the orc2-1 mutation or suppressed by a different mutation in ORC. A dosage suppressor screen identified the budding yeast co-chaperone protein Mge1p as a high copy suppressor of the orc2-1-specific lethal effects of adozelesin, a DNA-alkylating drug. Ectopic expression of Mge1p also suppressed the temperature sensitivity and initiation defect conferred by the orc2-1 mutation. In wild type cells, ectopic expression of Mge1p also suppressed the lethal effects of adozelesin in parallel with the suppression of adozelesin-induced alterations in protein-DNA interactions at origins, stimulation of initiation of DNA replication, and binding of the precursor form of Mge1p to nuclear chromatin. Mge1p is the budding yeast homologue of the Escherichia coli co-chaperone protein GrpE, which stimulates initiation at bacterial origins of replication by promoting interactions of initiator proteins with origin sequences. Our results reveal a novel, proliferation-dependent cytotoxic mechanism for DNA-damaging drugs that involves alterations in the function of initiation proteins and their interactions with DNA. PMID:15647270

  12. New World and Old World Alphaviruses Have Evolved to Exploit Different Components of Stress Granules, FXR and G3BP Proteins, for Assembly of Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dal Young; Reynaud, Josephine M.; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Mobley, James A.; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The positive-strand RNA viruses initiate their amplification in the cell from a single genome delivered by virion. This single RNA molecule needs to become involved in replication process before it is recognized and degraded by cellular machinery. In this study, we show that distantly related New World and Old World alphaviruses have independently evolved to utilize different cellular stress granule-related proteins for assembly of complexes, which recruit viral genomic RNA and facilitate formation of viral replication complexes (vRCs). Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) utilizes all members of the Fragile X syndrome (FXR) family, while chikungunya and Sindbis viruses exploit both members of the G3BP family. Despite being in different families, these proteins share common characteristics, which determine their role in alphavirus replication, namely, the abilities for RNA-binding and for self-assembly into large structures. Both FXR and G3BP proteins interact with virus-specific, repeating amino acid sequences located in the C-termini of hypervariable, intrinsically disordered domains (HVDs) of viral nonstructural protein nsP3. We demonstrate that these host factors orchestrate assembly of vRCs and play key roles in RNA and virus replication. Only knockout of all of the homologs results in either pronounced or complete inhibition of replication of different alphaviruses. The use of multiple homologous proteins with redundant functions mediates highly efficient recruitment of viral RNA into the replication process. This independently evolved acquisition of different families of cellular proteins by the disordered protein fragment to support alphavirus replication suggests that other RNA viruses may utilize a similar mechanism of host factor recruitment for vRC assembly. The use of different host factors by alphavirus species may be one of the important determinants of their pathogenesis. PMID:27509095

  13. An Amphipathic α-Helix Controls Multiple Roles of Brome Mosaic Virus Protein 1a in RNA Replication Complex Assembly and Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Westler, William M.; den Boon, Johan A.; Wang, Xiaofeng; Diaz, Arturo; Steinberg, H. Adam; Ahlquist, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) protein 1a has multiple key roles in viral RNA replication. 1a localizes to perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes as a peripheral membrane protein, induces ER membrane invaginations in which RNA replication complexes form, and recruits and stabilizes BMV 2a polymerase (2aPol) and RNA replication templates at these sites to establish active replication complexes. During replication, 1a provides RNA capping, NTPase and possibly RNA helicase functions. Here we identify in BMV 1a an amphipathic α-helix, helix A, and use NMR analysis to define its structure and propensity to insert in hydrophobic membrane-mimicking micelles. We show that helix A is essential for efficient 1a–ER membrane association and normal perinuclear ER localization, and that deletion or mutation of helix A abolishes RNA replication. Strikingly, mutations in helix A give rise to two dramatically opposite 1a function phenotypes, implying that helix A acts as a molecular switch regulating the intricate balance between separable 1a functions. One class of helix A deletions and amino acid substitutions markedly inhibits 1a–membrane association and abolishes ER membrane invagination, viral RNA template recruitment, and replication, but doubles the 1a-mediated increase in 2aPol accumulation. The second class of helix A mutations not only maintains efficient 1a–membrane association but also amplifies the number of 1a-induced membrane invaginations 5- to 8-fold and enhances viral RNA template recruitment, while failing to stimulate 2aPol accumulation. The results provide new insights into the pathways of RNA replication complex assembly and show that helix A is critical for assembly and function of the viral RNA replication complex, including its central role in targeting replication components and controlling modes of 1a action. PMID:19325881

  14. The severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus replicative protein nsp9 is a single-stranded RNA-binding subunit unique in the RNA virus world

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Marie-Pierre; Ferron, François; Campanacci, Valérie; Longhi, Sonia; Rancurel, Corinne; Dutartre, Hélène; Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Cambillau, Christian; Canard, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The recently identified etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) belongs to Coronaviridae (CoV), a family of viruses replicating by a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure at 2.7-Å resolution of nsp9, a hitherto uncharacterized subunit of the SARS-CoV replicative polyproteins. We show that SARS-CoV nsp9 is a single-stranded RNA-binding protein displaying a previously unreported, oligosaccharide/oligonucleotide fold-like fold. The presence of this type of protein has not been detected in the replicative complexes of RNA viruses, and its presence may reflect the unique and complex CoV viral replication/transcription machinery. PMID:15007178

  15. Human monoclonal ScFv specific to NS1 protein inhibits replication of influenza viruses across types and subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yodsheewan, Rungrueang; Maneewatch, Santi; Srimanote, Potjanee; Thueng-In, Kanyarat; Songserm, Thaweesak; Dong-Din-On, Fonthip; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Sookrung, Nitat; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2013-10-01

    Currently, there is a need of new anti-influenza agents that target influenza virus proteins other than ion channel M2 and neuraminidase. Non-structural protein-1 (NS1) is a highly conserved multifunctional protein which is indispensable for the virus replication cycle. In this study, fully human single chain antibody fragments (HuScFv) that bound specifically to recombinant and native NS1 were produced from three huscfv-phagemid transformed Escherichia coli clones (nos. 3, 10 and 11) selected from a human ScFv phage display library. Western blot analysis, mimotope searching/epitope identification, homology modeling/molecular docking and phage mimotope ELISA inhibition indicated that HuScFv of clone no. 3 reacted with NS1 R domain important for host innate immunity suppression; HuScFv of clone nos. 10 and 11 bound to E domain sites necessary for NS1 binding to the host eIF4GI and CPSF30, respectively. The HuScFv of all clones could enter the influenza virus infected cells and interfered with the NS1 activities leading to replication inhibition of viruses belonging to various heterologous A subtypes and type B by 2-64-fold as semi-quantified by hemagglutination assay. Influenza virus infected cells treated with representative HuScFv (clone 10) had up-expression of IRF3 and IFN-β genes by 14.75 and 4.95-fold, respectively, in comparison with the controls, indicating that the antibodies could restore the host innate immune response. The fully human single chain antibodies have high potential for developing further as a safe (adjunctive) therapeutic agent for mitigating, if not abrogating, severe symptoms of influenza.

  16. Immune responses elicited against rotavirus middle layer protein VP6 inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Suvi; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Tamminen, Kirsi; López-Guerrero, Vanessa; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Palomares, Laura A; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a common cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. Live oral RV vaccines protect against severe RVGE, but the immune correlates of protection are not yet clearly defined. Inner capsid VP6 protein is a highly conserved, abundant, and immunogenic RV protein, and VP6-specific mucosal antibodies, especially IgA, have been implicated to protect against viral challenge in mice. In the present study systemic and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were induced by immunizing BALB/c mice intranasally with a combination of recombinant RV VP6 protein (subgroup II [SGII]) and norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs) used in a candidate vaccine. Following immunization mice were challenged orally with murine RV strain EDIMwt (SG non-I-non-II, G3P10[16]). In order to determine neutralizing activity of fecal samples, sera, and vaginal washes (VW) against human Wa RV (SGII, G1P1A[8]) and rhesus RV (SGI, G3P5B[3]), the RV antigen production was measured with an ELISA-based antigen reduction neutralization assay. Only VWs of immunized mice inhibited replication of both RVs, indicating heterotypic protection of induced antibodies. IgA antibody depletion and blocking experiments using recombinant VP6 confirmed that neutralization was mediated by anti-VP6 IgA antibodies. Most importantly, after the RV challenge significant reduction in viral shedding was observed in feces of immunized mice. These results suggest a significant role for mucosal RV VP6-specific IgA for the inhibition of RV replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results underline the importance of non-serotype-specific immunity induced by the conserved subgroup-specific RV antigen VP6 in clearance of RV infection. PMID:25424814

  17. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1's anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides. PMID:24391867

  18. Immune responses elicited against rotavirus middle layer protein VP6 inhibit viral replication in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lappalainen, Suvi; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Tamminen, Kirsi; López-Guerrero, Vanessa; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Palomares, Laura A; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a common cause of severe gastroenteritis (GE) in children worldwide. Live oral RV vaccines protect against severe RVGE, but the immune correlates of protection are not yet clearly defined. Inner capsid VP6 protein is a highly conserved, abundant, and immunogenic RV protein, and VP6-specific mucosal antibodies, especially IgA, have been implicated to protect against viral challenge in mice. In the present study systemic and mucosal IgG and IgA responses were induced by immunizing BALB/c mice intranasally with a combination of recombinant RV VP6 protein (subgroup II [SGII]) and norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs) used in a candidate vaccine. Following immunization mice were challenged orally with murine RV strain EDIMwt (SG non-I-non-II, G3P10[16]). In order to determine neutralizing activity of fecal samples, sera, and vaginal washes (VW) against human Wa RV (SGII, G1P1A[8]) and rhesus RV (SGI, G3P5B[3]), the RV antigen production was measured with an ELISA-based antigen reduction neutralization assay. Only VWs of immunized mice inhibited replication of both RVs, indicating heterotypic protection of induced antibodies. IgA antibody depletion and blocking experiments using recombinant VP6 confirmed that neutralization was mediated by anti-VP6 IgA antibodies. Most importantly, after the RV challenge significant reduction in viral shedding was observed in feces of immunized mice. These results suggest a significant role for mucosal RV VP6-specific IgA for the inhibition of RV replication in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results underline the importance of non-serotype-specific immunity induced by the conserved subgroup-specific RV antigen VP6 in clearance of RV infection. PMID:25424814

  19. A Screen for Genetic Suppressor Elements of Hepatitis C Virus Identifies a Supercharged Protein Inhibitor of Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Rudo L.; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1’s anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides. PMID:24391867

  20. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication.

    PubMed

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1's anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides.

  1. Viral DNA tethering domains complement replication-defective mutations in the p12 protein of MuLV Gag.

    PubMed

    Schneider, William M; Brzezinski, Jonathon D; Aiyer, Sriram; Malani, Nirav; Gyuricza, Mercedes; Bushman, Frederic D; Roth, Monica J

    2013-06-01

    The p12 protein of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) group-specific antigen (Gag) is associated with the preintegration complex, and mutants of p12 (PM14) show defects in nuclear entry or retention. Here we show that p12 proteins engineered to encode peptide sequences derived from known viral tethering proteins can direct chromatin binding during the early phase of viral replication and rescue a lethal p12-PM14 mutant. Peptides studied included segments of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA)(1-23), human papillomavirus 8 E2, and prototype foamy virus chromatin-binding sequences. Amino acid substitutions in Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus LANA and prototype foamy virus chromatin-binding sequences that blocked nucleosome association failed to rescue MuLV p12-PM14. Rescue by a larger LANA peptide, LANA(1-32), required second-site mutations that are predicted to reduce peptide binding affinity to chromosomes, suggesting that excessively high binding affinity interfered with Gag/p12 function. This is supported by confocal microscopy of chimeric p12-GFP fusion constructs showing the reverted proteins had weaker association to condensed mitotic chromosomes. Analysis of the integration-site selection of these chimeric viruses showed no significant change in integration profile compared with wild-type MuLV, suggesting release of the tethered p12 post mitosis, before viral integration. PMID:23661057

  2. Viral DNA tethering domains complement replication-defective mutations in the p12 protein of MuLV Gag

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, William M.; Brzezinski, Jonathon D.; Aiyer, Sriram; Malani, Nirav; Gyuricza, Mercedes; Bushman, Frederic D.; Roth, Monica J.

    2013-01-01

    The p12 protein of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) group-specific antigen (Gag) is associated with the preintegration complex, and mutants of p12 (PM14) show defects in nuclear entry or retention. Here we show that p12 proteins engineered to encode peptide sequences derived from known viral tethering proteins can direct chromatin binding during the early phase of viral replication and rescue a lethal p12-PM14 mutant. Peptides studied included segments of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA)1–23, human papillomavirus 8 E2, and prototype foamy virus chromatin-binding sequences. Amino acid substitutions in Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus LANA and prototype foamy virus chromatin-binding sequences that blocked nucleosome association failed to rescue MuLV p12-PM14. Rescue by a larger LANA peptide, LANA1–32, required second-site mutations that are predicted to reduce peptide binding affinity to chromosomes, suggesting that excessively high binding affinity interfered with Gag/p12 function. This is supported by confocal microscopy of chimeric p12-GFP fusion constructs showing the reverted proteins had weaker association to condensed mitotic chromosomes. Analysis of the integration-site selection of these chimeric viruses showed no significant change in integration profile compared with wild-type MuLV, suggesting release of the tethered p12 post mitosis, before viral integration. PMID:23661057

  3. Bortezomib-induced unfolded protein response increases oncolytic HSV-1 replication resulting in synergistic, anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Hurwitz, Brian S; Bolyard, Chelsea; Yu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Jianying; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Rath, Kellie S; He, Shun; Bailey, Zachary; Eaves, David; Cripe, Timothy P; Parris, Deborah S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua; Old, Matthew; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bortezomib is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. We tested the impact of combining bortezomib with oHSV for anti-tumor efficacy. Methods The synergistic interaction between oHSV and bortezomib was calculated using Chou-Talalay analysis. Viral replication was evaluated using plaque assay and immune fluorescence. Western-blot assays were used to evaluate induction of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Inhibitors targeting Hsp90 were utilized to investigate the mechanism of cell killing. Anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using subcutaneous and intracranial tumor xenografts of glioma and head and neck cancer. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and two-sided log rank test. Results Combination treatment with bortezomib and oHSV, 34.5ENVE, displayed strong synergistic interaction in ovarian cancer, head & neck cancer, glioma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells. Bortezomib treatment induced ER stress, evident by strong induction of Grp78, CHOP, PERK and IRE1α (western blot analysis) and the UPR (induction of hsp40, 70 and 90). Bortezomib treatment of cells at both sublethal and lethal doses increased viral replication (p value <0.001), but inhibition of Hsp90 ablated this response, reducing viral replication and synergistic cell killing. The combination of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in multiple different tumor models in vivo. Conclusions The dramatic synergy of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE is mediated by bortezomib- induced UPR and warrants future clinical testing in patients. PMID:24815720

  4. Illuminating the Sites of Enterovirus Replication in Living Cells by Using a Split-GFP-Tagged Viral Protein.

    PubMed

    van der Schaar, H M; Melia, C E; van Bruggen, J A C; Strating, J R P M; van Geenen, M E D; Koster, A J; Bárcena, M; van Kuppeveld, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, enteroviruses generate new organelles (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition on which they multiply their viral genome. Suitable tools for live-cell imaging of enterovirus ROs are currently unavailable, as recombinant enteroviruses that carry genes that encode RO-anchored viral proteins tagged with fluorescent reporters have not been reported thus far. To overcome this limitation, we used a split green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system, comprising a large fragment [strands 1 to 10; GFP(S1-10)] and a small fragment [strand 11; GFP(S11)] of only 16 residues. The GFP(S11) (GFP with S11 fragment) fragment was inserted into the 3A protein of the enterovirus coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), while the large fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cells. The introduction of GFP(S11) did not affect the known functions of 3A when expressed in isolation. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM), we showed that GFP fluorescence was detected at ROs, whose morphologies are essentially identical to those previously observed for wild-type CVB3, indicating that GFP(S11)-tagged 3A proteins assemble with GFP(S1-10) to form GFP for illumination of bona fide ROs. It is well established that enterovirus infection leads to Golgi disintegration. Through live-cell imaging of infected cells expressing an mCherry-tagged Golgi marker, we monitored RO development and revealed the dynamics of Golgi disassembly in real time. Having demonstrated the suitability of this virus for imaging ROs, we constructed a CVB3 encoding GFP(S1-10) and GFP(S11)-tagged 3A to bypass the need to express GFP(S1-10) prior to infection. These tools will have multiple applications in future studies on the origin, location, and function of enterovirus ROs. IMPORTANCE Enteroviruses induce the formation of membranous structures (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition specialized for

  5. Illuminating the Sites of Enterovirus Replication in Living Cells by Using a Split-GFP-Tagged Viral Protein

    PubMed Central

    van der Schaar, H. M.; Melia, C. E.; van Bruggen, J. A. C.; Strating, J. R. P. M.; van Geenen, M. E. D.; Koster, A. J.; Bárcena, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, enteroviruses generate new organelles (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition on which they multiply their viral genome. Suitable tools for live-cell imaging of enterovirus ROs are currently unavailable, as recombinant enteroviruses that carry genes that encode RO-anchored viral proteins tagged with fluorescent reporters have not been reported thus far. To overcome this limitation, we used a split green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system, comprising a large fragment [strands 1 to 10; GFP(S1-10)] and a small fragment [strand 11; GFP(S11)] of only 16 residues. The GFP(S11) (GFP with S11 fragment) fragment was inserted into the 3A protein of the enterovirus coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), while the large fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cells. The introduction of GFP(S11) did not affect the known functions of 3A when expressed in isolation. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM), we showed that GFP fluorescence was detected at ROs, whose morphologies are essentially identical to those previously observed for wild-type CVB3, indicating that GFP(S11)-tagged 3A proteins assemble with GFP(S1-10) to form GFP for illumination of bona fide ROs. It is well established that enterovirus infection leads to Golgi disintegration. Through live-cell imaging of infected cells expressing an mCherry-tagged Golgi marker, we monitored RO development and revealed the dynamics of Golgi disassembly in real time. Having demonstrated the suitability of this virus for imaging ROs, we constructed a CVB3 encoding GFP(S1-10) and GFP(S11)-tagged 3A to bypass the need to express GFP(S1-10) prior to infection. These tools will have multiple applications in future studies on the origin, location, and function of enterovirus ROs. IMPORTANCE Enteroviruses induce the formation of membranous structures (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition

  6. Illuminating the Sites of Enterovirus Replication in Living Cells by Using a Split-GFP-Tagged Viral Protein.

    PubMed

    van der Schaar, H M; Melia, C E; van Bruggen, J A C; Strating, J R P M; van Geenen, M E D; Koster, A J; Bárcena, M; van Kuppeveld, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, enteroviruses generate new organelles (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition on which they multiply their viral genome. Suitable tools for live-cell imaging of enterovirus ROs are currently unavailable, as recombinant enteroviruses that carry genes that encode RO-anchored viral proteins tagged with fluorescent reporters have not been reported thus far. To overcome this limitation, we used a split green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system, comprising a large fragment [strands 1 to 10; GFP(S1-10)] and a small fragment [strand 11; GFP(S11)] of only 16 residues. The GFP(S11) (GFP with S11 fragment) fragment was inserted into the 3A protein of the enterovirus coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), while the large fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cells. The introduction of GFP(S11) did not affect the known functions of 3A when expressed in isolation. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM), we showed that GFP fluorescence was detected at ROs, whose morphologies are essentially identical to those previously observed for wild-type CVB3, indicating that GFP(S11)-tagged 3A proteins assemble with GFP(S1-10) to form GFP for illumination of bona fide ROs. It is well established that enterovirus infection leads to Golgi disintegration. Through live-cell imaging of infected cells expressing an mCherry-tagged Golgi marker, we monitored RO development and revealed the dynamics of Golgi disassembly in real time. Having demonstrated the suitability of this virus for imaging ROs, we constructed a CVB3 encoding GFP(S1-10) and GFP(S11)-tagged 3A to bypass the need to express GFP(S1-10) prior to infection. These tools will have multiple applications in future studies on the origin, location, and function of enterovirus ROs. IMPORTANCE Enteroviruses induce the formation of membranous structures (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition specialized for

  7. Systematic Mutagenesis of Genes Encoding Predicted Autotransported Proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei Identifies Factors Mediating Virulence in Mice, Net Intracellular Replication and a Novel Protein Conferring Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Natalie R. Lazar; Stevens, Mark P.; Dean, Rachel E.; Saint, Richard J.; Pankhania, Depesh; Prior, Joann L.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Kessler, Bianca; Nithichanon, Arnone; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v) normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA). Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE). A single mutant (bpaC) was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA), those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE), the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA). Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors and were

  8. Systematic mutagenesis of genes encoding predicted autotransported proteins of Burkholderia pseudomallei identifies factors mediating virulence in mice, net intracellular replication and a novel protein conferring serum resistance.

    PubMed

    Lazar Adler, Natalie R; Stevens, Mark P; Dean, Rachel E; Saint, Richard J; Pankhania, Depesh; Prior, Joann L; Atkins, Timothy P; Kessler, Bianca; Nithichanon, Arnone; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Galyov, Edouard E

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, which commonly presents as sepsis. The B. pseudomallei K96243 genome encodes eleven predicted autotransporters, a diverse family of secreted and outer membrane proteins often associated with virulence. In a systematic study of these autotransporters, we constructed insertion mutants in each gene predicted to encode an autotransporter and assessed them for three pathogenesis-associated phenotypes: virulence in the BALB/c intra-peritoneal mouse melioidosis model, net intracellular replication in J774.2 murine macrophage-like cells and survival in 45% (v/v) normal human serum. From the complete repertoire of eleven autotransporter mutants, we identified eight mutants which exhibited an increase in median lethal dose of 1 to 2-log10 compared to the isogenic parent strain (bcaA, boaA, boaB, bpaA, bpaC, bpaE, bpaF and bimA). Four mutants, all demonstrating attenuation for virulence, exhibited reduced net intracellular replication in J774.2 macrophage-like cells (bimA, boaB, bpaC and bpaE). A single mutant (bpaC) was identified that exhibited significantly reduced serum survival compared to wild-type. The bpaC mutant, which demonstrated attenuation for virulence and net intracellular replication, was sensitive to complement-mediated killing via the classical and/or lectin pathway. Serum resistance was rescued by in trans complementation. Subsequently, we expressed recombinant proteins of the passenger domain of four predicted autotransporters representing each of the phenotypic groups identified: those attenuated for virulence (BcaA), those attenuated for virulence and net intracellular replication (BpaE), the BpaC mutant with defects in virulence, net intracellular replication and serum resistance and those displaying wild-type phenotypes (BatA). Only BcaA and BpaE elicited a strong IFN-γ response in a restimulation assay using whole blood from seropositive donors and were

  9. HuR Displaces Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein To Facilitate La Binding to the 3′ Untranslated Region and Enhances Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Shwetha, Shivaprasad; Kumar, Anuj; Mullick, Ranajoy; Vasudevan, Deeptha; Mukherjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HuR is a ubiquitous, RNA binding protein that influences the stability and translation of several cellular mRNAs. Here, we report a novel role for HuR, as a regulator of proteins assembling at the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of viral RNA in the context of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HuR relocalizes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm upon HCV infection, interacts with the viral polymerase (NS5B), and gets redistributed into compartments of viral RNA synthesis. Depletion in HuR levels leads to a significant reduction in viral RNA synthesis. We further demonstrate that the interaction of HuR with the 3′ UTR of the viral RNA affects the interaction of two host proteins, La and polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB), at this site. HuR interacts with La and facilitates La binding to the 3′ UTR, enhancing La-mediated circularization of the HCV genome and thus viral replication. In addition, it competes with PTB for association with the 3′ UTR, which might stimulate viral replication. Results suggest that HuR influences the formation of a cellular/viral ribonucleoprotein complex, which is important for efficient initiation of viral RNA replication. Our study unravels a novel strategy of regulation of HCV replication through an interplay of host and viral proteins, orchestrated by HuR. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on various host factors for efficient replication of the viral RNA. Here, we have shown how a host factor (HuR) migrates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and gets recruited in the protein complex assembling at the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of HCV RNA. At the 3′ UTR, it facilitates circularization of the viral genome through interaction with another host factor, La, which is critical for replication. Also, it competes with the host protein PTB, which is a negative regulator of viral replication. Results demonstrate a unique strategy of regulation of HCV replication by a host protein through alteration of

  10. Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication Depends on Specific Cis- and Trans-Acting Activities of Viral Nonstructural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kazakov, Teymur; Yang, Feng; Ramanathan, Harish N.; Kohlway, Andrew; Diamond, Michael S.; Lindenbach, Brett D.

    2015-01-01

    Many positive-strand RNA viruses encode genes that can function in trans, whereas other genes are required in cis for genome replication. The mechanisms underlying trans- and cis-preferences are not fully understood. Here, we evaluate this concept for hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important cause of chronic liver disease and member of the Flaviviridae family. HCV encodes five nonstructural (NS) genes that are required for RNA replication. To date, only two of these genes, NS4B and NS5A, have been trans-complemented, leading to suggestions that other replicase genes work only in cis. We describe a new quantitative system to measure the cis- and trans-requirements for HCV NS gene function in RNA replication and identify several lethal mutations in the NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A, and NS5B genes that can be complemented in trans, alone or in combination, by expressing the NS3–5B polyprotein from a synthetic mRNA. Although NS5B RNA binding and polymerase activities can be supplied in trans, NS5B protein expression was required in cis, indicating that NS5B has a cis-acting role in replicase assembly distinct from its known enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the RNA binding and NTPase activities of the NS3 helicase domain were required in cis, suggesting that these activities play an essential role in RNA template selection. A comprehensive complementation group analysis revealed functional linkages between NS3-4A and NS4B and between NS5B and the upstream NS3–5A genes. Finally, NS5B polymerase activity segregated with a daclatasvir-sensitive NS5A activity, which could explain the synergy of this antiviral compound with nucleoside analogs in patients. Together, these studies define several new aspects of HCV replicase structure-function, help to explain the potency of HCV-specific combination therapies, and provide an experimental framework for the study of cis- and trans-acting activities in positive-strand RNA virus replication more generally. PMID:25875808

  11. Cellular Protein WDR11 Interacts with Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Proteins at the trans-Golgi Network To Promote Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryne E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been proposed that the herpes simplex virus (HSV) protein ICP0 has cytoplasmic roles in blocking antiviral signaling and in promoting viral replication in addition to its well-known proteasome-dependent functions in the nucleus. However, the mechanisms through which it produces these effects remain unclear. While investigating this further, we identified a novel cytoplasmic interaction between ICP0 and the poorly characterized cellular protein WDR11. During an HSV infection, WDR11 undergoes a dramatic change in localization at late times in the viral replication cycle, moving from defined perinuclear structures to a dispersed cytoplasmic distribution. While this relocation was not observed during infection with viruses other than HSV-1 and correlated with efficient HSV-1 replication, the redistribution was found to occur independently of ICP0 expression, instead requiring viral late gene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that WDR11 is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it interacts specifically with some, but not all, HSV virion components, in addition to ICP0. Knockdown of WDR11 in cultured human cells resulted in a modest but consistent decrease in yields of both wild-type and ICP0-null viruses, in the supernatant and cell-associated fractions, without affecting viral gene expression. Although further study is required, we propose that WDR11 participates in viral assembly and/or secondary envelopment. IMPORTANCE While the TGN has been proposed to be the major site of HSV-1 secondary envelopment, this process is incompletely understood, and in particular, the role of cellular TGN components in this pathway is unknown. Additionally, little is known about the cellular functions of WDR11, although the disruption of this protein has been implicated in multiple human diseases. Therefore, our finding that WDR11 is a TGN-resident protein that interacts with specific viral proteins to enhance viral yields improves both

  12. Dynamic spatial organization of multi-protein complexes controlling microbial polar organization, chromosome replication, and cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucille; Horowitz, Mark; Andersen, Gary; Downing, Kenneth; Earnest, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Gitai, Zemer; Larabell, Carolyn; Viollier, Patrick

    2012-06-18

    This project was a program to develop high-throughput methods to identify and characterize spatially localized multiprotein complexes in bacterial cells. We applied a multidisciplinary systems engineering approach to the detailed characterization of localized multi-protein structures in vivo a problem that has previously been approached on a fragmented, piecemeal basis.

  13. Spatial Patterns of DNA Replication, Protein Synthesis, and Oxygen Concentration within Bacterial Biofilms Reveal Diverse Physiological States▿

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Suriani Abdul; Pitts, Betsey; Beyenal, Haluk; Veluchamy, Raaja Angathevar; Lewandowski, Zbigniew; Davison, William M.; Buckingham-Meyer, Kelli; Stewart, Philip S.

    2007-01-01

    It has long been suspected that microbial biofilms harbor cells in a variety of activity states, but there have been few direct experimental visualizations of this physiological heterogeneity. Spatial patterns of DNA replication and protein synthetic activity were imaged and quantified in staphylococcal biofilms using immunofluorescent detection of pulse-labeled DNA and also an inducible green fluorescent protein (GFP) construct. Stratified patterns of DNA synthetic and protein synthetic activity were observed in all three biofilm systems to which the techniques were applied. In a colony biofilm system, the dimensions of the zone of anabolism at the air interface ranged from 16 to 38 μm and corresponded with the depth of oxygen penetration measured with a microelectrode. A second zone of activity was observed along the nutrient interface of the biofilm. Much of the biofilm was anabolically inactive. Since dead cells constituted only 10% of the biofilm population, most of the inactive cells in the biofilm were still viable. Collectively, these results suggest that staphylococcal biofilms contain cells in at least four distinct states: growing aerobically, growing fermentatively, dead, and dormant. The variety of activity states represented in a biofilm may contribute to the special ecology and tolerance to antimicrobial agents of biofilms. PMID:17337582

  14. Identification of the DNA-Binding Domains of Human Replication Protein A That Recognize G-Quadruplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Natarajan, Amarnath; Marky, Luis A.; Ouellette, Michel M.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.

    2011-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), a key player in DNA metabolism, has 6 single-stranded DNA-(ssDNA-) binding domains (DBDs) A-F. SELEX experiments with the DBDs-C, -D, and -E retrieve a 20-nt G-quadruplex forming sequence. Binding studies show that RPA-DE binds preferentially to the G-quadruplex DNA, a unique preference not observed with other RPA constructs. Circular dichroism experiments show that RPA-CDE-core can unfold the G-quadruplex while RPA-DE stabilizes it. Binding studies show that RPA-C binds pyrimidine- and purine-rich sequences similarly. This difference between RPA-C and RPA-DE binding was also indicated by the inability of RPA-CDE-core to unfold an oligonucleotide containing a TC-region 5′ to the G-quadruplex. Molecular modeling studies of RPA-DE and telomere-binding proteins Pot1 and Stn1 reveal structural similarities between the proteins and illuminate potential DNA-binding sites for RPA-DE and Stn1. These data indicate that DBDs of RPA have different ssDNA recognition properties. PMID:21772997

  15. Dictyostelium discoideum strains lacking the RtoA protein are defective for maturation of the Legionella pneumophila replication vacuole.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiru; Solomon, Jonathan M; Isberg, Ralph R

    2005-03-01

    To identify host proteins involved in Legionella pneumophila intracellular replication, the soil amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum was analysed. The absence of the amoebal RtoA protein is demonstrated here to depress L. pneumophila intracellular growth. Uptake of L. pneumophila into a D. discoideum rtoA(-) strain was marginally defective, but this effect was not sufficient to account for the defective intracellular growth of L. pneumophila. The rtoA mutant was also more resistant to high-multiplicity killing by the bacterium. A targeting assay testing the colocalization of L. pneumophila-containing vacuole with an endoplasmic reticulum/pre-Golgi intermediate compartment marker protein, GFP-HDEL, was used to analyse these defects. In parental D. discoideum, the L. pneumophila vacuole showed recruitment of GFP-HDEL within 40 min after introduction of bacteria to the amoebae. By 6 h after infection it was clear that the rtoA mutant acquired and retained the GFP-HDEL less efficiently than the parental strain, and that the mutant was defective for promoting the physical expansion of the membranous compartment surrounding the bacteria. Depressed intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in a D. discoideum rtoA(-) mutant therefore appeared to result from a lowered efficiency of vesicle trafficking events that are essential for the modification and expansion of the L. pneumophila-containing compartment. PMID:15679845

  16. The DNA replication inhibitor microcin B17 is a forty-three-amino-acid protein containing sixty percent glycine.

    PubMed

    Davagnino, J; Herrero, M; Furlong, D; Moreno, F; Kolter, R

    1986-11-01

    Microcin B17 is a low-molecular-weight protein that inhibits DNA replication in a number of enteric bacteria. It is produced by bacterial strains which harbor a 70-kilobase plasmid called pMccB17. Four plasmid genes (named mcbABCD) are required for its production. The product of the mcbA gene was identified by labelling minicells. The mcbA gene product was slightly larger when a mutation in any of the other three production genes was present. This indicates that these genes are involved in processing the primary mcbA product to yield the active molecule. The mcbA gene product predicted from the nucleotide sequence has 69 amino acids including 28 glycine residues. Microcin B17 was extracted from the cells by boiling in 100 mM acetic acid, 1 mM EDTA, and purified to homogeneity in a single step by high-performance liquid chromatography through a C18 column. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and amino acid composition demonstrated that mcbA is the structural gene for microcin B17. The active molecule is a processed product lacking the first 26 N-terminal residues. The 43 remaining residues include 26 glycines. While microcin B17 is an exported protein, the cleaved N-terminal peptide does not have the characteristic properties of a "signal sequence", which suggests that it is secreted by a mechanism different from that used by most secreted proteins of E. coli.

  17. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C

    PubMed Central

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S. Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J.; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  18. Surface hydrolysis of sphingomyelin by the outer membrane protein Rv0888 supports replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Alexander; Sun, Jim; Danilchanka, Olga; Meikle, Virginia; Rowland, Jennifer L.; Walter, Kerstin; Buck, Bradford R.; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Hölscher, Christoph; Ehrt, Sabine; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sphingomyelinases secreted by pathogenic bacteria play important roles in host-pathogen interactions ranging from interfering with phagocytosis and oxidative burst to iron acquisition. This study shows that the Mtb protein Rv0888 possesses potent sphingomyelinase activity cleaving sphingomyelin, a major lipid in eukaryotic cells, into ceramide and phosphocholine which are then utilized by Mtb as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus sources, respectively. An Mtb rv0888 deletion mutant did not grow on sphingomyelin as a sole carbon source anymore and replicated poorly in macrophages indicating that Mtb utilizes sphingomyelin during infection. Rv0888 is an unusual membrane protein with a surface-exposed C-terminal sphingomyelinase domain and a putative N-terminal channel domain that mediated glucose and phosphocholine uptake across the outer membrane in an M. smegmatis porin mutant. Hence, we propose to name Rv0888 as SpmT (sphingomyelinase of M. tuberculosis). Erythrocyte membranes contain up to 27% sphingomyelin. The finding that Rv0888 accounts for half of Mtb’s hemolysis is consistent with its sphingomyelinase activity and the observation that Rv0888 levels are increased in the presence of erythrocytes and sphingomyelin by 5- and 100-fold, respectively. Thus, Rv0888 is a novel outer membrane protein that enables Mtb to utilize sphingomyelin as a source of several essential nutrients during intracellular growth. PMID:26036301

  19. Screening of a Library of FDA-Approved Drugs Identifies Several Enterovirus Replication Inhibitors That Target Viral Protein 2C.

    PubMed

    Ulferts, Rachel; de Boer, S Matthijn; van der Linden, Lonneke; Bauer, Lisa; Lyoo, Hey Rhyoung; Maté, Maria J; Lichière, Julie; Canard, Bruno; Lelieveld, Daphne; Omta, Wienand; Egan, David; Coutard, Bruno; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2016-05-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) represent many important pathogens of humans. Unfortunately, no antiviral compounds currently exist to treat infections with these viruses. We screened the Prestwick Chemical Library, a library of approved drugs, for inhibitors of coxsackievirus B3, identified pirlindole as a potent novel inhibitor, and confirmed the inhibitory action of dibucaine, zuclopenthixol, fluoxetine, and formoterol. Upon testing of viruses of several EV species, we found that dibucaine and pirlindole inhibited EV-B and EV-D and that dibucaine also inhibited EV-A, but none of them inhibited EV-C or rhinoviruses (RVs). In contrast, formoterol inhibited all enteroviruses and rhinoviruses tested. All compounds acted through the inhibition of genome replication. Mutations in the coding sequence of the coxsackievirus B3 (CV-B3) 2C protein conferred resistance to dibucaine, pirlindole, and zuclopenthixol but not formoterol, suggesting that 2C is the target for this set of compounds. Importantly, dibucaine bound to CV-B3 protein 2C in vitro, whereas binding to a 2C protein carrying the resistance mutations was reduced, providing an explanation for how resistance is acquired. PMID:26856848

  20. Mutations within the nuclear localization signal of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein attenuate virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Hodgins, Douglas; Calvert, Jay G.; Welch, Siao-Kun W.; Jolie, Rika; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an RNA virus replicating in the cytoplasm, but the nucleocapsid (N) protein is specifically localized to the nucleus and nucleolus in virus-infected cells. A 'pat7' motif of 41-PGKK(N/S)KK has previously been identified in the N protein as the functional nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, the biological consequences of N protein nuclear localization are unknown. In the present study, the role of N protein nuclear localization during infection was investigated in pigs using an NLS-null mutant virus. When two lysines at 43 and 44 at the NLS locus were substituted to glycines, the modified NLS with 41-PGGGNKK restricted the N protein to the cytoplasm. This NLS-null mutation was introduced into a full-length infectious cDNA clone of PRRSV. Upon transfection of cells, the NLS-null full-length clone induced cytopathic effects and produced infectious progeny. The NLS-null virus grew to a titer 100-fold lower than that of wild-type virus. To examine the response to NLS-null PRRSV in the natural host, three groups of pigs, consisting of seven animals per group, were intranasally inoculated with wild-type, placebo, or NLS-null virus, and the animals were maintained for 4 weeks. The NLS-null-infected pigs had a significantly shorter mean duration of viremia than wild-type-infected pigs but developed significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Mutations occurred at the NLS locus in one pig during viremia, and four types of mutations were identified: 41-PGRGNKK, 41-PGGRNKK, and 41-PGRRNKK, and 41-PGKKSKK. Both wild-type and NLS-null viruses persisted in the tonsils for at least 4 weeks, and the NLS-null virus persisting in the tonsils was found to be mutated to either 41-PGRGNKK or 41-PGGRNKK in all pigs. No other mutation was found in the N gene. All types of reversions which occurred during viremia and persistence were able to translocate the mutated N proteins to the nucleus, indicating a

  1. Plasmid RSF1010 DNA replication in vitro promoted by purified RSF1010 RepA, RepB and RepC proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Scherzinger, E; Haring, V; Lurz, R; Otto, S

    1991-01-01

    We have constructed and analyzed an in vitro system that will efficiently replicate plasmid RSF1010 and its derivatives. The system contains a partially purified extract from E.coli cells and three purified RSF1010-encoded proteins, the products of genes repA, repB (or mobA/repB), and repC. Replication in this system mimics the in vivo mechanism in that it (i) is initiated at oriV, the origin of vegetative DNA replication, (ii) proceeds in a population of plasmid molecules in both directions from this 396-base-pair origin region, and (iii) is absolutely dependent on the presence of each of the three rep gene products. In addition, we find that E.coli DNA gyrase, DnaZ protein (gamma subunit of poIIII holoenzyme) and SSB are required for in vitro plasmid synthesis. The bacterial RNA polymerase, the initiation protein DnaA, and the primosomal proteins DnaB, DnaC, DnaG and DnaT are not required. Furthermore, the replicative intermediates seen in the electron microscope suggest that replication in vitro begins with the simultaneous or non-simultaneous formation of two displacement loops that expand for a short stretch of DNA toward each other, and form a theta-type structure when the two displacing strands pass each other. Images PMID:1851552

  2. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced “conquer and compromise” strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host. PMID:26870669

  3. Interaction between HP1{alpha} and replication proteins in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, Tanja . E-mail: tauth@uni-bonn.de; Kunkel, Elisabeth; Grummt, Friedrich . E-mail: grummt@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-10-15

    HP1 is an essential heterochromatin-associated protein known to play an important role in the organization of heterochromatin as well as in the transcriptional regulation of heterochromatic and euchromatic genes both in repression and activation. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and immunoprecipitation, we report here that murine HP1{alpha} interacts with the preRC proteins ORC1, ORC2 and CDC6. Immunofluorescence staining and EGFP/DsRed fusion proteins revealed a colocalization of HP1{alpha} with ORC1, ORC2 and CDC6 in heterochromatin, supporting the notion that ORC and probably CDC6 play an important role in murine HP1{alpha} function. Besides that, we also observed a colocalization of HP1{alpha} with {gamma}-tubulin suggesting a centrosomal localization of HP1{alpha} in murine cells. To gain insight into HP1{alpha} function, we applied the RNAi technique. Depletion of HP1{alpha} leads to a slow down of cell proliferation, an aberrant cell cycle progression as well as to multinucleated cells with insufficiently organized microtubule. These results together indicate that HP1{alpha} exerts functions in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  4. Epigenetically regulated miR-449a enhances hepatitis B virus replication by targeting cAMP-responsive element binding protein 5 and modulating hepatocytes phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyong; Liu, Hongyan; Xie, Zhanglian; Deng, Wangyu; Wu, Chunchen; Qin, Bo; Hou, Jinlin; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are able to influence hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication directly by binding to HBV transcripts or indirectly by targeting cellular factors. Here, we investigate the effect of epigenetically regulated miR-449a on HBV replication and the underlying mechanisms. miR-449a expression was lower in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells than in primary hepatocytes and could be induced by trichostatin A. Ectopic miR-449a expression in HCC cells strongly enhanced HBV replication, transcription, progeny virions secretion, and antigen expression in a dose-dependent manner. miR-449a directly targeted cAMP-responsive element binding protein 5 (CREB5), which in turn induced the expression of farnesoid X receptor α (FXRα), a transcription factor that facilitates HBV replication. CREB5 knockdown and overexpression demonstrated that it is a negative regulator of HBV replication. Additionally, miR-449a overexpression inhibited proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest, and promoted HCC cell differentiation. The results indicated that epigenetically regulated miR-449a targets CREB5 to increase FXRα expression, thereby promoting HBV replication and gene expression. Our findings provide a new understanding of the role of miRNAs in HBV replication. PMID:27138288

  5. The RdgC protein of Escherichia coli binds DNA and counters a toxic effect of RecFOR in strains lacking the replication restart protein PriA.

    PubMed

    Moore, Timothy; McGlynn, Peter; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Sharples, Gary J; Lloyd, Robert G

    2003-02-01

    PriA protein provides a means to load the DnaB replicative helicase at DNA replication fork and D loop structures, and is therefore a key factor in the rescue of stalled or broken forks and subsequent replication restart. We show that the nucleoid-associated RdgC protein binds non-specifically to single-stranded (ss) DNA and double-stranded DNA. It is also essential for growth of a strain lacking PriA, indicating that it might affect replication fork progression or fork rescue. dnaC suppressors of priA overcome this inviability, especially when RecF, RecO or RecR is inactivated, indicating that RdgC avoids or counters a toxic effect of these proteins. Mutations modifying ssDNA-binding (SSB) protein also negate this toxic effect, suggesting that the toxicity reflects inappropriate loading of RecA on SSB-coated ssDNA, leading to excessive or untimely RecA activity. We suggest that binding of RdgC to DNA limits RecA loading, avoiding problems at replication forks that would otherwise require PriA to promote replication restart. Mutations in RNA polymerase also reduce the toxic effect of RecFOR, providing a further link between DNA replication, transcription and repair. PMID:12554673

  6. PROTEOLYTIC REMOVAL OF THE CARBOXYL TERMINUS OF THE T4 GENE 32 HELIX-DESTABILIZING PROTEIN ALTERS THE T4 IN VITRO REPLICATION COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.L.; Alberts, B.M.; Hosoda, J.

    1980-07-01

    The proteolytic removal of about 60 amino acids from the COOH terminus of the bacteriophage T4 helix-destabilizing protein (gene 32 protein) produces 32*I, a 27,000-dalton fragment which still binds tightly and cooperatively to single-stranded DNA. The substitution of 32*I protein for intact 32 protein in the seven-protein T4 replication complex results in dramatic changes in some of the reactions catalyzed by this in vitro DNA replication system, while leaving others largely unperturbed. (1) Like intact 32 protein, the 32*I protein promotes DNA synthesis by the DNA polymerase when the T4 polymerase accessory proteins (gene 44/62 and 45 proteins) are also present. The host helix-destabilizing protein (Escherichia coli ssb protein) cannot replace the 32*I protein for this synthesis. (2) Unlike intact 32 protein, 32*I protein strongly inhibits DNA synthesis catalyzed by the T4 DNA polymerase alone on a primed single-stranded DNA template. (3) Unlike intact 32 protein, the 32*I protein strongly inhibits RNA primer synthesis catalyzed by the T4 gene 41 and 61 proteins and also reduces the efficiency of RNA primer utilization. As a result, de novo DNA chain starts are blocked completely in the complete T4 replication system, and no lagging strand DNA synthesis occurs. (4) The 32*I protein does not bind to either the T4 DNA polymerase or to the T4 gene 61 protein in the absence of DNA; these associations (detected with intact 32 protein) would therefore appear to be essential for the normal control of 32 protein activity, and to account at least in part for observations 2 and 3, above. We propose that the COOH-terminal domain of intact 32 protein functions to guide its interactions with the T4 DNA polymerase and the T4 gene 61 RNA-priming protein. When this domain is removed, as in 32*I protein, the helix destabilization induced by the protein is controlled inadequately, so that polymerizing enzymes tend to be displaced from the growing 3{prime}-OH end of a

  7. Replicating nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic replication disrupts each nucleosome as the fork passes, followed by reassembly of disrupted nucleosomes and incorporation of newly synthesized histones into nucleosomes in the daughter genomes. In this review, we examine this process of replication-coupled nucleosome assembly to understand how characteristic steady-state nucleosome landscapes are attained. Recent studies have begun to elucidate mechanisms involved in histone transfer during replication and maturation of the nucleosome landscape after disruption by replication. A fuller understanding of replication-coupled nucleosome assembly will be needed to explain how epigenetic information is replicated at every cell division. PMID:26269799

  8. Generation and characterization of functional recombinant antibody fragments against tomato yellow leaf curl virus replication-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Safarnejad, M R; Fischer, R; Commandeur, U

    2008-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a complex of geminivirus species prevalent in the tropics and sub-tropics, which causes severe diseases in economically important crops such as tomato. Conventional strategies for disease management have shown little success and new approaches based on genetic engineering need to be considered. We generated two single-chain variable fragment antibodies (scFv-ScRep1 and scFv-ScRep2) that bound strongly to continuous epitopes within the TYLCV replication-associated protein (Rep). The TYLCV-Ir C1 gene (encoding Rep) was expressed as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusions. Purified MBP-Rep was used to immunize mice allowing the construction of naïve and pre-immunized scFv phage display libraries. Immunoassays showed that scFv-ScRep1 recognized an N-terminal epitope of Rep, whereas scFv-ScRep2 recognized a more central epitope. This is the first successful production of scFv antibodies against a geminivirus Rep, the initial step in the production of transgenic plants with resistance to TYLCV. PMID:19226769

  9. RRB1 and RRB2 encode maize retinoblastoma-related proteins that interact with a plant D-type cyclin and geminivirus replication protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ach, R A; Durfee, T; Miller, A B; Taranto, P; Hanley-Bowdoin, L; Zambryski, P C; Gruissem, W

    1997-01-01

    Unlike mammalian and yeast cells, little is known about how plants regulate G1 progression and entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. In mammalian cells, a key regulator of this process is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). In contrast, G1 control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not utilize an RB-like protein. We report here the cloning of cDNAs from two Zea mays genes, RRB1 and RRB2, that encode RB-related proteins. Further, RRB2 transcripts are alternatively spliced to yield two proteins with different C termini. At least one RRB gene is expressed in all the tissues examined, with the highest levels seen in the shoot apex. RRB1 is a 96-kDa nuclear protein that can physically interact with two mammalian DNA tumor virus oncoproteins, simian virus 40 large-T antigen and adenovirus E1A, and with a plant D-type cyclin. These associations are abolished by mutation of a conserved cysteine residue in RRB1 that is also essential for RB function. RRB1 binding potential is also sensitive to deletions in the conserved A and B domains, although differences exist in these effects compared to those of human RB. RRB1 can also bind to the AL1 protein from tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV), a protein which is essential for TGMV DNA replication. These results suggest that G1 regulation in plant cells is controlled by a mechanism which is much more similar to that found in mammalian cells than that in yeast. PMID:9271385

  10. Trm9-Catalyzed tRNA Modifications Regulate Global Protein Expression by Codon-Biased Translation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wenjun; Babu, I. Ramesh; Su, Dan; Yin, Shanye; Begley, Thomas J.; Dedon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have long been recognized to play crucial roles in regulating the rate and fidelity of translation. However, the extent to which they determine global protein production remains poorly understood. Here we use quantitative proteomics to show a direct link between wobble uridine 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl (mcm5) and 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2) modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) in tRNAArg(UCU) and tRNAGlu(UUC) and selective translation of proteins from genes enriched with their cognate codons. Controlling for bias in protein expression and alternations in mRNA expression, we find that loss of Trm9 selectively impairs expression of proteins from genes enriched with AGA and GAA codons under both normal and stress conditions. Moreover, we show that AGA and GAA codons occur with high frequency in clusters along the transcripts, which may play a role in modulating translation. Consistent with these results, proteins subject to enhanced ribosome pausing in yeast lacking mcm5U and mcm5s2U are more likely to be down-regulated and contain a larger number of AGA/GAA clusters. Together, these results suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications play a significant role in regulating protein expression within the cell. PMID:26670883

  11. Inhibition of iridovirus protein synthesis and virus replication by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides targeted to the major capsid protein, the 18 kDa immediate-early protein, and a viral homolog of RNA polymerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, Robert; Bryan, Locke; Long, Scott; Majji, Sai; Hoskins, Glenn; Sinning, Allan; Olivier, Jake; Chinchar, V. Gregory . E-mail: vchinchar@microbio.umsmed.edu

    2007-02-20

    Frog virus 3 (FV3) is a large DNA virus that encodes {approx} 100 proteins. Although the general features of FV3 replication are known, the specific roles that most viral proteins play in the virus life cycle have not yet been elucidated. To address the question of viral gene function, antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (asMOs) were used to transiently knock-down expression of specific viral genes and thus infer their role in virus replication. We designed asMOs directed against the major capsid protein (MCP), an 18 kDa immediate-early protein (18K) that was thought to be a viral regulatory protein, and the viral homologue of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (vPol-II{alpha}). All three asMOs successfully inhibited translation of the targeted protein, and two of the three asMOs resulted in marked phenotypic changes. Knock-down of the MCP resulted in a marked reduction in viral titer without a corresponding drop in the synthesis of other late viral proteins. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that in cells treated with the anti-MCP MO assembly sites were devoid of viral particles and contained numerous aberrant structures. In contrast, inhibition of 18K synthesis did not block virion formation, suggesting that the 18K protein was not essential for replication of FV3 in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. Finally, consistent with the view that late viral gene expression is catalyzed by a virus-encoded or virus-modified Pol-II-like protein, knock-down of vPol-II{alpha} triggered a global decline in late gene expression and virus yields without affecting the synthesis of early viral genes. Collectively, these results demonstrate the utility of using asMOs to elucidate the function of FV3 proteins.

  12. Mutational analysis of the helicase domain of a replication initiator protein reveals critical roles of Lys 272 of the B' motif and Lys 289 of the β-hairpin loop in geminivirus replication.

    PubMed

    George, Biju; Ruhel, Rajrani; Mazumder, Mohit; Sharma, Veerendra Kumar; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Gourinath, Samudrala; Chakraborty, Supriya

    2014-07-01

    Replication initiator protein (Rep) is indispensable for rolling-circle replication of geminiviruses, a group of plant-infecting circular ssDNA viruses. However, the mechanism of DNA unwinding by circular ssDNA virus-encoded helicases is unknown. To understand geminivirus Rep function, we compared the sequence and secondary structure of Rep with those of bovine papillomavirus E1 and employed charged residue-to-alanine scanning mutagenesis to generate a set of single-substitution mutants in Walker A (K227), in Walker B (D261, 262), and within or adjacent to the B' motif (K272, K286 and K289). All mutants were asymptomatic and viral accumulation could not be detected by Southern blotting in both tomato and N. benthamiana plants. Furthermore, the K272 and K289 mutants were deficient in DNA binding and unwinding. Biochemical studies and modelling data based on comparisons with the known structures of SF3 helicases suggest that the conserved lysine (K289) located in a predicted β-hairpin loop may interact with ssDNA, while lysine 272 in the B' motif (K272) located on the outer surface of the protein is presumably involved in coupling ATP-induced conformational changes to DNA binding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the roles of the B' motif and the adjacent β-hairpin loop in geminivirus replication have been elucidated.

  13. Structural and biophysical characterization of the proteins interacting with the herpes simplex virus 1 origin of replication.

    PubMed

    Manolaridis, Ioannis; Mumtsidu, Eleni; Konarev, Peter; Makhov, Alexander M; Fullerton, Stephen W; Sinz, Andrea; Kalkhof, Stefan; McGeehan, John E; Cary, Peter D; Griffith, Jack D; Svergun, Dmitri; Kneale, Geoff G; Tucker, Paul A

    2009-06-12

    The C terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 origin-binding protein, UL9ct, interacts directly with the viral single-stranded DNA-binding protein ICP8. We show that a 60-amino acid C-terminal deletion mutant of ICP8 (ICP8DeltaC) also binds very strongly to UL9ct. Using small angle x-ray scattering, the low resolution solution structures of UL9ct alone, in complex with ICP8DeltaC, and in complex with a 15-mer double-stranded DNA containing Box I of the origin of replication are described. Size exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, backed up by isothermal titration calorimetry measurements, are used to show that the stoichiometry of the UL9ct-dsDNA15-mer complex is 2:1 at micromolar protein concentrations. The reaction occurs in two steps with initial binding of UL9ct to DNA (Kd approximately 6 nM) followed by a second binding event (Kd approximately 0.8 nM). It is also shown that the stoichiometry of the ternary UL9ct-ICP8DeltaC-dsDNA15-mer complex is 2:1:1, at the concentrations used in the different assays. Electron microscopy indicates that the complex assembled on the extended origin, oriS, rather than Box I alone, is much larger. The results are consistent with a simple model whereby a conformational switch of the UL9 DNA-binding domain upon binding to Box I allows the recruitment of a UL9-ICP8 complex by interaction between the UL9 DNA-binding domains.

  14. Inhibition of HIV type 1 replication by human T lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 Tax proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Christy S; Castillo, Laura; Giam, Chou-Zen; Wu, Li; Beilke, Mark A

    2013-07-01

    Patients with HIV-1 and human T-lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) coinfections often exhibit a clinical course similar to that seen in HIV-1-infected individuals who are long-term nonprogressors. These findings have been attributed in part to the ability of HTLV-2 to activate production of antiviral chemokines and to downregulate the CCR5 coreceptor on lymphocytes. To further investigate these observations, we tested the ability of recombinant Tax1 and Tax2 proteins to suppress HIV-1 viral replication in vitro. R5-tropic HIV-1 (NLAD8)-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated daily with recombinant Tax1 and Tax2 proteins (dosage range 1-100 pM). Culture supernatants were collected at intervals from days 1 to 22 postinfection and assayed for levels of HIV-1 p24 antigen by ELISA. Treatment of PBMCs with Tax2 protein resulted in a significant reduction in HIV-1 p24 antigen levels (p<0.05) at days 10, 14, and 18 postinfection compared to HIV-1-infected or mock-treated PBMCs. This was preceded by the detection of increased levels of CC-chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5 on days 1-7 of infection. Similar, but less robust inhibition was observed in Tax1-treated PBMCs. These results support the contention that Tax1 and Tax2 play a role in generating antiviral responses against HIV-1 in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23464580

  15. Grouper translationally controlled tumor protein prevents cell death and inhibits the replication of Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV).

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingguang; Guo, Minglan; Ji, Huasong; Yan, Yang; Ouyang, Zhengliang; Huang, Xiaohong; Hang, Youhua; Qin, Qiwei

    2012-10-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is an important molecule involved in multiple biological processes, such as cell growth, cell cycle progression, malignant transformation, and enhancement of the anti-apoptotic activity. In this study, the TCTP from orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides (Ec-TCTP) was cloned and characterized. The full-length cDNA of Ec-TCTP was comprised of 1057 bp with a 510 bp open reading frame that encodes a putative protein of 170 amino acids. Recombinant Ec-TCTP (rEc-TCTP) was expressed in Escherichia BL21 (DE3) and purified for mouse anti-Ec-TCTP serum preparation. The rEc-TCTP fusion protein was demonstrated to possess antioxidant activity, which conferred resistance to H(2)O(2) damage. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that Ec-TCTP mRNA is predominately expressed in the liver, and the expression was up-regulated in the liver of grouper after viral challenge with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV). Intracellular localization revealed that Ec-TCTP expression was distributed predominantly in the cytoplasm. Although human TCTP has a role in apoptosis regulation, it is not known if grouper TCTP has any role in apoptosis regulation. Strikingly, grouper TCTP, when overexpressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells, protected them from cell death induced by cycloheximide (CHX). In addition, overexpressed Ec-TCTP in grouper spleen (GS) cells inhibited the replication of SGIV. These results suggest that Ec-TCTP may play a critical role in their response to SGIV infection, through regulation of a cell death pathway that is common to fish and humans.

  16. Phosphorylation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Polymerases Ser29 and Ser42 by Protein Kinase C-Related Kinase 2 Regulates Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song-Hee; Kim, Seong-Jun; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Tae-Eun; Moon, Jae-Su; Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Kun; Yoo, Jong Shin; Son, Woo Sung; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Han, Seung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B), an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), is the key enzyme for HCV RNA replication. We previously showed that HCV RdRp is phosphorylated by protein kinase C-related kinase 2 (PRK2). In the present study, we used biochemical and reverse-genetics approaches to demonstrate that HCV NS5B phosphorylation is crucial for viral RNA replication in cell culture. Two-dimensional phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that PRK2 phosphorylates NS5B exclusively at its serine residues in vitro and in vivo. Using in vitro kinase assays and mass spectrometry, we identified two phosphorylation sites, Ser29 and Ser42, in the Δ1 finger loop region that interacts with the thumb subdomain of NS5B. Colony-forming assays using drug-selectable HCV subgenomic RNA replicons revealed that preventing phosphorylation by Ala substitution at either Ser29 or Ser42 impairs HCV RNA replication. Furthermore, reverse-genetics studies using HCV infectious clones encoding phosphorylation-defective NS5B confirmed the crucial role of these PRK2 phosphorylation sites in viral RNA replication. Molecular-modeling studies predicted that the phosphorylation of NS5B stabilizes the interactions between its Δ1 loop and thumb subdomain, which are required for the formation of the closed conformation of NS5B known to be important for de novo RNA synthesis. Collectively, our results provide evidence that HCV NS5B phosphorylation has a positive regulatory role in HCV RNA replication. IMPORTANCE While the role of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) in viral RNA replication is clear, little is known about their functional regulation by phosphorylation. In this study, we addressed several important questions about the function and structure of phosphorylated hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B). Reverse-genetics studies with HCV replicons encoding phosphorylation-defective NS5B mutants and analysis of their RdRp activities revealed

  17. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed Central

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-01-01

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators. PMID:11127914

  18. Relationship of the xeroderma pigmentosum group E DNA repair defect to the chromatin and DNA binding proteins UV-DDB and replication protein A.

    PubMed

    Rapić Otrin, V; Kuraoka, I; Nardo, T; McLenigan, M; Eker, A P; Stefanini, M; Levine, A S; Wood, R D

    1998-06-01

    Cells from complementation groups A through G of the heritable sun-sensitive disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) show defects in nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA. Proteins representing groups A, B, C, D, F, and G are subunits of the core recognition and incision machinery of repair. XP group E (XP-E) is the mildest form of the disorder, and cells generally show about 50% of the normal repair level. We investigated two protein factors previously implicated in the XP-E defect, UV-damaged DNA binding protein (UV-DDB) and replication protein A (RPA). Three newly identified XP-E cell lines (XP23PV, XP25PV, and a line formerly classified as an XP variant) were defective in UV-DDB binding activity but had levels of RPA in the normal range. The XP-E cell extracts did not display a significant nucleotide excision repair defect in vitro, with either UV-irradiated DNA or a uniquely placed cisplatin lesion used as a substrate. Purified UV-DDB protein did not stimulate repair of naked DNA by DDB- XP-E cell extracts, but microinjection of the protein into DDB- XP-E cells could partially correct the repair defect. RPA stimulated repair in normal, XP-E, or complemented extracts from other XP groups, and so the effect of RPA was not specific for XP-E cell extracts. These data strengthen the connection between XP-E and UV-DDB. Coupled with previous results, the findings suggest that UV-DDB has a role in the repair of DNA in chromatin. PMID:9584159

  19. The PriA Replication Restart Protein Blocks Replicase Access Prior to Helicase Assembly and Directs Template Specificity through Its ATPase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Manhart, Carol M.; McHenry, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    The PriA protein serves as an initiator for the restart of DNA replication on stalled replication forks and as a checkpoint protein that prevents the replicase from advancing in a strand displacement reaction on forks that do not contain a functional replicative helicase. We have developed a primosomal protein-dependent fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay using a minimal fork substrate composed of synthetic oligonucleotides. We demonstrate that a self-loading reaction, which proceeds at high helicase concentrations, occurs by threading of a preassembled helicase over free 5′-ends, an event that can be blocked by attaching a steric block to the 5′-end or coating DNA with single-stranded DNA binding protein. The specificity of PriA for replication forks is regulated by its intrinsic ATPase. ATPase-defective PriA K230R shows a strong preference for substrates that contain no gap between the leading strand and the duplex portion of the fork, as demonstrated previously. Wild-type PriA prefers substrates with larger gaps, showing maximal activity on substrates on which PriA K230R is inactive. We demonstrate that PriA blocks replicase function on forks by blocking its binding. PMID:23264623

  20. Replication of a pathogenic non-coding RNA increases DNA methylation in plants associated with a bromodomain-containing viroid-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Dian-Qiu; Liu, Shang-Wu; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Bang-Jun; Wang, Shao-Peng; Guo, Hui-Shan; Fang, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Viroids are plant-pathogenic molecules made up of single-stranded circular non-coding RNAs. How replicating viroids interfere with host silencing remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of a nuclear-replicating Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) on interference with plant RNA silencing. Using transient induction of silencing in GFP transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants (line 16c), we found that PSTVd replication accelerated GFP silencing and increased Virp1 mRNA, which encodes bromodomain-containing viroid-binding protein 1 and is required for PSTVd replication. DNA methylation was increased in the GFP transgene promoter of PSTVd-replicating plants, indicating involvement of transcriptional gene silencing. Consistently, accelerated GFP silencing and increased DNA methylation in the of GFP transgene promoter were detected in plants transiently expressing Virp1. Virp1 mRNA was also increased upon PSTVd infection in natural host potato plants. Reduced transcript levels of certain endogenous genes were also consistent with increases in DNA methylation in related gene promoters in PSTVd-infected potato plants. Together, our data demonstrate that PSTVd replication interferes with the nuclear silencing pathway in that host plant, and this is at least partially attributable to Virp1. This study provides new insights into the plant-viroid interaction on viroid pathogenicity by subverting the plant cell silencing machinery. PMID:27767195

  1. Human single-stranded DNA binding protein 1 (hSSB1/NABP2) is required for the stability and repair of stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Bolderson, Emma; Petermann, Eva; Croft, Laura; Suraweera, Amila; Pandita, Raj K; Pandita, Tej K; Helleday, Thomas; Khanna, Kum Kum; Richard, Derek J

    2014-06-01

    Aberrant DNA replication is a primary cause of mutations that are associated with pathological disorders including cancer. During DNA metabolism, the primary causes of replication fork stalling include secondary DNA structures, highly transcribed regions and damaged DNA. The restart of stalled replication forks is critical for the timely progression of the cell cycle and ultimately for the maintenance of genomic stability. Our previous work has implicated the single-stranded DNA binding protein, hSSB1/NABP2, in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks via homologous recombination. Here, we demonstrate that hSSB1 relocates to hydroxyurea (HU)-damaged replication forks where it is required for ATR and Chk1 activation and recruitment of Mre11 and Rad51. Consequently, hSSB1-depleted cells fail to repair and restart stalled replication forks. hSSB1 deficiency causes accumulation of DNA strand breaks and results in chromosome aberrations observed in mitosis, ultimately resulting in hSSB1 being required for survival to HU and camptothecin. Overall, our findings demonstrate the importance of hSSB1 in maintaining and repairing DNA replication forks and for overall genomic stability.

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Bacillus subtilis replication termination protein in complex with the 37-base-pair TerI-binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Vivian, J. P.; Porter, C.; Wilce, J. A.; Wilce, M. C. J.

    2006-11-01

    A preparation of replication terminator protein (RTP) of B. subtilis and a 37-base-pair TerI sequence (comprising two binding sites for RTP) has been purified and crystallized. The replication terminator protein (RTP) of Bacillus subtilis binds to specific DNA sequences that halt the progression of the replisome in a polar manner. These terminator complexes flank a defined region of the chromosome into which they allow replication forks to enter but not exit. Forcing the fusion of replication forks in a specific zone is thought to allow the coordination of post-replicative processes. The functional terminator complex comprises two homodimers each of 29 kDa bound to overlapping binding sites. A preparation of RTP and a 37-base-pair TerI sequence (comprising two binding sites for RTP) has been purified and crystallized. A data set to 3.9 Å resolution with 97.0% completeness and an R{sub sym} of 12% was collected from a single flash-cooled crystal using synchrotron radiation. The diffraction data are consistent with space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 118.8, c = 142.6 Å.

  3. A common set of conserved motifs in a vast variety of putative nucleic acid-dependent ATPases including MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V

    1993-06-11

    A new superfamily of (putative) DNA-dependent ATPases is described that includes the ATPase domains of prokaryotic NtrC-related transcription regulators, MCM proteins involved in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication, and a group of uncharacterized bacterial and chloroplast proteins. MCM proteins are shown to contain a modified form of the ATP-binding motif and are predicted to mediate ATP-dependent opening of double-stranded DNA in the replication origins. In a second line of investigation, it is demonstrated that the products of unidentified open reading frames from Marchantia mitochondria and from yeast, and a domain of a baculovirus protein involved in viral DNA replication are related to the superfamily III of DNA and RNA helicases that previously has been known to include only proteins of small viruses. Comparison of the multiple alignments showed that the proteins of the NtrC superfamily and the helicases of superfamily III share three related sequence motifs tightly packed in the ATPase domain that consists of 100-150 amino acid residues. A similar array of conserved motifs is found in the family of DnaA-related ATPases. It is hypothesized that the three large groups of nucleic acid-dependent ATPases have similar structure of the core ATPase domain and have evolved from a common ancestor.

  4. An siRNA screen for ATG protein depletion reveals the extent of the unconventional functions of the autophagy proteome in virus replication.

    PubMed

    Mauthe, Mario; Langereis, Martijn; Jung, Jennifer; Zhou, Xingdong; Jones, Alex; Omta, Wienand; Tooze, Sharon A; Stork, Björn; Paludan, Søren Riis; Ahola, Tero; Egan, Dave; Behrends, Christian; Mokry, Michal; de Haan, Cornelis; van Kuppeveld, Frank; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2016-08-29

    Autophagy is a catabolic process regulated by the orchestrated action of the autophagy-related (ATG) proteins. Recent work indicates that some of the ATG proteins also have autophagy-independent roles. Using an unbiased siRNA screen approach, we explored the extent of these unconventional functions of ATG proteins. We determined the effects of the depletion of each ATG proteome component on the replication of six different viruses. Our screen reveals that up to 36% of the ATG proteins significantly alter the replication of at least one virus in an unconventional fashion. Detailed analysis of two candidates revealed an undocumented role for ATG13 and FIP200 in picornavirus replication that is independent of their function in autophagy as part of the ULK complex. The high numbers of unveiled ATG gene-specific and pathogen-specific functions of the ATG proteins calls for caution in the interpretation of data, which rely solely on the depletion of a single ATG protein to specifically ablate autophagy. PMID:27573464

  5. Morphogenesis of Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane-Invaginated Vesicles during Beet Black Scorch Virus Infection: Role of Auxiliary Replication Protein and New Implications of Three-Dimensional Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiuling; Jin, Xuejiao; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Ying; Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Xianbing; Hong, Jian; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT All well-characterized positive-strand RNA viruses[(+)RNA viruses] induce the formation of host membrane-bound viral replication complexes (VRCs), yet the underlying mechanism and machinery for VRC formation remain elusive. We report here the biogenesis and topology of the Beet black scorch virus (BBSV) replication complex. Distinct cytopathological changes typical of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) aggregation and vesiculation were observed in BBSV-infected Nicotiana benthamiana cells. Immunogold labeling of the auxiliary replication protein p23 and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) revealed that the ER-derived membranous spherules provide the site for BBSV replication. Further studies indicated that p23 plays a crucial role in mediating the ER rearrangement. Three-dimensional electron tomographic analysis revealed the formation of multiple ER-originated vesicle packets. Each vesicle packet enclosed a few to hundreds of independent spherules that were invaginations of the ER membranes into the lumen. Strikingly, these vesicle packets were connected to each other via tubules, a rearrangement event that is rare among other virus-induced membrane reorganizations. Fibrillar contents within the spherules were also reconstructed by electron tomography, which showed diverse structures. Our results provide the first, to our knowledge, three-dimensional ultrastructural analysis of membrane-bound VRCs of a plant (+)RNA virus and should help to achieve a better mechanistic understanding of the organization and microenvironment of plant (+)RNA virus replication complexes. IMPORTANCE Assembly of virus replication complexes for all known positive-strand RNA viruses depends on the extensive remodeling of host intracellular membranes. Beet black scorch virus, a necrovirus in the family Tombusviridae, invaginates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes to form spherules in infected cells. Double-stranded RNAs, the viral replication intermediate, and the viral auxiliary replication

  6. Visualization of feline calicivirus replication in real-time with recombinant viruses engineered to express fluorescent reporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Abente, Eugenio J; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Bok, Karin; Green, Kim Y

    2010-04-25

    Caliciviruses are non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses with a single-stranded, positive sense RNA genome. Transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis was used to insert a transprimer sequence into random sites of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of the feline calicivirus (FCV) genome. A site in the LC gene (encoding the capsid leader protein) of the FCV genome was identified that could tolerate foreign insertions, and two viable recombinant FCV variants expressing LC fused either to AcGFP, or DsRedFP were recovered. The effects of the insertions on LC processing, RNA replication, and stability of the viral genome were analyzed, and the progression of a calicivirus single infection and co-infection were captured by real-time imaging fluorescent microscopy. The ability to engineer viable recombinant caliciviruses expressing foreign markers enables new approaches to investigate virus and host cell interactions, as well as studies of viral recombination, one of the driving forces of calicivirus evolution. PMID:20137802

  7. Cycloviruses, gemycircularviruses and other novel replication-associated protein encoding circular viruses in Pacific flying fox (Pteropus tonganus) faeces.

    PubMed

    Male, Maketalena F; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Kami, Viliami; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Viral metagenomic studies have demonstrated that animal faeces can be a good sampling source for exploring viral diversity associated with the host and its environment. As part of an continuing effort to identify novel circular replication-associated protein encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses circulating in the Tongan archipelago, coupled with the fact that bats are a reservoir species of a large number of viruses, we used a metagenomic approach to investigate the CRESS DNA virus diversity in Pacific flying fox (Pteropus tonganus) faeces. Faecal matter from four roosting sites located in Ha'avakatolo, Kolovai, Ha'ateiho and Lapaha on Tongatapu Island was collected in April 2014 and January 2015. From these samples we identified five novel cycloviruses representing three putative species, 25 gemycircularviruses representing at least 14 putative species, 17 other CRESS DNA viruses (15 putative species), two circular DNA molecules and a putative novel multi-component virus for which we have identified three cognate molecules. This study demonstrates that there exists a large diversity of CRESS DNA viruses in Pacific flying fox faeces. PMID:26873064

  8. Loss of Anticodon Wobble Uridine Modifications Affects tRNALys Function and Protein Levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Klassen, Roland; Grunewald, Pia; Thüring, Kathrin L.; Eichler, Christian; Helm, Mark; Schaffrath, Raffael

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, wobble uridines in the anticodons of tRNALysUUU, tRNAGluUUC and tRNAGlnUUG are modified to 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio-uridine (mcm5s2U). While mutations in subunits of the Elongator complex (Elp1-Elp6), which disable mcm5 side chain formation, or removal of components of the thiolation pathway (Ncs2/Ncs6, Urm1, Uba4) are individually tolerated, the combination of both modification defects has been reported to have lethal effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Contrary to such absolute requirement of mcm5s2U for viability, we demonstrate here that in the S. cerevisiae S288C-derived background, both pathways can be simultaneously inactivated, resulting in combined loss of tRNA anticodon modifications (mcm5U and s2U) without a lethal effect. However, an elp3 disruption strain displays synthetic sick interaction and synergistic temperature sensitivity when combined with either uba4 or urm1 mutations, suggesting major translational defects in the absence of mcm5s2U modifications. Consistent with this notion, we find cellular protein levels drastically decreased in an elp3uba4 double mutant and show that this effect as well as growth phenotypes can be partially rescued by excess of tRNALysUUU. These results may indicate a global translational or protein homeostasis defect in cells simultaneously lacking mcm5 and s2 wobble uridine modification that could account for growth impairment and mainly originates from tRNALysUUU hypomodification and malfunction. PMID:25747122

  9. Protein Transduction Domains Fused to Virus Receptors Improve Cellular Virus Uptake and Enhance Oncolysis by Tumor-Specific Replicating Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Kühnel, Florian; Schulte, Bernd; Wirth, Thomas; Woller, Norman; Schäfers, Sonja; Zender, Lars; Manns, Michael; Kubicka, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Expression of cellular receptors determines viral tropism and limits gene delivery by viral vectors. Protein transduction domains (PTDs) have been shown to deliver proteins, antisense oligonucleotides, liposomes, or plasmid DNA into cells. In our study, we investigated the role of several PTD motifs in adenoviral infection. When physiologically expressed, a PTD from human immunodeficiency virus transactivator of transcription (Tat) did not improve adenoviral infection. We therefore fused PTDs to the ectodomain of the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CARex) to attach PTDs to adenoviral fiber knobs. CARex-Tat and CARex-VP22 allowed efficient adenoviral infection in nonpermissive cells and significantly improved viral uptake rates in permissive cells. Dose-dependent competition of CARex-PTD-mediated infection using CARex and inhibition experiments with heparin showed that binding of CARex-PTD to both adenoviral fiber and cellular glycosaminoglycans is essential for the improvement of infection. CARex-PTD-treated adenoviruses retained their properties after density gradient ultracentrifugation, indicating stable binding of CARex-PTD to adenoviral particles. Consequently, the mechanism of CARex-PTD-mediated infection involves coating of the viral fiber knobs by CARex-PTD, rather than placement of CARex domains on cell surfaces. Expression of CARex-PTDs led to enhanced lysis of permissive and nonpermissive tumor cells by replicating adenoviruses, indicating that CARex-PTDs are valuable tools to improve the efficacy of oncolytic therapy. Together, our study shows that CARex-PTDs facilitate gene transfer in nonpermissive cells and improve viral uptake at reduced titers and infection times. The data suggest that PTDs fused to virus binding receptors may be a valuable tool to overcome natural tropism of vectors and could be of great interest for gene therapeutic approaches. PMID:15564483

  10. Structural analysis of the interactions between hsp70 chaperones and the yeast DNA replication protein Orc4p.

    PubMed

    Moreno-del Alamo, María; Sánchez-Gorostiaga, Alicia; Serrano, Ana M; Prieto, Alicia; Cuéllar, Jorge; Martín-Benito, Jaime; Valpuesta, José M; Giraldo, Rafael

    2010-10-15

    Hsp70 chaperones, besides their role in assisting protein folding, are key modulators of protein disaggregation, being consistently found as components of most macromolecular assemblies isolated in proteome-wide affinity purifications. A wealth of structural information has been recently acquired on Hsp70s complexed with Hsp40 and NEF co-factors and with small hydrophobic target peptides. However, knowledge of how Hsp70s recognize large protein substrates is still limited. Earlier, we reported that homologue Hsp70 chaperones (DnaK in Escherichia coli and Ssa1-4p/Ssb1-2p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) bind strongly, both in vitro and in vivo, to the AAA+ domain in the Orc4p subunit of yeast origin recognition complex (ORC). ScORC is the paradigm for eukaryotic DNA replication initiators and consists of six distinct protein subunits (ScOrc1p-ScOrc 6p). Here, we report that a hydrophobic sequence (IL(4)) in the initiator specific motif (ISM) in Orc4p is the main target for DnaK/Hsp70. The three-dimensional electron microscopy reconstruction of a stable Orc4p(2)-DnaK complex suggests that the C-terminal substrate-binding domain in the chaperone clamps the AAA+ IL(4) motif in one Orc4p molecule, with the substrate-binding domain lid subdomain wedging apart the other Orc4p subunit. Pairwise co-expression in E. coli shows that Orc4p interacts with Orc1/2/5p. Mutation of IL(4) selectively disrupts Orc4p interaction with Orc2p. Allelic substitution of ORC4 by mutants in each residue of IL(4) results in lethal (I184A) or thermosensitive (L185A and L186A) initiation-defective phenotypes in vivo. The interplay between Hsp70 chaperones and the Orc4p-IL(4) motif might have an adaptor role in the sequential, stoichiometric assembly of ScORC subunits. PMID:20732327

  11. The presence of tomato leaf curl Kerala virus AC3 protein enhances viral DNA replication and modulates virus induced gene-silencing mechanism in tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses encode few viral proteins. Most of the geminiviral proteins are multifunctional and influence various host cellular processes for the successful viral infection. Though few viral proteins like AC1 and AC2 are well characterized for their multiple functions, role of AC3 in the successful viral infection has not been investigated in detail. Results We performed phage display analysis with the purified recombinant AC3 protein with Maltose Binding Protein as fusion tag (MBP-AC3). Putative AC3 interacting peptides identified through phage display were observed to be homologous to peptides of proteins from various metabolisms. We grouped these putative AC3 interacting peptides according to the known metabolic function of the homologous peptide containing proteins. In order to check if AC3 influences any of these particular metabolic pathways, we designed vectors for assaying DNA replication and virus induced gene-silencing of host gene PCNA. Investigation with these vectors indicated that AC3 enhances viral replication in the host plant tomato. In the PCNA gene-silencing experiment, we observed that the presence of functional AC3 ORF strongly manifested the stunted phenotype associated with the virus induced gene-silencing of PCNA in tomato plants. Conclusions Through the phage display analysis proteins from various metabolic pathways were identified as putative AC3 interacting proteins. By utilizing the vectors developed, we could analyze the role of AC3 in viral DNA replication and host gene-silencing. Our studies indicate that AC3 is also a multifunctional protein. PMID:21496351

  12. Identification of the Replication Origins from Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and Their Interactions with the DnaA Protein: From In Silico to In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Song, Cheng-Cheng; Yang, Zhi-Liang; Dong, Yan; Hu, Yao-Zhong; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Based on the complete genome of Cyanothece ATCC 51142, the oriCs of both the circular and linear chromosomes in Cyanothece ATCC 51142 have been predicted by utilizing a web-based system Ori-Finder. Here, we provide experimental support for the results of Ori-Finder to identify the replication origins of Cyanothece ATCC 51142 and their interactions with the initiator protein, DnaA. The two replication origins are composed of three characteristically arranged DnaA boxes and an AT-rich stretch, and the oriC in the circular chromosome is followed by the dnaN gene. The dnaA gene is located downstream of the origin of the circular chromosome and it expresses a typical DnaA protein that is divided into four domains (I, II, III, IV), as with other members of the DnaA protein family. We purify DnaA (IV) and characterize the interaction of the purified protein with the replication origins, so as to offer experimental support for the prediction. The results of the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNase I footprint assay demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of the DnaA protein from Cyanothece ATCC 51142 specifically binds the oriCs of both the circular and linear chromosomes, and the DNase I footprint assay demonstrates that DnaA (IV) exhibits hypersensitive affinity with DnaA boxes in both oriCs. PMID:26696980

  13. Roles of stress-activated protein kinases in the replication of Singapore grouper iridovirus and regulation of the inflammatory responses in grouper cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; OuYang, Zhengliang; Cai, Jia; Yan, Yang; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-06-01

    Stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), are usually activated in response to different environmental stimuli, including virus infection. In the present study, the roles of SAPKs during Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) infection were investigated in fish cells. The results showed that increased phosphorylation of JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK occurred during active replication of SGIV in grouper cell cultures. Moreover, downstream effectors (c-Jun, MAPK-activated protein kinase 2, p53, activator protein 1, Myc and nuclear factor of activated T cells) were activated after SGIV infection, suggesting that SGIV replication activated the JNK and p38 MAPK signalling pathways. Notably, using specific inhibitors, it was found that viral gene transcripts, protein expression and viral titres were not affected by inhibition of p38 MAPK but were suppressed significantly by inhibiting JNK1/2 activation. In addition, transcription of grouper immune genes including interferon regulatory factor 1, interleukin-8 and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were regulated by JNK, whilst only TNF-α was regulated by p38 MAPK. It is proposed that the JNK pathway is important for SGIV replication and modulates the inflammatory responses during virus infection.

  14. Replication of Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus In Vivo Is Influenced by Residues in the VP2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James M.; McCrackin Stevenson, Mary A.; Bloom, Marshall E.

    1999-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) is the etiological agent of Aleutian disease of mink. Several ADV isolates have been identified which vary in the severity of the disease they elicit. The isolate ADV-Utah replicates to high levels in mink, causing severe Aleutian disease that results in death within 6 to 8 weeks, but does not replicate in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells. In contrast, ADV-G replicates in CrFK cells but does not replicate in mink. The ability of the virus to replicate in vivo is determined by virally encoded determinants contained within a defined region of the VP2 gene (M. E. Bloom, J. M. Fox, B. D. Berry, K. L. Oie, and J. B. Wolfinbarger. Virology 251:288–296, 1998). Within this region, ADV-G and ADV-Utah differ at only five amino acid residues. To determine which of these five amino acid residues comprise the in vivo replication determinant, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to individually convert the amino acid residues of ADV-G to those of ADV-Utah. A virus in which the ADV-G VP2 residue at 534, histidine (H), was converted to an aspartic acid (D) of ADV-Utah replicated in CrFK cells as efficiently as ADV-G. H534D also replicated in mink, causing transient viremia at 30 days postinfection and a strong antibody response. Animals infected with this virus developed diffuse hepatocellular microvesicular steatosis, an abnormal accumulation of intracellular fat, but did not develop classical Aleutian disease. Thus, the substitution of an aspartic acid at residue 534 for a histidine allowed replication of ADV-G in mink, but the ability to replicate was not sufficient to cause classical Aleutian disease. PMID:10482625

  15. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications. PMID:24261083

  16. Investigation of Pokemon-regulated proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma using mass spectrometry-based multiplex quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xin; Jin, Yibao; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Feng; Gao, Dan; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2013-01-01

    Pokemon is a transcription regulator involved in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. It is aberrantly overexpressed in multiple human cancers including Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is considered as a promising biomarker for HCC. In this work, the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics strategy was used to investigate the proteomic profile associated with Pokemon in human HCC cell line QGY7703 and human hepatocyte line HL7702. Samples were labeled with four-plex iTRAQ reagents followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 24 differentially expressed proteins were selected as significant. Nine proteins were potentially up-regulated by Pokemon while 15 proteins were potentially down-regulated and many proteins were previously identified as potential biomarkers for HCC. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment revealed that the listed proteins were mainly involved in DNA metabolism and biosynthesis process. The changes of glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (G6PD, up-regulated) and ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase large sub-unit (RIM1, down-regulated) were validated by Western blotting analysis and denoted as Pokemon's function of oncogenesis. We also found that Pokemon potentially repressed the expression of highly clustered proteins (MCM3, MCM5, MCM6, MCM7) which played key roles in promoting DNA replication. Altogether, our results may help better understand the role of Pokemon in HCC and promote the clinical applications.

  17. Surface reengineering of RPA70N enables cocrystallization with an inhibitor of the replication protein A interaction motif of ATR interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Feldkamp, Michael D; Frank, Andreas O; Kennedy, J Phillip; Patrone, James D; Vangamudi, Bhavatarini; Waterson, Alex G; Fesik, Stephen W; Chazin, Walter J

    2013-09-17

    Replication protein A (RPA) is the primary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein in eukaryotes. The N-terminal domain of the RPA70 subunit (RPA70N) interacts via a basic cleft with a wide range of DNA processing proteins, including several that regulate DNA damage response and repair. Small molecule inhibitors that disrupt these protein-protein interactions are therefore of interest as chemical probes of these critical DNA processing pathways and as inhibitors to counter the upregulation of DNA damage response and repair associated with treatment of cancer patients with radiation or DNA-damaging agents. Determination of three-dimensional structures of protein-ligand complexes is an important step for elaboration of small molecule inhibitors. However, although crystal structures of free RPA70N and an RPA70N-peptide fusion construct have been reported, RPA70N-inhibitor complexes have been recalcitrant to crystallization. Analysis of the P61 lattice of RPA70N crystals led us to hypothesize that the ligand-binding surface was occluded. Surface reengineering to alter key crystal lattice contacts led to the design of RPA70N E7R, E100R, and E7R/E100R mutants. These mutants crystallized in a P212121 lattice that clearly had significant solvent channels open to the critical basic cleft. Analysis of X-ray crystal structures, target peptide binding affinities, and (15)N-(1)H heteronuclear single-quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance spectra showed that the mutations do not result in perturbations of the RPA70N ligand-binding surface. The success of the design was demonstrated by determining the structure of RPA70N E7R soaked with a ligand discovered in a previously reported molecular fragment screen. A fluorescence anisotropy competition binding assay revealed this compound can inhibit the interaction of RPA70N with the peptide binding motif from the DNA damage response protein ATRIP. The implications of the results are discussed in the context of ongoing efforts

  18. Inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling under replication stress induced by nucleotide depletion in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    DNA replication checkpoint is a highly conserved cellular signaling pathway critical for maintaining genome integrity in eukaryotes. It is activated when DNA replication is perturbed. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, perturbed replication forks activate the sensor kinase Rad3 (ATR/Mec1), which works cooperatively with mediator Mrc1 and the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp to phosphorylate the effector kinase Cds1 (CHK2/Rad53). Phosphorylation of Cds1 promotes autoactivation of the kinase. Activated Cds1 diffuses away from the forks and stimulates most of the checkpoint responses under replication stress. Although this signaling pathway has been well understood in fission yeast, how the signaling is initiated and thus regulated remains incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that deletion of lem2(+) sensitizes cells to the inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, hydroxyurea. However, the underlying mechanism is still not well understood. This study shows that in the presence of hydroxyurea, Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling for Cds1 activation. Without Lem2, all known Rad3-dependent phosphorylations critical for replication checkpoint signaling are seriously compromised, which likely causes the aberrant mitosis and drug sensitivity observed in this mutant. Interestingly, the mutant is not very sensitive to DNA damage and the DNA damage checkpoint remains largely intact, suggesting that the main function of Lem2 is to facilitate checkpoint signaling in response to replication stress. Since Lem2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein, these results also suggest that the replication checkpoint may be spatially regulated inside the nucleus, a previously unknown mechanism.

  19. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models. PMID:26800776

  20. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models.

  1. Nuclear localization of dengue virus nonstructural protein 5 does not strictly correlate with efficient viral RNA replication and inhibition of type I interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Bühler, Sandra; Selisko, Barbara; Davidson, Andrew; Mulder, Klaas; Canard, Bruno; Miller, Sven; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human pathogen, especially in the tropical and subtropical parts of the world, causing considerable morbidity and mortality. DENV replication occurs in the cytoplasm; however, a high proportion of nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), containing methyltransferase (MTase) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activities, accumulates in the nuclei of infected cells. The present study investigates the impact of nuclear localization of NS5 on its known functions, including viral RNA replication and subversion of the type I interferon response. By using a mutation analysis approach, we identified the most critical residues within the αβ nuclear localization signal (αβNLS), which are essential for the nuclear accumulation of this protein. Although we observed an overall correlation between reduced nuclear accumulation of NS5 and impaired RNA replication, we identified one mutant with drastically reduced amounts of nuclear NS5 and virtually unaffected RNA replication, arguing that nuclear localization of NS5 does not correlate strictly with DENV replication, at least in cell culture. Because NS5 plays an important role in blocking interferon signaling via STAT-2 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 2) degradation, the abilities of the NLS mutants to block this pathway were investigated. All mutants were able to degrade STAT-2, with accordingly similar type I interferon resistance phenotypes. Since the NLS is contained within the RdRp domain, the MTase and RdRp activities of the mutants were determined by using recombinant full-length NS5. We found that the C-terminal region of the αβNLS is a critical functional element of the RdRp domain required for polymerase activity. These results indicate that efficient DENV RNA replication requires only minimal, if any, nuclear NS5, and they identify the αβNLS as a structural element required for proper RdRp activity. PMID:23408610

  2. Compartmentalization of prokaryotic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Alicia; Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Salas, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    It becomes now apparent that prokaryotic DNA replication takes place at specific intracellular locations. Early studies indicated that chromosomal DNA replication, as well as plasmid and viral DNA replication, occurs in close association with the bacterial membrane. Moreover, over the last several years, it has been shown that some replication proteins and specific DNA sequences are localized to particular subcellular regions in bacteria, supporting the existence of replication compartments. Although the mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of prokaryotic DNA replication are largely unknown, the docking of replication factors to large organizing structures may be important for the assembly of active replication complexes. In this article, we review the current state of this subject in two bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, focusing our attention in both chromosomal and extrachromosomal DNA replication. A comparison with eukaryotic systems is also presented.

  3. Translational infidelity-induced protein stress results from a deficiency in Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ashish; Chan, Clement T Y; Dyavaiah, Madhu; Rooney, John P; Dedon, Peter C; Begley, Thomas J

    2012-07-01

    Correct codon-anticodon pairing promotes translational fidelity, with these interactions greatly facilitated by modified nucleosides found in tRNA. We hypothesized that wobble uridine modifications catalyzed by tRNA methyltransferase 9 (Trm9) are essential for translational fidelity. In support, we have used phenotypic, reporter and protein-based assays to demonstrate increased translational infidelity in trm9Δ Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Codon reengineering studies suggest that Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific genes, those rich in arginine and glutamic acid codons from mixed boxes. Using quantitative tRNA modification analysis, we determined that trm9Δ cells are only deficient in 2 of 23 tRNA modifications, with those 2, 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm ( 5) U) and 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U), classified as key determinants of translational fidelity. We also show that in the absence of mcm ( 5) U and mcm ( 5) s ( 2) U, the resulting translational infidelity promotes protein errors and activation of unfolded protein and heat shock responses. These data support a model in which Trm9-catalyzed tRNA modifications promote fidelity during the translation of specific transcripts, with decreased wobble base modification leading to translational infidelity, protein errors and activation of protein stress response pathways. PMID:22832247

  4. Breast cancer proteins PALB2 and BRCA2 stimulate polymerase η in recombination-associated DNA synthesis at blocked replication forks.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Rémi; Niraj, Joshi; Pauty, Joris; Maity, Ranjan; Zhao, Weixing; Coulombe, Yan; Sung, Patrick; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2014-02-13

    One envisioned function of homologous recombination (HR) is to find a template for DNA synthesis from the resected 3'-OH molecules that occur during double-strand break (DSB) repair at collapsed replication forks. However, the interplay between DNA synthesis and HR remains poorly understood in higher eukaryotic cells. Here, we reveal functions for the breast cancer proteins BRCA2 and PALB2 at blocked replication forks and show a role for these proteins in stimulating polymerase η (Polη) to initiate DNA synthesis. PALB2, BRCA2, and Polη colocalize at stalled or collapsed replication forks after hydroxyurea treatment. Moreover, PALB2 and BRCA2 interact with Polη and are required to sustain the recruitment of Polη at blocked replication forks. PALB2 and BRCA2 stimulate Polη-dependent DNA synthesis on D loop substrates. We conclude that PALB2 and BRCA2, in addition to their functions in D loop formation, play crucial roles in the initiation of recombination-associated DNA synthesis by Polη-mediated DNA repair.

  5. A Cell Internalizing Antibody Targeting Capsid Protein (p24) Inhibits the Replication of HIV-1 in T Cells Lines and PBMCs: A Proof of Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed A.; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Choon, Tan Soo; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    There remains a need for newer therapeutic approaches to combat HIV/AIDS. Viral capsid protein p24 plays important roles in HIV pathogenesis. Peptides and small molecule inhibitors targeting p24 have shown to inhibit virus replication in treated cell. High specificity and biological stability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) make them an attractive contender for in vivo treatments. However, mAbs do not enter into cells, thus are restricted to target surface molecules. This also makes targeting intracellular HIV-1 p24 a challenge. A mAb specific to p24 that can internalize into the HIV-infected cells is hypothesized to inhibit the virus replication. We selected a mAb that has previously shown to inhibit p24 polymerization in an in vitro assay and chemically conjugated it with cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to generate cell internalizing anti-p24 mAbs. Out of 8 CPPs tested, κFGF-MTS -conjugated mAbs internalized T cells most efficiently. At nontoxic concentration, the κFGF-MTS-anti-p24-mAbs reduced the HIV-1 replication up to 73 and 49% in T-lymphocyte and PBMCs respectively. Marked inhibition of HIV-1 replication in relevant cells by κFGF-MTS-anti-p24-mAbs represents a viable strategy to target HIV proteins present inside the cells. PMID:26741963

  6. Replication-specific conversion of the Staphylococcus aureus pT181 initiator protein from an active homodimer to an inactive heterodimer.

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, A; Wang, P Z; Novick, R P

    1994-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus rolling circle plasmid pT181 regulates its replication by controlling the synthesis of its initiator protein RepC. RepC is inactivated during pT181 replication by the addition of an oligodeoxynucleotide, giving rise to a new form, RepC*. We analyzed RepC and RepC* in four classes of mutants: plasmid copy number mutants, two classes of RepC mutants affecting different portions of the protein and oriC (origin) mutants. We have found that in the cell with wild-type RepC there are similar relative amounts of RepC and RepC*, regardless of copy number, and that the conversion of RepC to RepC* is replication dependent. Genetic and biochemical evidence is presented that RepC functions as a dimer and that during replication the RepC homodimer is converted to the RepC/RepC* heterodimer. Images PMID:7957090

  7. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N.

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  8. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3–7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  9. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3-7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  10. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  11. Role of replication protein A as sensor in activation of the S-phase checkpoint in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Recolin, Bénédicte; Van der Laan, Siem; Maiorano, Domenico

    2012-04-01

    Uncoupling between DNA polymerases and helicase activities at replication forks, induced by diverse DNA lesions or replication inhibitors, generate long stretches of primed single-stranded DNA that is implicated in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. It is currently unclear whether nucleation of the essential replication factor RPA onto this substrate stimulates the ATR-dependent checkpoint response independently of its role in DNA synthesis. Using Xenopus egg extracts to investigate the role of RPA recruitment at uncoupled forks in checkpoint activation we have surprisingly found that in conditions in which DNA synthesis occurs, RPA accumulation at forks stalled by either replication stress or UV irradiation is dispensable for Chk1 phosphorylation. In contrast, when both replication fork uncoupling and RPA hyperloading are suppressed, Chk1 phosphorylation is inhibited. Moreover, we show that extracts containing reduced levels of RPA accumulate ssDNA and induce spontaneous, caffeine-sensitive, Chk1 phosphorylation in S-phase. These results strongly suggest that disturbance of enzymatic activities of replication forks, rather than RPA hyperloading at stalled forks, is a critical determinant of ATR activation. PMID:22187152

  12. Stimulation of the Replication of ICP0-Null Mutant Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and pp71-Deficient Human Cytomegalovirus by Epstein-Barr Virus Tegument Protein BNRF1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongxu; Orr, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is now well established that several cellular proteins that are components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs, also known as ND10) have restrictive effects on herpesvirus infections that are countered by viral proteins that are either present in the virion particle or are expressed during the earliest stages of infection. For example, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early (IE) protein ICP0 overcomes the restrictive effects of PML-NB components PML, Sp100, hDaxx, and ATRX while human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE protein IE1 targets PML and Sp100, and its tegument protein pp71 targets hDaxx and ATRX. The functions of these viral regulatory proteins are in part interchangeable; thus, both IE1 and pp71 stimulate the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, while ICP0 increases plaque formation by pp71-deficient HCMV. Here, we extend these studies by examining proteins that are expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We report that EBV tegument protein BNRF1, discovered by other investigators to target the hDaxx/ATRX complex, increases the replication of both ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 and pp71-deficient HCMV. In addition, EBV protein EBNA-LP, which targets Sp100, also augments ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 replication. The combination of these two EBV regulatory proteins had a greater effect than each one individually. These findings reinforce the concept that disruption of the functions of PML-NB proteins is important for efficient herpesvirus infections. IMPORTANCE Whether a herpesvirus initiates a lytic infection in a host cell or establishes quiescence or latency is influenced by events that occur soon after the viral genome has entered the host cell nucleus. Certain cellular proteins respond in a restrictive manner to the invading pathogen's DNA, while viral functions are expressed that counteract the cell-mediated repression. One aspect of cellular restriction of herpesvirus infections is mediated by components of nuclear structures known as

  13. Rubella virus-like replicon particles: analysis of encapsidation determinants and non-structural roles of capsid protein in early post-entry replication.

    PubMed

    Claus, Claudia; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Liebert, U G; Frey, Teryl K

    2012-03-01

    Rubella virus (RUBV) contains a plus-strand RNA genome with two ORFs, one encoding the non-structural replicase proteins (NS-ORF) and the second encoding the virion structural proteins (SP-ORF). This study describes development and use of a trans-encapsidation system for the assembly of infectious RUBV-like replicon particles (VRPs) containing RUBV replicons (self replicating genomes with the SP-ORF replaced with a reporter gene). First, this system was used to map signals within the RUBV genome that mediate packaging of viral RNA. Mutations within a proposed packaging signal did not significantly affect relative packaging efficiency. The insertion of various fragments derived from the RUBV genome into Sindbis virus replicons revealed that there are several regions within the RUBV genome capable of enhancing encapsidation of heterologous replicon RNAs. Secondly, the trans-encapsidation system was used to analyse the effect of alterations within the capsid protein (CP) on release of VRPs and subsequent initiation of replication in newly infected cells. Deletion of the N-terminal eight amino acids of the CP reduced VRP titre significantly, which could be partially complemented by native CP provided in trans, indicating that this mutation affected an entry or post-entry event in the replication cycle. To test this hypothesis, the trans-encapsidation system was used to demonstrate the rescue of a lethal deletion within P150, one of the virus replicase proteins, by CP contained within the virus particle. This novel finding substantiated the functional role of CP in early post-entry replication. PMID:22113006

  14. Replication restart in UV-irradiated Escherichia coli involving pols II, III, V, PriA, RecA and RecFOR proteins.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Savithri; Woodgate, Roger; Goodman, Myron F

    2002-02-01

    In Escherichia coli, UV-irradiated cells resume DNA synthesis after a transient inhibition by a process called replication restart. To elucidate the role of several key proteins involved in this process, we have analysed the time dependence of replication restart in strains carrying a combination of mutations in lexA, recA, polB (pol II), umuDC (pol V), priA, dnaC, recF, recO or recR. We find that both pol II and the origin-independent primosome-assembling function of PriA are essential for the immediate recovery of DNA synthesis after UV irradiation. In their absence, translesion replication or 'replication readthrough' occurs approximately 50 min after UV and is pol V-dependent. In a wild-type, lexA+ background, mutations in recF, recO or recR block both pathways. Similar results were obtained with a lexA(Def) recF strain. However, lexA(Def) recO or lexA(Def) recR strains, although unable to facilitate PriA-pol II-dependent restart, were able to perform pol V-dependent readthrough. The defects in restart attributed to mutations in recF, recO or recR were suppressed in a recA730 lexA(Def) strain expressing constitutively activated RecA (RecA*). Our data suggest that in a wild-type background, RecF, O and R are important for the induction of the SOS response and the formation of RecA*-dependent recombination intermediates necessary for PriA/Pol II-dependent replication restart. In con-trast, only RecF is required for the activation of RecA that leads to the formation of pol V (UmuD'2C) and facilitates replication readthrough. PMID:11929519

  15. Interactions between the RepB initiator protein of plasmid pMV158 and two distant DNA regions within the origin of replication

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Masó, José A.; Lurz, Rudi; Espinosa, Manuel; del Solar, Gloria

    2007-01-01

    Plasmids replicating by the rolling circle mode usually possess a single site for binding of the initiator protein at the origin of replication. The origin of pMV158 is different in that it possesses two distant binding regions for the initiator RepB. One region was located close to the site where RepB introduces the replication-initiating nick, within the nic locus; the other, the bind locus, is 84 bp downstream from the nick site. Binding of RepB to the bind locus was of higher affinity and stability than to the nic locus. Contacts of RepB with the bind and nic loci were determined through high-resolution footprinting. Upon binding of RepB, the DNA of the bind locus follows a winding path in its contact with the protein, resulting in local distortion and bending of the double-helix. On supercoiled DNA, simultaneous interaction of RepB with both loci favoured extrusion of the hairpin structure harbouring the nick site while causing a strong DNA distortion around the bind locus. This suggests interplay between the two RepB binding sites, which could facilitate loading of the initiator protein to the nic locus and the acquisition of the appropriate configuration of the supercoiled DNA substrate. PMID:17267412

  16. Binding of cellular export factor REF/Aly by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is not required for efficient KSHV lytic replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Jiang; Verma, Dinesh; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2012-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is expressed early during lytic KSHV replication, enhances expression of many KSHV genes, and is essential for virus production. ORF57 is a member of a family of proteins conserved among all human and many animal herpesviruses that are multifunctional regulators of gene expression and act posttranscriptionally to increase accumulation of their target mRNAs. The mechanism of ORF57 action is complex and may involve effects on mRNA transcription, stability, and export. ORF57 directly binds to REF/Aly, a cellular RNA-binding protein component of the TREX complex that mediates RNA transcription and export. We analyzed the effects of an ORF57 mutation known to abrogate REF/Aly binding and demonstrate that the REF-binding mutant is impaired in activation of viral mRNAs and noncoding RNAs confined to the nucleus. Although the inability to bind REF leads to decreased ORF57 activity in enhancing gene expression, there is no demonstrable effect on nuclear export of viral mRNA or the ability of ORF57 to support KSHV replication and virus production. These data indicate that REF/Aly-ORF57 interaction is not essential for KSHV lytic replication but may contribute to target RNA stability independent of effects on RNA export, suggesting a novel role for REF/Aly in viral RNA metabolism.

  17. Sequence-specific interactions of Rep proteins with ssDNA in the AT-rich region of the plasmid replication origin.

    PubMed

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Bury, Katarzyna; Rajewska, Magdalena; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Konieczny, Igor

    2014-07-01

    The DNA unwinding element (DUE) is a sequence rich in adenine and thymine residues present within the origin region of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic replicons. Recently, it has been shown that this is the site where bacterial DnaA proteins, the chromosomal replication initiators, form a specific nucleoprotein filament. DnaA proteins contain a DNA binding domain (DBD) and belong to the family of origin binding proteins (OBPs). To date there has been no data on whether OBPs structurally different from DnaA can form nucleoprotein complexes within the DUE. In this work we demonstrate that plasmid Rep proteins, composed of two Winged Helix domains, distinct from the DBD, specifically bind to one of the strands of ssDNA within the DUE. We observed nucleoprotein complexes formed by these Rep proteins, involving both dsDNA containing the Rep-binding sites (iterons) and the strand-specific ssDNA of the DUE. Formation of these complexes required the presence of all repeated sequence elements located within the DUE. Any changes in these repeated sequences resulted in the disturbance in Rep-ssDNA DUE complex formation and the lack of origin replication activity in vivo or in vitro.

  18. Sequence-specific interactions of Rep proteins with ssDNA in the AT-rich region of the plasmid replication origin

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Bury, Katarzyna; Rajewska, Magdalena; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Konieczny, Igor

    2014-01-01

    The DNA unwinding element (DUE) is a sequence rich in adenine and thymine residues present within the origin region of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic replicons. Recently, it has been shown that this is the site where bacterial DnaA proteins, the chromosomal replication initiators, form a specific nucleoprotein filament. DnaA proteins contain a DNA binding domain (DBD) and belong to the family of origin binding proteins (OBPs). To date there has been no data on whether OBPs structurally different from DnaA can form nucleoprotein complexes within the DUE. In this work we demonstrate that plasmid Rep proteins, composed of two Winged Helix domains, distinct from the DBD, specifically bind to one of the strands of ssDNA within the DUE. We observed nucleoprotein complexes formed by these Rep proteins, involving both dsDNA containing the Rep-binding sites (iterons) and the strand-specific ssDNA of the DUE. Formation of these complexes required the presence of all repeated sequence elements located within the DUE. Any changes in these repeated sequences resulted in the disturbance in Rep-ssDNA DUE complex formation and the lack of origin replication activity in vivo or in vitro. PMID:24838560

  19. Replication-Competent Influenza A and B Viruses Expressing a Fluorescent Dynamic Timer Protein for In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael; Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F; Perez, Daniel R; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses (IAV and IBV, respectively) cause annual seasonal human respiratory disease epidemics. In addition, IAVs have been implicated in occasional pandemics with inordinate health and economic consequences. Studying influenza viruses in vitro or in vivo requires the use of laborious secondary methodologies to identify infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, replication-competent infectious influenza viruses expressing an easily traceable fluorescent reporter protein can be used. Timer is a fluorescent protein that undergoes a time-dependent color emission conversion from green to red. The rate of spectral change is independent of Timer protein concentration and can be used to chronologically measure the duration of its expression. Here, we describe the generation of replication-competent IAV and IBV where the viral non-structural protein 1 (NS1) was fused to the fluorescent dynamic Timer protein. Timer-expressing IAV and IBV displayed similar plaque phenotypes and growth kinetics to wild-type viruses in tissue culture. Within infected cells, Timer's spectral shift can be used to measure the rate and cell-to-cell spread of infection using fluorescent microscopy, plate readers, or flow cytometry. The progression of Timer-expressing IAV infection was also evaluated in a mouse model, demonstrating the feasibility to characterize IAV cell-to-cell infections in vivo. By providing the ability to chronologically track viral spread, Timer-expressing influenza viruses are an excellent option to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo dynamics of viral infection. PMID:26809059

  20. Replication-Competent Influenza A and B Viruses Expressing a Fluorescent Dynamic Timer Protein for In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Steven F.; Perez, Daniel R.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses (IAV and IBV, respectively) cause annual seasonal human respiratory disease epidemics. In addition, IAVs have been implicated in occasional pandemics with inordinate health and economic consequences. Studying influenza viruses in vitro or in vivo requires the use of laborious secondary methodologies to identify infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, replication-competent infectious influenza viruses expressing an easily traceable fluorescent reporter protein can be used. Timer is a fluorescent protein that undergoes a time-dependent color emission conversion from green to red. The rate of spectral change is independent of Timer protein concentration and can be used to chronologically measure the duration of its expression. Here, we describe the generation of replication-competent IAV and IBV where the viral non-structural protein 1 (NS1) was fused to the fluorescent dynamic Timer protein. Timer-expressing IAV and IBV displayed similar plaque phenotypes and growth kinetics to wild-type viruses in tissue culture. Within infected cells, Timer’s spectral shift can be used to measure the rate and cell-to-cell spread of infection using fluorescent microscopy, plate readers, or flow cytometry. The progression of Timer-expressing IAV infection was also evaluated in a mouse model, demonstrating the feasibility to characterize IAV cell-to-cell infections in vivo. By providing the ability to chronologically track viral spread, Timer-expressing influenza viruses are an excellent option to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo dynamics of viral infection. PMID:26809059

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus Tegument Protein ORF75 Is Essential for Viral Lytic Replication and Plays a Critical Role in the Antagonization of ND10-Instituted Intrinsic Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Full, Florian; Jungnickl, Doris; Reuter, Nina; Bogner, Elke; Brulois, Kevin; Scholz, Brigitte; Stürzl, Michael; Myoung, Jinjong; Jung, Jae U.; Stamminger, Thomas; Ensser, Armin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear domain 10 (ND10) components are restriction factors that inhibit herpesviral replication. Effector proteins of different herpesviruses can antagonize this restriction by a variety of strategies, including degradation or relocalization of ND10 proteins. We investigated the interplay of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) infection and cellular defense by nuclear domain 10 (ND10) components. Knock-down experiments in primary human cells show that KSHV-infection is restricted by the ND10 components PML and Sp100, but not by ATRX. After KSHV infection, ATRX is efficiently depleted and Daxx is dispersed from ND10, indicating that these two ND10 components can be antagonized by KSHV. We then identified the ORF75 tegument protein of KSHV as the viral factor that induces the disappearance of ATRX and relocalization of Daxx. ORF75 belongs to a viral protein family (viral FGARATs) that has homologous proteins in all gamma-herpesviruses. Isolated expression of ORF75 in primary cells induces a relocalization of PML and dispersal of Sp100, indicating that this viral effector protein is able to influence multiple ND10 components. Moreover, by constructing a KSHV mutant harboring a stop codon at the beginning of ORF75, we could demonstrate that ORF75 is absolutely essential for viral replication and the initiation of viral immediate-early gene expression. Using recombinant viruses either carrying Flag- or YFP-tagged variants of ORF75, we could further corroborate the role of ORF75 in the antagonization of ND10-mediated intrinsic immunity, and show that it is independent of the PML antagonist vIRF3. Members of the viral FGARAT family target different ND10 components, suggesting that the ND10 targets of viral FGARAT proteins have diversified during evolution. We assume that overcoming ND10 intrinsic defense constitutes a critical event in the replication of all herpesviruses; on the other hand, restriction of herpesviral replication by ND10 components may also

  2. DNA replication origins.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Alan C; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression.

  3. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W Matthew

    2016-06-17

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes.

  4. Alanine substitutions within a linker region of the influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 alter its subcellular localization and attenuate virus replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Noah, James W; Noah, Diana L

    2011-08-01

    The influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional protein and an important virulence factor. It is composed of two well-characterized domains linked by a short, but not well crystallographically defined, region of unknown function. To study the possible function of this region, we introduced alanine substitutions to replace the two highly conserved leucine residues at amino acid positions 69 and 77. The mutant L69,77A NS1 protein retained wild-type (WT)-comparable binding capabilities to dsRNA, cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 and the p85β subunit of PI3K. A mutant influenza A virus expressing the L69,77A NS1 protein was generated using reverse genetics. L69,77A NS1 virus infection induced significantly higher levels of beta interferon (IFN-β) expression in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells compared with WT NS1 virus. In addition, the replication rate of the L69,77A NS1 virus was substantially lower in MDCK cells but not in Vero cells compared with the WT virus, suggesting that the L69,77A NS1 protein does not fully antagonize IFN during viral replication. L69,77A NS1 virus infection was not able to activate the PI3K/Akt anti-apoptotic pathway, suggesting that the mutant NS1 protein may not be localized such that it has access to p85β in vivo during infection, which was supported by the altered subcellular localization pattern of the mutant NS1 compared with WT NS1 after transfection or virus infection. Our data demonstrate that this linker region between the two domains is critical for the functions of the NS1 protein during influenza A virus infection, possibly by determining the protein's correct subcellular localization.

  5. Expression of porcine fusion protein IRF7/3(5D) efficiently controls foot-and-mouth disease virus replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have demonstrated that administration of type I, II, or III interferons (IFN) delivered using a replication defective human adenovirus 5 (Ad5) vector is effective to control Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) in cattle and swine during experimental infections. However, high doses are requi...

  6. SARS-CoV ORF1b-encoded nonstructural proteins 12-16: replicative enzymes as antiviral targets.

    PubMed

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Imbert, Isabelle; Ferron, François; Collet, Axelle; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic caused ten years ago by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has stimulated a number of studies on the molecular biology of coronaviruses. This research has provided significant new insight into many mechanisms used by the coronavirus replication-transcription complex (RTC). The RTC directs and coordinates processes in order to replicate and transcribe the coronavirus genome, a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA of outstanding length (∼27-32kilobases). Here, we review the up-to-date knowledge on SARS-CoV replicative enzymes encoded in the ORF1b, i.e., the main RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsp12), the helicase/triphosphatase (nsp13), two unusual ribonucleases (nsp14, nsp15) and RNA-cap methyltransferases (nsp14, nsp16). We also review how these enzymes co-operate with other viral co-factors (nsp7, nsp8, and nsp10) to regulate their activity. These last ten years of research on SARS-CoV have considerably contributed to unravel structural and functional details of one of the most fascinating replication/transcription machineries of the RNA virus world. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". PMID:24269475

  7. The lncRNA NRON modulates HIV-1 replication in a NFAT-dependent manner and is differentially regulated by early and late viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Imam, Hasan; Bano, Aalia Shahr; Patel, Paresh; Holla, Prasida; Jameel, Shahid

    2015-03-02

    A majority of the human genome is transcribed into noncoding RNAs, of which the functions of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are poorly understood. Many host proteins and RNAs have been characterized for their roles in HIV/AIDS pathogenesis, but there is only one lncRNA, NEAT1, which is shown to affect the HIV-1 life cycle. We profiled 90 disease-related lncRNAs and found NRON (noncoding repressor of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells [NFAT]) to be one of several lncRNAs whose expression was significantly altered following HIV-1 infection. The regulation of NRON expression during the HIV-1 life cycle was complex; its levels were reduced by the early viral accessory protein Nef and increased by the late protein Vpu. Consequently, Nef and Vpu also modulated activity of the transcription factor NFAT. The knockdown of NRON enhanced HIV-1 replication through increased activity of NFAT and the viral LTR. Using siRNA-mediated NFAT knockdown, we show the effects of NRON on HIV-1 replication to be mediated by NFAT, and the viral Nef and Vpu proteins to modulate NFAT activity through their effects on NRON. These findings add the lncRNA, NRON to the vast repertoire of host factors utilized by HIV for infection and persistence.

  8. Dual effect of nitric oxide on SARS-CoV replication: Viral RNA production and palmitoylation of the S protein are affected

    SciTech Connect

    Akerstroem, Sara; Gunalan, Vithiagaran; Keng, Choong Tat; Tan, Yee-Joo; Mirazimi, Ali

    2009-12-05

    Nitric oxide is an important molecule playing a key role in a broad range of biological process such as neurotransmission, vasodilatation and immune responses. While the anti-microbiological properties of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) such as peroxynitrite, are known, the mechanism of these effects are as yet poorly studied. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) belongs to the family Coronaviridae, was first identified during 2002-2003. Mortality in SARS patients ranges from between 6 to 55%. We have previously shown that nitric oxide inhibits the replication cycle of SARS-CoV in vitro by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we have further investigated the mechanism of the inhibition process of nitric oxide against SARS-CoV. We found that peroxynitrite, an intermediate product of nitric oxide in solution formed by the reaction of NO with superoxide, has no effect on the replication cycle of SARS-CoV, suggesting that the inhibition is either directly effected by NO or a derivative other than peroxynitrite. Most interestingly, we found that NO inhibits the replication of SARS-CoV by two distinct mechanisms. Firstly, NO or its derivatives cause a reduction in the palmitoylation of nascently expressed spike (S) protein which affects the fusion between the S protein and its cognate receptor, angiotensin converting enzyme 2. Secondly, NO or its derivatives cause a reduction in viral RNA production in the early steps of viral replication, and this could possibly be due to an effect on one or both of the cysteine proteases encoded in Orf1a of SARS-CoV.

  9. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.

  10. Influenza A Virus-Induced Degradation of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4B Contributes to Viral Replication by Suppressing IFITM3 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Wei, Haitao; Chen, Yuhai; Chen, Zhilong; Huang, Shile

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although alteration in host cellular translation machinery occurs in virus-infected cells, the role of such alteration and the precise pathogenic processes are not well understood. Influenza A virus (IAV) infection shuts off host cell gene expression at transcriptional and translational levels. Here, we found that the protein level of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4B (eIF4B), an integral component of the translation initiation apparatus, was dramatically reduced in A549 cells as well as in the lung, spleen, and thymus of mice infected with IAV. The decrease in eIF4B level was attributed to lysosomal degradation of eIF4B, which was induced by viral NS1 protein. Silencing eIF4B expression in A549 cells significantly promoted IAV replication, and conversely, overexpression of eIF4B markedly inhibited the viral replication. Importantly, we observed that eIF4B knockdown transgenic mice were more susceptible to IAV infection, exhibiting faster weight loss, shorter survival time, and more-severe organ damage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that eIF4B regulated the expression of interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (IFITM3), a critical protein involved in immune defense against a variety of RNA viruses, including influenza virus. Taken together, our findings reveal that eIF4B plays an important role in host defense against IAV infection at least by regulating the expression of IFITM3, which restricts viral entry and thereby blocks early stages of viral production. These data also indicate that influenza virus has evolved a strategy to overcome host innate immunity by downregulating eIF4B protein. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) infection stimulates the host innate immune system, in part, by inducing interferons (IFNs). Secreted IFNs activate the Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, leading to elevated transcription of a large group of IFN-stimulated genes that have antiviral function. To circumvent

  11. Lack of the H-NS Protein Results in Extended and Aberrantly Positioned DNA during Chromosome Replication and Segregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helgesen, Emily; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The architectural protein H-NS binds nonspecifically to hundreds of sites throughout the chromosome and can multimerize to stiffen segments of DNA as well as to form DNA-protein-DNA bridges. H-NS has been suggested to contribute to the orderly folding of the Escherichia coli chromosome in the highly compacted nucleoid. In this study, we investigated the positioning and dynamics of the origins, the replisomes, and the SeqA structures trailing the replication forks in cells lacking the H-NS protein. In H-NS mutant cells, foci of SeqA, replisomes, and origins were irregularly positioned in the cell. Further analysis showed that the average distance between the SeqA structures and the replisome was increased by ∼100 nm compared to that in wild-type cells, whereas the colocalization of SeqA-bound sister DNA behind replication forks was not affected. This result may suggest that H-NS contributes to the folding of DNA along adjacent segments. H-NS mutant cells were found to be incapable of adopting the distinct and condensed nucleoid structures characteristic of E. coli cells growing rapidly in rich medium. It appears as if H-NS mutant cells adopt a “slow-growth” type of chromosome organization under nutrient-rich conditions, which leads to a decreased cellular DNA content. IMPORTANCE It is not fully understood how and to what extent nucleoid-associated proteins contribute to chromosome folding and organization during replication and segregation in Escherichia coli. In this work, we find in vivo indications that cells lacking the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS have a lower degree of DNA condensation than wild-type cells. Our work suggests that H-NS is involved in condensing the DNA along adjacent segments on the chromosome and is not likely to tether newly replicated strands of sister DNA. We also find indications that H-NS is required for rapid growth with high DNA content and for the formation of a highly condensed nucleoid structure under such

  12. The role of Dbf4-dependent protein kinase in DNA polymerase ζ-dependent mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Luis N; Ferguson, Rebecca; Santoro, Irma; Jinks-Robertson, Sue; Sclafani, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    The yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) (composed of Dbf4 and Cdc7 subunits) is an essential, conserved Ser/Thr protein kinase that regulates multiple processes in the cell, including DNA replication, recombination and induced mutagenesis. Only DDK substrates important for replication and recombination have been identified. Consequently, the mechanism by which DDK regulates mutagenesis is unknown. The yeast mcm5-bob1 mutation that bypasses DDK's essential role in DNA replication was used here to examine whether loss of DDK affects spontaneous as well as induced mutagenesis. Using the sensitive lys2ΔA746 frameshift reversion assay, we show DDK is required to generate "complex" spontaneous mutations, which are a hallmark of the Polζ translesion synthesis DNA polymerase. DDK co-immunoprecipitated with the Rev7 regulatory, but not with the Rev3 polymerase subunit of Polζ. Conversely, Rev7 bound mainly to the Cdc7 kinase subunit and not to Dbf4. The Rev7 subunit of Polζ may be regulated by DDK phosphorylation as immunoprecipitates of yeast Cdc7 and also recombinant Xenopus DDK phosphorylated GST-Rev7 in vitro. In addition to promoting Polζ-dependent mutagenesis, DDK was also important for generating Polζ-independent large deletions that revert the lys2ΔA746 allele. The decrease in large deletions observed in the absence of DDK likely results from an increase in the rate of replication fork restart after an encounter with spontaneous DNA damage. Finally, nonepistatic, additive/synergistic UV sensitivity was observed in cdc7Δ pol32Δ and cdc7Δ pol30-K127R,K164R double mutants, suggesting that DDK may regulate Rev7 protein during postreplication "gap filling" rather than during "polymerase switching" by ubiquitinated and sumoylated modified Pol30 (PCNA) and Pol32. PMID:24875188

  13. Nucleoprotein of influenza A virus negatively impacts antiapoptotic protein API5 to enhance E2F1-dependent apoptosis and virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Mayank, A K; Sharma, S; Nailwal, H; Lal, S K

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis of host cells profoundly influences virus propagation and dissemination, events that are integral to influenza A virus (IAV) pathogenesis. The trigger for activation of apoptosis is regulated by an intricate interplay between cellular and viral proteins, with a strong bearing on IAV replication. Though the knowledge of viral proteins and mechanisms employed by IAV to induce apoptosis has advanced considerably of late, we know relatively little about the repertoire of host factors targeted by viral proteins. Thus, identification of cellular proteins that are hijacked by the virus will help us not only to understand the molecular underpinnings of IAV-induced apoptosis, but also to design future antiviral therapies. Here we show that the nucleoprotein (NP) of IAV directly interacts with and suppresses the expression of API5, a host antiapoptotic protein that antagonizes E2F1-dependent apoptosis. siRNA-mediated depletion of API5, in NP-overexpressed as well as IAV-infected cells, leads to upregulation of apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (APAF1), a downstream modulator of E2F1-mediated apoptosis, and cleavage of caspases 9 and 3, although a reciprocal pattern of these events was observed on ectopic overexpression of API5. In concordance with these observations, annexin V and 7AAD staining assays exhibit downregulation of early and late apoptosis in IAV-infected or NP-transfected cells on overexpression of API5. Most significantly, while overexpression of API5 decreases viral titers, cellular NP protein as well as mRNA levels in IAV-infected A549 cells, silencing of API5 expression causes a steep rise in the same parameters. From the data reported in this manuscript, we propose a proapoptotic role for NP in IAV pathogenesis, whereby it suppresses expression of antiapoptotic factor API5, thus potentiating the E2F1-dependent apoptotic pathway and ensuring viral replication. PMID:26673663

  14. Influence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus O/CHN/Mya98/33-P Strain Leader Protein on Viral Replication and Host Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shaodong; Bai, Xingwen; Li, Pinghua; Zhang, Meng; Bao, Huifang; Sun, Pu; Lu, Zengjun; Cao, Yimei; Chen, Yingli; Li, Dong; Fu, Yuanfang; Liu, Zaixin

    2015-09-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain was isolated from the esophageal-pharyngeal fluid sample of cattle, and was shown to cause persistent infection. Its leader protein contains 200 amino acids with one amino acid deletion, which is upstream and next to the second initiation codon compared with the majority of FMDV Mya98 strains. The FMDV genome includes two initiation codons that can produce two different leader proteins, Lab (from the first AUG) and Lb (from the second AUG). For convenience, the inter-AUG region was named as La. Previously, it was found that a recombinant virus with Lab of FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain had higher proliferation efficiency, and better ability to inhibit the host innate immune response. Three full-length infectious cDNA clones-rHN33-Lb, rHN33-La, and rHNGSLX-Lb-containing the FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P strain leader proteins Lb, La, or the FMDV O/GSLX/2010 strain leader protein Lb, respectively, were constructed based on an established infectious clone r-HN rescued from FMDV O/HN/CHN/93 strain. After infecting pig kidney primary cells, rHN33-La showed higher replication efficiency than r-HN, and rHN33-Lb displayed better ability to resist host innate immunity than rHNGSLX-Lb. These results demonstrated that the inter-AUG region of FMDV strain O/CHN/Mya98/33-P leader protein must be involved in increasing viral replication efficiency. Additionally, the Lb of FMDV O/CHN/Mya98/33-P must be involve in increasing its ability to inhibit host innate immune response, and the distinctive amino acids G56 and/or R118 of FMDV leader protein may play essential roles in it.

  15. Roles of the Fusion and Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Proteins in Replication, Tropism, and Pathogenicity of Avian Paramyxoviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Subbiah, Madhuri; Samuel, Arthur S.; Collins, Peter L.; Samal, Siba K.

    2011-01-01

    Virulent and moderately virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV), representing avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 (APMV-1), cause respiratory and neurological disease in chickens and other species of birds. In contrast, APMV-2 is avirulent in chickens. We investigated the role of the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) envelope glycoproteins in these contrasting phenotypes by designing chimeric viruses in which the F and HN glycoproteins or their ectodomains were exchanged individually or together between the moderately virulent, neurotropic NDV strain Beaudette C (BC) and the avirulent APMV-2 strain Yucaipa. When we attempted to exchange the complete F and HN glycoproteins individually and together between the two viruses, the only construct that could be recovered was recombinant APMV-2 strain Yucaipa (rAPMV-2), containing the NDV F glycoprotein in place of its own. This substitution of NDV F into APMV-2 was sufficient to confer the neurotropic, neuroinvasive, and neurovirulent phenotypes, in spite of all being at reduced levels compared to what was seen for NDV-BC. When the ectodomains of F and HN were exchanged individually and together, two constructs could be recovered: NDV, containing both the F and HN ectodomains of APMV-2; and APMV-2, containing both ectodomains of NDV. This supported the idea that homologous cytoplasmic tails and matched F and HN ectodomains are important for virus replication. Analysis of these viruses for replication in vitro, syncytium formation, mean embryo death time, intracerebral pathogenicity index, and replication and tropism in 1-day-old chicks and 2-week-old chickens showed that the two contrasting phenotypes of NDV and APMV-2 could largely be transferred between the two backbones by transfer of homotypic F and HN ectodomains. Further analysis provided evidence that the homologous stalk domain of NDV HN is essential for virus replication, while the globular head domain of NDV HN could be replaced with that of

  16. Identification of Small Molecule Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) Inhibitor That Disrupts Interactions with PIP-box Proteins and Inhibits DNA Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Inoue, Akira; Hishiki, Asami; Fujikawa, Yoshihiro; Connelly, Michele; Evison, Benjamin; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard; Kuraoka, Isao; Rodrigues, Patrick; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kawanishi, Masanobu; Sato, Mamoru; Yagi, Takashi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2012-01-01

    We have discovered that 3,3′,5-triiodothyronine (T3) inhibits binding of a PIP-box sequence peptide to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein by competing for the same binding site, as evidenced by the co-crystal structure of the PCNA-T3 complex at 2.1 Å resolution. Based on this observation, we have designed a novel, non-peptide small molecule PCNA inhibitor, T2 amino alcohol (T2AA), a T3 derivative that lacks thyroid hormone activity. T2AA inhibited interaction of PCNA/PIP-box peptide with an IC50 of ∼1 μm and also PCNA and full-length p21 protein, the tightest PCNA ligand protein known to date. T2AA abolished interaction of PCNA and DNA polymerase δ in cellular chromatin. De novo DNA synthesis was inhibited by T2AA, and the cells were arrested in S-phase. T2AA inhibited growth of cancer cells with induction of early apoptosis. Concurrently, Chk1 and RPA32 in the chromatin are phosphorylated, suggesting that T2AA causes DNA replication stress by stalling DNA replication forks. T2AA significantly inhibited translesion DNA synthesis on a cisplatin-cross-linked template in cells. When cells were treated with a combination of cisplatin and T2AA, a significant increase in phospho(Ser139)histone H2AX induction and cell growth inhibition was observed. PMID:22383522

  17. Replicating vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  18. Human Heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) promotes influenza A virus replication by assisting nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins.

    PubMed

    Batra, Jyoti; Tripathi, Shashank; Kumar, Amrita; Katz, Jacqueline M; Cox, Nancy J; Lal, Renu B; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lal, Sunil K

    2016-01-01

    A unique feature of influenza A virus (IAV) life cycle is replication of the viral genome in the host cell nucleus. The nuclear import of IAV genome is an indispensable step in establishing virus infection. IAV nucleoprotein (NP) is known to mediate the nuclear import of viral genome via its nuclear localization signals. Here, we demonstrate that cellular heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) facilitates the nuclear import of incoming IAV viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and is important for efficient IAV replication. Hsp40 was found to interact with NP component of IAV RNPs during early stages of infection. This interaction is mediated by the J domain of Hsp40 and N-terminal region of NP. Drug or RNAi mediated inhibition of Hsp40 resulted in reduced nuclear import of IAV RNPs, diminished viral polymerase function and attenuates overall viral replication. Hsp40 was also found to be required for efficient association between NP and importin alpha, which is crucial for IAV RNP nuclear translocation. These studies demonstrate an important role for cellular chaperone Hsp40/DnaJB1 in influenza A virus life cycle by assisting nuclear trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins. PMID:26750153

  19. Functional analysis of the N-terminal basic motif of a eukaryotic satellite RNA virus capsid protein in replication and packaging

    PubMed Central

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Mathews, Deborah; Garmann, Rees; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya; Rao, A. L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient replication and assembly of virus particles are integral to the establishment of infection. In addition to the primary role of the capsid protein (CP) in encapsidating the RNA progeny, experimental evidence on positive sense single-stranded RNA viruses suggests that the CP also regulates RNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that replication of Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is controlled by the cooperative interaction between STMV CP and the helper virus (HV) Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replicase. We identified that the STMV CP-HV replicase interaction requires a positively charged residue at the third position (3R) in the N-terminal 13 amino acid (aa) motif. Far-Northwestern blotting showed that STMV CP promotes binding between HV-replicase and STMV RNA. An STMV CP variant having an arginine to alanine substitution at position 3 in the N-terminal 13aa motif abolished replicase-CP binding. The N-terminal 13aa motif of the CP bearing alanine substitutions for positively charged residues located at positions 5, 7, 10 and 11 are defective in packaging full-length STMV, but can package a truncated STMV RNA lacking the 3′ terminal 150 nt region. These findings provide insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of STMV replication and packaging. PMID:27193742

  20. Dimerization of the ATRIP protein through the coiled-coil motif and its implication to the maintenance of stalled replication forks.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Eisuke; Sawada, Isao; Matsuura, Akira

    2005-12-01

    ATR (ATM and Rad3-related), a PI kinase-related kinase (PIKK), has been implicated in the DNA structure checkpoint in mammalian cells. ATR associates with its partner protein ATRIP to form a functional complex in the nucleus. In this study, we investigated the role of the ATRIP coiled-coil domain in ATR-mediated processes. The coiled-coil domain of human ATRIP contributes to self-dimerization in vivo, which is important for the stable translocation of the ATR-ATRIP complex to nuclear foci that are formed after exposure to genotoxic stress. The expression of dimerization-defective ATRIP diminishes the maintenance of replication forks during treatment with replication inhibitors. By contrast, it does not compromise the G2/M checkpoint after IR-induced DNA damage. These results show that there are two critical functions of ATR-ATRIP after the exposure to genotoxic stress: maintenance of the integrity of replication machinery and execution of cell cycle arrest, which are separable and are achieved via distinct mechanisms. The former function may involve the concentrated localization of ATR to damaged sites for which the ATRIP coiled-coil motif is critical.

  1. Human Heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) promotes influenza A virus replication by assisting nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Jyoti; Tripathi, Shashank; Kumar, Amrita; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Cox, Nancy J.; Lal, Renu B.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Lal, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    A unique feature of influenza A virus (IAV) life cycle is replication of the viral genome in the host cell nucleus. The nuclear import of IAV genome is an indispensable step in establishing virus infection. IAV nucleoprotein (NP) is known to mediate the nuclear import of viral genome via its nuclear localization signals. Here, we demonstrate that cellular heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40/DnaJB1) facilitates the nuclear import of incoming IAV viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs) and is important for efficient IAV replication. Hsp40 was found to interact with NP component of IAV RNPs during early stages of infection. This interaction is mediated by the J domain of Hsp40 and N-terminal region of NP. Drug or RNAi mediated inhibition of Hsp40 resulted in reduced nuclear import of IAV RNPs, diminished viral polymerase function and attenuates overall viral replication. Hsp40 was also found to be required for efficient association between NP and importin alpha, which is crucial for IAV RNP nuclear translocation. These studies demonstrate an important role for cellular chaperone Hsp40/DnaJB1 in influenza A virus life cycle by assisting nuclear trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins. PMID:26750153

  2. Functional analysis of the N-terminal basic motif of a eukaryotic satellite RNA virus capsid protein in replication and packaging.

    PubMed

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Mathews, Deborah; Garmann, Rees; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya; Rao, A L N

    2016-01-01

    Efficient replication and assembly of virus particles are integral to the establishment of infection. In addition to the primary role of the capsid protein (CP) in encapsidating the RNA progeny, experimental evidence on positive sense single-stranded RNA viruses suggests that the CP also regulates RNA synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that replication of Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is controlled by the cooperative interaction between STMV CP and the helper virus (HV) Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) replicase. We identified that the STMV CP-HV replicase interaction requires a positively charged residue at the third position (3R) in the N-terminal 13 amino acid (aa) motif. Far-Northwestern blotting showed that STMV CP promotes binding between HV-replicase and STMV RNA. An STMV CP variant having an arginine to alanine substitution at position 3 in the N-terminal 13aa motif abolished replicase-CP binding. The N-terminal 13aa motif of the CP bearing alanine substitutions for positively charged residues located at positions 5, 7, 10 and 11 are defective in packaging full-length STMV, but can package a truncated STMV RNA lacking the 3' terminal 150 nt region. These findings provide insights into the mechanism underlying the regulation of STMV replication and packaging. PMID:27193742

  3. Dpb11 protein helps control assembly of the Cdc45·Mcm2-7·GINS replication fork helicase.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Nalini; Bruck, Irina; Smith, Skye; Ning, Boting; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-03-20

    Dpb11 is required for the initiation of DNA replication in budding yeast. Dpb11 binds to S-phase cyclin-dependent kinase-phosphorylated Sld2 and Sld3 to form a ternary complex during S phase. The replication fork helicase in eukaryotes is composed of Cdc45, Mcm2-7, and GINS. We show here, using purified proteins from budding yeast, that Dpb11 alone binds to Mcm2-7 and that Dpb11 also competes with GINS for binding to Mcm2-7. Furthermore, Dpb11 binds directly to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and ssDNA inhibits the Dpb11 interaction with Mcm2-7. We also found that Dpb11 can recruit Cdc45 to Mcm2-7. We identified a mutant of the BRCT4 motif of Dpb11 that remains bound to Mcm2-7 in the presence of ssDNA (dpb11-m1,m2,m3,m5), and this mutant exhibits a DNA replication defect when expressed in budding yeast cells. Expression of this mutant results in increased interaction between Dpb11 and Mcm2-7 during S phase, impaired GINS interaction with Mcm2-7 during S phase, and decreased replication protein A (RPA) interaction with origin DNA during S phase. We propose a model in which Dpb11 first recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2-7. Dpb11, although bound to Cdc45·Mcm2-7, can block the interaction between GINS and Mcm2-7. Upon extrusion of ssDNA from the central channel of Mcm2-7, Dpb11 dissociates from Mcm2-7, and Dpb11 binds to ssDNA, thereby allowing GINS to bind to Cdc45·Mcm2-7. Finally, we propose that Dpb11 functions with Sld2 and Sld3 to help control the assembly of the replication fork helicase.

  4. KSHV Genome Replication and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Pravinkumar; Dabral, Prerna; Gupta, Namrata; Sarkar, Roni; Verma, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) is a major etiological agent for multiple severe malignancies in immune-compromised patients. KSHV establishes lifetime persistence in the infected individuals and displays two distinct life cycles, generally a prolonged passive latent, and a short productive or lytic cycle. During latent phase, the viral episome is tethered to the host chromosome and replicates once during every cell division. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is a predominant multifunctional nuclear protein expressed during latency, which plays a central role in episome tethering, replication and perpetual segregation of the episomes during cell division. LANA binds cooperatively to LANA binding sites (LBS) within the terminal repeat (TR) region of the viral episome as well as to the cellular nucleosomal proteins to tether viral episome to the host chromosome. LANA has been shown to modulate multiple cellular signaling pathways and recruits various cellular proteins such as chromatin modifying enzymes, replication factors, transcription factors, and cellular mitotic framework to maintain a successful latent infection. Although, many other regions within the KSHV genome can initiate replication, KSHV TR is important for latent DNA replication and possible segregation of the replicated episomes. Binding of LANA to LBS favors the recruitment of various replication factors to initiate LANA dependent DNA replication. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms relevant to KSHV genome replication, segregation, and maintenance of latency. PMID:26870016

  5. Localization of the Carnation Italian ringspot virus replication protein p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane is mediated by an internal targeting signal and the TOM complex

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yeen Ting; McCartney, Andrew W; Gidda, Satinder K; Mullen, Robert T

    2008-01-01

    Background Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV) is a positive-strand RNA virus that causes massive structural alterations of mitochondria in infected host cells, the most conspicuous being the formation of numerous internal vesicles/spherules that are derived from the mitochondrial outer membrane and serve as the sites for viral RNA replication. While the membrane-bound components of the CIRV replication complex, including a 36-kD RNA-binding protein (p36), are known to be essential for these changes in mitochondrial morphology and are relatively well characterized in terms of their roles in nascent viral RNA synthesis, how these proteins are specifically targeted and inserted into mitochondria is poorly defined. Results Here we report on the molecular signal responsible for sorting p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Using a combination of gain-of-function assays with portions of p36 fused to reporter proteins and domain-swapping assays with p36 and another closely-related viral RNA-binding protein, p33, that sorts specifically to the peroxisomal boundary membrane, we show that the mitochondrial targeting information in p36 resides within its two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and intervening hydrophilic loop sequence. Comprehensive mutational analysis of these regions in p36 revealed that the primary targeting determinants are the moderate hydrophobicity of both TMDs and the positively-charged face of an amphipathic helix within the intervening loop sequence. We show also using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) that p36 interacts with certain components of the translocase complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM), but not with the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM). Conclusion Our results provide insight to how viruses, such as CIRV, exploit specific host-cell protein sorting pathways to facilitate their replication. The characterization of the targeting and insertion of p36 into the mitochondrial outer membrane also sheds light on

  6. Abiotic self-replication.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    functions (including the replication of nucleic acids) to more competent protein enzymes would complete the journey from an abiotic world to the molecular biology we see today. PMID:22891822

  7. Abiotic self-replication.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    functions (including the replication of nucleic acids) to more competent protein enzymes would complete the journey from an abiotic world to the molecular biology we see today.

  8. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  9. A Proline-Tryptophan Turn in the Intrinsically Disordered Domain 2 of NS5A Protein Is Essential for Hepatitis C Virus RNA Replication*

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Marie; Madan, Vanesa; Montserret, Roland; Ahuja, Puneet; Huvent, Isabelle; Launay, Helene; Leroy, Arnaud; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Lippens, Guy; Hanoulle, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) and its interaction with the human chaperone cyclophilin A are both targets for highly potent and promising antiviral drugs that are in the late stages of clinical development. Despite its high interest in regards to the development of drugs to counteract the worldwide HCV burden, NS5A is still an enigmatic multifunctional protein poorly characterized at the molecular level. NS5A is required for HCV RNA replication and is involved in viral particle formation and regulation of host pathways. Thus far, no enzymatic activity or precise molecular function has been ascribed to NS5A that is composed of a highly structured domain 1 (D1), as well as two intrinsically disordered domains 2 (D2) and 3 (D3), representing half of the protein. Here, we identify a short structural motif in the disordered NS5A-D2 and report its NMR structure. We show that this structural motif, a minimal Pro314–Trp316 turn, is essential for HCV RNA replication, and its disruption alters the subcellular distribution of NS5A. We demonstrate that this Pro-Trp turn is required for proper interaction with the host cyclophilin A and influences its peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity on residue Pro314 of NS5A-D2. This work provides a molecular basis for further understanding of the function of the intrinsically disordered domain 2 of HCV NS5A protein. In addition, our work highlights how very small structural motifs present in intrinsically disordered proteins can exert a specific function. PMID:26085105

  10. A Novel Peptide Derived from the Fusion Protein Heptad Repeat Inhibits Replication of Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Virus In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Koichi; Abe, Yusaku; Kodama, Eiichi N; Nabika, Ryota; Oishi, Shinya; Ohara, Shinichiro; Sato, Masatoki; Kawasaki, Yukihiko; Fujii, Nobutaka; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a persistent, progressive, and fatal degenerative disease resulting from persistent measles virus (MV) infection of the central nervous system. Most drugs used to treat SSPE have been reported to have limited effects. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are urgently required. The SSPE virus, a variant MV strain, differs virologically from wild-type MV strain. One characteristic of the SSPE virus is its defective production of cell-free virus, which leaves cell-to-cell infection as the major mechanism of viral dissemination. The fusion protein plays an essential role in this cell-to-cell spread. It contains two critical heptad repeat regions that form a six-helix bundle in the trimer similar to most viral fusion proteins. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), a synthetic peptide derived from the heptad repeat region of the fusion protein enfuvirtide inhibits viral replication and is clinically approved as an anti-HIV-1 agent. The heptad repeat regions of HIV-1 are structurally and functionally similar to those of the MV fusion protein. We therefore designed novel peptides derived from the fusion protein heptad repeat region of the MV and examined their effects on the measles and SSPE virus replication in vitro and in vivo. Some of these synthetic novel peptides demonstrated high antiviral activity against both the measles (Edmonston strain) and SSPE (Yamagata-1 strain) viruses at nanomolar concentrations with no cytotoxicity in vitro. In particular, intracranial administration of one of the synthetic peptides increased the survival rate from 0% to 67% in an SSPE virus-infected nude mouse model. PMID:27612283

  11. Localization of the Tomato Bushy Stunt Virus Replication Protein p33 Reveals a Peroxisome-to-Endoplasmic Reticulum Sorting PathwayW⃞

    PubMed Central

    McCartney, Andrew W.; Greenwood, John S.; Fabian, Marc R.; White, K. Andrew; Mullen, Robert T.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), a positive-strand RNA virus, causes extensive inward vesiculations of the peroxisomal boundary membrane and formation of peroxisomal multivesicular bodies (pMVBs). Although pMVBs are known to contain protein components of the viral membrane-bound RNA replication complex, the mechanisms of protein targeting to peroxisomal membranes and participation in pMVB biogenesis are not well understood. We show that the TBSV 33-kD replication protein (p33), expressed on its own, targets initially from the cytosol to peroxisomes, causing their progressive aggregation and eventually the formation of peroxisomal ghosts. These altered peroxisomes are distinct from pMVBs; they lack internal vesicles and are surrounded by novel cytosolic vesicles that contain p33 and appear to be derived from evaginations of the peroxisomal boundary membrane. Concomitant with these changes in peroxisomes, p33 and resident peroxisomal membrane proteins are relocalized to the peroxisomal endoplasmic reticulum (pER) subdomain. This sorting of p33 is disrupted by the coexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of ADP-ribosylation factor1, implicating coatomer in vesicle formation at peroxisomes. Mutational analysis of p33 revealed that its intracellular sorting is also mediated by several targeting signals, including three peroxisomal targeting elements that function cooperatively, plus a pER targeting signal resembling an Arg-based motif responsible for vesicle-mediated retrieval of escaped ER membrane proteins from the Golgi. These results provide insight into virus-induced intracellular rearrangements and reveal a peroxisome-to-pER sorting pathway, raising new mechanistic questions regarding the biogenesis of peroxisomes in plants. PMID:16284309

  12. Origin-Independent Assembly of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus DNA Replication Compartments in Transient Cotransfection Assays and Association with the ORF-K8 Protein and Cellular PML

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Frederick Y.; Ahn, Jin-Hyun; Alcendor, Donald J.; Jang, Won-Jong; Xiao, Jinsong; Hayward, S. Diane; Hayward, Gary S.

    2001-01-01

    Six predicted Kaposi's sarcoma virus herpesvirus (KSHV) proteins have homology with other well-characterized herpesvirus core DNA replication proteins and are expected to be essential for viral DNA synthesis. Intact Flag-tagged protein products from all six were produced from genomic expression vectors, although the ORF40/41 transcript encoding a primase-helicase component proved to be spliced with a 127-bp intron. The intracellular localization of these six KSHV replication proteins and the mechanism of their nuclear translocation were investigated. SSB (single-stranded DNA binding protein, ORF6) and PPF (polymerase processivity factor, ORF59) were found to be intrinsic nuclear proteins, whereas POL (polymerase, ORF9), which localized in the cytoplasm on its own, was translocated to the nucleus when cotransfected with PPF. PAF (primase-associated factor, ORF40/41), a component of the primase-helicase tripartite subcomplex together with PRI (primase, ORF56) and HEL (helicase, ORF44), required the presence of all five other replication proteins for efficient nuclear translocation. Surprisingly, even in the absence of a lytic cycle replication origin (ori-Lyt) and any known initiator or origin binding protein, the protein products of all six KSHV core replication genes cooperated in a transient cotransfection assay to form large globular shaped pseudo-replication compartments (pseudo-RC), which excluded cellular DNA. These pseudo-RC structures were confirmed to include POL, SSB, PRI, and PAF but did not contain any newly synthesized DNA. Similar to the human cytomegalovirus system, the peripheries of these KSHV pre-RC were also found to be surrounded by punctate PML oncogenic domains (PODs). Furthermore, by transient cotransfection, the six KSHV core replication machinery proteins successfully replicated a plasmid containing EBV ori-Lyt in the presence of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded DNA binding initiator protein, ZTA. The KSHV-encoded K8 (ORF-K8) protein, which is

  13. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  14. Characterization of the ATPase activity of RecG and RuvAB proteins on model fork structures reveals insight into stalled DNA replication fork repair.

    PubMed

    Abd Wahab, Syafiq; Choi, Meerim; Bianco, Piero R

    2013-09-13

    RecG and RuvAB are proposed to act at stalled DNA replication forks to facilitate replication restart. To clarify the roles of these proteins in fork regression, we used a coupled spectrophotometric ATPase assay to determine how these helicases act on two groups of model fork substrates: the first group mimics nascent stalled forks, whereas the second mimics regressed fork structures. The results show that RecG is active on the substrates in group 1, whereas these are poor substrates for RuvAB. In addition, in the presence of group 1 forks, the single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) enhances the activity of RecG and enables it to compete with excess RuvA. In contrast, SSB inhibits the activity of RuvAB on these substrates. Results also show that the preferred regressed fork substrate for RuvAB is a Holliday junction, not a forked DNA. The active form of the enzyme on the Holliday junction contains a single RuvA tetramer. In contrast, although the enzyme is active on a regressed fork structure, RuvB loading by a single RuvA tetramer is impaired, and full activity requires the cooperative binding of two forked DNA substrate molecules. Collectively, the data support a model where RecG is responsible for stalled DNA replication fork regression. SSB ensures that if the nascent fork has single-stranded DNA character RuvAB is inhibited, whereas the activity of RecG is preferentially enhanced. Only once the fork has been regressed and the DNA is relaxed can RuvAB bind to a RecG-extruded Holliday junction.

  15. The inner membrane complex sub-compartment proteins critical for replication of the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii adopt a pleckstrin homology fold.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Beck, Josh R; Bradley, Peter J; Boulanger, Martin J

    2014-05-16

    Toxoplasma gondii, an apicomplexan parasite prevalent in developed nations, infects up to one-third of the human population. The success of this parasite depends on several unique structures including an inner membrane complex (IMC) that lines the interior of the plasma membrane and contains proteins important for gliding motility and replication. Of these proteins, the IMC sub-compartment proteins (ISPs) have recently been shown to play a role in asexual T. gondii daughter cell formation, yet the mechanism is unknown. Complicating mechanistic characterization of the ISPs is a lack of sequence identity with proteins of known structure or function. In support of elucidating the function of ISPs, we first determined the crystal structures of representative members TgISP1 and TgISP3 to a resolution of 2.10 and 2.32 Å, respectively. Structural analysis revealed that both ISPs adopt a pleckstrin homology fold often associated with phospholipid binding or protein-protein interactions. Substitution of basic for hydrophobic residues in the region that overlays with phospholipid binding in related pleckstrin homology domains, however, suggests that ISPs do not retain phospholipid binding activity. Consistent with this observation, biochemical assays revealed no phospholipid binding activity. Interestingly, mapping of conserved surface residues combined with crystal packing analysis indicates that TgISPs have functionally repurposed the phospholipid-binding site likely to coordinate protein partners. Recruitment of larger protein complexes may also be aided through avidity-enhanced interactions resulting from multimerization of the ISPs. Overall, we propose a model where TgISPs recruit protein partners to the IMC to ensure correct progression of daughter cell formation.

  16. The orthopoxvirus 68-kilodalton ankyrin-like protein is essential for DNA replication and complete gene expression of modified vaccinia virus Ankara in nonpermissive human and murine cells.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Karin M; Schwantes, Astrid; Staib, Caroline; Schnierle, Barbara S; Sutter, Gerd

    2009-06-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) is a highly attenuated and replication-deficient vaccinia virus (VACV) that is being evaluated as replacement smallpox vaccine and candidate viral vector. MVA lacks many genes associated with virulence and/or regulation of virus tropism. The 68-kDa ankyrin-like protein (68k-ank) is the only ankyrin repeat-containing protein that is encoded by the MVA genome and is highly conserved throughout the Orthopoxvirus genus. We showed previously that 68k-ank is composed of ankyrin repeats and an F-box-like domain and forms an SCF ubiquitin ligase complex together with the cellular proteins Skp1a and Cullin-1. We now report that 68k-ank (MVA open reading frame 186R) is an essential factor for completion of the MVA intracellular life cycle in nonpermissive human and murine cells. Infection of mouse NIH 3T3 and human HaCaT cells with MVA with a deletion of the 68k-ank gene (MVA-Delta68k-ank) was characterized by an extensive reduction of viral intermediate RNA and protein, as well as late transcripts and drastically impaired late protein synthesis. Furthermore, infections with MVA-Delta68k-ank failed to induce the host protein shutoff that is characteristic of VACV infections. Although we demonstrated that proteasome function in general is essential for the completion of the MVA molecular life cycle, we found that a mutant 68k-ank protein with a deletion of the F-box-like domain was able to fully complement the deficiency of MVA-Delta68k-ank to express all classes of viral genes. Thus, our data demonstrate that the 68k-ank protein contains another critical domain that may function independently of SCF ubiquitin ligase complex formation, suggesting multiple activities of this interesting regulatory protein.

  17. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A Cooperate in Cell Cycle–Associated Replication of Peroxisomes[W

    PubMed Central

    Lingard, Matthew J.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J.; Mullen, Robert T.; Trelease, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle–associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in ∼40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells. PMID:18539750

  18. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A cooperate in cell cycle-associated replication of peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Lingard, Matthew J; Gidda, Satinder K; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J; Mullen, Robert T; Trelease, Richard N

    2008-06-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle-associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in approximately 40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells.

  19. Initiation of DNA replication at the primary origin of bacteriophage T7 by purified proteins: requirement for T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, L J; Tamanoi, F; Richardson, C C

    1981-01-01

    The primary origin of bacteriophage T7 DNA replication is located 15% of the distance from the left end of the T7 DNA molecule. This intergenic segment is A + T-rich, contains a single gene 4 protein recognition site, and is preceded by two tandem promoters for T7 RNA polymerase [RNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.6]. Analysis by electron microscopy shows that T7 DNA polymerase [DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7] and gene 4 protein initiate DNA synthesis at randomly located nicks on duplex DNA to produce branched molecules. However, upon the addition of T7 RNA polymerase and ribonucleoside triphosphates 14% of the product molecules have replication bubbles, all of which are located near the primary origin observed in vivo; no such initiation occurs on T7 deletion mutant LG37 DNA, which lacks the primary origin. We have also studied initiation by using plasmids into which fragments of T7 DNA have been inserted. DNA synthesis on these templates is also dependent on the presence of T7 RNA polymerase and ribonucleoside triphosphates. DNA synthesis is specific for plasmids containing the primary origin, provided they are first converted to linear forms. PMID:6945573

  20. A cysteine-rich metal-binding domain from rubella virus non-structural protein is essential for viral protease activity and virus replication.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubin; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Ye, Yiming; Huang, Yun; Li, Shunyi; Chen, Yanyi; Frey, Teryl K; Yang, Jenny J

    2009-01-15

    The protease domain within the RUBV (rubella virus) NS (non-structural) replicase proteins functions in the self-cleavage of the polyprotein precursor into the two mature proteins which form the replication complex. This domain has previously been shown to require both zinc and calcium ions for optimal activity. In the present study we carried out metal-binding and conformational experiments on a purified cysteine-rich minidomain of the RUBV NS protease containing the putative Zn(2+)-binding ligands. This minidomain bound to Zn(2+) with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.7 and an apparent dissociation constant of <500 nM. Fluorescence quenching and 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid fluorescence methods revealed that Zn(2+) binding resulted in conformational changes characterized by shielding of hydrophobic regions from the solvent. Mutational analyses using the minidomain identified residues Cys(1175), Cys(1178), Cys(1225) and Cys(1227) were required for the binding of Zn(2+). Corresponding mutational analyses using a RUBV replicon confirmed that these residues were necessary for both proteolytic activity of the NS protease and viability. The present study demonstrates that the CXXC(X)(48)CXC Zn(2+)-binding motif in the RUBV NS protease is critical for maintaining the structural integrity of the protease domain and essential for proteolysis and virus replication. PMID:18795894

  1. Ciz1, a p21 cip1/Waf1-interacting zinc finger protein and DNA replication factor, is a novel molecular partner for human enhancer of rudimentary homolog.

    PubMed

    Lukasik, Anna; Uniewicz, Katarzyna A; Kulis, Marta; Kozlowski, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    Enhancer of rudimentary homolog (Drosophila) (ERH) is a small, highly conserved, nuclear protein with a unique three-dimensional structure, whose gene has been identified in animals, plants and protists, but not in fungi. Involvement of ERH in fundamental processes such as regulation of pyrimidine metabolism, cell cycle progression, transcription and cell growth control has been suggested. Here, employing a yeast two-hybrid system, a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay and tandem MS, we demonstrate that Ciz1 is a bona fide interactor of human ERH. Ciz1 is a nuclear zinc finger protein interacting with p21(Cip1/Waf1), a universal inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, and is a DNA replication factor. The region of Ciz1 necessary for the interaction with ERH spans residues 531-644, encompassing its first zinc finger motif. This region overlaps the p21(Cip1/Waf1)-binding site, suggesting that the interaction with ERH could block the binding of p21(Cip1/Waf1) by Ciz1 in the cell. When ERH and Ciz1 are coexpressed in HeLa cells, Ciz1 recruits ERH to DNA replication foci.

  2. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  3. Replication of a recombinant hepatitis E virus genome tagged with reporter genes and generation of a short-term cell line producing viral RNA and proteins.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Deepshi; Nayak, Baibaswata; Rehman, Shagufta; Durgapal, Hemlata; Panda, Subrat Kumar

    2005-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) replication has been demonstrated in HepG2 cells transfected with full-length in vitro transcripts of an infectious cDNA clone. This cDNA clone was modified to generate several subgenomic HEV replicons with fused reporter genes. In vitro-transcribed capped RNAs generated from these were transfected into HepG2 cells. Negative-strand RNA was detected, indicating the occurrence of replication. The replicon containing an in-frame fusion of HEV ORF2 with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was positive for fluorescence, whereas no signal was observed when the replicase domain was deleted. An HEV ORF3-EGFP in-frame fusion did not yield fluorescence. Deletions introduced into ORF2 did not affect the replication competency of the viral RNA. To explore the possibility of using a reporter-gene assay to monitor the synthesis of plus- and minus-strand RNA, the EGFP gene fused to the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES) was inserted into partially deleted ORF2 of HEV, in both the sense [HEV-IRES-EGFP(+)] and antisense [HEV-IRES-EGFP(-)] orientations. HepG2 cells transfected with HEV-IRES-EGFP(+) and HEV-IRES-EGFP(-) vectors were positive for EGFP fluorescence. To quantify HEV replication, EGFP was replaced with Renilla luciferase (RLuc). HEV-IRES-RLuc(+) showed approximately 10-fold higher luminescence than HEV-IRES-RLuc(-). There was complete loss of activity when the helicase-replicase domain in HEV-IRES-RLuc(-) was deleted. A short-term HepG2 cell line containing the full-length viral genome in the pcDNA3 vector was established. Viral RNA and proteins (RdRp, pORF2 and pORF3) could be detected in the geneticin-resistant cells, even after the seventh passage. In the absence of a reliable cell-culture system to study HEV biology, these reporter replicons, as well as the cell line, bestow immense utility.

  4. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  5. Membrane regulation of the chromosomal replication activity of E. coli DnaA requires a discrete site on the protein.

    PubMed Central

    Garner, J; Crooke, E

    1996-01-01

    The capacity of DnaA protein to initiate DNA synthesis at the chromosomal origin is influenced profoundly by the tightly bound nucleotides ATP and ADP. Acidic phospholipids can catalyze the conversion of inactive ADP-DnaA protein into the active ATP form. Proteolytic fragments of the nucleotide form of DnaA protein were examined to determine regions of the protein critical for functional interaction with membranes. A 35 kDa chymotryptic and 29 kDa tryptic fragment retained the tightly bound nucleotide. The fragments, whose amino-termini are within three residues of each other, but differ at their carboxyl ends, showed strikingly different behavior when treated with acidic phospholipids. The larger chymotryptic fragment released the bound nucleotide in the presence of acidic, but not neutral phospholipids. In contrast, the smaller tryptic fragment was inert to both forms of phospholipids. Acidic membranes, but not those composed of neutral phospholipids, protect from tryptic digestion a small portion of the segment that constitutes the difference between the 29 and 35 kDa fragments. The resulting 30 kDa tryptic fragment, which possesses this protected region, interacts functionally with acidic membranes to release the bound effector nucleotide. Inasmuch as the anionic ganglioside GM1, a compound structurally dissimilar to acidic glycerophospholipids, efficiently releases the nucleotide from DnaA protein, an acidic surface associated with a hydrophobic environment is the characteristic of the membrane that appears crucial for regulatory interaction with DnaA protein. Images PMID:8670850

  6. Rapid degradation of replication-dependent histone mRNAs largely occurs on mRNAs bound by nuclear cap-binding proteins 80 and 20

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Junho; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ye Kyung; Song, Ok-Kyu; Kim, Min Kyung; Lee, Byung-Gil; Song, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2013-01-01

    The translation of mammalian messenger RNAs (mRNAs) can be driven by either cap-binding proteins 80 and 20 (CBP80/20) or eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF)4E. Although CBP80/20-dependent translation (CT) is known to be coupled to an mRNA surveillance mechanism termed nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), its molecular mechanism and biological role remain obscure. Here, using a yeast two-hybrid screening system, we identify a stem-loop binding protein (SLBP) that binds to a stem-loop structure at the 3′-end of the replication-dependent histone mRNA as a CT initiation factor (CTIF)-interacting protein. SLBP preferentially associates with the CT complex of histone mRNAs, but not with the eIF4E-depedent translation (ET) complex. Several lines of evidence indicate that rapid degradation of histone mRNA on the inhibition of DNA replication largely takes place during CT and not ET, which has been previously unappreciated. Furthermore, the ratio of CBP80/20-bound histone mRNA to eIF4E-bound histone mRNA is larger than the ratio of CBP80/20-bound polyadenylated β-actin or eEF2 mRNA to eIF4E-bound polyadenylated β-actin or eEF2 mRNA, respectively. The collective findings suggest that mRNAs harboring a different 3′-end use a different mechanism of translation initiation, expanding the repertoire of CT as a step for determining the fate of histone mRNAs. PMID:23234701

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus non-structural protein 1 facilitates virus replication through miR-29a-mediated inhibition of interferon-α receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Yang, Lihua; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Guocheng; Sun, Xin

    2016-09-23

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) has recently been suggested to inhibit type-I interferon (IFN)-dependent immune responses during RSV infection. However, the precise function of RSV NS1 protein in reducing the antiviral effects of IFNs against RSV is poorly understood. The roles of cellular miRNAs in the defence against RSV infection are not well characterized. In this study, qRT-PCR analysis revealed that miR-29a expression was upregulated in the recombinant wild-type RSV (rRSV-WT) group compared with the control group, but no changes were observed in the recombinant RSV mutant lacking NS1 (rRSV-ΔNS1) group. Using dual-luciferase reporter assay, we demonstrated that miR-29a could directly target IFNAR1 3'-UTR and downregulate IFNAR1 expression. In addition, RSV NS1 suppressed IFNAR1 expression at both RNA level and protein level in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. RSV plaque assays showed that the number of RSV plaques in miR-29a mimics group was significantly higher than that in miR-29a inhibitor group or miRNA scramble control group. HA-NS1 overexpression increased the numbers of RSV plaque, but the promotive effect on virus replication was attenuated in cells transfected with miR-29a inhibitors. These results suggest that miR-29a, upregulated during RSV infection, is a negative regulator of IFNAR1 and is critical for RSV NS1-induced virus replication. PMID:27569280

  8. The C-terminal 50 amino acid residues of dengue NS3 protein are important for NS3-NS5 interaction and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Tay, Moon Y F; Saw, Wuan Geok; Zhao, Yongqian; Chan, Kitti W K; Singh, Daljit; Chong, Yuwen; Forwood, Jade K; Ooi, Eng Eong; Grüber, Gerhard; Lescar, Julien; Luo, Dahai; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2015-01-23

    Dengue virus multifunctional proteins NS3 protease/helicase and NS5 methyltransferase/RNA-dependent RNA polymerase form part of the viral replication complex and are involved in viral RNA genome synthesis, methylation of the 5'-cap of viral genome, and polyprotein processing among other activities. Previous studies have shown that NS5 residue Lys-330 is required for interaction between NS3 and NS5. Here, we show by competitive NS3-NS5 interaction ELISA that the NS3 peptide spanning residues 566-585 disrupts NS3-NS5 interaction but not the null-peptide bearing the N570A mutation. Small angle x-ray scattering study on NS3(172-618) helicase and covalently linked NS3(172-618)-NS5(320-341) reveals a rigid and compact formation of the latter, indicating that peptide NS5(320-341) engages in specific and discrete interaction with NS3. Significantly, NS3:Asn-570 to alanine mutation introduced into an infectious DENV2 cDNA clone did not yield detectable virus by plaque assay even though intracellular double-stranded RNA was detected by immunofluorescence. Detection of increased negative-strand RNA synthesis by real time RT-PCR for the NS3:N570A mutant suggests that NS3-NS5 interaction plays an important role in the balanced synthesis of positive- and negative-strand RNA for robust viral replication. Dengue virus infection has become a global concern, and the lack of safe vaccines or antiviral treatments urgently needs to be addressed. NS3 and NS5 are highly conserved among the four serotypes, and the protein sequence around the pinpointed amino acids from the NS3 and NS5 regions are also conserved. The identification of the functionally essential interaction between the two proteins by biochemical and reverse genetics methods paves the way for rational drug design efforts to inhibit viral RNA synthesis.

  9. Deletion or green fluorescent protein tagging of the pUL35 capsid component of pseudorabies virus impairs virus replication in cell culture and neuroinvasion in mice.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Mirjam; Maresch, Christina; Klupp, Barbara G; Fuchs, Walter; Mettenleiter, Thomas C

    2008-06-01

    To facilitate tracing of virion movement, the non-essential capsid proteins pUL35 of herpes simplex virus type 1 and pseudorabies virus (PrV) have been tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). However, the biological relevance of PrV pUL35 and the functionality of the fusion proteins have not yet been investigated in detail. We generated PrV mutants either lacking the 12 kDa UL35 gene product, or expressing GFP fused to the N terminus of pUL35. Remarkably, both mutants exhibited significant replication defects in rabbit kidney cells, which could be corrected in pUL35-expressing cells. After intranasal infection of mice both mutants showed delayed neuroinvasion, and survival times of the animals were extended to 3 days, compared with 2 days after wild-type infection. Thus, fusion of pUL35 with GFP resulted in a non-functional protein, which has to be considered for the use of corresponding mutants in tracing studies. PMID:18474549

  10. Dissimilar expression of multidrug resistance mdr1 and bcrp by the replication of hepatitis C virus: role of the nonstructural 5A protein.

    PubMed

    W Rivero, C; Rosso, N; Gentile, E; Cuestas, M; Tiribelli, C; Oubiña, J R; Mathet, V L

    2013-04-01

    Multidrug resistance associated with the overexpression of ATP-dependent binding cassette (ABC) proteins is widely accepted as an important cause of treatment failure in patients with neoplastic or infectious diseases. Some of them play also a pivotal role in detoxification processes. Herein, we investigated the effect of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein on the expression and functional activity of two ABC transport proteins: MDR1 and BCRP. RT-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was carried out for mdr1 and bcrp mRNAs in both Huh7 cells expressing NS5A and Huh7.5 cells containing either full-length- or subgenomic-HCV replicon systems. The functional activity of these pumps was studied by performing a dye efflux assay with DiOC2 and Rhodamine 123. A dose-dependent down-regulation of mdr1 expression was documented in Huh7 cells expressing the NS5A protein, as well as in both replicon systems. In contrast, a significant increase of bcrp expression in both systems was recorded, which were in full agreement with the dye efflux assay results. These results warrant further in vivo studies in HCV patients with cholestasis and/or patients that are refractive to the pharmacotherapy due to the activity of these pumps. PMID:23490381

  11. Cold-Inducible RNA-Binding Protein Bypasses Replicative Senescence in Primary Cells through Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1 and 2 Activation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Artero-Castro, Ana; Callejas, Francisco B.; Castellvi, Josep; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Carnero, Amancio; Fernández-Marcos, Pablo J.; Serrano, Manuel; Ramón y Cajal, Santiago; Lleonart, Matilde E.

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are immortalized cells whose proliferation rate is comparable to that of carcinogenic cells. To study the expression of embryonic stem cell genes in primary cells, genetic screening was performed by infecting mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with a cDNA library from embryonic stem cells. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) was identified due to its ability to bypass replicative senescence in primary cells. CIRP enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, and treatment with an MEK inhibitor decreased the proliferation caused by CIRP. In contrast to CIRP upregulation, CIRP downregulation decreased cell proliferation and resulted in inhibition of phosphorylated ERK1/2 inhibition. This is the first evidence that ERK1/2 activation, through the same mechanism as that described for a Val12 mutant K-ras to induce premature senescence, is able to bypass senescence in the absence of p16INK4a, p21WAF1, and p19ARF upregulation. Moreover, these results show that CIRP functions by stimulating general protein synthesis with the involvement of the S6 and 4E-BP1 proteins. The overall effect is an increase in kinase activity of the cyclin D1-CDK4 complex, which is in accordance with the proliferative capacity of CIRP MEFs. Interestingly, CIRP mRNA and protein were upregulated in a subgroup of cancer patients, a finding that may be of relevance for cancer research. PMID:19158277

  12. Defective RNA replication and late gene expression in temperature-sensitive influenza viruses expressing deleted forms of the NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Ana M; Marión, Rosa M; Zürcher, Thomas; Gómez, Paulino; Portela, Agustín; Nieto, Amelia; Ortín, Juan

    2004-04-01

    Influenza A virus mutants expressing C-terminally deleted forms of the NS1 protein (NS1-81 and NS1-110) were generated by plasmid rescue. These viruses were temperature sensitive and showed a small plaque size at the permissive temperature. The accumulation of virion RNA in mutant virus-infected cells was reduced at the restrictive temperature, while the accumulation of cRNA or mRNA was not affected, indicating that the NS1 protein is involved in the control of transcription versus replication processes in the infection. The synthesis and accumulation of late virus proteins were reduced in NS1-81 mutant-infected cells at the permissive temperature and were essentially abolished for both viruses at the restrictive temperature, while synthesis and accumulation of nucleoprotein (NP) were unaffected. Probably as a consequence, the nucleocytoplasmic export of virus NP was strongly inhibited at the restrictive temperature. These results indicate that the NS1 protein is essential for nuclear and cytoplasmic steps during the virus cycle.

  13. Making sense of nuclear localization: A zinc-finger protein encoded by a cytoplasmically replicating plant RNA virus acts a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Lukhovitskaya, Nina I.; Gushchin, Vladimir A.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Savenkov, Eugene I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered numerous nucleus-localized proteins encoded by plant RNA viruses. Whereas for some of these viruses nuclear (or, more specifically, nucleolar) passage of the proteins is needed for the virus movement within the plant or suppression of host defense, the nuclear function of these proteins remains largely unknown. Recently, the situation has been clarified for one group of plant RNA viruses, the Carlaviruses. Being positive-stranded RNA viruses, carlaviruses multiply exclusively in the cytoplasm. Chrysanthemum virus B (CVB, a carlavirus) encodes a zinc-finger protein p12 targeted to the nucleus in a nuclear localization signal-dependent manner. In a recent work, we demonstrated that p12 directly interacts with chromatin and plant promoters, thus, acts as a eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) and activates expression of a host TF involved in regulation of cell size and proliferation to favor virus infection. Therefore our studies identified a novel nuclear stage of in CVB infection involving modulation of host gene expression and plant development. Whereas it is well established that any RNA virus actively replicating in the cell causes changes in the transcriptome, our study expanded this view by showing that some positive-stranded RNA viruses can directly manipulate host transcription by encoding eukaryotic TFs. PMID:23759549

  14. The P2 of Wheat yellow mosaic virus rearranges the endoplasmic reticulum and recruits other viral proteins into replication-associated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liying; Andika, Ida Bagus; Shen, Jiangfeng; Yang, Di; Chen, Jianping

    2014-06-01

    Viruses commonly modify host endomembranes to facilitate biological processes in the viral life cycle. Infection by viruses belonging to the genus Bymovirus (family Potyviridae) has long been known to induce the formation of large membranous inclusion bodies in host cells, but their assembly and biological roles are still unclear. Immunoelectron microscopy of cells infected with the bymovirus Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) showed that P1, P2 and P3 are the major viral protein constituents of the membranous inclusions, whereas NIa-Pro (nuclear inclusion-a protease) and VPg (viral protein genome-linked) are probable minor components. P1, P2 and P3 associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but only P2 was able to rearrange ER and form large aggregate structures. Bioinformatic analyses and chemical experiments showed that P2 is an integral membrane protein and depends on the active secretory pathway to form aggregates of ER membranes. In planta and in vitro assays demonstrated that P2 interacts with P1, P3, NIa-Pro or VPg and recruits these proteins into the aggregates. In vivo RNA labelling using WYMV-infected wheat protoplasts showed that the synthesis of viral RNAs occurs in the P2-associated inclusions. Our results suggest that P2 plays a major role in the formation of membranous compartments that house the genomic replication of WYMV.

  15. Hibiscus Chlorotic Ringspot Virus Coat Protein Is Essential for Cell-to-Cell and Long-Distance Movement but Not for Viral RNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Shengniao; Gil-Salas, Francisco M.; Tewary, Sunil Kumar; Samales, Ashwin Kuppusamy; Johnson, John; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP) functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G) in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G) in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G) were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G) was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G) inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro. PMID:25402344

  16. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement but not for viral RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shengniao; Gil-Salas, Francisco M; Tewary, Sunil Kumar; Samales, Ashwin Kuppusamy; Johnson, John; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Wong, Sek-Man

    2014-01-01

    Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP) functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G) in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G) in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G) were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G) was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G) inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro. PMID:25402344

  17. Cellular DDX21 RNA helicase inhibits influenza A virus replication but is counteracted by the viral NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guifang; Liu, Chien-Hung; Zhou, Ligang; Krug, Robert M

    2014-04-01

    Influenza A virus RNA synthesis is catalyzed by the viral polymerase comprised of the PA, PB1, and PB2 proteins. We show that the host DDX21 RNA helicase restricts influenza A virus by binding PB1 and inhibiting polymerase assembly, resulting in reduced viral RNA and protein synthesis. Later during infection, the viral NS1 protein overcomes this restriction by binding to DDX21 and displacing PB1. DDX21 binds to a region of the NS1 N-terminal domain that also participates in other critical functions. A virus mutant whose NS1 protein is unable to bind DDX21 exhibits reduced viral protein synthesis at both late and early times of infection, a phenotype converted to wild-type upon DDX21 knockdown. As sequential interaction of PB1 and NS1 with DDX21 leads to temporal regulation of viral gene expression, influenza A virus likely uses the DDX21-NS1 interaction not only to overcome restriction, but also to regulate the viral life cycle.

  18. Small interfering RNAs targeting viral structural envelope protein genes and the 5ʹ-UTR inhibit replication of bovine viral diarrhea virus in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, N; Rajukumar, K; Kalaiyarasu, S; Behera, S P; Nema, R K; Dubey, S C

    2011-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) are important pathogens of cattle that occur worldwide, and for which no antiviral therapy is available. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of small interfering (si) RNAs on bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) replication in cultured bovine cells was explored. Four synthetic siRNAs were designed to target structural envelope region genes (Erns, E1, and E2) and one cocktail of siRNA was generated to target the 5ʹ-UTR of the BVDV-1 genome. The inhibitory effects of siRNAs were assessed by determination of infectious viral titer, viral antigen and viral RNA. The siRNA cocktail and three of the synthetic siRNAs produced moderate anti-BVDV-1 effect in vitro as shown by 25%-40% reduction in BVDV-1 antigen production, 7.9-19.9-fold reduction in viral titer and 21-48-fold reduction in BVDV-1 RNA copy number. Our findings suggest that siRNA cocktail targeted at the 5ʹ-UTR is a stronger inhibitor of BVDV-1 replication and the targets for siRNA inhibition can be extended to BVDV-1 structural envelope protein genes.

  19. Mapping by interspecies transformation experiments of several ribosomal protein genes near the replication origin of Bacillus subtilis chromosome.

    PubMed

    Osawa, S; Tokui, A; Saito, H

    1978-08-17

    Bacillus subtilis 168 was transformed with DNAs from B. amyloliquefaciens K or B. licheniformis IAM 11054. These two species show a considerable difference in ribosomal proteins from B. subtilis. Analyses of the transformants indicated that the genes for 16 proteins, S3, S5, S8, S12, S17, S19, BL1, BL5, BL6, BL8, BL14, BL16, BL17, BL22, BL23 and BL25 are located in the cysA-str-spc region on B. subtilis chromosome. The genes for 10 proteins, S4, S6, S13, S16, S20, BL15, BL18, BL20, BL24 and BL28 could not be found in this region in the present experiments.

  20. Complexity transmission during replication

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian K.

    1979-01-01

    The transmission of complexity during DNA replication has been investigated to clarify the significance of this molecular property in a deterministic process. Complexity was equated with the amount of randomness within an ordered molecular structure and measured by the entropy of a posteriori probabilities for discrete (monomer sequences, atomic bonds) and continuous (torsion angle sequences) structural parameters in polynucleotides, proteins, and ligand molecules. A theoretical analysis revealed that sequence complexity decreases during transmission from DNA to protein. It was also found that sequence complexity limits the attainable complexity in the folding of a polypeptide chain and that a protein cannot interact with a ligand moiety of higher complexity. The analysis indicated, furthermore, that in any deterministic molecular process a cause possesses more complexity than its effect. This outcome broadly complies with Curie's symmetry principle. Results from an analysis of an extensive set of experimental data are presented; they corroborate these findings. It is suggested, therefore, that complexity governs the direction of order—order molecular transformations. Two biological implications are (i) replication of DNA in a stepwise, repetitive manner by a polymerase appears to be a necessary consequence of structural constraints imposed by complexity, and (ii) during evolution, increases in complexity had to involve a nondeterministic mechanism. This latter requirement apparently applied also to development of the first replicating system on earth. PMID:287070

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr-Binding Protein VprBP, a WD40 Protein Associated with the DDB1-CUL4 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Is Essential for DNA Replication and Embryonic Development▿

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Chad M.; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Chastain, Paul D.; Jackson, Sarah C.; He, Yizhou J.; Kotake, Yojiro; Cook, Jeanette Gowen; Xiong, Yue

    2008-01-01

    Damaged DNA binding protein 1, DDB1, bridges an estimated 90 or more WD40 repeats (DDB1-binding WD40, or DWD proteins) to the CUL4-ROC1 catalytic core to constitute a potentially large number of E3 ligase complexes. Among these DWD proteins is the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr-binding protein VprBP, whose cellular function has yet to be characterized but has recently been found to mediate Vpr-induced G2 cell cycle arrest. We demonstrate here that VprBP binds stoichiometrically with DDB1 through its WD40 domain and through DDB1 to CUL4A, subunits of the COP9/signalsome, and DDA1. The steady-state level of VprBP remains constant during interphase and decreases during mitosis. VprBP binds to chromatin in a DDB1-independent and cell cycle-dependent manner, increasing from early S through G2 before decreasing to undetectable levels in mitotic and G1 cells. Silencing VprBP reduced the rate of DNA replication, blocked cells from progressing through the S phase, and inhibited proliferation. VprBP ablation in mice results in early embryonic lethality. Conditional deletion of the VprBP gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts results in severely defective progression through S phase and subsequent apoptosis. Our studies identify a previously unknown function of VprBP in S-phase progression and suggest the possibility that HIV-1 Vpr may divert an ongoing chromosomal replication activity to facilitate viral replication. PMID:18606781

  2. The Legionella pneumophila F-box protein Lpp2082 (AnkB) modulates ubiquitination of the host protein parvin B and promotes intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Lomma, M; Dervins-Ravault, D; Rolando, M; Nora, T; Newton, H J; Sansom, F M; Sahr, T; Gomez-Valero, L; Jules, M; Hartland, E L; Buchrieser, C

    2010-09-01

    The environmental pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes three proteins containing F-box domains and additional protein-protein interaction domains, reminiscent of eukaryotic SCF ubiquitin-protein ligases. Here we show that the F-box proteins of L. pneumophila strain Paris are Dot/Icm effectors involved in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins associated with the Legionella-containing vacuole. Single, double and triple mutants of the F-box protein encoding genes were impaired in infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, THP-1 macrophages and human lung epithelial cells. Lpp2082/AnkB was essential for infection of the lungs of A/J mice in vivo, and bound Skp1, the interaction partner of the SCF complex in mammalian cells, similar to AnkB from strain AA100/130b. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen and co-immunoprecipitation analysis we identified ParvB a protein present in focal adhesions and in lamellipodia, as a target. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that ectopically expressed Lpp2082/AnkB colocalized with ParvB at the periphery of lamellipodia. Unexpectedly, ubiquitination tests revealed that Lpp2082/AnkB diminishes endogenous ubiquitination of ParvB. Based on these results we propose that L. pneumophila modulates ubiquitination of ParvB by competing with eukaryotic E3 ligases for the specific protein-protein interaction site of ParvB, thereby revealing a new mechanism by which L. pneumophila may employ translocated effector proteins to promote bacterial survival.

  3. Integrity of helix 2-helix 3 domain of the PrP protein is not mandatory for prion replication.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Khalid; Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Herzog, Laetitia; Jaumain, Emilie; Béringue, Vincent; Rezaei, Human; Pastore, Annalisa; Laude, Hubert; Dron, Michel

    2012-06-01

    The process of prion conversion is not yet well understood at the molecular level. The regions critical for the conformational change of PrP remain mostly debated and the extent of sequence change acceptable for prion conversion is poorly documented. To achieve progress on these issues, we applied a reverse genetic approach using the Rov cell system. This allowed us to test the susceptibility of a number of insertion mutants to conversion into prion in the absence of wild-type PrP molecules. We were able to propagate several prions with 8 to 16 extra amino acids, including a polyglycine stretch and His or FLAG tags, inserted in the middle of the protease-resistant fragment. These results demonstrate the possibility to increase the length of the loop between helices H2 and H3 up to 4-fold, without preventing prion replication. They also indicate that this loop probably remains unstructured in PrP(Sc). We also showed that bona fide prions can be produced following insertion of octapeptides in the two C-terminal turns of H2. These insertions do not interfere with the overall fold of the H2-H3 domain indicating that the highly conserved sequence of the terminal part of H2 is not critical for the conversion. Altogether these data showed that the amplitude of modifications acceptable for prion conversion in the core of the globular domain of PrP is much greater than one might have assumed. These observations should help to refine structural models of PrP(Sc) and elucidate the conformational changes underlying prions generation. PMID:22511770

  4. The Weak Interdomain Coupling Observed in the 70 kDa Subunit of Human Replication Protein A is Unaffected by ssDNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Daughdrill, Gary W.; Ackerman, Jennifer; Isern, Nancy G.; Botuyan, Maria V.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Wold, Marc S.; Lowry, David F.

    2001-08-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric, multifunctional protein that binds single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and is essential for eukaryotic DNA metabolism. Using heteronuclear NMR methods we have investigated the domain interactions and ssDNA bind