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Sample records for reported outcome questionnaires

  1. Patient-Reported Outcome questionnaires for hip arthroscopy: a systematic review of the psychometric evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hip arthroscopies are often used in the treatment of intra-articular hip injuries. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are an important parameter in evaluating treatment. It is unclear which PRO questionnaires are specifically available for hip arthroscopy patients. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate which PRO questionnaires are valid and reliable in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Methods A search was conducted in Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Pedro, EMBASE and Web of Science from 1931 to October 2010. Studies assessing the quality of PRO questionnaires in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy were included. The quality of the questionnaires was evaluated by the psychometric properties of the outcome measures. The quality of the articles investigating the questionnaires was assessed by the COSMIN list. Results Five articles identified three questionnaires; the Modified Harris Hip Score (MHHS), the Nonarthritic Hip Score (NAHS) and the Hip Outcome Score (HOS). The NAHS scored best on the content validity, whereas the HOS scored best on agreement, internal consistency, reliability and responsiveness. The quality of the articles describing the HOS scored highest. The NAHS is the best quality questionnaire. The articles describing the HOS are the best quality articles. Conclusions This systematic review shows that there is no conclusive evidence for the use of a single patient-reported outcome questionnaire in the evaluation of patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. Based on available psychometric evidence we recommend using a combination of the NAHS and the HOS for patients undergoing hip arthroscopy. PMID:21619610

  2. Readability of patient-reported outcome questionnaires for use with persons who stutter.

    PubMed

    Zraick, Richard I; Atcherson, Samuel R; Brown, Angela M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the readability of several published patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires for use with persons who stutter, and to compare the readability results to existing data about average reading levels for English-speaking adults living in the United States. Published PRO questionnaires were identified that are traditionally completed by persons who stutter in a self-administered format. Reading grade levels were analyzed using the Flesch Reading Ease, FOG, and FORCAST formulas as computed by a readability calculations software package. Descriptive statistics were computed across the questionnaires. The results of this study demonstrate that many of the PRO questionnaires exceeded the fifth to sixth grade reading levels recommended by health literacy experts. The clinician should consider the average reading level needed to understand a particular PRO questionnaire when administering it to a patient or their proxy. Likewise, developers of PRO questionnaires should consider reading level of respondents and include information about this when reporting psychometric data. The reader will get an overview over the literature on patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires and their use with persons who stutter and will be able to: (1) define readability, (2) describe how reading levels are determined for a given PRO questionnaire, (3) list the strengths and limitations of readability assessment in the evaluation of persons who stutter and (4) analyze the role of readability assessment in future PRO questionnaire development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The OnyCOE-t™ questionnaire: responsiveness and clinical meaningfulness of a patient-reported outcomes questionnaire for toenail onychomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Lori P; Mathias, Susan D; Raut, Monika; Kianifard, Farid; Tavakkol, Amir

    2006-01-01

    Background This research was conducted to confirm the validity and reliability and to assess the responsiveness and clinical meaningfulness of the OnyCOE-t™, a questionnaire specifically designed to measure patient-reported outcomes (PRO) associated with toenail onychomycosis. Methods 504 patients with toenail onychomycosis randomized to receive 12 weeks of terbinafine 250 mg/day with or without target toenail debridement in the IRON-CLAD® trial completed the OnyCOE-t™ at baseline, weeks 6, 12, 24, and 48. The OnyCOE-t™ is composed of 6 multi-item scales and 1 single-item scale. These include a 7-item Toenail Symptom assessment, which comprises both Symptom Frequency and Symptom Bothersomeness scales; an 8-item Appearance Problems scale; a 7-item Physical Activities Problems scale; a 1-item Overall Problem scale; a 7-item Stigma scale; and a 3-item Treatment Satisfaction scale. In total, 33 toenail onychomycosis-specific items are included in the OnyCOE-t™. Clinical data, in particular the percent clearing of mycotic involvement in the target toenail, and OnyCOE-t™ responses were used to evaluate the questionnaire's reliability, validity, responsiveness, and the minimally clinical important difference (MCID). Results The OnyCOE-t™ was shown to be reliable and valid. Construct validity and known groups validity were acceptable. Internal consistency reliability of multi-item scales was demonstrated by Cronbach's alpha > .84. Responsiveness was good, with the Treatment Satisfaction, Symptom Frequency, Overall Problem, and Appearance Problem scales demonstrating the most responsiveness (Guyatt's statistic of 1.72, 1.31, 1.13, and 1.11, respectively). MCID was evaluated for three different clinical measures, and indicated that approximately an 8.5-point change (on a 0 to 100 scale) was clinically meaningful based on a 25% improvement in target nail clearing. Conclusion The OnyCOE-t™ questionnaire is a unique, toenail-specific PRO questionnaire that can be

  4. Mental health and adjustment to juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Level of agreement between parent and adolescent reports according to Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and Adolescent Outcomes Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Adamczyk, Katarzyna A.; Niedziela, Marek; Głowacki, Maciej; Głowacki, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were threefold. Firstly, to analyze the psychometric properties of the Polish-language Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) questionnaire in the self-report Adolescent Outcomes Questionnaire (adolescents, 11–18 years of age) and in the parent-report Adolescent Outcomes Questionnaire (completed by a parent or guardian of an adolescent aged 11–18 years). Secondly, to determine the level of agreement between parents and adolescents in rating dysfunction in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and thirdly, to examine associations between psychological adjustments of patients to JIA and disease as well as their socio-demographic characteristics. The study sample consisted of 52 participants. 26 adolescents between the ages of 11 and 18 years with a diagnosis of JIA and 26 parents were considered for inclusion. Disease course was classified as pauciarticular (n = 12, 46.2%) and polyarticular (n = 14, 53.8%). Participants completed the PODCI (self- and parent- report) twice and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire-25 (SDQ-25). Considering the distribution of results regarding PODCI normative scores, 73.1% of parents and 69.2% of patients scored below 50 on the Global Functioning Scale; that is lower than the average for the general healthy population. Regarding the parent report, the total score of the SDQ-25 equaled 11.86 (SD 2.66), whereas the patient report equaled 11.23 (SD 2.78). The study groups do not differ significantly in regards to either the PODCI or the SDQ-25 results. Parents and adolescents with JIA appear to hold very similar perceptions of patients' health. Greater differences emerge as disease severity and age of patients increase. Excellent internal consistency, intrarater and test-retest reliability of the Global Functioning Scale have been confirmed in the Polish version of the PODCI, the questionnaire may therefore aid identification of patients reporting significant problems in this group. PMID

  5. Which is the most useful patient-reported outcome in femoroacetabular impingement? Test-retest reliability of six questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Hinman, Rana S; Dobson, Fiona; Takla, Amir; O'Donnell, John; Bennell, Kim L

    2014-03-01

    The most reliable patient-reported outcomes (PROs) for people with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is unknown because there have been no direct comparisons of questionnaires. Thus, the aim was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of six existing PROs in a single cohort of young active people with hip/groin pain consistent with a clinical diagnosis of FAI. Young adults with clinical FAI completed six PRO questionnaires on two occasions, 1-2 weeks apart. The PROs were modified Harris Hip Score, Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Score, Hip Outcome Score, Non-Arthritic Hip Score, International Hip Outcome Tool, Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score. 30 young adults (mean age 24 years, SD 4 years, range 18-30 years; 15 men) with stable symptoms participated. Intraclass correlation coefficient(3,1) values ranged from 0.73 to 0.93 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.98) indicating that most questionnaires reached minimal reliability benchmarks. Measurement error at the individual level was quite large for most questionnaires (minimal detectable change (MDC95) 12.4-35.6, 95% CI 8.7 to 54.0). In contrast, measurement error at the group level was quite small for most questionnaires (MDC95 2.2-7.3, 95% CI 1.6 to 11). The majority of the questionnaires were reliable and precise enough for use at the group level. Samples of only 23-30 individuals were required to achieve acceptable measurement variation at the group level. Further direct comparisons of these questionnaires are required to assess other measurement properties such as validity, responsiveness and meaningful change in young people with FAI.

  6. Patient-reported outcome assessment after total joint replacement: comparison of questionnaire completion times on paper and tablet computer.

    PubMed

    Kesterke, N; Egeter, J; Erhardt, J B; Jost, B; Giesinger, K

    2015-07-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) assessment is becoming increasingly important after joint replacement surgery. However, PRO data collection, questionnaire handling, and data processing are time consuming and costly process. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficiency of PRO assessment using tablet computers compared with traditional paper questionnaires in a total hip or knee arthroplasty (THR or TKR) population. We recruited 100 patients from outpatient clinics attending for routine follow-up 2 months, 1 year, or 5 years after THR or TKR. Fifty patients completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) osteoarthritis score and Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12) questionnaires on paper, and 50 patients completed these on a tablet computer. Questionnaire completion was timed for each PRO assessment and for manual data entry of the paper questionnaires into the database. The t test, Mann-Whitney U test, Fisher's exact test, and Wilcoxon test were used for statistical analysis. The mean age of the patients was 67.0 years (standard deviation 10.3 years), with no significant difference between the two groups. Median time for WOMAC questionnaire completion (including data entry for the paper questionnaires) was 197 s for the paper version and 117 s for the tablet version (p < 0.001). Median times for completion of FJS-12 were comparable for paper and tablet versions (32 vs. 37 s). We did not find a significant correlation between age and time for questionnaire completion. Electronic PRO data collection can substantially decrease time, logistics, and effort associated with questionnaire completion in daily clinical practice. It is also acceptable for use in an older arthroplasty population.

  7. Development and initial psychometric evaluation of patient-reported outcome questionnaires to evaluate the symptoms and impact of hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Alexa B; Sundaram, Murali; Banderas, Benjamin; Foley, Catherine; Shields, Alan L

    2017-07-04

    Two patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires, the Hidradenitis Suppurativa Symptom Assessment (HSSA) and Hidradenitis Suppurativa Impact Assessment (HSIA), were developed to measure signs, symptoms and impacts of HS in treatment efficacy studies. In accordance with FDA guidelines and published best practices, four stages of research were conducted to create the questionnaires: concept elicitation, questionnaire construction, content evaluation and psychometric evaluation. Subjects (N = 20) who participated in the concept elicitation stage reported 15 unique HS-related signs and symptoms and 51 impacts. Following this, eight sign and symptom concepts and 21 impacts were selected for construction of the HSSA and HSIA, respectively. During content evaluation, cognitive debriefing interviews with HS subjects (N = 20) confirmed subjects could read, comprehend and meaningfully respond to both questionnaires. Modifications made after this stage of work resulted in a nine-item HSSA and a 17-item HSIA. The HSSA and HSIA were subsequently entered into a US-based observational study (N = 40), and the scores produced by each were found to be reliable, construct valid, and able to distinguish among clinically distinct groups. The HSSA and HSIA are content-valid, HS-specific, PRO questionnaires with demonstrated ability to generate reliable, valid scores when administered to patients with HS in a research setting.

  8. A narrative review shows the unvalidated use of self-report questionnaires for individual medication as outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Charlotte; Britten, Nicky

    2005-10-01

    Accurate individualized data on drug consumption is required for a number of purposes. While electronic medication event monitoring is the best objective measure available, self-report tools would be a useful alternative in certain situations. We searched for validated self-completion questionnaires suitable for measuring change in medication. A systematic search of the English language literature since 1980, and a narrative literature review. Few articles described the development or use of self-report methods to measure change in medication over time. We found no questionnaire that was commonly used for this purpose, nor one that had been evaluated and published. Considerable work has been undertaken to develop questionnaires or diaries for individual projects, but because these tools and their validation are rarely published, they are not available for other researchers to use, and comparison across studies is difficult. Some work has been done developing diary formats and the Medication Quantification Scale converts complex medication change data to a single numerical score. Medication change is rarely considered as an outcome, and when it is measured, nonstandardized methods are used. More attention needs to be given to developing self-report tools and validating them across a range of criteria.

  9. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886–0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management. PMID:27190648

  10. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886-0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management.

  11. The Munich Knee Questionnaire: Development and Validation of a New Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Tool for Knee Disorders.

    PubMed

    Beirer, Marc; Fiedler, Nico; Huber, Stephan; Schmitt-Sody, Marcus; Lorenz, Stephan; Biberthaler, Peter; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-08-01

    To develop and validate an all-purpose patient-reported outcome questionnaire for a patient-based follow-up examination regarding knee disorders. Each scale of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Lysholm knee score, Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool (WOMET) score, and Tegner score was analyzed, and after matching of the general topics, the dedicated items underwent a fusion to the final Munich Knee Questionnaire (MKQ) item and a score comprising 33 items was created. In a prospective clinical study, we evaluated validity, reliability, and responsiveness in 152 physical active patients (75 women and 77 men; mean age, 47 years) with traumatic as well as degenerative knee disorders. Test-retest reliability was substantial, with intraclass correlation coefficients of at least 0.91. Construct validity and responsiveness were confirmed by correlation coefficients of 0.78 to 0.86 (P = .01) and 0.41 to 0.71, respectively. Correlation coefficients of the original scores (KOOS, IKDC, Lysholm, WOMET, and Tegner) and the scores calculated from the MKQ were between 0.80 and 0.91 (P = .01). The MKQ is a reliable and valid patient-reported outcome questionnaire for assessing knee function. It seems to enable the calculation of the original items of the KOOS, IKDC score, Lysholm knee score, WOMET score, and Tegner score. The MKQ facilitates the comparison of treatment results in knee disorders and allows the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Identified inadequate treatment concepts could be eliminated, leading to increased patient satisfaction and optimized quality of health care. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patient experiences with oily skin: The qualitative development of content for two new patient reported outcome questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Robert; Atkinson, Mark J; Clark, Marci; Abetz, Linda; Lohs, Jan; Kuhagen, Ilka; Harness, Jane; Draelos, Zoe; Thiboutot, Diane; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Copley-Merriman, Kati

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop the content for two new patient reported outcome (PRO) measures to: a) assess the severity of symptoms; and b) the impact of facial skin oiliness on emotional wellbeing using qualitative data from face to face, and internet focus groups in Germany and the US. Methods Using input from initial treatment satisfaction focus groups (n = 42), a review of relevant literature and expert clinicians (n = 3), a discussion guide was developed to guide qualitative inquiry using Internet focus groups (IFGs). IFGs were conducted with German (n = 26) and US (n = 28) sufferers of oily skin. Questionnaire items were generated using coded transcript data from the focus groups. Cognitive debriefing was conducted online with 42 participants and face to face with an additional five participants to assess the comprehension of the items. Results There were equal numbers of male and female participants; mean age was 35.4 (SD 9.3) years. On average, participants had had oily skin for 15.2 years, and 74% (n = 40) reported having mild-moderate acne. Participants reported using visual, tactile and sensory (feel without touching their face) methods to evaluate the severity of facial oiliness. Oily facial skin had both an emotional and social impact, and was associated with feelings of unattractiveness, self-consciousness, embarrassment, irritation and frustration. Items were generated for a measure of oily skin severity (Oily Skin Self-Assessment Scale) and a measure of the impact of oily skin on emotional well-being (Oily Skin Impact Scale). Cognitive debriefing resulted in minor changes to the draft items and confirmed their face and content validity. Conclusion The research provides insight into the experience of having oily skin and illustrates significant difficulties associated with the condition. Item content was developed for early versions of two PRO measures of the symptoms and emotional impact of oily facial skin. The psychometric validation of these measures

  13. Response Rates for Patient-Reported Outcomes Using Web-Based Versus Paper Questionnaires: Comparison of Two Invitational Methods in Older Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Pauline AJ; Mols, Floortje; Thong, Melissa SY; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving questionnaire response rates is an everlasting issue for research. Today, the Internet can easily be used to collect data quickly. However, collecting data on the Internet can lead to biased samples because not everyone is able to access or use the Internet. The older population, for example, is much less likely to use the Internet. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Initial Treatment and Long-Term Evaluation of Survivorship (PROFILES) registry offers a platform to collect Web-based and paper questionnaires and to try different measures to improve response rates. Objective In this study, our aim was to study the influence of two methods of invitation on the response rate. Our second aim was to examine the preference of questionnaire mode of administration (paper or Web-based) for the older patient in particular. Methods To test these two invitational methods, 3406 colorectal cancer patients between ages 18 and 85 years received an invitation containing an access code for the Web-based questionnaire. They could also request a paper questionnaire with an included reply card (paper-optional group). In contrast, 179 randomly selected colorectal cancer patients received a paper questionnaire with the invitation (paper-included group). They could also choose to fill out the Web-based questionnaire with the included access code. Results Response rates did not differ between the paper-optional and the paper-included groups (73.14%, 2491/3406 and 74.9%, 134/179, P=.57). In the paper-optional group, online response was significantly higher when compared to the paper-included group (41.23%, 1027/2491 vs 12.7%, 17/134, P<.001). The majority of online respondents responded after the first invitation (95.33%, 979/1027), which was significantly higher than the paper respondents (52.19%, 764/1464, P<.001). Respondents aged 70 years and older chose to fill out a paper questionnaire more often (71.0%, 677/954). In the oldest age group (≥80 years), 18

  14. Response rates for patient-reported outcomes using web-based versus paper questionnaires: comparison of two invitational methods in older colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Horevoorts, Nicole Je; Vissers, Pauline Aj; Mols, Floortje; Thong, Melissa Sy; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2015-05-07

    Improving questionnaire response rates is an everlasting issue for research. Today, the Internet can easily be used to collect data quickly. However, collecting data on the Internet can lead to biased samples because not everyone is able to access or use the Internet. The older population, for example, is much less likely to use the Internet. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Initial Treatment and Long-Term Evaluation of Survivorship (PROFILES) registry offers a platform to collect Web-based and paper questionnaires and to try different measures to improve response rates. In this study, our aim was to study the influence of two methods of invitation on the response rate. Our second aim was to examine the preference of questionnaire mode of administration (paper or Web-based) for the older patient in particular. To test these two invitational methods, 3406 colorectal cancer patients between ages 18 and 85 years received an invitation containing an access code for the Web-based questionnaire. They could also request a paper questionnaire with an included reply card (paper-optional group). In contrast, 179 randomly selected colorectal cancer patients received a paper questionnaire with the invitation (paper-included group). They could also choose to fill out the Web-based questionnaire with the included access code. Response rates did not differ between the paper-optional and the paper-included groups (73.14%, 2491/3406 and 74.9%, 134/179, P=.57). In the paper-optional group, online response was significantly higher when compared to the paper-included group (41.23%, 1027/2491 vs 12.7%, 17/134, P<.001). The majority of online respondents responded after the first invitation (95.33%, 979/1027), which was significantly higher than the paper respondents (52.19%, 764/1464, P<.001). Respondents aged 70 years and older chose to fill out a paper questionnaire more often (71.0%, 677/954). In the oldest age group (≥80 years), 18.2% (61/336) of the respondents filled out

  15. The importance of rating scale design in the measurement of patient-reported outcomes using questionnaires or item banks.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Jyoti; McAlinden, Colm; Gothwal, Vijaya K; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2012-06-26

    To investigate the effect of rating scale designs (question formats and response categories) on item difficulty calibrations and assess the impact that rating scale differences have on overall vision-related activity limitation (VRAL) scores. Sixteen existing patient-reported outcome instruments (PROs) suitable for cataract assessment, with different rating scales, were self-administered by patients on a cataract surgery waiting list. A total of 226 VRAL items from these PROs in their native rating scales were included in an item bank and calibrated using Rasch analysis. Fifteen item/content areas (e.g., reading newspapers) appearing in at least three different PROs were identified. Within each content area, item calibrations were compared and their range calculated. Similarly, five PROs having at least three items in common with the Visual Function (VF-14) were compared in terms of average item measures. A total of 614 patients (mean age ± SD, 74.1 ± 9.4 years) participated. Items with the same content varied in their calibration by as much as two logits; "reading the small print" had the largest range (1.99 logits) followed by "watching TV" (1.60). Compared with the VF-14 (0.00 logits), the rating scale of the Visual Disability Assessment (1.13 logits) produced the most difficult items and the Cataract Symptom Scale (0.24 logits) produced the least difficult items. The VRAL item bank was suboptimally targeted to the ability level of the participants (2.00 logits). Rating scale designs have a significant effect on item calibrations. Therefore, constructing item banks from existing items in their native formats carries risks to face validity and transmission of problems inherent in existing instruments, such as poor targeting.

  16. The Munich Wrist Questionnaire (MWQ) - development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measurement tool for wrist disorders.

    PubMed

    Beirer, Marc; Serly, Julian; Vester, Helen; Pförringer, Dominik; Crönlein, Moritz; Deiler, Stephan; Biberthaler, Peter; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2016-04-14

    Although self-assessment questionnaires for the wrist joint are numerous, most validation studies focus on a specific pathology and patient collectives. In addition the available questionnaires focus on subjective parameters such as pain, usual and specific activities but the range of motion (ROM) as an essential objective parameter in wrist disorders is rarely considered. Therefore the purpose of the presented study was to develop and validate a new universally applicable self-assessment score, the Munich Wrist Questionnaire (MWQ), which allows for the assessment of subjective as well as objective parameters of the wrist joint. The MWQ consists of 16 items addressing three domains: pain, work and activities of daily living and wrist function including range of motion and grip strength. In a prospective clinical study validity, reliability and responsiveness of the MWQ of physical active patients were evaluated. Validation study included 100 patients (mean age 41 years, SD 16.3 years; range, 18-77 years). Test-retest reliability was substantial, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.75 to 0.83 for the three domains. Construct validity and responsiveness were confirmed by correlation coefficients of at least 0.86 for construct validity and for responsiveness ranging from 0.61 to 0.65. The MWQ presents a valid and reliable instrument for a qualitative self-assessment of subjective and objective parameters (e.g. range of motion) of the wrist joint. Quantitative measurement of wrist function may not longer be limited to specific wrist disorders or patient groups. The MWQ seems to allow for a broad application in clinical research and may facilitate the comparison of treatment results in wrist disorders.

  17. Change Trajectories for the Youth Outcome Questionnaire Self-Report: Identifying Youth at Risk for Treatment Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Jennifer A. N.; Warren, Jared S.; Nelson, Philip L.; Burlingame, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    This study used longitudinal youth outcome data in routine mental health services to test a system for identifying cases at risk for treatment failure. Participants were 2,715 youth (M age = 14) served in outpatient managed care and community mental health settings. Change trajectories were developed using multilevel modeling of archival data.…

  18. Development of a new occupational balance-questionnaire: incorporating the perspectives of patients and healthy people in the design of a self-reported occupational balance outcome instrument

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-reported outcome instruments in health research have become increasingly important over the last decades. Occupational therapy interventions often focus on occupational balance. However, instruments to measure occupational balance are scarce. The aim of the study was therefore to develop a generic self-reported outcome instrument to assess occupational balance based on the experiences of patients and healthy people including an examination of its psychometric properties. Methods We conducted a qualitative analysis of the life stories of 90 people with and without chronic autoimmune diseases to identify components of occupational balance. Based on these components, the Occupational Balance-Questionnaire (OB-Quest) was developed. Construct validity and internal consistency of the OB-Quest were examined in quantitative data. We used Rasch analyses to determine overall fit of the items to the Rasch model, person separation index and potential differential item functioning. Dimensionality testing was conducted by the use of t-tests and Cronbach’s alpha. Results The following components emerged from the qualitative analyses: challenging and relaxing activities, activities with acknowledgement by the individual and by the sociocultural context, impact of health condition on activities, involvement in stressful activities and fewer stressing activities, rest and sleep, variety of activities, adaptation of activities according to changed living conditions and activities intended to care for oneself and for others. Based on these, the seven items of the questionnaire (OB-Quest) were developed. 251 people (132 with rheumatoid arthritis, 43 with systematic lupus erythematous and 76 healthy) filled in the OB-Quest. Dimensionality testing indicated multidimensionality of the questionnaire (t = 0.58, and 1.66 after item reduction, non-significant). The item on the component rest and sleep showed differential item functioning (health condition and age

  19. Development of a new occupational balance-questionnaire: incorporating the perspectives of patients and healthy people in the design of a self-reported occupational balance outcome instrument.

    PubMed

    Dür, Mona; Steiner, Günter; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Dejaco, Clemens; Prodinger, Birgit; Stoffer, Michaela Alexandra; Binder, Alexa; Smolen, Josef; Stamm, Tanja Alexandra

    2014-04-05

    Self-reported outcome instruments in health research have become increasingly important over the last decades. Occupational therapy interventions often focus on occupational balance. However, instruments to measure occupational balance are scarce. The aim of the study was therefore to develop a generic self-reported outcome instrument to assess occupational balance based on the experiences of patients and healthy people including an examination of its psychometric properties. We conducted a qualitative analysis of the life stories of 90 people with and without chronic autoimmune diseases to identify components of occupational balance. Based on these components, the Occupational Balance-Questionnaire (OB-Quest) was developed. Construct validity and internal consistency of the OB-Quest were examined in quantitative data. We used Rasch analyses to determine overall fit of the items to the Rasch model, person separation index and potential differential item functioning. Dimensionality testing was conducted by the use of t-tests and Cronbach's alpha. The following components emerged from the qualitative analyses: challenging and relaxing activities, activities with acknowledgement by the individual and by the sociocultural context, impact of health condition on activities, involvement in stressful activities and fewer stressing activities, rest and sleep, variety of activities, adaptation of activities according to changed living conditions and activities intended to care for oneself and for others. Based on these, the seven items of the questionnaire (OB-Quest) were developed. 251 people (132 with rheumatoid arthritis, 43 with systematic lupus erythematous and 76 healthy) filled in the OB-Quest. Dimensionality testing indicated multidimensionality of the questionnaire (t = 0.58, and 1.66 after item reduction, non-significant). The item on the component rest and sleep showed differential item functioning (health condition and age). Person separation index was 0

  20. Development and content validity testing of a patient-reported outcomes questionnaire for the assessment of hereditary angioedema in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Nicola; Abetz-Webb, Linda; Renault, Lydie; Caballero, Teresa; Longhurst, Hilary; Maurer, Marcus; Christiansen, Sandra; Zuraw, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    Hereditary Angioedema (HAE), a rare genetic disease, manifests as intermittent, painful attacks of angioedema. Attacks vary in frequency and severity and include skin, abdominal and life-threatening laryngeal swellings. This study aimed to develop a patient reported outcome (PRO) tool for the assessment of HAE attacks, including their management and impact on patients' lives, for use in clinical studies, or by physicians in general practice. The results of open-ended face to face concept elicitation interviews with HAE patients in Argentina (n = 10) and the US (n = 33) were used to develop the first draft questionnaire of the HAE patient reported outcomes questionnaire (HAE PRO). Subsequently, in-depth cognitive debriefing interviews were performed with HAE patients in the UK (n = 10), Brazil (n = 10), Germany (n = 11) and France (n = 12). Following input from eight multinational clinical experts further cognitive interviews were conducted in the US (n = 12) and Germany (n = 12). Patients who experienced abdominal, cutaneous or laryngeal attacks of varying severity levels were included in all rounds of interviews. Across the rounds of interviews patients discussed their HAE attack symptoms, impacts and treatments. Cognitive debriefing interviews explored patient understanding and relevance of questionnaire items. All interviews were conducted face to face following a pre-defined semi-structured interview guide in the patient's native language. Patients reported a variety of HAE symptoms, attack triggers, warning signs, attack impacts and treatment options which were used to develop the HAE PRO. The HAE PRO was revised and refined following input from patients and clinical experts. The final 18-item HAE PRO provides an assessment of the HAE attack experience including symptoms, impacts, treatment requirements, healthcare resource use and loss of productivity caused by HAE attacks. Patient and expert input has contributed to the

  1. The use of computer touch-screen technology for the collection of patient-reported outcome data in rheumatoid arthritis: comparison with standardized paper questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Salaffi, F; Gasparini, S; Grassi, W

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the acceptability, feasibility, reliability and score agreement of collecting rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient-reported outcome (PRO) data using an interactive touch-screen computer system. Eighty-seven RA patients completed both the touch-screen and conventional paper-administered set of questionnaires. For this purpose, we have developed a computerized touch-screen system, namely RHEUMATISM (RHEUMA Touch-screen Italian SysteM), to capture PRO data. Variables recorded include the following information: demographic data, VAS scores for pain, patient's and physician's assessment of global activity, and physician's assessment of general health status, 28-joint counts measuring tender and swollen joint, patient self-reported tender joint count, Recent-Onset Arthritis Disability index, and laboratory findings. In a further test-retest study, 35 patients were evaluated. Although over half the patients had no prior computer experience, nearly all found the touch-screen easy to use. Moreover, 86% of the patients preferred the computer format to the paper format (2%) and 12% of subjects had no preference. The quality of the data collected with the touch-screen system was good, with no missed responses. Agreement between scores obtained with the two modes of administration was very good, with concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) from 0.887 to 0.972. CCCs were similar in men and in women, in subjects with or without prior computer experience and in subjects below or above age 65. The electronic questionnaire had good test-retest reliability (CCCs from 0.836 to 0.907). Computer touch-screen questionnaires were well accepted by RA patients, with good data quality, reliability and score agreement.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcomes Following Breast Reconstruction Surgery and Therapeutic Mammoplasty: Prospective Evaluation 1 Year Post-Surgery with BREAST-Q Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Laxmi; Busheri, Laleh; Dixit, Santosh; Patel, Chaula; Dhar, Upendra; Koppiker, Chaitanyanand

    2015-12-01

    Breast Cancer (BC) treatment leads to mutilation and destruction of breast shape with negative effects on body image and self-esteem.One of the main goals of reconstructive and oncoplastic breast surgery is to satisfy patients and improve their quality of life (QoL).Therefore, it is important to assess the patient experience post-surgery by means of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that focus on the patient's perception of the surgery and surgical care, as well as psychosocial well-being and physical functioning. The objective of the current study was to identify predictors of patient satisfaction such as breast appearance including implant type in a selective sample of women who underwent breast reconstruction surgery using implants. Participants in this prospective study were women, (age 26-75 years) that were newly diagnosed with breast carcinoma. All consecutive patients who underwent breast reconstruction between January 2013 and October 2014 were asked to complete the BREAST-Q questionnaire 1 year after surgery. 120 patients underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using implant. While 38 patients underwent reconstruction with opposite breast reduction symmertization, 27 patients underwent therapeutic mammoplasty. The response rate for BREAST-Q questionnaire completion was 98 % with 147 out of 150 study participants completed the questionnaire. From the data collected from 147 patients, the responses could be distributed into 4 distinct groups based on the reconstruction outcomes namely "very much satisfied" (93 %) or "definitely and mostly satisfied" (94 %) or "satisfied" with the outcome (88 %) or "definitely agree on having reconstruction rather than the alternative of having no breast "(91 %).The results showed significant improvement in all four areas that were evaluated after surgery namely satisfaction with the appearance of the breasts, psychosocial, sexual and physical well-being. While the reconstruction surgery had an overall

  3. The Otology Questionnaire Amsterdam: a generic patient reported outcome measure about the severity and impact of ear complaints. A cross-sectional study on the development of this questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Bruinewoud, E M; Kraak, J T; van Leeuwen, L M; Kramer, S E; Merkus, P

    2017-08-03

    Development of the 'Otology Questionnaire Amsterdam' (OQUA), a patient reported outcome measure (PROM), measuring the severity and impact of ear complaints of patients visiting an ENT surgeon. Multicenter, cross-sectional study. Phase 1: qualitative research. In-depth interviews (N = 16) to identify relevant types of ear complaints and to formulate items. Pilot study of the first and second draft of the OQUA (N = 32, N = 39). Phase 2: quantitative research. Field-testing of the OQUA (N = 352). Item reduction based on inter-item correlation, factor analysis and expert opinion. Two secondary and two tertiary ENT clinics. Patients over the age of sixteen visiting an ENT surgeon with an ear complaint. Phase 1: meaning units and frequency of selected descriptions. Phase 2: inter-item correlation, factor loading and Cronbach's Alpha (α). Phase 1: eight relevant types of ear complaints were identified: earache, pressure in ear, hearing loss, tinnitus, otorrhoea, itch, dizziness and loss of taste. Phase 2: factor analysis generated a factor 'impact' (α = 0.913). The current version of the OQUA consists of 34 items, covers eight types of ear complaints and consists of two constructs: complaints and impact. The OQUA is a generic, otologic PROM designed to evaluate the severity of ear complaints and their impact on patients lives. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Otolaryngology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. European multicentre pilot survey to assess vitamin D status in rheumatoid arthritis patients and early development of a new Patient Reported Outcome questionnaire (D-PRO).

    PubMed

    Vojinovic, Jelena; Tincani, Angela; Sulli, Alberto; Soldano, Stefano; Andreoli, Laura; Dall'Ara, Francesca; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Pasalic, Katarina Simic; Balcune, Inete; Ferraz-Amaro, Ivan; Tlustochowicz, Małgorzata; Butrimiene, Irena; Punceviciene, Egle; Toroptsova, Natalia; Grazio, Simeon; Morovic-Vergles, Jadranka; Masaryk, Pavol; Otsa, Kati; Bernardes, Miguel; Boyadzhieva, Vladimira; Salaffi, Fausto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2017-05-01

    To collect data on vitamin D (25(OH)D) serum levels in a large number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from different European countries, to investigate their relation with disease activity, disability, quality of life, and possibly to construct a new Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) questionnaire in order to self-estimate if they are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency-related clinical implications (D-PRO). This was a European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) supported cross-sectional study (project No CLI064) which involved 625 RA patients (mean age 55±11years, mean disease duration 11±9years), 276 age and sex matched healthy subjects, and rheumatologists working in academic institutions or hospital centres, as well as PARE organizations (patient representatives) from 13 European countries. Serum samples for 25(OH)D level measurement were collected during winter time and analyzed in a central laboratory using chemiluminescence immunoassay (DiaSorin). Patient past medical history was recorded. RA patients were provided with three questionnaires: the Rheumatoid Arthritis Impact Diseases score (RAID), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and the new D-PRO questionnaire at the time of 25(OH)D serum sampling. D-PRO questionnaire consisted of three domains, Symptom Risk Score (SRS), Habitus Risk Score (HRS) and Global Risk Score (SRS+HRS=GRS), constructed with items possibly related to vitamin D deficiency. D-PRO was correlated with both clinical and PRO scores. DAS28-CRP was also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by non parametric tests. Mean serum concentration of 25(OH)D in RA patients (17.62±9.76ng/ml) was found significantly lower if compared to the levels obtained in matched controls (18.95±9.45ng/ml) (p=0.01), with statistically significant differences among several European countries. Negative correlations were found between 25(OH)D serum levels and DAS28-CRP (p<0.001), RAID (p=0.05) and HAQ (p=0.04) scores in the RA

  5. Qualitative development of the 'Questionnaire on Pain caused by Spasticity (QPS),' a pediatric patient-reported outcome for spasticity-related pain in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Geister, Thorin L; Quintanar-Solares, Manjari; Martin, Mona; Aufhammer, Stephan; Asmus, Friedrich

    2014-04-01

    To develop a patient-reported outcome measure for spasticity-related pain in children/adolescents (age 2-17 years) with cerebral palsy (CP), the 'Questionnaire on Pain caused by Spasticity (QPS).' Using a semi-structured interview guide, concept elicitation interviews on spasticity-related pain in upper and lower limbs were conducted in 21 children and caregiver pairs. Data were used to modify initial QPS modules and develop six draft modules, which were subsequently refined and finalized in four consecutive cognitive interview waves (12 children and caregiver pairs). To accommodate the broad range in the children's communication skills, QPS child/adolescent modules were developed in both interviewer-administered and self-administered formats. With the additional parent modules, three QPS modules were developed for each of the upper and lower limb applications. Information gained from the parent/caregiver modules complements the child/adolescent assessment. Parents report observed signs and frequency of pain in the same situations used to capture the child/adolescent reports of pain severity (e.g., rest, usual daily activities, active mobilization, and physically difficult activities). Participating children/adolescents and parents/caregivers reported that the final QPS instruments were comprehensive, relevant to the child's spasticity-related experience, and easy to understand and complete. The QPS is a novel instrument for the assessment of spasticity-related pain in children/adolescents with CP that was developed with direct patient input. Its modules allow the use of this instrument in children/adolescents with varied levels of impairment and communication skills.

  6. Detecting Careless Responses to Self-Reported Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kountur, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Problem Statement: The use of self-report questionnaires may lead to biases such as careless responses that distort the research outcomes. Early detection of careless responses in self-report questionnaires may reduce error, but little guidance exists in the literature regarding techniques for detecting such careless or random responses in…

  7. Using the Evaluative Linguistic Framework for Questionnaires to Assess Comprehensibility of Self-Report Health Questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Clerehan, Rosemary; Guillemin, Francis; Epstein, Jonathan; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-01

    The Evaluative Linguistic Framework (ELF) was developed to judge the quality of health care texts for patients, based on systemic functional linguistic theory. This approach considers key variables such as context and structure, known to be important for communication. Our objective was to adapt the ELF to evaluate the quality of self-report questionnaires. We reviewed the Health Literacy Questionnaire using the ELF. On the basis of these data, we drafted the preliminary version of the Evaluative Linguistic Framework for Questionnaires (ELF-Q) and applied it to English- and French-language versions of two arthritis self-report questionnaires and to Spanish, Dutch, and Turkish versions of an arthritis questionnaire. The developed ELF-Q was found to be effective for evaluating questionnaires in English and in four other languages. It contains nine items with new descriptions and assessment probes. These include overall organizational or generic structure of the questionnaire, metadiscourse (or text about the text), headings, rhetorical elements (function of each "move" or stage of the text in relation to the reader), the writer-reader relationship, technicality of vocabulary, lexical density (proportion of content words in the text), format, and overall judgment. We added assessment responses on a two- or three-point Likert scale to complement the assessment probes and make the intent and meaning of the probes fully explicit for the questionnaire developer or assessor. The ELF-Q is a framework practical to use for the development or assessment of any type of self-report questionnaire. Its application can identify features of a self-report questionnaire that could be improved to optimize its comprehensibility. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-reported defence mechanisms as an outcome measure in psychotherapy: a study on the German version of the Defence Style Questionnaire DSQ 40.

    PubMed

    Schauenburg, Henning; Willenborg, Verena; Sammet, Isa; Ehrenthal, Johannes C

    2007-09-01

    The psychoanalytically informed construct of 'defence mechanisms' is of central importance for the understanding of the dynamics of inner conflicts and the onset of neurotic symptoms. Objective and valid assessment of 'defence' is difficult. There are a number of observer rating instruments but only few self-report questionnaires. The German version of the 'Defence Style Questionnaire - DSQ 40' (Andrews, Singh, & Bond, 1993) was examined with regard to its factorial and content validity, and its sensitivity to change during inpatient psychotherapy. One hundred and fifty-five patients with mixed diagnoses were administered the DSQ 40 and the SCL-90-R before and after 3 months of inpatient psychotherapy. Diagnoses were mostly affective and anxiety disorders as well as eating disorders, and there was a high comorbidity of personality disorders. After deletion of some items due to insufficient pairwise item-intercorrelation or false classification to a defence mechanism by experienced clinicians, we found three stable factors of defence (maladaptive, intermediate-neurotic and adaptive) consistent with the previous research. After 3 months of therapy, a decrease in maladaptive mechanisms and an increase in adaptive patterns were found, while neurotic mechanisms did not change on average. Our shortened version of the DSQ 40 was shown to be a valid instrument for the assessment of defence mechanisms and change in these mechanisms after psychotherapy. Our design did not permit an assessment of whether or not the change in defence mechanisms was due to the therapeutic treatment.

  9. A disease-specific questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes and experiences in the Swedish National Diabetes Register: Development and evaluation of content validity, face validity, and test-retest reliability.

    PubMed

    Svedbo Engström, Maria; Leksell, Janeth; Johansson, Unn-Britt; Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina; Borg, Sixten; Palaszewski, Bo; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2017-07-14

    To describe the development and evaluation of the content and face validity and test-retest reliability of a disease-specific questionnaire that measures patient-reported outcomes and experiences for the Swedish National Diabetes Register for adult patients who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In this methodological study, a questionnaire was developed over four phases using an iterative process. Expert reviews and cognitive interviews were conducted to evaluate content and face validity, and a postal survey was administered to evaluate test-retest reliability. The expert reviews and cognitive interviews found the disease-specific questionnaire to be understandable, with relevant content and value for diabetes care. An item-level content validity index ranged from 0.6-1.0 and a scale content validity/average ranged from 0.7-1.0. The fourth version, with 33 items, two main parts and seven dimensions, was answered by 972 adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (response rate 61%). Weighted Kappa values ranged from 0.31-0.78 for type 1 diabetes and 0.27-0.74 for type 2 diabetes. This study describes the initial development of a disease-specific questionnaire in conjunction with the NDR. Content and face validity were confirmed and test-retest reliability was satisfactory. With the development of this questionnaire, the NDR becomes a clinical tool that contributes to further understanding the perspectives of adult individuals with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Further Evaluation of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Suh, Hanna; Ege, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Data from clinical and nonclinical samples ("Ns" = 2,096, 618) were used to evaluate and replicate the measurement structure of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Different measurement models and invariance tests were evaluated and the best psychometric support was found for a shortened measure of two factors: overall maladjustment and…

  11. An Examination of the "Interpersonalness" of the Outcome Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Timothy R.; Rohlfing, Jessica E.; Hardy, Amanda O.; Glidden-Tracey, Cynthia; Tracey, Terence J. G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ) and its subscales assessed unique interpersonal distress. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP) was used to assess discriminant validity for unique interpersonal distress. Participants (N = 121) were recruited from a southwestern university counselor training center. Significant…

  12. Further Evaluation of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Suh, Hanna; Ege, Engin

    2014-01-01

    Data from clinical and nonclinical samples ("Ns" = 2,096, 618) were used to evaluate and replicate the measurement structure of the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Different measurement models and invariance tests were evaluated and the best psychometric support was found for a shortened measure of two factors: overall maladjustment and…

  13. Imputation by the mean score should be avoided when validating a Patient Reported Outcomes questionnaire by a Rasch model in presence of informative missing data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nowadays, more and more clinical scales consisting in responses given by the patients to some items (Patient Reported Outcomes - PRO), are validated with models based on Item Response Theory, and more specifically, with a Rasch model. In the validation sample, presence of missing data is frequent. The aim of this paper is to compare sixteen methods for handling the missing data (mainly based on simple imputation) in the context of psychometric validation of PRO by a Rasch model. The main indexes used for validation by a Rasch model are compared. Methods A simulation study was performed allowing to consider several cases, notably the possibility for the missing values to be informative or not and the rate of missing data. Results Several imputations methods produce bias on psychometrical indexes (generally, the imputation methods artificially improve the psychometric qualities of the scale). In particular, this is the case with the method based on the Personal Mean Score (PMS) which is the most commonly used imputation method in practice. Conclusions Several imputation methods should be avoided, in particular PMS imputation. From a general point of view, it is important to use an imputation method that considers both the ability of the patient (measured for example by his/her score), and the difficulty of the item (measured for example by its rate of favourable responses). Another recommendation is to always consider the addition of a random process in the imputation method, because such a process allows reducing the bias. Last, the analysis realized without imputation of the missing data (available case analyses) is an interesting alternative to the simple imputation in this context. PMID:21756330

  14. Imputation by the mean score should be avoided when validating a Patient Reported Outcomes questionnaire by a Rasch model in presence of informative missing data.

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Jean-Benoit; Conroy, Ronán; Sébille, Véronique

    2011-07-14

    Nowadays, more and more clinical scales consisting in responses given by the patients to some items (Patient Reported Outcomes - PRO), are validated with models based on Item Response Theory, and more specifically, with a Rasch model. In the validation sample, presence of missing data is frequent. The aim of this paper is to compare sixteen methods for handling the missing data (mainly based on simple imputation) in the context of psychometric validation of PRO by a Rasch model. The main indexes used for validation by a Rasch model are compared. A simulation study was performed allowing to consider several cases, notably the possibility for the missing values to be informative or not and the rate of missing data. Several imputations methods produce bias on psychometrical indexes (generally, the imputation methods artificially improve the psychometric qualities of the scale). In particular, this is the case with the method based on the Personal Mean Score (PMS) which is the most commonly used imputation method in practice. Several imputation methods should be avoided, in particular PMS imputation. From a general point of view, it is important to use an imputation method that considers both the ability of the patient (measured for example by his/her score), and the difficulty of the item (measured for example by its rate of favourable responses). Another recommendation is to always consider the addition of a random process in the imputation method, because such a process allows reducing the bias. Last, the analysis realized without imputation of the missing data (available case analyses) is an interesting alternative to the simple imputation in this context.

  15. Development and validation of the impact of dry eye on everyday life (IDEEL) questionnaire, a patient-reported outcomes (PRO) measure for the assessment of the burden of dry eye on patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a comprehensive patient-reported outcomes instrument focusing on the impact of dry eye on everyday life (IDEEL). Methods Development and validation of the IDEEL occurred in four phases: 1) focus groups with 45 dry eye patients to develop a draft instrument, 2) item generation, 3) pilot study to assess content validity in 16 patients and 4) psychometric validation in 210 subjects: 130 with non-Sjögren's keratoconjunctivitis sicca, 32 with Sjögren's syndrome and 48 controls, and subsequent item reduction. Results Focus groups identified symptoms and the associated bother, the impact of dry eye on daily life and the patients' satisfaction with their treatment as the central concepts in patients' experience of dry eye. Qualitative analysis indicated that saturation was achieved for these concepts and yielded an initial 112-item draft instrument. Patients understood the questionnaire and found the items to be relevant indicating content validity. Patient input, item descriptive statistics and factor analysis identified 55 items that could be deleted. The final 57-item IDEEL assesses dry eye impact constituting 3 modules: dry eye symptom-bother, dry eye impact on daily life comprising impact on daily activities, emotional impact, impact on work, and dry eye treatment satisfaction comprising satisfaction with treatment effectiveness and treatment-related bother/inconvenience. The psychometric analysis results indicated that the IDEEL met the criteria for item discriminant validity, internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability and floor/ceiling effects. As expected, the correlations between IDEEL and the Dry Eye Questionnaire (a habitual symptom questionnaire) were higher than between IDEEL and Short-Form-36 and EuroQoL-5D, indicating concurrent validity. Conclusion The IDEEL is a reliable, valid and comprehensive questionnaire relevant to issues that are specific to dry eye patients, and meets current FDA patient-reported

  16. Patient-reported outcomes in primary care patients with COPD: psychometric properties and usefulness of the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ). A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Pommer, Antoinette M; Pouwer, François; Denollet, Johan; Meijer, Jan-Willem; Pop, Victor J

    2014-07-17

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with considerable consequences for patients' daily lives. The Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) was designed to measure these consequences in daily practice. Although the CCQ is widely used, its original structure has never been tested. This study examines the psychometric properties of the CCQ with regard to its latent structure in a sample of primary care patients with COPD. Two cross-sectional studies were conducted; in study 1 (N=243) exploratory analyses, including exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and Mokken scale analysis, were performed to explore the latent structure of the CCQ. In study 2 (N=244), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to evaluate the model fit of the structure found in study 1. Both EFA and Mokken scale analysis revealed a structure of two dimensions ('general impact' α=0.91 and 'cough' α=0.84). This structure, however, was not confirmed in study 2, nor was the original structure. However, subsequently removing items that violated the assumption of a normal response distribution did result in an excellent model fit with two dimensions measuring 'dyspnoea' and 'cough' (CFA: comparative fit index (CFI) 0.98; normed fit index (NFI) 0.97; root mean squared error of approximation (RMSEA) 0.08 (0.04)). In primary care, factor analyses on the CCQ revealed a two-component structure measuring 'general impact', and 'cough'. A shortened and more specific version of the CCQ could be regarded as a useful instrument to screen for exacerbations by measuring dyspnoea, coughing and producing phlegm.

  17. Patient-reported outcomes in primary care patients with COPD: psychometric properties and usefulness of the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ). A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Pommer, Antoinette M; Pouwer, François; Denollet, Johan; Meijer, Jan-Willem; Pop, Victor J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease with considerable consequences for patients’ daily lives. The Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) was designed to measure these consequences in daily practice. Although the CCQ is widely used, its original structure has never been tested. Aims: This study examines the psychometric properties of the CCQ with regard to its latent structure in a sample of primary care patients with COPD. Methods: Two cross-sectional studies were conducted; in study 1 (N=243) exploratory analyses, including exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and Mokken scale analysis, were performed to explore the latent structure of the CCQ. In study 2 (N=244), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to evaluate the model fit of the structure found in study 1. Results: Both EFA and Mokken scale analysis revealed a structure of two dimensions (‘general impact’ α=0.91 and ‘cough’ α=0.84). This structure, however, was not confirmed in study 2, nor was the original structure. However, subsequently removing items that violated the assumption of a normal response distribution did result in an excellent model fit with two dimensions measuring ‘dyspnoea’ and ‘cough’ (CFA: comparative fit index (CFI) 0.98; normed fit index (NFI) 0.97; root mean squared error of approximation (RMSEA) 0.08 (0.04)). Conclusions: In primary care, factor analyses on the CCQ revealed a two-component structure measuring ‘general impact’, and ‘cough’. A shortened and more specific version of the CCQ could be regarded as a useful instrument to screen for exacerbations by measuring dyspnoea, coughing and producing phlegm. PMID:25030777

  18. The Brief Symptom Inventory and the Outcome Questionnaire-45 in the Assessment of the Outcome Quality of Mental Health Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Schuetz, Christopher; Andreae, Andreas; Koemeda, Margit; Schulthess, Peter; Tschuschke, Volker; von Wyl, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    Self-report questionnaires are economical instruments for routine outcome assessment. In this study, the performance of the German version of the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) was evaluated when applied in analysis of the outcome quality of psychiatric and psychotherapeutic interventions. Pre-post data from two inpatient samples (N = 5711) and one outpatient sample (N = 239) were analyzed. Critical differences (reliable change index) and cut-off points between functional and dysfunctional populations were calculated using the Jacobson and Truax method of calculating clinical significance. Overall, the results indicated that the BSI was more accurate than the OQ-45 in correctly classifying patients as clinical subjects. Nonetheless, even with the BSI, about 25% of inpatients with schizophrenia attained a score at admission below the clinical cut-off. Both questionnaires exhibited the highest sensitivity to psychopathology with patients with personality disorders. When considering the differences in the prescores, both questionnaires showed the same sensitivity to change. The advantage of using these self-report measures is observed primarily in assessing outpatient psychotherapy outcome. In an inpatient setting two main problems—namely, the low response rate and the scarce sensitivity to psychopathology with severely ill patients—limit the usability of self-report questionnaires. PMID:27699166

  19. Usability of a barcode scanning system as a means of data entry on a PDA for self-report health outcome questionnaires: a pilot study in individuals over 60 years of age

    PubMed Central

    Boissy, Patrick; Jacobs, Karen; Roy, Serge H

    2006-01-01

    Background Throughout the medical and paramedical professions, self-report health status questionnaires are used to gather patient-reported outcome measures. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate in individuals over 60 years of age the usability of a PDA-based barcode scanning system with a text-to-speech synthesizer to collect data electronically from self-report health outcome questionnaires. Methods Usability of the system was tested on a sample of 24 community-living older adults (7 men, 17 women) ranging in age from 63 to 93 years. After receiving a brief demonstration on the use of the barcode scanner, participants were randomly assigned to complete two sets of 16 questions using the bar code wand scanner for one set and a pen for the other. Usability was assessed using directed interviews with a usability questionnaire and performance-based metrics (task times, errors, sources of errors). Results Overall, participants found barcode scanning easy to learn, easy to use, and pleasant. Participants were marginally faster in completing the 16 survey questions when using pen entry (20/24 participants). The mean response time with the barcode scanner was 31 seconds longer than traditional pen entry for a subset of 16 questions (p = 0.001). The responsiveness of the scanning system, expressed as first scan success rate, was less than perfect, with approximately one-third of first scans requiring a rescan to successfully capture the data entry. The responsiveness of the system can be explained by a combination of factors such as the location of the scanning errors, the type of barcode used as an answer field in the paper version, and the optical characteristics of the barcode scanner. Conclusion The results presented in this study offer insights regarding the feasibility, usability and effectiveness of using a barcode scanner with older adults as an electronic data entry method on a PDA. While participants in this study found their experience with the

  20. Psychometric Validation of the Preschool Outcome Questionnaire: A Preschool Treatment Outcome Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, David H.; Lloyd, Thad Q.; Stewart, Peter K.; Wells, M. Gawain

    2010-01-01

    Developing normed treatment outcome measures is important to research addressing treatment effectiveness and to improved clinical care. The Preschool Outcome Questionnaire (POQ) is a new measure designed for use with preschool children aged two to six. Designed in collaboration with parents and clinicians, the POQ is brief, easy to administer,…

  1. Identifying patient-centred recommendations for improving patient safety in General Practices in England: a qualitative content analysis of free-text responses using the Patient Reported Experiences and Outcomes of Safety in Primary Care (PREOS-PC) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Cabello, Ignacio; Saletti-Cuesta, Lorena; Slight, Sarah P; Valderas, Jose M

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing interest in identifying strategies to achieve safer primary health-care provision. However, most of the research conducted so far in this area relies on information supplied by health-care providers, and limited attention has been paid to patients' perspectives. To explore patients' experiences and perceptions of patient safety in English general practices with the aim of eliciting patient-centred recommendations for improving patient safety. The Patient Reported Experiences and Outcomes of Safety in Primary Care questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 6736 primary care users registered in 45 English practices. We conducted a qualitative content analysis of responses to seven open-ended items addressing patients' experiences of safety problems, lessons learnt as a result of such experiences and recommendations for safer health care. A total of 1244 (18.4%) participants returned completed questionnaires. Of those, 678 (54.5%) responded to at least one open-ended question. Two main themes emerged as follows: (i) experiences of safety problems and (ii) good practices and recommendations to improve patient safety in primary care. Most frequent experiences of safety problems were related to appointments, coordination between providers, tests, medication and diagnosis. Patients' responses to these problems included increased patient activation (eg speaking up about concerns with their health care) and avoidance of unnecessary health care. Recommendations for safer health care included improvements in patient-centred communication, continuity of care, timely appointments, technical quality of care, active monitoring, teamwork, health records and practice environment. This study identified a number of patient-centred recommendations for improving patient safety in English general practices. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Student Outcomes Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.

    Prince George's Community College (PGCC) created a Student Outcomes Report in December 1996 that measures course completion, retention, student achievement, program completion, transfer, and certification. Findings indicated that though the course pass rate was 75%, individual course completion ranged from 44% to 100%. Divisional pass rates ranged…

  3. Catquest-9SF patient outcomes questionnaire: nine-item short-form Rasch-scaled revision of the Catquest questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Mats; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2009-03-01

    To assess and optimize the Catquest questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes of cataract surgery using Rasch analysis. Fifty-eight ophthalmic surgical units in Sweden. Catquest questionnaires (n = 21364) from the Swedish National Cataract Register were selected and randomized to 2 groups. Data from 10486 questionnaires were comprehensively Rasch analyzed using a 4-Andrich rating scale model in Winsteps software. A revised version of Catquest was developed (Catquest-9SF) and tested in 10886 patients for validity and responsiveness to cataract surgery. Only the visual disability subscale formed a valid measurement scale. This could be enhanced through the addition of the 2 global assessment items; however, the symptoms and frequency of performing the activities items did not contribute to the measurement. The 9-item short-form version (Catquest-9SF) had ordered response thresholds and good person separation (2.65) and was largely free from differential item functioning. All items fit a single overall construct (infit range, 0.75 to 1.29; outfit range, 0.70 to 1.39) and unidimensional by principal components analysis. The items were well targeted to the preoperative participants (0.34 logit difference in means). The score correlated with visual acuity (r = 0.43 preoperatively; r = 0.48 postoperatively) and was highly responsive to cataract surgery (preoperatively -0.32 +/- 2.15 logits; postoperatively -3.21 +/- 2.50 logits (P<.0001). The 9-item Rasch-scaled Catquest-9SF was highly valid in measuring visual disability outcomes of cataract surgery. Its brevity makes it suited to routine clinical use, and a raw-data to Rasch-measure conversion simplifies application.

  4. The Oxford hip and knee outcome questionnaires for arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pynsent, P B; Adams, D J; Disney, S P

    2005-02-01

    The Oxford hip and knee scores are used to measure the outcome after primary total hip and knee replacement. We propose a new layout for the instrument in which patients are always asked about both limbs. In addition, we have defined an alternative scoring method which accounts for missing data. Over a period of 4.5 years, 4086 (1423 patients) and 5708 (1458 patients) questionnaires were completed for hips and knees, respectively. The hip score had a pre-operative median of 70.8 (interquartile range (IQR) 58.3 to 81.2) decreasing to 20.8 (IQR 10.4 to 35.4) after one year. The knee score had a pre-operative median of 68.8 (IQR 56.2 to 79.2) decreasing to 29.2 (IQR 14.6 to 45.8). There was no further significant change in either score after one year. As a result of the data analysis, we suggest that the score percentiles can be used as a standard for auditing patients before and after operation.

  5. Measuring the Effects of Self-Awareness: Construction of the Self-Awareness Outcomes Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Dispositional self-awareness is conceptualized in several different ways, including insight, reflection, rumination and mindfulness, with the latter in particular attracting extensive attention in recent research. While self-awareness is generally associated with positive psychological well-being, these different conceptualizations are also each associated with a range of unique outcomes. This two part, mixed methods study aimed to advance understanding of dispositional self-awareness by developing a questionnaire to measure its outcomes. In Study 1, expert focus groups categorized and extended an initial pool of potential items from previous research. In Study 2, these items were reduced to a 38 item self-report questionnaire with four factors representing three beneficial outcomes (reflective self-development, acceptance and proactivity) and one negative outcome (costs). Regression of these outcomes against self-awareness measures revealed that self-reflection and insight predicted beneficial outcomes, rumination predicted reduced benefits and increased costs, and mindfulness predicted both increased proactivity and costs. These studies help to refine the self-awareness concept by identifying the unique outcomes associated with the concepts of self-reflection, insight, reflection, rumination and mindfulness. It can be used in future studies to evaluate and develop awareness-raising techniques to maximize self-awareness benefits while minimizing related costs. PMID:27872672

  6. Measuring the Effects of Self-Awareness: Construction of the Self-Awareness Outcomes Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Dispositional self-awareness is conceptualized in several different ways, including insight, reflection, rumination and mindfulness, with the latter in particular attracting extensive attention in recent research. While self-awareness is generally associated with positive psychological well-being, these different conceptualizations are also each associated with a range of unique outcomes. This two part, mixed methods study aimed to advance understanding of dispositional self-awareness by developing a questionnaire to measure its outcomes. In Study 1, expert focus groups categorized and extended an initial pool of potential items from previous research. In Study 2, these items were reduced to a 38 item self-report questionnaire with four factors representing three beneficial outcomes (reflective self-development, acceptance and proactivity) and one negative outcome (costs). Regression of these outcomes against self-awareness measures revealed that self-reflection and insight predicted beneficial outcomes, rumination predicted reduced benefits and increased costs, and mindfulness predicted both increased proactivity and costs. These studies help to refine the self-awareness concept by identifying the unique outcomes associated with the concepts of self-reflection, insight, reflection, rumination and mindfulness. It can be used in future studies to evaluate and develop awareness-raising techniques to maximize self-awareness benefits while minimizing related costs.

  7. Clinicians' Attitudes Towards Outcome and Process Monitoring: A Validation of the Outcome Measurement Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Smits, Dave F; Claes, Laurence; Stinckens, Nele; Smits, Dirk J M

    2015-09-01

    Valid and reliable instruments to measure monitoring attitudes of clinicians are scarce. The influence of sociodemographics and professional characteristics on monitoring attitudes is largely unknown. First, we investigated the factor structure and reliability of the Outcome Measurement Questionnaire among a sample of Flemish mental health professionals (n = 170). Next, we examined the relationship between clinicians' sociodemographic and professional characteristics and monitoring attitudes. Construct validity was determined using a confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was ascertained using Cronbach's alpha. Mean level differences in monitoring attitudes related to clinicians' gender, work setting, level of education and psychotherapeutic training, were investigated using ANOVAs. The relationships between clinicians' age, clinical experience and attitudes were calculated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. A model with one general factor and a method factor referring to reverse-worded items best fitted our data. Internal consistency was good. Clinicians with psychotherapeutic training reported more favorable monitoring attitudes than those without such training. Compared to clinicians working in subsidized outpatient services, private practitioners and clinicians from inpatient mental health clinics had more positive attitudes. Results highlight the need for sustained and targeted training, with particular focus on transforming measurement data into meaningful clinical support tools.

  8. Patients' perception of postoperative pain management: validation of the International Pain Outcomes (IPO) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rothaug, Judith; Zaslansky, Ruth; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Komann, Marcus; Allvin, Renée; Backström, Ragnar; Brill, Silviu; Buchholz, Ingo; Engel, Christoph; Fletcher, Dominique; Fodor, Lucian; Funk, Peter; Gerbershagen, Hans J; Gordon, Debra B; Konrad, Christoph; Kopf, Andreas; Leykin, Yigal; Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther; Puig, Margarita; Rawal, Narinder; Taylor, Rod S; Ullrich, Kristin; Volk, Thomas; Yahiaoui-Doktor, Maryam; Meissner, Winfried

    2013-11-01

    PAIN OUT is a European Commission-funded project aiming at improving postoperative pain management. It combines a registry that can be useful for quality improvement and research using treatment and patient-reported outcome measures. The core of the project is a patient questionnaire-the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire-that comprises key patient-level outcomes of postoperative pain management, including pain intensity, physical and emotional functional interference, side effects, and perceptions of care. Its psychometric quality after translation and adaptation to European patients is the subject of this validation study. The questionnaire was administered to 9,727 patients in 10 languages in 8 European countries and Israel. Construct validity was assessed using factor analysis. Discriminant validity assessment used Mann-Whitney U tests to detect mean group differences between 2 surgical disciplines. Internal consistency reliability was calculated as Cronbach's alpha. Factor analysis resulted in a 3-factor structure explaining 53.6% of variance. Cronbach's alpha at overall scale level was high (.86), and for the 3 subscales was low, moderate, or high (range, .53-.89). Significant mean group differences between general and orthopedic surgery patients confirmed discriminant validity. The psychometric quality of the International Pain Outcomes questionnaire can be regarded as satisfactory. The International Pain Outcomes questionnaire provides an instrument for postoperative pain assessment and improvement of quality of care, which demonstrated good psychometric quality when translated into a variety of languages in a large European and Israeli patient population. This measure provides the basis for the first comprehensive postoperative pain registry in Europe and other countries. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Responsiveness of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire and physical measurements in outcome studies of distal radius fracture treatment.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Sandra V; Lau, Frank H; Chung, Kevin C

    2007-01-01

    Outcomes study of distal radius fracture (DRF) treatment has been hampered by an uncertainty regarding the most appropriate outcomes assessment tool to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. This study aimed to measure the responsiveness of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) and physical measurements to assess the value of these outcomes tools for DRF studies. Forty-seven patients prospectively completed the MHQ and physical testing at 3 months and 6 months (period 1) after open reduction and internal fixation of unstable DRFs. Thirty-seven patients prospectively completed the MHQ and physical testing at 6 months and 1 year after open reduction and internal fixation (period 2). Responsiveness to clinical change within each period was calculated with standardized response means (SRMs). In period 1, all domains of the MHQ except aesthetics significantly improved. The SRMs were large for the overall score and for the work domain. The SRMs were medium for the pain, function, and activities of daily living domains. In period 1, the grip strength, pinch strength, and active wrist range of motion measurements significantly improved and had large SRMs. In period 2, the grip- and pinch-strength tests significantly improved and the SRMs were medium, whereas the active wrist range of motion had a small SRM. Unlike other conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome, for which the outcomes questionnaire is the most responsive measure, in DRF treatment both the MHQ and physical tests are responsive in measuring outcomes and should be reported for outcomes studies of DRFs. The MHQ and physical tests can be used for outcomes research related to DRF with the advantage of also being useful for assessing and comparing outcomes for other hand disorders.

  10. Health-related quality of life questionnaires: an important method to evaluate patient outcomes in atrial fibrillation ablation.

    PubMed

    Ha, Andrew C T; Dorian, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Improvement of symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are important treatment goals in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). For patients with symptomatic AF, catheter ablation is a commonly performed therapy for rhythm control. As a result, accurate documentation of the changes in HRQoL for these patients is necessary. This paper will review why HRQoL questionnaires are important in evaluating patient outcomes for AF ablation. First, we discuss how the results of these questionnaires can influence the cost-effectiveness of AF ablation. This may, in turn, affect healthcare resource allocation in favor of this therapy. Also, these questionnaires can provide additional information over traditional quantitative measures of AF burden in assessing post-ablation outcomes. By standardizing the way by which HRQoL is measured and reported, these questionnaires are valuable in evaluating this important patient-reported outcome in AF ablation trials.

  11. Nail patella syndrome: Knee symptoms and surgical outcomes. A questionnaire-based survey.

    PubMed

    Tigchelaar, S; Lenting, A; Bongers, E M H F; van Kampen, A

    2015-12-01

    Patellofemoral instability and dysfunction are frequent symptoms in Nail patella syndrome (NPS). In this article, the first large series of NPS patients is presented in which these knee symptoms were assessed using validated outcome scores. Additionally, the need for surgical interventions, percentage of patients who received surgical treatment and patient reported outcomes are reported. A questionnaire based survey was conducted in 139 Dutch NPS patients. Symptoms of the knees were assessed by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and Kujala knee score. The questionnaire addressed whether surgical intervention was currently considered, history of past surgeries, type of surgical procedures performed and results of these procedures. Response rate was 74%. Mean KOOS (73.04) and Kujala (74.01) scores showed a wide range and variability between patients. Patellofemoral instability was present in 48.5% of patients. Surgical intervention was currently considered by 12% of patients. Their KOOS and Kujala scores were significantly lower compared to those not considering surgery and they experienced more patellar instability. Surgery was performed on 31 knees in 23 patients. KOOS and Kujala scores were lower in surgically treated versus nonoperated patients but no difference in patellar instability was present. An improvement in pain in 87% and in function in 30% of knees was reported after surgery. Patient satisfaction with the surgical results was 61% and 10% was dissatisfied. Patellar realignment procedures showed similar results, although persistent patellar instability was reported in 40% of patients, not different from nonoperated patients. Knee symptoms in NPS patients vary widely, with patellar instability present in nearly half of the patients. Although surgical treatment appears unfavourable as surgically treated patients have lower KOOS and Kujala scores, the patient reported surgical results are generally good with a high patient satisfaction

  12. The European solar physics community: outcome from a questionnaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenti, Susanna

    2002-12-01

    At the SPM10 meeting held in Prague, for the first time was organized a "young section" which was dedicated to "the career in Solar Physics" (Aulanier, this issue). Prior to the meeting a questionnaire was distributed to the community with the aim to build statistic on the career. The informations collected in this way relate to personal and professional aspects of the career, how much the countries' policy and the working environment can affect it. Moreover, particular attention was given to the PhD and post-doctorate (post-doc) conditions. From the statistics it comes clear that the European Solar Physics is having a difficult period. Besides the main problems, we found the lack of an integrated European community, the lack of permanent positions, the low salary and the lost of popularity among students. Several ideas were proposed to improve the situation.

  13. Italian adaptation of the functional outcome questionnaire - aphasia: initial psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Spaccavento, Simona; Cafforio, Elisabetta; Cellamare, Fara; Colucci, Antonia; Di Palma, Angela; Falcone, Rosanna; Craca, Angela; Loverre, Anna; Nardulli, Roberto; Glueckauf, Robert L

    2017-08-04

    To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Italian version of Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia. Two hundred and five persons with stroke-related aphasia and right hemiparesis who received ongoing assistance from a family caregiver were assessed using the Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia, Aachener Aphasie Test, Token Test, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, Functional Independence Measure (FIM), Functional Assessment Measure (FAM), and Quality of Life Questionnaire for Aphasics (QLQA). The Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia was translated into the Italian language using a translation and back-translation method. Reliability and construct validity of the Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia were evaluated. The Italian version of the Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability for the overall scale (α = 0.98; ICC = 0.95) and subscales (α = 0.89 for the communicating basic needs (CBN), α = 0.92 for the making routine requests (MRR), α = 0.96 for the communicating new information (CNI), α = 0.93 for the attention/other communication skills (AO); ICC = 0.95 for CBN, ICC = 0.96 for MRR, ICC = 0.97 for CNI and ICC = 0.92 for AO). Significant correlations were found between the Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia and Token Test, QLQA, Aachener Aphasie Test scores, and FAM linguistic scores, indicating good convergent validity. Low correlations were found between Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices and FIM motor scores, showing good discriminant validity. The overall findings of this study supported the reliability and construct validity of the Italian version of the Functional Outcome Questionnaire - Aphasia. This measure holds considerable promise in assessing the functional outcomes of aphasia rehabilitation in Italian-speaking persons with aphasia. Implications for

  14. Portuguese validation of the Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review (CAMPHOR) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Reis, Abílio; Twiss, James; Vicente, Margarida; Gonçalves, Fabienne; Carvalho, Luísa; Meireles, José; Melo, Alzira; McKenna, Stephen P; Almeida, Luís

    2016-07-26

    Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and other forms of precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) have impaired quality of life (QoL). The Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) is a PH-specific patient-reported outcome measure that assesses symptoms, activity limitations and QoL. It was originally developed in UK-English. The main objective of this study was to create an adaptation of the CAMPHOR suitable for a Portuguese-speaking population. A multi-step approach was followed: bilingual and lay panel translation; cognitive debriefing interviews; and psychometric testing in repeated postal surveys (2 weeks apart) including assessment of internal consistency, reproducibility and validity. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) questionnaire was used as a comparator instrument to test convergent validity. The CAMPHOR was translated without difficulty by the two panels. Cognitive debriefing interviews showed the questionnaire was easily understood and considered relevant to patients' experience with their illness. Psychometric evaluation was performed with 50 PAH patients (47 ± 14 years, 37 women). Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed good internal consistency for the three CAMPHOR scales [Symptoms = 0.95; Activities = 0.93 and QoL = 0.94]. Test-retest coefficients showed that all scales had excellent reliability (Symptoms = 0.94; Activities = 0.89 and QoL = 0.93), indicating low levels of random measurement error. The CAMPHOR correlated as expected with the NHP. The magnitude of correlations followed a similar pattern to those in the original development study. The CAMPHOR also exhibited evidence of known group validity in its ability to distinguish between self-reported severity and general health groups. A valid and reliable version of the CAMPHOR questionnaire for the European Portuguese-speaking population was developed and is recommended for use.

  15. Validation of a family-centred outcome questionnaire for pinnaplasty: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fraser, L; Montgomery, J; James, H; Wynne, D M; MacGregor, F B; Clement, W A; Morrissey, M S C; Kubba, H

    2016-10-01

    Comparison of pinnaplasty techniques is difficult due to variation in the reporting of outcomes. We aimed to develop a family-centred outcome questionnaire for use after pinnaplasty and assess it for reliability and validity. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary referral paediatric otolaryngology centre. 20 prospective and 71 retrospective pinnaplasty patients and their parent(s). The Post-Operative Pinnaplasty Questionnaire (POPQ) was developed after semi-structured interview with families of children undergoing pinnaplasty. Children aged 4-16 were recruited. Three different ear measurements (auriculocephalic angle, helix-mastoid distance and Walker's ratio) were performed pre-operatively. Children were reviewed 3 months post-operatively and asked to complete a POPQ and Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory with their parent(s). Ear measurements were repeated and data collected on surgical technique and complications. 200 retrospective pinnaplasty patients were posted a POPQ and Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory and data collected on surgical technique, complication rate and Walker's angle. Validity and reliability of the POPQ. Age range was 4-16 (median 12). POPQ correlated well with Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory (Spearman's rho = 0.776, P < 0.001). There was no correlation of POPQ scores with age, sex, complication or surgical technique. POPQ score was not associated with severe prominence pre-op nor change or degree of prominence post-op. POPQ displayed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.850) and ease-of-use scores. We have developed a family-focused outcome tool for pinnaplasty that displays good face validity, internal consistency and correlation with health-related quality of life and that is simple and easy to use. No correlation was seen with more traditional measures of outcome such as complications or ear measurements. Further refinement and testing of validity and reliability on a larger sample is planned. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Predictors of nonresponse in a questionnaire-based outcome study of vocational rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Burrus, Cyrille; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Deriaz, Olivier; Gobelet, Charles; Luthi, François

    2009-09-01

    To identify predictors of nonresponse to a self-report study of patients with orthopedic trauma hospitalized for vocational rehabilitation between November 15, 2003, and December 31, 2005. The role of biopsychosocial complexity, assessed using the INTERMED, was of particular interest. Cohort study. Questionnaires with quality of life, sociodemographic, and job-related questions were given to patients at hospitalization and 1 year after discharge. Sociodemographic data, biopsychosocial complexity, and presence of comorbidity were available at hospitalization (baseline) for all eligible patients. Logistic regression models were used to test a number of baseline variables as potential predictors of nonresponse to the questionnaires at each of the 2 time points. Rehabilitation clinic. Patients (N=990) hospitalized for vocational rehabilitation over a period of 2 years. Not applicable. Nonresponse to the questionnaires was the binary dependent variable. Patients with high biopsychosocial complexity, foreign native language, or low educational level were less likely to respond at both time points. Younger patients were less likely to respond at 1 year. Those living in a stable partnership were less likely than singles to respond at hospitalization. Sex, psychiatric, and somatic comorbidity and alcoholism were never associated with nonresponse. We stress the importance of assessing biopsychosocial complexity to predict nonresponse. Furthermore, the factors we found to be predictive of nonresponse are also known to influence treatment outcome and vocational rehabilitation. Therefore, it is important to increase the response rate of the groups of concern in order to reduce selection bias in epidemiologic investigations.

  17. Trends in Teacher Education as Reported on the Institutional Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluzzo, Gary R.; And Others

    This paper reports on the degree to which teacher educators have addressed the current calls for reform in teacher education. The data were taken from the Institutional Questionnaire of the Research about Teacher Education (RATE) Project of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE). The 90 respondents, each representing…

  18. Measuring hearing aid outcomes using the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire: Australian data.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Margaret; Denzin, Lauren; Dunstan, Amy; Sellars, Jillian; Hickson, Louise

    2005-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate hearing aid satisfaction for a group of older Australians fitted with government-funded hearing aids using the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire; to compare the Australian data gathered with the provisional normative data reported by Cox and Alexander (1999); and to investigate the relationship between SADL satisfaction and several participant variables, hearing aid variables, and other outcome measures. The SADL questionnaire and a Client Satisfaction Survey (CSS) were distributed by mail to 1284 adults fitted with government-funded hearing aids three to six months previously. 1014 surveys were returned. The mean age of participants was 75.32 years; 54.4% of participants were male, and 54.8% were fitted binaurally. Participants were fitted primarily with digitally programmable hearing aids of various styles (22.5% BTEs, 34.8% ITEs, 41.8% ITCs, 0.9% nonstandard [NS] devices). Overall, participants reported a considerable level of satisfaction with their devices. SADL Global and subscale scores were significantly higher for the Australian sample than the U.S. norms described by Cox and Alexander (1999).

  19. A parent-report gender identity questionnaire for children.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laurel L; Bradley, Susan J; Birkenfeld-Adams, Andrea S; Kuksis, Myra A Radzins; Maing, Dianne M; Mitchell, Janet N; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2004-04-01

    This paper reports on the psychometric properties of a 16-item parent-report Gender Identity Questionnaire, originally developed by P. H. Elizabeth and R. Green (1984), to aid in the assessment of children with potential problems in their gender identity development. The questionnaire, which covered aspects of the core phenomenology of gender identity disorder (GID), was completed by parents of gender-referred children (N = 325) and controls (siblings, clinic-referred, and nonreferred; N = 504), who ranged in age from 2.5-12 years (mean age, 7.6 years). Factor-analysis indicated that a one-factor solution, containing 14 of the 16 items with factor loadings > or =.30, best fit the data, accounting for 43.7% of the variance. The gender-referred children had a significantly more deviant total score than did the controls, with a large effect size of 3.70. The GIQ total score had negligible age effects, indicating that the questionnaire has utility for assessing change over time. The gender-referred children who met the complete DSM criteria for GID had a significantly more deviant total score than did the children who were subthreshold for GID, although the latter group had a mean score that was closer to the threshold cases than to the controls. With a specificity rate set at 95% for the controls, the sensitivity rate for the probands was 86.8%. It is concluded that this parent-report gender identity questionnaire has excellent psychometric properties and can serve as a useful screening device for front-line clinicians, for whom more extensive, expensive, and time-consuming assessment procedures may be precluded.

  20. Development of a Patient-Reported Outcome Instrument to Evaluate Symptoms of Advanced NSCLC: Qualitative Research and Content Validity of the Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Symptom Assessment Questionnaire (NSCLC-SAQ)

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Thomas M.; DeBusk, Kendra P.A.; Liepa, Astra M.; Scanlon, Michael; Coons, Stephen Joel

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe the process and results of the preliminary qualitative development of a new symptom-based PRO measure intended to assess treatment benefit in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) clinical trials. METHODS Individual qualitative interviews were conducted with adult NSCLC (Stage I–IV) patients in the US. Experienced interviewers conducted concept elicitation (CE) and cognitive interviews using semi-structured interview guides. The CE interview guide was used to elicit spontaneous reports of symptom experiences along with probing to further explore and confirm concepts. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed by professional qualitative coders using Atlas.ti software, and were summarized by like-content using an iterative coding framework. Data from the CE interviews were considered alongside existing literature and clinical expert opinion during an item-generation process, leading to development of a preliminary version of the NSCLC Symptom Assessment Questionnaire (NSCLC-SAQ). Three waves of cognitive interviews were conducted to evaluate concept relevance, item interpretability, and structure of the draft items to facilitate further instrument refinement. FINDINGS Fifty-one patients (mean age 64.9 [SD=11.2]; 51.0% female) participated in the CE interviews. A total of 1,897 expressions of NSCLC-related symptoms were identified and coded in interview transcripts, representing approximately 42 distinct symptom concepts. A 9-item initial draft instrument was developed for testing in three waves of cognitive interviews with additional NSCLC patients (n=20), during which both paper and electronic versions of the instrument were evaluated and refined. Participant responses and feedback during cognitive interviews led to the removal of 2 items and substantial modifications to others. IMPLICATIONS The NSCLC-SAQ is a 7-item PRO measure intended for use in advanced NSCLC clinical trials to support medical product labelling. The NSCLC-SAQ uses

  1. Evaluating the Responsiveness to Therapeutic Change with Routine Outcome Monitoring: A Comparison of the Symptom Questionnaire-48 (SQ-48) with the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) and the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45).

    PubMed

    Carlier, Ingrid V E; Kovács, Viktória; van Noorden, Martijn S; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina; Mooij, Nanda; Schulte-van Maaren, Yvonne W M; van Hemert, Albert M; Zitman, Frans G; Giltay, Erik J

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of psychological distress is important, because it may help to monitor treatment effects and predict treatment outcomes. We previously developed the 48-item Symptom Questionnaire (SQ-48) as a public domain self-report psychological distress instrument and showed good internal consistency as well as good convergent and divergent validity among clinical and non-clinical samples. The present study, conducted among psychiatric outpatients in a routine clinical setting, describes additional psychometric properties of the SQ-48. The primary focus is on responsiveness to therapeutic change, which to date has been rarely examined within psychiatry or clinical psychology. Since a questionnaire should also be stable when no clinically important change occurs, we also examined test-retest reliability within a test-retest design before treatment (n = 43). A pre-treatment/post-treatment design was used for responsiveness to therapeutic change, comparing the SQ-48 with two internationally widely used instruments: the Brief Symptom Inventory (n = 97) and the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (n = 109). The results showed that the SQ-48 has excellent test-retest reliability and good responsiveness to therapeutic change, without significant differences between the questionnaires in terms of responsiveness. In sum, the SQ-48 is a psychometrically sound public domain self-report instrument that can be used for routine outcome monitoring, as a benchmark tool or for research purposes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message The SQ-48 is developed as a public domain self-report questionnaire, in line with growing efforts to develop clinical instruments that are free of charge. The SQ-48 has excellent test-retest reliability and good responsiveness to therapeutic change or patient progress. There were no significant differences in terms of responsiveness between the SQ-48 and BSI or OQ-45. The SQ-48 can be used as a routine evaluation outcome

  2. The Cognitive Bias Questionnaire: An Outcome Measure in the Treatment of Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Yolanda; And Others

    The Cognitive Bias Questionnaire (CBQ) was assessed as an outcome measure in the treatment of depression in a study involving 20 depressed and 20 non-depressed female subjects. The role of depressive distortion in the maintenance or stabilization of depression was also examined. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups:…

  3. Introducing an Outcome Expectation Questionnaire and Its Psychometric Properties Regarding Leisure Time Physical Activity for Iranian Male Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Abasi, Mohammad Hadi; Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Rakhshani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Outcome expectation (OE) is known as a psychosocial determinant of leisure time physical activity (LTPA). Despite importance of this construct evaluation, there is no evidence of special questionnaire for measuring OE in Persian speaking Iranian male adolescents. Objectives: This article reports development and psychometric evaluation process of a specific questionnaire that evaluates OE about LTPA among Iranian male adolescents. Materials and Methods: Literature review and group discussions were used to select 26 items of this questionnaire based on 3 dimensions of OE (self-evaluation, social expectancy, and physical expectancy). All Participants (n = 720) were divided into two groups randomly after evaluating comprehensibility, face and content validity, and items analysis. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were separately operated on one of these groups for evaluation of the construct validity of questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaire was estimated by the Cronbach α. Results: EFA extracted 3 main factors explained 45.80%, 10.31%, and 7.51% of OE variance, respectively. Almost all fit indexes in CFA were acceptable (CMIN = 107.39, CMIN/DF = 2.619, CFI = 0.938, PCFI = 0.699, RMSEA = 0.067, PCLOSE = 0.034). Finally 11 items remained in the questionnaire, which showed excellent reliability on main study (α = 0.85). Conclusions: This study provided evidence regarding the reliability and validity of the Iranian male adolescent outcome expectation about leisure time physical activity (IMAO-PAC) and illustrated that this new questionnaire can be used to measure the perceived exercise benefits among target group in observational and interventional studies. PMID:26082851

  4. The Eating Disorder Recovery Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (EDRSQ): change with treatment and prediction of outcome.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Heinberg, Leslie J; Coughlin, Janelle W; Fava, Joseph L; Guarda, Angela S

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive validity of the Eating Disorder Recovery Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (EDRSQ), an empirically-derived self-report instrument that assesses confidence to eat without engaging in eating disordered behavior or experiencing undue emotional distress (Normative Eating Self-Efficacy) and confidence to maintain a realistic body image that is not dominated by pursuit of thinness (Body Image Self-Efficacy). Participants were 104 female inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN), subthreshold AN, or underweight bulimia nervosa who were treated at a specialized eating disorder clinic and completed the EDRSQ and Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) Drive for Thinness (DT) and Body Dissatisfaction (BD) subscales upon admission. A subset of patients completed the EDRSQ (n=81) and EDI-2 subscales (n=70) following inpatient treatment. Self-efficacy increased significantly during treatment. EDRSQ scores at admission were inversely related to length of hospital stay and posttreatment DT and BD subscales and positively related to partial hospital weight gain rate. The EDRSQ significantly predicted length of hospital stay and posttreatment BD above and beyond clinical indicators and eating disorder psychopathology at inpatient admission. Findings support the validity of the EDRSQ and suggest it is a useful predictor of short-term hospital treatment outcome in underweight eating disorder patients.

  5. Patient-reported physical activity questionnaires: A systematic review of content and format

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic illness are limited in their physical activities. This systematic review evaluates the content and format of patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires that measure physical activity in elderly and chronically ill populations. Methods Questionnaires were identified by a systematic literature search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, PsychINFO & CINAHL), hand searches (reference sections and PROQOLID database) and expert input. A qualitative analysis was conducted to assess the content and format of the questionnaires and a Venn diagram was produced to illustrate this. Each stage of the review process was conducted by at least two independent reviewers. Results 104 questionnaires fulfilled our criteria. From these, 182 physical activity domains and 1965 items were extracted. Initial qualitative analysis of the domains found 11 categories. Further synthesis of the domains found 4 broad categories: 'physical activity related to general activities and mobility', 'physical activity related to activities of daily living', 'physical activity related to work, social or leisure time activities', and '(disease-specific) symptoms related to physical activity'. The Venn diagram showed that no questionnaires covered all 4 categories and that the '(disease-specific) symptoms related to physical activity' category was often not combined with the other categories. Conclusions A large number of questionnaires with a broad range of physical activity content were identified. Although the content could be broadly organised, there was no consensus on the content and format of physical activity PRO questionnaires in elderly and chronically ill populations. Nevertheless, this systematic review will help investigators to select a physical activity PRO questionnaire that best serves their research question and context. PMID:22414164

  6. Psychometric properties of the Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire in stroke patients with aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Alicia; Morris, Reg; Kneebone, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of an observational, carer-completed anxiety screen for aphasic stroke patients. Design: Phase 1: A cross-sectional questionnaire design to establish psychometric properties. Phase 2: A randomized longitudinal design with treatment and control to evaluate sensitivity to change and repeatability/reliability. Subjects: Phase 1: 111 patient-carer dyads were recruited through stroke charities: patient mean age 69.7(10. 7), 6.2(5. 2) years since stroke, 76 male; carer mean age 64.7(12. 2), 27 male. Phase 2. A subsample of 50 dyads (29 completed). Measures: All patients completed the Tension Rating Circles and the Frenchay Aphasia Screening Test. Carers completed the Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire, observational versions of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A) and the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7, and a feedback questionnaire. Intervention: Phase 2: 25 dyads were offered relaxation training and 25 acted as controls. Results: The Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire correlated .77 with the HADS-A and Cronbach’s Alpha was .82 demonstrating validity and internal consistency. Using HADS-A cut-off > 7 as criterion the area under the curve was 0.90 and at cut-off of > 16 sensitivity (0.85) and specificity (0.85) were both good. Scores declined significantly more in a group given anxiety training (n = 12) than in a control group (n = 17), demonstrating sensitivity to change and construct validity. Two-week repeatability/reliability was .92. Feedback suggested the scale was acceptable. Conclusions: The Behavioural Outcomes of Anxiety questionnaire shows promise as an anxiety screen for stroke patients with aphasia and is sensitive to change. Further analysis of dimensionality and discriminant validity is needed. PMID:27121863

  7. Qualitative interviews vs standardized self-report questionnaires in assessing quality of life in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Abbey, Susan E; De Luca, Enza; Mauthner, Oliver E; McKeever, Patricia; Shildrick, Margrit; Poole, Jennifer M; Gewarges, Mena; Ross, Heather J

    2011-08-01

    Quality of life (QoL) studies in heart transplant recipients (HTRs) using validated, quantitative, self-report questionnaires have reported poor QoL in approximately 20% of patients. This consecutive mixed methods study compared self-report questionnaires, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (MOS SF-36) and the Atkinson Life Satisfaction Scale, with phenomenologically informed audiovisual (AV) qualitative interview data in 27 medically stable HTRs (70% male; age 53 ± 13.77 years; time since transplant 4.06 ± 2.42 years). Self-report questionnaire data reported poor QoL and more distress compared with previous studies and normative population samples; in contrast, 52% of HTRs displayed pervasive distress according to visual methodology. Using qualitative methods to assess QoL yields information that would otherwise remain unobserved by the exclusive use of quantitative QOL questionnaires.

  8. Is Measured Hearing Aid Benefit Affected by Seeing Baseline Outcome Questionnaire Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, ShienPei; Cates, Megan; Saunders, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether hearing aid outcome measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory (HHI) for the Elderly/Adults (Newman, Weinstein, Jacobson, & Hug, 1990; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982) is differentially affected by informed vs. blind administration of the postfitting questionnaire. Method Participants completed the HHI at their hearing aid evaluation and again at their hearing aid follow-up visit. At follow-up, half received a clean HHI form (blind administration), whereas the remainder responded on their original form (informed administration) and could thus base their follow-up responses on those they gave at the hearing aid evaluation. Results The data show that for the population examined here, informed administration of the follow-up HHI did not yield a different outcome to blind administration of the follow-up HHI. This was not influenced by past hearing aid use, age of the participant, or the duration of time between baseline questionnaire completion and follow-up completion. Conclusion These data suggest that completion of follow-up questionnaires in either informed or blind format will have little impact on HHI responses, most likely because of the many other factors that combined to influence hearing aid outcome. PMID:21940983

  9. A psychometric evaluation of the anatomy learning experiences questionnaire and correlations with learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Choi-Lundberg, Derek L; Williams, Anne-Marie M; Zimitat, Craig

    2017-04-17

    The Anatomy Learning Experiences Questionnaire (ALEQ) was designed by Smith and Mathias to explore students' perceptions and experiences of learning anatomy. In this study, the psychometric properties of a slightly altered 34-item ALEQ (ALEQ-34) were evaluated, and correlations with learning outcomes investigated, by surveying first- and second-year undergraduate medical students; 181 usable responses were obtained (75% response rate). Psychometric analysis demonstrated overall good reliability (Cronbach's alpha of 0.85). Exploratory factor analysis yielded a 27-item, three-factor solution (ALEQ-27, Cronbach's alpha of 0.86), described as: (Factor 1) (Reversed) challenges in learning anatomy, (Factor 2) Applications and importance of anatomy, and (Factor 3) Learning in the dissection laboratory. Second-year students had somewhat greater challenges and less positive attitudes in learning anatomy than first-year students. Females reported slightly greater challenges and less confidence in learning anatomy than males. Total scores on summative gross anatomy examination questions correlated with ALEQ-27, Pearson's r = 0.222 and 0.271, in years 1 and 2, respectively, and with Factor 1, r = 0.479 and 0.317 (all statistically significant). Factor 1 also had similar correlations across different question types (multiple choice; short answer or essay; cadaveric; and anatomical models, bones, or radiological images). In a retrospective analysis, Factor 1 predicted poor end-of-semester anatomy examination results in year 1 with a sensitivity of 88% and positive predictive value of 33%. Further development of ALEQ-27 may enable deeper understanding of students' learning of anatomy, and its ten-item Factor 1 may be a useful screening tool to identify at-risk students. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Association between adverse perinatal outcomes and amino acid levels measured with nutrient questionnaire in adolescent pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Guzel, Ali Irfan; Cinar, Mehmet; Erkilinc, Selcuk; Aksoy, Rıfat Taner; Yumusak, Omer Hamid; Celik, Fatma; Celik, Yusuf

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the maternal serum amino acid levels in first trimester adolescent pregnancies by using a new developed dietary questionnaire. A group of 169 pregnant women in the first trimester of their pregnancy were asked to complete the dietary questionnaire. Among all the women, 39 were adolescent pregnancies. The results of the questionnaire were evaluated by a nutrient database program (BeBiS software program) designed to evaluate Turkish traditional foods and commercial processed foods. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of body mass index and educational and socio-economic status. The mean age and gravidity was statistically significantly lower in adolescent pregnancies. The mean isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, threonine, valine, arginine, and proline levels were statistically significantly lower in adolescent pregnancies. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed the cut-off values of these amino acids. Of these amino acids; lower values of histidine, serine, and alanine were associated with lower birth weight, and lower values of histidine and alanine were associated with preterm delivery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the amino acid levels in adolescent pregnancies. According to this study, some amino acid levels were lower in adolescent pregnancies and associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. Further studies with maternal and perinatal outcomes are needed to demonstrate the effects of these amino acids in such pregnancies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation, validation, and reliability of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire among Persian population.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Birjandinejad, Ali; Kachooei, Amir Reza

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to validate a cross-culturally adapted version of the Persian Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHOQ). We followed the Beaton's guideline to translate the questionnaire to Persian. We administered the final version to 223 patients among which 79 patients returned 3 days later to respond to the Persian MHOQ for the second time. In the first visit, respondents also filled the Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and rated the pain based on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Cronbach's alpha for the total MHOQ was 0.79 which showed good internal consistency. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the total MHOQ was 0.84 which demonstrated good reliability between test and retest. The absolute correlation coefficient between total MHOQ and the DASH was as high as 0.74. Persian version of the MHOQ proved to be a reliable and valid instrument to be implemented among Persian population with the hand and wrist disorders.

  12. The Relation of the Response Distribution to Self-Report Questionnaire Items and Cognitive Ability among School-Aged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, Laura M.; Reiner, Laura S.; Aluvathingal, Anu J.

    2010-01-01

    This proposed research is part of an on-going line of research of developing questionnaire instruments for use at the elementary school level. Because field trials often use child self-report as outcome measures and sometimes determine implementation fidelity using such measures, evaluation of the validity of the use of such measures with…

  13. Patient-Reported Outcome Questionnaire for Systemic Mastocytosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-06

    Aggressive Systemic Mastocytosis (ASM); SM w Assoc Clonal Hema Non-mast Cell Lineage Disease (SM-AHNMD); Mast Cell Leukemia (MCL); Smoldering Systemic Mastocytosis (SSM); Indolent Systemic Mastocytosis (ISM) ISM Subgroup Fully Recruited

  14. Psychometric validation of the Coronary Revascularisation Outcome Questionnaire (CROQv2) in the context of the NHS Coronary Revascularisation PROMs Pilot

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Rebecca; Green, Stephen; Jackson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The Coronary Revascularisation Outcome Questionnaire (CROQ) is a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We tested the psychometric properties of a modified version (CROQv2) when administered in a National Health Service (NHS)/Department of Health (DH) funded pilot of PROMs for coronary revascularisation. Design Psychometric validation study. Setting 11 English hospitals in the UK taking part in the NHS/DH funded pilot of PROMs for coronary revascularisation. Participants Comprehensive analyses of acceptability, reliability, validity and responsiveness were conducted independently for each of the prerevascularisation (n=2685 and n=3711) and postrevascularisation (n=869 and n=837) versions of the CROQ-CABG and CROQ-PCI, respectively. Results All versions met prespecified stringent criteria for (1) acceptability of items (missing data) and scales (missing data, floor and ceiling effects, skewness); (2) tests of scaling assumptions; (3) reliability: internal consistency (Cronbach's α, item-total correlations); (4) construct validity based on within-scale analyses (internal consistency, intercorrelations between scales, factor analysis and hypothesis testing); (5) construct validity based on comparisons with external measures (convergent and discriminant validity and hypothesis testing) and (6) responsiveness. Results were also confirmed when tests were repeated on subsamples of CABG (n=639) and PCI (n=615) patients who reported receiving help completing prerevascularisation questionnaires. Conclusions The availability of a psychometrically robust procedure-specific tool that could be used as part of a large-scale coronary revascularisation PROMs programme to capture the patients' perspective of coronary revascularisation will enable outcomes important to patients to be routinely collected alongside clinical outcomes. The CROQ is suitable for administration by postal

  15. Reference values for anxiety questionnaires: the Leiden Routine Outcome Monitoring Study.

    PubMed

    Schulte-van Maaren, Yvonne W M; Giltay, Erik J; van Hemert, Albert M; Zitman, Frans G; de Waal, Margot W M; Carlier, Ingrid V E

    2013-09-25

    The monitoring of patients with an anxiety disorder can benefit from Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM). As anxiety disorders differ in phenomenology, several anxiety questionnaires are included in ROM: Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA), PADUA Inventory Revised (PI-R), Panic Appraisal Inventory (PAI), Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ), Worry Domains Questionnaire (WDQ), Social Interaction, Anxiety Scale (SIAS), Social Phobia Scale (SPS), and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). We aimed to generate reference values for both 'healthy' and 'clinically anxious' populations for these anxiety questionnaires. We included 1295 subjects from the general population (ROM reference-group) and 5066 psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with a specific anxiety disorder (ROM patient-group). The MINI was used as diagnostic device in both the ROM reference group and the ROM patient group. To define limits for one-sided reference intervals (95th percentile; P95) the outermost 5% of observations were used. Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analyses were used to yield alternative cut-off values for the anxiety questionnaires. For the ROM reference-group the mean age was 40.3 years (SD=12.6), and for the ROM patient-group it was 36.5 years (SD=11.9). Females constituted 62.8% of the reference-group and 64.4% of the patient-group. P95 ROM reference group cut-off values for reference versus clinically anxious populations were 11 for the BSA, 43 for the PI-R, 37 for the PAI Anticipated Panic, 47 for the PAI Perceived Consequences, 65 for the PAI Perceived Self-efficacy, 66 for the PSWQ, 74 for the WDQ, 32 for the SIAS, 19 for the SPS, and 36 for IES-R. ROC analyses yielded slightly lower reference values. The discriminative power of all eight anxiety questionnaires was very high. Substantial non-response and limited generalizability. For eight anxiety questionnaires a comprehensive set of reference values was provided. Reference values were generally higher in women than in men

  16. Outcome-Reporting Bias in Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigott, Therese D.; Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Williams, Ryan T.; Canada, Dericka D.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome-reporting bias occurs when primary studies do not include information about all outcomes measured in a study. When studies omit findings on important measures, efforts to synthesize the research using systematic review techniques will be biased and interpretations of individual studies will be incomplete. Outcome-reporting bias has been…

  17. The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) after 15 years of field trial

    PubMed Central

    Shauver, Melissa J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) has been used to assess a variety of hand and upper extremity injuries and conditions for nearly 15 years. It has been included in several overviews of upper extremity outcomes measures, but it has not been systematically examined regarding its clinimetric properties during field trials. Methods We conducted a review of the MHQ in the English language literature from 1998 through March 2012. Data from clinical studies were abstracted and compiled. Results The MHQ has been used in 58 clinical studies and its clinimetric properties have been analyzed in an additional 18 publications. The MHQ compares favorably with other hand outcomes instruments in the areas of test-retest reliability, validity, and responsiveness. High internal consistency may indicate redundancy within the items in the MHQ. The strength of the MHQ is its multidimensional construct in measuring patient-rated outcomes in symptom, function, aesthetics, and satisfaction. Conclusions The MHQ has been applied across a variety of conditions affecting the hand and upper limb. Its psychometric properties have been tested through field trials in various clinical settings around the world. Level of Evidence Systematic Review; Level II PMID:23629117

  18. Reported Voice Difficulties in Student Teachers: A Questionnaire Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Carol; Richards, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As professional voice users, teachers are particularly at risk of abusing their voices and developing voice disorders during their career. In spite of this, attention paid to voice care in the initial training and further professional development of teachers is unevenly spread and insufficient. This article describes a questionnaire survey of 171…

  19. AEL Continuous School Improvement Questionnaire. User Manual and Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Craig, James R.; Balow, Nancy; Childers, Robert D.

    The Continuous School Improvement Questionnaire (CSIQ) developed by the AEL helps a school staff gauge its performance on six dimensions related to continuous school improvement. Each member of the staff responds to the CSIQ individually. Although results might be used at the district or regional level, the most widely intended unit for applying…

  20. Reported Voice Difficulties in Student Teachers: A Questionnaire Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Carol; Richards, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As professional voice users, teachers are particularly at risk of abusing their voices and developing voice disorders during their career. In spite of this, attention paid to voice care in the initial training and further professional development of teachers is unevenly spread and insufficient. This article describes a questionnaire survey of 171…

  1. Responsiveness of the Korean version of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire after carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Wi, Seung Myung; Gong, Hyun Sik; Bae, Kee Jeong; Roh, Young Hak; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2014-06-01

    The Korean version of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (K-MHQ) was recently validated; however, the questionnaire's responsiveness as well as the degree to which the instrument is sensitive to change has not been thoroughly evaluated in a specific condition in Koreans. We evaluated the responsiveness of the K-MHQ in a homogenous cohort of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and we compared it with that of the Korean version of the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Questionnaire (K-DASH), which was found to have a large degree of responsiveness after carpal tunnel release for Korean patients with CTS. Thirty-seven patients with CTS prospectively completed the K-MHQ and the K-DASH before and 6 months after surgery. The responsiveness statistics were assessed for both the K-MHQ and the K-DASH by using the standardized response mean (SRM), which was defined as the mean change of the original scores after surgery divided by the standard deviation of the change. All domains of the K-MHQ significantly improved after carpal tunnel release (p < 0.001). The SRM for all scales but one (the aesthetics scale) showed large responsiveness of ≥ 0.8. The aesthetics scale showed medium responsiveness of 0.6. The combined function/symptom scale of the K-DASH significantly improved after surgery (p < 0.001). The SRM of the K-DASH revealed large responsiveness of 0.9. The K-MHQ was found to have a large degree of responsiveness after carpal tunnel release for Korean patients with CTS, which is comparable not only to the K-DASH, but also to the original version of the MHQ. The region-specific K-MHQ can be useful for outcomes research related to carpal tunnel surgery, especially for research comparing CTS with various other hand and wrist health conditions.

  2. Measurement Properties of the Brief Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire in Patients With Dupuytren Contracture.

    PubMed

    Wehrli, Martina; Hensler, Stefanie; Schindele, Stephan; Herren, Daniel B; Marks, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    The brief Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (briefMHQ) was developed as a shorter version of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ), but its measurement properties have not been investigated in patients with Dupuytren contracture. The objective of the study was to investigate the reliability, validity, responsiveness, and interpretability of the briefMHQ. Fifty-seven patients diagnosed with Dupuytren contracture completed the briefMHQ as well as the full-length MHQ and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire at baseline. Two to 14 days after baseline and 1 year after collagenase injection or surgery, patients again filled out the briefMHQ. Reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient and by calculating internal consistency (Cronbach alpha). Validity was tested by quantifying correlations with the full-length MHQ and QuickDASH. Responsiveness, based on the standardized response mean and the minimally clinically important change, was also determined. The briefMHQ had an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87, Cronbach alpha of 0.88, and correlations of r = 0.88 and -0.82 with the original MHQ and QuickDASH, respectively. The standardized response mean was 0.9 and the minimally clinically important change was 7 points. Overall, the briefMHQ demonstrates excellent reliability, good validity, and high responsiveness in patients with Dupuytren contracture. The briefMHQ is an accurate and time-saving tool to evaluate patients with Dupuytren contracture and the effect of a corresponding treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Longitudinal deteriorations in patient reported outcomes in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Oga, Toru; Nishimura, Koichi; Tsukino, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Susumu; Hajiro, Takashi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2007-01-01

    Goals of effective management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include relieving their symptoms and improving their health status. We examined how such patient reported outcomes would change longitudinally in comparison to physiological outcomes in COPD. One hundred thirty-seven male outpatients with stable COPD were recruited for the study. The subjects health status was evaluated using the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ). Their dyspnoea using the modified Medical Research Council (MRC) scale and their psychological status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were assessed upon entry and every 6 months thereafter over a 5-year period. Pulmonary function and exercise capacity as evaluated by peak oxygen uptake (VO2) on progressive cycle ergometry were also followed over the same time. Using mixed effects models to estimate the slopes for the changes, scores on the SGRQ, the CRQ, the MRC and the HADS worsened in a statistically significant manner over time. However, changes only weakly correlated with changes in forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) and peak (VO2). We demonstrated that although changes in pulmonary function and exercise capacity are well known in patients with COPD, patient reported outcomes such as health status, dyspnoea and psychological status also deteriorated significantly over time. In addition, deteriorations in patient reported outcomes only weakly correlated to changes in physiological indices. To capture the overall deterioration of COPD from the subjective viewpoints of the patients, patient reported outcomes should be followed separately from physiological outcomes.

  4. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J; Jacob, Gitta A; Brändle, Laura S; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes.

  5. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Jacob, Gitta A.; Brändle, Laura S.; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  6. Self-Reported Knee Symptoms Assessed by KOOS Questionnaire in Downhill Runners (Skyrunners)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The knee is the weight-bearing joint most commonly associated with sports injuries, and therefore is most at risk of developing degenerative changes, including osteoarthritis. Skyrunners can be considered to be at risk of developing symptoms of post-traumatic osteoarthritis due to downhill running. Aim The aim of this study was to analyze the health of the knee joints of a large group of these athletes via a specific self-report questionnaire. Methods This study was carried out by asking the participants of seven official Skyraces (22.4±3.1 km length; 1596±393 m elevation) to fill out a questionnaire. Information regarding age, sex, downhill elevation (m) during training and competitions over the last month, and history of previous knee injury was also collected before the participants filled out the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), which is a reliable and validated instrument designed to assess patients’ opinions about their knees and associated problems that can result in post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Athletes were divided into six age groups (from 17 to 70 years) and 12 groups based on the downhill gradient they had covered over the last month (from 1,000 to 40,000 m). Results Six hundred twenty-one questionnaires were collected from 45% of the participants in the seven races. Multivariate analysis revealed that self-reported KOOS scores were unrelated to age, sex and monthly downhill gradient. Only 74 (12%) of the participants reported previous knee injuries. Significant differences in the five subscales of the KOOS were found between skyrunners with and without previous knee injuries (P<0.01). Conclusions In the studied population, regular training for downhill running and participation in Skyraces could not be considered risk factors for subjective knee symptoms. Skyrunners with self-reported histories of knee injuries scored worse on all five subscales of the KOOS. PMID:25902316

  7. Development and validation of a questionnaire assessing discrepancy between patients' pre-surgery expectations and abilities and post-surgical outcomes following knee replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Pazit; Diamond, Neil T; Menz, Hylton B; Wee, Elin; Margelis, Soula; Stewart, Andrew G; Bartlett, John R; Bergman, Neil B; McMahon, Stephen; Hare, David L; Hill, Keith

    2016-10-01

    The discrepancy between patient-desired outcomes and achievable functional outcomes is a source of patient dissatisfaction. This paper reports development and validation of a questionnaire to assess this discrepancy in patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. The initial questionnaire (Knee Surgery Perception Questionnaire, KSPQ) comprised two parts. Part A, assessed patients' perception of their current level of function and pain, and Part B, assessed patients' desired outcomes of the surgery. Validation was carried out for Part A and then applied to Part B using a one-factor congeneric model and was tested in 185 patients preceding surgery. A discrepancy score between patients' expectations and desired outcome (Part B) and their perception of current function (Part A) was also calculated. Pearson correlations were used between the KSPQ total score and subscales and other knee-specific questionnaires to determine construct validity. The final best set of models included four items for each subscale with a Chi-square value of 7.3 (n.s). The subscales and the total KSPQ showed significant strong to moderate correlations with knee-specific questionnaires. The discrepancy score in each subscale and the overall score showed relatively large discrepancy between patients' expectations and their perception of current function; with higher discrepancy score reported for pain and walking. The KSPQ is a valid questionnaire to assess patients' expected and desired outcomes of knee replacement surgery and their perception of their current abilities and function, and discrepancy between these. The KSPQ now requires further investigation at different stages of recovery following surgery. III.

  8. The Portuguese version of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45): Normative data, reliability, and clinical significance cut-offs scores.

    PubMed

    Machado, Paulo P P; Fassnacht, Daniel B

    2015-12-01

    The Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45) is one of the most extensively used standardized self-report instruments to monitor psychotherapy outcomes. The questionnaire is designed specifically for the assessment of change during psychotherapy treatments. Therefore, it is crucial to provide norms and clinical cut-off values for clinicians and researchers. The current study aims at providing study provides norms, reliability indices, and clinical cut-off values for the Portuguese version of the scale. Data from two large non-clinical samples (high school/university, N = 1,669; community, N = 879) and one clinical sample (n = 201) were used to investigate psychometric properties and derive normative data for all OQ-45 subscales and the total score. Significant and substantial differences were found for all subscales between the clinical and non-clinical sample. The Portuguese version also showed adequate reliabilities (internal consistency, test-retest), which were comparable to the original version. To assess individual clinical change, clinical cut-off values and reliable change indices were calculated allowing clinicians and researchers to monitor and evaluate clients' individual change. The Portuguese version of the OQ-45 is a reliable instrument with comparable Portuguese norms and cut-off scores to those from the original version. This allows clinicians and researchers to use this instrument for evaluating change and outcome in psychotherapy. This study provides norms for non-clinical and clinical Portuguese samples and investigates the reliability (internal consistency and test-retest) of the OQ-45. Cut-off values and reliable change index are provided allowing clinicians to evaluate clinical change and clients' response to treatment, monitoring the quality of mental health care services. These can be used, in routine clinical practice, as benchmarks for treatment progress and to empirically base clinical decisions such as continuation of treatment or considering

  9. Psychometrics of the Personal Questionnaire: A client-generated outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Robert; Wagner, John; Sales, Célia M D; Rodgers, Brian; Alves, Paula; Café, Maria J

    2016-03-01

    We present a range of evidence for the reliability and validity of data generated by the Personal Questionnaire (PQ), a client-generated individualized outcome measure, using 5 data sets from 3 countries. Overall pretherapy mean internal consistency (alpha) across clients was .80, and within-client alphas averaged .77; clients typically had 1 or 2 items that did not vary with the other items. Analyses of temporal structure indicated high levels of between-clients variance (58%), moderate pretherapy test-retest correlation (r = .57), and high session-to-session Lag-1 autocorrelation (.82). Scores on the PQ provided clear evidence of convergence with a range of outcome measures (within-client r = .41). Mean pre-post effects were large (d = 1.25). The results support a revised caseness cutoff of 3.25 and a reliable change index interval of 1.67. We conclude that PQ data meet criteria for evidence-based, norm-referenced measurement of client psychological distress for supporting psychotherapy practice and research.

  10. Student Outcomes: Annual Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research.

    Each year a study is conducted at Prince George's Community College (PGCC) to update student outcomes data using quantifiable measures of student achievement. Data for the 1989 study were obtained from the college's student information system, the University of Maryland (UM) system, and surveys of all 825 fiscal year 1988 graduates and 118 of…

  11. Questionnaires for outcome expectancy, self-regulation, and behavioral expectation for resistance training among young-old adults: development and preliminary validity.

    PubMed

    Williams, David M; Savla, Jyoti; Davy, Brenda M; Kelleher, Sarah A; Marinik, Elaina L; Winett, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present research was to develop questionnaires to assess outcome expectancy for resistance training (RT), behavioral expectation in the context of perceived barriers to RT, and self-regulation strategies for RT among young-old adults (50-69 years). Measurement development included (a) item generation through elicitation interviews (N = 14) and open-ended questionnaires (N = 56), (b) expert feedback on a preliminary draft of the questionnaires (N = 4), and (c) a quantitative longitudinal study for item-reduction and psychometric analyses (N = 94). Elicitation procedures, expert feedback, and item reduction yielded four questionnaires with a total of 33 items. Positive outcome expectancy (α = .809), negative outcome expectancy (α = .729), behavioral expectation (α = .925), and self-regulation (α = .761) had-with one exception-moderate bivariate associations with two different indicators of self-reported RT behavior at one-month follow-up (r = .298 to .506). The present research provides preliminary support for newly developed questionnaires to facilitate understanding of the psychosocial determinants of RT among young-old adults.

  12. Validating a Children's Self-Report Plate Waste Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrestal, Sarah G.; Issel, L. Michele; Kviz, Frederick J.; Chávez, Noel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The National School Lunch Program is well situated to address the vulnerability of lower income children at increased risk for both under and overnutrition. Evidence suggests, however, that a significant amount of food served in the program goes uneaten. One way to monitor this problem is through children's self-reported plate…

  13. Validating a Children's Self-Report Plate Waste Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrestal, Sarah G.; Issel, L. Michele; Kviz, Frederick J.; Chávez, Noel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The National School Lunch Program is well situated to address the vulnerability of lower income children at increased risk for both under and overnutrition. Evidence suggests, however, that a significant amount of food served in the program goes uneaten. One way to monitor this problem is through children's self-reported plate…

  14. Self reported risk behaviour among injecting drug users: self versus assisted questionnaire completion.

    PubMed

    White, B; Day, C; Maher, L

    2007-03-01

    The current study aimed to compare self-reported injecting and sexual risk behaviour among Needle and Syringe Program (NSP) attendees who self-completed a questionnaire to that of those who received assistance in completing the questionnaire. Information on demographic, injecting and sexual risk behaviour was collected via a self-completed questionnaire for an annual cross-sectional survey of injecting drug users (IDUs) recruited from sentinel NSPs around Australia. Assistance was provided when necessary and recorded. Of 2,035 participants, 1,452 (71%) reported completing the questionnaire without assistance. Being male and nominating a language other than English spoken at home was independently associated with receiving assistance with questionnaire completion. Participants who reported heroin as the drug last injected were also more likely to receive assistance. Multivariate analyses revealed those who received assistance with questionnaire completion were less likely to report re-using a syringe after someone else and less likely to report sex work in the past month. The current findings suggest self-completion of risk behaviour questionnaires should be considered as an alternative to interviewer administered questionnaires to maximise accuracy of self-reports.

  15. Measuring visual outcomes in children with uveitis using the “Effects of Youngsters’ Eyesight on Quality of Life” questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Angeles-Han, Sheila T.; Yeh, Steven; McCracken, Courtney; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stryker, Daneka; Myoung, Erica; Vogler, Larry; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Lambert, Scott R.; Harrison, Melanie J.; Prahalad, Sampath; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Effects of Youngsters’ Eyesight on Quality of Life (EYE-Q) is a novel measure of vision-related quality of life (QOL) and function in children. We aim to determine the validity of EYE-Q in childhood uveitis. Methods We abstracted medical record data on arthritis and uveitis in a convenience sample of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and/or uveitis. In addition to the EYE-Q, parents and patients completed questionnaires on overall QOL (Pediatric QOL Inventory - PedsQL), and physical functioning (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire - CHAQ). Results Among 57 children (8 JIA, 24 JIA and uveitis, 25 uveitis alone), 102 ocular examinations were performed within 1 month of completing questionnaires. Uveitis patients had bilateral disease (69%), anterior involvement (78%), synechiae (51%) and cataracts (49%). Children with vision loss in their better eye (visual acuity (VA) 20/50 or worse) had worse EYE-Q (p = 0.006), and PedsQL (p = 0.028), but not CHAQ scores. The EYE-Q moderately correlated with logMAR VA (rs = −0.43), PedsQL (rs = 0.43) and CHAQ (rs = −0.45), but was not correlated with anterior chamber cells or intraocular pressure. The PedsQL and CHAQ did not correlate with VA or cells. There were strong correlations between the parent and child EYE-Q (rs = 0.62). Cronbach's α for the child report was 0.91. The EYE-Q had strong test-retest reliability (rs=0.75). Conclusion The EYE-Q may be an important tool in the assessment of visual outcomes in childhood uveitis and an improvement over general measures in detecting changes in vision-related function. PMID:26037544

  16. Predicting functional outcomes among college drinkers: reliability and predictive validity of the Young Adult Alcohol Consequences Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Read, Jennifer P; Merrill, Jennifer E; Kahler, Christopher W; Strong, David R

    2007-11-01

    Heavy drinking and associated consequences are widespread among U.S. college students. Recently, Read et al. (Read, J. P., Kahler, C. W., Strong, D., & Colder, C. R. (2006). Development and preliminary validation of the Young Adult Alcohol Consequences Questionnaire. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 67, 169-178) developed the Young Adult Alcohol Consequences Questionnaire (YAACQ) to assess the broad range of consequences that may result from heavy drinking in the college milieu. In the present study, we sought to add to the psychometric validation of this measure by employing a prospective design to examine the test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, and predictive validity of the YAACQ. We also sought to examine the utility of the YAACQ administered early in the semester in the prediction of functional outcomes later in the semester, including the persistence of heavy drinking, and academic functioning. Ninety-two college students (48 females) completed a self-report assessment battery during the first weeks of the Fall semester, and approximately one week later. Additionally, 64 subjects (37 females) participated at an optional third time point at the end of the semester. Overall, the YAACQ demonstrated strong internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent and predictive validity. YAACQ scores also were predictive of both drinking frequency, and "binge" drinking frequency. YAACQ total scores at baseline were an early indicator of academic performance later in the semester, with greater number of total consequences experienced being negatively associated with end-of-semester grade point average. Specific YAACQ subscale scores (Impaired Control, Dependence Symptoms, Blackout Drinking) showed unique prediction of persistent drinking and academic outcomes.

  17. Development of a Self-Report Tool to Evaluate Hearing Aid Outcomes among Chinese Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lena L. N.; Hang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development of a self-report tool--the Chinese Hearing Aid Outcomes Questionnaire (CHAOQ)--to evaluate hearing aid outcomes among Chinese speakers. Method: There were 4 phases to construct the CHAOQ and evaluate its psychometric properties. First, items were selected to evaluate a range of culturally relevant…

  18. Development of a Self-Report Tool to Evaluate Hearing Aid Outcomes among Chinese Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lena L. N.; Hang, Na

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports on the development of a self-report tool--the Chinese Hearing Aid Outcomes Questionnaire (CHAOQ)--to evaluate hearing aid outcomes among Chinese speakers. Method: There were 4 phases to construct the CHAOQ and evaluate its psychometric properties. First, items were selected to evaluate a range of culturally relevant…

  19. Spanish Adaptation and Validation of the Outcome Questionnaire OQ-30.2

    PubMed Central

    Errázuriz, Paula; Opazo, Sebastián; Behn, Alex; Silva, Oscar; Gloger, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the psychometric properties of a Spanish version of the Shortened Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-30.2, Lambert et al., 2004) validated with a sample of 546 patients in an outpatient mental health clinic and 100 non-clinical adults in Chile. Our results show that this measure has similar normative data to the original measure, with a cutoff score for the Chilean population set at 43.36, and the reliable change index at 14. This Spanish OQ-30.2 has good internal consistency (α = 0.90), has concurrent validity with the Depressive, Anxious, and Somatoform disorders measuring scale (Alvarado and Vera, 1991), and is sensitive to change during psychotherapy. Consistent with previous studies, factorial analyses showed that both, the one-factor solution for a general scale and the three-factor solution containing three theoretical scales yielded poor fit estimates. Overall, our results are similar to past research on the OQ-45 and the OQ-30. The short version has adequate psychometric properties, comparable to those of the OQ-45, but provides a gain in application time that could be relevant in the setting of psychotherapy research with large samples, frequent assessments over time, and/or samples that may require more assistance completing items (e.g., low-literacy). We conclude that this measure will be a valuable instrument for research and clinical practice. PMID:28559857

  20. Measuring Appetite with the Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire Identifies Hospitalised Older People at Risk of Worse Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    PILGRIM, A.L.; BAYLIS, D.; JAMESON, K.A.; COOPER, C.; SAYER, A.A.; ROBINSON, S.M.; ROBERTS, H.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Poor appetite is commonly reported by older people but is rarely measured. The Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) was validated to predict weight loss in community dwelling older adults but has been little used in hospitals. We evaluated it in older women on admission to hospital and examined associations with healthcare outcomes. Design Longitudinal observational with follow-up at six months. Setting Female acute Medicine for Older People wards at a University hospital in England. Participants 179 female inpatients. Measurements Age, weight, Body Mass Index (BMI), grip strength, SNAQ, Barthel Index Score, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Geriatric Depression Scale: Short Form (GDS-SF), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), category of domicile and receipt of care were measured soon after admission and repeated at six month follow-up. The length of hospital stay (LOS), hospital acquired infection, readmissions and deaths by follow-up were recorded. Results 179 female participants mean age 87 (SD 4.7) years were recruited. 42% of participants had a low SNAQ score (<14, indicating poor appetite). A low SNAQ score was associated with an increased risk of hospital acquired infection (OR 3.53; 95% CI: 1.48, 8.41; p=0.004) and with risk of death (HR 2.29; 95% CI: 1.12, 4.68; p = 0.023) by follow-up. Conclusion Poor appetite was common among the older hospitalised women studied, and was associated with higher risk of poor healthcare outcomes. PMID:26728926

  1. Validation of a questionnaire assessing patient's aesthetic and functional outcome after nasal reconstruction: the patient NAFEQ-score.

    PubMed

    Moolenburgh, S E; Mureau, M A M; Duivenvoorden, H J; Hofer, S O P

    2009-05-01

    In determining patient satisfaction with functional and aesthetic outcome after reconstructive surgery, including nasal reconstruction, standardised assessment instruments are very important. These standardised tools are needed to adequately evaluate and compare outcome results. Since no such instrument existed for nasal reconstruction, a standardised evaluation questionnaire was developed to assess aesthetic and functional outcome after nasal reconstruction. Items of the Nasal Appearance and Function Evaluation Questionnaire (NAFEQ) were derived from both the literature and experiences with patients. The NAFEQ was validated on 30 nasal reconstruction patients and a reference group of 175 people. A factor analysis confirmed the arrangement of the questionnaire in two subscales: functional and aesthetic outcome. High Cronbach's alpha values (>0.70) for both subscales showed that the NAFEQ was an internally consistent instrument. This study demonstrated that the NAFEQ can be used as a standardised questionnaire for detailed evaluation of aesthetic and functional outcome after nasal reconstruction. Its widespread use would enable comparison of results achieved by different techniques, surgeons and centres in a standardised fashion.

  2. Prospects: Student Outcomes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puma, Michael J.; Karweit, Nancy; Price, Cristofer; Ricciuti, Anne; Thompson, William; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael

    This report is one of a series presenting findings from "Prospects: The Congressionally Mandated Study of Educational Growth and Opportunity." This study, conducted in response to the 1988 Hawkins-Stafford Amendments, was a major effort to examine the effects of Chapter 1 on student achievement and other school-related educational…

  3. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS® Measures

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients’ symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients’ reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  4. Measurement Properties of the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire in Adolescent Patients With Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Gabriel; Joncas, Julie; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Beauséjour, Marie; Roy-Beaudry, Marjolaine; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Prospective validation of the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire French-Canadian version (SRS-22fv) in adolescent patients with spondylolisthesis. To determine the measurement properties of the SRS-22fv. The SRS-22 is widely used for the assessment of health-related quality of life in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and other spinal deformities. Spondylolisthesis has an important effect on quality of life. The instrument was previously used in this population, although its measurement properties remained unknown. We aim to determine its reliability, factorial, concurrent validity, and its discriminant capacity in an adolescent spondylolisthesis population. The SRS-22fv was tested in 479 subjects (272 patients with spondylolisthesis, 143 with AIS, and 64 controls) at a single institution. Its reliability was measured using the coefficient of internal consistency, concurrent validity by the short form-12 (SF-12v2 French version) and discriminant validity using multivariate analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and multivariate linear regression. The SRS-22fv showed a good global internal consistency (spondylolisthesis: Cronbach α = 0.91, AIS: 0.86, and controls: 0.78) in all its domains for spondylolisthesis patients. It showed a factorial structure consistent with the original questionnaire, with 60% of explained variance under four factors. Moderate to high correlation coefficients were found for specifically corresponding domains between SRS-22fv and SF-12v2. Boys had higher scores than do girls, scores worsened with increasing age and body mass index. Analysis of covariance showed statistically significant differences between patients with spondylolisthesis, patients with AIS, and controls when controlling for age, sex, body mass index, pain, function, and self-image scores. In the spondylolisthesis group, scores on all domains and mean total scores were significantly lower in surgical candidates and in patients with high

  5. Patient Reported Outcomes and Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David A.; Kratz, Anna L.

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is classified as a chronic pain condition accompanied by symptoms of fatigue, sleep problems, problems with cognition, negative mood, limited functional status, and the presence of other chronic overlapping pain conditions (COPCs). Comprehensive assessment of all of these components can be challenging. This paper provides an overview of patient-reported approaches that can be taken to assess FM in the contexts of diagnosis, symptom monitoring, phenotyping/characterization, and for purposes of clinical trials. PMID:27133492

  6. Development of a short questionnaire to measure an extended set of job demands, job resources, and positive health outcomes: the new brief job stress questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Akiomi; Kawakami, Norito; Shimomitsu, Teruichi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Haratani, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Toru; Shimazu, Akihito; Odagiri, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reliability and construct validity of a new version of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (New BJSQ), which measures an extended set of psychosocial factors at work by adding new scales/items to the current version of the BJSQ. Additional scales/items were extensively collected from theoretical job stress models and similar questionnaires in several countries. Scales/items were field-tested and refined through a pilot internet survey. Finally, an 84-item questionnaire (141 items in total when combined with the current BJSQ) was developed. A nationally representative survey was administered to employees in Japan (n=1,633) to examine the reliability and construct validity. Most scales showed acceptable levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Principal component analyses showed that the first factor explained 50% or greater proportion of the variance in most scales. A scale factor analysis and a correlation analysis showed that these scales fit the theoretical expectations. These findings provided a piece of evidence that the New BJSQ scales are reliable and valid. Although more detailed content and construct validity should be examined in future study, the New BJSQ is a useful instrument to evaluate psychosocial work environment and positive mental health outcomes in the current workplace.

  7. Development of a Short Questionnaire to Measure an Extended Set of Job Demands, Job Resources, and Positive Health Outcomes: The New Brief Job Stress Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Akiomi; KAWAKAMI, Norito; SHIMOMITSU, Teruichi; TSUTSUMI, Akizumi; HARATANI, Takashi; YOSHIKAWA, Toru; SHIMAZU, Akihito; ODAGIRI, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the reliability and construct validity of a new version of the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (New BJSQ), which measures an extended set of psychosocial factors at work by adding new scales/items to the current version of the BJSQ. Additional scales/items were extensively collected from theoretical job stress models and similar questionnaires in several countries. Scales/items were field-tested and refined through a pilot internet survey. Finally, an 84-item questionnaire (141 items in total when combined with the current BJSQ) was developed. A nationally representative survey was administered to employees in Japan (n=1,633) to examine the reliability and construct validity. Most scales showed acceptable levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Principal component analyses showed that the first factor explained 50% or greater proportion of the variance in most scales. A scale factor analysis and a correlation analysis showed that these scales fit the theoretical expectations. These findings provided a piece of evidence that the New BJSQ scales are reliable and valid. Although more detailed content and construct validity should be examined in future study, the New BJSQ is a useful instrument to evaluate psychosocial work environment and positive mental health outcomes in the current workplace. PMID:24492763

  8. The Early Motor Questionnaire (EMQ): A Parental Report Measure of Early Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Libertus, Klaus; Landa, Rebecca J.

    2013-01-01

    Children's early motor skills are critical for development across language, social, and cognitive domains, and warrant close examination. However, examiner-administered motor assessments are time consuming and expensive. Parent-report questionnaires offer an efficient alternative, but validity of parent report is unclear and only few motor questionnaires exist. In this report, we use cross-sectional and longitudinal data to investigate the validity of parent report in comparison to two examiner-administered measures (Mullen Scales of Early Learning, MSEL; Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, PDMS-2), and introduce a new parent-report measure called the Early Motor Questionnaire (EMQ). Results indicate strong correlations between parent report on the EMQ and a child's age, robust concurrent and predictive validity of parent report with both the MSEL and PDMS-2, and good test-re-test reliability of parent report on the EMQ. Together, our findings support the conclusion that parents provide dependable accounts of early motor and cognitive development. PMID:24140841

  9. Discordant patient pain level reporting between questionnaires and physician encounters of the same day

    PubMed Central

    Juckett, David A.; Davis, Fred N.; Gostine, Mark; Kasten, Eric P.; Reed, Philip L.; Gardiner, Joseph; Risko, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    We examined the consistency of pain reporting by patients in a community pain management practice in Michigan. We compared pain levels (range 0-10) entered by patients in questionnaires versus those provided during their face-to-face physician encounter on the same day. Both of these values were available for approximately 10,000 encounters during the study period (2010–2014). Two subpopulations of patients were identifiable. One was consistent in reporting worst or least pain levels on the questionnaire and during the provider encounter. The other was discordant. Factor analysis had previously identified severity scales for patient biopsychosocial characteristics derived from the full questionnaire. The two subpopulations differed in their factor profiles even though they had similar demographics. In general, pain reported directly to physicians was more correlated to biopsychosocial indicators. Pain self-reporting using questionnaires has often been assumed to be ground truth, but those obtained during the physician encounter may be more reliable. PMID:28269863

  10. Challenging the reported disadvantages of e-questionnaires and addressing methodological issues of online data collection.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Louise

    2012-01-01

    To review the advantages and disadvantages of e-questionnaires, and question whether or not reported disadvantages remain valid or can be limited or circumvented. The internet is likely to become the dominant medium for survey distribution, yet nurses and midwives have been slow to use online technology for research involving questionnaires. Relatively little is known about optimal methods of harnessing the internet's potential in health studies. A small e-questionnaire of health workers. The Medline and Maternity and Infant Care databases were searched for articles containing the words 'web', 'online', or 'internet' and 'survey' or 'questionnaire'. The search was restricted to articles in English published since 2000. The reference lists of retrieved articles were also searched. Reported disadvantages of online data collection, such as sample bias, psychometric distortions, 'technophobia' and lower response rates are discussed and challenged. The author reports her experience of conducting a survey with an e-questionnaire to contribute to the limited body of knowledge in this area, and suggests how to maximise the quantity and quality of responses to e-questionnaires. E-questionnaires offer the researcher an inexpensive, quick and convenient way to collect data. Many of the reported disadvantages of the medium are no longer valid. The science of conducting the perfect e-survey is emerging. However, the lessons learned in the author's study, together with other research, seem to suggest that satisfactory response rates and data quality can be achieved in a relatively short time if certain tactics are used. To get the best results from e-questionnaires, it is suggested that the questionnaire recipients should be targeted carefully and that the value of their potential contribution to the project should be emphasised. E-questionnaires should be convenient, quick and easy to access, and be set out in a way that encourages full and complete responses.

  11. Assessment of satisfaction and Quality of Life using self -reported questionnaires after urethroplasty: a prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Eduardo Terra; Koff, Walter José; Rosito, Tiago Elias; Berger, Milton; Bortolini, Tiago; Neto, Brasil Silva

    2017-01-01

    To assess patient satisfaction and quality of life after urethroplasty using two different self-reported outcome measures and to compare it with objective clinical data. We prospectively collected data from 35 consecutive patients who underwent urethroplasty from January 2013 to September 2014. Patient demographics, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life score, urethral stricture surgery patient-reported outcome measure (USS-PROM), maximum flow rate (Qmax) and post-void residual urine were collected before, two and eight months after surgery. Failure occurred when any postoperative instrumentation was performed. General estimation equation was used to compare the results and linear regression analysis to correlate both questionnaires with objective data. Mean age was 61 years. Urethroplasties were equally divided between anastomotic and buccal mucosa grafts and 19 patients (59.3%) had a previous urethral procedure. Overall success rate was 87.5%. IPSS improved from a mean 19 at baseline to 5.32 at 8 months (p < 0.001). The mean USS-PROM score also improved from 13.21 preoperatively to 3.36 after surgery (p< 0.001) and 84.3% of patients were satisfied or very satisfied with surgical results. Mean Qmax increased from 4.64mL/s to 11mL/s (p< 0.001). Strong negative correlation was found respectively between flow rate and USS-PROM (r=-0.531, p< 0.001) and with IPSS (r=-0.512, p < 0.001). Significant improvements in urinary symptoms and in quality of life are expected after urethroplasty and they are correlated with objective measures. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  12. Workplace bullying in the UK NHS: a questionnaire and interview study on prevalence, impact and barriers to reporting

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Madeline; Thompson, Neill; Crampton, Paul; Morrow, Gill; Burford, Bryan; Gray, Christopher; Illing, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence and impact of bullying behaviours between staff in the National Health Service (NHS) workplace, and to explore the barriers to reporting bullying. Design Cross-sectional questionnaire and semi-structured interview. Setting 7 NHS trusts in the North East of England. Participants 2950 NHS staff, of whom 43 took part in a telephone interview. Main outcome measures Prevalence of bullying was measured by the revised Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ-R) and the impact of bullying was measured using indicators of psychological distress (General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12), intentions to leave work, job satisfaction and self-reported sickness absence. Barriers to reporting bullying and sources of bullying were also examined. Results Overall, 20% of staff reported having been bullied by other staff to some degree and 43% reported having witnessed bullying in the last 6 months. Male staff and staff with disabilities reported higher levels of bullying. There were no overall differences due to ethnicity, but some differences were detected on several negative behaviours. Bullying and witnessing bullying were associated with lower levels of psychological health and job satisfaction, and higher levels of intention to leave work. Managers were the most common source of bullying. Main barriers to reporting bullying were the perception that nothing would change, not wanting to be seen as a trouble-maker, the seniority of the bully and uncertainty over how policies would be implemented and bullying cases managed. Data from qualitative interviews supported these findings and identified workload pressures and organisational culture as factors contributing to workplace bullying. Conclusions Bullying is a persistent problem in healthcare organisations which has significant negative outcomes for individuals and organisations.

  13. Monitoring validated quality of life outcomes after prostatectomy: initial description of novel online questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Sebrow, Dov; Lavery, Hugh J; Brajtbord, Jonathan S; Hobbs, Adele; Levinson, Adam W; Samadi, David B

    2012-02-01

    To describe a novel, low-cost, online health-related quality of life (HRQOL) survey that allows for automated follow-up and convenient access for patients in geographically diverse locations. Clinicians and investigators have been encouraged to use validated HRQOL instruments when reporting outcomes after radical prostatectomy. The institutional review board approved our protocol and the use of a secure web site (http://www.SurveyMonkey.com) to send patients a collection of validated postprostatectomy HRQOL instruments by electronic mail. To assess compliance with the electronic mail format, a pilot study of cross-sectional surveys was sent to patients who presented for follow-up after robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy. The response data were transmitted in secure fashion in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. After providing written informed consent, 514 patients who presented for follow-up after robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy from March 2010 to February 2011 were sent the online survey. A total of 293 patients (57%) responded, with an average age of 60 years and a median interval from surgery of 12 months. Of the respondents, 75% completed the survey within 4 days of receiving the electronic mail, with a median completion time of 15 minutes. The total survey administration costs were limited to the web site's $200 annual fee-for-service. An online survey can be a low-cost, efficient, and confidential modality for assessing validated HRQOL outcomes in patients who undergo treatment of localized prostate cancer. This method could be especially useful for those who cannot return for follow-up because of geographic reasons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Examining adverse events after intensive care unit discharge: outcomes from a pilot questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Malcolm; Page, Karen; Worrall-Carter, Linda; Rolley, John

    2013-10-01

    Adverse events are common in acute clinical settings but little is known about these events occurring after Intensive Care discharge. This study aimed to develop a reliable and valid tool for exploring clinicians' opinions of factors associated with post-Intensive Care adverse events. A convenience sample of Australian Intensive Care Liaison Nurses was invited to complete and appraise a questionnaire using structured guidelines. Content validity and internal consistency were assessed. Twelve Intensive Care Liaison Nurses completed the questionnaire. Cronbach?s alpha coefficient showed high internal consistency for the questionnaire; all 24 items on the questionnaire had coefficients greater than 0.852. The content validity index of the questionnaire overall was 0.76. The post-Intensive Care adverse events questionnaire demonstrated reliability and validity. It is a tool that can be used to explore clinicians? opinions of factors associated with these events. The tool is important as it facilitates further insight into the causes of post-Intensive Care adverse events. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Measuring Resource Utilization: A Systematic Review of Validated Self-Reported Questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Leggett, Laura E; Khadaroo, Rachel G; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Lorenzetti, Diane L; Hanson, Heather; Wagg, Adrian; Padwal, Raj; Clement, Fiona

    2016-03-01

    A variety of methods may be used to obtain costing data. Although administrative data are most commonly used, the data available in these datasets are often limited. An alternative method of obtaining costing is through self-reported questionnaires. Currently, there are no systematic reviews that summarize self-reported resource utilization instruments from the published literature.The aim of the study was to identify validated self-report healthcare resource use instruments and to map their attributes.A systematic review was conducted. The search identified articles using terms like "healthcare utilization" and "questionnaire." All abstracts and full texts were considered in duplicate. For inclusion, studies had to assess the validity of a self-reported resource use questionnaire, to report original data, include adult populations, and the questionnaire had to be publically available. Data such as type of resource utilization assessed by each questionnaire, and validation findings were extracted from each study.In all, 2343 unique citations were retrieved; 2297 were excluded during abstract review. Forty-six studies were reviewed in full text, and 15 studies were included in this systematic review. Six assessed resource utilization of patients with chronic conditions; 5 assessed mental health service utilization; 3 assessed resource utilization by a general population; and 1 assessed utilization in older populations. The most frequently measured resources included visits to general practitioners and inpatient stays; nonmedical resources were least frequently measured. Self-reported questionnaires on resource utilization had good agreement with administrative data, although, visits to general practitioners, outpatient days, and nurse visits had poorer agreement.Self-reported questionnaires are a valid method of collecting data on healthcare resource utilization.

  16. Single-joint outcome measures: preliminary validation of patient-reported outcomes and physical examination.

    PubMed

    Heald, Alison E; Fudman, Edward J; Anklesaria, Pervin; Mease, Philip J

    2010-05-01

    To assess the validity, responsiveness, and reliability of single-joint outcome measures for determining target joint (TJ) response in patients with inflammatory arthritis. Patient-reported outcomes (PRO), consisting of responses to single questions about TJ global status on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS; TJ global score), function on a 100-mm VAS (TJ function score), and pain on a 5-point Likert scale (TJ pain score) were piloted in 66 inflammatory arthritis subjects in a phase 1/2 clinical study of an intraarticular gene transfer agent and compared to physical examination measures (TJ swelling, TJ tenderness) and validated function questionnaires (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scale, Rheumatoid Arthritis Outcome Score, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire). Construct validity was assessed by evaluating the correlation between the single-joint outcome measures and validated function questionnaires using Spearman's rank correlation. Responsiveness or sensitivity to change was assessed through calculating effect size and standardized response means (SRM). Reliability of physical examination measures was assessed by determining interobserver agreement. The single-joint PRO were highly correlated with each other and correlated well with validated functional measures. The TJ global score exhibited modest effect size and modest SRM that correlated well with the patient's assessment of response on a 100-mm VAS. Physical examination measures exhibited high interrater reliability, but correlated less well with validated functional measures and the patient's assessment of response. Single-joint PRO, particularly the TJ global score, are simple to administer and demonstrate construct validity and responsiveness in patients with inflammatory arthritis. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00126724).

  17. Clinical Assessment of Affective Instability: Comparing EMA Indices, Questionnaire Reports, and Retrospective Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhan, Marika B.; Trull, Timothy J.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional self-report measures of psychopathology may be influenced by a variety of recall biases. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reduces these biases by assessing individuals' experiences as they occur in their natural environments. This study examines the discrepancy between trait questionnaire, retrospective report, and EMA measures of…

  18. Clinical Assessment of Affective Instability: Comparing EMA Indices, Questionnaire Reports, and Retrospective Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhan, Marika B.; Trull, Timothy J.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional self-report measures of psychopathology may be influenced by a variety of recall biases. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reduces these biases by assessing individuals' experiences as they occur in their natural environments. This study examines the discrepancy between trait questionnaire, retrospective report, and EMA measures of…

  19. Alaska Performance Scholarship Outcomes Report 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS) Outcomes Report analyzes the characteristics of high school graduates, those who were eligible to receive the scholarship, and those who went on to make use of it during the three years of the scholarship's existence. The analysis includes their geographic, gender, ethnic, and socioeconomic…

  20. Validation of questionnaire-reported hearing with medical records: A report from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study

    PubMed Central

    Scheinemann, Katrin; Grotzer, Michael; Kompis, Martin; Kuehni, Claudia E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hearing loss is a potential late effect after childhood cancer. Questionnaires are often used to assess hearing in large cohorts of childhood cancer survivors and it is important to know if they can provide valid measures of hearing loss. We therefore assessed agreement and validity of questionnaire-reported hearing in childhood cancer survivors using medical records as reference. Procedure In this validation study, we studied 361 survivors of childhood cancer from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (SCCSS) who had been diagnosed after 1989 and had been exposed to ototoxic cancer treatment. Questionnaire-reported hearing was compared to the information in medical records. Hearing loss was defined as ≥ grade 1 according to the SIOP Boston Ototoxicity Scale. We assessed agreement and validity of questionnaire-reported hearing overall and stratified by questionnaire respondents (survivor or parent), sociodemographic characteristics, time between follow-up and questionnaire and severity of hearing loss. Results Questionnaire reports agreed with medical records in 85% of respondents (kappa 0.62), normal hearing was correctly assessed in 92% of those with normal hearing (n = 249), and hearing loss was correctly assessed in 69% of those with hearing loss (n = 112). Sensitivity of the questionnaires was 92%, 74%, and 39% for assessment of severe, moderate and mild bilateral hearing loss; and 50%, 33% and 10% for severe, moderate and mild unilateral hearing loss, respectively. Results did not differ by sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents, and survivor- and parent-reports were equally valid. Conclusions Questionnaires are a useful tool to assess hearing in large cohorts of childhood cancer survivors, but underestimate mild and unilateral hearing loss. Further research should investigate whether the addition of questions with higher sensitivity for mild degrees of hearing loss could improve the results. PMID:28333999

  1. Validation of questionnaire-reported hearing with medical records: A report from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annette; Sommer, Grit; Kuonen, Rahel; Scheinemann, Katrin; Grotzer, Michael; Kompis, Martin; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2017-01-01

    Hearing loss is a potential late effect after childhood cancer. Questionnaires are often used to assess hearing in large cohorts of childhood cancer survivors and it is important to know if they can provide valid measures of hearing loss. We therefore assessed agreement and validity of questionnaire-reported hearing in childhood cancer survivors using medical records as reference. In this validation study, we studied 361 survivors of childhood cancer from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (SCCSS) who had been diagnosed after 1989 and had been exposed to ototoxic cancer treatment. Questionnaire-reported hearing was compared to the information in medical records. Hearing loss was defined as ≥ grade 1 according to the SIOP Boston Ototoxicity Scale. We assessed agreement and validity of questionnaire-reported hearing overall and stratified by questionnaire respondents (survivor or parent), sociodemographic characteristics, time between follow-up and questionnaire and severity of hearing loss. Questionnaire reports agreed with medical records in 85% of respondents (kappa 0.62), normal hearing was correctly assessed in 92% of those with normal hearing (n = 249), and hearing loss was correctly assessed in 69% of those with hearing loss (n = 112). Sensitivity of the questionnaires was 92%, 74%, and 39% for assessment of severe, moderate and mild bilateral hearing loss; and 50%, 33% and 10% for severe, moderate and mild unilateral hearing loss, respectively. Results did not differ by sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents, and survivor- and parent-reports were equally valid. Questionnaires are a useful tool to assess hearing in large cohorts of childhood cancer survivors, but underestimate mild and unilateral hearing loss. Further research should investigate whether the addition of questions with higher sensitivity for mild degrees of hearing loss could improve the results.

  2. Residential Learning Outcomes: Analysis Using the College Student Experiences Questionnaire at a Large Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Cari

    2010-01-01

    The creation of learning outcomes inside and outside of the classroom on college campuses has been a growing trend based on a variety of publications which encouraged the fostering of diverse types learning and the measurement of student learning outside of the classroom (ACPA, 1994; Keeling, 2004). The creation of the learning outcomes is a…

  3. Construction of a traditional Chinese medicine syndrome-specific outcome measure: the Kidney Deficiency Syndrome questionnaire (KDSQ)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) syndrome-specific outcome measures is needed for the evaluation of TCM syndrome-specific therapies. We constructed a Kidney Deficiency Syndrome Questionnaire (KDSQ) for the evaluation of the common TCM syndromes Kidney-Yin Deficiency Syndrome (KDS-Yin) and Kidney-Yang Deficiency Syndrome (KDS-Yang) in middle-aged women with menopausal symptoms. Methods KDS-Yin and KDS-Yang were traditionally defined by expert opinion were validated by exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM). Content validity was tested by EFA on a sample of 236 women from a seminar and SEM on another sample of 321 women from a postal survey. Other psychometric properties were tested on 292 women from the seminar at baseline and two systematically selected sub-samples: 54 who reported no changes in discomforts 11–12 days after the baseline and 31 who reported changes in discomforts 67–74 days after the baseline. All participants completed the KDSQ, the Greene Climacteric Scale and the standard 12-item Short Form Health Survey. Results The EFA and SEM established the measurement models of KDS-Yin and KDS-Yang supporting content validity of the KDSQ. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach’s Alpha >0.70). Construct validity was supported by theoretically-derived levels of correlation with the established external measures. Test–retest reliability was strong (ICCagreement: KDS-Yin, 0.94; KDS-Yang, 0.93). The KDSQ was responsive to changes over time as tested by effect size and longitudinal validity. Conclusions The KDSQ was a valid and reliable measure for KDS-Yin and KDS-Yang in Hong Kong Chinese middle-aged women with menopausal symptoms. PMID:22672362

  4. Affective Outcomes of Schooling: Full-Information Item Factor Analysis of a Student Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muraki, Eiji; Engelhard, George, Jr.

    Recent developments in dichotomous factor analysis based on multidimensional item response models (Bock and Aitkin, 1981; Muthen, 1978) provide an effective method for exploring the dimensionality of questionnaire items. Implemented in the TESTFACT program, this "full information" item factor analysis accounts not only for the pairwise joint…

  5. The measurement of disability in the elderly: a systematic review of self-reported questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Ding, Xiang; Dong, Birong

    2014-02-01

    To analyze the contents and formats of general self-reported questionnaires on disability that are designed for and/or are widely applied in the elderly population to depict a complete picture of this field and help researchers to choose proper tools more efficiently. A broad systematic literature search was performed in September 2013 and included the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PROQOLID. The publication language was limited to English and Chinese. Two review authors independently performed the study selection and data extraction. All of the included instruments were extracted and classified using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health framework. Of 5569 articles retrieved from the searches and 156 articles retrieved from the pearling, 22 studies (including 24 questionnaires) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these, 42 different domains and 458 items were extracted. The most frequently used questionnaire was the Barthel Index followed by the Lawton and Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale and the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living, respectively. The contents and formats of the questionnaires varied considerably. Activities and participation were the most commonly assessed dimensions. In addition, the Activities of Daily Living, mobility and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale were the most common domains assessed among the included questionnaires. Among the 24 included questionnaires, the most frequently used questionnaires were the Barthel Index, Lawton and Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living. The content and format of the questionnaires varied considerably, but none of the questionnaires covered all essential dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health framework. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  6. Reliability and validity of adapted French Canadian version of Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire (SRS-22) in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Beauséjour, Marie; Joncas, Julie; Goulet, Lise; Roy-Beaudry, Marjolaine; Parent, Stefan; Grimard, Guy; Forcier, Martin; Lauriault, Sophie; Labelle, Hubert

    2009-03-15

    Prospective validation study of a cross-cultural adaptation of the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) Outcomes Questionnaire. To provide a French Canadian version of the SRS Outcomes Questionnaire and to empirically test its response in healthy adolescents and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients in Québec. The SRS Outcomes Questionnaire is widely used for the assessment of health-related quality of life in AIS patients. French translation and back-translation of the SRS-22 (SRS-22-fv) were done by an expert committee. Its reliability was measured using the coefficient of internal consistency, construct validity with a factorial analysis, concurrent validity by using the short form-12 and discriminant validity using ANOVA and multivariate linear regression, on 145 AIS patients, 44 patients with non clinically significant scoliosis (NCSS), and 64 healthy patients. The SRS-22-fv showed a good global internal consistency (AIS: Cronbach alpha = 0.86, NCSS: 0.81, and controls: 0.79) and in all of its domains for AIS patients. The factorial structure was coherent with the original questionnaire (47.4% of explained variance). High correlation coefficients were obtained between SRS-22-fv and short form-12 corresponding domains. Boys had higher scores than girls, scores worsened with age, and with increasing body mass index. Mean Total, Pain, Self-image, and Satisfaction scores, were correlated with Cobb angle. Adjusted regression models showed statistically significant differences between the AIS, NCSS, and control groups in the Total, Pain, and Function scores. The SRS-22-fv showed satisfactory reliability, factorial, concurrent, and discriminant validity. This study provides scores in a significant group of healthy adolescents and demonstrates a clear gradient in response between subjects with AIS, NCSS, and controls.

  7. Using Data Linkage to Investigate Inconsistent Reporting of Self-Harm and Questionnaire Non-Response

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Becky; Cornish, Rosie; Heron, Jon; Boyd, Andy; Crane, Catherine; Hawton, Keith; Lewis, Glyn; Tilling, Kate; Macleod, John; Gunnell, David

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine agreement between self-reported and medically recorded self-harm, and investigate whether the prevalence of self-harm differs in questionnaire responders vs. non-responders. A total of 4,810 participants from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) completed a self-harm questionnaire at age 16 years. Data from consenting participants were linked to medical records (number available for analyses ranges from 205–3,027). The prevalence of self-harm leading to hospital admission was somewhat higher in questionnaire non-responders than responders (2.0 vs. 1.2%). Hospital attendance with self-harm was under-reported on the questionnaire. One third reported self-harm inconsistently over time; inconsistent reporters were less likely to have depression and fewer had self-harmed with suicidal intent. Self-harm prevalence estimates derived from self-report may be underestimated; more accurate figures may come from combining data from multiple sources. PMID:26789257

  8. Dental patients' self-reported use of dietary supplements on medical history questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Bakuri, Sarmad; Lanning, Sharon K; Best, Al M; Sabatini, Robert; Gunsolley, John; Waldrop, Thomas C

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplement effects and drug interactions can lead to significant adverse health events, thus potentially impacting the safe delivery of oral healthcare. This study sought to determine the frequency of, and factors impacting, dietary supplement use among 209 dental patients and whether the design of a medical history questionnaire influences reporting of supplement use. Patients were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 groups in which they completed either a standard medical history questionnaire (n = 107) or the same questionnaire with an additional item about dietary supplement use (n = 102). All patients were then administered a survey with questions about their demographics, their use and knowledge of dietary supplements, and the person or persons who recommended dietary supplement use to the patient. While 62% of the total population (130/209) reported supplement use, specific prompting nearly doubled the number of supplements reported (mean with prompting: 1.53; mean without prompting: 0.76; P < 0.0001). Patients younger than 30 years of age reported significantly less dietary supplement use than all other age groups except the 30-40 age group (P = 0.0003). An estimated 70% of all respondents were not aware of potentially detrimental side effects of dietary supplement use or possible interactions with conventional drug therapies. Since patients tended to report a greater use of dietary supplements when specifically asked about their use on a medical history questionnaire, a checklist or set of designated questions may be a suitable first step toward gathering this essential information.

  9. Linking questionnaire reports and observer ratings of young couples’ hostility and support

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Frederick O.; Melby, Janet N.; Conger, Rand D.; Surjadi, Florenzia F.

    2012-01-01

    Past studies have correlated observer ratings with questionnaire self- and partner-reports of behaviors in close relationships. However, few studies have actually proposed and tested longitudinal models that link observer ratings to past behaviors and to questionnaire self- and partner-reports of behaviors during an observational task. Using data from a panel of 324 young couples, we demonstrate that (1) observer ratings of hostility and support are significantly related to couple reports of the same behavior in the relationship two years earlier, and (2) respondent and partner questionnaire reports of hostility and support during the observational task converge with observer ratings of the same behavior even after controlling for earlier self- and partner-reports. These findings demonstrate that observer reports based on brief discussion tasks reflect the tenor of the relationship over a relatively long period of time. They also demonstrate that couple reports of hostile interactions reflect observable behaviors beyond that attributed to earlier self- and partner-reports. Consistent with previous research, effect sizes are larger for hostility than support but there are few differences between men and women. PMID:22662768

  10. The Individual Consistency of Acquiescence and Extreme Response Style in Self-Report Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weijters, Bert; Geuens, Maggie; Schillewaert, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The severity of bias in respondents' self-reports due to acquiescence response style (ARS) and extreme response style (ERS) depends strongly on how consistent these response styles are over the course of a questionnaire. In the literature, different alternative hypotheses on response style (in)consistency circulate. Therefore, nine alternative…

  11. Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire: Validation of a Parent-Report Screening Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcutt, Erik G.; Boada, Richard; Riddle, Margaret W.; Chhabildas, Nomita; DeFries, John C.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the internal structure and convergent and discriminant evidence for the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ), a 20-item parent-report rating scale that was developed to provide a brief screening measure for learning difficulties. CLDQ ratings were obtained from parents of children in 2 large community samples…

  12. Does Participation in an Intervention Affect Responses on Self-Report Questionnaires?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranowski, Tom; Allen, Diane D.; Masse, Louise C.; Wilson, Mark

    2006-01-01

    There has been some concern that participation in an intervention and exposure to a measurement instrument can change participants' interpretation of the items on a self-report questionnaire thereby distorting subsequent responses and biasing results. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using item response modeling can ascertain possible…

  13. Staff Behavior toward Children and Adolescents in a Residential Facility: A Self-Report Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huitink, C.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Veerman, J. W.; Verhoeven, L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine psychometric properties of the Staff Behavior toward Clients questionnaire (SBC), a self-report measure for care staff working with children and adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities in residential care. Ninety-nine care staff completed the SBC and the Strengths and…

  14. Development of a new self-report questionnaire to measure self esteem.

    PubMed

    Robson, P

    1989-05-01

    In constructing a new self-report questionnaire for measuring self esteem, the aim has been to satisfy psychometric requirements without sacrificing the intuitive meaning of the concept. Self esteem is seen as a composite, and examination of its components may have more analytic or predictive value than 'global' scores. Preliminary reliability and validity data are encouraging.

  15. A Comparison of Father and Mother Report of Child Behaviour on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dave, Shreya; Nazareth, Irwin; Senior, Rob; Sherr, Lorraine

    2008-01-01

    To date there has been no comparison of father and mother report on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a standardised measure of child behaviour used widely in the UK in clinical practice and research. The objectives of the study were to investigate differences and agreement between parents on the various SDQ domains of child…

  16. Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire: Validation of a Parent-Report Screening Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcutt, Erik G.; Boada, Richard; Riddle, Margaret W.; Chhabildas, Nomita; DeFries, John C.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the internal structure and convergent and discriminant evidence for the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ), a 20-item parent-report rating scale that was developed to provide a brief screening measure for learning difficulties. CLDQ ratings were obtained from parents of children in 2 large community samples…

  17. Evaluation Report 1-C-4: End-of-Year Data from Teacher Questionnaires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holz, Alan; And Others

    This evaluation report is one of 17 planned for the longitudinal pilot study of the implementation in kindergarten and grade 1 of the Comprehensive School Mathematics Program (CSMP). Teachers using the CSMP curricula in kindergarten and first-grade classrooms were asked to complete questionnaires concerning implementation problems, timing and…

  18. Does participation in an intervention affect responses on self-reported questionnaires?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There has been some concern that participation in an intervention and exposure to a measurement instrument can change participants' interpretation of the items on a self-report questionnaire, thereby distorting subsequent responses and biasing results. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis us...

  19. Patients' preferences for nutrition-related health outcomes in liver disease: a preliminary study using an electronic questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nowson, Gemma K; Madden, Angela M

    2015-02-01

    Patients with liver disease frequently have nutritional problems but intervening to improve these is challenging. Healthcare interventions that respond to patients' needs are associated with better health outcomes but no studies investigating patients' preferences for nutrition-related outcomes in liver disease have been published. The present study aimed to identify nutrition-related health outcomes that are important to patients with liver disease. An electronic questionnaire was devised and reviewed by patients and dietitians with relevant experience. It comprised a Likert scale and open questions focussing on six domains considered pertinent to patients with liver disease. An invitation to participate was posted on the website of a national liver charity and sent to liver patient support groups. Fifty-one patients participated (22 men and 29 women). Responses indicated a wide range of preferred nutrition-related outcomes, with those identified as very important most frequently focussing on gaining knowledge about which foods to eat more or less of, as well as on understanding why nutrition is important in liver disease. Women tended to score outcomes as more important than did men. Participants who considered themselves overweight scored outcomes on body size and shape as more important than those with other nutritional problems. Additional outcomes were identified and included an increased knowledge of healthy eating, interactions between medication and food, and supplementation. The present study identified a wide range of nutrition-related outcomes that were important to this small sample of patients with liver disease and these may be useful to guide the direction of future nutrition-related management. © 2014 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Patient-reported outcome measures for asthma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Worth, Allison; Hammersley, Victoria; Knibb, Rebecca; Flokstra-de-Blok, Bertine; DunnGalvin, Audrey; Walker, Samantha; Dubois, Anthony E J; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are measures of the outcome of treatment(s) reported directly by the patient or carer. There is increasing international policy interest in using these to assess the impact of clinical care. Aims: To identify suitably validated PROMs for asthma and examine their potential for use in clinical settings. Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases from 1990 onwards to identify PROMs for asthma. These were critically appraised, then narratively synthesised. We also identified the generic PROMs commonly used alongside asthma-specific PROMs. Results: We identified 68 PROMs for asthma, 13 of which were selected through screening as being adequately developed to warrant full-quality appraisal: 8 for adults, 4 for children and 1 for a child’s caregiver. The PROMs found to be sufficiently well validated to offer promise for use in clinical settings were the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and mini-AQLQ for adults, and Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire for children. Rhinasthma was considered promising in simultaneously assessing the impact of asthma and rhinitis in those with coexistent disease. We identified 28 generic PROMs commonly used in conjunction with asthma-specific instruments. Conclusions: We identified asthma PROMs that offer the greatest potential for use in clinical settings. Further work is needed to assess whether these are fit-for-purpose for use in clinical practice with individual patients. In particular, there is a need to ensure these are validated for use in clinical settings, acceptable to patients, caregivers and clinicians, and yield meaningful outcomes. PMID:24964767

  1. A systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures for chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Phillips, John S; Yung, Matthew W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this review was to systematically appraise the world literature to identify existing patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for the assessment of outcomes in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media, to verify the diversity of the individual questionnaire items, to report the methods employed to evaluate the questionnaires, and to identify areas for development in the future. Embase (January 1980-November 2014), MEDLINE (January 1946-November 2014), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (January 1981-November 2014), and PsycINFO (January 1806-November 2014). A systematic literature search was independently undertaken by the two authors according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Nine original articles were identified, which overall outlined the evaluation of four different questionnaires. This systematic appraisal of the world literature has identified four PROM questionnaires for use in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media. All four questionnaires evaluate reliability and validity using different psychometric methods. The Chronic Ear Survey questionnaire has been most broadly evaluated and disseminated. All four questionnaires assess static health status. There are many advantages to developing a dynamic one-hit questionnaire to assess the health status of patients having undergone an intervention for chronic suppurative otitis media. NA Laryngoscope, 126:1458-1463, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in the upper extremity: the future of outcomes reporting?

    PubMed

    Makhni, Eric C; Meadows, Molly; Hamamoto, Jason T; Higgins, John D; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-02-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) serve an integral role in clinical research by helping to determine the impact of clinical care as experienced by the patient. With recent initiatives in health care policy and pay for performance, outcome reporting is now recognized as a policy-driven requirement in addition to a clinical research tool. For outcome measures to satisfy these regulatory requirements and provide value in understanding disease outcomes, they must be responsive and efficient. Recent research has uncovered certain concerns regarding traditional PROs in patients with upper extremity disability and injury. These include lack of consensus regarding selection of PROs for a given diagnoses, inconsistent techniques of administration of the same PROs, and the administrative burden to patients and providers of completing these forms. To address these limitations, emphasis has been placed on streamlining the outcomes reporting process, and, as a result, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) created the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). PROMIS forms were created to comprehensively and efficiently measure outcomes across multiple disease states, including orthopedics. These tools exist in computer adaptive testing and short forms with the intention of more efficiently measuring outcomes compared with legacy PROs. The goals of this review are to highlight the main components of PROMIS reporting tools and identify recent use of the scores in the upper extremity literature. The review will also highlight the research and health policy potentials and limitations of implementing PROMIS into everyday orthopedic practice. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Convergent validity of a brief self-reported physical activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Kelley Pettee; Sidney, Stephen; Jacobs, David R; Quesenberry, Charles P; Reis, Jared P; Jiang, Sheng-Fang; Sternfeld, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether summary estimates of a self-report physical activity questionnaire that does not specifically assess frequency or duration (the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) physical activity history (PAH)) differs from the summary estimates of one that does (CARDIA Supplemental Questionnaire). After the year 25 examination (2010-2011), 203 CARDIA black and white men and women (age 50.3 ± 3.6 yr) at the Oakland, CA, site participated in this comparison study. The between-questionnaire association and agreement were determined for continuous and categorical estimates on the basis of 1) quartiles and 2) meeting 2008 physical activity guidelines. Differences in participant characteristics by concordance/discordance status were also examined. Finally, receiver operating characteristic curves were computed to determine the accuracy of the PAH compared with the supplemental questionnaire. Reported physical activity levels were high and varied significantly by race and sex (all P < 0.01). Between-questionnaire estimates were significantly correlated (rho = 0.75 to 0.90, all P < 0.001) and had high agreement (κ = 0.51 to 0.80) across all race/sex groups. A higher proportion of women than men were classified as concordant by quartile of vigorous intensity (P = 0.001), but no other participant characteristics were associated with concordant/discordant quartile ranking. Participants classified as concordant on the basis of physical activity guidelines had lower body mass index than those classified as discordant (both P < 0.05). The area under the curve was 0.95, suggesting that the PAH has high accuracy for classifying individuals as meeting physical activity guidelines. Although it is inconvenient that the PAH is not expressed in more standard units, these findings support the practice of not directly assessing frequency and duration, which are frequent sources of reporting error.

  4. [Rehabilitation goals in discharge reports and in patient questionnaires--on the example of endometriosis patients].

    PubMed

    Brandes, I; Niehues, C

    2014-02-01

    [corrected] The goal orientation of rehabilitation has increasingly found its way in research and practice. Though, shortcomings were ascertained for the implementation into the clinical routine furthermore. An empirical analysis of goal setting in clinical practice should complement the available evidence. The study is based on a cross-sectional survey of all endometriosis patients, who had been treated at a rehabilitation center in 2008 or 2009. Data stemmed from the uniform medical rehabilitation discharge reports, and a patient questionnaire, which was sent to the registered women by the clinic routinely before the beginning of the rehabilitation. Data about rehabilita­tion goals were available as free text information for both the discharge reports as well as the pa­tient questionnaires. A category system oriented at the ICF system (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health), was developed to structure the goals. 293 patients had provided information concerning their rehabilitation goals, while 69 patients didn’t reply to the question of their rehabilitation goals. The latter were excluded to the analysis. In the discharge reports, altogether, more goals were documented than in the patient questionnaires (5.98 compared to 4.97 goals per patient). In 35% of the numbers of rehabilitation goals clear congruence was found between the data in the discharge reports and the patient questionnaires. The results support the assump­tion that the included patients had difficulties in goal-setting. In addition it is obvious that the goals in the discharge reports had little relation to the goals framed by the patients, in language and content. A goal-setting process less oriented towards the medical and clinical needs but more towards the patients needs and expectation would be desirable particularly with regard to a more intensive patient orientation. The implementation of a prepared list of possible rehabilitation goals could serve for the

  5. Patients' and doctors' views on depression severity questionnaires incentivised in UK quality and outcomes framework: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Dowrick, Christopher; Leydon, Geraldine M; McBride, Anita; Howe, Amanda; Burgess, Hana; Clarke, Pamela; Maisey, Sue; Kendrick, Tony

    2009-03-19

    To gain understanding of general practitioners' and patients' opinions of the routine introduction of standardised measures of severity of depression through the UK general practice quality and outcomes framework. Semistructured qualitative interview study, with purposive sampling and constant comparative analysis. 34 general practitioners and 24 patients. 38 general practices in three sites in England: Southampton, Liverpool, and Norfolk. Patients generally favoured the measures of severity for depression, whereas general practitioners were generally cautious about the validity and utility of such measures and sceptical about the motives behind their introduction. Both general practitioners and patients considered that assessments of severity should be seen as one aspect of holistic care. General practitioners considered their practical wisdom and clinical judgment ("phronesis") to be more important than objective assessments and were concerned that the assessments reduced the human element of the consultation. Patients were more positive about the questionnaires, seeing them as an efficient and structured supplement to medical judgment and as evidence that general practitioners were taking their problems seriously through a full assessment. General practitioners and patients were aware of the potential for manipulation of indicators: for economic reasons for doctors and for patients to avoid stigma or achieve desired outcomes. Despite general practitioners' caution about measures of severity for depression, these may benefit primary care consultations by increasing patients' confidence that general practitioners are correct in their diagnosis and are making systematic efforts to assess and manage their mental health problems. Further education of primary care staff may optimise the use and interpretation of depression questionnaires.

  6. Using postal questionnaires to evaluate physical activity and diet behaviour change: case study exploring implications of valid responder characteristics in interpreting intervention outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cole, Judith A; Gillespie, Paddy; Smith, Susan M; Byrne, Molly; Murphy, Andrew W; Cupples, Margaret E

    2014-10-15

    Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used to evaluate lifestyle interventions but little is known about differences between patients returning valid and invalid responses, or of potential for bias in evaluations. We aimed to examine the characteristics of patients who returned valid responses to lifestyle questionnaires compared to those whose responses were invalid for evaluating lifestyle change. We conducted a secondary data analysis from the SPHERE Study, a trial of an intervention to improve outcomes for patients with coronary heart disease in primary care. Postal questionnaires were used to assess physical activity (Godin) and diet (DINE) among study participants at baseline and 18 month follow-up. Three binary response variables were generated for analysis: (1) valid Godin score; (2) valid DINE Fibre score; and (3) valid DINE Total Fat score. Multivariate analysis comprised generalised estimating equation regression to examine the association of patients' characteristics with their return of valid responses at both timepoints. Overall, 92.1% of participants (832/903) returned questionnaires at both baseline and 18 months. Relatively fewer valid Godin scores were returned by those who left school aged <15 years (36.5%) than aged 18 and over (50.5%), manual workers (39.5%) than non-manual (49.5%) and those with an elevated cholesterol (>5 mmol) (34.7%) than those with a lower cholesterol (44.4%) but multivariate analysis identified that only school leaving age (p = 0.047) was of statistical significance.Relatively fewer valid DINE scores were returned by manual than non-manual workers (fibre: 80.8% v 86.8%; fat: 71.2% v 80.0%), smokers (fibre: 72.6% v 84.7%; fat: 67.5% v 76.9%), patients with diabetes (fibre: 75.9% v 82.9%; fat: 66.9% v 75.8%) and those with cholesterol >5 mmol (fat: 68.2% v 76.2%) but multivariate analysis showed statistical significance only for smoking (fibre: p = 0.013; fat: p = 0.045), diabetes (fibre: p = 0.039; fat: p = 0

  7. Depression in chronic low back pain patients: diagnostic efficiency of three self-report questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Love, A W

    1987-01-01

    Three self-report questionnaires (the Beck Depression Inventory, the MMPI-D scale, and the depression subscale of the Middlesex Hospital Questionnaire) were examined to see how accurately they could identify chronic low back pain patients who were suffering depression, as defined by DSM-III criteria. According to these criteria, 25% of a sample of 68 patients currently were depressed, a rate comparable to those reported by other studies that have used standardized criteria. On the basis of relative conditional probability ratios, the BDI was shown to be the most efficient instrument for identifying these cases and represents an excellent screening device for depression with this population. The individual items of the BDI then were examined, and the conditional probability ratios revealed that several may be helpful as indicators of possible depression among chronic low back pain patients. The relationship between depression and chronic pain is reconsidered in the light of these results.

  8. Patient reported outcomes in the assessment of premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Althof, Stanley E

    2016-08-01

    The term 'Patient Reported Outcome', abbreviated as PRO, was introduced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which proposed guidance on the development and validation of PROs. Previously PROs were known as self-report diaries, event-logs, self-administered questionnaires, and clinician administered rating scales. PROs seek to capture the subjective perceptions of patients and/or partner's related to their specific symptoms, degree of bother, efficacy of a medication or psychotherapy intervention, and quality of life issues related to a specific condition. This article reviews the essential psychometric and regulatory agency requirements in the development of PROs. The constructs of reliability, various forms of validity, sensitivity, and specificity as well as concerns with translating a PRO into a different language are reviewed. Three PROs, the Premature Ejaculation Profile (PEP), the Index of Premature Ejaculation (IPE) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) all used in the assessment of premature ejaculation (PE) are discussed. These questionnaires meet or exceed all the psychometric requirements and have been employed in clinical trials and observational studies of men with PE. The article concludes on discussing some of the limitations of PRO use and recommendations for the future.

  9. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for Hand and Wrist Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan; Amirfeyz, Rouin; Davis, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are important tools for assessing outcomes following injuries to the hand and wrist. Many commonly used PROMs have no evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. This systematic review examines the PROMs used in the assessment of hand and wrist trauma patients, and the evidence for reliability, validity, and responsiveness of each measure in this population. Methods: A systematic review of Pubmed, Medline, and CINAHL searching for randomized controlled trials of patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist was carried out to identify the PROMs. For each identified PROM, evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness was identified using a further systematic review of the Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, and reverse citation trail audit procedure. Results: The PROM used most often was the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire; the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), Gartland and Werley score, Michigan Hand Outcomes score, Mayo Wrist Score, and Short Form 36 were also commonly used. Only the DASH and PRWE have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist; other measures either have incomplete evidence or evidence gathered in a nontraumatic population. Conclusions: The DASH and PRWE both have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. Other PROMs used to assess hand and wrist trauma patients do not. This should be considered when selecting a PROM for patients with traumatic hand and wrist pathology. PMID:27418884

  10. A review of self-report medication side effect questionnaires for mental health patients.

    PubMed

    Ashoorian, Deena; Davidson, Rowan; Rock, Daniel; Gudka, Sajni; Clifford, Rhonda

    2014-11-30

    Side effects of psychotropic medications are important determinants of adherence to treatment. Discussion between the patient and clinician facilitated through the use of a side effect self-report questionnaire (SRQ) could lead to improved communications and treatment adherence. The aim of this review was to 1) identify all currently available side effect SRQs used in the assessment of mental health patients' subjective experiences, 2) evaluate the characteristics of the studies and 3) assess the psychometric properties of each of the questionnaires. Eight electronic databases were searched for peer-reviewed published articles. Six side effect SRQs were identified. Two independent reviewers assessed the quality of the study designs and psychometric properties of the identified SRQs. All questionnaires consisted of closed questions relating to antipsychotic side effects and completion times ranged from 5 to 20 min. Five questionnaires had undergone some form of psychometric testing, ranging from basic to comprehensive. There is a need in everyday clinical practice for a side effect communication tool applicable to all psychotropic medications, which allows the patient to express their subjective beliefs about their medications. This could provide an important contribution to the working relationship between patients and clinicians leading to informed decision-making and improved adherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Possible Effects of Various Reporting Methods on Learning Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingenkamp, Karlheinz

    1986-01-01

    Two quasi-experimental longitudinal studies, conducted by the Centre for Educational Research in Landau, Germany, are reported. Various effects of reporting the outcomes of learning to students were studied. Results emphasized the importance of feedback for learning outcomes. (LMO)

  12. How to capture patients' concerns and related changes: comparing the MYCaW questionnaire, semi-structured interview and a priority list of outcome areas.

    PubMed

    Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, A; Johannessen, H

    2014-08-01

    To compare the capacity of the MYCaW questionnaire, a priority list of concerns covered by validated questionnaires, and semi-structured interviews to identify patients' personalized concerns and related changes. In a pragmatic trial on the effectiveness of energy healing as rehabilitation after colorectal cancer, a sub-sample of 31 participants completed the MYCaW questionnaire and the priority list and were interviewed before, during and after the treatment period. Treatments were provided in healers' clinics in Denmark. For each participant convergences and divergences of the outcome measures are identified, and strengths and weaknesses of the three methods in regard to capturing personalized concerns and changes are discussed. Three patterns were identified: (1) in the intervention groups concerns stated in MYCaW were adjusted after experience with the treatment, while concerns stated in interviews and the priority list remained stable throughout the study; (2) emotional concerns were reported more often in interviews than in MYCaW, physical concerns were predominant in MYCaW, and quality of life was marked as a primary concern most frequently on the priority list; (3) participants reported greater improvement in interviews than in MYCaW. Relevant concerns in the MYCaW questionnaire seem to require that participants are well acquainted with the treatment under study. The priority list directs participants to particular areas of concerns and markings are stable. Interviews are well suited to disclose concerns regarding sensitive issues, e.g. anxiety of relapse, and experiences of subtle, non-specific changes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Patient Reported Outcomes from Sacroiliac Joint Fusion

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Shane M.; Audley, Brittany N.; Sokunbi, Gbolabo; Puccio, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective, case series. Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine morbidity, complications, and patient reported outcomes from minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion. Overview of Literature Lumbar back pain emanating from the SIJ can be surgically treated via a percutaneous approach in the appropriately selected patient with minimal morbidity and acceptable functional outcomes. Methods Patients diagnosed by >2 physical examination maneuvers and subjective relief from a computed tomography–guided lidocaine-bupivacaine-steroid injection underwent SIJ fusion after failing conservative management with a combination of oral anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and pelvic belt stabilization. Perioperative data collected include estimated blood loss (EBL) and operative time. Oswestry disability index, 12-item short form health survey (SF-12), visual analogue score, and functional status were analyzed. All complications were noted. Results The study cohort of 45 cases (69% female) achieved postoperative survey follow-up at 9.9 and 32.3 months. SF-12 physical component summary statistically improved while all other scores were equivalent. Mean EBL and operative time were 22 mL and 36 minutes, respectively. Initial survey showed that 64% of patients discontinued narcotics (29/45), 71% do not use an assistive device (32/45), and 15.6% do not work due to pain (7/45). 73% of patients stated they would have the surgery again (33/45). For the second survey, 65% of patients discontinued narcotics (26/40), 70% did not use an assistive device (28/40), and 17.5% did not work due to pain (7/40). A history of thoracolumbar instrumentation (16/45) did not significantly affect outcomes. Three complications described by screw malposition with neurologic deficit (6.7%) were treated with screw repositioning (1 case) and removal of a single superior implant (2 cases) with time to revision of 2.2 months. All three ultimately had resolution of

  14. The relationship between hospital work environment and nurse outcomes in Guangdong, China: a nurse questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; You, Li-Ming; Chen, Shao-Xian; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Zhu, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Li-Feng; Aiken, Linda H

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives This study examines the relationship between hospital work environments and job satisfaction, job-related burnout and intention to leave among nurses in Guangdong province, China. Background The nursing shortage is an urgent global problem and also of concern in China. Studies in Western countries have shown that better work environments are associated with higher nurse satisfaction and lower burnout, thereby improving retention and lowering turnover rates. However, there is little research on the relationship between nurse work environments and nurse outcomes in China. Design This is a cross-sectional study. Survey data were collected from 1104 bedside nurses in 89 medical, surgical and intensive care units in 21 hospitals across the Guangdong province in China. Methods Stratified convenience sampling was used to select hospitals, and systematic sampling was used to select units. All staff nurses working on participating units were surveyed. The China Hospital Nurse Survey, including the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and Maslach Burnout Inventory, was employed to collect data from nurses. Statistical significance level was set at 0·05. Results Thirty-seven per cent of the nurses experienced high burnout, and 54% were dissatisfied with their jobs. Improving nurses’ work environments from poor to better was associated with a 50% decrease in job dissatisfaction and a 33% decrease in job-related burnout among nurses. Conclusion Burnout and job dissatisfaction are high among hospital nurses in Guangdong province, China. Better work environments for nurses were associated with decreased job dissatisfaction and job-related burnout, which may successfully address the nursing shortage in China. Relevance to clinical practice The findings of this study indicate that improving work environments is essential to deal with the nursing shortage; the findings provide motivation for nurse managers and policy makers to improve work

  15. Validation of a Self-Report Questionnaire Assessing the Bodily and Physiological Sensations of Orgasm.

    PubMed

    Dubray, Samantha; Gérard, Marina; Beaulieu-Prévost, Dominic; Courtois, Frédérique

    2017-02-01

    Despite a plethora of research on sexual functioning during the past decades, the field is still lacking standardized measurements specifically characterizing orgasm. Although several validated tools are available to assess sexual function in healthy and clinical populations, items on orgasm are limited to frequency or dichotomous responses. A neurophysiologic model of orgasm developed from previous research in able-bodied and spinally injured populations offers a promising framework for the construction of a new questionnaire. To develop and validate a brief self-report measurement of orgasm by the assessment of bodily and physiologic sensations perceived during climax by able-bodied individuals. Although the currently available tool focuses on the phenomenological sensations associated with climax, the goal of this questionnaire was to capture the more specific genital and extragenital sensations associated with orgasm. The current Bodily Sensations of Orgasm questionnaire and the Orgasm Rating Scale. Data from previous research conducted on individuals with spinal cord injury and the available empirical literature provided a pool of 45 items organized into four categories, which were reviewed by an expert panel. Upon review, a 28-item questionnaire was created and administered to a community sample of 227 participants, including men and women, 18 to 73 years old. Exploratory factor analyses supported the four-factor model, in which orgasm is comprised of extragenital sensations, genital sensations and spasms, nociceptive sensations, and sweating responses. Overall, a high degree of internal consistency was found for the final 22-item questionnaire (Cronbach α = 0.87), with individual reliability coefficients showing moderate to high internal consistency (r = 0.65-0.79) for each dimension. Overall temporal stability of the measurement was acceptable (r = 0.74). Using the Orgasm Rating Scale, satisfying convergent validity was confirmed, thereby indicating

  16. [Assessment of the outcome of anorexia nervosa: construction of a self-administered questionnaire based on the patients' perception].

    PubMed

    Ronze, M; Mamelle, N; Combe, C; Pugeat, M

    2010-02-01

    Our working hypothesis is that a better insight into the outcome of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa should contribute to preventing relapses and further complications and assessing treatment efficiency. Through anorexia nervosa, the patients express the difficulty they have to view themselves as specific subjects. The current classic outcome evaluation is based on the study of objective events, which only partially reflect the reality of the patients' outcome at a subjective level. The objective of this study was to set up a new assessing instrument of the outcome of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa, essentially based on the patients' perception of their experience. The methodology used has been based on: (1) the conduct by the main investigator of unstructured interviews using "free association", with the help of an interview guide. The anorexia nervosa patients were recruited among those who were hospitalized on an isolation contract, or among outpatients under a psychiatrist/psychoanalyst's supervision, aged over 25 years old so that they may have started their reproductive life. The study included 30 patients; (2) the analysis of the interview contents backed by preexisting hypotheses and by new ones suggested by the expression of the patients' perception, so as to set up an inventory of new themes; (3) the construction of a self-administered questionnaire starting from the development of each theme into several questions taking up the patients' own words and offering 4 possible answers (disagree completely, disagree, agree, quite agree). The analysis of the interviews contents has led to the development of 11 themes. The self-administered questionnaire includes a total of 124 items stemming from the development of each theme into between 9 and 16 items that were mixed in the version submitted to patients. This original interpretation of the outcome of the patients through their experience provides a better understanding of their relation to

  17. Measuring engagement with music: development of an informant-report questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Vanstone, Ashley D; Wolf, Michael; Poon, Tina; Cuddy, Lola L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development of the Music Engagement Questionnaire (MusEQ), a 35-item scale to measure engagement with music in daily life. Music has implications for well-being and for therapy, notably for individuals living with dementia. A number of excellent scales or questionnaires are now available to measure music engagement. Unlike these scales, the MusEQ may be completed by either the participant or an informant. Study 1 drew on a community-based sample of 391 participants. Exploratory factor analysis revealed six interpretable factors, which formed the basis for construction of six subscales. Study 2 applied the MusEQ to a group of participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 16) as well as a group of neurotypical older adults (OA; n = 16). Informants completed the MusEQ, and the OA group also completed the self-report version of the MusEQ. Both groups had an interview in which they described the place music had in their lives. These interviews were scored by three independent raters. The MusEQ showed excellent internal consistency. Five of the factor-derived subscales showed good or excellent internal consistency. MusEQ scores were moderately correlated with a global rating of 'musicality' and with music education. There was strong agreement between self-report and informant-report data. MusEQ scores showed a significant positive relationship to independent ratings of music engagement. The MusEQ provides a meaningful and reliable option for measuring music engagement among participants who are unable to complete a self-report questionnaire.

  18. The Norwegian version of the American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire: reliability and validity of three subscales.

    PubMed

    Dihle, Alfhild; Helseth, Sølvi; Christophersen, Knut-Andreas

    2008-08-01

    To examine some psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the American Pain Society's Patient Outcome Questionnaire(APS-POQ-N). This study is part of an investigation of Norwegian orthopaedic surgical patients, where the overall aim is to evaluate the quality of postoperative pain management. Therefore, an adequate questionnaire on the quality of postoperative pain management was needed. The sample included 114 orthopaedic postoperative patients. The instrument consists of three main subscales, namely the modified Brief Pain Inventory(modified BPI subscale), the subscale on satisfaction with pain management(Satisfaction subscale) and the subscale on beliefs about pain management (Beliefs subscale), together with six single items about pain management. The reliability of these three main subscales was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficients and the construct validity was evaluated using principal-axis factor analysis with oblimin rotation. Face and content validity of the APS-POQ-N were satisfactory, while the modified BPI and the Beliefs subscales showed acceptable internal consistency but the Satisfaction subscale did not. Factor analyses yielded a three-factor solution for the modified BPI, a one-factor solution for the Satisfaction subscale and a two-factor solution for the Beliefs subscale. The APS-POQ-N appears, in general, to be an acceptable method of evaluating postoperative pain management in orthopaedic postoperative patients.However, the alpha value of the Satisfaction subscale was low, and thus the subscale is not recommended for this purpose.

  19. Use of Patient Self-Report Oral Health Outcome Measures in Assessment of Dental Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Wanda G.; Jones, Judith A.; Spiro, Avron; Rich, Sharron E.; Kressin, Nancy R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the sensitivity of a newly developed brief measure of oral health-related quality of life (OQOL). Methods Self-assessed oral health and OQOL were measured in three groups of patients who had presented for either prophylaxis (n = 32), endodontic care (n = 15), or for a denture (n = 16) in a dental school setting before and after treatment. Main outcome measures included the single-item self-report of oral health (OH-1) and the 6- and 12-item versions of a new OQOL instrument. General linear modeling was used to compute means of self-reported oral health by treatment group. Results Of the 63 patients who completed the baseline questionnaire, 44 (70 percent) returned questionnaires after treatment. The sample averaged 43 ± 15 years, 48 percent male and 55 percent with some college education. Ethnic representation included 35 percent White, 33 percent Black, and 32 percent other – mostly Latino. The mean self-reported number of teeth was 20.6. In terms of sensitivity, significant differences were observed between the treatment groups on the items assessing being upset (P < 0.05), feeling depressed (P < 0.05), and uncomfortable about the appearance of teeth or dentures (P < 0.05). However, magnitude of change, as measured by an effect size, was characterized as minimal to small in the recall and endodontic groups and borderline moderate in the denture group. Conclusion The measure was sensitive to differences within groups, with a small to borderline magnitude of change. PMID:19054312

  20. Patient reported outcomes in benign multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hviid, Line E; Healy, Brian C; Rintell, David J; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Glanz, Bonnie I

    2011-07-01

    Benign MS patients have a mild course of disease and show no or minimal accumulation of disability over time. Little is known about the patient reported outcomes (PROs) in benign MS. The objective of the study was to compare PROs in benign MS patients and patients with similar disease duration or disability status, and to investigate how the definition of benign MS affected this outcome. Two groups of Benign MS patients (disease duration ≥15 years, Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score ≤1.5 [Benign-1.5], or ≤3.0 [Benign-3]) were compared with four other MS groups: disease duration ≥15 years, EDSS score >3.0 (Late-MS); disease duration <15 years, and EDSS score ≤1.5 (Low-EDSS-1.5), or ≤3.0 (Low-EDSS-3); disease duration ≤5 years (Early-MS). PROs included measures of QOL, fatigue, depression, and social support. Cognitive function was also assessed. Both benign groups had better PROs than Late MS patients on all measures (p < 0.05). QOL, depression, and fatigue were significantly different between Benign-1.5 and Early-MS groups (p < 0.01). Benign-1.5 had higher mental health QOL than Low EDSS-1.5, but was otherwise similar. Benign-3 patients had worse depression than Early-MS (p < 0.01), and worse cognition compared with Low-EDSS-3 (p = 0.033). Benign-1.5 had higher QOL and lower fatigue (p < 0.005) than Benign-2-3, and showed a marginally significant difference in cognitive functioning (p = 0.055). Patients with benign MS had better PROs than other groups of MS patients, suggesting that both disease duration and disability influence PROs. The study also showed a difference in PROs based on the way benign MS was defined.

  1. The reasons for Chinese nursing staff to report adverse events: a questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Hong, Su; Li, QiuJie

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the impact of nurses' perception of patient safety culture and adverse event reporting, and demographic factors on adverse event reporting in Chinese hospitals. Accurate and timely adverse event reporting is integral in promoting patient safety and professional learning around the incident. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 919 nurses completed a structured questionnaire composed of two validated instruments measuring nurses' perception of patient safety culture and adverse event reporting. Associations between the variables were examined using multiple linear regression analysis. The positive response rates of five dimensions of the Patient Safety Culture Assessment Scale varied from 47.55% to 80.62%. The accuracy rate of Adverse Event Reporting Perception Scale was 63.16%. Five hundred and thirty-one (58.03%) nurses did not report adverse event in past 12 months. Six variables were found to be associated with nurses' adverse event reporting: total work experience (P = 0.003), overall patient safety culture score (P < 0.001), safety climate (P < 0.001), teamwork climate (P < 0.001), overall the adverse event reporting perception scale score (P = 0.003) and importance or reporting (P = 0.002). The results confirmed that improvements in the patient safety culture and nurses' perception of adverse event reporting were related to an increase in voluntary adverse event reporting. The knowledge of adverse event reporting should be integrated into the patient safety curriculum. Interventions that target a specific domain are necessary to improve the safety culture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Patient-reported outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis research.

    PubMed

    Swigris, Jeffrey J; Fairclough, Diane

    2012-08-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) include questionnaires or surveys that ask patients for their perceptions about things like symptoms they are experiencing or quality of life. For incurable, morbid, life-shortening conditions like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), PROs are particularly germane: They elucidate for clinicians and researchers what it is like for patients to live with such a disease, and they may detect important treatment effects not captured by other metrics (eg, pulmonary physiology). However, a relative paucity of research on PROs in IPF has left significant knowledge gaps in this area and contributed to the timidity investigators have about using PROs as prominent outcomes in IPF drug trials. Additional research on existing instruments is needed to establish or bolster their basic psychometric properties in IPF. When PROs are used as end points in therapeutic trials, analyzing PRO response data can be challenging, but these challenges can be overcome with a transparent, thoughtful, and sophisticated statistical approach. In this article, we discuss some of the basics of PRO assessment, existing knowledge gaps in IPF-related PRO research, and the potential usefulness of using PROs in IPF trials and conclude by offering specific recommendations for an approach to analyzing repeated-measures PRO data from IPF trials.

  3. Child Welfare Outcomes 2002-2005. Report to Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Child Welfare Outcomes 2002-2005: Report to Congress" (Child Welfare Outcomes Report) is the seventh in a series of annual reports from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (the Department). The reports are developed in accordance with section 479A of the Social Security Act (as amended by the Adoption and Safe Families Act…

  4. King's Health Questionnaire to assess subjective outcomes after surgical treatment for urinary incontinence: can it be useful?

    PubMed

    Luz, Rita; Pereira, Inês; Henriques, Alexandra; Ribeirinho, Ana Luísa; Valentim-Lourenço, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Midurethral slings (MUS) are the mainstay of treatment for stress urinary incontinence, but the definition of success varies widely amongst studies. The King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) was designed to evaluate the impact of urinary incontinence on the quality of life. We hypothesised that the KHQ could be useful for postoperative quantitative assessment of subjective outcomes. This is a retrospective analysis of 204 patients who underwent incontinence surgery with transobturator MUS between 2004 and 2013. Follow-up was planned at 6, 12 and 24 months and success was evaluated using the cough stress test (objective cure) and the KHQ global score (subjective outcomes). Statistical analysis included receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to calculate a cut-off value for the KHQ global score to define subjective cure. The minimal clinically important difference was calculated with a distribution-based method (effect size) to estimate subjective improvement. Objective cure rates were 97 % and 95 % at 6 and 24 months respectively. ROC curves established the cut-off score at ≤ 31 for subjective cure, with sensitivity of 63-100 % and specificity of 82-88 %. Subjective cure rates were 80 % and 85 % at 6 and 24 months respectively. The minimal clinically important difference was set at 10 and an improvement of ≥ 10 points was defined as subjective improvement. Rates varied between 10 and 13 %. This study showed the value of the KHQ as an evaluation tool after UI surgery and determined clinically relevant threshold scores to define subjective outcomes.

  5. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  6. Systematic content evaluation and review of measurement properties of questionnaires for measuring self-reported fatigue among older people.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Thorlene; Riphagen, Ingrid I; Nygård, Arnhild J; Thingstad, Pernille; Helbostad, Jorunn L

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fatigue in older people requires simple and user-friendly questionnaires that capture the phenomenon, yet are free from items indistinguishable from other disorders and experiences. This study aimed to evaluate the content, and systematically review and rate the measurement properties of self-report questionnaires for measuring fatigue, in order to identify the most suitable questionnaires for older people. This study firstly involved identification of questionnaires that purport to measure self-reported fatigue, and evaluation of the content using a rating scale developed for the purpose from contemporary understanding of the construct. Secondly, for the questionnaires that had acceptable content, we identified studies reporting measurement properties and rated the methodological quality of those studies according to the COSMIN system. Finally, we extracted and synthesised the results of the studies to give an overall rating for each questionnaire for each measurement property. The protocol was registered with PROSPERO (CRD42013005589). Of the 77 identified questionnaires, twelve were selected for review after content evaluation. Methodological quality varied, and there was a lack of information on measurement error and responsiveness. The PROMIS-Fatigue item bank and short forms perform the best. The FACIT-Fatigue scale, Parkinsons Fatigue Scale, Perform Questionnaire, and Uni-dimensional Fatigue Impact Scale also perform well and can be recommended. Minor modifications to improve performance are suggested. Further evaluation of unresolved measurement properties, particularly with samples including older people, is needed for all the recommended questionnaires.

  7. How Does Nursing Staff Perceive the Use of Electronic Handover Reports? A Questionnaire-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Meum, Torbjørg; Wangensteen, Gro; Soleng, Karen S.; Wynn, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Following the implementation of electronic nursing records in a psychogeriatric ward, we examined nursing staff's attitudes and perceptions to the implementation of an electronic handover routine. A web-based anonymous and secure questionnaire was distributed by e-mail to all nursing staff at a psychogeriatric ward at a university hospital. Most respondents were satisfied with the electronic handover, and they believed they managed to keep informed by the new routine. The simultaneous introduction of a morning meeting, to ensure a forum for oral professional discussion, was a success. A minority of staff did not fully trust the information conveyed in the electronic handover, and a significant proportion expressed a need for guidance in using the system. Staff that had a high level of trust in written reports believed these saved time, had little trouble finding time and a place to read the reports, and were more positive to the new handover routine. PMID:21760779

  8. Patient reported outcomes in hip arthroplasty registries.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    PROs are used increasingly in orthopedics and in joint registries, but still many aspects of use in this area have not been examined in depth. To be able to introduce PROs in the DHR in a scientific fashion, my studies were warranted; the feasibility of four often used PROs (OHS, HOOS, EQ-5D and SF-12) was examined in a registry context. Having the PROs in the target language is an absolute necessity, so I translated, cross-culturally adapted and validated a Danish language version of an often used PRO (OHS), since this PRO had no properly developed Danish language version. To minimize data loss and to maximize the data quality I validated our data capture procedure, an up to date AFP system, by comparing scannable, paper-based PROs, with manual single-key- and double-key entered data. To help further registry-PRO studies, I calculated the number of patients needed to discriminate between subgroups of age, sex, diagnosis, and prosthesis type for each of four often used PROs (OHS, HOOS, EQ-5D and SF-12), and to simplify the clinical interpretation of PRO scores and PRO change scores in PRO studies, I estimated MCII and PASS for two often used PROs (EQ-5D and HOOS). The feasibility study included 5,747 THA patients registered in the DHR, and I found only minor differences between the disease-specific and the generic PROs regarding ceiling and floor effects as well as discarded items. The HOOS, the OHS, the SF-12, and the EQ-5D are all appropriate PROs for administration in a hip registry. I found that group sizes from 51 to 1,566 were needed for subgroup analysis, depending on descriptive factors and choice of PRO. The AFP study included 200 THA patients (398 PROs, 4,875 items and 21,887 data fields), and gave excellent results provided use of highly structured questionnaires. OMR performed equally as well as manual double-key entering, and better than single-key entering. The PRO translation and validation study included 2,278 patients (and 212 patients for the test

  9. Outcome selection and role of patient reported outcomes in contemporary cardiovascular trials: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Aneil; Banning, Adrian P; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To systematically assess the type of outcomes selected and the prevalence of patient reported outcomes in contemporary cardiovascular trials and to quantify any misuse or underuse of patient reported outcomes using a specially developed tool that would allow estimation of the relevance of such outcomes to clinical decision making. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline and Embase. Study selection Randomised controlled trials of the treatment for or prevention of cardiovascular disease published in 10 leading general medical and cardiology journals from January 2005 to December 2008. Results Primary outcomes were patient important (death, morbidity, or patient reported outcomes) in only 93 of 413 trials (23%, SE 2%), whereas another 92 (22%, SE 2%) combined these outcomes with other less important ones into a composite. Sixty five trials (16%; SE 2%) used at least one instrument to measure patient reported outcomes, mostly in trials where such information would have been important or crucial for clinical decision making (52 trials). Patient reported outcomes were judged to be of little incremental value to a large number of, mostly explanatory, cardiovascular trials (152 trials). However, many trials in which patient reported outcomes would have been important or crucial for clinical decision making did not report such outcomes (122 of 174 trials, 70%). These included several trials that primarily aimed to improve symptoms or functional status, trials that tested interventions with a considerable potential for causing harm (mainly bleeding) that were not meaningfully measured, and trials with composite outcomes that were dominated by outcomes of questionable importance to patients. Conclusions Despite a continued rise in the reporting of patient reported outcomes with no evidence for their misuse in more recent cardiovascular trials, they seem to be still underused once their relevance to clinical decision making has been taken into account. This

  10. The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ): a validation study of a multidimensional self-report questionnaire to assess distress, depression, anxiety and somatization

    PubMed Central

    Terluin, Berend; van Marwijk, Harm WJ; Adèr, Herman J; de Vet, Henrica CW; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Hermens, Marleen LM; van Boeijen, Christine A; van Balkom, Anton JLM; van der Klink, Jac JL; Stalman, Wim AB

    2006-01-01

    Background The Four-Dimensional Symptom Questionnaire (4DSQ) is a self-report questionnaire that has been developed in primary care to distinguish non-specific general distress from depression, anxiety and somatization. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate its criterion and construct validity. Methods Data from 10 different primary care studies have been used. Criterion validity was assessed by comparing the 4DSQ scores with clinical diagnoses, the GPs' diagnosis of any psychosocial problem for Distress, standardised psychiatric diagnoses for Depression and Anxiety, and GPs' suspicion of somatization for Somatization. ROC analyses and logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations. Construct validity was evaluated by investigating the inter-correlations between the scales, the factorial structure, the associations with other symptom questionnaires, and the associations with stress, personality and social functioning. The factorial structure of the 4DSQ was assessed through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The associations with other questionnaires were assessed with Pearson correlations and regression analyses. Results Regarding criterion validity, the Distress scale was associated with any psychosocial diagnosis (area under the ROC curve [AUC] 0.79), the Depression scale was associated with major depression (AUC = 0.83), the Anxiety scale was associated with anxiety disorder (AUC = 0.66), and the Somatization scale was associated with the GPs' suspicion of somatization (AUC = 0.65). Regarding the construct validity, the 4DSQ scales appeared to have considerable inter-correlations (r = 0.35-0.71). However, 30–40% of the variance of each scale was unique for that scale. CFA confirmed the 4-factor structure with a comparative fit index (CFI) of 0.92. The 4DSQ scales correlated with most other questionnaires measuring corresponding constructs. However, the 4DSQ Distress scale appeared to correlate with some other depression scales more

  11. Early Evidence of the Italian Parent-Report Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ-P).

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Bin; Delvecchio, Elisa; Di Riso, Daniela; Lis, Adriana; Salcuni, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    The parent-report Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ-P) is a widely used scale that assesses children's and adolescents' strengths and difficulties. The present study applied this scale to Italian adolescents and compared the current results with previous Chinese findings and the United Kingdom norm. Participants were 422 Italian parents and their adolescent children. Parents and adolescents answered the parent-report and the self-report SDQ, respectively. Results showed that the five-factor first-order model was better than other competing models. Cronbach's alpha of emotional problems, conduct problems, hyperactivity, peer problems, prosocial behavior, and total difficulties was .63, .52, .69, .51, .59, and .77 respectively for mother-report measure, and .67, .48, .67, .46, .55, and .79 respectively for father-report measure. Parent-adolescent agreements ranged from low to medium, whereas mother-father agreements were large. Parents did not rate boys and girls as well as early-adolescence and mid-adolescence differently. Italian parents rated their adolescent children to have lower levels of hyperactivity, peer problems, total difficulties, and higher levels of prosocial behavior than Chinese parents; and Italian mothers rated their adolescent children to have lower levels of hyperactivity than United Kingdom parents. In conclusion, the current findings suggest both strengths and inadequacies of the SDQ-P for Italian adolescents.

  12. Psychometric properties of the Arabic self-report version of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Emam, Mahmoud Mohamed; Abu Hilal, Maher M; Kazem, Ali Mahdi; Alkharousi, Suad Juma

    2016-12-01

    Students in middle school tend to display emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBDs) compared to other forms of psychopathology. Early identification of EBDs is therefore a priority in order to prevent the chronic co-morbidity with other forms of psychopathology which may affect students' academic achievement. Assessment of EBDs has been traditionally undertaken via proxy reporting; but psychometrically rigorous instruments are needed so that children and adolescents can report on their own emotions and behaviours. Such need increases in the Omani context given the lack of EBDs adequate assessment instruments. In the current study the factor structure of the Arabic self-report version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (A-SDQ) was examined in a sample of 815 middle school students (mean age=14 years). The study tested the SDQ original five-factor model which received considerable empirical support. Responses on the A-SDQ were compared to responses obtained via proxy reports from teachers and parents through confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs). Results showed a reasonable fit for the three informant forms. Nevertheless, there were differences in item loadings across the three informant forms. Additionally, participants' self-report responses were tested for invariance across gender. CFAs provided support to the invariance hypothesis for item loadings, indicating that the items were similarly valid indices of the five factors for males and females. Factor correlations, factor variances and item residuals were not invariant across gender.

  13. Incomplete Reporting: Addressing the Prevalence of Outcome-Reporting Bias in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Brian; Polanin, Joshua; Williams, Ryan; Pigott, Terri

    2015-01-01

    Outcome reporting bias refers to the practice of omitting from primary studies outcomes that were actually collected. When primary studies do not report on all the outcomes assessed, there is an incomplete understanding of a phenomenon that may be compounded when the study is included in a systematic review of research. Outcome reporting bias is…

  14. Defining operative mortality: Impact on outcome reporting.

    PubMed

    Maximus, Steven; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Danielsen, Beate; Khan, Junaid; Shemin, Richard; Carey, Joseph S

    2016-04-01

    Death is an important outcome of procedural interventions. The death rate, or mortality rate, is subject to variability by definition. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database definition of "operative" mortality originally included all in-hospital deaths and deaths occurring within 30 days of the procedure. In recent versions of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database, "in-hospital" has been modified to include "patients transferred to other acute care facilities," and "deaths within 30 days unless clearly unrelated to the procedure" has been changed to "deaths within 30 days regardless of cause." This study addresses the impact of these redefinitions on outcome reporting. The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development hospitalized patient discharge database was queried for the year 2009, the most recent year that data files could be linked to the vital statistics death files to include all-cause mortality. Isolated coronary artery bypass grafting, isolated valve, coronary artery bypass grafting valve, and percutaneous coronary intervention procedures were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification procedure codes. Percutaneous coronary intervention procedures were further divided into acute coronary syndrome (percutaneous coronary intervention acute coronary syndrome) and all other percutaneous coronary intervention (percutaneous coronary intervention no acute coronary syndrome). Deaths were counted by 5 methods depending on the time and place of occurrence: (1) in-hospital or during the index hospitalization; (2) in-hospital + connected hospitalization, defined as a transfer to another acute care facility on the same day or within 24 hours of discharge; (3) in-hospital + 30 day, death during index hospitalization or within 30 days after the procedure; (4) in-hospital + connected + 30 day readmission, death during index hospitalization, transfer to

  15. Measuring changes in self-concept: a qualitative evaluation of outcome questionnaires in people having acupuncture for their chronic health problems

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    Background Changes in self-concept are an important potential outcome for many interventions for people with long-term conditions. This study sought to identify and evaluate outcome questionnaires suitable for quantifying changes in self-concept in people with long-term conditions, in the context of treatment with acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Methods A literature search was followed by an evaluation of three questionnaires: The Wellbeing Questionnaire W-BQ12, the Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI), and the Arizona Integrative Outcome Scale (AIOS). A convenience sample of 23 people completed the questionnaires on two occasions and were interviewed about their experience and their questionnaire responses. All acupuncturists were interviewed. Results Changes in self-concept were common and emerged over time. The three questionnaires had different strengths and weaknesses in relation to measuring changes in self-concept. The generic AIOS had face validity and was sensitive to changes in self-concept over time, but it lacked specificity. The PEI was sensitive and specific in measuring these changes but had lower acceptability. The sensitivity of the W-BQ12 was affected by initial high scores (ceiling effect) and a shorter timescale but was acceptable and is suitable for repeated administration. The PEI and W-BQ12 questionnaires worked well in combination. Conclusion Changes in self-concept are important outcomes of complex interventions for people with long-term illness and their measurement requires carefully evaluated tools and long-term follow-up. The literature review and the analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the questionnaires is a resource for other researchers. The W-BQ12 and the PEI both proved useful for this population and a larger quantitative study is planned. PMID:16539737

  16. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Questionnaire Based on the Nursing Outcomes Classification to Determine the Knowledge of Parents on Breast-Feeding: Research Protocol.

    PubMed

    Paloma-Castro, Olga; Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Paramio-Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Pastor-Montero, Sonia María; Del Carmen Sánchez-Dalda, María; Rozadillas-Sanmiguel, Elena; Moreno-Corral, Luis Javier

    2017-04-01

    To develop and psychometrically evaluate a questionnaire based on the outcome "Knowledge: Breast-feeding" of the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) to determine the knowledge of parents on breast-feeding. The NOC outcome "Knowledge: Breast-feeding" allows for nurses/midwives to assess the efficacy of interventions aimed to improve the knowledge on breast-feeding in parents thought the clinical interview/observation. However, the use of self-administered questionnaires by patients could facilitate its evaluation. Two-phased study: (1) Development of the questionnaire based on experts' opinions; (2) Methodological design to assess its psychometric properties. The availability of tools that enable the determination of the knowledge of patients would facilitate nurses/midwives to set objectives, individualize interventions, and measure their effectiveness. © 2015 NANDA International, Inc.

  17. Assessment of quality-of-life outcomes after surgery for nasal polyposis with the DyNaChron questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Trung; Guillemin, Francis; Arous, Fabien; Jankowski, Roger

    2015-02-01

    This prospective study assesses outcomes at 6 weeks and 7 months after radical ethmoid surgery in 65 patients with nasal polyposis using a new and detailed instrument, the DyNaChron questionnaire, which was filled in the day prior to surgery and at 6 weeks and 7 months after surgery at follow-up visits. Before surgery, the leading bothersome symptoms were olfactory disturbances (7.74 ± 2.81) and nasal obstruction (6.66 ± 2.28). After surgery (6th week and 7th month), there was a clear improvement of all symptoms including nasal obstruction, olfactory disturbances, anterior rhinorrhea, postnasal discharge, facial pain/headache and cough in comparison to baseline (p < 0.0001). Nasal obstruction was the most improved symptom (effect size of 2.24). At 7th post-operative month, the sense of smell continued to improve slightly. By contrast, the postnasal discharge score that was significantly improved at 6th post-operative week tended to worsen at 7 months (p = 0.0045). Before surgery, strong psychosocial impacts were observed in association with nasal obstruction and anterior rhinorrhea. The physical impacts of each symptom were proportionally correlated to the symptom score before and after surgery. The quality of life (QOL) related to each symptom was clearly better at 6 weeks and remained steady at 7 months after surgery. In conclusion, olfactory disorders and postnasal rhinorrhea were the main remaining symptoms after sinus surgery despite a global improvement of symptoms and quality of life. The earlier time point to stabilize QOL outcomes of endoscopic sinus surgery could be suggested at 6 weeks after surgery.

  18. Use of self-report postal questionnaires for district-based adult oral health needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Tickle, M; Craven, R; Blinkhorn, A S

    1996-12-01

    Self-report postal questionnaires have been advocated as an efficient means of collecting local data on adult oral health needs. The aim of this study was to compare the response from deprived and affluent communities and examine a method for the detection and compensation of non-response bias. An oral health status questionnaire was administered by post to random samples of older residents from affluent and deprived electoral wards. The survey was conducted in three distinct stages to increase the response rate and to quantify the effects of non-response. A response of 59.6 per cent was achieved from the deprived ward and 77.7 per cent from the affluent ward, this difference was statistically significant. The response rate compared favourably with contemporary national and international studies of oral health using postal survey methods. The pattern of response over the three stages was used to detect the presence and direction of non-response bias. This analysis showed evidence of non-response bias for only one variable of interest, for which an estimated prevalence value was calculated.

  19. Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

    2014-12-01

    This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality.

  20. Using Patient Reported Outcomes in Oncology Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Sarah A; Somers, Tamara J; Locklear, Tracie; Crosswell, Alexandra D; Abernethy, Amy P

    2016-10-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly being implemented into the care of patients with cancer. The use of a standard set of PROs (e.g., pain) in cancer is becoming established and there is interest in what additional PROs might provide valuable information. The goal of this observational study was to examine how the PROs of self-efficacy for pain and other symptoms assessed at the point of service were associated with pain, symptom severity and distress, and physical and psychosocial functioning in a sample of breast and gastrointestinal patients. We also sought to examine differences in these relationships by cancer type (breast and gastrointestinal) as well as understand differences in self-assessment mode (paper/pencil or electronic tablet). 178 patients with breast (n=65) and gastrointestinal cancer (n = 113) completed the Chronic Pain Self Efficacy Scale, M.D. Anderson Symptom Inventory, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General questionnaires. Measures were completed with paper and pencil and electronically using a tablet computer while patients waited for their clinical appointment. Responses from the initial completed questionnaires on both the paper and electronic instruments were analyzed. Patients' self-efficacy scores for pain and other symptoms correlated positively with pain, symptom severity and distress, and physical and psychosocial functioning; patients with lower levels of self-efficacy reported poorer outcomes and functioning overall. The results were independent of cancer type and mode of assessment. No statistically significant differences were found in the PROs when collected by electronic technology versus paper-pencil mode; patients were very satisfied with using the tablet computer to complete the PRO measures. Our results suggest that self-efficacy for pain and symptom management may be a beneficial addition to clinic-based PRO assessment batteries for patients with cancer and other chronic diseases. Existing short

  1. Validation of a one-page patient-reported Charlson comorbidity index questionnaire for upper aerodigestive tract cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Habbous, Steven; Chu, Karen P; Harland, Luke T G; La Delfa, Anthony; Fadhel, Ehab; Sun, Bin; Xu, Wei; Wong, Amy; Howell, Doris; Ringash, Jolie; Waldron, John; O'Sullivan, Brian; Goldstein, David; Huang, Shao-Hui; Liu, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Cancer patients have a wide range of comorbidities that are important confounders for biomarker and clinical studies of prognosis and outcome. Comorbidities can be captured using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) through abstraction of medical records, but patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires have also been used. The objective was to validate the PRO-CCI in a head and neck cancer (HNC) population, and to assess its level of agreement with the standard (std-CCI) method of chart review. A one-page PRO-CCI was compared with the std-CCI obtained through independent abstraction in 882 HNC patients (2007-2010). Kappa statistics and associated measures (p(pos) and p(neg)) were used to assess agreement. Discrepancy for each comorbid illness was evaluated. Proportional hazard models compared the association of std-CCI and PRO-CCI with overall survival (OS). Adjustments were made and a modified PRO-CCI was re-evaluated in a new cohort of upper aerodigestive tract cancers patient. PRO-CCI was higher than the std-CCI (p < 0.0001). After adjustment, having at least two comorbidities according to either the std-CCI [HR 1.97 (1.38-2.80)] or the PRO-CCI [HR 1.62 (1.18-2.24)] was prognostic. Of the most prevalent comorbidities, agreement was high for most of the CCI elements (kappa 0.76-0.93), but poorest agreement for connective tissue disease (kappa = 0.29, p(pos) = 43%, p(neg) = 84%) and COPD (kappa = 0.48, p(pos) = 53%, p(neg) = 95%). When the connective tissue disease question was modified, agreement of this item improved (kappa = 0.47, p(pos) = 50%). PRO-CCI can be an easy and effective tool in prognostic and outcomes research in HNC patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire:Validation of a parent-report screening measure

    PubMed Central

    Willcutt, Erik G.; Boada, Richard; Riddle, Margaret W.; Chhabildas, Nomita; DeFries, John C.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the internal structure and convergent and discriminant evidence for the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ), a 20-item parent-report rating scale that was developed to provide a brief screening measure for learning difficulties. CLDQ ratings were obtained from parents of children in two large community samples and two samples from clinics that specialize in the assessment of learning disabilities and related disorders (total N = 8,004). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed five correlated but separable dimensions that were labeled reading, math, social cognition, social anxiety, and spatial difficulties. Results revealed strong convergent and discriminant evidence for the CLDQ Reading scale, suggesting that this scale may provide a useful method to screen for reading difficulties in both research studies and clinical settings. Results are also promising for the other four CLDQ scales, but additional research is needed to refine each of these measures. PMID:21574721

  3. Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire: validation of a parent-report screening measure.

    PubMed

    Willcutt, Erik G; Boada, Richard; Riddle, Margaret W; Chhabildas, Nomita; DeFries, John C; Pennington, Bruce F

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated the internal structure and convergent and discriminant evidence for the Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire (CLDQ), a 20-item parent-report rating scale that was developed to provide a brief screening measure for learning difficulties. CLDQ ratings were obtained from parents of children in 2 large community samples and 2 samples from clinics that specialize in the assessment of learning disabilities and related disorders (total N = 8,004). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed 5 correlated but separable dimensions that were labeled reading, math, social cognition, social anxiety, and spatial difficulties. Results revealed strong convergent and discriminant evidence for the CLDQ Reading scale, suggesting that this scale may provide a useful method to screen for reading difficulties in both research studies and clinical settings. Results are also promising for the other 4 CLDQ scales, but additional research is needed to refine each of these measures.

  4. Comparison of the Patient Health Questionnaire and the Older Adult Health and Mood Questionnaire for self-reported depressive symptoms after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee L.; Reed, Karla S.; Coker, Jennifer; Zhai, Yusheng; Johnson, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Objective To directly compare estimates of potential depressive disorders and clinically significant depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Older Adult Health and Mood Questionnaire (OAHMQ) among participants with spinal cord injury (SCI). Research Design 727 participants from a hospital in the Southeastern United States were administered the PHQ-9 and OAHMQ during a follow-up survey. We compared the rates of depressive disorders using cutoff scores and diagnostic criteria for each instrument. No independent psychiatric diagnostic interviews were conducted. Results The PHQ-9 and OAHMQ were significantly correlated (r=.78) and both were correlated with satisfaction with life (r=-.48, -.54). Using recommended diagnostic scoring procedures, 10.7% of participants met the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder with the PHQ-9, 9.3% met the criteria for major depression based on PHQ-9 ≥ 10, and 19.7% based on PHQ-9 ≥ 15. Using the OAHMQ, 19.7% reported probable major depression and 44.5% clinically significant symptomatology. Conclusions The measures were highly correlated overall. However, the estimated prevalence of depressive disorders varied substantially between the two instruments. These estimates were comparable to those previously reported for each instrument (i.e., higher rates with the OAHMQ). Therefore, differing estimates of depressive disorders reported in the literature using these instruments were largely attributable to the instruments themselves. PMID:19929126

  5. The Walking Speed Questionnaire: Assessing Walking Speed in a Self-Reported Format

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Guang-Ting; Cohn, Matthew R.; Villa, Jordan; Kerwin, Lewis J.; Rosen, Natalie; Fang, Xiu Zhen; Christos, Paul J.; Evrony, Ayelet; Chen, Jin; Torres, Ashley; Lane, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES The literature increasingly demonstrates the importance of gait speed in the frailty assessment of patients 60 years and older. Conventional gait speed measurement, however, may be contraindicated in settings such as trauma where the patient is temporarily immobilized. We devised a Walking Speed Questionnaire (WSQ) to allow assessment of pre-injury baseline gait speed, in meters per second, in a self-reported manner, to overcome the inability to directly test the patients’ walking speed. DESIGN Four questions comprise the WSQ, and were derived using previously published questionnaires and expert opinion of six physician-researchers. SETTING Four ambulatory clinics. PARTICIPANTS Ambulating individuals aged 60 to 95 (mean age 73.2 ± 8.1, 86.1% female, N = 101). INTERVENTION Participants completed the WSQ and underwent gait speed measurement for comparison. ANALYSIS WSQ score correlation to true gait speed, receiver operating characteristics, and validation statistics were performed. RESULTS All four questions of the WSQ independently predicted true gait speed significantly (P<0.001). The WSQ sufficiently predicted true gait speed with r = 0.696 and ρ = 0.717. CONCLUSION The WSQ is an effective tool for assessing baseline walking speed in patients 60 years and older in a self-reported manner. It permits gait screening in health care environments where conventional gait speed testing is contraindicated due to temporary immobilization, and may be used to provide baseline targets for goal-oriented post-trauma care. Given its ability to capture gait speed in patients who are unable to ambulate, it may open doors for frailty research in previously unattainable populations. PMID:26569186

  6. Diagnostic accuracy for major depression in multiple sclerosis using self-report questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Anja; Fischer, Marcus; Nicholls, Robert A; Lau, Stephanie; Poettgen, Jana; Patas, Kostas; Heesen, Christoph; Gold, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis and major depressive disorder frequently co-occur but depression often remains undiagnosed in this population. Self-rated depression questionnaires are a good option where clinician-based standardized diagnostics are not feasible. However, there is a paucity of data on diagnostic accuracy of self-report measures for depression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Moreover, head-to-head comparisons of common questionnaires are largely lacking. This could be particularly relevant for high-risk patients with depressive symptoms. Here, we compare the diagnostic accuracy of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and 30-item version of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Rated (IDS-SR30) for major depressive disorder (MSS) against diagnosis by a structured clinical interview. Methods Patients reporting depressive symptoms completed the BDI, the IDS-SR30 and underwent diagnostic assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, M.I.N.I.). Receiver-Operating Characteristic analyses were performed, providing error estimates and false-positive/negative rates of suggested thresholds. Results Data from n = 31 MS patients were available. BDI and IDS-SR30 total score were significantly correlated (r = 0.82). The IDS-SR30total score, cognitive subscore, and BDI showed excellent to good accuracy (area under the curve (AUC) 0.86, 0.91, and 0.85, respectively). Conclusion Both the IDS-SR30 and the BDI are useful to quantify depressive symptoms showing good sensitivity and specificity. The IDS-SR30 cognitive subscale may be useful as a screening tool and to quantify affective/cognitive depressive symptomatology. PMID:26445703

  7. Psychometric Properties of the Self-Report Version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Hyuk; Min, Seongho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the reliability and validity of the self-report Korean version of Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ-Kr) in the community sample. Methods The SDQ-Kr was administered to a large sample of school children and adolescents (n=2814) and youth attendees of a psychiatric clinic (n=385) aged 11-16 years. To examine temporal stability, the same questionnaire was administered to a subsample of 167 school youths five to six weeks after the initial assessment. To examine the reliability, we calculated Cronbach's alpha coefficients for internal consistency and Pearson's correlations for test-retest stability. In order to evaluate the factorial structure of the SDQ-Kr items, we conducted an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with varimax rotation. Finally, discriminant validity was examined by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves employing the area under the curve (AUC) as an index of discriminant ability. Results Although the internal consistency of some subscales of the SDQ-Kr was somewhat less satisfactory (alpha coefficients; 0.28-0.54) than the English original, coefficients for the total difficulties scores approached sufficient levels (coefficients; 0.69). Other psychometric properties including discriminant validity (AUC for total difficulties and four subscales >0.7) were comparable to those obtained in other language studies. Conclusion The self-report SDQ-Kr exhibited a low level of reliability, indicating that some items need to be further evaluated and revised to improve the psychometric properties. We suggest that the total difficulties score could be used with more confidence for screening possible mental health problems in youths. PMID:26508960

  8. Variation in outcome reporting in endometriosis trials: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Martin; Duffy, James M N; Kusznir, Jennie O; Davis, Colin J; Plana, Maria N; Khan, Khalid S

    2016-04-01

    We reviewed the outcomes and outcome measures reported in randomized controlled trials and their relationship with methodological quality, year of publication, commercial funding, and journal impact factor. We searched the following sources: (1) Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, (2) Embase, and (3) MEDLINE from inception to November 2014. We included all randomized controlled trials evaluating a surgical intervention with or without a medical adjuvant therapy for the treatment of endometriosis symptoms. Two authors independently selected trials, assessed methodological quality (Jadad score; range, 1-5), outcome reporting quality (Management of Otitis Media with Effusion in Cleft Palate criteria; range, 1-6), year of publication, impact factor in the year of publication, and commercial funding (yes or no). Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed using Spearman Rh and Mann-Whitney U tests. We used a multivariate linear regression model to assess relationship associations between outcome reporting quality and other variables. There were 54 randomized controlled trials (5427 participants), which reported 164 outcomes and 113 outcome measures. The 3 most commonly reported primary outcomes were dysmenorrhea (10 outcome measures; 23 trials), dyspareunia (11 outcome measures; 21 trials), and pregnancy (3 outcome measures; 26 trials). The median quality of outcome reporting was 3 (interquartile range 4-2) and methodological quality 3 (interquartile range 5-2). Multivariate linear regression demonstrated a relationship between outcome reporting quality with methodological quality (β = 0.325; P = .038) and year of publication (β = 0.067; P = .040). No relationship was demonstrated between outcome reporting quality with journal impact factor (Rho = 0.190; P = .212) or commercial funding (P = .370). Variation in outcome reporting within published endometriosis trials prohibits comparison, combination, and synthesis of data. This limits the usefulness of

  9. Critical Limb Ischemia: Reporting Outcomes and Quality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The impetus to pursue quality in limb salvage is high in the current economic environment. This has been spurred on by the diffusion of multiple technologies, the lack of well-defined cost-effectiveness benchmarks, and the paucity of process and structure benchmarks. Furthermore, no national database exists to capture current activity and trends, and lead structure and process changes that could analyze outcomes and improve standards in peripheral interventions for limb salvage. This manuscript examines the challenges in measuring outcomes and quality in limb salvage and explores the components necessary for ensuring quality in limb salvage interventions. PMID:23342183

  10. Reliability and construct validity of self-report questionnaires for patients with pelvic girdle pain.

    PubMed

    Grotle, Margreth; Garratt, Andrew M; Krogstad Jenssen, Hanne; Stuge, Britt

    2012-01-01

    There is little evidence for the measurement properties of instruments commonly used for women with pelvic girdle pain. The aim of this study was to examine the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of instruments used for women with pelvic girdle pain. This was a cross-sectional methodology study, including test-retest reliability assessment. Women with pelvic girdle pain in pregnancy and after delivery participated in a postal survey that included the Pelvic Girdle Questionnaire (PGQ), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Disability Rating Index (DRI), Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), and 8-item version of the Medical Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36). Test-retest reliability was assessed with a random subsample 1 week later. Internal consistency was assessed with the Cronbach alpha, and test-retest reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and minimal detectable change (MDC). Construct validity based on hypotheses was assessed by correlation analysis. Discriminant validity was assessed with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. All participants responded to the main (N=87) and test-retest (n=42) surveys. Cronbach alpha values ranged from .88 to .94, and ICCs ranged from .78 to .94. The MDC at the individual level constituted about 7% to 14% of total scores for the 8-item version of the SF-36, ODI, and PGQ activity subscale; about 18% to 22% for the DRI, PGQ symptom subscale, and PCS; and about 25% for the FABQ. Hypotheses were mostly confirmed by correlations between the instruments. The PGQ was the only instrument that significantly discriminated participants who were pregnant from participants who were not pregnant as well as pain locations. A comparison of responsiveness to change of the various instruments used in this study was not undertaken, but will be carried out in a future study. Self-report

  11. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Pellar, Russell E; Tingey, Theresa M; Pope, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease that can damage multiple organs and reduce quality of life. Patient-reported outcome measures capture the patient's perspective. Some measures are specific to systemic sclerosis and others are general. Patient-reported outcomes in systemic sclerosis are important to aid in understanding the impact of systemic sclerosis on patients.

  12. Development and Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Mentalizing: The Reflective Functioning Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Fonagy, Peter; Luyten, Patrick; Moulton-Perkins, Alesia; Lee, Ya-Wen; Warren, Fiona; Howard, Susan; Ghinai, Rosanna; Fearon, Pasco; Lowyck, Benedicte

    2016-01-01

    Reflective functioning or mentalizing is the capacity to interpret both the self and others in terms of internal mental states such as feelings, wishes, goals, desires, and attitudes. This paper is part of a series of papers outlining the development and psychometric features of a new self-report measure, the Reflective Functioning Questionnaire (RFQ), designed to provide an easy to administer self-report measure of mentalizing. We describe the development and initial validation of the RFQ in three studies. Study 1 focuses on the development of the RFQ, its factor structure and construct validity in a sample of patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and Eating Disorder (ED) (n = 108) and normal controls (n = 295). Study 2 aims to replicate these findings in a fresh sample of 129 patients with personality disorder and 281 normal controls. Study 3 addresses the relationship between the RFQ, parental reflective functioning and infant attachment status as assessed with the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) in a sample of 136 community mothers and their infants. In both Study 1 and 2, confirmatory factor analyses yielded two factors assessing Certainty (RFQ_C) and Uncertainty (RFQ_U) about the mental states of self and others. These two factors were relatively distinct, invariant across clinical and non-clinical samples, had satisfactory internal consistency and test–retest stability, and were largely unrelated to demographic features. The scales discriminated between patients and controls, and were significantly and in theoretically predicted ways correlated with measures of empathy, mindfulness and perspective-taking, and with both self-reported and clinician-reported measures of borderline personality features and other indices of maladaptive personality functioning. Furthermore, the RFQ scales were associated with levels of parental reflective functioning, which in turn predicted infant attachment status in the SSP. Overall, this study lends

  13. Self-reported symptoms associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields: a questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Küçer, Nermin; Pamukçu, Tuğba

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the last years, it has been discussed frequently whether there are any harmful effects of electromagnetic fields on human health. Electromagnetic fields are generated by several natural and man-made sources. Part of the electromagnetic spectrum called Radiofrequency is used in communication systems such as mobile (cellular) phone and computer. The aim of our study was to explore different self-reported symptoms that may be associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields. This survey study was conducted, using a questionnaire, on 350 people aged +9 years in Turkey. The chi-square test was used for data analysis. Self-reported symptoms were headache, vertigo/dizziness, fatigue, forgetfulness, sleep disturbance-insomnia, tension-anxiety, joint and bone pain, lacrimation of the eyes, hearing loss and tinnitus. As a result of the survey, the study has shown that users of mobile phone and computer more often complained of headache, joint and bone pain, hearing loss, vertigo/dizziness, tension-anxiety symptoms according to time of daily usage (p < 0.05). In users of mobile phone and computer, women significantly (p < 0.05) complained more often of headache, vertigo/dizziness, fatigue, forgetfulness and tension-anxiety than men.

  14. [Wender-Reimherr self-report questionnaire on adult ADHD : German version].

    PubMed

    Retz-Junginger, P; Giesen, L; Philipp-Wiegmann, F; Rösler, M; Retz, W

    2017-07-01

    The Wender-Reimherr adult attention deficit disorder scale (WRAADDS) is an internationally accepted attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) interview with an authorized German translation. The WRAADS not only assesses the symptoms of ADHD but also the severity of the symptoms using the Utah criteria. With the aim of economizing the diagnostic process the original English version of the Wender-Reimherr self-report questionnaire was translated into German (WR-SB) in order to evaluate the test psychometric properties. To explore the psychometric properties of the WR-SB within a classical test theory framework. The psychometric properties of the WR-SB were determined in a population of 122 adult ADHD patients and 79 healthy controls. For the individual WR-SB subscales the results showed an adequate discriminatory power and a high internal consistency. The correlation between the WRAADS and the WR-SB was significant and the retest reliability was high. The WR-SB is a brief, self-report instrument and an economical alternative to assess adult ADHD symptomatology using the Utah criteria. The results of this evaluation study showed the WR-SB to be a valid and reliable measurement for both clinical and research purposes.

  15. Reporting questionnaire for children as a screening instrument for child mental health problems in Iraqi Kurdistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Abdulbaghi; Abdul-Majeed, Anas M; Siddiq, Aras A; Jabar, Fatima; Qahar, Jabar; Rasheed, Jihan; von Knorring, Anne-Liis

    2007-03-01

    To identify child mental health problems in a mid-sized to large city in Iraqi Kurdistan, the Reporting Questionnaire for Children (RQC), followed by the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and the Post-traumatic Stress Symptom Checklist for Children (PTSS-C), were administered in interview form to the caregivers of 806 school-aged children. To cover different categories of children, four samples were randomly selected from among the general population (n = 201), orphans (n = 241), primary medical care patients (n = 199), and hospital patients (n = 165). The RQC revealed satisfactory validity against a deviant CBCL cut-off. The screening capacity of the RQC was further supported by its similarity to the CBCL in distribution of problem scores among the four samples and its positive correlation with the CBCL, but not with the trauma-related PTSS-C. Although the general population showed lower problem scores than the orphans and the two clinical samples, problem scores in all instruments were considerably higher than those reported from other societies. The RQC seems to be useful as a first-stage screening instrument for child mental health problems in Kurdistan.

  16. Cross-cultural examination of the structure of the Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ-R).

    PubMed

    Botti, Mari; Khaw, Damien; Jørgensen, Emmy Brandt; Rasmussen, Bodil; Hunter, Susan; Redley, Bernice

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the cross-cultural factor stability and internal consistency of the Revised American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire (APS-POQ-R), a measure of the quality of postoperative pain management used internationally. We conducted exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of APS-POQ-R data from 2 point prevalence studies comprising 268 and 311 surveys of Danish and Australian medical-surgical patients, respectively. Parallel analysis indicated 4- and 3-factor solutions for Danish and Australian patients, respectively, which accounted for 58.1% and 52.9% of variance. Internal consistency was unsatisfactory among both Danish (Cronbach α = .54) and Australian (Cronbach α = .63) cohorts. There was a high degree of between-group similarity in item-factor loadings of variables coded as "pain experience," but not "pain management." This finding reflected cross-cultural differences in ratings of treatment satisfaction. For Danish patients, satisfaction was associated with the degree of pain severity and activity interference, whereas for Australian patients, satisfaction was associated with their perceived ability to participate in treatment. To facilitate further cross-cultural comparison, we compared our findings with past research conducted in the United States and Iceland. EFA supported the construct validity of the APS-POQ-R as a measure of "pain experience" but indicated that items measuring "pain management" may vary cross-culturally. Findings highlighted the need for further validation of the APS-POQ-R internationally. This study revealed the APS-POQ-R as a valid measure of postoperative pain experience for Danish and Australian patients. Measures of patients' perception of pain management were not robust to group differences in treatment expectations and demonstrated cross-cultural instability. Results highlighted the difficulties in establishing stable cross-cultural, cross-population subscales for the APS-POQ-R. Copyright © 2015

  17. Interaction between the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire and the Pocock's clinical score in predicting heart failure outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sawadogo, Kiswendsida; Ambroise, Jérôme; Vercauteren, Steven; Castadot, Marc; Vanhalewyn, Michel; Col, Jacques; Robert, Annie

    2016-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome. Its appropriate management should combine several health measurements. We assessed the relationship between the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) and the Pocock's clinical score. We conducted a prospective registry of HF outpatients. The main outcome was occurrence of death or hospitalization during a 6-month follow-up. A multivariate logistic regression was performed, including the KCCQ overall summary score, the Pocock's clinical score and their interaction in the model. From January 2008 to December 2010, 143 patients were involved. Mean age of patients was 68 years, and 74% were men. KCCQ's overall summary score and Pocock's clinical score were inversely correlated (r = -0.24, p = 0.026). A total of 61 (42.7%) events occurred. There was a high proportion of events (77.8%) in patients with a Pocock's clinical score > 50%, whatever the KCCQ score value. When the KCCQ score was ≤ 50 %, there was a low increase in risk as the Pocock's clinical score increased (OR 2.0 [0.6; 6.6]). However, when the KCCQ score was between 50 and 75 or ≥ 75 %, there was a high increase in risk as the Pocock's clinical score increased (OR 6.9 [1.2; 38.9] and OR 7.4 [0.8; 69.7], respectively). Patients with a high Pocock's clinical score are at a high risk of death or hospitalization. For patients with a low Pocock's clinical score, the KCCQ score can identify those at risk of these events.

  18. Development and Validation of the "iCAN!"--A Self-Administered Questionnaire Measuring Outcomes/Competences and Professionalism of Medical Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimoliatis, Ioannis D. K.; Lyrakos, Georgios N.; Tseretopoulou, Xanthippi; Tzamalis, Theodoros; Bazoukis, George; Benos, Alexis; Gogos, Charalambos; Malizos, Konstantinos; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Thermos, Kyriaki; Kaldoudi, Eleni; Tzaphlidou, Margaret; Papadopoulos, Iordanis N.; Jelastopulu, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    The Tuning-Medicine Project produced a set of "level one" and "level two" learning outcomes/competences to be met by European medical graduates. In the learner-centered era self-assessment becomes more and more important. Our aim was to develop a self-completion questionnaire ("iCAN!") evaluating graduates' learning…

  19. Measuring parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain: A preliminary validation of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, parent report

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Laura E.; Sieberg, Christine B.; Kaczynski, Karen J.

    2013-01-01

    Parent perceptions of and responses to pain have been identified as important factors in understanding pain-related disability among children and adolescents with chronic pain. The ability to “accept” chronic pain rather than focus on ways to avoid or control it has been linked to positive outcomes in chronic pain research. To examine parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain, the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, parent report (CPAQ-P) was developed and administered to 195 parents of children with persistent pain evaluated in a multidisciplinary pain clinic. Analyses support the internal consistency of the CPAQ-P (α= .89) and one-month stability estimates were acceptable for the total scale score (α= .72) and results suggest some responsivity to change. Exploratory factor analysis identified a two-factor model with four items removed from the original 20-item measure. Confirmatory factor analysis strongly supported the modified version. For construct validity, parent beliefs about child acceptance were negatively correlated with parent pain catastrophizing and parent fear of pain. Greater acceptance was also negatively associated protective parent responses to pain. These results support the CPAQ-P as a promising measure for assessing parent beliefs about child acceptance of pain and reinforce the importance of the social context and parental influence on child functioning. PMID:21783324

  20. Reporting of outcomes in orthopaedic randomized trials: does blinding of outcome assessors matter?

    PubMed

    Poolman, Rudolf W; Struijs, Peter A A; Krips, Rover; Sierevelt, Inger N; Marti, René K; Farrokhyar, Forough; Bhandari, Mohit

    2007-03-01

    Randomization, concealment of treatment allocation, and blinding are all known to limit bias in clinical research. Nonsurgical studies that fail to meet these standards have been reported to inflate the differences between treatment and control groups. While surgical trials can rarely blind surgeons or patients, they can often blind outcome assessors. The aim of this systematic review was threefold: (1) to examine the reporting of outcome measures in orthopaedic trials, (2) to determine the feasibility of blinding in published orthopaedic trials, and (3) to examine the association between the magnitude of treatment differences and the blinding of outcome assessors. We identified and reviewed thirty-two randomized, controlled trials published in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume) in 2003 and 2004 for the appropriate use of outcome measures. These trials represented 3.4% of all 938 studies published during that time-period. All thirty-two trials were reviewed by two authors for (1) the outcome measures used and (2) the blinding of outcomes assessors. We calculated the magnitude of the treatment effect of the use of blinded compared with unblinded outcome assessors. Ten (31%) of the thirty-two randomized controlled trials used a modified outcome instrument. Of the ten trials, four failed to describe how the outcome instrument was modified. Nine of the ten articles did not describe how the modified instrument was validated and retested. Sixteen of the thirty-two randomized controlled trials did not report blinding of outcome assessors when blinding would have been possible. Among the studies with continuous outcome measure, unblinded outcomes assessment was associated with significantly larger treatment effects than blinded outcomes assessment (standardized mean difference, 0.76 compared with 0.25; p = 0.01). Similarly, in the studies with dichotomous outcomes, unblinded outcomes assessments were associated with significantly greater treatment

  1. Questionnaire for Persons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA): initial validity and reliability of a new outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Kerstin; Brånemark, Rickard; Hägg, Olle

    2004-09-01

    The Questionnaire for Persons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA) is a new self-report measure developed for nonelderly transfemoral amputees using a socket- or osseointegrated prosthesis to reflect use, mobility, problems, and global health, each in a separate score (0-100). This paper describes the initial measurement properties of the Q-TFA as completed by 156 persons with a transfemoral amputation using a socket prosthesis (67% male, 92% nonvascular cases, mean age 51 years). Criterion validity was determined by associations between scores of the Q-TFA and the Short-Form 36 (SF-36)-Item Health Survey. Reliability was assessed by retest (n = 48) and by determination of the internal consistency. Correlations between Q-TFA and SF-36-Item Health Survey scales matched hypothesized patterns. Intraclass correlations were between 0.89 and 0.97, and measurement error ranged from 10 to 19 points. Cronbach's alpha revealed good internal consistency, with no values less than 0.7. This study shows that the Q-TFA, applied to persons using a transfemoral socket prosthesis, has adequate initial validity and reliability.

  2. The Derivation of Job Compensation Index Values from the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ). Report No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Ernest J.; And Others

    The study deals with the job component method of establishing compensation rates. The basic job analysis questionnaire used in the study was the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ) (Form B). On the basis of a principal components analysis of PAQ data for a large sample (2,688) of jobs, a number of principal components (job dimensions) were…

  3. Correlation between adherence rates measured by MEMS and self-reported questionnaires: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lizheng; Liu, Jinan; Fonseca, Vivian; Walker, Philip; Kalsekar, Anupama; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2010-09-13

    It is vital to understand the associations between the medication event monitoring systems (MEMS) and self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) because both are often used to measure medication adherence and can produce different results. In addition, the economic implication of using alternative measures is important as the cost of electronic monitoring devices is not covered by insurance, while self-reports are the most practical and cost-effective method in the clinical settings. This meta-analysis examined the correlations of two measurements of medication adherence: MEMS and SRQs. The literature search (1980-2009) used PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO), OVID HealthStar, EMBASE (Elsevier), and Cochrane Databases. Studies were included if the correlation coefficients [Pearson (rp) or Spearman (rs)] between adherences measured by both MEMS and SRQs were available or could be calculated from other statistics in the articles. Data were independently abstracted in duplicate with standardized protocol and abstraction form including 1) first author's name; 2) year of publication; 3) disease status of participants; 4) sample size; 5) mean age (year); 6) duration of trials (month); 7) SRQ names if available; 8) adherence (%) measured by MEMS; 9) adherence (%) measured by SRQ; 10) correlation coefficient and relative information, including p-value, 95% confidence interval (CI). A meta-analysis was conducted to pool the correlation coefficients using random-effect model. Eleven studies (N = 1,684 patients) met the inclusion criteria. The mean of adherence measured by MEMS was 74.9% (range 53.4%-92.9%), versus 84.0% by SRQ (range 68.35%-95%). The correlation between adherence measured by MEMS and SRQs ranged from 0.24 to 0.87. The pooled correlation coefficient for 11 studies was 0.45 (p = 0.001, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.34-0.56). The subgroup meta-analysis on the seven studies reporting rp and four studies reporting rs reported the pooled

  4. Does participation in an intervention affect responses on self-report questionnaires?

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; Allen, Diane D; Mâsse, Louise C; Wilson, Mark

    2006-12-01

    There has been some concern that participation in an intervention and exposure to a measurement instrument can change participants' interpretation of the items on a self-report questionnaire thereby distorting subsequent responses and biasing results. Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis using item response modeling can ascertain possible differences in item interpretation by testing for differences in item location between groups. The DIF for treatment versus control group differences at post-intervention assessment and the Time 1 and Time 2 differences in a control group were analyzed using data from a dietary change intervention trial for Boy Scouts. The measures included fruit and vegetable (FV) frequency of consumption, preferences and self-efficacy. Treatment-control group DIF at post-intervention assessment was detected in a higher percentage of items for FV frequency than for preference or self-efficacy. Time 1 to Time 2 differences in items for the control group were detected in one item for each of the three scales. Further research will need to clarify whether the obtained DIFs reflected true changes in frequency, preference or self-efficacy or some reinterpretation of items by participants following an intervention or merely after previous exposure to the measure.

  5. Examining the validity of the adapted Alabama Parenting Questionnaire-Parent Global Report Version.

    PubMed

    Maguin, Eugene; Nochajski, Thomas H; De Wit, David J; Safyer, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to comprehensively examine the validity of an adapted version of the parent global report form of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ) with respect to its factor structure, relationships with demographic and response style covariates, and differential item functioning (DIF). The APQ was adapted by omitting the corporal punishment and the other discipline items. The sample consisted of 674 Canadian and United States families having a 9- to 12-year-old child and at least 1 parent figure who had received treatment within the past 5 years for alcohol problems or met criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence. The primary parent in each family completed the APQ. The 4-factor CFA model of the 4 published scales used and the 3-factor CFA model of those scales from prior research were rejected. Exploratory structural equation modeling was then used. The final 3-factor model combined the author-defined Involvement and Positive Parenting scales and retained the original Poor Monitoring/Supervision and Inconsistent Discipline scales. However, there were substantial numbers of moderate magnitude cross-loadings and large magnitude residual covariances. Differential item functioning (DIF) was observed for a number of APQ items. Controlling for DIF, response style and demographic variables were related significantly to the factors. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Internal consistency of the self-reporting questionnaire-20 in occupational groups

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Kionna Oliveira Bernardes; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; de Araújo, Tânia Maria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess the internal consistency of the measurements of the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) in different occupational groups. METHODS A validation study was conducted with data from four surveys with groups of workers, using similar methods. A total of 9,959 workers were studied. In all surveys, the common mental disorders were assessed via SRQ-20. The internal consistency considered the items belonging to dimensions extracted by tetrachoric factor analysis for each study. Item homogeneity assessment compared estimates of Cronbach’s alpha (KD-20), the alpha applied to a tetrachoric correlation matrix and stratified Cronbach’s alpha. RESULTS The SRQ-20 dimensions showed adequate values, considering the reference parameters. The internal consistency of the instrument items, assessed by stratified Cronbach’s alpha, was high (> 0.80) in the four studies. CONCLUSIONS The SRQ-20 showed good internal consistency in the professional categories evaluated. However, there is still a need for studies using alternative methods and additional information able to refine the accuracy of latent variable measurement instruments, as in the case of common mental disorders. PMID:27007682

  7. Examing the Validity of the Adapted Alabama Parenting Questionnaire Parent Global Report Version

    PubMed Central

    Maguin, Eugene; Nochajski, Thomas; Dewit, David; Safyer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to comprehensively examine the validity of an adapted version of the parent global report form of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (APQ) with respect to its factor structure, relationships with demographic and response style covariates, and differential item functioning (DIF). The APQ was adapted by omitting the Corporal Punishment and the other discipline items. The sample consisted of 674 Canadian and United States families having a 9–12 year old child and at least one parent-figure who had received treatment within the past five years for alcohol problems or met criteria for alcohol abuse or dependence. The primary parent in each family completed the APQ. The four factor CFA model of the four published scales used and the three factor CFA model of those scales from prior research were rejected. Exploratory structural equation modeling was then used. The final three factor model combined the author-defined Involvement and Positive Parenting scales and retained the original Poor Monitoring/Supervision and Inconsistent Discipline scales. However, there were substantial numbers of moderate magnitude cross-loadings and large magnitude residual covariances. Differential item functioning (DIF) was observed for a number of APQ items. Controlling for DIF, response style and demographic variables were related significantly to the factors. PMID:26348028

  8. Addictive behaviors in comorbid addiction and mental illness: preliminary results from a self-report questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Malat, Jan; Collins, Jane; Dhayanandhan, Bramilee; Carullo, Frances; Turner, Nigel E

    2010-03-01

    : The objective of this study was to pilot a new self-report screening instrument, the addictive behaviors questionnaire (ABQ), which screens for a broad range of impulsive-compulsive behaviors, in a treatment-seeking psychiatric population with comorbid addiction. : Psychiatric outpatients (N = 94) being treated for comorbid addiction and mental illness were approached consecutively by their therapists to fill out a number of self-report measures, in addition to the ABQ, including the Addiction Severity Index, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Reflective Activity Scale. The ABQ was evaluated both as a continuous measure and as a categorical measure using clinically relevant cutoff scores for each behavior. It was tested for internal reliability, test-retest reliability, and correlation with other scales. : The completion rate for the ABQ was 74%. It demonstrated good internal reliability (continuous measure α = 0.81, categorical measure alpha = 0.82) and good test-retest reliability (continuous r = 0.68, categorical r = 0.76). The total ABQ score positively correlated with alexithymia (continuous r = 0.45, P < 0.001; categorical r = 0.37, P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with reflective activity (continuous r = -0.29, P < 0.01; categorical r = -0.27, P < 0.05). The behaviors that were most commonly endorsed as problematic were overeating, unhealthy relationships, excessive TV watching, and excessive shopping. Based on cutoff scores, 61% of the sample endorsed at least one problematic behavior and 31% endorsed 2 or more behaviors. : These preliminary results suggest that the ABQ is reliable and easily administered by clinicians treating comorbid addiction in an outpatient setting. Further study is required with larger sample sizes, normative data, and comparable scales to help establish construct validity and cutoff scores.

  9. Current status of worldwide use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in spine care.

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Dozza, Diego Cassol; Teles, Alisson R; Wong, Chung Chek; Barbagallo, Giuseppe; Brodke, Darrel; Al-Mutair, Abdulaziz; Ghogawala, Zoher; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-09-08

    Patient-reported outcome measures PROMs are the most widely accepted means of measuring outcomes following spine procedures. We sought to determine the current status of worldwide use of PROMs in Latin America (LA), Europe (EU), Asia Pacific (AP), North America (NA), and Middle East (ME) in order to determine the barrier to its full implementation. A questionnaire survey was sent by e-mail to members of AOSpine to evaluate their familiarity and use of PROMs instruments, and to assess the barriers to their use in spine care practice in LA, EU, AP, NA, and ME. A total of 1,634 AOSpine members from LA, EU, AP, NA, and ME answered the electronic questionnaire. The percentage of spine surgeons familiar with the generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire was 71.7%. in addition, 31.9% of respondents did not routinely use any PROMs. The main barriers to implementing PROMs were lack of time to administer the questionnaires (57%) followed by lack of staff to assist in data collection (55%), and the long time to fill out the questionnaires (46%). The routine use of questionnaires was more frequent in NA and EU and less common in LA and ME (p<0.001). We found that 31.9% of spine surgeons do not routinely use the PROMs questionnaire. This appears to occur because of lack of knowledge regarding their importance, absence of reimbursement for this extra work, minimal financial support for clinical research, the cost of implementation and lack of concern among physicians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Low self-awareness of ADHD in adults using a self-report screening questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Manor, I; Vurembrandt, N; Rozen, S; Gevah, D; Weizman, A; Zalsman, G

    2012-07-01

    Awareness of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults has been growing over the last decade. One of the most interesting issues related to this topic is these adults' self-awareness of their ADHD symptoms and their estimation of their own impairments. Our hypothesis while studying young adult ADHD populations was that there would be a significant difference between their self-report and their clinical assessment. One hundred and three students volunteered for this study. In order to validate our ADHD screening questionnaire (ADHD-SQ), and to assess the level of awareness they have of their own symptoms, participants underwent a complete clinical assessment for ADHD. They were divided into a control group (n=24), and an ADHD study group (n=79), which in turn was composed of two sub-groups, one comprising 24 ADHD predominantly inattentive (ADHD-I) and the other 55 ADHD combined type (ADHD-C). Factor analysis yielded two factors explaining 41% of the variance. The Inattention (IA) subscale score tended to be higher in both ADHD sub-groups as compared to the control group (6.5 ± 2.1 vs. 2.34 ± 2.3 with P<0.001), with no significant difference between the two ADHD sub-groups. Hyperactivity Impulsivity (HI) subscale was significantly higher for the ADHD-C sub-group than in the ADHD-I sub-group, whose score was similar to that of the control group (control: 1.6 ± 2.1; ADHD-I: 1.55 ± 1.0; ADHD-C: 4.5 ± 2.6, P<0.0001). Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis showed similar results. The area under the curve (AUC) of IA subscale score was 0.90 (95% confidence: 0.83-0.96) and for HI subscale score was 0.75, (95% confidence: 0.63-0.86). Classification into groups used a cut-off point of 3+ items out of nine, in the SQ and 6+ items out of nine in the clinical assessment. These two classifications showed 68% agreement (46% sensitivity and 95% specificity). In both ADHD sub-groups, the self-reported average number of positive symptoms per student

  11. Development and Validation of the EXPECT Questionnaire: Assessing Patient Expectations of Outcomes of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Salene M W; Lange, Jane; Turner, Judith; Cherkin, Dan; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Hsu, Clarissa; Berthoud, Heidi; Sherman, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Patient expectations may be associated with outcomes of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments for chronic pain. However, a psychometrically sound measure of such expectations is needed. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a questionnaire to assess individuals' expectations regarding outcomes of CAM treatments for chronic low back pain (CLBP), as well as a short form of the questionnaire. An 18-item draft questionnaire was developed through literature review, cognitive interviews with individuals with CLBP, CAM practitioners, and expert consultation. Two samples completed the questionnaire: (1) a community sample (n = 141) completed it via an online survey before or soon after starting a CAM treatment for CLBP, and (2) participants (n = 181) in randomized clinical trials evaluating CAM treatments for CLBP or fibromyalgia completed it prior to or shortly after starting treatment. Factor structure, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and criterion validity were examined. Based on factor analyses, 10 items reflecting expectations (used to create a total score) and three items reflecting hopes (not scored) were selected for the questionnaire. The questionnaire had high internal consistency, moderate test-retest reliability, and moderate correlations with other measures of expectations. A three-item short form also had adequate reliability and validity. The Expectations for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments (EXPECT) questionnaire can be used in research to assess individuals' expectations of treatments for chronic pain. It is recommended that the three hope questions are included (but not scored) to help respondents distinguish between hopes and expectations. The short form may be appropriate for clinical settings and when expectation measurement is not a primary focus.

  12. Patient reported outcomes measures in neurogenic bladder and bowel: A systematic review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshan P; Elliott, Sean P; Stoffel, John T; Brant, William O; Hotaling, James M; Myers, Jeremy B

    2016-01-01

    To describe existing bladder and bowel specific quality of life (QoL) measurement tools, QoL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury (SCI), Parkinson's Disease (PD), stroke, or spina bifida (SB) affected by bladder or bowel dysfunction, and the impact of specific bladder and bowel management on QoL. We performed a systematic review in PubMed/Medline databases in accordance with the PRISMA statement for English publications between January 1, 2000 and January 1, 2014. Articles were first screened based on their abstract and select full-text articles were then reviewed for eligibility. Articles with no QoL or PROM assessing urinary or bowel dysfunction were excluded. Risk of bias assessment included randomization, incomplete outcomes data, selective outcomes reporting, and other biases. All articles were graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as per the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. The most common QoL measurement tool for urinary and bowel dysfunction was the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. Twelve (24%) studies used only non-validated QoL questionnaires. Only three urinary or bowel specific QoL measures were found: the Qualiveen questionnaire, the FICQoL, and the QoL-BM. Several studies identified instances were clinical and patient-reported outcomes were inconsistent particularly with indwelling urinary catheter usage and reconstructive surgery. Additionally, certain clinical outcomes surrogates commonly used as primary outcomes measures may not correlate with the patient reported outcomes (PRO). Current PRO measures (PROM) and QoL assessments are heterogeneous and several inconsistencies in clinical and PRO for various management options exist. Standardized PROM will help identify optimal bladder and bowel management for patients with neurologic conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Alternative Learning Programs Evaluation: Part 2 Report. Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability Services/Research.

    In 1996, North Carolina began a 5-year evaluation of Alternative Learning Programs (ALPs). This report describes selected outcomes for students who participated in ALPs during 1995-96. These outcomes include performance on North Carolina End-of-Grade tests (elementary school) and performance on the End-of-Course(EOC) tests (high school) for…

  14. Self-reported injuries among seafarers. Questionnaire validity and results from an international study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Olaf C; Sørensen, Jens F L; Kaerlev, Linda; Canals, M Luisa; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Saarni, Heikki

    2004-05-01

    International surveys of occupational injuries among seafarers have so far been missing. It was the aim to test the method of self-report of injuries and length of time at risk during the latest duty period and second to study the injury incidence rate among seafarers by use of the method. A pilot study was conducted (n = 1068) in Finland, Denmark, the Philippines, Croatia and Spain using self-completed questionnaires with questions about the person, the ship, the duration of latest duty period and injuries. The duration of the self-reporting duty period was in the Danish part compared with information from the crew register of the Maritime Authority. For seafarers from merchant ships in the Danish sub-study there was acceptable correspondence between the information from the seafarers and the Maritime Authority, but not when referring to ferries and non-specified types of ship. Unadjusted and adjusted injury incidence rates-ratios (IRRs) based on number of injuries per number of work hours were calculated. Adjusted IRRs for ordinary seamen/officers: IRR = 2.43 (95% CI: 1.25-4.72); for age < 35/35+ years: IRR = 1.97 (1.02-3.81); length of tour: 117 days or longer compared with < 117 days: IRR = 0.46 (95% CI: 0.22-0.95); 57-70 working hours per week compared with < 57 h: IRR = 1.26 (0.48-3.29), 71+h compared with < 57 h: IRR = 2.12 (0.84-5.36). Non-significant IRRs >1.00 were found for ships under 10,000 GT compared with larger ships and for own flagged ships compared with ships under flag of convenience. In conclusion, more than 70 h of work per week was related to a higher rate of injuries for seafarers on merchant ships, but the result was not statistically significant. Self-report of the duration of the latest tour of duty is useful for seafarers from merchant ships with short-term employments, but not for ferries and other, non-specified types of ship with other or permanent employment.

  15. Patient-reported outcomes. How important are they?

    PubMed

    Korolija, D; Wood-Dauphinee, S; Pointner, R

    2007-04-01

    Outcome after surgical treatment has been based predominantly on objective criteria (biomedical model) and has largely ignored, until recently, the expectations, personal feelings, satisfaction, and quality of life of patients (outcomes model). The importance of this derives from considerations that the viewpoints and priorities of patients may not be the same as those of their surgeons. Furthermore, there is often little correlation between symptom severity and disease severity. Measures of quality of life and patient satisfaction are, thus, important in valid assessment of the results of surgical treatment. Global assessment based on both the biomedical and outcomes models constitutes the ideal. Questionnaires designed to measure both quality life (generic and specific) and patient satisfaction with treatment require careful development and validation by appropriate studies.

  16. Assessment of short and long-term outcomes of diabetes patient education using the health education impact questionnaire (HeiQ).

    PubMed

    Laursen, Ditte Hjorth; Christensen, Karl Bang; Christensen, Ulla; Frølich, Anne

    2017-06-15

    Type 2 diabetes is a progressive chronic illness that will affect more than 500 million people worldwide by 2030. It is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Finding the right care management for diabetes patients is necessary to effectively address the growing population of affected individuals and escalating costs. Patient education is one option for improving patient self-management. However, there are large discrepancies in the outcomes of such programs and long-term data are lacking. We assessed the short and long-term outcomes of diabetes patient education using the health education impact questionnaire (HeiQ). We conducted a observational cohort study of 83 type 2 diabetes patients participating in patient education programs in Denmark. The seven-scale HeiQ was completed by telephone interview at baseline and 2 weeks (76 participants, 93%) and 12 months (66, 80%) after the patient education ended. Changes over time were assessed using mean values and standard deviation at each time point and Cohen effect sizes. Patients reported improvements 2 weeks after the program ended in 4 of 7 constructs: skills and technique acquisition (ES = 0.59), self-monitoring and insight (ES = 0.52), constructive attitudes and approaches (ES = 0.43) and social integration and support (ES = 0.27). After 12 months, patients reported improvements in 3 of 7 constructs: skills and technique acquisition (ES = 0.66), constructive attitudes and approaches (ES = 0.43), and emotional wellbeing (ES = 0.44). Skills and technique showed the largest short- and long-term effect size. No significant changes were found in health-related activity or positive and active engagement in life over time. After 12 months, diabetes patients who participated in patient education demonstrated increased self-management skills, improved acceptance of their chronic illness and decreased negative emotional response to their disease. Applying HeiQ as an outcome measure yielded new

  17. 2012 Alaska Performance Scholarship Outcomes Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Brian

    2012-01-01

    As set forth in Alaska Statute 14.43.840, Alaska's Departments of Education & Early Development (EED) and Labor and Workforce Development (DOLWD), the University of Alaska (UA), and the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE) present this first annual report on the Alaska Performance Scholarship to the public, the Governor, and the…

  18. 2013 Alaska Performance Scholarship Outcomes Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with Alaska statute the departments of Education & Early Development (EED) and Labor and Workforce Development (DOLWD), the University of Alaska (UA), and the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education (ACPE) present this second annual report on the Alaska Performance Scholarship (APS). Among the highlights: (1) In the public…

  19. Observation versus self-report: validation of a consumer food behavior questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Patricia A; Elsbernd, Anne; Sinclair, Kelly; Schroeder, Mary; Chen, Gang; Bergmann, Verna; Hillers, Virginia N; Medeiros, Lydia C

    2004-11-01

    A reliable and validated set of food safety behavior questions that could be used with confidence when evaluating food safety education programs was identified in this study. A list of 29 food-handling and consumption behaviors rank-ordered within five pathogen control factors by nationally recognized food safety experts was the basis for the development of the behavior questions. Questions were evaluated for reliability and several forms of validity. During a kitchen activity session, 70 graduates of a nutrition education program completed four food preparation tasks while being observed and videotaped. The individuals also participated in an in-depth interview to validate behaviors that could not be observed during the food preparation activity, e.g., refraining from preparing food for others when experiencing diarrhea. Criterion validity was established by comparing questionnaire responses to observed behavior and interview responses. Twenty-eight questions met the validity criterion (> or = 70% agreement between observed and interviewed responses and self-reported responses), with three or more questions from each of five pathogen control factor areas. Observation assessments revealed that hand washing was more likely to be performed prior to beginning food preparation than between working with raw meats and fresh produce. Errors in methods of washing hands, utensils, and preparation surfaces between food preparation tasks were common. Most participants did not use thermometers to evaluate doneness but still cooked to safe internal temperatures. The results provide a tool that educators can use to evaluate food safety programs and will help guide the development of more effective food safety education programs targeting needed improvements in behavioral skills.

  20. Delusional experience awareness gap between patients and treating doctors - Self-reported EPDS questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kanemoto, Kousuke; Tsuda, Hisamitsu; Goji, Hiroko; Tadokoro, Yukari; Oshima, Tomohiro; Tachimori, Hisateru; DeToffol, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    Although early and rapid recognition of a psychotic trend in patients with epilepsy certainly pay dividends, there is no handy assessment instrument for screening because of multiple intrinsic difficulties such as lack of a standard screener as well as a reliability gap for screeners between help-seeking and general populations. On the other hand, the predominance of positive symptoms at the initial stage of psychosis is a promising aspect of this specific group. The following specific questions were examined. Is there a measurable difference between the assessment of the treating doctor and the real feelings of the patient? How well does the attained score correspond to the clinical diagnosis? The self-reported Emotions with Persecutory Delusions Scale (EPDS) questionnaire, previously validated in a general population, was used as the assessment tool for psychotic trend in 79 outpatients with epilepsy. Independent from scoring by the patients, the treating doctors also expressed their impressions about the same patients using the same scoring tool. Stepwise multiple regression analysis of the EPDS scores of both doctors and patients revealed that a clinical diagnosis of psychosis was the only independent variable significantly related to EPDS score. Also, there was a significant difference between the EPDS scores of the patients and those of the doctors, in favor of the former. Clinical diagnosis of psychosis proved to be the most powerful determinant of EPDS score independent from other clinical factors. The awareness gap between doctors and patients based on EPDS score revealed that treating doctors often clearly underestimate the psychotic trend of their patients. Our findings suggest that such simple tests as EPDS, with a narrow focus on attenuated delusional symptoms, may help screen for an early psychotic episode in patients with epilepsy that may otherwise not be diagnosed by their physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Bipolar II Depression Questionnaire: A Self-Report Tool for Detecting Bipolar II Depression

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Chi Ming; Yim, Chi Lap; Yan, Connie T. Y.; Chan, Cheuk Chi; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Mak, Arthur D. P.; Fok, Marcella Lei-Yee; Ungvari, Gabor S.

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar II (BP-II) depression is often misdiagnosed as unipolar (UP) depression, resulting in suboptimal treatment. Tools for differentiating between these two types of depression are lacking. This study aimed to develop a simple, self-report screening instrument to help distinguish BP-II depression from UP depressive disorder. A prototype BP-II depression questionnaire (BPIIDQ-P) was constructed following a literature review, panel discussions and a field trial. Consecutively assessed patients with a diagnosis of depressive disorder or BP with depressive episodes completed the BPIIDQ-P at a psychiatric outpatient clinic in Hong Kong between October and December 2013. Data were analyzed using discriminant analysis and logistic regression. Of the 298 subjects recruited, 65 (21.8%) were males and 233 (78.2%) females. There were 112 (37.6%) subjects with BP depression [BP-I = 42 (14.1%), BP-II = 70 (23.5%)] and 182 (62.4%) with UP depression. Based on family history, age at onset, postpartum depression, episodic course, attacks of anxiety, hypersomnia, social phobia and agoraphobia, the 8-item BPIIDQ-8 was constructed. The BPIIDQ-8 differentiated subjects with BP-II from those with UP depression with a sensitivity/specificity of 0.75/0.63 for the whole sample and 0.77/0.72 for a female subgroup with a history of childbirth. The BPIIDQ-8 can differentiate BP-II from UP depression at the secondary care level with satisfactory to good reliability and validity. It has good potential as a screening tool for BP-II depression in primary care settings. Recall bias, the relatively small sample size, and the high proportion of females in the BP-II sample limit the generalization of the results. PMID:26963908

  2. Patient-reported symptom questionnaires in laryngeal cancer: voice, speech and swallowing.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, R N P M; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I M; van den Brakel, N; de Bree, R; Eerenstein, S E J; Aaronson, N; Leemans, C R

    2014-08-01

    To validate questionnaires on voice, speech, and swallowing among laryngeal cancer patients, to assess the need for and use of rehabilitation services, and to determine the association between voice, speech, and swallowing problems, and quality of life and distress. Laryngeal cancer patients at least three months post-treatment completed the VHI (voice), SHI (speech), SWAL-QOL (swallowing), EORTC QLQ-C30, QLQ-HN35, HADS, and study-specific questions on rehabilitation. Eighty-eight patients and 110 healthy controls participated. Cut off scores of 15, 6, and 14 were defined for the VHI, SHI, and SWAL-QOL (sensitivity > 90%; specificity > 80%). Based on these scores, 56% of the patients reported voice, 63% speech, and 54% swallowing problems. VHI, SHI, and SWAL-QOL scores were associated significantly with quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30 global quality of life scale) (r = .43 (VHI and SHI) and r = .46 (SWAL-QOL)) and distress (r = .50 (VHI and SHI) and r = .58 (SWAL-QOL)). In retrospect, 32% of the patients indicated the need for rehabilitation at time of treatment, and 81% of these patients availed themselves of such services. Post-treatment, 8% of the patients expressed a need for rehabilitation, and 20% of these patients actually made use of such services. Psychometric characteristics of the VHI, SHI, and SWAL-QOL in laryngeal cancer patients are good. The prevalence of voice, speech, and swallowing problems is high, and clearly related to quality of life and distress. Although higher during than after treatment, the perceived need for and use of rehabilitation services is limited. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Self-Report of Tobacco Use Status: Comparison of Paper-Based Questionnaire, Online Questionnaire, and Direct Face-to-Face Interview—Implications for Meaningful Use

    PubMed Central

    Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Hays, J. Taylor; Newcomb, Richard D.; Molella, Robin G.; Cha, Stephen S.; Hagen, Philip T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Identifying tobacco use status is essential to address use and provide resources to help patients quit. Being able to collect this information in an electronic format will become increasingly important, as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has included the assessment of tobacco use as part of its Stage 1 Meaningful Use criteria. The objective was to compare the accuracy of online vs. paper assessment methods to ascertain cigarette smoking status using a face-to-face structured interview as the gold standard. This was a retrospective analysis of a stratified opportunity sample of consecutive patients, reporting in 2010 for a periodic health evaluation, who completed either a scannable paper-based form or an online questionnaire and underwent a standardized rooming interview. Compared with face-to-face structured interview, the overall observed agreement and kappa coefficient for both methods combined (paper and online) were 97.7% and 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51–0.86) . For the online form they were 97.4% and 0.61 (95% CI 0.33–0.90), and for the paper form they were 97.9% and 0.75 (95% CI 0.54–0.96). There was no statistically significant difference in agreement between the online and paper-based methods (P=0.76) compared with a face-to-face structured interview. Online assessment of tobacco use status is as accurate as a paper questionnaire, and both methods have greater than 97% observed agreement with a face-to-face structured interview. The use of online assessment of tobacco use status has several advantages and more widespread use should be explored. (Population Health Management 2014;17:185–189) PMID:24476559

  4. Self-report of tobacco use status: comparison of paper-based questionnaire, online questionnaire, and direct face-to-face interview--implications for meaningful use.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Mark W; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Hays, J Taylor; Newcomb, Richard D; Molella, Robin G; Cha, Stephen S; Hagen, Philip T

    2014-06-01

    Identifying tobacco use status is essential to address use and provide resources to help patients quit. Being able to collect this information in an electronic format will become increasingly important, as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has included the assessment of tobacco use as part of its Stage 1 Meaningful Use criteria. The objective was to compare the accuracy of online vs. paper assessment methods to ascertain cigarette smoking status using a face-to-face structured interview as the gold standard. This was a retrospective analysis of a stratified opportunity sample of consecutive patients, reporting in 2010 for a periodic health evaluation, who completed either a scannable paper-based form or an online questionnaire and underwent a standardized rooming interview. Compared with face-to-face structured interview, the overall observed agreement and kappa coefficient for both methods combined (paper and online) were 97.7% and 0.69 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51-0.86) . For the online form they were 97.4% and 0.61 (95% CI 0.33-0.90), and for the paper form they were 97.9% and 0.75 (95% CI 0.54-0.96). There was no statistically significant difference in agreement between the online and paper-based methods (P=0.76) compared with a face-to-face structured interview. Online assessment of tobacco use status is as accurate as a paper questionnaire, and both methods have greater than 97% observed agreement with a face-to-face structured interview. The use of online assessment of tobacco use status has several advantages and more widespread use should be explored.

  5. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Kratz, Anna L

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is classified as a chronic pain condition accompanied by symptoms of fatigue, sleep problems, problems with cognition, negative mood, limited functional status, and the presence of other chronic overlapping pain conditions. Comprehensive assessment of all of these components can be challenging. This paper provides an overview of patient-reported approaches that can be taken to assess FM in the contexts of diagnosis, symptom monitoring, phenotyping/characterization, and for purposes of clinical trials.

  6. Toward Ensuring Health Equity: Readability and Cultural Equivalence of OMERACT Patient-reported Outcome Measures

    PubMed Central

    Petkovic, Jennifer; Epstein, Jonathan; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Welch, Vivian; Rader, Tamara; Lyddiatt, Anne; Clerehan, Rosemary; Christensen, Robin; Boonen, Annelies; Goel, Niti; Maxwell, Lara J.; Toupin-April, Karine; De Wit, Maarten; Barton, Jennifer; Flurey, Caroline; Jull, Janet; Barnabe, Cheryl; Sreih, Antoine G.; Campbell, Willemina; Pohl, Christoph; Duruöz, Mehmet Tuncay; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Tugwell, Peter S.; Guillemin, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 12 (2014) equity working group was to determine whether and how comprehensibility of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) should be assessed, to ensure suitability for people with low literacy and differing cultures. Methods The English, Dutch, French, and Turkish Health Assessment Questionnaires and English and French Osteoarthritis Knee and Hip Quality of Life questionnaires were evaluated by applying 3 readability formulas: Flesch Reading Ease, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook; and a new tool, the Evaluative Linguistic Framework for Questionnaires, developed to assess text quality of questionnaires. We also considered a study assessing cross-cultural adaptation with/without back-translation and/or expert committee. The results of this preconference work were presented to the equity working group participants to gain their perspectives on the importance of comprehensibility and cross-cultural adaptation for PROM. Results Thirty-one OMERACT delegates attended the equity session. Twenty-six participants agreed that PROM should be assessed for comprehensibility and for use of suitable methods (4 abstained, 1 no). Twenty-two participants agreed that cultural equivalency of PROM should be assessed and suitable methods used (7 abstained, 2 no). Special interest group participants identified challenges with cross-cultural adaptation including resources required, and suggested patient involvement for improving translation and adaptation. Conclusion Future work will include consensus exercises on what methods are required to ensure PROM are appropriate for people with low literacy and different cultures. PMID:26077410

  7. Patient-reported outcome measures in burning mouth syndrome - a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ni Riordain, R; McCreary, C

    2013-04-01

    Oral Diseases (2013) 19, 230-235 This review aims to investigate the patient-reported outcomes currently used in the burning mouth syndrome literature and to explore whether any standardisation of such measures has taken place. Electronic databases were searched for all types of burning mouth syndrome studies using patient-reported outcome measures. Studies were selected by predefined inclusion criteria. Copies of the papers obtained were thoroughly reviewed. A study-specific data extraction form was used, allowing papers to be reviewed in a standardised manner. The initial literature search yielded a total of 173 citations, 43 of which were deemed suitable for inclusion in this study. Symptom severity and symptomatic relief were reported as a patient-reported outcome measure in 40 of the studies and quantified most commonly using a visual analogue scale. Quality of life was reported in 13 studies included in this review. Depression and/or anxiety was reported in 14 of the studies. As is evident from the variety of questionnaires and instruments used in the evaluation of the impact of burning mouth syndrome on patients' lives, no standardisation of patient outcomes has yet been achieved.

  8. Hearing-aid outcomes in Chinese adults: clinical application and psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Kam, Anna Chi Shan

    2012-06-01

    To adapt the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire into Chinese (the SADL-CH questionnaire) and investigate hearing-aid satisfaction in a group of adult Hong Kong Chinese fitted with free hearing aids. Cross-sectional survey. One hundred and twenty-five experienced hearing-aid users. The subjects completed a history form seeking demographic data and a questionnaire combining the SADL-CH instrument with questions seeking subjects' subjective ratings of satisfaction with some hearing-aid features and overall satisfaction with their hearing aid. The SADL-CH questionnaire had a good internal consistency reliability estimate (α = 0.79) comparable to that of the original version. SADL-CH scores were observed to have significant correlations with other satisfaction ratings on some hearing-aid features and the overall satisfaction measure. A high degree of test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.79) was observed. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the SADL-CH questionnaire had a four-factor structure. Interim norms were derived for the SADL-CH questionnaire. The level of hearing-aid satisfaction in Chinese adults was generally lower than that reported in studies conducted among Western populations. The SADL-CH questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring hearing-aid satisfaction.

  9. Comparing Self-Report Measures of Internalized Weight Stigma: The Weight Self-Stigma Questionnaire versus the Weight Bias Internalization Scale

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Claudia; Schmidt, Ricarda; Selle, Janine; Köhler, Hinrich; Müller, Astrid; de Zwaan, Martina; Hilbert, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Background Internalized weight stigma has gained growing interest due to its association with multiple health impairments in individuals with obesity. Especially high internalized weight stigma is reported by individuals undergoing bariatric surgery. For assessing this concept, two different self-report questionnaires are available, but have never been compared: the Weight Self-Stigma Questionnaire (WSSQ) and the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS). The purpose of the present study was to provide and to compare reliability, convergent validity with and predictive values for psychosocial health outcomes for the WSSQ and WBIS. Methods The WSSQ and the WBIS were used to assess internalized weight stigma in N = 78 prebariatric surgery patients. Further, body mass index (BMI) was assessed and body image, quality of life, self-esteem, depression, and anxiety were measured by well-established self-report questionnaires. Reliability, correlation, and regression analyses were conducted. Results Internal consistency of the WSSQ was acceptable, while good internal consistency was found for the WBIS. Both measures were significantly correlated with each other and body image. While only the WSSQ was correlated with overweight preoccupation, only the WBIS was correlated with appearance evaluation. Both measures were not associated with BMI. However, correlation coefficients did not differ between the WSSQ and the WBIS for all associations with validity measures. Further, both measures significantly predicted quality of life, self-esteem, depression, and anxiety, while the WBIS explained significantly more variance than the WSSQ total score for self-esteem. Conclusions Findings indicate the WSSQ and the WBIS to be reliable and valid assessments of internalized weight stigma in prebariatric surgery patients, although the WBIS showed marginally more favorable results than the WSSQ. For both measures, longitudinal studies on stability and predictive validity are warranted, for

  10. The Adult Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2A): A Self-Report Measure of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sarah L.; Uljarevic, Mirko; Baker, Emma K.; Richdale, Amanda L.; Jones, Catherine R. G.; Leekam, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies we developed and tested a new self-report measure of restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRB) suitable for adults. In Study 1, The Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 for adults (RBQ-2A) was completed by a sample of 163 neurotypical adults. Principal components analysis revealed two components: Repetitive Motor Behaviours and…

  11. The Adult Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2A): A Self-Report Measure of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sarah L.; Uljarevic, Mirko; Baker, Emma K.; Richdale, Amanda L.; Jones, Catherine R. G.; Leekam, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    In two studies we developed and tested a new self-report measure of restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRB) suitable for adults. In Study 1, The Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 for adults (RBQ-2A) was completed by a sample of 163 neurotypical adults. Principal components analysis revealed two components: Repetitive Motor Behaviours and…

  12. Relationship Between Hospital Financial Performance and Publicly Reported Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Halm, Ethan A.; Makam, Anil N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospitals that have robust financial performance may have improved publicly reported outcomes. Objectives To assess the relationship between hospital financial performance and publicly reported outcomes of care, and to assess whether improved outcome metrics affect subsequent hospital financial performance. Design Observational cohort study. Setting And Patients Hospital financial data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development in California in 2008 and 2012 were linked to data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare website. Measurements Hospital financial performance was measured by net revenue by operations, operating margin, and total margin. Outcomes were 30-day risk-standardized mortality and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and pneumonia (PNA). Results Among 279 hospitals, there was no consistent relationship between measures of financial performance in 2008 and publicly reported outcomes from 2008 to 2011 for AMI and PNA. However, improved hospital financial performance (by any of the 3 measures) was associated with a modest increase in CHF mortality rates (ie, 0.26% increase in CHF mortality rate for every 10% increase in operating margin [95% confidence interval: 0.07%-0.45%]). Conversely, there were no significant associations between outcomes from 2008 to 2011 and subsequent financial performance in 2012 (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions Robust financial performance is not associated with improved publicly reported outcomes for AMI, CHF, and PNA. Financial incentives in addition to public reporting, such as readmissions penalties, may help motivate hospitals with robust financial performance to further improve publicly reported outcomes. Reassuringly, improved mortality and readmission rates do not necessarily lead to loss of revenue. PMID:26929094

  13. Relationship between hospital financial performance and publicly reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Halm, Ethan A; Makam, Anil N

    2016-07-01

    Hospitals that have robust financial performance may have improved publicly reported outcomes. To assess the relationship between hospital financial performance and publicly reported outcomes of care, and to assess whether improved outcome metrics affect subsequent hospital financial performance. Observational cohort study. Hospital financial data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development in California in 2008 and 2012 were linked to data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare website. Hospital financial performance was measured by net revenue by operations, operating margin, and total margin. Outcomes were 30-day risk-standardized mortality and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and pneumonia (PNA). Among 279 hospitals, there was no consistent relationship between measures of financial performance in 2008 and publicly reported outcomes from 2008 to 2011 for AMI and PNA. However, improved hospital financial performance (by any of the 3 measures) was associated with a modest increase in CHF mortality rates (ie, 0.26% increase in CHF mortality rate for every 10% increase in operating margin [95% confidence interval: 0.07%-0.45%]). Conversely, there were no significant associations between outcomes from 2008 to 2011 and subsequent financial performance in 2012 (P > 0.05 for all). Robust financial performance is not associated with improved publicly reported outcomes for AMI, CHF, and PNA. Financial incentives in addition to public reporting, such as readmissions penalties, may help motivate hospitals with robust financial performance to further improve publicly reported outcomes. Reassuringly, improved mortality and readmission rates do not necessarily lead to loss of revenue. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:481-488. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Minimal Clinically Important Difference of Patient Reported Outcome Measures of Lower Extremity Injuries in Orthopedics

    PubMed Central

    Çelik, Derya; Çoban, Özge; Kılıçoğlu, Önder

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: MCID scores for outcome measures are frequently used evidence-based guides to gage meaningful changes. To conduct a systematic review of the quality and content of the the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) relating to 16 patient-rated outcome measures (PROM) used in lower extremity. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review on articles reporting MCID in lower extremity outcome measures and orthopedics from January 1, 1980, to May 10, 2016. We evaluated MCID of the 16 patient reported outcome measures (PROM) which were Harris Hip Score (HHS), Oxford Hip Score (OHS), Hip Outcome Score (HOS), Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), The International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Form (IKDC), The Lysholm Scale, The Western Ontario Meniscal Evaluation Tool (WOMET), The Anterior Cruciate Ligament Quality of Life Questionnaire (ACL-QOL), The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), The Western Ontario and Mcmaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Knee İnjury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Oxford Knee Score (OKS), Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, The Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment Patellar Tendinosis (Jumper’s Knee) (VİSA-P), Tegner Activity Rating Scale, Marx Activity Rating Scale, Foot And Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), The Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot And Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), The Foot And Ankle Disability Index Score and Sports Module, Achill Tendon Total Rupture Score(ATRS), The Victorian İnstitute Of Sports Assesment Achilles Questionnaire(VİSA-A), American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS). A search of the PubMed/MEDLINE, PEDro and Cochrane Cen¬tral Register of Controlled Trials and Web of Science databases from the date of inception to May 1, 2016 was conducted. The terms “minimal clinically important difference,” “minimal clinically important change”, “minimal clinically important improvement” “were combined with one of the PROM as mentioned above

  15. [Performance of the Self-Reporting Questionnaire as a psychiatric screening questionnaire: a comparative study with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Daniel Maffasioli; Stein, Airton Tetelbon; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2008-02-01

    The SRQ (Self-Reporting Questionnaire) is a psychiatric screening tool that originally included 30 questions. The Brazilian version of SRQ-20 (a version that includes the 20 items for non-psychotic mental disorders) was validated in the early 1980s. The objective of the present study was to validate the Brazilian version of SRQ-20 and the 5 items for alcohol-related disorders as compared to the SCID-IV-TR (Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR) as the gold standard. The study was conducted in Santa Cruz do Sul, a small town in southern Brazil, with 485 subjects (54.8% females, mean age 40.04 years). The 5 items for alcohol-related disorders showed low sensitivity (66%). The optimum cutoff value for SRQ-20 was 7/8, with 86.33% sensitivity and 89.31% specificity. The discriminant power of SRQ-20 for psychiatric screening was 0.9, and Cronbach's alpha was 0.86.

  16. Correlation of three validated questionnaires for assessment of outcomes following surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women.

    PubMed

    Abdel-fattah, Mohamed; Hasafa, Zaid; Mostafa, Alyaa

    2011-08-01

    To assess the correlation between women's responses to the "Patient Global Impression of Improvement" questionnaire (PGI-I) and changes in women's quality of life and sexual function following surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Ancillary analysis of data from a prospective randomised surgical trial: 299 women underwent transobturator tape insertion as a sole procedure and completed the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ) and Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) at baseline and at 12-month follow-up in addition to PGI-I at 12 months. Spearman's correlation coefficient was used to evaluate the degree of association between PGI-I responses and the changes in total KHQ and PISQ-12 scores. Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to compare the 7-point scale PGI-I responses in terms of changes in KHQ and PISQ-12 scores. There was a significant positive correlation between PGI-I responses and changes in the total KHQ scores (r=0.48, p<0.001). The changes in the total KHQ score became larger (i.e., more positive) as the PGI-I responses became more positive. There were statistically significant differences across the PGI-I groups with respect to the changes in total KHQ scores (p<0.001). "Very much improved/Much improved" responses on PGI-I were associated with median (IQR) improvement in KHQ scores of 46 (32, 60) and 35 (18, 49) points respectively. An 18-point improvement in total KHQ score was required to clearly indicate a "better" response on PGI-I. There was a statistically significant, but weak, positive correlation between PGI-I responses and the changes in the total PISQ-12 score (r=0.17, p=0.019). The Patient Global Impression of Improvement Questionnaire strongly correlates with changes in Kings Health Questionnaire scores following surgery for SUI and can reliably predict improvement and deterioration in women's quality of life. The Patient Global Impression of Improvement Questionnaire strongly correlates

  17. Factors associated with self-reported outcome in adaptation of hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Young-Soo; Choi, Jeesun; Moon, Il Joon; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2016-09-01

    This investigation evaluated the associated factors with self-reported outcome in hearing aid users by adopting the Korean version of International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) and Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE). Two hundred and eight participants were enrolled in this study. Participants completed the HHIE at pre-fitting, HHIE and the IOI-HA at 1 and 3 months after fitting. The outcomes of both questionnaires were analyzed with regard to the variable factors reported or expected to be associated with the outcome of hearing aid use. The hearing-related handicap evaluated by HHIE score at pre-fitting had significant associations with age and the severity of hearing impairment. The IOI-HA score with hearing aid use was significantly correlated with WRS and the severity of hearing impairment. The improvement of HHIE score showed a significant correlation with WRS. Word recognition score (WRS) is the most significantly associated factor for outcome of hearing aid use. In addition, audiometric configuration, previous experience of hearing aid use, and initial hearing handicap should be considered as associated factors with hearing aid outcome.

  18. The Development of a Questionnaire to Measure Students' Motivation Towards Science Learning. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuan, Hsiao-Lin; Chin, Chi-Chin; Shieh, Shyang-Horng

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire that measures students' motivation toward science learning (SMTSL). Six scales were developed: self-efficacy, active learning strategies, science learning value, performance goal, achievement goal, and learning environment stimulation. In total, 1407 junior high school students from central…

  19. Initial Psychometric Properties of the Experiences Questionnaire: Validation of a Self-Report Measure of Decentering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresco, David M.; Moore, Michael T.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.; Segal, Zindel V.; Ma, S. Helen; Teasdale, John D.; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings as temporary, objective events in the mind, as opposed to reflections of the self that are necessarily true. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) was designed to measure both decentering and rumination but has not been empirically validated. The current study investigated…

  20. Current Issues in the Teaching of English: Report on a Questionnaire Study; English Curricula in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

    The first two papers in this volume discusses the results of questionnaires intended for primary and secondary teachers to elicit information on current issues in the teaching of English in Australia. It was learned that secondary teachers reached consensus only on the very broadest levels. They all agreed that literature, communication, and…

  1. Prediction of Drug Abuse by the Life Values Questionnaire: Interim Report, May 1973-February 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Joseph L.; And Others

    Three experimental psychological tests were investigated to determine if they added significantly to the prediction of eight drug abuse criteria when combined with a basic predictor set consisting of background variables only. Of the four tests investigated, only one, the Life Values Questionnaire appeared to add any significant unique variance to…

  2. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2009 Cohort: Wave 2 (2010)-- Questionnaire. Technical Report 71A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 2009 cohort Wave 2 (2010) data set.

  3. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2003 Cohort: Wave 7 (2009)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 57A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 2003 cohort Wave 7 (2009) data set. [For the related frequency tables, see ED512163.

  4. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2009 Cohort: Wave 3 (2011)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 72A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 2009 cohort Wave 3 (2011) data set.

  5. Preliminary Report on the Replies Received to the Institute's Questionnaire Issued in 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Inst. for Adult Literacy Methods, Teheran (Iran).

    In 1969 800 questionnaires were sent in four languages to governmental and non-governmental agencies dealing directly with adult literacy in 123 countries. The purpose was to receive details on methods and techniques used. Only 80 replies were received, 73 of which provided information for the study. Replies were classified in seven main…

  6. Measurement of the Type A Behavior Pattern by Self-Report Questionnaires: Several Perspectives on Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluated the validity of the Type A behavior pattern as measured by paper-and-pencil questionnaires. The Jenkins Activity Survey, Framingham Type A Scale, Thurstone Activity Scales, a new bipolar adjective Type A measure, and measures of achievement and nurturance needs were completed by 418 students. (Author/BS)

  7. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 2006 Cohort: Wave 6 (2011)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 75A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This series of documents provides supporting information for the LSAY data set of the 2006 cohort at wave 6 (2011). The document presents the questionnaire for LSAY…

  8. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) 1998 Cohort: Wave 12 (2009)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 58A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 1998 cohort Wave 12 (2009) data set. [For the accompanying frequency tables, "Longitudinal Surveys…

  9. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY): 2006 Cohort Wave 4 (2009)--Questionnaire. Technical Report 56A

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program studies the progress of several groups of young Australians as they move from school into post-secondary education and work. This technical paper contains the questionnaire for the LSAY 2006 cohort Wave 4 (2009) data set. [For the "Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY):…

  10. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Castle, Jessica R; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J Hans; Doyle, Francis J; Griffen, Steven C; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L; Nimri, Revital; O'Neal, David N; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Zisser, Howard; Lum, John W

    2016-07-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes.

  11. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M.; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Castle, Jessica R.; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R.; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J. Hans; Doyle, Francis J.; Griffen, Steven C.; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W.; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L.; Nimri, Revital; O’Neal, David N.; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J.; Weinzimer, Stuart A.; Zisser, Howard

    2016-01-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27330126

  12. Psychological mindedness as a predictor of psychotherapy outcome: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Conte, H R; Plutchik, R; Jung, B B; Picard, S; Karasu, T B; Lotterman, A

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated the properties of a new measure of psychological mindness (PM). A 45-item self-report questionnaire was administered to consecutive admissions to a large outpatient clinic that provides primarily psychodynamically oriented individual psychotherapy. The PM scores of a sample of 44 of these patients who attended a median of 15 sessions were correlated with several outcome measures obtained from retrospective chart reviews. These measures consisted of the number of sessions attended, discharge ratings, and change scores on a Global Assessment Scale (GAS) and on a symptom checklist. Coefficient alpha for the Psychological Mindedness (PM) Scale indicated high reliability. Total PM score correlated significantly with three of the outcome measures. Twenty of the 45-items were good predictors of one or more outcome measures.

  13. A randomized controlled trial of patient-reported outcomes with tai chi exercise in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuzhong; Harmer, Peter; Liu, Yu; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Fitzgerald, Kathleen; Stock, Ronald; Chou, Li-Shan

    2014-04-01

    A previous randomized, controlled trial of tai chi showed improvements in objectively measured balance and other motor-related outcomes in patients with Parkinson's disease. This study evaluated whether patient-reported outcomes could be improved through exercise interventions and whether improvements were associated with clinical outcomes and exercise adherence. In a secondary analysis of the tai chi trial, patient-reported and clinical outcomes and exercise adherence measures were compared between tai chi and resistance training and between tai chi and stretching exercise. Patient-reported outcome measures were perceptions of health-related benefits resulting from participation, assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-8) and Vitality Plus Scale (VPS). Clinical outcome measures included motor symptoms, assessed by a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-Motor Examination (UPDRS-ME) and a 50-foot speed walk. Information on continuing exercise after the structured interventions were terminated was obtained at a 3-month postintervention follow-up. Tai chi participants reported significantly better improvement in the PDQ-8 (-5.77 points, P = 0.014) than did resistance training participants and in PDQ-8 (-9.56 points, P < 0.001) and VPS (2.80 points, P = 0.003) than did stretching participants. For tai chi, patient-reported improvement in the PDQ-8 and VPS was significantly correlated with their clinical outcomes of UPDRS-ME and a 50-foot walk, but these correlations were not statistically different from those shown for resistance training or stretching. However, patient-reported outcomes from tai chi training were associated with greater probability of continued exercise behavior than were either clinical outcomes or patient-reported outcomes from resistance training or stretching. Tai chi improved patient-reported perceptions of health-related benefits, which were found to be associated with a greater probability of exercise

  14. Outcome Discrepancies and Selective Reporting: Impacting the Leading Journals?

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Padhraig S.; Koletsi, Despina; Dwan, Kerry; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Background Selective outcome reporting of either interesting or positive research findings is problematic, running the risk of poorly-informed treatment decisions. We aimed to assess the extent of outcome and other discrepancies and possible selective reporting between registry entries and published reports among leading medical journals. Methods Randomized controlled trials published over a 6-month period from July to December 31st, 2013, were identified in five high impact medical journals: The Lancet, British Medical Journal, New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine and Journal of American Medical Association were obtained. Discrepancies between published studies and registry entries were identified and related to factors including registration timing, source of funding and presence of statistically significant results. Results Over the 6-month period, 137 RCTs were found. Of these, 18% (n = 25) had discrepancies related to primary outcomes with the primary outcome changed in 15% (n = 20). Moreover, differences relating to non-primary outcomes were found in 64% (n = 87) with both omission of pre-specified non-primary outcomes (39%) and introduction of new non-primary outcomes (44%) common. No relationship between primary or non-primary outcome change and registration timing (prospective or retrospective; P = 0.11), source of funding (P = 0.92) and presence of statistically significant results (P = 0.92) was found. Conclusions Discrepancies between registry entries and published articles for primary and non-primary outcomes were common among trials published in leading medical journals. Novel approaches are required to address this problem. PMID:25996928

  15. Patient reported outcomes as endpoints in medical research.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Diane L

    2004-04-01

    This review covers a number of the many design and analytic issues associated with clinical trials that incorporate patient reported outcomes as primary or secondary endpoints. We use a clinical trial designed to evaluate a new therapy for the prevention of migraines to illustrate how endpoints are defined by the objectives of the study, the methods for handling longitudinal assessments with multiple scales or outcomes, and the methods of analysis in the presence of missing data.

  16. Additional difficulties associated with aetiologies of deafness: outcomes from a parent questionnaire of 540 children using cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Inscoe, Jayne Ramirez; Bones, Christine

    2016-01-01

    To update our clinical records of additional difficulties and significant health issues of children receiving cochlear implants (CIs) at the Nottingham Auditory Implant Programme, to investigate possible trends in cohorts of children with the same aetiology of deafness, and to discuss clinical implications. A written postal questionnaire was sent to parents/carers of 590 children asking if their child had been diagnosed with specified additional difficulties and any significant health issues likely to impact on their child's listening and language development. Responses to these questionnaires were collated and the data reviewed. Of the 91.5% questionnaires returned, the percentage of children with additional difficulties was found to be 47%. The numbers of CI recipients with three or more additional difficulties in this group were found to be 11%. The distribution of additional difficulties within cohorts of CI recipients with the same aetiology was examined, and trends were identified. Those deafened by cytomegalovirus or meningitis and those with auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder were found to have the greatest number of co-existing additional difficulties including epilepsy and autism, while those with an aetiology of Connexin 26 had almost no additional difficulties. It is hoped that the information obtained will (i) inform the counselling of parents pre-implant, particularly with children whose aetiology means that there is a high risk of additional difficulties, and (ii) improve CI recipient care. The results suggest that children with severe-profound sensorineural deafness have more additional difficulties than has been previously cited.

  17. Psychometric properties of an innovative self-report measure: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for Adults

    PubMed Central

    Caballo, Vicente E.; Arias, Benito; Salazar, Isabel C.; Irurtia, María Jesús; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the psychometric properties of a new measure of social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults (SAQ), composed of 30 items that were developed based on participants from 16 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. Two groups of participants were included in the study: a non-clinical group involving 18,133 persons and a clinical group comprising 334 patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 5-factor structure of the questionnaire. The factors were labeled: 1) Interactions with strangers, 2) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, 3) Interactions with the opposite sex, 4) Criticism and embarrassment, and 5) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust or displeasure. Psychometric evidence supported the internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the SAQ. To facilitate clinical applications, a ROC analysis identified cut scores for men and women for each factor and for the global score. PMID:25774643

  18. Assessing Adult Leisure Activities: An Extension of a Self-Report Activity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jopp, Daniela; Hertzog, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, we enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities, and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. Our proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: three types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical, developmental, and experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in two independent samples. A higher-order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented VLS activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measure of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals. PMID:20230157

  19. Assessing adult leisure activities: an extension of a self-report activity questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jopp, Daniela S; Hertzog, Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Everyday leisure activities in adulthood and old age have been investigated with respect to constructs such as successful aging, an engaged lifestyle, and prevention of age-related cognitive decline. They also relate to mental health and have clinical value, as they can inform diagnosis and interventions. In the present study, the authors enhanced the content validity of the Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire by adding items on physical and social activities and validated a shortened version of the questionnaire. The proposed leisure activity model included 11 activity categories: 3 types of social activities (i.e., activities with close social partners, group-centered public activity, religious activities), physical activities, developmental activities, experiential activities, crafts, game playing, TV watching, travel, and technology use. Confirmatory factor analyses validated the proposed factor structure in 2 independent samples. A higher order model with a general activity factor fitted the activity factor correlations with relatively little loss of fit. Convergent and discriminant validity for the activity scales were supported by patterns of their correlations with education, health, depression, cognition, and personality. In sum, the scores derived from of the augmented Victoria Longitudinal Study activity questionnaire demonstrate good reliability, and validity evidence supports their use as measures of leisure activities in young, middle-aged, and older individuals.

  20. A systematic review of primary outcomes and outcome measure reporting in randomized trials evaluating treatments for pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Duffy, James M N; Hirsch, Martin; Gale, Chris; Pealing, Louise; Kawsar, Anusuya; Showell, Marian; Williamson, Paula R; Khan, Khalid S; Ziebland, Sue; McManus, Richard J

    2017-08-13

    An evaluation of outcome reporting is required to develop a core outcome set. To assess primary outcomes and outcome measure reporting in pre-eclampsia trials. Five online databases were searched from inception to January 2016 using terms including "preeclampsia" and "randomized controlled trial". Randomized controlled trials evaluating treatments for pre-eclampsia published in any language were included. Primary outcomes and data on outcome measure reporting were systematically extracted and categorized. Overall, 79 randomized trials including data from 31 615 women were included. Of those, 38 (48%) reported 35 different primary outcomes; 28 were maternal outcomes and seven were fetal/neonatal outcomes. Three randomized trials reported composite outcomes, incorporating between six and nine outcome components. The method of definition or measurement was infrequently or poorly reported. Even when outcomes were consistent across trials, different methods of definition or measurement were frequently described. In randomized trials evaluating interventions for pre-eclampsia, critical information related to the primary outcome, including definition and measurement, is regularly omitted. Developing a core outcome set for pre-eclampsia trials would help to inform primary outcome selection and outcome measure reporting. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  1. The Perceived Deficits Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Allison; Nikelshpur, Olga M.; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; DeLuca, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cognitive dysfunction affects approximately 43% to 70% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) and is an important determinant of several functional outcomes in MS and quality of life. Brief neuropsychological test batteries have been developed specifically for use in MS and are widely used to aid clinicians in assessing levels of cognitive impairment in MS. Neuropsychologists and neurologists also frequently use briefer screening measures, such as the Perceived Deficits Questionnaire (PDQ), to assist in determining whether a more extensive neuropsychological evaluation is warranted. However, despite the ease of such measures, the relationship between self-report and objective cognitive impairment has been inconsistent, at best. Moreover, factors such as depression, fatigue, anxiety, and personality have been found to be more related to reports of cognitive difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the relationship between subjective cognitive concerns and objective cognitive impairment while accounting for related symptoms. Methods: We examined the association of self-reported cognitive concerns on the PDQ with objective cognitive measures, as well as depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Results: There was no relationship between self-reported cognitive concerns and objective performance. Rather, reports on the PDQ were more correlated with reports of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and self-efficacy. Conclusions: Depression and poor self-efficacy can contribute to reports of cognitive difficulties. Effective treatment to improve these factors seems warranted given the impact of perceived cognitive impairment on outcomes in MS and the potential for more accurate self-reports. PMID:27551243

  2. The Design and Validation of a Parent-Report Questionnaire for Assessing the Characteristics and Quality of Early Intervention Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Gascon-Ramos, Maria; Campbell, Malcolm; Bamford, John

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns a parent-report repeat questionnaire to evaluate the quality of multiprofessional early intervention following early identification of deafness. It discusses the rationale for the design of the instrument, its theoretical underpinnings, its psychometric properties, and its usability. Results for the validity and reliability of the instrument are based on completion by 82 parents. The questionnaire is divided into four sections. “The description of the structure of professional services” demonstrated good face and content validity; the “content of intervention scale” yielded high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.88) and reliability (6-month test–retest correlations, rho = 0.88, r = .68; 12-month test–retest correlations, rho = 0.60, r = .82); the “process of intervention” scale yielded high internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.93) and high reliability on test–retest administration (6-month test–retest correlations, r = 0.64; 12 month test–retest correlations, r = .82); and the short “overall impact” questions were answered well. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire was used to control for influence of parental disposition on ratings of quality of intervention. Evaluating the goodness of fit between early intervention and parental priorities/values is discussed as a vital component in improving child and family outcomes. PMID:19617378

  3. The design and validation of a parent-report questionnaire for assessing the characteristics and quality of early intervention over time.

    PubMed

    Young, Alys; Gascon-Ramos, Maria; Campbell, Malcolm; Bamford, John

    2009-01-01

    This article concerns a parent-report repeat questionnaire to evaluate the quality of multiprofessional early intervention following early identification of deafness. It discusses the rationale for the design of the instrument, its theoretical underpinnings, its psychometric properties, and its usability. Results for the validity and reliability of the instrument are based on completion by 82 parents. The questionnaire is divided into four sections. "The description of the structure of professional services" demonstrated good face and content validity; the "content of intervention scale" yielded high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88) and reliability (6-month test-retest correlations, rho = 0.88, r = .68; 12-month test-retest correlations, rho = 0.60, r = .82); the "process of intervention" scale yielded high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.93) and high reliability on test-retest administration (6-month test-retest correlations, r = 0.64; 12 month test-retest correlations, r = .82); and the short "overall impact" questions were answered well. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire was used to control for influence of parental disposition on ratings of quality of intervention. Evaluating the goodness of fit between early intervention and parental priorities/values is discussed as a vital component in improving child and family outcomes.

  4. Reporting accuracy of population dietary sodium intake using duplicate 24 h dietary recalls and a salt questionnaire.

    PubMed

    De Keyzer, Willem; Dofková, Marcela; Lillegaard, Inger Therese L; De Maeyer, Mieke; Andersen, Lene Frost; Ruprich, Jirí; Řehůřková, Irena; Geelen, Anouk; van 't Veer, Pieter; De Henauw, Stefaan; Crispim, Sandra Patricia; de Boer, Evelien; Ocké, Marga; Slimani, Nadia; Huybrechts, Inge

    2015-02-14

    High dietary Na intake is associated with multiple health risks, making accurate assessment of population dietary Na intake critical. In the present study, reporting accuracy of dietary Na intake was evaluated by 24 h urinary Na excretion using the EPIC-Soft 24 h dietary recall (24-HDR). Participants from a subsample of the European Food Consumption Validation study (n 365; countries: Belgium, Norway and Czech Republic), aged 45-65 years, completed two 24 h urine collections and two 24-HDR. Reporting accuracy was calculated as the ratio of reported Na intake to that estimated from the urinary biomarker. A questionnaire on salt use was completed in order to assess the discretionary use of table and cooking salt. The reporting accuracy of dietary Na intake was assessed using two scenarios: (1) a salt adjustment procedure using data from the salt questionnaire; (2) without salt adjustment. Overall, reporting accuracy improved when data from the salt questionnaire were included. The mean reporting accuracy was 0·67 (95 % CI 0·62, 0·72), 0·73 (95 % CI 0·68, 0·79) and 0·79 (95 % CI 0·74, 0·85) for Belgium, Norway and Czech Republic, respectively. Reporting accuracy decreased with increasing BMI among male subjects in all the three countries. For women from Belgium and Norway, reporting accuracy was highest among those classified as obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2: 0·73, 95 % CI 0·67, 0·81 and 0·81, 95 % CI 0·77, 0·86, respectively). The findings from the present study showed considerable underestimation of dietary Na intake assessed using two 24-HDR. The questionnaire-based salt adjustment procedure improved reporting accuracy by 7-13 %. Further development of both the questionnaire and EPIC-Soft databases (e.g. inclusion of a facet to describe salt content) is necessary to estimate population dietary Na intakes accurately.

  5. Impact of Asthma Controller Medications on Clinical, Economic, and Patient-Reported Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hiangkiat; Sarawate, Chaitanya; Singer, Joseph; Elward, Kurt; Cohen, Rubin I.; Smart, Brian A.; Busk, Michael F.; Lustig, James; O'Brien, Jeana D.; Schatz, Michael

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To comprehensively evaluate clinical, economic, and patient-reported outcomes associated with various therapeutic classes of asthma controller medications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This observational study, which used administrative claims data from US commercial health plans, included patients with asthma aged 18 through 64 years who filled a prescription for at least 1 asthma controller medication from September 1, 2003, through August 31, 2005. Outcome metrics included the use of short-acting β-agonists (SABAs), the use of oral corticosteroids, inpatient (INP)/emergency department (ED) visits, and asthma-related health care costs. A subset of 5000 patients was randomly selected for a survey using the Mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire, and the Asthma Therapy Assessment Questionnaire. RESULTS: Of 56,168 eligible patients, 823 returned completed questionnaires. Compared with inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs), leukotriene modifiers (LMs) were associated with lower odds of INP/ED visits (odds ratio [OR], 0.80; P<.001), lower odds of using 6 or more SABA canisters (OR, 0.81; P<.001), and higher annual cost ($193; P<.001). In the subgroup analysis of adherent patients, LMs were associated with higher odds of INP/ED visits (OR, 1.74; P=.04), lower odds of using 6 or more SABA canisters (OR, 0.46; P<.001), and higher annual cost ($235; P<.001). Inhaled corticosteroids and LMs had a comparable impact on all patient-reported outcomes. For combination therapy, ICS plus a long-acting β-agonist consistently showed at least equivalent or better outcomes in the use of SABAs and oral corticosteroids, the risk of INP/ED visits, cost, asthma control level, quality of life, and impairment in productivity and activity. CONCLUSION: Inhaled corticosteroids were associated with a lower risk of INP/ED visits, and a lower cost if adherence was achieved. When adherence cannot be achieved, LMs may be a reasonable

  6. The Reporting of Patient-reported Outcomes in Studies of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review of 250 Articles.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Levent; Erden, Abdulsamet; Bingham, Clifton O; Gossec, Laure; Kalyoncu, Umut

    2016-07-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) provide important information regarding disease effect. The study objective was to assess the frequency of PRO use in recent RA studies and compare results with a previous systematic review (SR) in 2005-2007. An SR was performed in PubMed MEDLINE (January 2015). Publications were identified using these MEdical Subject Headings terms: "arthritis, rheumatoid" with a limitation to "humans," "all adults: 19+ years," "English," "published in the last 2 years," and "clinical trials." All studies were assessed, whatever their designs. All PRO reported in publications were classified according to general domains of health by 2 authors. Statistics were descriptive. Two hundred fifty articles were analyzed. Of them, 113 (45.2%) were randomized controlled trials; 138 different PRO were reported. The most frequent PRO, similar to the 2007 SR, were function (68.0%), pain (40.0%), patient's global assessment (49.2%), and health-related quality of life (18.4%). Fatigue (14.4%), morning stiffness (10.0%), psychological status (9.6%), productivity losses (6.4%), utility (5.2%), sleep disturbance (2.4%), and coping (2.0%) were rarely reported. Although frequent domains were reported using well-validated questionnaires, the others were reported using heterogeneous questionnaires. The PRO collected and reported in RA studies are remarkably consistent with those seen in 2005-2007, and reflect the existing RA Core Set measures. Other domains of health prioritized by patients including fatigue, psychological status, productivity losses, sleep disturbance, and coping remain rarely reported. Further, heterogeneity in outcome measures used presents challenges in interpreting true disease effect and response to therapy.

  7. Morning stiffness and other patient-reported outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sokka, T

    2011-01-01

    Morning stiffness has been recognized in traditional approaches to assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although morning stiffness is not specific to RA, changes in morning stiffness for an individual patient are helpful when monitoring health status. Health professionals can ask about morning stiffness but the most accurate and consistent approach to assessment from one visit to the next appears to be a patient self-report questionnaire. However, quantitative measures of patient-reported data are not an integral part of clinical monitoring in most clinics. No single measure is adequate for all individual patients, so quantitative measurement of patient-reported data should include many elements such as pain, functional status, fatigue, sleep, morning stiffness, work capacity, and physical and emotional well-being. In daily clinical practice, patient-reported outcomes can be collected easily using a standard questionnaire that patients can complete with pencil and paper or electronically on a touch screen in the waiting room. The results are then immediately available to the rheumatologists, to facilitate doctor-patient communication to improve the quality of patient care, leading to better patient outcomes.

  8. Correlation of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System with legacy outcomes measures in assessment of response to lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Shahgholi, L; Yost, K J; Carter, R E; Geske, J R; Hagen, C E; Amrami, K K; Diehn, F E; Kaufmann, T J; Morris, J M; Murthy, N S; Wald, J T; Thielen, K R; Kallmes, D F; Maus, T P

    2015-03-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System is a newly developed outcomes measure promulgated by the National Institutes of Health. This study compares changes in pain and physical function-related measures of this system with changes on the Numeric Rating Pain Scale, Roland Morris Disability Index, and the European Quality of Life scale 5D questionnaire in patients undergoing transformational epidural steroid injections for radicular pain. One hundred ninety-nine patients undergoing transforaminal epidural steroid injections for radicular pain were enrolled in the study. Before the procedure, they rated the intensity of their pain by using the 0-10 Numeric Rating Pain Scale, Roland Morris Disability Index, and European Quality of Life scale 5D questionnaire. Patients completed the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Physical Function, Pain Behavior, and Pain Interference short forms before transforaminal epidural steroid injections and at 3 and 6 months. Seventy and 43 subjects replied at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Spearman rank correlations were used to assess the correlation between the instruments. The minimally important differences were calculated for each measurement tool as an indicator of meaningful change. All instruments were responsive in detecting changes at 3- and 6-month follow-up (P < .0001). There was significant correlation between changes in Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System scores and legacy questionnaires from baseline to 3 months (P < .05). There were, however, no significant correlations in changes from 3 to 6 months with any of the instruments. The studied Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System domains offered responsive and correlative psychometric properties compared with legacy instruments in a population of patients undergoing transforaminal epidural steroid injections for radicular pain. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Application of Bother in patient reported outcomes instruments across cultures.

    PubMed

    Gawlicki, Mary C; McKown, Shawn M; Talbert, Matthew J; Brandt, Barbara A

    2014-02-13

    The objective of this study was to determine the applicability of the term bother, as used in Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) instruments that will be translated into foreign languages from English for the United States. Bother is versatile in English for the U.S., in that it can describe negative mental states and physical sensations, as well as social disturbances. Bother has many different meanings across cultures, due to this versatility. Alternatives for bother were explored for future PRO instrument development. A PRO instrument used to evaluate the degree of bother resulting from psoriasis was analyzed. This disease can negatively impact patients physically, emotionally and socially. Translations of bother were analyzed to determine its meaning when translated into other languages. Cognitive debriefing was conducted on psoriasis patients with the instrument containing bother. Following cognitive debriefing, a questionnaire was distributed to linguists and cognitive debriefing subjects to collect definitions of bother in each target language, and detail any difficulty with translation.To establish alternatives to bother and demonstrate the breakdown of concepts within bother, translations of the Dermatology Quality of Life Index (DLQI) were analyzed. This instrument was selected for its focus on psoriasis and use of terminology that lacks the ambiguity of bother. An analysis of back-translations revealed that bother yielded a back-translation that was conceptually different from the source 20% of the time (5/26). Analysis of alternative terminology found in the DLQI revealed much greater conceptual equivalence when translated into other languages. When developing the wording of PRO instruments, the terminology chosen should be applicable across languages to allow for international pooling and comparison of data. While all linguists and subjects of cognitive debriefing understood bother to have a negative connotation, a large variety of definitions and

  10. Application of Bother in patient reported outcomes instruments across cultures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the applicability of the term bother, as used in Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) instruments that will be translated into foreign languages from English for the United States. Bother is versatile in English for the U.S., in that it can describe negative mental states and physical sensations, as well as social disturbances. Bother has many different meanings across cultures, due to this versatility. Alternatives for bother were explored for future PRO instrument development. Methods A PRO instrument used to evaluate the degree of bother resulting from psoriasis was analyzed. This disease can negatively impact patients physically, emotionally and socially. Translations of bother were analyzed to determine its meaning when translated into other languages. Cognitive debriefing was conducted on psoriasis patients with the instrument containing bother. Following cognitive debriefing, a questionnaire was distributed to linguists and cognitive debriefing subjects to collect definitions of bother in each target language, and detail any difficulty with translation. To establish alternatives to bother and demonstrate the breakdown of concepts within bother, translations of the Dermatology Quality of Life Index (DLQI) were analyzed. This instrument was selected for its focus on psoriasis and use of terminology that lacks the ambiguity of bother. Results An analysis of back-translations revealed that bother yielded a back-translation that was conceptually different from the source 20% of the time (5/26). Analysis of alternative terminology found in the DLQI revealed much greater conceptual equivalence when translated into other languages. Conclusion When developing the wording of PRO instruments, the terminology chosen should be applicable across languages to allow for international pooling and comparison of data. While all linguists and subjects of cognitive debriefing understood bother to have a negative connotation, a

  11. [Utility of the questionnaire for quality of life EORTC-QLQ-C30 in psycho-oncological outcome research].

    PubMed

    Determann, M M; Kollenbaum, V-E; Henne-Bruns, D

    2004-01-01

    Aim of this paper is to examine the utility and validity of the questionnaire for quality of life EORTC-QLQ-C30 (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer). Data were collected within the scope of a study for evaluation of individual psycho-oncological support for inpatients with colorectal cancer undergoing surgery. The study was sponsored by the German Cancer Aid. The design was a prospective randomized controlled trial. After informed consent, patients were randomized in one of two groups: patients in the experimental group received individualized psychotherapeutic support during the hospital stay; those in the control group received a daily program of classical music. All patients were assessed one day before surgical treatment, ten days and three months after surgery. Instruments were questionnaires for quality of life and state anxiety. 106 patients met the inclusion criteria. Results show insufficient discriminative power (high significant bivariate correlations between most EORTC scales, Kendalls tau-b) and insufficient construct validity (high and significant bivariate correlations between most EORTC scales and state anxiety, Kendalls tau-b) of the EORTC scales. The scores of "cognitive functioning" and some symptom scales show an insufficient scatter. The illustration of situational influences and therefore an insufficient illustration of effects of specific interventions are connected with a high sensitivity of the scales and a tendency to extreme sores. The psycho-oncological intervention shows a significant stress reducing effect on the specific EORTC-scale "Emotional Functioning" and on State Anxiety (STAI). The testing of utility and validity of the EORTC-Questionnaire shows that they are insufficient and therefore the benefit for evaluation of specific intervention procedures is restricted.

  12. Cognitive, behavioral, and social factors are associated with bias in dietary questionnaire self-reports by schoolchildren aged 9 to 11 years.

    PubMed

    Moore, Graham F; Tapper, Katy; Moore, Laurence; Murphy, Simon

    2008-11-01

    Measuring children's dietary behavior is central to evaluating interventions and identifying predictors and outcomes of dietary behaviors. Systematic biases may obscure or inflate associations with self-reported intakes. To identify cognitive, behavioral, and social correlates of bias in children's reporting of breakfast items on a self-completion questionnaire. Cross-sectional survey. Children completed standardized tests of episodic memory, working memory, and attention, and a questionnaire assessing attitudes toward breakfast. Teachers completed a classroom behavior measure. Associations between measures and children's underreporting of breakfast foods (ie, cereals, bread, milk, fruits, sweet items, and potato chips) on a self-completion questionnaire relative to validated 24-hour recall were examined. Subjects were aged 9 to 11 years (n=678). Data were collected from 111 schools throughout Wales in 2005. A larger percentage of less-healthful breakfast items (ie, sweet snacks and potato chips) than more healthful items (ie, fruit, cereals, bread, and milk) were omitted from questionnaire self-reports. Children from lower socioeconomic status schools omitted more items than those from wealthier schools (Kruskal-Wallis H=12.51, P<0.01), with omissions twice as high for less-healthful items than for more-healthful items within the lowest socioeconomic status schools. Those with positive attitudes (H=23.85, P<0.001), better classroom behavior (H=6.26, P<0.05), and better episodic memory (H=8.42, P<0.05) omitted fewer items than those with negative attitudes, poorer behavior, and poorer episodic memory. Children who ate more items omitted more than those who ate fewer (H=47.65, P<0.001). No differences were observed in terms of attention and working memory. Episodic memory, classroom behavior, attitudes, socioeconomic status, and total items consumed are associated with bias in questionnaire self reports. Such biases have implications for examination of associations

  13. Systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures for functional performance in the lower limb.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Stephen; Brown, Susan; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    To identify psychometrically evaluated patient-reported outcome measures reflective of 'real-life' function (active and passive) for application following focal rehabilitation interventions in the lower limb after stroke or brain injury. A literature search conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Web of Science, PubMed, National Health Service National Research Register, MRC Clinical Trials directory, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Interventional study designs using patient-reported outcome measures for outcome evaluation meeting the review objective. Evaluation of the psychometric properties used the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement Instruments (COSMIN) process, by two independent reviewers reaching consensus, with adjudication by a third reviewer. One-hundred and thirteen studies were identified following initial review of the abstracts, yielding 12 outcome measures. Eight measures were identified, which were relevant to real life functional performance. These were the Brain Injury Community Rehabilitation Outcome, Climbing Stairs Questionnaire, Human Activity Profile, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, Nottingham Extended ADL Index, Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI), Sickness Impact Profile, Stroke Impact Scale. All measures addressed active function, with none evaluating passive function. The RMI met most psychometric criteria, but may have a ceiling effect for high functioning patients.

  14. [Analysis of the reliability and validity of three self-report questionnaires to assess physical activity among Spanish adolescents].

    PubMed

    Cancela Carral, José María; Lago Ballesteros, Joaquín; Ayán Pérez, Carlos; Mosquera Morono, María Belén

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the reliability and validity of the Weekly Activity Checklist (WAC), the One Week Recall (OWR), and the Godin-Shephard Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) in Spanish adolescents. A total of 78 adolescents wore a pedometer for one week, filled out the questionnaires at the end of this period and underwent a test to estimate their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). The reliability of the questionnaires was determined by means of a factor analysis. Convergent validity was obtained by comparing the questionnaires' scores against the amount of physical activity quantified by the pedometer and the VO2max reported. The questionnaires showed a weak internal consistency (WAC: α=0.59-0.78; OWR: α=0.53-0.73; GLTEQ: α=0.60). Moderate statistically significant correlations were found between the pedometer and the WAC (r=0.69; p <0.01) and the OWR (r=0.42; p <0.01), while a low statistically significant correlation was found for the GLTEQ (r=0.36; p=0.01). The estimated VO2max showed a low level of association with the WAC results (r=0.30; p <0.05), and the OWR results (r=0.29; p <0.05). When classifying the participants as active or inactive, the level of agreement with the pedometer was moderate for the WAC (k=0.46) and the OWR (r=0.44), and slight for the GLTEQ (r=0.20). Of the three questionnaires analysed, the WAC showed the best psychometric performance as it was the only one with respectable convergent validity, while sharing low reliability with the OWR and the GLTEQ. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The Discrete Emotions Questionnaire: A New Tool for Measuring State Self-Reported Emotions

    PubMed Central

    Harmon-Jones, Cindy; Bastian, Brock

    2016-01-01

    Several discrete emotions have broad theoretical and empirical importance, as shown by converging evidence from diverse areas of psychology, including facial displays, developmental behaviors, and neuroscience. However, the measurement of these states has not progressed along with theory, such that when researchers measure subjectively experienced emotions, they commonly rely on scales assessing broad dimensions of affect (positivity and negativity), rather than discrete emotions. The current manuscript presents four studies that validate a new instrument, the Discrete Emotions Questionnaire (DEQ), that is sensitive to eight distinct state emotions: anger, disgust, fear, anxiety, sadness, happiness, relaxation, and desire. Emotion theory supporting the importance of distinguishing these specific emotions is reviewed. PMID:27500829

  16. The Discrete Emotions Questionnaire: A New Tool for Measuring State Self-Reported Emotions.

    PubMed

    Harmon-Jones, Cindy; Bastian, Brock; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Several discrete emotions have broad theoretical and empirical importance, as shown by converging evidence from diverse areas of psychology, including facial displays, developmental behaviors, and neuroscience. However, the measurement of these states has not progressed along with theory, such that when researchers measure subjectively experienced emotions, they commonly rely on scales assessing broad dimensions of affect (positivity and negativity), rather than discrete emotions. The current manuscript presents four studies that validate a new instrument, the Discrete Emotions Questionnaire (DEQ), that is sensitive to eight distinct state emotions: anger, disgust, fear, anxiety, sadness, happiness, relaxation, and desire. Emotion theory supporting the importance of distinguishing these specific emotions is reviewed.

  17. Memory worries and self-reported daily forgetfulness: a psychometric evaluation of the Dutch translation of the Multifactorial Memory Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, Sieberen P; Vos, Sandra H

    2011-02-01

    The expression of memory worries and the self-reporting of daily forgetfulness easily spark discussion among sufferers and their family or friends about what is normal or abnormal forgetfulness. One way to investigate whether the reporting of forgetfulness might be excessive is to use a standardized memory questionnaire--for instance, the Multifactorial Memory Questionnaire (MMQ). The MMQ measures worries, daily forgetfulness, and memory strategy use. In this study we present a psychometric evaluation of the Dutch translation of the MMQ and provide normative data to determine the significance of individual differences in subtest scores. In addition, clinical examples are given of the use and interpretation of percentile norms and single-case statistics.

  18. The Adult Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 (RBQ-2A): A Self-Report Measure of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviours.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Sarah L; Uljarević, Mirko; Baker, Emma K; Richdale, Amanda L; Jones, Catherine R G; Leekam, Susan R

    2015-11-01

    In two studies we developed and tested a new self-report measure of restricted and repetitive behaviours (RRB) suitable for adults. In Study 1, The Repetitive Behaviours Questionnaire-2 for adults (RBQ-2A) was completed by a sample of 163 neurotypical adults. Principal components analysis revealed two components: Repetitive Motor Behaviours and Insistence on Sameness. In Study 2, the mean RBQ-2A scores of a group of adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; N = 29) were compared to an adult neurotypical group (N = 37). The ASD sample had significantly higher total and subscale scores. These results indicate that the RBQ-2A has utility as a self-report questionnaire measure of RRBs suitable for adults, with potential clinical application.

  19. Short, self-report voice symptom scales: psychometric characteristics of the voice handicap index-10 and the vocal performance questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Deary, Ian J; Webb, Alison; Mackenzie, Kenneth; Wilson, Janet A; Carding, Paul N

    2004-09-01

    Short, self-report symptom questionnaires are useful in routine clinical situations for assessing the progress of disorders and the influence of interventions. The Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) and Vocal Performance Questionnaire (VPQ) are brief self-reported assessments of voice pathology, apparently useful in the general voice clinic population. Little is known of the structure or internal consistency of either tool, nor whether they correlate. This study carried out a substantial, systematic evaluation of their performance in the Laryngology office setting. 330 adult (222 women, 108 men) voice clinic attenders completed the VHI and the VPQ. The VHI-10 and VPQ each had a large, single principal component, high internal consistency, and were highly correlated (disattenuated r=0.91). The VHI-10 and the VPQ are similar, short, convenient, internally-consistent, unidimensional tools. The total VHI-10 or VPQ score is a good overall indicator of the severity of voice disorders.

  20. Assessment of Learning Strategies: Self-Report Questionnaire or Learning Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kikas, Eve; Jõgi, Anna-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Two types of assessment instruments were developed to assess middle school students' learning strategies, and their effectiveness in predicting various learning outcomes was examined. The participants were 565 middle school students. Three subscales (rehearsal, organization, elaboration) from the "Motivated Strategies for Learning…

  1. Assessment of Learning Strategies: Self-Report Questionnaire or Learning Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kikas, Eve; Jõgi, Anna-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Two types of assessment instruments were developed to assess middle school students' learning strategies, and their effectiveness in predicting various learning outcomes was examined. The participants were 565 middle school students. Three subscales (rehearsal, organization, elaboration) from the "Motivated Strategies for Learning…

  2. Surgical Determinants of Patient-Reported Outcomes following Postmastectomy Reconstruction in Women with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, Ranjeet; Browne, John P; Gulliver-Clarke, Carmel; Pereira, Jerome; Caddy, Christopher M; van der Meulen, Jan H P; Cromwell, David A

    2017-05-01

    This national prospective cohort study compared the patient-reported outcomes of breast cancer patients undergoing postmastectomy autologous reconstruction to those who had breast implants, in terms of aesthetic appearance; levels of psychological, physical, and sexual well-being; and overall satisfaction. Of 5063 women who underwent immediate reconstruction (n = 3349) or delayed reconstruction (n = 1714) between January 1, 2008, and March 31, 2009, in England, 2923 women who gave informed consent were sent validated, procedure-specific, 18-month follow-up questionnaires. Outcome scale scores ranged from 0 (poor) to 100 (excellent); multiple linear regression was used to adjust scores for patient and treatment characteristics. Two thousand two hundred eighty-nine women (78 percent) returned completed questionnaires (immediate reconstruction, n = 1528; delayed reconstruction, n = 761). For immediate reconstruction, mean overall satisfaction scores for the various techniques ranged from 67 to 85 (median, 67 to 93). For delayed reconstruction, mean overall satisfaction scores ranged from 70 to 85 (median, 75 to 100). For both groups, similar gradients were observed for the other outcome scales across techniques. Reconstruction using patients' own tissues tended to have higher mean adjusted scores compared with those techniques using implants alone (p < 0.0001 for aesthetic appearance, psychological well-being, sexual well-being, and satisfaction with outcomes for immediate and delayed reconstruction groups). Women who underwent autologous reconstruction tended to report greater satisfaction than those who underwent implant reconstruction. These results can inform patients of the anticipated outcomes of their selected surgery, but further research is required to confirm whether autologous reconstruction is superior in general. Therapeutic, II.

  3. Psychometric properties of an innovative self-report measure: The Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults.

    PubMed

    Caballo, Vicente E; Arias, Benito; Salazar, Isabel C; Irurtia, María Jesús; Hofmann, Stefan G

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the psychometric properties of a new measure of social anxiety, the Social Anxiety Questionnaire for adults (SAQ), composed of 30 items that were developed based on participants from 16 Latin American countries, Spain, and Portugal. Two groups of participants were included in the study: a nonclinical group involving 18,133 persons and a clinical group comprising 334 patients with a diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (social phobia). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported a 5-factor structure of the questionnaire. The factors were labeled as follows: (1) Interactions with strangers, (2) Speaking in public/talking with people in authority, (3) Interactions with the opposite sex, (4) Criticism and embarrassment, and (5) Assertive expression of annoyance, disgust, or displeasure. Psychometric evidence supported the internal consistency, convergent validity, and measurement invariance of the SAQ. To facilitate clinical applications, a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis identified cut scores for men and women for each factor and for the global score. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Minimum 20 Years Long-term Clinical Outcome After Spinal Fusion and Instrumentation for Scoliosis: Comparison of the SRS-22 Patient Questionnaire With That in Nonscoliosis Group.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takahiro; Suzuki, Nobumasa; Kono, Katsuki; Ohyama, Yasumasa; Imura, Jyunya; Ato, Akihisa; Ozeki, Satoru; Nohara, Yutaka

    2015-08-15

    A retrospective minimum 20-year follow-up study using 4 standard self-administered questionnaires, one of which, the SRS-22 was also administered to control groups. To evaluate long-term postoperative pain and other clinical outcomes of scoliosis correction and fusion surgery with Harrington instrumentation using Moe square-ended rods for better preservation of sagittal alignment. Only a few long-term outcome studies have used standardized and validated self-administered tools, and no studies have established SRS-22 control data within their own population. There is no previous minimum 20-year follow-up evaluation after correction surgery preserving thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis. Of 86 consecutive patients who underwent instrumentation surgery for scoliosis by a single surgeon, 61 patients participated using Japanese Orthopaedic Association, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index, and Scoliosis Research Society (SRS-22) questionnaires and 51 patients were included in this study. Results were analyzed for pain and other clinical outcomes. A total of 771 hospital employees were sent SRS-22 questionnaires. A total of 763 responded, resulting in 2 control groups composed of nonscoliosis and untreated mild scoliosis controls of the same culture and language as the long-term follow-up group. The prevalence of continuous low back pain was about 15%. Average Japanese Orthopaedic Association, Oswestry Disability Index, and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire scores at follow-up were 25 points, 7.3%, and 1.6, respectively. The average SRS-22 scores were 4.2 (function), 4.3 (pain), 3.7 (self-image), and 3.9 (mental health) for the postoperative follow-up group compared with 4.5 (function), 4.3 (pain), 3.5 (self-image), and 3.5 (mental health) for the nonscoliosis controls. Improved preservation of normal sagittal alignment resulted in a prevalence of low back pain comparable with the age-matched general population. Moreover, SRS-22

  5. Cancer patient-reported outcomes assessment using wireless touch screen tablet computers.

    PubMed

    Stukenborg, G J; Blackhall, L; Harrison, J; Barclay, J S; Dillon, P; Davis, M A; Mallory, M; Read, P

    2014-06-01

    To assess the feasibility of collecting patient-reported outcomes data with wireless touch screen tablet computers in the adult oncology palliative care setting. Patients were provided with tablet computers during scheduled clinic visits and answered online queries about their experience over the past week in the health domains of anxiety, depression, fatigue, pain interference, physical function, instrumental social support, sleep impairment, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, dyspnea, neuropathy, and spiritual values. Content analysis of patient interviews indicates that wireless touch screen tablet computers are a feasible approach for collecting patient-reported outcome measures by palliative care cancer patients presenting in clinic. Most patients indicated that the questionnaire was easy to answer. However, all but one patient requested some form of assistance, and many reported difficulties attributable to a lack of familiarity with the device, interpretation of certain questions, and wireless connectivity-related issues. This feasibility study demonstrates that tablet computers have the potential to efficiently and reliably collect patient-reported health status measures among palliative care cancer patients presenting in clinics. The use of these devices may lead to substantial improvements by making patient-reported outcomes available for clinical decision-making.

  6. Self-report of headache in children and adolescents in Germany: possibilities and confines of questionnaire data for headache classification.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, M; Morris, L; Kröner-Herwig, B

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence rates of different types of primary headache in 9- to 14-year-old children in a population-based sample. Case definition was based on International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) criteria. The possibility of implementing these criteria within a questionnaire format, which has been regarded as problematic by some authors, was the main focus of the study. A questionnaire was sent to children and adolescents in 6400 randomly drawn families in southern Lower Saxony. Valid questionnaires were returned by 61.1% of the sample. The overall prevalence rate for tension-type headache (TTH) (criteria C and D) was 17.6% and for migraine (criteria B, C and D) 13.1%. Despite the use of abridged criteria for headache classification, 35.5% of all children reported headache that could not be classified using the ICHD criteria. The response behaviour of these children indicated that they had difficulties reporting symptoms that were defining for migraine or TTH. The classifiability of headache does not seem to be dependent on age or frequency of headache, but rather on the number of 'I don't know' answers given regarding headache characteristics. It is likely that studies reporting prevalence rates that are limited to migraine and or TTH diagnoses underestimate the true prevalence of headache in children and adolescents.

  7. Sinonasal symptom assessment by the self-reported DyNaChron questionnaire: Before or after consultation?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Rumeau, C; Felix-Ravelo, M; Nguyen-Thi, P-L; Jankowski, R

    2017-02-01

    Assessment of sinonasal symptoms on a self-reported questionnaire is thoroughly subjective, but indispensable for quantifying symptoms. The present study sought to compare responses on the DyNaChron questionnaire just before and just after consultation for chronic sinonasal dysfunction. 78 patients (mean age, 43.1±16.9 years) consulting for chronic sinonasal dysfunction took part in a prospective study, responding to the computerized version of the DyNaChron self-reported questionnaire, in a dedicated room, just before and just after medical interview and physical examination. Most patients tended to grade symptoms as less severe after consultation. Significant differences in mean score were found for nasal obstruction (difference of 0.94/10), anterior (0.40) and posterior rhinorrhea (0.26), olfactory disorder (0.65), and facial pain and headache (0.65), but not for chronic cough. Self-reported scores for chronic sinonasal dysfunction differ slightly from before to after consultation. They are therefore to be interpreted with caution, taking account of possible factors of bias. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Test-retest reliability and predictors of unreliable reporting for a sexual behavior questionnaire for U.S. men.

    PubMed

    Nyitray, Alan G; Harris, Robin B; Abalos, Andrew T; Nielson, Carrie M; Papenfuss, Mary; Giuliano, Anna R

    2010-12-01

    Accurate knowledge about human sexual behaviors is important for increasing our understanding of human sexuality; however, there have been few studies assessing the reliability of sexual behavior questionnaires designed for community samples of adult men. A test-retest reliability study was conducted on a questionnaire completed by 334 men who had been recruited in Tucson, Arizona. Reliability coefficients and refusal rates were calculated for 39 non-sexual and sexual behavior questionnaire items. Predictors of unreliable reporting for lifetime number of female sexual partners were also assessed. Refusal rates were generally low, with slightly higher refusal rates for questions related to immigration, income, the frequency of sexual intercourse with women, lifetime number of female sexual partners, and the lifetime number of male anal sex partners. Kappa and intraclass correlation coefficients were substantial or almost perfect for all non-sexual and sexual behavior items. Reliability dropped somewhat, but was still substantial, for items that asked about household income and the men's knowledge of their sexual partners' health, including abnormal Pap tests and prior sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Age and lifetime number of female sexual partners were independent predictors of unreliable reporting while years of education was inversely associated with unreliable reporting. These findings among a community sample of adult men are consistent with other test-retest reliability studies with populations of women and adolescents.

  9. Enterobacter cloacae Postsurgical Endophthalmitis: Report of a Positive Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Butikofer, Scott; Dettori, Jason M.; Vemulakonda, G. Atma; Slabaugh, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We report a positive outcome of postcataract endophthalmitis caused by Enterobacter cloacae, which has previously resulted in poor outcomes in endophthalmitis. A 67-year-old man underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery. On the morning of postoperative day (POD) #1, he had significant anterior chamber inflammation without pain, hypopyon, or vitritis but then rapidly developed hypopyon and worsening visual acuity. He underwent a tap and inject with vancomycin and ceftazidime and was prescribed topical steroids and antibiotics as well as oral levofloxacin. On POD #3, cultures of the vitreous and aqueous returned positive for E. cloacae. By POD #6, his hypopyon had resolved with improved vitritis, decreased inflammation, and visual acuity of 20/200. Two weeks after surgery, his best-corrected visual acuity was 20/60. Contrary to prior reports, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve a good outcome in cases of E. cloacae endophthalmitis treated early with appropriate antibiotics and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:23626573

  10. Patient-reported outcomes in gastroenterology: clinical and research applications.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2013-04-01

    Patient-generated reports, also known as Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs), capture the patients' illness experience in a structured format and may help bridge the gap between patients and providers. PROs measure any aspect of patient-reported health (e.g., physical, emotional or social symptoms) and can help to direct care and improve clinical outcomes. When clinicians systematically collect patient-reported data in the right place at the right time, PRO measurement can effectively aid in detection and management of conditions, improve satisfaction with care and enhance the patient-provider relationship. This review article summarizes the latest approaches to PRO measuring for clinical trials and clinical practice, with a focus on use of PROs in gastroenterology.

  11. Temporal preference in individuals reporting chronic pain: discounting of delayed pain-related and monetary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Johnson, Patrick S; Smith, Michael T; Strain, Eric C; Edwards, Robert R; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-08-01

    Opioid therapy for pain is associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders. This study's purpose was to determine the association between opioid misuse propensity (Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients in Pain-Revised) and delay discounting (DD), a behavioral process linked to substance use disorders, which quantifies the extent to which outcomes are devalued because of their delay. Participants reporting chronic pain (N = 249) answered pain and opioid use questions and then completed 4 DD tasks. Each of these tasks assessed either money or pain consequences, framed as either rewards or punishments. Each task involved hypothetical choices between immediate smaller vs delayed larger consequences. The extant Monetary Choice Questionnaire assessed DD of money rewards, and a modified version assessed discounting of money losses (immediate smaller loss vs larger delayed loss). Based on the Monetary Choice Questionnaire, the novel Pain Relief Choice Questionnaire assessed choices between an immediate short duration of pain relief vs a longer duration of pain relief. Similarly, the novel Additional Pain Choice Questionnaire assessed choices between an immediate short duration of additional pain vs a longer duration of additional pain. Discounting of both additional pain and money losses were significantly associated with high Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients in Pain-Revised scores-indicating participants at greatest risk for opioid misuse discount future punishments rather than future rewards compared with those at low risk. Measures of DD may have promise in more accurately identifying individuals at highest risk for opioid misuse during chronic opioid therapy.

  12. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures. PMID:25152661

  13. Mission Indicators of Success Outcomes Report, 2000/2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pima Community Coll., Tucson, AZ. Office of Institutional Research.

    This report on outcomes of education for Pima Community College (PCC) in Arizona discusses 10 of PCC's success indicators: (1) PCC students and employees will reflect the diversity of the community; (2) students will find the college's programs and services accessible and competitively affordable among Arizona community colleges; (3) college…

  14. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures.

  15. Student Reports of Peer Threats of Violence: Prevalence and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nekvasil, Erin K.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2012-01-01

    Authorities in education and law enforcement have recommended that schools use a threat-assessment approach to prevent violence, but there is relatively little research on characteristics and outcomes of threats among students. The current study examined student reports of threat experiences in a sample of 3,756 high school students. Approximately…

  16. Personality, Organizational Orientations and Self-Reported Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamber, David; Castka, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To identify competencies connecting personality, organizational orientations and self-reported learning outcomes (as measured by concise Likert-type scales), for individuals who are learning for their organizations. Design/methodology/approach: Five concise factor scales were constructed to represent aspects of personality. Three further…

  17. Meeting Report: Outcomes from the Undergraduate Research Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes from the undergraduate research summit held on August 2003 at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. This summit brought together an array of stakeholders from the chemistry community, ranging from those with a long history of success in undergraduate research to junior faculty members who have started on a trajectory…

  18. Meeting Report: Outcomes from the Undergraduate Research Summit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenzel, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes from the undergraduate research summit held on August 2003 at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. This summit brought together an array of stakeholders from the chemistry community, ranging from those with a long history of success in undergraduate research to junior faculty members who have started on a trajectory…

  19. Initial psychometric properties of the experiences questionnaire: validation of a self-report measure of decentering.

    PubMed

    Fresco, David M; Moore, Michael T; van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Segal, Zindel V; Ma, S Helen; Teasdale, John D; Williams, J Mark G

    2007-09-01

    Decentering is defined as the ability to observe one's thoughts and feelings as temporary, objective events in the mind, as opposed to reflections of the self that are necessarily true. The Experiences Questionnaire (EQ) was designed to measure both decentering and rumination but has not been empirically validated. The current study investigated the factor structure of the EQ in both undergraduate and clinical populations. A single, unifactorial decentering construct emerged using 2 undergraduate samples. The convergent and discriminant validity of this decentering factor was demonstrated in negative relationships with measures of depression symptoms, depressive rumination, experiential avoidance, and emotion regulation. Finally, the factor structure of the EQ was replicated in a clinical sample of individuals in remission from depression, and the decentering factor evidenced a negative relationship to concurrent levels of depression symptoms. Findings from this series of studies offer initial support for the EQ as a measure of decentering.

  20. Parenting Behavior in Mothers of Preschool Children with ASD: Development of a Self-Report Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Greet; Maljaars, Jarymke; Boonen, Hannah; van Esch, Lotte; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Noens, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Parents of young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encounter many daily challenges and often experience much stress. However, little research exists about parenting behavior among these parents. With this study, we aim to address this gap. We examined the structure and internal consistency of a questionnaire intended to measure parenting behavior among mothers of young children with ASD. Furthermore, we compared parenting behavior among mothers of young children with and without ASD between two and six years old. Factor analyses resulted in a factor solution with seven subscales of parenting behavior. Two additional subscales especially relevant for parenting preschoolers with ASD were also considered. Analyses of covariance, controlling for gender and age, showed significantly higher scores for Discipline and Stimulating the Development in the control group in comparison with the ASD group. These findings suggest that mothers of preschoolers with ASD are still trying to find strategies to guide and stimulate their child's behavior and development effectively. PMID:26605085

  1. Outcomes reported in high-impact surgical journals.

    PubMed

    Antonescu, I; Mueller, C L; Fried, G M; Vassiliou, M C; Mayo, N E; Feldman, L S

    2014-04-01

    With advances in operative technique and perioperative care, traditional endpoints such as morbidity and mortality provide an incomplete description of surgical outcomes. There is increasing emphasis on the need for patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to evaluate fully the effectiveness and quality of surgical interventions. The objective of this study was to identify the outcomes reported in clinical studies published in high-impact surgical journals and the frequency with which PROs are used. Electronic versions of material published between 2008 and 2012 in the four highest-impact non-subspecialty surgical journals (Annals of Surgery, British Journal of Surgery (BJS), Journal of the American College of Surgeons (JACS), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Surgery) were hand-searched. Clinical studies of adult patients undergoing planned abdominal, thoracic or vascular surgery were included. Reported outcomes were classified into five categories using Wilson and Cleary's conceptual model. A total of 893 articles were assessed, of which 770 were included in the analysis. Some 91·6 per cent of studies reported biological and physiological outcomes, 36·0 per cent symptoms, 13·4 per cent direct indicators of functional status, 10·6 per cent general health perception and 14·8 per cent overall quality of life (QoL). The proportion of studies with at least one PRO was 38·7 per cent overall and 73·4 per cent in BJS (P < 0·001). The proportion of studies using a formal measure of health-related QoL ranged from 8·9 per cent (JAMA Surgery) to 33·8 per cent (BJS). The predominant reporting of clinical endpoints and the inconsistent use of PROs underscore the need for further research and education to enhance the applicability of these measures in specific surgical settings. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Psychometric Performance and Responsiveness of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index in a Randomized Trial: The HomePAP Study

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Martha E.; Rosen, Carol L.; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis C.; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) specific for sleep disorders have had limited psychometric evaluation in the context of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We investigated the psychometric properties of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI). We evaluated the FOSQ and SAQLI construct and criterion validity, determined a minimally important difference, and assessed for associations of responsiveness to baseline subject characteristics and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in a RCT population. Design: Secondary analysis of data collected in a multisite RCT of home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (HomePAP trial). Participants: Individuals enrolled in the HomePAP trial (n = 335). Interventions: N/A. Measurement and Results: The FOSQ and SAQLI subscores demonstrated high reliability and criterion validity, correlating with Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Survey domains. Correlations were weaker with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Both the FOSQ and SAQLI scores improved after 3 mo with CPAP therapy. Averaging 4 h or more of CPAP use was associated with an increase in the FOSQ beyond the minimally important difference. Baseline depressive symptoms and sleepiness predicted FOSQ and SAQLI responsiveness; demographic, objective obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity and sleep habits were not predictive in linear regression. Conclusions: The Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI) are responsive to CPAP intervention, with the FOSQ being more sensitive to differences in CPAP adherence than the SAQLI. These instruments provide unique information about health outcomes beyond that provided by changes in physiological measures of OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index). Clinical Trial Information: Portable Monitoring for Diagnosis and Management of Sleep

  3. Postoperative perceived health status in adolescent following idiopathic scoliosis surgical treatment: results using the adapted French version of Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes questionnaire (SRS-22).

    PubMed

    Chaib, Y; Bachy, M; Zakine, S; Mary, P; Khouri, N; Vialle, R

    2013-06-01

    Assessing functional outcome from patient-based outcomes questionnaires are essential to the evaluation of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgical treatment At the minimum follow-up of 2 years, 45 operated on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients were mailed the French version of the Scoliosis Research Society Outcome Instrument (SRS-22) questionnaires containing items on pain, activities of daily living, and satisfaction. Mean values of the SRS-22 domains were 3,66 for the Pain domain, 3,85 for the Self-perceived image domain, 4,32 for the Function domain, 3,52 for the Mental health domain and 4,12 for the Global satisfaction with management domain. Mean value of the global SRS-22 score was 3,88. We showed no differences in functional SRS-22 health status in patients according to the type of curve (Lenke classification). We showed statistically significant correlations between the gain of Cobb angle and Patients self-image and function domain scores. There was a statistically significant correlation between preoperative Cobb angle and patient satisfaction with management. Even if Function and Self-image scores in our patients are close to control group values, indicating good short to mid-term outcome of surgical treatment, scores for pain and mental health status were significantly lower in patients than controls. Long-term follow-up studies conducted by multiple surgeons over successive generations are mandatory to assess clinical significance of these differences. Level IV. Retrospective study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment adherence of cancer patients to orally administered chemotherapy: insights from a Greek study using a self-reported questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Saratsiotou, Ioanna; Kordoni, Maria; Bakogiannis, Charalampos; Livadarou, Eleftheria; Skarlos, Dimosthenis; Kosmidis, Paris A; Razis, Evangelia

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this prospective observational study was to investigate the patterns of treatment adherence to orally administered chemotherapy of patients being treated for cancer. Patients were asked to participate in the survey during their visits to the study centers' pharmacists or doctors to obtain their oral medication from April 2008 until May 2009. The data were collected using a self-reported anonymous 7-page long questionnaire, which contained questions about their demographic profile, disease and treatment characteristics, and side-effects and adherence information, both intentional and nonintentional. 99 Patients completed the questionnaire. Missing values ranged from 1% to 8%. Unintended nonadherence to therapy was reported by 19 patients. The most important factor correlating with unintended nonadherence was the patient's belief regarding treatment effectiveness since only 16.7% of the patients believing that their treatment is effective reported nonadherence as opposed to 62.5% for those that did not believe that treatment is effective (p=0.03). Intentional nonadherence was reported by 14 patients The most important factor correlating to intentional nonadherence was time since disease diagnosis, as nonadherence was reported by 33.3% of the patients having the disease less than 6 months, compared to 16.7% for those between 6 and 24 months and 8.3% for those between 2 and 5 years (p=0.01). Greek patients seem to have similar nonadherence pattern as in other countries. Confidence in treatment efficacy appeared as a significant adherence determinant.

  5. The health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) is strongly predictive of good outcome in early diffuse scleroderma: results from an analysis of two randomized controlled trials in early diffuse scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Sultan, N; Pope, J E; Clements, P J

    2004-04-01

    Scoring poorly on the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) has recently been shown to be a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), while a good HAQ score is predictive of a better outcome. In patients presenting with early diffuse scleroderma prognosis is variable. Our goal was to determine possible baseline predictors of future good outcomes. We used the raw data from two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in early diffuse scleroderma: methotrexate (Pope et al.) and D-penicillamine (Clements et al.). Subjects in the methotrexate trial were divided into the following groups: (1) those with at least 20% improvement in the primary outcome measurements [patient global assessment, physician global assessment, UCLA skin tethering score, modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS), DLCO as % predicted and HAQ disability] at 1 yr vs (2) the others. Baseline factors (including age, gender, skin scores, physician and patient global assessments, HAQ disability and pain scores, DLCO and physical parameters) were analysed to find baseline variables strongly correlated with later improvement. These variables were explored in the D-penicillamine trial to determine if (in a separate trial) they were still predictive of improved outcome at 1 and 2 yr. Adjusted models were used to find baseline predictors of good outcome. The median HAQ-DI was 1.3 (methotrexate) and 1.0 (D-penicillamine). A baseline HAQ disability score of less than the median was predictive of at least a 20% improvement at 1 and 2 yr with odds ratios of 1.77 to 5.05, in four of the five outcome measurements (in both groups); with strongly significant P values for 3 of 5 outcomes (UCLA skin score, MRSS, patient global skin score; P<0.02) from the methotrexate study group. These three outcomes were strongly correlated with improvement (r between 0.25 and 0.35). Although data from the D-penicillamine trial were less convincing, in both trials the less than median HAQ-DI and HAQ pain scores

  6. How patient outcomes are reported in drug advertisements.

    PubMed Central

    Lexchin, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how changes in outcomes are reported in drug advertisements in medical journals. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Advertisements from a convenience sample of 38 issues of Canadian Family Physician, Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia, Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Canadian Medical Association Journal, and the New England Journal of Medicine. MAIN MESSAGE: Method of reporting changes in clinical outcomes (relative risk reduction [RRR], absolute risk reduction [ARR], number needed to treat [NNT]), name of product, and company marketing product were sought. In the 22 advertisements included in the analysis, 11 reported results as RRRs; two reported results as RRRs, but readers could calculate ARRs or NNTs from figures given in the advertisement; and nine gave no measure of results, but readers could calculate RRRs, ARRs, or NNTs from figures given. CONCLUSIONS: Most companies report changes in outcomes as RRRs, and this bias could influence the way physicians prescribe. Changes to the rules governing journal advertising and increased emphasis on critical appraisal skills would help mitigate this bias. PMID:10349065

  7. [The benefits of using patient-reported outcomes in cancer treatment: an overview].

    PubMed

    Wintner, Lisa M; Giesinger, Johannes M; Kemmler, Georg; Sztankay, Monika; Oberguggenberger, Anne; Gamper, Eva-Maria; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara; Holzner, Bernhard

    2012-05-01

    The patient's perspective evaluated by patient-reported outcomes (PROs) gains more and more importance, since treatment efficacy is no longer solely linked to clinical outcomes like cure and overall survival. Ailments like pain, fatigue and social isolation can only be assessed by patients' direct expression without any interpretation made by medical staff. PROs facilitate the disclosure of quality of life issues and patients feel a stronger support due to improved communication. PROs offer many further advantages like saving of time, cost and staff, targeted intervention and sensitizing of clinicians. Also, internationally validated questionnaires are available and the development of electronic PROs eases data-collection, calculation and storage. PROs collected within clinical routine are versatile concerning their applicability: They can be used for scientific analyses, quality assurance, and health technology assessment.

  8. Development and Validation of a Self-reported Questionnaire for Measuring Internet Search Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Wu, Lingdan; Zhou, Hongli; Xu, Jiaojing; Dong, Guangheng

    2016-01-01

    Internet search has become the most common way that people deal with issues and problems in everyday life. The wide use of Internet search has largely changed the way people search for and store information. There is a growing interest in the impact of Internet search on users’ affect, cognition, and behavior. Thus, it is essential to develop a tool to measure the changes in psychological characteristics as a result of long-term use of Internet search. The aim of this study is to develop a Questionnaire on Internet Search Dependence (QISD) and test its reliability and validity. We first proposed a preliminary structure and items of the QISD based on literature review, supplemental investigations, and interviews. And then, we assessed the psychometric properties and explored the factor structure of the initial version via exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The EFA results indicated that four dimensions of the QISD were very reliable, i.e., habitual use of Internet search, withdrawal reaction, Internet search trust, and external storage under Internet search. Finally, we tested the factor solution obtained from EFA through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The results of CFA confirmed that the four dimensions model fits the data well. In all, this study suggests that the 12-item QISD is of high reliability and validity and can serve as a preliminary tool to measure the features of Internet search dependence. PMID:28066753

  9. [Report of a study concerning carry-over in epilepsy patients: questionnaire survey of neurologists].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masako; Watanabe, Yutaka; Murata, Yoshiko; Taniguchi, Go; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey on 7,500 members of the Societas Neurologica Japonica regarding the carry-over from pediatric to adult epilepsy care. The response rate was 16.9%. Analysis of the responses showed that 46% of the neurologists were aware of the term "carry-over" in epilepsy care, and 78% felt difficulties with epilepsy care in general. The most common reasons included "not familiar with interpreting EEG" and "not familiar with the laws, regulations and medical and welfare systems specific to epilepsy". Among the neurologists who felt difficulties when accepting epilepsy patients aged 20 years or older referred from the pediatric department, 68% had experienced accepting these patients. The two major reasons for feeling difficulties when accepting these patients were "difficult to have good understanding of the disease course from infancy" and "not familiar with the epilepsy syndrome specific to infancy". The above findings highlight the importance of recognizing the existence of the issue of carry-over in adult epilepsy care and its significance, and to resolve the factors that hinder the transition of care. To achieve this goal, joint activities of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology and the Japan Epilepsy Society in collaboration with the Societas Neurologica Japonica, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology, and the Japan Neurosurgical Society are critical.

  10. Development and Validation of a Self-reported Questionnaire for Measuring Internet Search Dependence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifan; Wu, Lingdan; Zhou, Hongli; Xu, Jiaojing; Dong, Guangheng

    2016-01-01

    Internet search has become the most common way that people deal with issues and problems in everyday life. The wide use of Internet search has largely changed the way people search for and store information. There is a growing interest in the impact of Internet search on users' affect, cognition, and behavior. Thus, it is essential to develop a tool to measure the changes in psychological characteristics as a result of long-term use of Internet search. The aim of this study is to develop a Questionnaire on Internet Search Dependence (QISD) and test its reliability and validity. We first proposed a preliminary structure and items of the QISD based on literature review, supplemental investigations, and interviews. And then, we assessed the psychometric properties and explored the factor structure of the initial version via exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The EFA results indicated that four dimensions of the QISD were very reliable, i.e., habitual use of Internet search, withdrawal reaction, Internet search trust, and external storage under Internet search. Finally, we tested the factor solution obtained from EFA through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The results of CFA confirmed that the four dimensions model fits the data well. In all, this study suggests that the 12-item QISD is of high reliability and validity and can serve as a preliminary tool to measure the features of Internet search dependence.

  11. Agreement between upper respiratory diagnoses from self-report questionnaires and medical records in an occupational health setting.

    PubMed

    Weakley, Jessica; Webber, Mayris P; Ye, Fen; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Cohen, Hillel W; Hall, Charles B; Kelly, Kerry; Prezant, David J

    2014-10-01

    The Fire Department of the City of New York World Trade Center Health Program (FDNY-WTCHP) monitors and treats WTC-related illnesses through regular physical exams, self-administered health questionnaires and treatment visits, as indicated. We measured positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) of self-reported diagnoses of GERD and rhinosinusitis from the health questionnaires in relation to FDNY physician diagnoses from the medical record. Self-reported GERD had PPV and NPV of 54.0% and 95.7%, respectively; for rhinosinusitis, the PPV and NPV were 48.2% and 91.9%. These characteristics improved considerably (PPV 78.0% GERD and PPV 76.5% rhinosinusitis) in a subpopulation receiving medications from the FDNY-WTCHP. The PPV of self-reported diagnoses demonstrates only modest value in predicting physician diagnoses, although high NPVs suggest benefit in ruling out disease. In subgroups selected for their higher disease prevalence, self-reported diagnoses may be considerably more useful. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Assessment of patient-reported outcome measures in the surgical treatment of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; van der Wielen, Nicole; Joosten, Pieter J; Terwee, Caroline B; Cuesta, Miguel A; Jansma, Elise P; van der Peet, Donald L

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is responsible for 10 % of all cancer-related deaths worldwide. With improved operative techniques and neo-adjuvant therapy, survival rates are increasing. Outcomes of interest are shifting to quality of life (QOL), with many different tools available. The aim of this study was to assess which patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used to measure QOL after a gastrectomy for cancer. A comprehensive search was conducted for original articles investigating QOL after gastrectomy. Two authors independently selected relevant articles, conducted clinical appraisal and extracted data (P.J. and J.S.). Out of 3414 articles, 26 studies were included, including a total of 4690 patients. These studies included ten different PROMs, which could be divided into generic, symptom-specific and disease-specific questionnaires. The EORTC and the FACT questionnaires use an oncological overall QOL module and an organ-specific module. Only one validation study regarding the use of the EORTC after surgery for gastric cancer was available, demonstrating good psychometric properties and clinical validity. A great variety of PROMs are being used in the measurement of QOL after surgery for gastric cancer. A questionnaire with a general module along with a disease-specific module for the assessment of QOL seems most desirable, such as the EORTC and the FACT with their specific modules. Both are developed in different treatment modalities, such as in surgical patients. EORTC is the most widely used questionnaire and therefore allows for comparison of new studies to existing data. Future studies are needed to assess content validity in surgical gastric cancer patients.

  13. The Implementation of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Yoga Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alyson; Birdee, Gurjeet; Touchton-Leonard, Katharine; Bevans, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Yoga therapists are interested in knowing whether their therapeutic interventions are helpful in improving health and wellbeing in their yoga therapy clients. However, few yoga therapists use standardized, reliable, and valid questionnaires to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of their treatments. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are paper or web-based questionnaires used to assess an individual's perceptions of their symptoms and/or quality of life. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the PROMIS(®) initiative to standardize and simplify the collection of PROs in research and in clinical practice. The PROMIS(®) initiative launched a multicenter cooperative group that collected and reviewed thousands of PROs, then extensively tested them in over 20,000 research participants. The result was a web-based collection of item banks of the best questions or "items" within three domains of interest: physical, mental, and social health. These item banks are housed in the Assessment Center, a free online resource for collecting PROs.(1) Incorporating PROMIS(®) outcomes into yoga therapy streamlines and optimizes the collection of PROs by enabling access to reliable and valid questionnaires that are easy to read, simple to complete, and are available in multiple languages as well as in both adult and pediatric versions. The use of standardized PROs may improve yoga therapy implementation in healthcare and accelerate translation of clinical research by allowing yoga therapists to conduct indepth symptom assessments using tools that allow for comparisons to other therapeutic clinical and research interventions. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the development of the NIH PROMIS(®) initiative and to provide suggestions for incorporating PRO collection into yoga therapy. Important considerations to consider when implementing PROs into yoga therapy are discussed, including the choice of questionnaires and method of delivery (paper or

  14. The Implementation of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Yoga Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alyson; Birdee, Gurjeet; Touchton-Leonard, Katharine; Bevans, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Yoga therapists are interested in knowing whether their therapeutic interventions are helpful in improving health and wellbeing in their yoga therapy clients. However, few yoga therapists use standardized, reliable, and valid questionnaires to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of their treatments. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are paper or web-based questionnaires used to assess an individual's perceptions of their symptoms and/or quality of life. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched the PROMIS(®) initiative to standardize and simplify the collection of PROs in research and in clinical practice. The PROMIS(®) initiative launched a multicenter cooperative group that collected and reviewed thousands of PROs, then extensively tested them in over 20,000 research participants. The result was a web-based collection of item banks of the best questions or "items" within three domains of interest: physical, mental, and social health. These item banks are housed in the Assessment Center, a free online resource for collecting PROs.(1) Incorporating PROMIS(®) outcomes into yoga therapy streamlines and optimizes the collection of PROs by enabling access to reliable and valid questionnaires that are easy to read, simple to complete, and are available in multiple languages as well as in both adult and pediatric versions. The use of standardized PROs may improve yoga therapy implementation in healthcare and accelerate translation of clinical research by allowing yoga therapists to conduct indepth symptom assessments using tools that allow for comparisons to other therapeutic clinical and research interventions. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the development of the NIH PROMIS(®) initiative and to provide suggestions for incorporating PRO collection into yoga therapy. Important considerations to consider when implementing PROs into yoga therapy are discussed, including the choice of questionnaires and method of delivery (paper or

  15. The relationship between interviewer–respondent race match and reporting of energy intake using food frequency questionnaires in the rural South United States

    PubMed Central

    Lemacks, Jennifer L.; Huye, Holly; Rupp, Renee; Connell, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the observational study was to determine whether interviewer race influences food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) reporting accuracy in a Deep South, largely African American cohort. Methods A secondary analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of interviewer race on energy reporting of 319 African Americans who participated in the Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living intervention in May–June 2011, a community-based and USDA-funded project. Reported energy intake was compared to total energy expenditure to identify normal (ENR), under-(EUR) and over-reporters (EOR). Multivariate logistic regression models determined the relationship between race match and energy misreporting, accounting for confounding variables (educational level, health status perception, BMI, gender, and age) identified using chi-square/correlation analyses. Results The sample included 278 African Americans with 165 EURs, 26 EORs, and 87 ENRs identified. Logistic regression analyses revealed that there was no relationship between race-matched participants and EUR or EOR; controlling factors, BMI and perceived health status were significant in the model. Conclusion This study is the first to our knowledge to examine whether race influences dietary intake reporting which may influence assessment data used for comparison with health outcomes. This may have important implications for research conducted in health disparate populations, particularly rural, Southern populations. PMID:26844114

  16. The distinction of 'psychosomatogenic family types' based on parents' self reported questionnaire information: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Sofie; Grietens, Hans; Vanderfaeillie, Johan; Ceulemans, Eva; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel; Desoete, Annemie; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2014-06-01

    The theory of 'psychosomatogenic family types' is often used in treatment of somatizing adolescents. This study investigated the validity of distinguishing 'psychosomatogenic family types' based on parents' self-reported family features. The study included a Flemish general population sample of 12-year olds (n = 1428). We performed cluster analysis on 3 variables concerning parents' self-reported problems in family functioning. The distinguished clusters were examined for differences in marital problems, parental emotional problems, professional help for family members, demographics, and adolescents' somatization. Results showed the existence of 5 family types: 'chaotic family functioning,' 'average amount of family functioning problems,' 'few family functioning problems,' 'high amount of support and communication problems,' and 'high amount of sense of security problems' clusters. Membership of the 'chaotic family functioning' and 'average amount of family functioning problems' cluster was significantly associated with higher levels of somatization, compared with 'few family functioning problems' cluster membership. Among additional variables, only marital and parental emotional problems distinguished somatization relevant from non relevant clusters: parents in 'average amount of family functioning problems' and 'chaotic family functioning' clusters reported higher problems. The data showed that 'apparently perfect' or 'enmeshed' patterns of family functioning may not be assessed by means of parent report as adopted in this study. In addition, not only adolescents from 'extreme' types of family functioning may suffer from somatization. Further, professionals should be careful assuming that families in which parents report average to high amounts of family functioning problems also show different demographic characteristics.

  17. Tracking patient-reported outcomes in spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nikhil R.; Coats, John Mitchell; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Stein, Sherman C.; Malhotra, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) quantify health status from the patient's point of view. While the number of published outcomes studies grows each year, so too has the number of instruments being reported, leading to confusion on which instruments are appropriate to use for various spinal conditions. Methods: A broad search was conducted to identify commonly used PROMs in patients undergoing spinal surgery. We searched PubMed for combinations of terms related to anatomic location and a measure of patient-reported outcome in the title or text. We supplemented the search using the “related articles” feature of PubMed and by manually searching the bibliographies of selected articles. Results: Major categories of PROMs in spine surgery include health-related quality-of-life, pain, and disease-specific disability, for which several different instrument options were identified and detailed. The minimal clinically important difference varies between instruments and differentiates statistical significance from clinical significance. In addition, the accurate estimation of costs has become a challenging but intrinsically linked variable to outcomes as increased attention is paid to the relative value of surgical interventions. Conclusion: While a number of PROMs are available for tracking outcomes in spine surgery, only a handful appear to be widely used. At least one instrument from each category should be measured pre- and post-operatively to quantify treatment effect. In addition, while the primary goal is to select the most appropriate instruments for the patient's condition, one should keep in mind sustainability of efforts with regard to patient and administrative burden. PMID:26605111

  18. Patient-Reported Outcomes 1 Year After Immediate Breast Reconstruction: Results of the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Andrea L; Matros, Evan; Fine, Neil; Buchel, Edward; Gordillo, Gayle M; Hamill, Jennifer B; Kim, Hyungjin M; Qi, Ji; Albornoz, Claudia; Klassen, Anne F; Wilkins, Edwin G

    2017-08-01

    Purpose The goals of immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction are to minimize deformity and optimize quality of life as perceived by patients. We prospectively evaluated patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in women undergoing immediate implant-based or autologous reconstruction. Methods Women undergoing immediate postmastectomy reconstruction for invasive cancer and/or carcinoma in situ were enrolled at 11 sites. Women underwent implant-based or autologous tissue reconstruction. Patients completed the BREAST-Q, a condition-specific PRO measure for breast surgery patients, and Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System-29, a generic PRO measure, before and 1 year after surgery. Mean changes in PRO scores were summarized. Mixed-effects regression models were used to compare PRO scores across procedure types. Results In total, 1,632 patients (n = 1,139 implant, n = 493 autologous) were included; 1,183 (72.5%) responded to 1-year questionnaires. After analysis was controlled for baseline values, patients who underwent autologous reconstruction had greater satisfaction with their breasts than those who underwent implant-based reconstruction (difference, 6.3; P < .001), greater sexual well-being (difference, 4.5; P = .003), and greater psychosocial well-being (difference, 3.7; P = .02) at 1 year. Patients in the autologous reconstruction group had improved satisfaction with breasts (difference, 8.0; P = .002) and psychosocial well-being (difference, 4.6; P = .047) compared with preoperative baseline. Physical well-being of the chest was not fully restored in either the implant group (difference, -3.8; P = .001) or autologous group (-2.2; P = .04), nor was physical well-being of the abdomen in patients who underwent autologous reconstruction (-13.4; P < .001). Anxiety and depression were mitigated at 1 year in both groups. Compared with their baseline reports, patients who underwent implant reconstruction had decreased fatigue (difference, -1.4; P = .035

  19. The California Hospital Outcomes Project: how useful is California's report card for quality improvement?

    PubMed

    Rainwater, J A; Romano, P S; Antonius, D M

    1998-01-01

    Hospital report cards have proliferated in the 1990s but remain controversial because risk-adjusted outcomes measures are complex and have uncertain validity. Despite this controversy, little is known about their value and impact. A two-stage survey of hospital leaders in California was undertaken in September 1996 and July 1997 to explore how the 1996 reports and data from the California Hospital Outcomes Project (CHOP) were used to improve organizations' performance. In the first stage, a questionnaire was mailed to the chief executive officer of each hospital in the report. In the second stage, a stratified random sample of the respondents who indicated a willingness to provide further information was interviewed. Thirty-nine interviews were completed, representing 87% yield after replacing informants who failed to return six messages. About three-quarters of the interviewees found some aspect of the CHOP report to be useful, especially for benchmarking performance, improving ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) coding, and educating physicians about documentation and clinical pathways. The most common criticisms were that the reports were not timely and described death rates without providing practical information about the process of care. Although the 1996 CHOP reports and data were widely disseminated within hospitals, most reported uses did not directly affect the process of care for patients with acute myocardial infarction. This finding reflects two critical weaknesses of the project--nontimely data and lack of information about the process of care. Nevertheless, hospital quality managers recognize that public report cards are here to stay, and some carefully studied their outcomes data to identify areas for improvement.

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes after Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mason, M.; Metcalfe, C.; Walsh, E.; Blazeby, J.M.; Peters, T.J.; Holding, P.; Bonnington, S.; Lennon, T.; Bradshaw, L.; Cooper, D.; Herbert, P.; Howson, J.; Jones, A.; Lyons, N.; Salter, E.; Thompson, P.; Tidball, S.; Blaikie, J.; Gray, C.; Bollina, P.; Catto, J.; Doble, A.; Doherty, A.; Gillatt, D.; Kockelbergh, R.; Kynaston, H.; Paul, A.; Powell, P.; Prescott, S.; Rosario, D.J.; Rowe, E.; Davis, M.; Turner, E.L.; Martin, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Robust data on patient-reported outcome measures comparing treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer are lacking. We investigated the effects of active monitoring, radical prostatectomy, and radical radiotherapy with hormones on patient-reported outcomes. Methods We compared patient-reported outcomes among 1643 men in the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial who completed questionnaires before diagnosis, at 6 and 12 months after randomization, and annually thereafter. Patients completed validated measures that assessed urinary, bowel, and sexual function and specific effects on quality of life, anxiety and depression, and general health. Cancer-related quality of life was assessed at 5 years. Complete 6-year data were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Results The rate of questionnaire completion during follow-up was higher than 85% for most measures. Of the three treatments, prostatectomy had the greatest negative effect on sexual function and urinary continence, and although there was some recovery, these outcomes remained worse in the prostatectomy group than in the other groups throughout the trial. The negative effect of radiotherapy on sexual function was greatest at 6 months, but sexual function then recovered somewhat and was stable thereafter; radiotherapy had little effect on urinary continence. Sexual and urinary function declined gradually in the active-monitoring group. Bowel function was worse in the radiotherapy group at 6 months than in the other groups but then recovered somewhat, except for the increasing frequency of bloody stools; bowel function was unchanged in the other groups. Urinary voiding and nocturia were worse in the radiotherapy group at 6 months but then mostly recovered and were similar to the other groups after 12 months. Effects on quality of life mirrored the reported changes in function. No significant differences were observed among the groups in measures of anxiety

  1. Patient-Reported Outcomes after Monitoring, Surgery, or Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Lane, J Athene; Mason, Malcolm; Metcalfe, Chris; Walsh, Eleanor; Blazeby, Jane M; Peters, Tim J; Holding, Peter; Bonnington, Susan; Lennon, Teresa; Bradshaw, Lynne; Cooper, Deborah; Herbert, Phillipa; Howson, Joanne; Jones, Amanda; Lyons, Norma; Salter, Elizabeth; Thompson, Pauline; Tidball, Sarah; Blaikie, Jan; Gray, Catherine; Bollina, Prasad; Catto, James; Doble, Andrew; Doherty, Alan; Gillatt, David; Kockelbergh, Roger; Kynaston, Howard; Paul, Alan; Powell, Philip; Prescott, Stephen; Rosario, Derek J; Rowe, Edward; Davis, Michael; Turner, Emma L; Martin, Richard M; Neal, David E

    2016-10-13

    Background Robust data on patient-reported outcome measures comparing treatments for clinically localized prostate cancer are lacking. We investigated the effects of active monitoring, radical prostatectomy, and radical radiotherapy with hormones on patient-reported outcomes. Methods We compared patient-reported outcomes among 1643 men in the Prostate Testing for Cancer and Treatment (ProtecT) trial who completed questionnaires before diagnosis, at 6 and 12 months after randomization, and annually thereafter. Patients completed validated measures that assessed urinary, bowel, and sexual function and specific effects on quality of life, anxiety and depression, and general health. Cancer-related quality of life was assessed at 5 years. Complete 6-year data were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Results The rate of questionnaire completion during follow-up was higher than 85% for most measures. Of the three treatments, prostatectomy had the greatest negative effect on sexual function and urinary continence, and although there was some recovery, these outcomes remained worse in the prostatectomy group than in the other groups throughout the trial. The negative effect of radiotherapy on sexual function was greatest at 6 months, but sexual function then recovered somewhat and was stable thereafter; radiotherapy had little effect on urinary continence. Sexual and urinary function declined gradually in the active-monitoring group. Bowel function was worse in the radiotherapy group at 6 months than in the other groups but then recovered somewhat, except for the increasing frequency of bloody stools; bowel function was unchanged in the other groups. Urinary voiding and nocturia were worse in the radiotherapy group at 6 months but then mostly recovered and were similar to the other groups after 12 months. Effects on quality of life mirrored the reported changes in function. No significant differences were observed among the groups in measures of anxiety

  2. Freshman to Senior Year Gains Reported on the College Student Experiences Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Karen W.

    1995-01-01

    Examines differences in quality of effort and self-reported gains students make in academic and personal/social development. Results indicate that students invested more effort in writing, science applications and procedures, and college housing as freshmen, but invested more effort in the library and social interactions as seniors. (JPS)

  3. Retrospective Assessment of Behavioral Inhibition in Infants and Toddlers: Development of a Parent Report Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gensthaler, A.; Mohler, E.; Resch, F.; Paulus, F.; Schwenck, C.; Freitag, C. M.; Goth, K.

    2013-01-01

    A behaviorally inhibited temperament in early childhood has been identified as a potential risk factor for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. The purpose of our investigation was the development and evaluation of the factor structure, reliability and validity of the first retrospective parent report measure to assess behavioral…

  4. Preanesthesia Questionnaire

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask Brochures and Resources Videos AANA / Patients Pre-Anesthesia Questionnaire Page Content The information you supply below ... supplements; complementary or ... Pre-Anesthesia Questionnaire Please answer the following questions. These responses ...

  5. Patient reported outcomes in the assessment of premature ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘Patient Reported Outcome’, abbreviated as PRO, was introduced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which proposed guidance on the development and validation of PROs. Previously PROs were known as self-report diaries, event-logs, self-administered questionnaires, and clinician administered rating scales. PROs seek to capture the subjective perceptions of patients and/or partner’s related to their specific symptoms, degree of bother, efficacy of a medication or psychotherapy intervention, and quality of life issues related to a specific condition. This article reviews the essential psychometric and regulatory agency requirements in the development of PROs. The constructs of reliability, various forms of validity, sensitivity, and specificity as well as concerns with translating a PRO into a different language are reviewed. Three PROs, the Premature Ejaculation Profile (PEP), the Index of Premature Ejaculation (IPE) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) all used in the assessment of premature ejaculation (PE) are discussed. These questionnaires meet or exceed all the psychometric requirements and have been employed in clinical trials and observational studies of men with PE. The article concludes on discussing some of the limitations of PRO use and recommendations for the future. PMID:27652219

  6. Clinician-Reported Outcome Assessments of Treatment Benefit: Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcome Assessment Emerging Good Practices Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Powers, John H.; Patrick, Donald L.; Walton, Marc K.; Marquis, Patrick; Cano, Stefan; Hobart, Jeremy; Isaac, Maria; Vamvakas, Spiros; Slagle, Ashley; Molsen, Elizabeth; Burke, Laurie B.

    2017-01-01

    A clinician-reported outcome (ClinRO) assessment is a type of clinical outcome assessment (COA). ClinRO assessments, like all COAs (patient-reported, observer-reported, or performance outcome assessments), are used to 1) measure patients’ health status and 2) define end points that can be interpreted as treatment benefits of medical interventions on how patients feel, function, or survive in clinical trials. Like other COAs, ClinRO assessments can be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. A ClinRO assessment is conducted and reported by a trained health care professional and requires specialized professional training to evaluate the patient’s health status. This is the second of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment—Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. The first report provided an overview of COAs including definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement practices. This report focuses specifically on issues related to ClinRO assessments. In this report, we define three types of ClinRO assessments (readings, ratings, and clinician global assessments) and describe emerging good measurement practices in their development and evaluation. The good measurement practices include 1) defining the context of use; 2) identifying the concept of interest measured; 3) defining the intended treatment benefit on how patients feel, function, or survive reflected by the ClinRO assessment and evaluating the relationship between that intended treatment benefit and the concept of interest; 4) documenting content validity; 5) evaluating other measurement properties once content validity is established (including intra- and inter-rater reliability); 6) defining study objectives and end point(s) objectives, and defining study end points and placing study end points within the hierarchy of end points; 7) establishing interpretability in trial results; and 8) evaluating operational considerations for the implementation

  7. Favorable patient reported outcomes after penile plication for wide array of peyronie disease abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Steven J; Morey, Allen F; Adibi, Mehrad; Bagrodia, Aditya

    2013-03-01

    We present patient reported outcomes from our 5-year experience using penile plication to correct a wide variety of Peyronie disease malformations. We reviewed the records of all men who underwent penile plication for Peyronie disease, as performed by one of us (AFM). All patients were treated with tunical plication without penile degloving via a 2 cm longitudinal penile incision regardless of curvature severity or erectile function. A concomitant inflatable penile prosthesis was placed in men with refractory erectile dysfunction. A questionnaire was administered to assess the patient perception of postoperative penile curvature, length, rigidity and adequacy for intercourse. Of 154 treated patients 78 (51%) and 65 (42%) had simple (less than 60 degrees) and complex (biplanar curvature, or curvature 60 degrees or greater) malformation, respectively, while 11 (7%) underwent plication plus inflatable penile prosthesis placement. A total of 132 patients responded to the questionnaire a mean 14 months after surgery. Overall, 96% of patients reported curvature improvement after penile plication, 93% reported erection adequate for sexual intercourse and 95% considered that the overall condition improved after surgery. Despite a significant difference in the number of plication sutures (mean 10 vs 7) and curvature angle correction (mean 57 vs 30 degrees, each p <0.005), self-reported outcomes of complex cases were equivalent to those of simple cases. While 84% of patients had no measureable decrease in stretched penile length, 103 of 154 (78%) reported a perceived penile length reduction after surgery. Penile plication without degloving is effective for correcting a wide variety of Peyronie disease malformations. It can be safely combined with inflatable penile prosthesis placement. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Multicenter Analysis of Patient Reported Outcomes Following Artificial Urinary Sphincter Placement for Male Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wingate, Jonathan T; Erickson, Bradley A; Murphy, Gregory; Smith, Thomas G; Breyer, Benjamin N; Voelzke, Bryan B

    2017-09-27

    Patient-centered data regarding functional and quality of life improvements after AUS placement is lacking. We analyzed the degree of benefit from AUS placement utilizing the ISI, a validated patient reported outcome measure assessing severity and bother of urinary incontinence and the IIQ-7, a validated patient reported outcome measure assessing the impact and emotional distress of urinary incontinence. We performed a retrospective review from four participating centers in the Trauma and Urologic Reconstruction Network of Surgeons. Data were available for 51 and 45 patients who underwent AUS placement and had preoperative and postoperative ISI and IIQ-7 data, respectively. Mean age was 64.8 years. The median time from surgery to follow-up questionnaires was 8.5 months. Among the ISI, the median preoperative severity and bother scores were 24 (IQR 20, 28.5) and 6 (IQR 4, 7), respectively. The median postoperative severity and bother scores were 10 (IQR 4.5, 17) and 1 (IQR 0, 3), respectively. Improvement for each item of the ISI questionnaire was statistically significant.Among the IIQ-7, the median preoperative impact and distress scores were 9 (IQR 6, 13) and 4 (2, 6), respectively. The median postoperative impact and distress scores were 3 (IQR 0, 7) and 0 (IQR 0, 3). Improvement for each item of the IIQ-7 questionnaire was statistically significant. AUS implantation significantly reduces the severity and bother of stress urinary incontinence symptoms. Longer follow up and development of a PROM targeting male SUI is needed. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Systematic review of patient-reported outcome instruments for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish B; Halling, Katarina; Becher, Anja; Rydén, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms are best assessed using patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments. Guidance on developing well-defined and reliable instruments that capture optimal information from the patient's perspective was recently published by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and evaluate existing PRO instruments for GERD symptoms with regard to regulatory requirements. Systematic literature searches were conducted in PubMed and Embase to identify PRO instruments for GERD symptoms that have undergone psychometric evaluation. Content, construct and test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and responsiveness were evaluated in relation to regulatory recommendations. Supplementary searches were conducted to assess whether identified instruments had been used as clinical trial endpoint measures. The systematic literature searches identified 15 PRO instruments for GERD symptoms that have undergone psychometric evaluation. Eight were designed to evaluate GERD symptoms, two were to diagnose GERD, four were designed for both evaluative and diagnostic purposes, and one was designed for screening purposes. Five instruments were developed and reported to include most steps recommended by the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency, and have also been used as endpoint measures in clinical trials: the GERD Symptom Assessment Scale, the Nocturnal Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Disease Symptom Severity and Impact Questionnaire, the Reflux Questionnaire, the Reflux Disease Questionnaire, and the Proton pump inhibitor Acid Suppression Symptom test. Existing PRO instruments for GERD do not meet all the regulatory requirements for an outcome instrument in reflux trials and may need further validation.

  10. Meaningful health outcomes for paediatric neurodisability: Stakeholder prioritisation and appropriateness of patient reported outcome measures.

    PubMed

    Morris, Christopher; Janssens, Astrid; Shilling, Valerie; Allard, Amanda; Fellowes, Andrew; Tomlinson, Richard; Williams, Jane; Thompson Coon, Jo; Rogers, Morwenna; Beresford, Bryony; Green, Colin; Jenkinson, Crispin; Tennant, Alan; Logan, Stuart

    2015-06-25

    Health services are increasingly focused on measuring and monitoring outcomes, particularly those that reflect patients' priorities. To be meaningful, outcomes measured should be valued by patients and carers, be consistent with what health professionals seek to achieve, and be robust in terms of measurement properties. The aim of this study was (i) to seek a shared vision between families and clinicians regarding key aspects of health as outcomes, beyond mortality and morbidity, for children with neurodisability, and (ii) to appraise which multidimensional patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) could be used to assess salient health domains. Relevant outcomes were identified from (i) qualitative research with children and young people with neurodisability and parent carers, (ii) Delphi survey with health professionals, and (iii) systematic review of PROMs. The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health provided a common language to code aspects of health. A subset of stakeholders participated in a prioritisation meeting incorporating a Q-sorting task to discuss and rank aspects of health. A total of 33 pertinent aspects of health were identified. Fifteen stakeholders from the qualitative and Delphi studies participated in the prioritisation meeting: 3 young people, 5 parent carers, and 7 health professionals. Aspects of health that emerged as more important for families and targets for health professionals were: communication, emotional wellbeing, pain, sleep, mobility, self-care, independence, mental health, community and social life, behaviour, toileting and safety. Whilst available PROMs measure many aspects of health in the ICF, no single PROM captures all the key domains prioritised as for children and young people with neurodisability. The paucity of scales for assessing communication was notable. We propose a core suite of key outcome domains for children with neurodisability that could be used in evaluative research, audit and as

  11. Psychometric properties of self-reported questionnaires for the evaluation of symptoms and functional limitations in individuals with rotator cuff disorders: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Corinne; Desmeules, François; Dionne, Clermont E; Frémont, Pierre; MacDermid, Joy C; Roy, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    To conduct a systematic review of the psychometric properties (reliability, validity and responsiveness) of self-report questionnaires used to assess symptoms and functional limitations of individuals with rotator cuff (RC) disorders. A systematic search in three databases (Cinahl, Medline and Embase) was conducted. Data extraction and critical methodological appraisal were performed independently by three raters using structured tools, and agreement was achieved by consensus. A descriptive synthesis was performed. One-hundred and twenty articles reporting on 11 questionnaires were included. All questionnaires were highly reliable and responsive to change, and showed construct validity; seven questionnaires also shown known-group validity. The minimal detectable change ranged from 6.4% to 20.8% of total score; only two questionnaires (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon questionnaire [ASES] and Upper Limb Functional Index [ULFI]) had a measurement error below 10% of global score. Minimal clinically important differences were established for eight questionnaires, and ranged from 8% to 20% of total score. Overall, included questionnaires showed acceptable psychometric properties for individuals with RC disorders. The ASES and ULFI have the smallest absolute error of measurement, while the Western Ontario RC Index is one of the most responsive questionnaires for individuals suffering from RC disorders. All included questionnaires are reliable, valid and responsive for the evaluation of individuals with RC disorders. As all included questionnaires showed good psychometric properties for the targeted population, the choice should be made according to the purpose of the evaluation and to the construct being evaluated by the questionnaire. The WORC, a RC-specific questionnaire, appeared to be more responsive. It should therefore be used to evaluate change in time. If the evaluation is time-limited, shorter questionnaires or short versions should be considered (such as

  12. Integrating Patient Reported Outcomes With Clinical Cancer Registry Data: A Feasibility Study of the Electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes From Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) System

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Helen; Thomas, James; Newsham, Alex; Downing, Amy; Morris, Eva; Brown, Julia; Velikova, Galina; Forman, David; Wright, Penny

    2013-01-01

    Background Routine measurement of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) linked with clinical data across the patient pathway is increasingly important for informing future care planning. The innovative electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system was developed to integrate PROs, collected online at specified post-diagnostic time-points, with clinical and treatment data in cancer registries. Objective This study tested the technical and clinical feasibility of ePOCS by running the system with a sample of potentially curable breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer patients in their first 15 months post diagnosis. Methods Patients completed questionnaires comprising multiple Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) via ePOCS within 6 months (T1), and at 9 (T2) and 15 (T3) months, post diagnosis. Feasibility outcomes included system informatics performance, patient recruitment, retention, representativeness and questionnaire completion (response rate), patient feedback, and administration burden involved in running the system. Results ePOCS ran efficiently with few technical problems. Patient participation was 55.21% (636/1152) overall, although varied by approach mode, and was considerably higher among patients approached face-to-face (61.4%, 490/798) than by telephone (48.8%, 21/43) or letter (41.0%, 125/305). Older and less affluent patients were less likely to join (both P<.001). Most non-consenters (71.1%, 234/329) cited information technology reasons (ie, difficulty using a computer). Questionnaires were fully or partially completed by 85.1% (541/636) of invited participants at T1 (80 questions total), 70.0% (442/631) at T2 (102-108 questions), and 66.3% (414/624) at T3 (148-154 questions), and fully completed at all three time-points by 57.6% (344/597) of participants. Reminders (mainly via email) effectively prompted responses. The PROs were successfully linked with cancer registry data for 100% of patients (N=636). Participant feedback

  13. Integrating patient reported outcomes with clinical cancer registry data: a feasibility study of the electronic Patient-Reported Outcomes From Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Laura; Jones, Helen; Thomas, James; Newsham, Alex; Downing, Amy; Morris, Eva; Brown, Julia; Velikova, Galina; Forman, David; Wright, Penny

    2013-10-25

    Routine measurement of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) linked with clinical data across the patient pathway is increasingly important for informing future care planning. The innovative electronic Patient-reported Outcomes from Cancer Survivors (ePOCS) system was developed to integrate PROs, collected online at specified post-diagnostic time-points, with clinical and treatment data in cancer registries. This study tested the technical and clinical feasibility of ePOCS by running the system with a sample of potentially curable breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer patients in their first 15 months post diagnosis. Patients completed questionnaires comprising multiple Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) via ePOCS within 6 months (T1), and at 9 (T2) and 15 (T3) months, post diagnosis. Feasibility outcomes included system informatics performance, patient recruitment, retention, representativeness and questionnaire completion (response rate), patient feedback, and administration burden involved in running the system. ePOCS ran efficiently with few technical problems. Patient participation was 55.21% (636/1152) overall, although varied by approach mode, and was considerably higher among patients approached face-to-face (61.4%, 490/798) than by telephone (48.8%, 21/43) or letter (41.0%, 125/305). Older and less affluent patients were less likely to join (both P<.001). Most non-consenters (71.1%, 234/329) cited information technology reasons (ie, difficulty using a computer). Questionnaires were fully or partially completed by 85.1% (541/636) of invited participants at T1 (80 questions total), 70.0% (442/631) at T2 (102-108 questions), and 66.3% (414/624) at T3 (148-154 questions), and fully completed at all three time-points by 57.6% (344/597) of participants. Reminders (mainly via email) effectively prompted responses. The PROs were successfully linked with cancer registry data for 100% of patients (N=636). Participant feedback was encouraging and positive, with

  14. Self-reported non-adherence to ART and virological outcome in a multiclinic UK study.

    PubMed

    Sherr, L; Lampe, F C; Clucas, C; Johnson, M; Fisher, M; Leake Date, H; Anderson, J; Edwards, S; Smith, C J; Hill, T; Harding, R

    2010-08-01

    Adherence is of fundamental importance to ART success. We examined the association of self-reported non-adherence with demographic factors, health and behaviour issues, and virological outcome, in a multi-clinic study. Seven hundred and seventy-eight HIV patients in five clinics in London and Brighton completed a questionnaire on adherence and HIV/health issues at baseline in 2005/6. For 486 subjects taking ART, non-adherence in the past week was defined as: (A)>or=1 dose missed or taken incorrectly (wrong time/circumstances); (B)>or=1 dose missed; (C)>or=2 doses missed. Questionnaire data were matched with routine treatment and virology data for consenting subjects (61.4%). We assessed four virological outcomes in 307 of 486 patients: (i) VL>50c/mL using latest VL at the questionnaire and excluding patients starting HAART<24 weeks ago; (ii) VL>50c/mL using the first VL from 6 to 12 months post-questionnaire; (iii) any VL>50c/mL from 6 to 12 months post-questionnaire; (iv) among patients with VL<50c/mL at questionnaire, time to first subsequent VL>50c/mL over two years follow up. Non-adherence was reported by 278 (57.2%), 102 (21.0%) and 49 (10.1%) of 486 patients, for definitions A, B and C, respectively. Non-adherence declined markedly with older age, and tended to be more commonly reported by Black patients, those born outside the UK, those with greater psychological symptoms and those with suicidal thoughts. There was a weaker association with physical symptoms and no association with gender/sexuality, education, unemployment, or risk behaviour (p>0.1). In logistic regression analyses, younger age, non-UK birth and psychological variables were independent predictors of non-adherence [e.g., for non-adherence B: odds ratios (95% CI) were 0.95 (0.92, 0.98) for every year older age; 1.6 (1.0, 2.5) for non-UK born; 2.3 (1.5, 3.7) for suicidal thoughts]. Non-adherence was associated with poorer virological outcome; the most consistent association was for definition C

  15. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries.

    PubMed

    Rolfson, Ola; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-07-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA).

  16. Temporal preference in individuals reporting chronic pain: discounting of delayed pain-related and monetary outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tompkins, D. Andrew; Johnson, Patrick S.; Smith, Michael T.; Strain, Eric C.; Edwards, Robert R.; Johnson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Opioid therapy for pain is associated with an increased risk for substance use disorders (SUD). This study’s purpose was to determine the association between opioid misuse propensity (Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients in Pain-Revised; SOAPP-R) and delay discounting, a behavioral process linked to SUD which quantifies the extent to which outcomes are devalued due to their delay. Participants reporting chronic pain (PRCP N=249) answered pain and opioid use questions, and then completed four delay discounting tasks. Each of these tasks assessed either money or pain consequences, framed as either rewards or punishments. Each task involved hypothetical choices between immediate smaller vs. delayed larger consequences. The extant Monetary Choice Questionnaire (MCQ) assessed delay discounting of money rewards, and a modified version assessed discounting of money losses (immediate smaller loss vs. larger delayed loss). Based on the MCQ, the novel Pain Relief Choice Questionnaire (PRCQ) assessed choices between an immediate short duration of pain relief vs. a longer duration of pain relief. Similarly, the novel Additional Pain Choice Questionnaire (APCQ) assessed choices between an immediate short duration of additional pain vs. a longer duration of additional pain. Discounting of both additional pain and money losses were significantly associated with high SOAPP-R scores – indicating participants at greatest risk for opioid misuse discount future punishments rather than future rewards compared to those at low risk. Measures of delay discounting may have promise in more accurately identifying individuals at highest risk for opioid misuse during chronic opioid therapy. PMID:27075431

  17. Present status and self-reported diseases of the Korean atomic bomb survivors: a mail questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Jhun, Hyung-Joon; Ju, Young-Su; Kim, Jung-Bum; Kim, Jin-Kook

    2005-01-01

    Many Koreans were forced to move to Japan while Korea was occupied by Japan. Consequently, when the atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki an estimated 40,000 Koreans died and 30,000 survived. In 2004, 2,235 Koreans were registered as A-bomb survivors in South Korea. A mail questionnaire survey to evaluate the present status and self-reported diseases of the Korean survivors was conducted. In total, 1,256 questionnaires were returned and analysed. The most frequent chronic diseases reported by Korean survivors were hypertension (40.1 per cent), peptic ulcer disease (25.7 per cent), anaemia (23.3 per cent) and cataracts (23.1 per cent). The most frequent malignant diseases were stomach cancer (1.9 per cent), colon cancer (0.5 per cent) and leukaemia/multiple myeloma (0.4 per cent). This study suggests that further investigations are needed into the health concerns of the survivors and into health protection measures.

  18. Prevalence of self-reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields in a population-based questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Hillert, Lena; Berglind, Niklas; Arnetz, Bengt B; Bellander, Tom

    2002-02-01

    The prevalence of medically unexplained symptoms attributed to exposure to electromagnetic fields is still largely unknown. Previous studies have investigated reported hypersensitivity to electricity in selected groups recruited from workplaces or outpatient clinics. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of self-reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields in the general population and to describe characteristics of the group reporting such hypersensitivity with regard to demographics, other complaints, hypersensitivities, and traditional allergies. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in 1997 among 15,000 men and women between 19 and 80 years of age in Stockholm County. The response rate was 73%. One and a half percent of the respondents reported hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields. Prevalence was highest among women and in the 60- to 69-year age group. The hypersensitive group reported all symptoms, allergies, and other types of hypersensitivities included in the survey (as well as being disturbed by various factors in the home) to a significantly greater extent than the rest of the respondents. No specific symptom profile set off the hypersensitive group from the rest of the respondents. The results should be interpreted with caution. But they suggest that there is widespread concern among the general population about risks to health posed by electric and magnetic fields. More research is warranted to explore ill health among people reporting hypersensitivity to electric or magnetic fields.

  19. Can 'partial' PTSD explain differences in diagnosis of PTSD by questionnaire self-report and interview after head injury?

    PubMed

    Chalton, L D; McMillan, T M

    2009-02-01

    Can the concept of 'partial' PTSD explain the disparity between the relatively high incidence of PTSD found using self-report questionnaires and the relatively low incidence using structured interview? It was hypothesized that self-report of greater PTSD symptom severity is associated with increased heart rate and movement when responding to questions about the traumatic event, if 'partial' PTSD is an explanation. A within participants single group design. Twenty-one adults with head injury underwent self-report (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Scale) and interview (Clinical Assessment of PTSD) assessments of PTSD, the Traumatic Memory Interview, self-report of mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and cognitive assessment (Wechsler Test of Adult Reading, Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Hayling Test, Digit Symbol Test), during which heart rate and motor activity were recorded. Self-report of greater PTSD symptom severity was not associated with increases in heart rate or movement during questions about the traumatic event. In fact, heart rate decreased from baseline in those with higher self-report scores for PTSD, consistent with curiosity about the traumatic event and not 'partial' PTSD. These preliminary findings agree with an emerging theme suggesting that, although PTSD can occur after head injury, it is easily over-diagnosed.

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Tools for Collecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Children With Juvenile Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Timothy G; Becker, Brandon D; Bevans, Katherine B; Weiss, Pamela F

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the precision and construct validity of pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) instruments in a population of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and parent proxies. A convenience sample of JIA patients and parents of JIA patients completed PROMIS instruments for 8 domains: anger, anxiety, depressive symptoms, fatigue, mobility, pain interference, peer relationships, and upper-extremity function. Short form and computerized adaptive test (CAT) scores were derived from item bank responses. Raw scores were translated to standardized T scores with corresponding SEs. Discrimination between inactive versus active disease was evaluated as an indicator of each measure's construct validity. SEs were plotted to evaluate each instrument's relative precision. Patient-parent concordance was assessed using intraclass correlations (ICCs). A total of 228 patients and 223 parents participated, providing 71-78 responses per domain. Patient- and parent-reported anger, fatigue, mobility, and pain interference scores significantly differed between those with inactive and active disease. Anxiety, depressive symptoms, and peer relationships differed by disease activity levels for parent-report only. Short forms and CATs provided comparable reliability to the full item banks across the full range of each outcome. Patient-parent agreement ranged from ICC 0.3 to 0.8. CATs did not reduce the number of items for any domain compared to the short form. Precision and discriminatory abilities of PROMIS instruments depend on health domain and report type (self-report versus parent proxy-report) for children with JIA. Varying levels of patient-parent concordance reinforces the importance of considering both perspectives in comprehensive health outcomes assessments. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. The effect of implementing the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 feedback system in Norway: A multisite randomized clinical trial in a naturalistic setting.

    PubMed

    Amble, Ingunn; Gude, Tore; Stubdal, Sven; Andersen, Bror Just; Wampold, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that the monitoring of ongoing psychotherapy is of crucial importance for improving the quality of mental health care. This study investigated the effect of using the Norwegian version of the patient feedback system OQ-Analyst using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Patients from six psychiatric clinics in Southern Norway (N = 259) were randomized to feedback (FB) or no feedback (NFB). The main effect of feedback was statistical significant (p = .027), corroborating the hypothesis that feedback would improve the quality of services, although the size of the effect was small to moderate (d = 0.32). The benefits of feedback have to be considered against the costs of implementation.

  2. When Using Patient-Reported Outcomes in Clinical Practice, the Measure Matters: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Claire F.; Herman, Joseph M.; White, Sharon M.; Luber, Brandon S.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Carducci, Michael A.; Wu, Albert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are increasingly being used in clinical practice to inform individual patient management, but evidence is needed on which PROs are best suited for clinical use. Methods: This controlled trial randomly assigned patients with breast and prostate cancer undergoing treatment to complete one of three PRO measures: European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30), Supportive Care Needs Survey-Short Form (SCNS-SF34), or six domains from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Patients completed the PRO measures before clinic visits, and the results were provided to both the patient and clinician. At treatment completion, patients and clinicians completed brief feedback forms on the intervention's usefulness and value. Exit interviews were conducted with patients (at end of treatment) and clinicians (at end of study). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients in each arm who either strongly agreed or agreed to all feedback form items. Results: Of 294 eligible patients invited to participate, 224 (76%) enrolled (median age 66 years, 78% white, 72% prostate). Of the 181 patients (81%) who completed at least one feedback form item, participants in the QLQ-C30 study arm were most likely to strongly agree/agree to all items (74%) followed by PROMIS (61%) and SCNS-SF34 (52%; P = .03). Of the 116 participants (52%) who completed all feedback form items, the results were similar: 82% for the QLQ-C30, 62% for PROMIS, and 56% for SCNS-SF34 (P = .05). Clinicians did not prefer one questionnaire over the others. Conclusion: These results suggest that, when using PROs in clinical practice for patient management, the measure matters in terms of usefulness to patients. PMID:24986113

  3. Treatment of distal radioulnar joint disorders with a modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure: long-term outcome with special attention to the DASH Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Robert; Gschwentner, Martin; Arora, Rohit; Harpf, Christoph; Gabl, Markus; Pechlaner, Sigurd

    2003-07-01

    An intact distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is essential for normal functioning of the upper limb. Osteoarthritis of the DRUJ often leads to ulnar wrist pain, limitation of forearm rotation and reduced grip strength, all of which limit activities of daily living. Once the joint is damaged, salvage procedures are recommended. Between 1986 and 1996 a modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure was performed in 117 patients with painfully limited forearm rotation and osteoarthritis of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Of the 117 patients, 73 women and 32 men, whose ages at operation ranged from 22 to 74 years (average 58 years), were retrospectively reviewed clinically and radiologically 8 years (range 5-12 years) after the operation. The DASH questionnaire was used with 53 patients, 43 patients were accepted for the study, and 10 were excluded. Forearm rotation improved in all patients, ulnar wrist pain was reduced in 97% of the patients, and 9% had mild pain at the proximal ulnar stump. Grip strength improved from a preoperative mean of 38% to a postoperative mean of 55% compared with the contralateral side. The mean DASH score was 28 points (range 0-53 points). In all cases the arthrodesis fused within 8 weeks. The radiographs showed approximation between the proximal ulna stump and the radius compared with the preoperative situation in 74% of the patients. Our clinical and radiological findings suggest that the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure is indicated in symptomatic, non-reconstructable disorders of the DRUJ. The DASH questionnaire provides a general view of the functional outcome after the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure. The DASH questionnaire is very helpful in evaluating the effect of the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure on the entire upper limb.

  4. Clients' Perception of Outcome of Team-Based Prenatal and Reproductive Genetic Counseling in Serbian Service Using the Perceived Personal Control (PPC) Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Cuturilo, Goran; Vucinic, Olivera Kontic; Novakovic, Ivana; Ignjatovic, Svetlana; Mijovic, Marija; Sulovic, Nenad; Vukolic, Dusan; Komnenic, Milica; Tadic, Jasmina; Cetkovic, Aleksandar; Belic, Aleksandra; Ljubic, Aleksandar

    2016-02-01

    This is the first study in Serbia and the region of South-East Europe dedicated to clients' perception of outcome and efficiency of prenatal and reproductive genetic counseling. The primary aim of this study was to assess overall value and success of genetic counseling in prenatal and reproductive care with regard to perceived personal control of clients, reflecting also in a part patient comprehension, knowledge retention, and empowerment in decision-making. The standardized Perceived Personal Control questionnaire (PPC) was used for the assessment of 239 female participants. First, we performed a complete validation of the psychometric characteristics of the Serbian-language version of the PPC questionnaire. The validation of the questionnaire permits other researchers from Serbian-speaking regions of South-East Europe to use this standard instrument to assess the effectiveness of prenatal genetic counseling in their communities and analyze advantages and disadvantages of their counseling models. We also measured social and demographic characteristics of participants. Further, we analyzed effects of our team-based prenatal and reproductive genetic counseling model through (a) calculation of PPC scores at three different stages (before initial, after initial, and before second counseling session), and (b) by assessing participants' responses by indication for referral (advanced maternal age, abnormal biochemical screening, family history of hereditary disorders, maternal exposure to drugs, exposure to radiation, exposure to infective agents, infertility or recurrent abortions, and miscellaneous). The results indicate that participants' knowledge after initial counseling increased significantly and after that remained stable and sustainable. A satisfactory level of confidence among participants had been achieved, in that many felt an increased sense of control over their situation and emotional response to it. Indirectly, these results indicate the success of a

  5. Do people still report dreaming in black and white? An attempt to replicate a questionnaire from 1942.

    PubMed

    Schwitzgebel, Eric

    2003-02-01

    In the 1940s and 1950s many people in the United States appear to have thought they dreamed in black and white. For example, Middleton (1942) found that 70.7% of 277 college sophomores reported "rarely" or "never" seeing colors in their dreams. The present study replicated Middleton's questionnaire and found that a sample of 124 students in 2001 reported a significantly greater rate of colored dreaming than the earlier sample, with only 17.7% saying that they "rarely" or "never" see colors in their dreams. Assuming that dreams themselves have not changed over this time period, it appears that one or the other (or both) groups of respondents must be profoundly mistaken about a basic feature of their dream experiences.

  6. Do Patient-Reported Outcomes Have a Role in the Management of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Salek, M. Sam; Jones, S.; Rezaie, M.; Davies, C.; Mills, R.; Ketchell, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a rapidly growing area of expertise and the most commonly used patient-reported outcome (PRO). The impact of cystic fibrosis (CF) on HRQoL is liable to be great, making CF patients ideal candidates for the application of HRQoL instruments. The aims of this study were to assess the affect of CF on HRQoL, to ascertain the reliability and validity of the United Kingdom Sickness Impact Profile (UKSIP) and the Cystic Fibrosis Quality of Life Questionnaire (CFQoL) in the adult CF population, and to examine their role in the management of patients. Methods: Seventy participants were recruited from the All Wales Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre at Llandough Hospital, UK. There were two stages to the study: self-report of the UKSIP and CFQoL; and completion of the same two questionnaires 7–10 days later. Results: The areas of HRQoL most impaired by CF were employment and concerns regarding the future. The UKSIP and CFQoL showed high internal consistency (rα = 0.89–0.93) and test–retest reliability (rs = 0.57–0.94, p < 0.005) in the CF population. Validity was variable with the UKSIP showing discrimination across socio-demographic factors, whilst the CFQoL showed increased sensitivity to clinical variables. Many parameters influenced patient-reported HRQoL, with the greatest correlations seen with the Borg score (p < 0.005). The use of a HRQoL instrument in CF annual reviews is recommended to provide holistic patient care. The results of this study underpin the value of HRQoL as a patient-reported outcome measure in the management of adult CF. PMID:22416231

  7. A proof of principle for using adaptive testing in routine Outcome Monitoring: the efficiency of the Mood and Anxiety Symptoms Questionnaire -Anhedonic Depression CAT

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM) there is a high demand for short assessments. Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) is a promising method for efficient assessment. In this article, the efficiency of a CAT version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire, - Anhedonic Depression scale (MASQ-AD) for use in ROM was scrutinized in a simulation study. Methods The responses of a large sample of patients (N = 3,597) obtained through ROM were used. The psychometric evaluation showed that the items met the requirements for CAT. In the simulations, CATs with several measurement precision requirements were run on the item responses as if they had been collected adaptively. Results CATs employing only a small number of items gave results which, both in terms of depression measurement and criterion validity, were only marginally different from the results of a full MASQ-AD assessment. Conclusions It was concluded that CAT improved the efficiency of the MASQ-AD questionnaire very much. The strengths and limitations of the application of CAT in ROM are discussed. PMID:22233260

  8. Predictive validity of self-report questionnaires in the assessment of autism spectrum disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Sizoo, Bram B; Horwitz, E H; Teunisse, J P; Kan, C C; Vissers, Ctwm; Forceville, Ejm; Van Voorst, Ajp; Geurts, H M

    2015-10-01

    While various screening instruments for autism spectrum disorders are widely used in diagnostic assessments, their psychometric properties have not been simultaneously evaluated in the outpatient setting where these instruments are used most. In this study, we tested the Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised and two short versions of the Autism-Spectrum Quotient, the AQ-28 and AQ-10, in 210 patients referred for autism spectrum disorder assessment and in 63 controls. Of the 210 patients, 139 received an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis and 71 received another psychiatric diagnosis. The positive predictive values indicate that these tests correctly identified autism spectrum disorder patients in almost 80% of the referred cases. However, the negative predictive values suggest that only half of the referred patients without autism spectrum disorder were correctly identified. The sensitivity and specificity of each of these instruments were much lower than the values reported in the literature. In this study, the sensitivity of the Ritvo Autism Asperger Diagnostic Scale-Revised was the highest (73%), and the Autism-Spectrum Quotient short forms had the highest specificity (70% and 72%). Based on the similar area under the curve values, there is no clear preference for any of the three instruments. None of these instruments have sufficient validity to reliably predict a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder in outpatient settings.

  9. Registering initial defaulters and reporting on their treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Rusen, I D; Chiang, C-Y; Hinderaker, S G; Enarson, D A

    2009-07-01

    This Unresolved Issues article highlights three original articles that appeared last year in the Journal discussing the phenomenon of initial defaulters. There are three important challenges with patients that appear in the laboratory sputum register but are not recorded in the tuberculosis (TB) patient register: the first is how to identify these patients, trace them and get them on to treatment as soon as possible; the second is how to register and report on these cases as part of the case-finding component of TB control; and the third is whether to include these initial default patients in the cohort analysis of treatment outcomes. We recommend a step-wise approach to these challenges and advocate that these patients be included, wherever possible, in the TB patient register and in the cohort analysis of treatment outcomes.

  10. Negative Effects of Psychological Treatments: An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Negative Effects Questionnaire for Monitoring and Reporting Adverse and Unwanted Events

    PubMed Central

    Kottorp, Anders; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted during the last decades has provided increasing evidence for the use of psychological treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders and somatic complaints. However, by focusing only on the positive outcomes, less attention has been given to the potential of negative effects. Despite indications of deterioration and other adverse and unwanted events during treatment, little is known about their occurrence and characteristics. Hence, in order to facilitate research of negative effects, a new instrument for monitoring and reporting their incidence and impact was developed using a consensus among researchers, self-reports by patients, and a literature review: the Negative Effects Questionnaire. Participants were recruited via a smartphone-delivered self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder and through the media (N = 653). An exploratory factor analysis was performed, resulting in a six-factor solution with 32 items, accounting for 57.64% of the variance. The derived factors were: symptoms, quality, dependency, stigma, hopelessness, and failure. Items related to unpleasant memories, stress, and anxiety were experienced by more than one-third of the participants. Further, increased or novel symptoms, as well as lack of quality in the treatment and therapeutic relationship rendered the highest self-reported negative impact. In addition, the findings were discussed in relation to prior research and other similar instruments of adverse and unwanted events, giving credence to the items that are included. The instrument is presently available in eleven different languages and can be freely downloaded and used from www.neqscale.com. PMID:27331907

  11. Negative Effects of Psychological Treatments: An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Negative Effects Questionnaire for Monitoring and Reporting Adverse and Unwanted Events.

    PubMed

    Rozental, Alexander; Kottorp, Anders; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted during the last decades has provided increasing evidence for the use of psychological treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders and somatic complaints. However, by focusing only on the positive outcomes, less attention has been given to the potential of negative effects. Despite indications of deterioration and other adverse and unwanted events during treatment, little is known about their occurrence and characteristics. Hence, in order to facilitate research of negative effects, a new instrument for monitoring and reporting their incidence and impact was developed using a consensus among researchers, self-reports by patients, and a literature review: the Negative Effects Questionnaire. Participants were recruited via a smartphone-delivered self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder and through the media (N = 653). An exploratory factor analysis was performed, resulting in a six-factor solution with 32 items, accounting for 57.64% of the variance. The derived factors were: symptoms, quality, dependency, stigma, hopelessness, and failure. Items related to unpleasant memories, stress, and anxiety were experienced by more than one-third of the participants. Further, increased or novel symptoms, as well as lack of quality in the treatment and therapeutic relationship rendered the highest self-reported negative impact. In addition, the findings were discussed in relation to prior research and other similar instruments of adverse and unwanted events, giving credence to the items that are included. The instrument is presently available in eleven different languages and can be freely downloaded and used from www.neqscale.com.

  12. Development of the PMPQ: A Structural Job Analysis Questionnaire for the Study of Professional and Managerial Positions. PMPQ Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jimmy L.; McCormick, Ernest J.

    The development and analysis of the Professional and Managerial Position Questionnaire (PMPQ) is reported. PMPQ is intended to serve as a job analysis instrument for higher level occupations than those assessed by the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ). Four approaches to job analysis are described with different emphases on the requirements of…

  13. A proposed set of metrics for standardized outcome reporting in the management of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Clement, R Carter; Welander, Adina; Stowell, Caleb; Cha, Thomas D; Chen, John L; Davies, Michelle; Fairbank, Jeremy C; Foley, Kevin T; Gehrchen, Martin; Hagg, Olle; Jacobs, Wilco C; Kahler, Richard; Khan, Safdar N; Lieberman, Isador H; Morisson, Beth; Ohnmeiss, Donna D; Peul, Wilco C; Shonnard, Neal H; Smuck, Matthew W; Solberg, Tore K; Stromqvist, Bjorn H; Hooff, Miranda L Van; Wasan, Ajay D; Willems, Paul C; Yeo, William; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Outcome measurement has been shown to improve performance in several fields of healthcare. This understanding has driven a growing interest in value-based healthcare, where value is defined as outcomes achieved per money spent. While low back pain (LBP) constitutes an enormous burden of disease, no universal set of metrics has yet been accepted to measure and compare outcomes. Here, we aim to define such a set. An international group of 22 specialists in several disciplines of spine care was assembled to review literature and select LBP outcome metrics through a 6-round modified Delphi process. The scope of the outcome set was degenerative lumbar conditions. Patient-reported metrics include numerical pain scales, lumbar-related function using the Oswestry disability index, health-related quality of life using the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, and questions assessing work status and analgesic use. Specific common and serious complications are included. Recommended follow-up intervals include 6, 12, and 24 months after initiating treatment, with optional follow-up at 3 months and 5 years. Metrics for risk stratification are selected based on pre-existing tools. The outcome measures recommended here are structured around specific etiologies of LBP, span a patient's entire cycle of care, and allow for risk adjustment. Thus, when implemented, this set can be expected to facilitate meaningful comparisons and ultimately provide a continuous feedback loop, enabling ongoing improvements in quality of care. Much work lies ahead in implementation, revision, and validation of this set, but it is an essential first step toward establishing a community of LBP providers focused on maximizing the value of the care we deliver.

  14. A proposed set of metrics for standardized outcome reporting in the management of low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Clement, R Carter; Welander, Adina; Stowell, Caleb; Cha, Thomas D; Chen, John L; Davies, Michelle; Fairbank, Jeremy C; Foley, Kevin T; Gehrchen, Martin; Hagg, Olle; Jacobs, Wilco C; Kahler, Richard; Khan, Safdar N; Lieberman, Isador H; Morisson, Beth; Ohnmeiss, Donna D; Peul, Wilco C; Shonnard, Neal H; Smuck, Matthew W; Solberg, Tore K; Stromqvist, Bjorn H; Hooff, Miranda L Van; Wasan, Ajay D; Willems, Paul C; Yeo, William; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Outcome measurement has been shown to improve performance in several fields of healthcare. This understanding has driven a growing interest in value-based healthcare, where value is defined as outcomes achieved per money spent. While low back pain (LBP) constitutes an enormous burden of disease, no universal set of metrics has yet been accepted to measure and compare outcomes. Here, we aim to define such a set. Patients and methods An international group of 22 specialists in several disciplines of spine care was assembled to review literature and select LBP outcome metrics through a 6-round modified Delphi process. The scope of the outcome set was degenerative lumbar conditions. Results Patient-reported metrics include numerical pain scales, lumbar-related function using the Oswestry disability index, health-related quality of life using the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire, and questions assessing work status and analgesic use. Specific common and serious complications are included. Recommended follow-up intervals include 6, 12, and 24 months after initiating treatment, with optional follow-up at 3 months and 5 years. Metrics for risk stratification are selected based on pre-existing tools. Interpretation The outcome measures recommended here are structured around specific etiologies of LBP, span a patient’s entire cycle of care, and allow for risk adjustment. Thus, when implemented, this set can be expected to facilitate meaningful comparisons and ultimately provide a continuous feedback loop, enabling ongoing improvements in quality of care. Much work lies ahead in implementation, revision, and validation of this set, but it is an essential first step toward establishing a community of LBP providers focused on maximizing the value of the care we deliver. PMID:25828191

  15. Research Priorities for Optimal Use of Patient-reported Outcomes in Quality and Outcome Improvement for Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Patricia D

    2017-02-01

    The national Functional and Outcomes Research for Comparative Effectiveness in Total Joint Replacement program routinely collects pre- and postoperative patient-reported outcomes for clinicians to use when making individual patient treatment decisions and monitoring aggregate quality of care and outcomes. When the pre-post gains in pain or function at one site vary from the national norms, the next question is, "how do we improve?" This paper will use the traditional quality management's framework of inputs (patients), processes (clinical care), and outcomes to outline priority research questions to learn how clinicians, hospital managers, and patients can interpret patient-reported outcomes to improve total knee arthroplasty care and outcomes. In summary, research should identify best practices to minimize variation in a patient's health status before surgery, tailor peri-total knee arthroplasty care pathways to match individual patient risks to optimize safe care, and implement patient-reported measures to document optimal outcomes.

  16. Validation of the self-reporting questionnaire (SRQ 20) in British Pakistani and White European population in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Husain, Nusrat; Chaudhry, Nasim; Rhouma, Abdulhakim; Sumra, Altaf; Tomenson, Barbara; Waheed, Waquas

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of depression is difficult to determine because of low clinical depression detection rates in the primary care setting. This low level of detection is a significantly greater problem in people from ethnic minority communities. The availability of culturally validated screening questionnaires might help to improve the detection and treatment of depression. The aim of the study was to assess the validity of the self-reporting questionnaire SRQ 20, (English and Urdu versions) in white Europeans and British Pakistanis and to determine the optimum cut-off scores for detecting depression. Validation of the English and Urdu versions of the SRQ was conducted with a sample of white Europeans and British Pakistani participants. The semi-structured Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) was used as the gold standard diagnostic interview, and receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate SRQ test performance. The SRQ was completed by 1856 participants out of whom 651 completed the SCAN interview. The SRQ sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values versus SCAN indicated a cut-off score of 7 as optimum for white Europeans and a cut-off score of 6 for British Pakistanis. This study focused on depression alone and did not take into consideration comorbid conditions such as anxiety which might have affected the way respondents answered the questions and contributed to comparatively lower optimum cut-off scores in British Pakistanis. The findings of this validation study provide evidence for high sensitivity and specificity of SRQ amongst both white Europeans and British Pakistanis. The SRQ can be used as a routine screening questionnaire for depression in English and Urdu speaking populations in the UK. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessment of proximal outcomes of self-management programs: translation and psychometric evaluation of a German version of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ™).

    PubMed

    Schuler, Michael; Musekamp, Gunda; Faller, Hermann; Ehlebracht-König, Inge; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Kirchhof, Roland; Bengel, Jürgen; Nolte, Sandra; Osborne, Richard H; Schwarze, Monika

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the translation, cultural adaption, and psychometric evaluation of a German version of the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ™), a widely used generic instrument assessing a wide range of proximal outcomes of self-management programs. The translation was carried out according to international standards and included forward and backward translations. Comprehensibility and content validity were tested using cognitive interviews with 10 rehabilitation inpatients. Psychometric properties were examined in rehabilitation inpatients (n = 1,202) with a range of chronic conditions. Factorial validity was assessed using confirmatory factor analysis; concurrent validity was explored by correlations with comparator scales. The items of the German heiQ™ were well understood by rehabilitation inpatients. The structure of the eight heiQ™ scales was replicated after minor adjustment. heiQ™ scales had higher correlations with comparator scales with similar constructs, particularly mental health concepts than with physical health. Moreover, all heiQ™ scales differentiated between individuals across different levels of depression. The German heiQ™ is comprehensible for German-speaking patients suffering from different types of chronic conditions; it assesses relevant outcomes of self-management programs in a reliable and valid manner. Further studies involving its practical application are warranted.

  18. The McGill Pain Questionnaire in Amharic: Zwai Health Center patients' reports on the experience of pain.

    PubMed

    Aboud, Frances E; Hiwot, Mismay G; Arega, Adefris; Molla, Mesfin; Samson, S; Seyoum, Nebyou; Ressom, Shewangizaw; Worku, Solomon; Mulatu, Mesfin; Egale, Tewedros

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents for the first time an Amharic translation of the McGill Pain Questionnaire developed by Melzack and used in many countries around the world. It allows for a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the intensity, location, and nature of experienced pain, as well as conditions that relieve pain. Data collected from one hundred patients attending the Zwai Health Center indicated that 81% reported pain at the time, one-quarter of whom were in severe pain. The most commonly chosen descriptors were: burning, stabbing, sore, gnawing, aching, and cramping. Descriptors were often associated with certain diagnoses: burning with gastrointestinal problems, stabbing with respiratory diseases, and gnawing or aching with myalgia/neuralgia. Approximately 40% of those in pain had previously sought relief from a clinic or pharmacy and were attending the center because the pain persisted. Analgesics were more likely to be prescribed for those in mild pain, while other medication without analgesics were prescribed for those in severe pain. The McGill Pain Questionnaire--Amharic (MPQ-Am) could be a useful tool for future studies of illness-specific pain, and of the effectiveness of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical strategies for pain management.

  19. Whose quality of life? Ethical implications in patient-reported health outcome measurement.

    PubMed

    Hagell, Peter; Reimer, Jan; Nyberg, Per

    2009-06-01

    Patient-reported health status questionnaires intend to assess illness and therapy from the patients' perspective. To provide fair and valid assessments, they should be equally relevant to major subsets of respondents. Furthermore, disease-specific measures are assumed to be perceived as more relevant than generic ones. This study assessed these assumptions among people with Parkinson's disease. Cross-sectional data from 202 people with Parkinson's disease (54% men; mean age, 70) were analyzed regarding patient-rated relevance and predictors of patient-rated poor relevance of two generic [the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP)] and one disease-specific [Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39)] health status questionnaire. There were no differences in relevance ratings across the questionnaires. Poorer overall quality of life [odds ratio (OR), 2.459] and mental health (OR, 1.023) were associated with poorer patient-rated relevance of the SF-36, and higher age was associated with poorer patient-rated relevance of the PDQ-39 (OR, 1.040). No significant predictors were found for the NHP. The PDQ-39 failed to meet the assumption that disease-specific scales are more relevant than generic ones. Nevertheless, the most important implication of this study is an ethical one. Because the relevance of the SF-36 and PDQ-39 is perceived as poorer by those who fare least well and by older people, these scales may not reflect the perspectives of these groups. This challenges bioethical principles and threatens scientific validity. Perceived relevance of patient-centered outcomes needs to be considered, or the voice of vulnerable groups may be silenced, fair inferences prohibited, and opportunities for improved care lost.

  20. Outcomes of ptosis surgery assessed using a patient-reported outcome measure: an exploration of time effects.

    PubMed

    Mahroo, Omar A; Hysi, Pirro G; Dey, Sarju; Gavin, Elizabeth A; Hammond, Christopher J; Jones, Carole A

    2014-03-01

    To explore effects of time following ptosis surgery on patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), a validated, postinterventional questionnaire was administered to consecutive adults undergoing ptosis surgery on the operating list of one surgeon over a 30-month period. Patients who were not contactable or unable to provide answers were excluded. Mean scores of patients grouped by time since surgery were compared (unpaired t test and Westlake intervals to test equivalence). Of 63 consecutive patients, 50 (79%) were included. Mean age was 63 years. Mean time since surgery was 561 days (range 21-973). There was no significant difference in mean total scores of patients assessed less than 18 months since surgery compared with those assessed later (p=0.544). Distributions of total scores were similar. No significant differences were found for subscores or when patients were divided into three groups according to time after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression revealed no significant effect of time since surgery. Trends were seen with regard to age and type of operation, but did not reach significance. Patient-perceived benefit following ptosis surgery shows stability with time, as assessed using the GBI. Future studies could explore correlations with age and type of surgery.

  1. Content and Construct Validity, Reliability, and Responsiveness of the Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare Questionnaire: OMERACT 2016 Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Susan J; Barbic, Skye P; Bykerk, Vivian P; Choy, Ernest H; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; den Broeder, Alfons; Fautrel, Bruno; Furst, Daniel E; Guillemin, Francis; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye L; Lyddiatt, Anne; March, Lyn; Montie, Pamela; Pohl, Christoph; Scholte Voshaar, Marieke; Woodworth, Thasia G; Bingham, Clifton O

    2017-08-15

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Group was established to develop a reliable way to identify and measure RA flares in randomized controlled trials (RCT). Here, we summarized the development and field testing of the RA Flare Questionnaire (RA-FQ), and the voting results at OMERACT 2016. Classic and modern psychometric methods were used to assess reliability, validity, sensitivity, factor structure, scoring, and thresholds. Interviews with patients and clinicians also assessed content validity, utility, and meaningfulness of RA-FQ scores. People with RA in observational trials in Canada (n = 896) and France (n = 138), and an RCT in the Netherlands (n = 178) completed 5 items (11-point numerical rating scale) representing RA Flare core domains. There was moderate to high evidence of reliability, content and construct validity, and responsiveness. Factor analysis supported unidimensionality. Rasch analysis showed acceptable fit to the Rasch model, with items and people covering a broad measurement continuum and evidence of appropriate targeting of items to people, ordered thresholds, minimal differential item functioning by language, sex, or age. A summative score across items is defensible, yielding an interval score (0-50) where higher scores reflect worsening flare. The RA-FQ received endorsement from 88% of attendees that it passed the OMERACT Filter 2.0 "Eyeball Test" for instrument selection. The RA-FQ has been developed to identify and measure RA flares. Its review through OMERACT Filter 2.0 shows evidence of reliability, content and construct validity, and responsiveness. These properties merit its further validation as an outcome for clinical trials.

  2. Psychometric performance and responsiveness of the functional outcomes of sleep questionnaire and sleep apnea quality of life instrument in a randomized trial: the HomePAP study.

    PubMed

    Billings, Martha E; Rosen, Carol L; Auckley, Dennis; Benca, Ruth; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Iber, Conrad; Zee, Phyllis C; Redline, Susan; Kapur, Vishesh K

    2014-12-01

    Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQL) specific for sleep disorders have had limited psychometric evaluation in the context of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We investigated the psychometric properties of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Instrument (SAQLI). We evaluated the FOSQ and SAQLI construct and criterion validity, determined a minimally important difference, and assessed for associations of responsiveness to baseline subject characteristics and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in a RCT population. Secondary analysis of data collected in a multisite RCT of home versus laboratory-based diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (HomePAP trial). Individuals enrolled in the HomePAP trial (n = 335). N/A. The FOSQ and SAQLI subscores demonstrated high reliability and criterion validity, correlating with Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Survey domains. Correlations were weaker with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Both the FOSQ and SAQLI scores improved after 3 mo with CPAP therapy. Averaging 4 h or more of CPAP use was associated with an increase in the FOSQ beyond the minimally important difference. Baseline depressive symptoms and sleepiness predicted FOSQ and SAQLI responsiveness; demographic, objective obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity and sleep habits were not predictive in linear regression. The FOSQ and SAQLI are responsive to CPAP intervention, with the FOSQ being more sensitive to differences in CPAP adherence than the SAQLI. These instruments provide unique information about health outcomes beyond that provided by changes in physiological measures of OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index). Portable Monitoring for Diagnosis and Management of Sleep Apnea (HomePAP) URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00642486. NIH clinical trials registry number: NCT00642486. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  4. A new internet-based tool for reporting and analysing patient-reported outcomes and the feasibility of repeated data collection from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Brochmann, Nana; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Kjerholt, Mette; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard

    2016-04-01

    An Internet-based tool for reporting and analysing patient-reported outcomes (PROs) has been developed. The tool enables merging PROs with blood test results and allows for computation of treatment responses. Data may be visualized by graphical analysis and may be exported for downstream statistical processing. The aim of this study was to investigate, whether patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) were willing and able to use the tool and fill out questionnaires regularly. Participants were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Haematology, Roskilde University Hospital, Denmark. Validated questionnaires that were used were European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30, Myeloproliferative Neoplasm Symptom Assessment Form, Brief Fatigue Inventory and Short Form 36 Health Survey. Questionnaires were filled out ≥ 6 months online or on paper according to participant preference. Regularity of questionnaire submission was investigated, and participant acceptance was evaluated by focus-group interviews. Of 135 invited patients, 118 (87 %) accepted participation. One hundred and seven participants (91 %) preferred to use the Internet-based tool. Of the 118 enrolled participants, 104 (88 %) submitted PROs regularly ≥ 6 months. The focus-group interviews revealed that the Internet-based tool was well accepted. The Internet-based approach and regular collection of PROs are well accepted with a high participation rate, persistency and adherence in a population of MPN patients. The plasticity of the platform allows for adaptation to patients with other medical conditions.

  5. PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOMES (PROs): PUTTING THE PATIENT PERSPECTIVE IN PATIENT-CENTERED OUTCOMES RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Claire F.; Jensen, Roxanne E.; Segal, Jodi B.; Wu, Albert W.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) aims to improve care quality and patient outcomes by providing information that patients, clinicians, and family members need regarding treatment alternatives, and emphasizing patient input to inform the research process. PCOR capitalizes on available data sources and generates new evidence to provide timely and relevant information and can be conducted using prospective data collection, disease registries, electronic medical records, aggregated results from prior research, and administrative claims. Given PCOR’s emphasis on the patient perspective, methods to incorporate patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are critical. PROs are defined by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration as “Any report coming directly from patients… about a health condition and its treatment.” However, PROs have not routinely been collected in a way that facilitates their use in PCOR. Electronic medical records, disease registries, and administrative data have only rarely collected, or been linked to, PROs. Recent technological developments facilitate the electronic collection of PROs and linkage of PRO data, offering new opportunities for putting the patient perspective in PCOR. This paper describes the importance of and methods for using PROs for PCOR. We (1) define PROs; (2) identify how PROs can be used in PCOR, and the critical role of electronic data methods for facilitating the use of PRO data in PCOR; (3) outline the challenges and key unanswered questions that need to be addressed for the routine use of PROs in PCOR; and (4) discuss policy and research interventions to accelerate the integration of PROs with clinical data. PMID:23774513

  6. Designing of Intelligent Multilingual Patient Reported Outcome System (IMPROS)

    PubMed Central

    Pourasghar, Faramarz; Partovi, Yeganeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: By self-reporting outcome procedure the patients themselves record disease symptoms outside medical centers and then report them to medical staff in specific periods of time. One of the self-reporting methods is the application of interactive voice response (IVR), in which some pre-designed questions in the form of voice tracks would be played and then the caller responses the questions by pressing phone’s keypad bottoms. Aim: The present research explains the main framework of such system designing according to IVR technology that is for the first time designed and administered in Iran. Methods: Interactive Voice Response system was composed by two main parts of hardware and software. Hardware section includes one or several digital phone lines, a modem card with voice playing capability and a PC. IVR software on the other hand, acts as an intelligent control center, records call information and controls incoming data. Results: One of the main features of the system is its capability to be administered in common PCs, utilizing simple and cheap modems, high speed to take responses and it’s appropriateness to low literate patients. The system is applicable for monitoring chronic diseases, cancer and also in psychological diseases and can be suitable for taking care of elders and Children who require long term cares. Other features include user-friendly, decrease in direct and indirect costs of disease treatment and enjoying from high level of security to access patients’ profiles. Conclusions: Intelligent multilingual patient reported outcome system (IMPROS) by controlling diseases gives the opportunity to patients to have more participation during treatment and it improves mutual interaction between patient and medical staff. Moreover it increases the quality of medical services, Additional to empowering patients and their followers. PMID:26635441

  7. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

    PubMed Central

    Cella, David; Yount, Susan; Rothrock, Nan; Gershon, Richard; Cook, Karon; Reeve, Bryce; Ader, Deborah; Fries, James F.; Bruce, Bonnie; Rose, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Roadmap initiative (www.nihpromis.org) is a 5-year cooperative group program of research designed to develop, validate, and standardize item banks to measure patient-reported outcomes (PROs) relevant across common medical conditions. In this article, we will summarize the organization and scientific activity of the PROMIS network during its first 2 years. Design The network consists of 6 primary research sites (PRSs), a statistical coordinating center (SCC), and NIH research scientists. Governed by a steering committee, the network is organized into functional subcommittees and working groups. In the first year, we created an item library and activated 3 interacting protocols: Domain Mapping, Archival Data Analysis, and Qualitative Item Review (QIR). In the second year, we developed and initiated testing of item banks covering 5 broad domains of self-reported health. Results The domain mapping process is built on the World Health Organization (WHO) framework of physical, mental, and social health. From this framework, pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical functioning, social role participation, and global health perceptions were selected for the first wave of testing. Item response theory (IRT)-based analysis of 11 large datasets supplemented and informed item-level qualitative review of nearly 7000 items from available PRO measures in the item library. Items were selected for rewriting or creation with further detailed review before the first round of testing in the general population and target patient populations. Conclusions The NIH PROMIS network derived a consensus-based framework for self-reported health, systematically reviewed available instruments and datasets that address the initial PROMIS domains. Qualitative item research led to the first wave of network testing which began in the second year. PMID:17443116

  8. Patient reported outcomes and patient empowerment in clinical genetics services.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M; Dearing, A

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of clinical genetics services (CGS), including genetic counseling and genetic testing, has been problematic. Patient mortality and morbidity are unlikely to be directly improved by interventions offered in CGS. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are not routinely measured in CGS evaluation, but this may change as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) become a key part of how healthcare services are managed and funded across the world. However, there is no clear consensus about which PROMs are most useful for CGS evaluation. This review summarizes the published research on how PROs from CGS have been measured and how patients may benefit from using those services, with a focus on patient empowerment. Many patient benefits (PROs) identified repeatedly in the research literature can be re-interpreted within a patient empowerment framework. Other important PROs identified include family functioning, social functioning, altruism, sense of purpose, enabling development of future research and treatment/participating in research. Well-validated measures are available to capture (dimensions of) patient empowerment. Although generic measures of family functioning are available, suitable measures capturing social functioning, development of future treatments, and altruism were not identified in this review. Patient empowerment provides one useful approach to measuring PROs from CGS.

  9. Clinical validity of the Me and My School questionnaire: a self-report mental health measure for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Patalay, Praveetha; Deighton, Jessica; Fonagy, Peter; Vostanis, Panos; Wolpert, Miranda

    2014-01-01

    The Me and My School Questionnaire (M&MS) is a self-report measure for children aged eight years and above that measures emotional difficulties and behavioural difficulties, and has been previously validated in a community sample. The present study aimed to assess its clinical sensitivity to justify its utility as a screening tool in schools. Data were collected from service-users (n = 91, 8-15 years) and accompanying parent/carer in outpatient mental health services in England. A matched community sample (N = 91) were used to assess the measure's ability to discriminate between low- and high-risk samples. Receiver operating curves (area under the curve, emotional difficulties = .79; behavioural difficulties = .78), mean comparisons (effect size, emotional difficulties d = 1.17, behavioural difficulties = 1.12) and proportions above clinical thresholds indicate that the measure satisfactorily discriminates between the samples. The scales have good internal reliability (emotional difficulties α = .84; behavioural difficulties α = .82) and cross-informant agreement with parent-reported symptoms is comparable to existing measures (r = .30). The findings of this study indicate that the M&MS sufficiently discriminates between high-risk (clinic) and low-risk (community) samples, has good internal reliability, compares favourably with existing self-report measures of mental health and has comparable levels of agreement between parent-report and self-report to other measures. Alongside existing validation of the M&MS, these findings justify the measures use as a self-report screening tool for mental health problems in community settings for children aged as young as 8 years.

  10. Patient-reported outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Kirtane, Kedar; Walter, Roland B; Lee, Stephanie J; Lyman, Gary H

    2017-09-01

    Outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia remain poor, and treatment decisions must consider not just quantity, but also quality of life (QOL). We conducted a systematic review of studies in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome that incorporated patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures. PubMed and PsycINFO were searched for articles published from January 2000 through June 2016. Forty-one were relevant for our review with more published in recent years. There was considerable inter-study heterogeneity in which instruments were used, and many studies employed multiple (often overlapping) instruments. Longitudinal studies in particular suffered from both high attrition rates due to disease-related mortality as well as waning compliance with questionnaire completion. There remain significant challenges to incorporation of PROs into leukemia trials. Despite these limitations, however, well-implemented PROs can provide important information beyond objective response outcomes and highlight areas of focus for clinicians caring for patients and for future research endeavors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Utility of Washington Early Recognition Center Self-Report Screening Questionnaires in the Assessment of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Christina J.; Godwin, Douglass; Mamah, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Early identification and treatment are associated with improved outcomes in bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Screening for the presence of these disorders usually involves time-intensive interviews that may not be practical in settings where mental health providers are limited. Thus, individuals at earlier stages of illness are often not identified. The Washington Early Recognition Center Affectivity and Psychosis (WERCAP) screen is a self-report questionnaire originally developed to identify clinical risk for developing bipolar or psychotic disorders. The goal of the current study was to investigate the utility of the WERCAP Screen and two complementary questionnaires, the WERC Stress Screen and the WERC Substance Screen, in identifying individuals with established SCZ or BPD. Participants consisted of 35 BPD and 34 SCZ patients, as well as 32 controls (CON), aged 18–30 years. Univariate analyses were used to test for score differences between groups. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to identify diagnostic predictors. Significant group differences were found for the psychosis section of the WERCAP (pWERCAP; p < 0.001), affective section of the WERCAP (aWERCAP; p = 0.001), and stress severity (p = 0.027). No significant group differences were found in the rates of substance use as measured by the WERC Substance Screen (p = 0.267). Only the aWERCAP and pWERCAP scores were useful predictors of diagnostic category. ROC curve analysis showed the optimal cut point on the aWERCAP to identify BPD among our participant groups was a score of >20 [area under the curve (AUC): 0.87; sensitivity: 0.91; specificity: 0.71], while that for the pWERCAP to identify SCZ was a score of >13 (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 0.88; specificity: 0.82). These results indicate that the WERCAP Screen may be useful in screening individuals for BPD and SCZ and that identifying stress and substance-use severity can be

  12. Health Services OutPatient Experience questionnaire: factorial validity and reliability of a patient-centered outcome measure for outpatient settings in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, Anna; Ferretti, Fabio; Pozza, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The patient-centered approach to health care does not seem to be sufficiently developed in the Italian context, and is still characterized by the biomedical model. In addition, there is a lack of validated outcome measures to assess outpatient experience as an aspect common to a variety of settings. The current study aimed to evaluate the factorial validity, reliability, and invariance across sex of the Health Services OutPatient Experience (HSOPE) questionnaire, a short ten-item measure of patient-centeredness for Italian adult outpatients. The rationale for unidimensionality of the measure was that it could cover global patient experience as a process common to patients with a variety of diseases and irrespective of the phase of treatment course. Patients and methods The HSOPE was compiled by 1,532 adult outpatients (51% females, mean age 59.22 years, standard deviation 16.26) receiving care in ten facilities at the Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital of Siena, Italy. The sample represented all the age cohorts. Twelve percent were young adults, 57% were adults, and 32% were older adults. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to evaluate factor structure. Reliability was evaluated as internal consistency using Cronbach’s α. Factor invariance was assessed through multigroup analyses. Results Both exploratory and confirmatory analyses suggested a clearly defined unidimensional structure of the measure, with all the ten items having salient loadings on a single factor. Internal consistency was excellent (α=0.95). Indices of model fit supported a single-factor structure for both male and female outpatient groups. Young adult outpatients had significantly lower scores on perceived patient-centeredness relative to older adults. No significant difference emerged on patient-centeredness between male and female outpatients. Conclusion The HSOPE questionnaire seemed to be a tool with high acceptability and excellent psychometric

  13. Comparative Effectiveness Study of Patient-Reported Outcomes following Proton Therapy or IMRT for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Morris, Christopher G.; Henderson, Randal H.; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Williams, Christopher; Regan, Meredith M.; Chipman, Jonathan; Crociani, Catrina; Sandler, Howard M.; Sanda, Martin G.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data continues to emerge on the relative merits of different treatment modalities for prostate cancer. The purpose of this study is to compare patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes (QOL) after proton therapy (PT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods A comparison was performed of prospectively collected QOL data using the expanded prostate cancer index (EPIC) questionnaire. QOL data was collected during the first 2 years following treatment for men treated with PT and IMRT. PT was delivered to 1,243 men at a single center to 76-82Gy. IMRT was delivered to 204 men included in the Prostate Cancer Quality Assurance Study (PROSTQA) in doses of 75.6-79.4Gy.The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare EPIC outcomes by modality using baseline-adjusted scores at different time points. Individual questions were assessed by converting to binary outcomes and testing with generalized estimating equations. Results No differences in changes in summary scores for bowel, urinary incontinence, urinary irritative/obstructive, and sexual domains were seen between the two cohorts. However, more men treated with IMRT reported moderate/big problems with rectal urgency (p=0.02) and frequent bowel movements (p=0.05) than men treated with PT. Conclusions There were no differences in QOL summary scores between the IMRT and PT cohorts during early follow-up up to 2-years. Response to individual questions suggests possible differences in specific bowel symptoms between the two cohorts. These outcomes highlight the need for further comparative studies of PT and IMRT. PMID:24382757

  14. Implementing patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in palliative care - users' cry for help

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcome measurement (PROM) plays an increasingly important role in palliative care. A variety of measures exists and is used in clinical care, audit and research. However, little is known about professionals' views using these measures. The aim of this study is to describe the use and experiences of palliative care professionals with outcome measures. Methods A web-based online survey was conducted in Europe and Africa. Professionals working in clinical care, audit and research in palliative care were invited to the survey via national palliative care associations and various databases. Invitation e-mails were sent with a link to the questionnaire. Results Overall participation rate 42% (663/1592), overall completion rate 59% (392/663). The majority of respondents were female (63.4%), mean age 46 years (SD 9). 68.1% respondents from Europe and 73.3% from Africa had experiences with outcome measures in palliative care. Non-users reported time constraints, burden, lack of training and guidance as main reasons. In clinical care/audit, assessment of patients' situation, monitoring changes and evaluation of services were main reasons for use. Choice of OMs for research was influenced by validity of the instrument in palliative care and comparability with international literature. Main problems were related to patient characteristics, staff, and outcome measures. Participants expressed the need for more guidance and training in the use of PROMs. Conclusions Professionals need more support for the use and implementation of PROMs in clinical practice and research through training and guidance in order to improve patient care. PMID:21507232

  15. Feasibility of Frequent Patient-Reported Outcome Surveillance in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A.; Deal, Allison M.; Abernethy, Amy; Basch, Ethan; Battaglini, Claudio; Kim, Yoon Hie; Whitley, Julia; Shatten, Charlotte; Serody, Jon; Shea, Thomas; Reeve, Bryce B.

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), including symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), provide a patient-centered description of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)-related toxicity. These data characterize the patient experience after HCT and may have prognostic usefulness for long-term outcomes after HCT. We conducted a study of 32 patients after HCT (10 autologous HCT recipients, 11 full-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients, and 11 reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients) to determine the feasibility of weekly electronic PRO collection from HCT until day (D) + 100. We used questions from the PRO version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to capture symptoms, and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health scale to measure physical and mental HRQOL. The vast majority (94%) of patients used the electronic PRO system, with only 6% opting for paper-and-pencil only. The median weekly percentage of participants who completed the surveys was 100% in all cohorts through hospital discharge, and remained 100% for the autologous HCT and reduced-intensity allogeneic HCT cohorts through D+100. Patients were satisfied with the electronic system, giving high marks for readability, comfort, and questionnaire length. Symptom severity varied by absolute level and type of symptom across the 3 cohorts, with the full-intensity allogeneic HCT cohort exhibiting the greatest median overall symptom severity, peaking at D+7. Median physical health HRQOL scores decreased with time in the 3 cohorts, and HRQOL was generally correlated with overall symptom severity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of frequent electronic PROs in the early post-HCT period. Future studies in larger populations to explore predictive models using frequent PRO data for outcomes, including long-term HRQOL and survival, are warranted. PMID:23253558

  16. Quality of life and urolithiasis: the patient - reported outcomes measurement information system (PROMIS).

    PubMed

    Patel, Nishant; Brown, Robert D; Sarkissian, Carl; De, Shubha; Monga, Manoj

    2017-08-08

    With a high rate of recurrence, urolithiasis is a chronic disease that impacts quality of life. The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System is an NIH validated questionnaire to assess patient quality of life. We evaluated the impact of urolithiasis on quality of life using the NIH-sponsored PROMIS-43 questionnaire. Patients reporting to the kidney stone clinic were interviewed to collect information on stone history and demographic information and were asked to complete the PROMIS-43 questionnaire. Quality of life scores were analyzed using gender and age matched groups for the general US population. Statistical comparisons were made based on demographic information and patient stone history. Statistical significance was P<0.05. 103 patients completed the survey. 36% of respondents were male, the average age of the group was 52 years old, with 58% primary income earners, and 35% primary caregivers. 7% had never passed a stone or had a procedure while 17% passed 10 or more stones in their lifetime. Overall, pain and physical function were worse in patients with urolithiasis. Primary income earners had better quality of life while primary caregivers and those with other chronic medical conditions were worse. Patients on dietary and medical therapy had better quality of life scores. Urolithiasis patients subjectively have worse pain and physical function than the general population. The impact of pain on quality of life was greatest in those patients who had more stone episodes, underscoring the importance of preventive measures. Stone prevention measures improve quality of life. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  17. Patient-Reported Outcomes Are Changing the Landscape in Oncology Care: Challenges and Opportunities for Payers

    PubMed Central

    Zagadailov, Erin; Fine, Michael; Shields, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient-reported outcome (PRO) is a subjective report that comes from a patient without interpretation by a clinician. Because of the increasingly significant role of PROs in the development and evaluation of new medicines, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a formal guidance to describe how PRO instruments will be reviewed and evaluated with respect to claims in approved medical product labeling. Meanwhile, PROs continue to appear in oncology clinical trials more frequently; however, it is unclear how payers and policymakers can use PRO data in the context of decision-making for cancer treatments. Objective The objective of this article is to discuss the challenges and opportunities of incorporating oncology-related PRO data into payer decision-making. Discussion Payer concerns with PRO instruments are often related to issues regarding measurement, relevance, quality, and interpretability of PROs. Payers may dismiss PROs that do not independently predict improved outcomes. The FDA guidance released in 2009 demonstrates, as evidenced by the case of ruxolitinib, how PRO questionnaires can be generated in a relevant, trustworthy, and meaningful way, which provides an opportunity for payers and policy decision makers to focus on how to use PRO data in their decision-making. This is particularly relevant in oncology, where a recent and sizable number of clinical trials include PRO measures. Conclusion As an increasing number of oncology medications enter the market with product labeling claims that contain PRO data, payers will need to better familiarize themselves with the opportunities associated with PRO questionnaires when making coverage decisions. PRO measures will continue to provide valuable information regarding the risk–benefit profile of novel agents. As such, PRO measures may provide evidence that should be considered in payers' decisions and discussions; however, the formal role of PROs and the pertinence of PROs in decision

  18. Comparative effectiveness studies examining patient-reported outcomes among children with cleft lip and/or palate: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Kavitha; Vercler, Christian J; Warschausky, Seth A; MacEachern, Mark P; Buchman, Steven R; Waljee, Jennifer F

    2015-01-01

    Health care policy makers are increasingly encouraging comparative effectiveness research. Little is known regarding comparative studies among children with cleft lip and/or palate. Cleft lip and/or palate profoundly influences self-perception and social functioning, and patient-reported outcomes provide a unique perspective on the success of reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature regarding patient-reported outcomes among patients with cleft lip and/or palate. The authors reviewed articles from MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycInfo that examined the use of patient-reported outcome instruments for cleft lip and/or palate. Studies of patients with cleft lip and/or palate across any age that described the use of patient-completed measures in patient and control populations were included. A research librarian confirmed the search, and two independent, blinded reviewers performed full-text review. The authors identified 1979 articles and selected 30 for inclusion. Forty-two different assessment tools were used to analyze factors such as self-esteem, behavior, and social support. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire was most commonly used (n = 7), followed by the Childhood Experience Questionnaire (n = 5), and the Satisfaction with Appearance survey (n = 4). Barriers to analysis included lack of standardization of survey administration, effect of publication bias, and variations in patient populations between individual studies. Comparative studies of patient-reported outcomes among patients with cleft lip and/or palate are infrequent. Many instruments exist to measure patient-reported outcomes in this population, but no specific standard exists. Identifying efficient and targeted forms of instrument selection and administration will enhance comparative studies among children with cleft lip and/or palate. Diagnostic, III.

  19. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried OF; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden. PMID:26159464

  20. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report.

    PubMed

    Harle, Christopher A; Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried Of; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden.

  1. The Gutenberg Health Study: measuring psychosocial factors at work and predicting health and work-related outcomes with the ERI and the COPSOQ questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Nuebling, Matthias; Seidler, Andreas; Garthus-Niegel, Susan; Latza, Ute; Wagner, Mandy; Hegewald, Janice; Liebers, Falk; Jankowiak, Sylvia; Zwiener, Isabella; Wild, Philipp S; Letzel, Stephan

    2013-06-04

    Several instruments have been developed to assess psychosocial workload. We compared two of these instruments, the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model and the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) with regard to congruent validity and internal validity. This analysis is based on a population-based sample of the baseline examination of 2,783 employees from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS). About half of the participants completed the ERI questionnaire (n = 1,342), the other half completed the COPSOQ (n = 1,441). First, the two samples were compared and descriptive analyses were carried out calculating mean values for both instruments in general, then separately for age, gender and main occupational groups. Second, we analyzed the relationship between ERI and COPSOQ scales on the workplace situation and on the workplace outcomes: job satisfaction, general health, burnout, satisfaction with life, by applying stepwise logistic regression analysis. For the majority of occupations, high effort as reflected by the ERI corresponded with high demands as reflected by the COPSOQ. Comparably, high reward (according to ERI) yielded a good agreement with high "influence and development" (according to COPSOQ). However, we could also find differences between ERI and COPSOQ concerning the intensity of psychosocial workload in some occupations (e.g., physicians/pharmacists or warehouse managers/warehousemen/transport workers). These differences point to differing theoretical concepts of ERI and COPSOQ. When the ability of ERI and COPSOQ was examined to determine the associations with health and work outcomes, burnout could be better predicted by the COPSOQ; this might be due to the fact that COPSOQ comprises the constructs "work-privacy conflict" and "emotional demand", which are closely related to burnout. However, methodological differences between these instruments limit their direct comparability. The ERI and COPSOQ instrument yielded similar results for most

  2. Assessing Repetitive Negative Thinking Using Categorical and Transdiagnostic Approaches: A Comparison and Validation of Three Polish Language Adaptations of Self-Report Questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Kornacka, Monika; Buczny, Jacek; Layton, Rebekah L

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a transdiagnostic process involved in the risk, maintenance, and relapse of serious conditions including mood disorders, anxiety, eating disorders, and addictions. Processing mode theory provides a theoretical model to assess, research, and treat RNT using a transdiagnostic approach. Clinical researchers also often employ categorical approaches to RNT, including a focus on depressive rumination or worry, for similar purposes. Three widely used self-report questionnaires have been developed to assess these related constructs: the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS), the Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire (PTQ), and the Mini-Cambridge Exeter Repetitive Thought Scale (Mini-CERTS). Yet these scales have not previously been used in conjunction, despite useful theoretical distinctions only available in Mini-CERTS. The present validation of the methods in a Polish speaking population provides psychometric parameters estimates that contribute to current efforts to increase reliable replication of theoretical outcomes. Moreover, the following study aims to present particular characteristics and a comparison of the three methods. Although there has been some exploration of a categorical approach, the comparison of transdiagnostic methods is still lacking. These methods are particularly relevant for developing and evaluating theoretically based interventions like concreteness training, an emerging field of increasing interest, which can be used to address the maladaptive processing mode in RNT that can lead to depression and other disorders. Furthermore, the translation of these measures enables the examination of possible cross-cultural structural differences that may lead to important theoretical progress in the measurement and classification of RNT. The results support the theoretical hypothesis. As expected, the dimensions of brooding, general repetitive negative thinking, as well as abstract analytical thinking, can all be classified

  3. Assessing Repetitive Negative Thinking Using Categorical and Transdiagnostic Approaches: A Comparison and Validation of Three Polish Language Adaptations of Self-Report Questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Kornacka, Monika; Buczny, Jacek; Layton, Rebekah L.

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a transdiagnostic process involved in the risk, maintenance, and relapse of serious conditions including mood disorders, anxiety, eating disorders, and addictions. Processing mode theory provides a theoretical model to assess, research, and treat RNT using a transdiagnostic approach. Clinical researchers also often employ categorical approaches to RNT, including a focus on depressive rumination or worry, for similar purposes. Three widely used self-report questionnaires have been developed to assess these related constructs: the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS), the Perseverative Thinking Questionnaire (PTQ), and the Mini-Cambridge Exeter Repetitive Thought Scale (Mini-CERTS). Yet these scales have not previously been used in conjunction, despite useful theoretical distinctions only available in Mini-CERTS. The present validation of the methods in a Polish speaking population provides psychometric parameters estimates that contribute to current efforts to increase reliable replication of theoretical outcomes. Moreover, the following study aims to present particular characteristics and a comparison of the three methods. Although there has been some exploration of a categorical approach, the comparison of transdiagnostic methods is still lacking. These methods are particularly relevant for developing and evaluating theoretically based interventions like concreteness training, an emerging field of increasing interest, which can be used to address the maladaptive processing mode in RNT that can lead to depression and other disorders. Furthermore, the translation of these measures enables the examination of possible cross-cultural structural differences that may lead to important theoretical progress in the measurement and classification of RNT. The results support the theoretical hypothesis. As expected, the dimensions of brooding, general repetitive negative thinking, as well as abstract analytical thinking, can all be classified

  4. Development of a parent-reported questionnaire evaluating upper limb activity limitation in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Preston, N; Horton, M; Levesley, M; Mon-Williams, M; O'Connor, R J

    2017-01-23

    Upper limb activity measures for children with cerebral palsy have a number of limitations, for example, lack of validity and poor responsiveness. To overcome these limitations, we developed the Children's Arm Rehabilitation Measure (ChARM), a parent-reported questionnaire validated for children with cerebral palsy aged 5-16 years. This paper describes both the development of the ChARM items and response categories and its psychometric testing and further refinement using the Rasch measurement model. To generate valid items for the ChARM, we collected goals of therapy specifically developed by therapists, children with cerebral palsy, and their parents for improving activity limitation of the upper limb. The activities, which were the focus of these goals, formed the basis for the items. Therapists typically break an activity into natural stages for the purpose of improving activity performance, and these natural orders of achievement formed each item's response options. Items underwent face validity testing with health care professionals, parents of children with cerebral palsy, academics, and lay persons. A Rasch analysis was performed on ChARM questionnaires completed by the parents of 170 children with cerebral palsy from 12 hospital paediatric services. The ChARM was amended, and the procedure repeated on 148 ChARMs (from children's mean age: 10 years and 1 month; range: 4 years and 8 months to 16 years and 11 months; 85 males; Manual Ability Classification System Levels I = 9, II = 26, III = 48, IV = 45, and V = 18). The final 19-item unidimensional questionnaire displayed fit to the Rasch model (chi-square p = .18), excellent reliability (person separation index = 0.95, α = 0.95), and no floor or ceiling effects. Items showed no response bias for gender, distribution of impairment, age, or learning disability. The ChARM is a psychometrically sound measure of upper limb activity validated for children with cerebral palsy aged 5-16

  5. Impact of Communicating Familial Risk of Diabetes on Illness Perceptions and Self-Reported Behavioral Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pijl, Miranda; Timmermans, Danielle R.M.; Claassen, Liesbeth; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Marteau, Theresa M.; Henneman, Lidewij

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the potential effectiveness of communicating familial risk of diabetes on illness perceptions and self-reported behavioral outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Individuals with a family history of diabetes were randomized to receive risk information based on familial and general risk factors (n = 59) or general risk factors alone (n = 59). Outcomes were assessed using questionnaires at baseline, 1 week, and 3 months. RESULTS Compared with individuals receiving general risk information, those receiving familial risk information perceived heredity to be a more important cause of diabetes (P < 0.01) at 1-week follow-up, perceived greater control over preventing diabetes (P < 0.05), and reported having eaten more healthily (P = 0.01) after 3 months. Behavioral intentions did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS Communicating familial risk increased personal control and, thus, did not result in fatalism. Although the intervention did not influence intentions to change behavior, there was some evidence to suggest it increases healthy behavior. PMID:19131458

  6. The orthogonal-oblique bi-level model of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45.2): Polish adaptation based on factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Simon, Witold; Śliwka, Piotr; Sobański, Jerzy A; Klasa, Katarzyna; Sala, Paweł; Żak, Wojciech; Busath, Gregory; Lambert, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    AIM : The aim of this project was to conduct the cross-cultural factorial validation of the Outcome Questionnaire (OQ-45.2) using the Polish population. Data were obtained from day-patients (n = 211), inpatients (n = 234), outpatients (n = 137) and non-patients (n = 426). Statistical analyses included: parallel analysis, exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, correlation analysis, criterion equivalence, clinical significance and reliable change index, and test-retest. Statistical analyses provided the strongest support for the bi-level model of the total score, five orthogonal (subscales specific for the Polish OQ, i.e. Social Conflicts and Addictive Behaviors; and original yet modified subscales, i.e. Symptom Distress, Interpersonal Relations, and Social Role), and two oblique factors (Somatization and Anxiety, Social Role 2). The psychometric properties of the Polish OQ were found to be adequate and similar to the original American OQ and its international adaptations. Specific for the Polish OQ cut-off scores for clinical significance were established. The role of cultural differences and the passage of time in the process of the cross-cultural validation were elaborated upon. The Polish version of the OQ 45-2 has been recognized as an instrument adequately measuring general functioning as well as specific areas of functioning of the individual (i.e. interpersonal relations; social role performance; social conflicts; symptom distress; somatization and anxiety; addictive behaviors). Results of this factorial analysis seem to be valuable for both clinicians using the OQ-45.2 and for creators of any psychotherapy outcome measure.

  7. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Successful management of complex conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE, and comorbid conditions benefit significantly from patient-reported outcomes (PRO) instruments that validly and precisely measure relevant aspects of health status (e.g., symptoms) and health related quality of life. Measuring health related quality of life and other aspects of health status (e.g., symptoms, functioning) with PROs provides SLE patients with an opportunity to participate in their treatment and to facilitate better communication with the multi-disciplinary team of health professionals involved in their care. Health outcomes research has produced a number of well-validated instruments that can be used across diseases whereas some have been specifically developed for SLE. The use of either a generic and SLE-specific PRO depends on the particular needs of a variety of clinical applications including population monitoring, treatment decision-making in clinical practice, clinical trials research, and for evaluating and comparing the effect of therapies across conditions, therapies, trials and patients in clinical research studies. PMID:27133488

  8. [The possibility of using standardized self-report anxiety and depression scales in elderly patients: anxiety scales/questionnaires].

    PubMed

    Ivanets, N N; Kinkulkina, M A; Avdeeva, T I; Sysoeva, V P

    To describe the specifics of using self-report anxiety scales in elderly patients, determine the parameters of their reliability and validity and develop recommendations on the use of these scales. The study included 234 patients, aged over 50 years, with non-psychotic anxiety disorders. The following scales/questionnaires BAI, GAI, STAI, ZAS, HADS were used at baseline and 12 weeks after treatment. Conditions of testing, form and content of instructions were similar. Data analysis included the estimation of reliability and validity of these scales. Assessment made by the physician on the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAМ-А) was used as «validity standard». All scales (BAI, GAI, STAI, ZAS, HADS-А) can be used for screening diagnosis of anxiety in elderly people. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the scales for subjective assessment of anxiety slightly decrease in advanced age and is sufficient for screening purposes. Based on the analysis, the authors have developed recommendations (common and specific for each scale) on the optimization of using self-report anxiety scales in advanced age.

  9. A parent-report Gender Identity Questionnaire for Children: A cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Wallien, Madeleine; Johnson, Laurel L; Owen-Anderson, Allison F H; Bradley, Susan J; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2006-07-01

    A one-factor, 14-item parent-report Gender Identity Questionnaire for Children (GIQC) was developed in a sample of 325 clinic-referred children with gender identity problems and 504 controls from Toronto, Canada (Johnson et al., 2004). In this study, we report a cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis of the GIQC on gender-referred children (N = 338) from Toronto and gender-referred children (N = 175) from Utrecht, The Netherlands. Across clinics, the results showed both similarities and differences. Gender-referred boys from Utrecht had a significantly higher total score (indicating more cross-gender behavior) than did gender-referred boys from Toronto, but there was no significant difference for girls. In the Toronto sample, the gender-referred girls had a significantly higher total score than the gender-referred boys, but there was no significant sex difference in the Utrecht sample. Across both clinics, gender-referred children who met the complete DSM criteria for gender identity disorder (GID) had a significantly higher cross-gender score than the gender-referred children who were subthreshold for GID (Cohen's d = 1.11). The results of this study provide the first empirical evidence of relative similarity in cross-gender behavior in a sample of gender-referred children from western Europe when compared to North American children. The results also provide some support for cross-clinic consistency in clinician-based diagnosis of GID.

  10. The Gross Motor Function Classification System Family Report Questionnaire: reliability between special-education teachers and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Ramrit, Sirinun; Yonglitthipagon, Ponlapat; Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Emasithi, Alongkot; Siritaratiwat, Wantana

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of the Thai Gross Motor Function Classification System Family Report Questionnaire (GMFCS-FR) and the possibility of special-education teachers and caregivers in the community using this system in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The reliability was examined by two teachers and two caregivers who classified 21 children with CP aged 2 to 12 years. A GMFCS-FR workshop was organized for raters. The teachers and caregivers classified the mobility of 362 children. The rater reliability was analysed using the weighted kappa coefficient. The possibility of using the GMFCS-FR is reported. The reliability of using the GMFCS-FR in the community was analysed by the intraclass correlation coefficient. The intrarater reliability ranged from 0.91 to 1.00. The interrater reliability between teachers was 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-0.97) and between caregivers was 0.84 (95% CI 0.70-0.97). Ninety-seven percent of raters used the Thai GMFCS-FR correctly. The overall intraclass correlation coefficient between raters was 0.90 (95% CI 0.88-0.92). The Thai GMFCS-FR is a reliable system for classifying the motor function of young children with CP by teachers and caregivers in the community. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  11. "Not just little adults": qualitative methods to support the development of pediatric patient-reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Arbuckle, Rob; Abetz-Webb, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) have issued incentives and laws mandating clinical research in pediatrics. While guidances for the development and validation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) or health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures have been issued by these agencies, little attention has focused on pediatric PRO development methods. With reference to the literature, this article provides an overview of specific considerations that should be made with regard to the development of pediatric PRO measures, with a focus on performing qualitative research to ensure content validity. Throughout the questionnaire development process it is critical to use developmentally appropriate language and techniques to ensure outcomes have content validity, and will be reliable and valid within narrow age bands (0-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-11, 12-14, 15-17 years). For qualitative research, sample sizes within those age bands must be adequate to demonstrate saturation while taking into account children's rapid growth and development. Interview methods, interview guides, and length of interview must all take developmental stage into account. Drawings, play-doh, or props can be used to engage the child. Care needs to be taken during cognitive debriefing, where repeated questioning can lead a child to change their answers, due to thinking their answer is incorrect. For the PROs themselves, the greatest challenge is in measuring outcomes in children aged 5-8 years. In this age range, while self-report is generally more valid, parent reports of observable behaviors are generally more reliable. As such, 'team completion' or a parent-administered child report is often the best option for children aged 5-8 years. For infants and very young children (aged 0-4 years), patient rating of observable behaviors is necessary, and, for adolescents and children aged 9 years and older, self-reported outcomes are generally valid and reliable. In conclusion, the development of PRO

  12. Surgical outcome of spinal neurilemmoma: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Kuang-Ting; Lee, Ru-Ping; Yu, Tzai-Chiu; Chen, Ing-Ho; Peng, Cheng-Huan; Liu, Kuan-Lin; Wang, Jen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Tien

    2015-02-01

    Neurilemmoma commonly occurs from the fourth to sixth decades of life with an incidence of 3 to 10 per 100,000 people, and is rare in adolescence. This case report describes the clinical and radiographic features of 2 rare cases with intraspinal neurilemmoma of the cervical and thoracic spine. A 29-year-old man who experienced middle back pain with prominent right lower limb weakness, and an 11-year-old boy who suffered from sudden onset neck pain with left arm weakness and hand clawing for 2 weeks before admission to our department were included in this case report. Magnetic resonance imaging of both patients revealed an intraspinal mass causing spinal cord compression at the cervical and thoracic spine. The patients subsequently received urgent posterior spinal cord decompression and tumor resection surgery. The histopathology reports revealed neurilemmoma. The 2 patients recovered and resumed their normal lives within 1 year. Intraspinal neurilemmoma is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression. Advances in imaging techniques and surgical procedures have yielded substantially enhanced clinical outcomes in intraspinal neoplasm cases. Delicate preoperative study and surgical skill with rehabilitation and postoperative observation are critical.

  13. The relationship between child- and parent-reported shared decision making and child-, parent-, and clinician-reported treatment outcome in routinely collected child mental health services data.

    PubMed

    Edbrooke-Childs, Julian; Jacob, Jenna; Argent, Rachel; Patalay, Praveetha; Deighton, Jessica; Wolpert, Miranda

    2016-04-01

    Shared decision making (SDM) between service users and providers is increasingly being suggested as a key component of good healthcare. The aim of this research was to explore whether child- and parent-reported experience of SDM was associated with child- and parent-reported improvement in psychosocial difficulties and clinician-reported functioning at the end of treatment in child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). The sample comprised N = 177 children (62% female; 31% aged 6-12 and 69% aged 13-18) with a variety of mental health problems from 17 services where routinely collected data consisted of presenting problems at outset, child- and parent-reported change in symptoms between Time 1 and Time 2 (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire; SDQ), clinician-reported change in functioning between Time 1 and Time 2 (Children's Global Assessment Scale; CGAS), and experience of SDM at Time 2 (as measured by responses to the Experience of Service Questionnaire; ESQ). Analysis revealed that both child- and parent-reported experience of SDM were associated with higher levels of child- and parent-reported improvement in psychosocial difficulties. However, child-reported experience of SDM was only associated with higher levels of child-reported improvement when their parents also reported higher levels of SDM. In CAMHS, involving both children and parents in decision making may contribute to enhanced treatment outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Patient-reported outcomes in stuttering treatment: conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Franic, Duska M; Bothe, Anne K

    2008-04-01

    Evaluation of: Yaruss JS, Quesal RW. Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering (OASES): documenting multiple outcomes in stuttering treatment. J. Fluency Disord. 31(2), 90-115 (2006) [1] . These authors presented the first complete instrument intended to measure the impact of stuttering in adults who stutter (Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering; [OASES]). OASES is a 100-item self-report metric with four sections: general information, reactions to stuttering, communication in daily situations and quality of life. Its conceptual framework includes historic views of the influence of emotional and cognitive variables on stuttering; the WHO's International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH); and the WHO's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). However, both this conceptual framework and the psychometric data presented to support the OASES are problematic in ways that clinicians and researchers in areas well-beyond stuttering may find informative as they consider their own applications.

  15. Pixel or Paper? Validation of a Mobile Technology for Collecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Epis, Oscar Massimiliano; Casu, Cinzia; Belloli, Laura; Schito, Emanuela; Filippini, Davide; Muscarà, Marina; Gentile, Maria Giovanna; Perez Cagnone, Paula Carina; Venerelli, Chiara; Sonnati, Massimo; Schiavetti, Irene; Bruschi, Eleonora

    2016-11-16

    In the management of chronic disease, new models for telemonitoring of patients combined with the choice of electronic patient-reported outcomes (ePRO) are being encouraged, with a clear improvement of both patients' and parents' quality of life. An Italian study demonstrated that ePRO were welcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with excellent matching data. The aim of this study is to evaluate the level of agreement between electronic and paper-and-pencil questionnaire responses. This is an observational prospective study. Patients were randomly assigned to first complete the questionnaire by paper and pencil and then by tablet or in the opposite order. The questionnaire consisted of 3 independent self-assessment visual rating scales (Visual Analog Scale, Global Health score, Patient Global Assessment of Disease Activity) commonly used in different adult patients, including those with rheumatic diseases. A total of 185 consecutive RA patients were admitted to hospital and were enrolled and completed the questionnaire both on paper and on electronic versions. For all the evaluated items, the intrarater degree of agreement between 2 approaches was found to be excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient>0.75, P<.001). An electronic questionnaire is uploaded in a dedicated Web-based tool that could implement a telemonitoring system aimed at improving the follow-up of RA patients. High intrarater reliability between paper and electronic methods of data collection encourage the use of a new digital app with consequent benefit for the overall health care system.

  16. Validation of the Vitiligo Noticeability Scale: a patient-reported outcome measure of vitiligo treatment success.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, J M; Tan, W; Tour, S; Yong, A; Montgomery, A A; Thomas, K S

    2016-02-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures are rarely used in vitiligo trials. The Vitiligo Noticeability Scale (VNS) is a new patient-reported outcome measure assessing how 'noticeable' vitiligo patches are after treatment. The noticeability of vitiligo after treatment is an important indicator of treatment success from the patient's perspective. To evaluate the construct validity, acceptability and interpretability of the VNS. Clinicians (n = 33) and patients with vitiligo (n = 101) examined 39 image pairs, each depicting a vitiligo lesion pre- and post-treatment. Using an online questionnaire, respondents gave a global assessment of treatment success and a VNS score for treatment response. Clinicians also estimated percentage repigmentation of lesions (< 25%; 25-50%; 51-75%; > 75%). Treatment success was defined as 'yes' on global assessment, a VNS score of 4 or 5, and > 75% repigmentation. Agreement between respondents and the different scales was assessed using kappa (κ) statistics. Vitiligo Noticeability Scale scores were associated with both patient- and clinician-reported global treatment success (κ = 0·54 and κ = 0·47, respectively). Percentage repigmentation showed a weaker association with patient- and clinician-reported global treatment success (κ = 0·39 and κ = 0·29, respectively). VNS scores of 4 or 5 can be interpreted as representing treatment success. Images depicting post-treatment hyperpigmentation were less likely to be rated as successful. The VNS is a valid patient-reported measure of vitiligo treatment success. Further validation of the VNS is required, using larger sets of clinical pre- and post-treatment images, affecting a wider range of anatomical sites. © 2015 The Authors. British Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists.

  17. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Trial: Comparison of Clinician- versus Patient-reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mukesh, M B; Qian, W; Wah Hak, C C; Wilkinson, J S; Barnett, G C; Moody, A M; Wilson, C; Coles, C E

    2016-06-01

    Breast radiotherapy-associated toxicity is often reported using clinical and photographic assessments. The addition of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) is becoming more common. This study investigated the concordance between clinician- and patient-reported outcomes. The Cambridge Breast Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) trial prospectively collected data on clinician assessment and PROMs at 2 and 5 years after breast radiotherapy. Clinician assessment included physical examination and photographic assessment. PROMs included European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) BR23 questionnaire and four breast radiotherapy-specific questions. The correlation between patient and clinician scores were analysed on an independent patient basis using percentage agreement, Cohen's kappa coefficient (k) and Bowker's test of symmetry. The analysis was repeated after stratifying patients based on age, baseline Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) and baseline body image score. At 2 and 5 years, a weak level of concordance was seen between the clinician-based assessment and PROMS for all the five toxicity end points (k = 0.05-0.21), with individual patient-based agreement of 32.9-78.3% and a highly discordant Bowker's test of symmetry (P < 0.001). The most frequently reported moderate-severe toxicity by patients was change in breast appearance (14% at both 2 and 5 years), whereas it was breast induration (36% and 25% at 2 and 5 years, respectively) by the clinicians. The lack of concordance was not affected by patient's age, baseline HADS and baseline body image score. This study found that moderate-severe toxicity reported by patients is low and the overall concordance between clinicians and patients is low. This could be due to methodological limitations or alternatively reflects the subjective nature of PROMs. Incorporation of a patient's perception on treatment-related toxicity will have important implications for treatment

  18. Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of the Literature Focusing on Reported Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Aswin; Hocking, Katie C.; Broughton, Ellie; Turner, Carole; Santarius, Thomas; Hutchinson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The plethora of studies in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has not resulted in the development of an evidence-based treatment strategy, largely due to heterogeneous outcome measures that preclude cross-study comparisons and guideline development. This study aimed to identify and quantify the heterogeneity of outcome measures reported in the CSDH literature and to build a case for the development of a consensus-based core outcome set. This systematic review adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews (CRD42014007266). All full-text English language studies with >10 patients (prospective) or >100 patients (retrospective) published after 1990 examining clinical outcomes in CSDH were eligible for inclusion. One hundred two eligible studies were found. There were 14 (13.7%) randomized controlled trials, one single arm trial (1.0%), 25 (24.5%) cohort comparison studies, and 62 (60.8%) prospective or retrospective cohort studies. Outcome domains reported by the studies included mortality (63.8% of included studies), recurrence (94.1%), complications (48.0%), functional outcomes (40.2%), and radiological (38.2%) outcomes. There was significant heterogeneity in the definitions of the outcome measures, as evidenced by the seven different definitions of the term “recurrence,” with no definition given in 19 studies. The time-points of assessment for all the outcome domains varied greatly from inpatient/hospital discharge to 18 months. This study establishes and quantifies the heterogeneity of outcome measure reporting in CSDH and builds the case for the development of a robust consensus-based core outcome set for future studies to adhere to as part of the Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in CSDH (CODE-CSDH) project. PMID:26295586

  19. Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Systematic Review of the Literature Focusing on Reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chari, Aswin; Hocking, Katie C; Broughton, Ellie; Turner, Carole; Santarius, Thomas; Hutchinson, Peter J; Kolias, Angelos G

    2016-07-01

    The plethora of studies in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has not resulted in the development of an evidence-based treatment strategy, largely due to heterogeneous outcome measures that preclude cross-study comparisons and guideline development. This study aimed to identify and quantify the heterogeneity of outcome measures reported in the CSDH literature and to build a case for the development of a consensus-based core outcome set. This systematic review adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement and was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews (CRD42014007266). All full-text English language studies with >10 patients (prospective) or >100 patients (retrospective) published after 1990 examining clinical outcomes in CSDH were eligible for inclusion. One hundred two eligible studies were found. There were 14 (13.7%) randomized controlled trials, one single arm trial (1.0%), 25 (24.5%) cohort comparison studies, and 62 (60.8%) prospective or retrospective cohort studies. Outcome domains reported by the studies included mortality (63.8% of included studies), recurrence (94.1%), complications (48.0%), functional outcomes (40.2%), and radiological (38.2%) outcomes. There was significant heterogeneity in the definitions of the outcome measures, as evidenced by the seven different definitions of the term "recurrence," with no definition given in 19 studies. The time-points of assessment for all the outcome domains varied greatly from inpatient/hospital discharge to 18 months. This study establishes and quantifies the heterogeneity of outcome measure reporting in CSDH and builds the case for the development of a robust consensus-based core outcome set for future studies to adhere to as part of the Core Outcomes and Common Data Elements in CSDH (CODE-CSDH) project.

  20. Comparing a tablet computer and paper forms for assessing patient-reported outcomes in edentulous patients.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Thais Angelina; Ribeiro, Adriana Barbosa; Della Vecchia, Maria Paula; Cunha, Tatiana Ramirez; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Souza, Raphael Freitas

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether two methods of documentation, print and electronic forms, for the assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in complete denture wearers provide comparable results. The study also quantified the time needed for filling the forms by each method. Thirty participants enrolled in a university clinic answered two forms (a questionnaire for denture satisfaction and OHIP-EDENT). They provided answers with two application methods in a random order, with a one-month interval between them: (1) electronic forms on a tablet computer; and (2) print forms. The methods were compared in terms of mean results, correlation/agreement, internal consistency, and spent time. Mean results for both methods were similar for each denture satisfaction item (100-mm VAS) and OHIP-EDENT summary score. Both questionnaires presented good internal consistency regardless of the application method (Cronbach's α=0.86 or higher). Correlation and agreement between the methods regarding specific items was at least moderate for the majority of cases. Mean time for the electronic and print forms were 9.2 and 8.5 minutes, respectively (paired t test, P=.06, non-significant). The electronic method is comparable to print forms for the assessment of important PRO of prosthetic treatment for edentulism, considering the results and time needed. Findings suggest the viability of replacing print forms with a tablet for applying the tested inventories in clinical trials.

  1. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Review of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Krohe, Meaghan; Hao, Yanni; Lamoureux, Roger E.; Galipeau, Nina; Globe, Denise; Foley, Catherine; Mazar, Iyar; Solomon, Jeffrey; Shields, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures serve to capture vital patient information not otherwise obtained by primary study endpoints. This paper examines how PROs are utilized as endpoints in industry-sponsored metastatic breast cancer clinical trials. METHODS A search was conducted in the clinicaltrials.gov web site for trials involving common treatments for metastatic breast cancer. Thirty-eight clinical trials were identified which included a PRO endpoint in the study, and data were extracted and summarized. RESULTS Overall, 17 unique PRO questionnaires and 14 concepts of measurement were identified as secondary or exploratory endpoints. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—Breast was the most frequently utilized questionnaire, commonly implemented to assess quality of life. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was also frequently used to measure quality of life or pain. CONCLUSION This review shares insights into the role of PROs in trials for metastatic breast cancer from which treatment developers and other stakeholders can enhance successful implementation of the patient voice into future trials. PMID:27441001

  2. Comparing a tablet computer and paper forms for assessing patient-reported outcomes in edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Thais Angelina; Ribeiro, Adriana Barbosa; Della Vecchia, Maria Paula; Cunha, Tatiana Ramirez; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine whether two methods of documentation, print and electronic forms, for the assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) in complete denture wearers provide comparable results. The study also quantified the time needed for filling the forms by each method. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty participants enrolled in a university clinic answered two forms (a questionnaire for denture satisfaction and OHIP-EDENT). They provided answers with two application methods in a random order, with a one-month interval between them: (1) electronic forms on a tablet computer; and (2) print forms. The methods were compared in terms of mean results, correlation/agreement, internal consistency, and spent time. RESULTS Mean results for both methods were similar for each denture satisfaction item (100-mm VAS) and OHIP-EDENT summary score. Both questionnaires presented good internal consistency regardless of the application method (Cronbach's α=0.86 or higher). Correlation and agreement between the methods regarding specific items was at least moderate for the majority of cases. Mean time for the electronic and print forms were 9.2 and 8.5 minutes, respectively (paired t test, P=.06, non-significant). CONCLUSION The electronic method is comparable to print forms for the assessment of important PRO of prosthetic treatment for edentulism, considering the results and time needed. Findings suggest the viability of replacing print forms with a tablet for applying the tested inventories in clinical trials. PMID:28018563

  3. Patient reported outcome measures for visual impairment after stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Lauren R; Rowe, Fiona J; Harper, Robert; Jarvis, Kathryn; Shipman, Tracey; Rodgers, Helen

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this review was to identify patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) for use in research and clinical practice involving individuals with visual impairment following stroke and to evaluate their content validity against quality assessment criteria. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify articles related to the development and/or validation of PROMS. We searched scholarly online resources and hand searched journals. Search terms included MESH terms and alternatives relating to PROMs, visual impairments and quality of life. Data were extracted relating to the development and validation of the included instruments. The quality of the development process was assessed using a modified version of a PROM quality assessment tool. A total of 142 PROMs were identified, 34 vision-specific PROMs were relevant and available to be analysed in this review. Quality appraisal identified four highly rated instruments: the National Eye Institute Visual Functional Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ), Activity Inventory (AI), Daily Living Tasks Dependant on Vision (DLTV) and Veterans Affairs Low Visual Function Questionnaire (VA LV VFQ). The four instruments have only been used with either a limited number of stroke survivors or a sub-population within visual impairment following stroke. No instruments were identified which specifically targeted individuals with visual impairment following stroke. Further research is required to identify the items which a population of stroke survivors with visual impairment consider to be of most importance. The validation of a combination of instruments or a new instrument for use with this population is required.

  4. Patient-reported outcomes following flexible sigmoidoscopy screening for colorectal cancer in a demonstration screening programme in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robb, Kathryn A; Lo, Siu Hing; Power, Emily; Kralj-Hans, Ines; Edwards, Robert; Vance, Maggie; von Wagner, Christian; Atkin, Wendy; Wardle, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS) screening for colorectal cancer will be introduced into the National Cancer Screening Programmes in England in 2013. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) from trial participants indicate high acceptability and no adverse physical or psychological consequences, but this may not generalize to routine screening in the community. This study examined PROMs in a community-based FS screening programme. Eligible adults aged 58-59 (n = 2016) registered at 34 London general practices were mailed a National Health Service-endorsed invitation to attend FS screening. Pain and side-effects were assessed in a 'morning-after' questionnaire, and satisfaction was assessed in a three-month follow-up questionnaire. Anxiety, self-rated health and colorectal symptoms were assessed at prescreening and follow-up. In total, 1020 people attended screening and were included in the current analyses, of whom 913 (90%) returned the morning-after questionnaire, and 674 (66%) the follow-up questionnaire. The prescreening questionnaire had been completed by 751 (74%) of those who attended. The majority (87%) of respondents reported no pain or mild pain, and the most frequent side-effect (wind) was only experienced more than mildly by 16%. Satisfaction was extremely high, with 98% glad they had the test; 97% would encourage a friend to have it. From prescreening to follow-up there were no changes in anxiety or self-rated health, and the number of colorectal symptoms declined. Satisfaction and changes in wellbeing were not moderated by gender, deprivation, ethnicity or screening outcome. PROMs indicate high acceptability of FS screening in 58-59 year olds, with no adverse effects on colorectal symptoms, health status or psychological wellbeing.

  5. Establishing Core Outcome Domains in Hemodialysis: Report of the Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Consensus Workshop.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Wheeler, David C; Evangelidis, Nicole; Tugwell, Peter; Crowe, Sally; Van Biesen, Wim; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; O'Donoghue, Donal; Tam-Tham, Helen; Shen, Jenny I; Pinter, Jule; Larkins, Nicholas; Youssouf, Sajeda; Mandayam, Sreedhar; Ju, Angela; Craig, Jonathan C

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-informed decision making in clinical care and policy in nephrology is undermined by trials that selectively report a large number of heterogeneous outcomes, many of which are not patient centered. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Initiative convened an international consensus workshop on November 7, 2015, to discuss the identification and implementation of a potential core outcome set for all trials in hemodialysis. The purpose of this article is to report qualitative analyses of the workshop discussions, describing the key aspects to consider when establishing core outcomes in trials involving patients on hemodialysis therapy. Key stakeholders including 8 patients/caregivers and 47 health professionals (nephrologists, policymakers, industry, and researchers) attended the workshop. Attendees suggested that identifying core outcomes required equitable stakeholder engagement to ensure relevance across patient populations, flexibility to consider evolving priorities over time, deconstruction of language and meaning for conceptual consistency and clarity, understanding of potential overlap and associations between outcomes, and an assessment of applicability to the range of interventions in hemodialysis. For implementation, they proposed that core outcomes must have simple, inexpensive, and validated outcome measures that could be used in clinical care (quality indicators) and trials (including pragmatic trials) and endorsement by regulatory agencies. Integrating these recommendations may foster acceptance and optimize the uptake and translation of core outcomes in hemodialysis, leading to more informative research, for better treatment and improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Health service utilization by patients with common mental disorder identified by the Self-Reporting Questionnaire in a primary care setting in Zomba, Malawi: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Udedi, Michael; Swartz, Leslie; Stewart, Robert C.; Kauye, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Background There has been no study carried out to assess health service utilization by people with common mental disorder (CMD) in Malawi. Aim The aim of the study was to evaluate health service utilization patterns of patients with CMD in primary health care (PHC) clinics. Methods The study was conducted in two PHC clinics in one of the 28 districts in Malawi. Face-to-face interviews with the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) were conducted in a sample of 323 PHC attendees aged 18 years and older who attended the PHC clinics for any reason. Results The prevalence of probable CMD in the sample was 20.1%. People with probable CMD had a higher mean number of health facility visits in the previous three months compared to those without probable CMD (1.6 vs 1.19, p = .02). Conclusion The study reveals high utilization of health services for people with CMD in the PHC setting. There is a need for PHC workers to improve skills in diagnosing patients with CMD to make PHC services more effective by reducing re-attendance and improving patient outcomes. PMID:23877337

  7. Parent Reports of Mental Health Concerns and Functional Impairment on Routine Screening with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Biel, Matthew G.; Kahn, Nicole F.; Srivastava, Anjuli; Mete, Mihriye; Banh, My K.; Wissow, Lawrence S.; Anthony, Bruno J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study used the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) to describe the prevalence of parent-reported mental health (MH) concerns in youth presenting for primary care appointments and to examine relationships between children’s MH issues and functional impairment. We hypothesized that increased MH symptomology would be associated with increased impairment and family burden. Methods Parents of 4–17 years old children were approached at routine visits in 13 primary care sites. Chi-square tests, independent samples t-tests, and a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to make comparisons between demographic groups. Age-, sex-, and race-adjusted ordered logistic regression models and ANOVAs examined relationships between impact and SDQ scales. Results Boys had higher total Hyperactivity and Peer Problems. Adolescents showed higher Emotional Symptoms, while younger children showed more Hyperactivity. Latinos reported more Conduct Problems, Hyperactivity, and Peer Problems. Latinos also indicated less distress on the child, impairment at home and school, and family burden. Regression analyses indicated increased odds of impairment with higher scale scores. MH symptoms identified with the SDQ in pediatric primary care settings were associated with parent-reported impairment affecting youth and their families. Conclusions The presence of significant impairment suggests that parents’ concerns identified by screening are likely to be clinically important and worthy of practice strategies designed to promote assessment, treatment, and referral for these common problems. Identifying and exploring parents’ concerns with strategic use of screening tools may allow PCPs to directly engage families around the MH issues that affect them most. PMID:25922333

  8. Self-Reported Benefits and Adverse Outcomes of Hot Yoga Participation.

    PubMed

    Mace, Casey; Eggleston, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    There is little to no scientific data about the health benefits or risks to participating in hot yoga, in particular distinguishing it from the practice of non-hot yoga. This study aims to provide some preliminary evidence about the risks and benefits of participating in hot yoga. Future studies will be able to build off the findings herein. This study utilized online survey software (Qualtrics) and recruited participants through convenience sampling (n = 157) by targeting yoga websites and online forums. As there is currently no known questionnaire that has been developed to assess the risks and benefits of hot yoga participation, an exploratory measure was designed to gain more detailed responses from participants. Descriptive epidemiological analyses we re conducted. Participants of hot yoga had a number of pre-existing health conditions. Both benefits and adverse outcomes were reported. The most frequently reported health benefits of hot yoga in this sample included increased flexibility (63%), improved mood (58%), increased fitness (43%), and improved stamina (42%). Just over half of the participants reported some sort of adverse event during a hot yoga session (n = 82). The most commonly reported adverse events included dizziness (60%), feeling light headed (61%), nausea (35%), and dehydration (34%), amongst others. Further study on the risks and benefits of hot yoga participation is required.

  9. Self-Reported Benefits and Adverse Outcomes of Hot Yoga Participation.

    PubMed

    Mace, Casey; Eggleston, Brandon

    2016-08-15

    There is little to no scientific data about the health benefits or risks to participating in hot yoga, in particular distinguishing it from the practice of non-hot yoga. This study aims to provide some preliminary evidence about the risks and benefits of participating in hot yoga. Future studies will be able to build off the findings herein. This study utilized online survey software (Qualtrics) and recruited participants through convenience sampling (n = 157) by targeting yoga websites and online forums. As there is currently no known questionnaire that has been developed to assess the risks and benefits of hot yoga participation, an exploratory measure was designed to gain more detailed responses from participants. Descriptive epidemiological analyses we re conducted. Participants of hot yoga had a number of pre-existing health conditions. Both benefits and adverse outcomes were reported. The most frequently reported health benefits of hot yoga in this sample included increased flexibility (63%), improved mood (58%), increased fitness (43%), and improved stamina (42%). Just over half of the participants reported some sort of adverse event during a hot yoga session (n = 82). The most commonly reported adverse events included dizziness (60%), feeling light headed (61%), nausea (35%), and dehydration (34%), amongst others. Further study on the risks and benefits of hot yoga participation is required.

  10. Long-term result and patient reported outcome of wrist splint treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Povlsen, Bo; Bashir, Muhammad; Wong, Fabian

    2014-06-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the commonest peripheral neuropathy presenting to specialist hand and wrist clinics. This study investigated the long-term outcome of carpal tunnel syndrome treated with isolated night wrist splint and the factors determining the likelihood of success of this intervention. Seventy-five patients referred to a specialist hand clinic with CTS were given night wrist splint treatment for 3 months as per a previous study protocol. Fifty-two patients from this cohort did not wish to have surgery after wrist splint treatment and were followed for a further 33-month period. Baseline pain and numbness levels were recorded on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) using a questionnaire upon first presentation. A further questionnaire at 36 months reassessed pain and numbness levels, patients' satisfaction with the treatment, and whether they had subsequent surgical decompression. Of the patients who completed the follow-up questionnaire 33 months after their period of conservative management, 43% were successfully treated with splint treatment alone. There was no difference in the VAS for pain or numbness at the baseline and at 36 months between successful and failed treatment groups. Patients successfully treated with wrist splinting alone reported a higher level of satisfaction with their treatment compared to patients who failed wrist splint treatment or had surgical decompression. The results reinforce the previous recommendation on wrist splinting as a first-line treatment in the Primary Care setting. Referral to specialist hand and wrist clinics should be reserved for patients with symptoms refractory to this initial measure.

  11. Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Children with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Marina; DeWalt, Darren A; Martin, Christopher F; Long, Millie D; Chen, Wenli; Jaeger, Beth; Sandler, Robert S; Kappelman, Michael D

    2016-07-01

    To assess the criterion validity and responsiveness of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in a web-based cohort of children with Crohn's disease. We recruited children with Crohn's disease (ages 9-17 years) and their parents from the web-based Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America Kids and Teens Study cohort. Upon entry into the cohort and 6 months later, children self-reported Crohn's disease activity, health-related quality of life, and PROMIS domains of pain interference, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and peer relationships. Mean PROMIS scores for the 276 participating patients were worse among those with worse self-reported Crohn's disease activity (per Short Crohn's Disease Activity Index, P < .005 for all), Crohn's disease activity in the prior 6 months (per Manitoba Index, P < .01 for all), and health-related quality of life (per IMPACT-35, P < .001 for all). One hundred forty-three patients and their parents completed follow-up questionnaires, 75% of whom reported stable disease activity. Those with improved Crohn's disease activity reported improved PROMIS scores, and those with worsened Crohn's disease activity reported worse PROMIS scores for all domains except anxiety. All participants reported improved anxiety from baseline, but those with stable or worsened Crohn's disease activity reported less improvement (P = .07). PROMIS scores were significantly associated with Crohn's disease activity in a linear and clinically meaningful manner, and responded to change in Crohn's disease activity over a 6-month period. This supports the criterion validity and responsiveness of pediatric PROMIS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment Patterns and Patient Reported Outcomes in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients with Overactive Bladder Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Tae Hyo; Lee, Seung Wook; Chung, Byung Ha; Cho, Jin Seon; Lee, Ji Youl

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to examine the treatment patterns, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. Seven hundred and forty seven patients were included in this prospective observational study. The primary endpoint was to describe the medical treatment patterns for BPH patients with OAB symptoms. The secondary endpoint was to determine the PROs of these patients. Clinical outcome was assessed using International prostate symptom score (IPSS), and PROs were measured using BPH-Related QoL Questionnaire Korea 1 (BPH QoL K1) and Euroqol-5 Dimension (EQ-5D). When starting the study, 391 patients (52.3%) received α-blocker monotherapy, whereas 356 (47.7%) received combination therapy with anticholinergics. Of the 369 patients who completed the 6-month treatment, 139 patients (37.7%) still received α-blocker monotherapy, 122 (33.1%) still received combination therapy with anticholinergics, and 108 (29.3%) received subsequent anticholinergics in addition to α-blocker. When the patients were stratified, storage subscore was higher (9.5 vs. 8.8, P = 0.034) and voiding subscore (9.7 vs. 11.6, P = 0.001) was lower in patients with anticholinergics than those without it. Although all treatment groups reported a significant improvement from baseline, no significant between-group differences in changes in IPSS, EQ-5D and BPH QoL K1 was found. About one-third of patients received α-blocker monotherapy, one-third received combination therapy with anticholinergics, and another one-third received subsequent anticholinergics in addition to α-blocker. Storage subscore was higher in patients with anticholinergics than those without it, but vice-versa for voiding subscore. Similar improvement on clinical outcomes and PROs was observed in all treatment groups. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures initiative as applied to psoriatic disease outcomes: a report from the GRAPPA 2013 meeting.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Armstrong, April W; Christensen, Robin; Garg, Amit; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Merola, Joseph F; Gladman, Dafna D; Mease, Philip J; Swerlick, Robert A; Rosen, Cheryl F; Abernethy, April

    2014-06-01

    In the United States, access to care is the number one issue facing our patients with dermatological conditions. In part, this is because we do not have outcome measures that are useful in clinical practice and available in databases where payers and governmental agencies can compare the performance of physicians and treatments. There is a growing recognition that insufficient attention has been paid to the outcomes measured in clinical trials and subsequently in clinical practice. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures group includes all willing stakeholders: patients, physicians, payers, and pharmaceutical scientists. As reported herein, the group's goal is to develop outcome measures in dermatology that address the needs of all involved.

  14. [Agreement of clinical diagnosis, structured interviews, and self-report questionnaires for depression in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Dolle, Kathrin; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; von Hofacker, Nikolaus; Izat, Yonca; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin

    2012-11-01

    The present study examines the agreement of structured child and parent interviews as well as clinical diagnosis for depressive episodes in children and adolescents. Moreover, it compares the accuracy and optimal cutoff scores of self-report questionnaires with reference to each of these diagnostic assessments. 81 children (9-12 years) and 88 adolescents (13-16 years) in psychiatric care and their parents completed the structured diagnostic interview Kinder-DIPS. The children answered the German Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), and the adolescents answered the German Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Kappa coefficients quantified the agreement. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine optimal cutoff scores, sensitivity, specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive values. The agreement between the child and parent interviews as well as between the interviews and clinical diagnosis was low to moderate. Clinicians diagnosed depressive episodes more frequently than the interviews. Cutoff scores and measures of accuracy varied between the reference standards, with less favorable results for clinical diagnosis. Clinicians may profit from conducting structured interviews. Strategies for dealing with conflicting information from children and parents should be tested empirically and described in detail.

  15. The Wayfinding Questionnaire: A clinically useful self-report instrument to identify navigation complaints in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, N K; Claessen, M H G; van der Ham, I J M; Post, M W M; Visser-Meily, J M A

    2017-07-18

    Post-stroke navigation complaints are frequent (about 30%) and intervention is possible, but there is no assessment instrument to identify patients with navigation complaints. We therefore studied the clinical validity of the Wayfinding Questionnaire (WQ) in a cross-sectional study with 158 chronic stroke patients and 131 healthy controls. Patients with low (more navigation complaints) versus normal WQ scores were compared for demographics, stroke characteristics, emotional and cognitive complaints, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Actual navigation performance of 78 patients was assessed in a virtual reality setting. Effect sizes (d) were calculated. WQ responses (22 items) of stroke patients were compared with those of controls (discriminant validity). Results showed that patients with a low WQ score (n = 49, 32%) were more often women (p = 0.013) and less educated (p = 0.004), reported more cognitive complaints (d = 0.69), more emotional problems (d = 0.38 and 0.52), and lower HRQoL (d = 0.40 and 0.45) and, last but not least, performed worse on the navigation ability tasks (d = 0.23-0.80). Patients scored lower than controls on 21/22 WQ items, predominantly with small to medium effect sizes (d = 0.20-0.51). We conclude that the WQ is valid as a measure of navigation complaints in stroke patients, and thus strongly advocate its use in stroke care.

  16. Psychosocial outcomes and counselee satisfaction following genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: A patient-reported outcome study.

    PubMed

    Oberguggenberger, Anne; Sztankay, Monika; Morscher, Raphael Johannes; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara; Weber, Ingrid; Hubalek, Michael; Kemmler, Georg; Zschocke, Johannes; Martini, Caroline; Egle, Daniel; Dünser, Martina; Gamper, Eva; Meraner, Verena

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the psychosocial consequences of genetic counseling and testing (GCT) for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) at follow-up in a "real-life" sample of counselees at an Austrian tertiary care center. The study cohort included counselees who had undergone genetic counseling for HBOC and completed a follow-up self-report questionnaire battery on psychosocial outcomes (quality of life, psychological distress, satisfaction with counseling and decisions). For comparison of distress, we recruited a reference sample of breast cancer survivors (BCS; n=665) who had not requested GCT in the same setting. Overall, counselees did not exhibit increased levels of anxiety and depression when compared to BCS. No specific follow-up deleterious psychosocial consequences were detected among the former group. Of the 137 counselees, 22.6% and 9.8% experienced clinically relevant levels of anxiety and depression, respectively, at an average follow-up time of 1.8years. However, both anxiety and depression significantly decreased with time and were alike between counselees with and without cancer diagnosis. Follow-up cancer worry seems to be significantly higher among counselees who had not undergone genetic testing or were undecided about it than among counselees who had been tested. Our results strongly support GCT as part of routine care for patients with HBOC. The risk factors of increased distress in specific subgroups of counselees, such as recent cancer diagnosis or uncertainty about testing, warrant further exploration and specific attention in clinical routines. Particularly, the psychological needs of undecided counselees warrant ongoing attention and potential follow-ups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between interviewer-respondent race match and reporting of energy intake using food frequency questionnaires in the rural South United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of the observational study was to determine whether interviewer race influences food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) reporting accuracy in a Deep South, largely African American cohort. A secondary analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of interviewer race on energy reporting ...

  18. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract — The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question (“During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?”; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome (“How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?”; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or

  19. Patient-Reported Outcomes After Multiligament Knee Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Jessica M.; Anthony, Christopher A.; DeMik, David; Glass, Natalie; Amendola, Annunziato; Wolf, Brian R.; Bollier, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Background: Management of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in the setting of a multiligamentous knee injury (MLKI) represents an area of great controversy. Purpose: Our study was designed to compare long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after MCL repair versus reconstruction in the setting of a multiligamentous injury of the knee. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: At a single institution, 68 patients were identified over a 10-year period as having MCL intervention in the setting of MLKI. Of these patients, 34 (50%) were successfully contacted via telephone to collect Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. A retrospective chart review of these subjects was also conducted to identify patient and surgical factors affecting PROs. Results: At a mean 6-year follow-up (range, 2-11 years), the mean Lysholm score was 77.4 ± 23.1 and mean IKDC score was 72.6 ± 23.6. Univariate analyses identified time to surgery (P = .005) and MCL reconstruction (P = .001) as risk factors for Lysholm score ≤75. Univariate analyses identified patient age (P = .049), time to surgery (P = .018), and MCL reconstruction (P = .004) as risk factors for IKDC score ≤75. On subsequent multivariate analysis, MCL reconstruction was found to be a predictor of Lysholm or IKDC score of ≤75. Conclusion: Patients undergoing MCL repair in the setting of MLKI generally had higher PROs than those undergoing reconstructions at a mean 6 years of follow-up. Further work is needed to elucidate patient and surgical factors that may influence subjective outcomes after multiligament knee injuries. PMID:28357408

  20. [Scientific Evaluation of TCM Clinical Outcomes Rating Scale for Heart Failure Based on Patients Report].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-qiang; Mao, Jing-yuan; Wang, Xian-liang; Hou, Ya-zhu; Bi, Ying-fei

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical outcomes rating scale for heart failure (HF) based on patients' report. TCM clinical outcomes rating scale for HF (TCM-HF-PRO) were evaluated based on 340 HF patients' report from multiple centers. The completion of the investigation was recorded. Cronbach's α coefficient and split-half reliability were used for reliability analysis, and factor analysis was used to assess the construct validity of the rating scale. Pearson correlation analysis was then used for criterion validity analysis. Discriminant analysis was used to assess the responsiveness of the scale. All 340 HF patients having complete TCM-HF-PRO data were assigned to the treatment group and the control group by central randomization. The total TCM-HF-PRO scores of the two groups were compared using paired t-test to reflect the longitude responsiveness of the scale before treatment and at week 2 after treatment. (1) The recycling rate of the scale was 100.0%. One of them was not filled completely, which was rejected thereby. So the completion rate was 99.7%. The completion time for TCM-HF-PRO scale ranged 15 to 25 min. (2) The Cronbach's α coefficient of rating scale was 0.903, split-half reliability was 0.844 and 0.849. (3) Confirmatory factor analysis showed that 7 factors and items formed according to maximum load factor basically coincided with the construct of the rating scale, 7 factors accumulated contribution rate was 43.8%. TCM clinical outcomes rating scale for HF based on patients' report was relatively better correlated with the Minnesota living with HF questionnaire (r = 0.726, P < 0.01). (4) Discriminant analysis showed that the rating scale correctly classified more than 78.8% of case studies having confirmed initial differential diagnosis by experts. The total scale of the rating scale decreased more in the two group after treatment, with significant difference as compared with

  1. A self-report outcome measure for the evaluation of hearing aid fittings and services.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, S

    1999-11-01

    To design, optimise and validate an outcome measure for the evaluation of adult hearing aid fittings. A multi-dimensional subject-specific and situation-specific questionnaire (the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile--GHABP) to assess initial disability, handicap, use, benefit, residual disability and satisfaction before and after hearing aid provision. Hearing-impaired adults attending National Health Service clinics for the first time for whom amplification is an appropriate management option. A self-report instrument of length compatible with the requirements of routine clinical practice which retains psychometric leverage. The GHABP demonstrates sensitivity to the technological content and rehabilitative context of interventions. The scale properties facilitate the use of the GHABP in decision-making for individual hearing-impaired patients. An outcome measure such as the GHABP offers the various interested parties (purchasers, providers and patients) a tool for use in the evaluation of the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of existing services and future developments. Many of the design concepts embodied in the GHABP are applicable in other healthcare contexts.

  2. Inclusion criteria for outcomes of studies not clearly reported in Cochrane systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Jos; Ijaz, Sharea; Mischke, Christina

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to survey how outcomes in recent Cochrane reviews were defined and used for inclusion of studies and how this compares with guidance on preventing outcome reporting bias. A survey of Cochrane reviews. We extracted data on the outcomes and how the outcomes were used for inclusion of studies in the review. We included 52 reviews with a mean of 8.4 (standard deviation, 4.3) outcomes. Of all reviews, 47 (90%) used primary and secondary outcomes as the names for their review's outcomes but without further definition. None reported using a core outcome set. Forty reviews (77%) did not explain if they used outcomes for inclusion of studies, 8 (15%) stated that studies were included if they reported either primary or secondary outcomes, 1 (2%) reported that outcomes were not used for inclusion, and for 3 (6%), this was unclear. In a sample of Cochrane reviews, most reviews did not state if outcomes were used for inclusion of studies. Better explanation of inclusion decisions is needed to be able to understand the risk of outcome reporting bias in a review. Consistent guidance in names and definitions for different types of outcomes used in systematic reviews is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How bad is bile acid diarrhoea: an online survey of patient-reported symptoms and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bannaga, Ayman; Kelman, Lawrence; O'Connor, Michelle; Pitchford, Claire; Walters, Julian R F; Arasaradnam, Ramesh P

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) is an underdiagnosed condition producing diarrhoea, urgency and fear of faecal incontinence. How patients experience these symptoms has not previously been studied. Bile Acid Malabsorption (BAM) Support UK was established in 2015 as a national charity with objectives including to provide details regarding how BAD affects patients, to improve earlier recognition and clinical management. Design, setting and main outcome A questionnaire was collected anonymously by BAM Support UK and the Bile Salt Malabsorption Facebook group over 4 weeks at the end of 2015. It comprised 56 questions and aimed to inform patients and clinicians about how BAD affects the respondents. Results The first 100 responses were analysed. 91% of the respondents reported a diagnosis of BAD. 58% of total respondents diagnosed following a Selenium-homocholic acid taurine scan, 69% were diagnosed by a gastroenterologist, with type 2 and 3 BAD comprising 38% and 37%, respectively, of total respondents. Symptoms had been experienced for more than 5 years before diagnosis in 44% of respondents. Following treatment, usually with bile acid sequestrants, 60% of participants reported improvement of diarrhoea and most reported their mental health has been positively impacted. Just over half of the cohort felt as though their symptoms had been dismissed during clinical consultations and 28% felt their GPs were unaware of BAD. Conclusions BAD requires more recognition by clinicians to address the current delays in diagnosis. Treatment improves physical and mental symptoms in the majority of participants. PMID:28123771

  4. Validation of the Turkish Version of the Sexual Health Outcomes in Women Questionnaire (SHOW-Q) in Turkish-Speaking Women.

    PubMed

    Selcuk, Selcuk; Kucukbas, Mehmet; Cam, Cetin; Eser, Ahmet; Devranoglu, Belgin; Turkyilmaz, Sebnem; Karateke, Ates

    2016-06-01

    The Sexual Health Outcomes in Women Questionnaire (SHOW-Q) is designed to evaluate the sexual life of women for satisfaction, orgasm, desire, and pelvic problem interference. The SHOW-Q is important for evaluating worsening of sexual life for patients with pelvic problems and the management of these women to improve their sexual life. To validate the Turkish versions of the SHOW-Q for Turkish-speaking women. The Turkish version of the SHOW-Q was generated by two independent professional English-to-Turkish translators. The translated version of the SHOW-Q was reverse translated by two bilingual translators whose native language was English. Women with at least one symptom related to pelvic problems (n = 71) and those with no symptoms (n = 38) were included in the present study. Test-retest reliability analysis, content-face validity, internal consistency reliability, item-total correlations, convergent validity, construct validity, and factorial validity were performed to assess the psychometric properties of the Turkish versions of the SHOW-Q. Test-retest reliability demonstrated good correlation for all subscales. Cronbach α values ranged from 0.735 to 0.892 and indicated high internal consistency. There was a strong correlation for the corresponding subscales between the SHOW-Q and the Female Sexual Function Index. The mean score of each SHOW-Q subscale showed significant differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. The Turkish version of the SHOW-Q is a valid and reliable instrument that can be used to evaluate the sexual life of Turkish-speaking women with different pelvic problems. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Agreement between prospective diary data and retrospective questionnaire report of abdominal pain and stooling symptoms in children with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Self, M M; Williams, A E; Czyzewski, D I; Weidler, E M; Shulman, R J

    2015-08-01

    In functional gastrointestinal disorders, patient recall of symptoms drives diagnostic decisions and evaluation of treatment response, and research conclusions about potential treatments. In pediatrics, parent report also impacts assessment and care. Hence, identifying methods for accurately capturing patient and parent report of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms is important. This study evaluated correspondence between retrospective questionnaire (parent and child report) and prospective diary data for children and adolescents with IBS. Participants included 50 children/adolescents with IBS per Rome III criteria. Children completed a 2-week pain and stool diary. Children and parents subsequently completed a 2-week recall questionnaire, reporting number of pain days, maximum pain, days without bowel movement, and days with diarrhea during the diary interval. Intraclass correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots assessed agreement. For pain and days without bowel movement, overall agreement between child recall questionnaire and child diary was strong, although under conditions likely to facilitate agreement and with individual variation observed. Parent recall and child diary were less concordant, and agreement about diarrhea was poor for parent and child. Age did not significantly correlate with agreement. Child questionnaire with short recall interval may be a reasonable approximation for diary data, although this varies by individual and replication/investigation of lengthier recall are needed. Relying on parent questionnaire does not appear a suitable proxy, and recall of stool form by both parent and child appears more problematic. These results combined with existing literature support use of diary data whenever possible. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Development of a self-report questionnaire designed for population-based surveillance of gingivitis in adolescents: assessment of content validity and reliability

    PubMed Central

    QUIROZ, Viviana; REINERO, Daniela; HERNÁNDEZ, Patricia; CONTRERAS, Johanna; VERNAL, Rolando; CARVAJAL, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The major infectious diseases in Chile encompass the periodontal diseases, with a combined prevalence that rises up to 90% of the population. Thus, the population-based surveillance of periodontal diseases plays a central role for assessing their prevalence and for planning, implementing, and evaluating preventive and control programs. Self-report questionnaires have been proposed for the surveillance of periodontal diseases in adult populations world-wide. Objective This study aimed to develop and assess the content validity and reliability of a cognitively adapted self-report questionnaire designed for surveillance of gingivitis in adolescents. Material and Methods Ten predetermined self-report questions evaluating early signs and symptoms of gingivitis were preliminary assessed by a panel of clinical experts. Eight questions were selected and cognitively tested in 20 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years from Santiago de Chile. The questionnaire was then conducted and answered by 178 Chilean adolescents. Internal consistency was measured using the Cronbach’s alpha and temporal stability was calculated using the Kappa-index. Results A reliable final self-report questionnaire consisting of 5 questions was obtained, with a total Cronbach’s alpha of 0.73 and a Kappa-index ranging from 0.41 to 0.77 between the different questions. Conclusions The proposed questionnaire is reliable, with an acceptable internal consistency and a temporal stability from moderate to substantial, and it is promising for estimating the prevalence of gingivitis in adolescents. PMID:28877279

  7. Systematic review of patient-reported outcome measures in the surgical treatment of patients with esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Straatman, J; Joosten, P J M; Terwee, C B; Cuesta, M A; Jansma, E P; van der Peet, D L

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal cancer is currently the eighth most common cancer worldwide. Improvements in operative techniques and neoadjuvant therapies have led to improved outcomes. Resection of the esophagus carries a high risk of severe complications and has a negative impact on health-related quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study was to assess which patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are used to measure QOL after esophagectomy for cancer. A comprehensive search of original articles was conducted investigating QOL after surgery for esophageal carcinoma. Two authors independently selected relevant articles, conducted clinical appraisal, and extracted data (PJ and JS). Out of 5893 articles, 58 studies were included, consisting of 41 prospective and 17 retrospective cohort studies, including a total of 6964 patients. These studies included 11 different PROMs. The existing PROMs could be divided into generic, symptom-specific, and disease-specific questionnaires. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QOL Questionnaire Core 30 (QLQ C-30) along with the EORTC QLQ-OESophagus module OES18 was the most widely used; in 42 and 32 studies, respectively. The EORTC and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) questionnaires use an oncological module and an organ-specific module. One validation study was available, which compared the FACT and EORTC, showing moderate to poor correlation between the questionnaires. A great variety of PROMs are being used in the measurement of QOL after surgery for esophageal cancer. A questionnaire with a general module along with a disease-specific module for assessment of QOL of different treatment modalities seem to be the most desirable, such as the EORTC and the FACT with their specific modules (EORTC QLQ-OES18 and FACT-E). Both are developed in different treatment modalities, such as in surgical patients. With regard to reproducibility of current results, the EORTC is recommended. © 2015

  8. Long term rehabilitation management and outcome of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: case reports.

    PubMed

    Bach, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an auto immune-disorder. It is a life threatening condition that typically presents with viral illness, headaches, severe psychiatric symptoms, seizures, behavioural changes, decreasing levels of unconsciousness and progressive unresponsiveness, cognitive impairment, abnormal movements (e.g., dyskinesia), ataxia and hypoventilation. This paper describes the long term outcome and rehabilitation management of patients with NMDAR encephalitis and highlights the diverse outcome of this condition and the unique and individual long term management needs associated with this disorder. This is a case report study of three different patients with NMDAR encephalitis. All three cases are young women, two of whom presented with ovarian teratoma. Patient KH is the most impaired and was resident in a slow stream rehabilitation care home and presented with challenging behaviour. Patients RM and OA both lived in the community and presented with similar anxieties but diverse levels of cognition and motivation. A review of the literature is provided summarizing the disorder, interventions, management and challenges of this varied and complex condition. Standard neuropsychological tests and questionnaires to assess community integration (BICRO-39), quality of life (QOLIBRI-OS) and mood (HADS) were administered. Positive outcomes were achieved for all three patients using a variety of interventions which included behavioural management, family psycho-education and an integrated holistic multi-disciplinary team community approach. Memory and executive deficits were persistent in the long term and severity of impairments showed wide variability between patients. Emotional distress and behavioural difficulties were prominent and persistent and had a pronounced impact on rehabilitation. Continence issues were also a major factor impacting on the rehabilitation. Long term integrated and multi-disciplinary input by a variety of

  9. An Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome Measures System in UK Chiropractic Practices: A Feasibility Study of Routine Collection of Outcomes and Costs.

    PubMed

    Newell, Dave; Diment, Emily; Bolton, Jenni E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of collecting valid and widely used health outcomes, including information concerning cost of care, using a Web-based patient-driven patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) collection process within a cohort of UK chiropractic practices. A Web-based PROM system (Care Response) was used. Patients with low back and neck pain were recruited from a group of chiropractic practices located in the United Kingdom. Information collected included demographic data, generic and condition-specific PROMs at the initial consultation and 90 days later, patient-reported experience measures, and additional health seeking to estimate costs of care. A group of 33 clinics provided information from a total of 1895 patients who completed baseline questionnaires with 844 (45%) completing the measures at 90-day follow-up. Subsequent outcomes suggest that more than 70% of patients improved over the course of treatment regardless of the outcome used. Using the baseline as a virtual counterfactual with respect to follow-up, we calculated quality-adjusted life years and the cost thereof resulting in a mean quality-adjusted life years gained of 0.8 with an average cost of £895 per quality-adjusted life year. Routine collection of PROMs, including information about cost, is feasible and can be achieved using an online system within a clinical practice environment. We describe a Web-based collection system and discuss the choice of measures leading to a comprehensive understanding of outcomes and costs in routine practice. Copyright © 2016 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Indirect treatment comparison/network meta-analysis study questionnaire to assess relevance and credibility to inform health care decision making: an ISPOR-AMCP-NPC Good Practice Task Force report.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jeroen P; Trikalinos, Thomas; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Daw, Jessica; Andes, Sherry; Eldessouki, Randa; Salanti, Georgia

    2014-03-01

    Despite the great realized or potential value of network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trial evidence to inform health care decision making, many decision makers might not be familiar with these techniques. The Task Force developed a consensus-based 26-item questionnaire to help decision makers assess the relevance and credibility of indirect treatment comparisons and network meta-analysis to help inform health care decision making. The relevance domain of the questionnaire (4 questions) calls for assessments about the applicability of network meta-analysis results to the setting of interest to the decision maker. The remaining 22 questions belong to an overall credibility domain and pertain to assessments about whether the network meta-analysis results provide a valid answer to the question they are designed to answer by examining 1) the used evidence base, 2) analysis methods, 3) reporting quality and transparency, 4) interpretation of findings, and 5) conflicts of interest. The questionnaire aims to help readers of network meta-analysis opine about their confidence in the credibility and applicability of the results of a network meta-analysis, and help make decision makers aware of the subtleties involved in the analysis of networks of randomized trial evidence. It is anticipated that user feedback will permit periodic evaluation and modification of the questionnaire. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing patient reported outcome measures: A practical guide for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Hayley A; Williams, John G

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses cause physical, emotional and social impact on patients. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used in clinical decision-making, clinical research and approval of new therapies. In the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in the number of PROMs in gastroenterology and, therefore, the choice between which of these PROMs to use can be difficult. Not all PROM instruments currently used in research and clinical practice in gastroenterology have gone through a rigorous development methodology. New drugs and therapies will not have access to the market if the PROMs used in their clinical trials are not validated according to the guidelines of the international agencies. Therefore, it is important to know the required properties of PROMs when choosing or evaluating a drug or a clinical intervention. This paper reviews the current literature on how to assess the validity and reliability of PROMs. It summarises the required properties into a practical guide for gastroenterologists to use in assessing an instrument for use in clinical practice or research. PMID:25452841

  12. Addressing Missing Data in Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS): Implications for the Use of PROMS for Comparing Provider Performance.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Manuel; Gutacker, Nils; Bojke, Chris; Street, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are now routinely collected in the English National Health Service and used to compare and reward hospital performance within a high-powered pay-for-performance scheme. However, PROMs are prone to missing data. For example, hospitals often fail to administer the pre-operative questionnaire at hospital admission, or patients may refuse to participate or fail to return their post-operative questionnaire. A key concern with missing PROMs is that the individuals with complete information tend to be an unrepresentative sample of patients within each provider and inferences based on the complete cases will be misleading. This study proposes a strategy for addressing missing data in the English PROM survey using multiple imputation techniques and investigates its impact on assessing provider performance. We find that inferences about relative provider performance are sensitive to the assumptions made about the reasons for the missing data.

  13. Validation study of the Forgotten Joint Score-12 as a universal patient-reported outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mikio; Baba, Tomonori; Homma, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochi, Hironori; Yuasa, Takahito; Behrend, Henrik; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The Forgotten Joint Score-12 (FJS-12) is for patients to forget their artificial joint and is reportedly a useful patient-reported outcome tool for artificial joints. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the FJS-12 is as useful as the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) or the Japanese Orthopaedic Association Hip Disease Evaluation Questionnaire (JHEQ) in Japan. All patients who visited our hospital's hip joint specialists following unilateral THA from August 2013 to July 2014 were evaluated. Medical staff members other than physicians administered three questionnaires. Items evaluated were (1) the reliability of the FJS-12 and (2) correlations between the FJS-12 and the total and subscale scores of the WOMAC or JHEQ. Of 130 patients, 22 were excluded. Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.97 for the FJS-12. The FJS-12 showed a significantly lower score than the WOMAC or JHEQ (p < 0.01). The FJS-12 was moderately correlated with the total WOMAC score (r = 0.522) and its subscale scores for "stiffness" (r = 0.401) and "function" (r = 0.539) and was weakly correlated with the score for "pain" (r = 0.289). The FJS-12 was favorably correlated with the total JHEQ score (r = 0.686) and its subscale scores (r = 0.530-0.643). The FJS-12 was correlated with and showed reliability similar to that of the JHEQ and WOMAC. The FJS-12, which is not affected by culture or lifestyle, may be useful in Japan.

  14. Effect of Intensive Blood-Pressure Treatment on Patient-Reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Berlowitz, Dan R; Foy, Capri G; Kazis, Lewis E; Bolin, Linda P; Conroy, Molly B; Fitzpatrick, Peter; Gure, Tanya R; Kimmel, Paul L; Kirchner, Kent; Morisky, Donald E; Newman, Jill; Olney, Christine; Oparil, Suzanne; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Powell, James; Ramsey, Thomas; Simmons, Debra L; Snyder, Joni; Supiano, Mark A; Weiner, Daniel E; Whittle, Jeff

    2017-08-24

    The previously published results of the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial showed that among participants with hypertension and an increased cardiovascular risk, but without diabetes, the rates of cardiovascular events were lower among those who were assigned to a target systolic blood pressure of less than 120 mm Hg (intensive treatment) than among those who were assigned to a target of less than 140 mm Hg (standard treatment). Whether such intensive treatment affected patient-reported outcomes was uncertain; those results from the trial are reported here. We randomly assigned 9361 participants with hypertension to a systolic blood-pressure target of less than 120 mm Hg or a target of less than 140 mm Hg. Patient-reported outcome measures included the scores on the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey, the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item depression scale (PHQ-9), patient-reported satisfaction with their blood-pressure care and blood-pressure medications, and adherence to blood-pressure medications. We compared the scores in the intensive-treatment group with those in the standard-treatment group among all participants and among participants stratified according to physical and cognitive function. Participants who received intensive treatment received an average of one additional antihypertensive medication, and the systolic blood pressure was 14.8 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 14.3 to 15.4) lower in the group that received intensive treatment than in the group that received standard treatment. Mean PCS, MCS, and PHQ-9 scores were relatively stable over a median of 3 years of follow-up, with no significant differences between the two treatment groups. No significant differences between the treatment groups were noted when participants were stratified according to baseline measures of physical or cognitive function. Satisfaction with blood-pressure care was high in both treatment

  15. Parallel accounts? Discrepancies between self-report (diary) and recall (questionnaire) measures of the same sexual behaviour.

    PubMed

    Coxon, A P

    1999-04-01

    Questionnaires and diaries have complementary biases and advantages for obtaining information on sexual behaviour but self-completed sexual diaries have the advantage of reducing retrospective bias. In a validation study of homosexual behaviour, sexual diary counts and subsequent questionnaire estimates (together with ratings of the certainty of the estimates) referring to the same month are compared and the discrepancies analyzed. Main findings include: questionnaire data yield consistently higher average estimates than diary counts, but have the same ordinal profile; individual difference (diary-questionnaire) scores show that 55% of questionnaire estimates of acts are higher than diary counts, 20% are identical and 25% are under-estimates; discrepancies are differentially located in different sexual acts. Masturbation and fellatio are systematically over-estimated in questionnaires and anal intercourse without a condom is the major source of inaccuracies, but in different directions: active partners under-estimate and passive partners over-estimate the amount of highest-risk sex. A strategy of joint use is discussed.