Science.gov

Sample records for repressor protein jdp2

  1. Suppression of cell-cycle progression by Jun dimerization protein-2 (JDP2) involves downregulation of cyclin-A2

    PubMed Central

    Pan, J; Nakade, K; Huang, Y-C; Zhu, Z-W; Masuzaki, S; Hasegawa, H; Murata, T; Yoshiki, A; Yamaguchi, N; Lee, C-H; Yang, W-C; Tsai, E-M; Obata, Y; Yokoyama, K K

    2010-01-01

    We report here a novel role for Jun dimerization protein-2 (JDP2) as a regulator of the progression of normal cells through the cell cycle. To determine the role of JDP2 in vivo, we generated Jdp2-knockout (Jdp2KO) mice by targeting exon-1 to disrupt the site of initiation of transcription. The epidermal thickening of skin from the Jdp2KO mice after treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) proceeded more rapidly than that of control mice, and more proliferating cells were found at the epidermis. Fibroblasts derived from embryos of Jdp2KO mice proliferated faster and formed more colonies than fibroblasts from wild-type mice. JDP2 was recruited to the promoter of the gene for cyclin-A2 (ccna2) at the AP-1 site. Cells lacking Jdp2 had elevated levels of cyclin-A2 mRNA. Furthermore, reintroduction of JDP2 resulted in the repression of transcription of ccna2 and of cell-cycle progression. Thus, transcription of the gene for cyclin-A2 appears to be a direct target of JDP2 in the suppression of cell proliferation. PMID:20802531

  2. Nuclear translocation of doublecortin-like protein kinase and phosphorylation of a transcription factor JDP2

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamine, Tadashi; Nomada, Shohgo; Onouchi, Takashi; Kameshita, Isamu; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase. • In living cells, DCLK was cleaved into two functional fragments. • zDCLK(kinase) was translocated into the nucleus by osmotic stresses. • Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. • JDP2 was efficiently phosphorylated by zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. - Abstract: Doublecortin-like protein kinase (DCLK) is a microtubule-associated protein kinase predominantly expressed in brain. In a previous paper, we reported that zebrafish DCLK2 (zDCLK) was cleaved into two functional fragments; the N-terminal zDCLK(DC + SP) with microtubule-binding activity and the C-terminal zDCLK(kinase) with a Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. In this study, we demonstrated that zDCLK(kinase) was widely distributed in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus when the cells were treated under hyperosmotic conditions with NaCl or mannitol. By two-hybrid screening using the C-terminal domain of DCLK, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a nuclear transcription factor, was identified as zDCLK(kinase)-binding protein. Furthermore, JDP2 served as an efficient substrate for zDCLK(kinase) only when histone was present. These results suggest that the kinase fragment of DCLK is translocated into the nucleus upon hyperosmotic stresses and that the kinase efficiently phosphorylates JDP2, a possible target in the nucleus, with the aid of histones.

  3. Host JDP2 expression in the bone marrow contributes to metastatic spread

    PubMed Central

    Barbarov, Yelena; Timaner, Michael; Alishekevitz, Dror; Hai, Tsonwin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun Dimerization Protein 2, JDP2, is a basic leucine zipper protein member of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors. JDP2 typically suppresses gene transcription through multiple mechanisms and plays a dual role in multiple cellular processes, including cell differentiation and proliferation which is dependent on AP-1 function. Whereas the role of JDP2 expression within cancer cells has been studied, its role in stromal cells at the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Here we show that mice lacking JDP2 (JDP2−/−) display a reduced rate of metastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT) breast carcinoma mouse models. The replacement of wild-type bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) with JDP2-deficient BMDCs recapitulates the metastatic phenotype of JDP2−/− tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, conditioned medium of wild-type BMDCs significantly potentiates the migration and invasion capacity of LLC cells as compared to that of JDP2−/− BMDCs. Furthermore, wild-type BMDCs secrete CCL5, a chemokine known to contribute to metastasis, to a greater extent than JDP2−/− BMDCs. The supplementation of CCL5 in JDP2−/− BMDC conditioned medium was sufficient to potentiate the invasion capacity of LLC. Overall, this study suggests that JDP2-expressing BMDCs within the tumor microenvironment contribute to metastatic spread. PMID:26497998

  4. Jun Dimerization Protein 2 Controls Senescence and Differentiation via Regulating Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Chang; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Wang, Shin-Wei; Ku, Chia-Chen; Lin, Ying-Chu; Chiou, Shyh-Shin; Hou, Ming-Feng; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Saito, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), binds directly to histones and DNAs and then inhibits the p300-mediated acetylation both of core histones and of reconstituted nucleosomes that contain JDP2 recognition DNA sequences. JDP2 plays a key role as a repressor of adipocyte differentiation by regulation of the expression of the gene C/EBPδ via inhibition of histone acetylation. Moreover, JDP2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (JDP2−/− MEFs) are resistant to replicative senescence. JDP2 inhibits the recruitment of polycomb repressive complexes (PRC1 and PRC2) to the promoter of the gene encoding p16Ink4a, resulting from the inhibition of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27). Therefore, it seems that chromatin-remodeling factors, including the PRC complex controlled by JDP2, may be important players in the senescence program. The novel mechanisms that underline the action of JDP2 in inducing cellular senescence and suppressing adipocyte differentiation are reviewed. PMID:21197464

  5. Endoglin integrates BMP and Wnt signalling to induce haematopoiesis through JDP2

    PubMed Central

    Baik, June; Magli, Alessandro; Tahara, Naoyuki; Swanson, Scott A.; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Borges, Luciene; Stewart, Ron; Garry, Daniel J.; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Thomson, James A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of haematopoietic and cardiac patterning remain poorly understood. Here we show that the BMP and Wnt signalling pathways are integrated in an endoglin (Eng)-dependent manner in cardiac and haematopoietic lineage specification. Eng is expressed in early mesoderm and marks both haematopoietic and cardiac progenitors. In the absence of Eng, yolk sacs inappropriately express the cardiac marker, Nkx2.5. Conversely, high levels of Eng in vitro and in vivo increase haematopoiesis and inhibit cardiogenesis. Levels of Eng determine the activation of both BMP and Wnt pathways, which are integrated downstream of Eng by phosphorylation of Smad1 by Gsk3. By interrogating Eng-dependent Wnt-mediated transcriptional changes, we identify Jdp2 as a key Eng-dependent Wnt target, sufficient to establish haematopoietic fate in early mesoderm when BMP and Wnt crosstalk is disturbed. These studies provide mechanistic insight into the integration of BMP and Wnt signalling in the establishment of haematopoietic and cardiac progenitors during embryogenesis. PMID:27713415

  6. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the C(α) atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the C(β) atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations. PMID:23005801

  7. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein.

    PubMed

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the C(α) atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the C(β) atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations.

  8. Solitons and collapse in the λ-repressor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhotin, Andrey; Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2012-08-01

    The enterobacteria lambda phage is a paradigm temperate bacteriophage. Its lysogenic and lytic life cycles echo competition between the DNA binding λ-repressor (CI) and CRO proteins. Here we scrutinize the structure, stability, and folding pathways of the λ-repressor protein, which controls the transition from the lysogenic to the lytic state. We first investigate the supersecondary helix-loop helix composition of its backbone. We use a discrete Frenet framing to resolve the backbone spectrum in terms of bond and torsion angles. Instead of four, there appears to be seven individual loops. We model the putative loops using an explicit soliton Ansatz. It is based on the standard soliton profile of the continuum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the Ansatz far exceeds the B-factor fluctuation distance accuracy of the experimentally determined protein configuration. We then investigate the folding pathways and dynamics of the λ-repressor protein. We introduce a coarse-grained energy function to model the backbone in terms of the Cα atoms and the side chains in terms of the relative orientation of the Cβ atoms. We describe the folding dynamics in terms of relaxation dynamics and find that the folded configuration can be reached from a very generic initial configuration. We conclude that folding is dominated by the temporal ordering of soliton formation. In particular, the third soliton should appear before the first and second. Otherwise, the DNA binding turn does not acquire its correct structure. We confirm the stability of the folded configuration by repeated heating and cooling simulations.

  9. Ni2+-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Velkov, Tony; Jones, Alun; Lim, Maria L R

    2008-01-01

    A two-step chromatographic sequence is described for the purification of native lactose operon repressor protein from Escherichia coli cells. The first step involves Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography of the soluble cytoplasmic extract. This method provides superior speed, resolution and yield than the established phosphocellulose cation-exchange chromatographic procedure. Anion-exchange chromatography is used for further purification to >95% purity. The identity and purity of the lactose repressor protein were demonstrated using sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide electrophoresis, crystallization, tryptic finger-printing mass spectrometry, and inducer binding assays. The purified lac repressor exhibited inducer sensitivity for operator DNA binding and undergoes a conformational change upon inducer binding. By all these extensive biochemical criteria, the purified protein behaves exactly as that described for the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor. PMID:18800304

  10. Ligand interactions with lactose repressor protein and the repressor-operator complex: the effects of ionization and oligomerization on binding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Zhan, Hongli; Swint-Kruse, Liskin; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2007-03-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and ligands that modify their functions are crucial in biology. Here, we examine sugars that bind the lactose repressor protein (LacI) and modify repressor affinity for operator DNA using isothermal titration calorimetry and equilibrium DNA binding experiments. High affinity binding of the commonly-used inducer isopropyl-beta,D-thiogalactoside is strongly driven by enthalpic forces, whereas inducer 2-phenylethyl-beta,D-galactoside has weaker affinity with low enthalpic contributions. Perturbing the dimer interface with either pH or oligomeric state shows that weak inducer binding is sensitive to changes in this distant region. Effects of the neutral compound o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-galactoside are sensitive to oligomerization, and at elevated pH this compound converts to an anti-inducer ligand with slightly enhanced enthalpic contributions to the binding energy. Anti-inducer o-nitrophenyl-beta,D-fucoside exhibits slightly enhanced affinity and increased enthalpic contributions at elevated pH. Collectively, these results both demonstrate the range of energetic consequences that occur with LacI binding to structurally-similar ligands and expand our insight into the link between effector binding and structural changes at the subunit interface. PMID:16860458

  11. Evidence-Based Structural Model of the Staphylococcal Repressor Protein: Separation of Functions into Different Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nyíri, Kinga; Kőhegyi, Bianka; Micsonai, András; Kardos, József; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of mobile genetic elements within Staphylococci is of high biomedical significance as such elements are frequently responsible for virulence and toxic effects. Staphylococcus-encoded repressor proteins regulate the replication of these mobile genetic elements that are located within the so-called pathogenicity islands. Here, we report structural and functional characterization of one such repressor protein, namely the Stl protein encoded by the pathogenicity island SaPIbov1. We create a 3D structural model and based on this prediction, we investigate the different functionalities of truncated and point mutant constructs. Results suggest that a helix-turn-helix motif governs the interaction of the Stl protein with its cognate DNA site: point mutations within this motif drastically decrease DNA-binding ability, whereas the interaction with the Stl-binding partner protein dUTPase is unperturbed by these point mutations. The 3D model also suggested the potential independent folding of a carboxy-terminal domain. This suggestion was fully verified by independent experiments revealing that the carboxy-terminal domain does not bind to DNA but is still capable of binding to and inhibiting dUTPase. A general model is proposed, which suggests that among the several structurally different repressor superfamilies Stl-like Staphylococcal repressor proteins belong to the helix-turn-helix transcription factor group and the HTH motif is suggested to reside within N-terminal segment. PMID:26414067

  12. The non-JAZ TIFY protein TIFY8 from Arabidopsis thaliana is a transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar Pérez, Amparo; Nagels Durand, Astrid; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Persiau, Geert; Van Wees, Saskia C M; Pieterse, Corné M J; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signalling is mediated by the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) repressor proteins, which are degraded upon JA perception to release downstream responses. The ZIM protein domain is characteristic of the larger TIFY protein family. It is currently unknown if the atypical member TIFY8 is involved in JA signalling. Here we show that the TIFY8 ZIM domain is functional and mediated interaction with PEAPOD proteins and NINJA. TIFY8 interacted with TOPLESS through NINJA and accordingly acted as a transcriptional repressor. TIFY8 expression was inversely correlated with JAZ expression during development and after infection with Pseudomonas syringae. Nevertheless, transgenic lines with altered TIFY8 expression did not show changes in JA sensitivity. Despite the functional ZIM domain, no interaction with JAZ proteins could be found. In contrast, TIFY8 was found in protein complexes involved in regulation of dephosphorylation, deubiquitination and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification suggesting an important role in nuclear signal transduction.

  13. The Non-JAZ TIFY Protein TIFY8 from Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Transcriptional Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cuéllar Pérez, Amparo; Nagels Durand, Astrid; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Clercq, Rebecca; Persiau, Geert; Van Wees, Saskia C. M.; Pieterse, Corné M. J.; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2014-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA) signalling is mediated by the JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) repressor proteins, which are degraded upon JA perception to release downstream responses. The ZIM protein domain is characteristic of the larger TIFY protein family. It is currently unknown if the atypical member TIFY8 is involved in JA signalling. Here we show that the TIFY8 ZIM domain is functional and mediated interaction with PEAPOD proteins and NINJA. TIFY8 interacted with TOPLESS through NINJA and accordingly acted as a transcriptional repressor. TIFY8 expression was inversely correlated with JAZ expression during development and after infection with Pseudomonas syringae. Nevertheless, transgenic lines with altered TIFY8 expression did not show changes in JA sensitivity. Despite the functional ZIM domain, no interaction with JAZ proteins could be found. In contrast, TIFY8 was found in protein complexes involved in regulation of dephosphorylation, deubiquitination and O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification suggesting an important role in nuclear signal transduction. PMID:24416306

  14. Jun dimerization protein 2 is a critical component of the Nrf2/MafK complex regulating the response to ROS homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tanigawa, S; Lee, C H; Lin, C S; Ku, C C; Hasegawa, H; Qin, S; Kawahara, A; Korenori, Y; Miyamori, K; Noguchi, M; Lee, L H; Lin, Y C; Steve Lin, C L; Nakamura, Y; Jin, C; Yamaguchi, N; Eckner, R; Hou, D-X; Yokoyama, K K

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular complications, inflammation and neurodegeneration. Cellular defense systems must work constantly to control ROS levels and to prevent their accumulation. We report here that the Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2) has a critical role as a cofactor for transcription factors nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and small Maf protein family K (MafK) in the regulation of the antioxidant-responsive element (ARE) and production of ROS. Chromatin immunoprecipitation–quantitative PCR (qPCR), electrophoresis mobility shift and ARE-driven reporter assays were carried out to examine the role of JDP2 in ROS production. JDP2 bound directly to the ARE core sequence, associated with Nrf2 and MafK (Nrf2–MafK) via basic leucine zipper domains, and increased DNA-binding activity of the Nrf2–MafK complex to the ARE and the transcription of ARE-dependent genes. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Jdp2-knockout (Jdp2 KO) mice, the coordinate transcriptional activation of several ARE-containing genes and the ability of Nrf2 to activate expression of target genes were impaired. Moreover, intracellular accumulation of ROS and increased thickness of the epidermis were detected in Jdp2 KO mice in response to oxidative stress-inducing reagents. These data suggest that JDP2 is required to protect against intracellular oxidation, ROS activation and DNA oxidation. qPCR demonstrated that several Nrf2 target genes such as heme oxygenase-1, glutamate–cysteine ligase catalytic and modifier subunits, the notch receptor ligand jagged 1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1 are also dependent on JDP2 for full expression. Taken together, these results suggest that JDP2 is an integral component of the Nrf2–MafK complex and that it modulates antioxidant and detoxification programs by acting via the ARE. PMID:24232097

  15. Ethylene regulates arabidopsis development via the modulation of DELLA protein growth repressor function.

    PubMed

    Achard, Patrick; Vriezen, Wim H; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2003-12-01

    Phytohormones regulate plant development via a poorly understood signal response network. Here, we show that the phytohormone ethylene regulates plant development at least in part via alteration of the properties of DELLA protein nuclear growth repressors, a family of proteins first identified as gibberellin (GA) signaling components. This conclusion is based on the following experimental observations. First, ethylene inhibited Arabidopsis root growth in a DELLA-dependent manner. Second, ethylene delayed the GA-induced disappearance of the DELLA protein repressor of ga1-3 from root cell nuclei via a constitutive triple response-dependent signaling pathway. Third, the ethylene-promoted "apical hook" structure of etiolated seedling hypocotyls was dependent on the relief of DELLA-mediated growth restraint. Ethylene, auxin, and GA responses now can be attributed to effects on DELLA function, suggesting that DELLA plays a key integrative role in the phytohormone signal response network.

  16. Repressing a repressor: gibberellin-induced rapid reduction of the RGA protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Silverstone, A L; Jung, H S; Dill, A; Kawaide, H; Kamiya, Y; Sun, T P

    2001-07-01

    RGA (for repressor of ga1-3) and SPINDLY (SPY) are likely repressors of gibberellin (GA) signaling in Arabidopsis because the recessive rga and spy mutations partially suppressed the phenotype of the GA-deficient mutant ga1-3. We found that neither rga nor spy altered the GA levels in the wild-type or the ga1-3 background. However, expression of the GA biosynthetic gene GA4 was reduced 26% by the rga mutation, suggesting that partial derepression of the GA response pathway by rga resulted in the feedback inhibition of GA4 expression. The green fluorescent protein (GFP)-RGA fusion protein was localized to nuclei in transgenic Arabidopsis. This result supports the predicted function of RGA as a transcriptional regulator based on sequence analysis. Confocal microscopy and immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the levels of both the GFP-RGA fusion protein and endogenous RGA were reduced rapidly by GA treatment. Therefore, the GA signal appears to derepress the GA signaling pathway by degrading the repressor protein RGA. The effect of rga on GA4 gene expression and the effect of GA on RGA protein level allow us to identify part of the mechanism by which GA homeostasis is achieved.

  17. Contextual interactions determine whether the Drosophila homeodomain protein, Vnd, acts as a repressor or activator

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhongxin; Syu, Li-Jyun; Mellerick, Dervla M.

    2005-01-01

    At the molecular level, members of the NKx2.2 family of transcription factors establish neural compartment boundaries by repressing the expression of homeobox genes specific for adjacent domains [Muhr et al. (2001) Cell, 104, 861–873; Weiss et al. (1998) Genes Dev., 12, 3591–3602]. The Drosophila homologue, vnd, interacts genetically with the high-mobility group protein, Dichaete, in a manner suggesting co-operative activation [Zhao and Skeath (2002) Development, 129, 1165–1174]. However, evidence for direct interactions and transcriptional activation is lacking. Here, we present molecular evidence for the interaction of Vnd and Dichaete that leads to the activation of target gene expression. Two-hybrid interaction assays indicate that Dichaete binds the Vnd homeodomain, and additional Vnd sequences stabilize this interaction. In addition, Vnd has two activation domains that are typically masked in the intact protein. Whether vnd can activate or repress transcription is context-dependent. Full-length Vnd, when expressed as a Gal4 fusion protein, acts as a repressor containing multiple repression domains. A divergent domain in the N-terminus, not found in vertebrate Vnd-like proteins, causes the strongest repression. The co-repressor, Groucho, enhances Vnd repression, and these two proteins physically interact. The data presented indicate that the activation and repression domains of Vnd are complex, and whether Vnd functions as a transcriptional repressor or activator depends on both intra- and inter-molecular interactions. PMID:15640442

  18. The lactose repressor system: paradigms for regulation, allosteric behavior and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C J; Zhan, H; Swint-Kruse, L; Matthews, K S

    2007-01-01

    In 1961, Jacob and Monod proposed the operon model for gene regulation based on metabolism of lactose in Escherichia coli. This proposal was followed by an explication of allosteric behavior by Monod and colleagues. The operon model rationally depicted how genetic mechanisms can control metabolic events in response to environmental stimuli via coordinated transcription of a set of genes with related function (e.g. metabolism of lactose). The allosteric response found in the lactose repressor and many other proteins has been extended to a variety of cellular signaling pathways in all organisms. These two models have shaped our view of modern molecular biology and captivated the attention of a surprisingly broad range of scientists. More recently, the lactose repressor monomer was used as a model system for experimental and theoretical explorations of protein folding mechanisms. Thus, the lac system continues to advance our molecular understanding of genetic control and the relationship between sequence, structure and function. PMID:17103112

  19. A Repressor Protein Complex Regulates Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Nathalie; Pauwels, Laurens; Baekelandt, Alexandra; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Leene, Jelle; Besbrugge, Nienke; Heyndrickx, Ken S; Cuéllar Pérez, Amparo; Durand, Astrid Nagels; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Eeckhout, Dominique; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-08-01

    Cell number is an important determinant of final organ size. In the leaf, a large proportion of cells are derived from the stomatal lineage. Meristemoids, which are stem cell-like precursor cells, undergo asymmetric divisions, generating several pavement cells adjacent to the two guard cells. However, the mechanism controlling the asymmetric divisions of these stem cells prior to differentiation is not well understood. Here, we characterized PEAPOD (PPD) proteins, the only transcriptional regulators known to negatively regulate meristemoid division. PPD proteins interact with KIX8 and KIX9, which act as adaptor proteins for the corepressor TOPLESS. D3-type cyclin encoding genes were identified among direct targets of PPD2, being negatively regulated by PPDs and KIX8/9. Accordingly, kix8 kix9 mutants phenocopied PPD loss-of-function producing larger leaves resulting from increased meristemoid amplifying divisions. The identified conserved complex might be specific for leaf growth in the second dimension, since it is not present in Poaceae (grasses), which also lack the developmental program it controls. PMID:26232487

  20. A Repressor Protein Complex Regulates Leaf Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Nathalie; Pauwels, Laurens; Baekelandt, Alexandra; De Milde, Liesbeth; Van Leene, Jelle; Besbrugge, Nienke; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Pérez, Amparo Cuéllar; Durand, Astrid Nagels; De Clercq, Rebecca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Eeckhout, Dominique; Gevaert, Kris; Vandepoele, Klaas; De Jaeger, Geert; Goossens, Alain; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Cell number is an important determinant of final organ size. In the leaf, a large proportion of cells are derived from the stomatal lineage. Meristemoids, which are stem cell-like precursor cells, undergo asymmetric divisions, generating several pavement cells adjacent to the two guard cells. However, the mechanism controlling the asymmetric divisions of these stem cells prior to differentiation is not well understood. Here, we characterized PEAPOD (PPD) proteins, the only transcriptional regulators known to negatively regulate meristemoid division. PPD proteins interact with KIX8 and KIX9, which act as adaptor proteins for the corepressor TOPLESS. D3-type cyclin encoding genes were identified among direct targets of PPD2, being negatively regulated by PPDs and KIX8/9. Accordingly, kix8 kix9 mutants phenocopied PPD loss-of-function producing larger leaves resulting from increased meristemoid amplifying divisions. The identified conserved complex might be specific for leaf growth in the second dimension, since it is not present in Poaceae (grasses), which also lack the developmental program it controls. PMID:26232487

  1. Functional and Structural Analysis of HrcA Repressor Protein from Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Susin, Michelle F.; Perez, Humberto R.; Baldini, Regina L.; Gomes, Suely L.

    2004-01-01

    A large number of bacteria regulate chaperone gene expression during heat shock by the HrcA-CIRCE system, in which the DNA element called CIRCE serves as binding site for the repressor protein HrcA under nonstress conditions. In Caulobacter crescentus, the groESL operon presents a dual type of control. Heat shock induction is controlled by a σ32-dependent promoter and the HrcA-CIRCE system plays a role in regulation of groESL expression under physiological temperatures. To study the activity of HrcA in vitro, we purified a histidine-tagged version of the protein, and specific binding to the CIRCE element was obtained by gel shift assays. The amount of retarded DNA increased significantly in the presence of GroES/GroEL, suggesting that the GroE chaperonin machine modulates HrcA activity. Further evidence of this modulation was obtained using lacZ transcription fusions with the groESL regulatory region in C. crescentus cells, producing different amounts of GroES/GroEL. In addition, we identified the putative DNA-binding domain of HrcA through extensive protein sequence comparison and constructed various HrcA mutant proteins containing single amino acid substitutions in or near this region. In vitro and in vivo experiments with these mutated proteins indicated several amino acids important for repressor activity. PMID:15466027

  2. Regulated expression of a repressor protein: FadR activates iclR.

    PubMed

    Gui, L; Sunnarborg, A; LaPorte, D C

    1996-08-01

    The control of the glyoxylate bypass operon (aceBAK) of Escherichia coli is mediated by two regulatory proteins, IclMR and FadR. IclMR is a repressor protein which has previously been shown to bind to a site which overlaps the aceBAK promoter. FAR is a repressor/activator protein which participates in control of the genes of fatty acid metabolism. A sequence just upstream of the iclR promoter bears a striking resemblance to FadR binding sites found in the fatty acid metabolic genes. The in vitro binding specificity of FadR, determined by oligonucleotide selection, was in good agreement with the sequences of these sites. The ability of FadR to bind to the site associated with iclR was demonstrated by gel shift and DNase I footprint analyses. Disruption of FadR or inactivation of the FadR binding site of iclR decreased the expression of an iclR::lacZ operon fusion, indicating that FadR activates the expression of iclR. It has been reported that disruption of fadR increases the expression of aceBAK. We observed a similar increase when we inactivated the FadR binding site of an iclR+ allele. This result suggests that FadR regulates aceBAK indirectly by altering the expression of IclR. PMID:8755903

  3. Energy transfer in lactose repressor protein modified with N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J A; Matthews, K S

    1991-03-12

    Energy transfer between the two tryptophan residues in the lactose repressor protein and the fluorescent moiety of the cysteine-specific reagent N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonate (1,5-IAEDANS) has been examined. Modification of repressor with this compound did not affect operator or inducer binding. 1,5-IAEDANS reacted primarily with Cys140 in wild-type repressor [Schneider et al. (1984) Biochemistry 23, 2221]; in the presence of inducer, modification at Cys107 increased, while reaction at Cys140 remained unchanged. Energy transfer between tryptophans and the AEDANS moiety(ies) in wild-type lac repressor occurred with an efficiency of 6.7 +/- 1.9% in the absence and 7.8 +/- 1.6% in the presence of inducer. The distance between the Trp donor(s) and the acceptor in wild-type repressor was calculated to be in the range approximately 35 A under both conditions. The similarity in efficiency despite large differences in the amount of acceptor attached to Cys107 when inducer is bound indicates that the AEDANS group at position 107 does not participate significantly in energy transfer and that the label at position 140 acts as the primary acceptor group. The similarity of energy-transfer efficiency (7.1 +/- 3.8%) observed for 1,5-IAEDANS-modified monomeric mutant repressor (Y282D) indicates that the transfer is primarily intrasubunit in the native tetramer. Measurements using two mutant repressors (each with a single tryptophan and modified with 1,5-IAEDANS) demonstrated that both tryptophans can serve as donor in the energy-transfer process. The W201Y repressor (containing Trp220) exhibited a transfer efficiency lower than wild type (5.6 +/- 2.4%), corresponding to a slightly larger distance between the donor-acceptor pair in this mutant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Crosslinking of hemin to a specific site on the 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jihjing; Thach, R.E. ); Patino, M.M.; Gaffield, L.; Walden. W.E. ); Smith, A. )

    1991-07-15

    Incubation of a 90-kDa ferritin repressor protein (FRP) with small amounts of radiolabeled hemin resulted in the formation of a strong interaction between the two that was stable to SDS/PAGE. Of seven other proteins tested individually, only apohemopexin and bovine serum albumin showed similar crosslinking ability, albeit to a much lower extent. ({sup 14}C)Hemin specifically crosslinked to FRP in the presence of a 50-fold excess of total wheat germ proteins. Inclusion of catalase did not prevent the reaction of hemin with FRP, suggesting that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not involved. The subsequent addition of a stoichiometric amount of apohemopexin did not reverse the reaction. Exhaustive digestion of the complex with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease produced a major labeled peptide of 17 kDa. These results show the existence of a highly specific, uniquely reactive hemin binding site on FRP.

  5. The protein kinase Akt1 regulates the interferon response through phosphorylation of the transcriptional repressor EMSY.

    PubMed

    Ezell, Scott A; Polytarchou, Christos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Guo, Ailan; Sanidas, Ioannis; Bihani, Teeru; Comb, Michael J; Sourvinos, George; Tsichlis, Philip N

    2012-03-01

    The protein kinases Akt1, Akt2, and Akt3 possess nonredundant signaling properties, few of which have been investigated. Here, we present evidence for an Akt1-dependent pathway that controls interferon (IFN)-regulated gene expression and antiviral immunity. The target of this pathway is EMSY, an oncogenic interacting partner of BRCA2 that functions as a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of EMSY in hTERT-immortalized mammary epithelial cells, and in breast and ovarian carcinoma cell lines, represses IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in a BRCA2-dependent manner, whereas its knockdown has the opposite effect. EMSY binds to the promoters of ISGs, suggesting that EMSY functions as a direct transcriptional repressor. Akt1, but not Akt2, phosphorylates EMSY at Ser209, relieving EMSY-mediated ISG repression. The Akt1/EMSY/ISG pathway is activated by both viral infection and IFN, and it inhibits the replication of HSV-1 and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Collectively, these data define an Akt1-dependent pathway that contributes to the full activation of ISGs by relieving their repression by EMSY and BRCA2.

  6. Diethyl pyrocarbonate reaction with the lactose repressor protein affects both inducer and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, C.F.; Matthews, K.S.

    1988-04-05

    Modification of the lactose repressor protein of Escherichia coli with diethyl pyrocarbonate (DPC) results in decreased inducer binding as well as operator and nonspecific DNA binding. Spectrophotometric measurements indicated a maximum of three histidines per subunit was modified, and quantitation of lysine residues with trinitrobenzenesulfonate revealed the modification of one lysine residue. The loss of DNA binding, both operator and nonspecific, was correlated with histidine modification; removal of the carbethoxy groups from the histidines by hydroxylamine was accompanied by significant recovery of DNA binding function. The presence of inducing sugars during the DPC reaction had no effect on histidine modification or the loss of DNA binding activity. In contrast, inducer binding was not recovered upon reversal of the histidine modification. However, the presence of inducer during reaction protected lysine from reaction and also prevented the decrease in inducer binding; these results indicate that reaction of the lysine residue(s) may correlate to the loss of sugar binding activity. Since no difference in incorporation of radiolabeled carbethoxy was observed following reaction with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of inducer, the reagent appears to function as a catalyst in the modification of the lysine. The formation of an amide bond between the affected lysine and a nearby carboxylic acid moiety provides a possible mechanism for the activity loss. Reaction of the isolated NH2-terminal domain resulted in loss of DNA binding with modification of the single histidine at position 29. Results from the modification of core domain paralleled observations with intact repressor.

  7. Escherichia coli gene purR encoding a repressor protein for purine nucleotide synthesis. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and interaction with the purF operator.

    PubMed

    Rolfes, R J; Zalkin, H

    1988-12-25

    The Escherichia coli gene purR, encoding a repressor protein, was cloned by complementation of a purR mutation. Gene purR on a multicopy plasmid repressed expression of purF and purF-lacZ and reduced the growth rate of host cells by limiting the rate of de novo purine nucleotide synthesis. The level of a 1.3-kilobase purR mRNA was higher in cells grown with excess adenine, suggesting that synthesis of the repressor may be regulated. The chromosomal locus of purR was mapped to coordinate 1755-kb on the E. coli restriction map (Kohara, Y., Akiyama, K., and Isono, K. (1987) Cell 50, 495-508). Pur repressor bound specifically to purF operator DNA as determined by gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays. The amino acid sequence of Pur repressor was derived from the nucleotide sequence. Pur repressor subunit contains 341 amino acids and has a calculated Mr of 38,179. Pur repressor is 31-35% identical with the galR and cytR repressors and 26% identical with the lacI repressor. These four repressors are likely homologous. Amino acid sequence similarity is greatest in an amino-terminal region presumed to contain a DNA-binding domain. A similarity is also noted in the operator sites for these repressors.

  8. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (-42 to -57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (-63 to -74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (-59 to -66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism.

  9. A testis cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein that has the properties of a translational repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; Fajardo, M A; Braun, R E

    1996-01-01

    Translation of the mouse protamine 1 (Prm-1) mRNA is repressed for several days during male germ cell differentiation. With the hope of cloning genes that regulate the translational repression of Prm-1, we screened male germ cell cDNA expression libraries with the 3' untranslated region of the Prm-1 RNA. From this screen we obtained two independent clones that encode Prbp, a Prm-1 RNA-binding protein. Prbp contains two copies of a double-stranded-RNA-binding domain. In vitro, the protein binds to a portion of the Prm-1 3' untranslated region previously shown to be sufficient for translational repression in transgenic mice, as well as to poly(I). poly(C). Prbp protein is present in multiple forms in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from wild-type mouse testes and is absent from testes of germ cell-deficient mouse mutants, suggesting that Prbp is restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Immunocytochemical localization confirmed that Prbp is present in the cytoplasmic compartment of late-stage meiotic cells and haploid round spermatids. Recombinant Prbp protein inhibits the translation of multiple mRNAs in a wheat germ lysate, suggesting that Prbp acts to repress translation in round spermatids. While this protein lacks complete specificity for Prm-1-containing RNAs in vitro, the properties of Prbp are consistent with it acting as a general repressor of translation. PMID:8649414

  10. The lac repressor.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2005-06-01

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field as the lac repressor has had in Molecular Biology. Over 40 years ago, Jacob and Monod [Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins, J. Mol. Biol. 3 (1961) 318] proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks. It is a cogent depiction of how a set of 'structural' genes may be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. In bacteria, the genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated when a repressor molecule binds to an upstream cis activated operator. The repressor and its operator together form a genetic switch, the lac operon. The switch functions when inducer molecules alter the conformation of the repressor in a specific manner. In the presence of a particular metabolite, the repressor undergoes a conformational change that reduces its affinity for the operator. The structures of the lac repressor and its complexes with operator DNA and effector molecules have provided a physical platform for visualizing at the molecular level the different conformations the repressor and the molecular basis for the switch. The structures of lac repressor, bound to its operator and inducer, have also been invaluable for interpreting a plethora of biochemical and genetic data. PMID:15950160

  11. Repressor and activator protein accelerates hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang Xian; Lo, Chung Mau; Lian, Qizhou; Ng, Kevin Tak-Pan; Liu, Xiao Bing; Ma, Yuen Yuen; Qi, Xiang; Yeung, Oscar Wai Ho; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Yang, Xin Xiang; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jiang; Shao, Yan; Man, Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Repressor and activator protein (Rap1) directly regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent signaling, which contributes to hepatic IRI. We here intended to investigate the effect of Rap1 in hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The association of Rap1 expression with hepatic inflammatory response were investigated in both human and rat liver transplantation. The effect of Rap1 in hepatic IRI was studied in Rap1 knockout mice IRI model in vivo and primary cells in vitro. Our results showed that over expression of Rap1 was associated with severe liver graft inflammatory response, especially in living donor liver transplantation. The results were also validated in rat liver transplantation model. In mice hepatic IRI model, the knockout of Rap1 reduced hepatic damage and hepatic inflammatory response. In primary cells, the knockout of Rap1 suppressed neutrophils migration activity and adhesion in response to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells through down-regulating neutrophils F-Actin expression and CXCL2/CXCR2 pathway. In addition, the knockout of Rap1 also decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in primary neutrophils and neutrophils-induced hepatocyte damage. In conclusion, Rap1 may induce hepatic IRI through promoting neutrophils inflammatory response. Rap1 may be the potential therapeutic target of attenuating hepatic IRI. PMID:27050284

  12. Tumor repressor protein 53 and steroid hormones provide a new paradigm for ovarian cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Mullany, Lisa K; Liu, Zhilin; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Deneke, Victoria; Ren, Yi Athena; Herron, Alan; Richards, JoAnne S

    2014-01-01

    The functional status of the tumor repressor protein (TP53 or TRP53) is a defining feature of ovarian cancer. Mutant or null alleles of TP53 are expressed in greater than 90% of all high-grade serous adenocarcinomas. Wild-type TP53 is elevated in low-grade serous adenocarcinomas in women and in our Pten;Kras;Amhr2-Cre mutant mouse model. Disruption of the Trp53 gene in this mouse model did not lead to high-grade ovarian cancer but did increase expression of estrogen receptor α (ESR1) and markedly enhanced the responsiveness of these cells to estrogen. Specifically, when Trp53-positive and Trp53 null mutant mice were treated with estradiol or vehicle, only the Trp53 null and Esr1-positive tumors respond vigorously to estradiol in vivo and exhibit features characteristic of high-grade type ovarian cancer: invasive growth into the ovarian stroma, rampant metastases to the peritoneal cavity, and nuclear atypia. Estrogen promoted and progesterone suppressed the growth of Trp53 null ovarian tumors and tumor cells injected ip, sc, or when grown in matrigel. Exposure of the Trp53 depleted cells to estrogen also has a profound impact on the tumor microenvironment and immune-related events. These results led to the new paradigm that TRP53 status is related to the susceptibility of transformed ovarian surface epithelial cells to estradiol-induced metastases and nuclear atypia via increased levels of estradiol receptor α.

  13. DNA sequence-dependent mechanics and protein-assisted bending in repressor-mediated loop formation

    PubMed Central

    Boedicker, James Q.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Johnson, Stephanie; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    As the chief informational molecule of life, DNA is subject to extensive physical manipulations. The energy required to deform double-helical DNA depends on sequence, and this mechanical code of DNA influences gene regulation, such as through nucleosome positioning. Here we examine the sequence-dependent flexibility of DNA in bacterial transcription factor-mediated looping, a context for which the role of sequence remains poorly understood. Using a suite of synthetic constructs repressed by the Lac repressor and two well-known sequences that show large flexibility differences in vitro, we make precise statistical mechanical predictions as to how DNA sequence influences loop formation and test these predictions using in vivo transcription and in vitro single-molecule assays. Surprisingly, sequence-dependent flexibility does not affect in vivo gene regulation. By theoretically and experimentally quantifying the relative contributions of sequence and the DNA-bending protein HU to DNA mechanical properties, we reveal that bending by HU dominates DNA mechanics and masks intrinsic sequence-dependent flexibility. Such a quantitative understanding of how mechanical regulatory information is encoded in the genome will be a key step towards a predictive understanding of gene regulation at single-base pair resolution. PMID:24231252

  14. Regulation of RNA splicing by the methylation-dependent transcriptional repressor methyl-CpG binding protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Young, Juan I.; Hong, Eugene P.; Castle, John C.; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Bowman, Aaron B.; Rose, Matthew F.; Kang, Dongcheul; Richman, Ron; Johnson, Jason M.; Berget, Susan; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2005-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the loss of acquired motor and language skills, autistic features, and unusual stereotyped movements. RTT is caused by mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mutations in MECP2 cause a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders including X-linked mental retardation, psychiatric disorders, and some cases of autism. Although MeCP2 was identified as a methylation-dependent transcriptional repressor, transcriptional profiling of RNAs from mice lacking MeCP2 did not reveal significant gene expression changes, suggesting that MeCP2 does not simply function as a global repressor. Changes in expression of a few genes have been observed, but these alterations do not explain the full spectrum of Rett-like phenotypes, raising the possibility that additional MeCP2 functions play a role in pathogenesis. In this study, we show that MeCP2 interacts with the RNA-binding protein Y box-binding protein 1 and regulates splicing of reporter minigenes. Importantly, we found aberrant alternative splicing patterns in a mouse model of RTT. Thus, we uncovered a previously uncharacterized function of MeCP2 that involves regulation of splicing, in addition to its role as a transcriptional repressor. PMID:16251272

  15. The cox protein of bacteriophage P2 inhibits the formation of the repressor protein and autoregulates the early operon.

    PubMed Central

    Saha, S; Haggård-Ljungquist, E; Nordström, K

    1987-01-01

    The cox gene is the first gene of the early operon of bacteriophage P2. The early promoter Pe and the repressor promoter Pc are located close to each other and in such a way that their transcripts have opposite polarity and show an overlap of about 30 nucleotides. The expression of the early operon and of the C gene was studied in vivo by using fusions to a promoterless cat (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase) gene. The results show that the Cox protein negatively autoregulates the early operon and inhibits the formation of the repressor C. By measuring the efficiency of plating of a series of P2 virulent deletion mutants on bacteria carrying a cloned cox gene, the site of action of the Cox protein was mapped within the Pe-Pc region. The stimulatory effect of the C protein on expression of the Pc promoter was found to be due to inhibition of transcription from Pc; this was demonstrated by mutating Pe which showed that loss of transcription from Pe stimulated transcription from Pc. Hence, this is a case of regulation of gene expression by convergent transcription. By cloning the region C-Pe-Pc-cox such that the cat and kan genes are expressed from Pc and Pe, respectively, it was shown that only one of the resistances (Cm and Km) was expressed. This mimics the choice between lysogeny and lytic growth of the phage. The 'lysogenic' state was very stable whereas the 'lytic' state flipped to the 'lysogenic' at a somewhat higher frequency. The presence of a cloned cox gene drastically stimulated the formation of free phage from a P2-lysogen and dramatically reduced the frequency of lysogenization after P2 infection. We conclude that the pleiotropic effects of the cox (control of excision) gene, namely effects on lysogenization, formation of free phage and site-specific P2 recombination, can be explained by the effect of the Cox protein on the activity of the promoters Pc and Pe. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2826134

  16. A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the DNA-binding affinity of Cro repressor protein stabilized by a disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Baleja, J D; Sykes, B D

    1994-01-01

    The structure, dynamics, and DNA-binding characteristics of wild-type and cross-linked Cro repressors are compared by using circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. The Cro repressor is a small dimeric DNA-binding protein from bacteriophage lambda. Replacement of valine-55 by cysteine in the dimer interaction region of each monomer subunit results in the spontaneous formation of a disulfide cross-link between the subunits. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy and CD data show the variant has nearly the same conformation as the wild-type protein. However, by monitoring the CD band at 222 nm, the cross-linked protein is shown to have a heat-denaturation midpoint temperature of 67 degrees C, whereas the wild-type protein has a melting temperature of about 47 degrees C. Using 1H-NMR to follow the denaturation by heat, the same melting temperature is observed for wild-type Cro (47 degrees C), but a much lower melting temperature is seen for V55C Cro (58 degrees C). This suggests that between 58 and 67 degrees C the cross-linked protein exists in a molten globule state with the alpha-helices mainly intact, but without the interaction of chemical groups that cause spectral dispersion. Binding parameters for interaction of the proteins with DNA were obtained by observing the NMR spectrum for the imino protons of a 10 base-pair half-operator DNA and titrating in protein. The cross-linked protein binds DNA (Kd = 160 microM) about eight times more weakly than the wild-type protein (Kd = 19 microM). Adjustments in protein structure, necessary to form a tight protein-DNA complex, appear to be hindered by a loss in protein flexibility caused by the intersubunit cross-link.

  17. The Arabidopsis F-box protein SLEEPY1 targets gibberellin signaling repressors for gibberellin-induced degradation.

    PubMed

    Dill, Alyssa; Thomas, Stephen G; Hu, Jianhong; Steber, Camille M; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2004-06-01

    The nuclear DELLA proteins are highly conserved repressors of hormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, GA derepresses its signaling pathway by inducing proteolysis of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA). SLEEPY1 (SLY1) encodes an F-box-containing protein, and the loss-of-function sly1 mutant has a GA-insensitive dwarf phenotype and accumulates a high level of RGA. These findings suggested that SLY1 recruits RGA to the SCFSLY1 E3 ligase complex for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. In this report, we provide new insight into the molecular mechanism of how SLY1 interacts with the DELLA proteins for controlling GA response. By yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull-down assays, we demonstrated that SLY1 interacts directly with RGA and GA INSENSITIVE (GAI, a closely related DELLA protein) via their C-terminal GRAS domain. The rga and gai null mutations additively suppressed the recessive sly1 mutant phenotype, further supporting the model that SCFSLY1 targets both RGA and GAI for degradation. The N-terminal DELLA domain of RGA previously was shown to be essential for GA-induced degradation. However, we found that this DELLA domain is not required for protein-protein interaction with SLY1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), suggesting that its role is in a GA-triggered conformational change of the DELLA proteins. We also identified a novel gain-of-function sly1-d mutation that increased GA signaling by reducing the levels of the DELLA protein in plants. This effect of sly1-d appears to be caused by an enhanced interaction between sly1-d and the DELLA proteins. PMID:15155881

  18. Ion concentration and temperature dependence of DNA binding: comparison of PurR and LacI repressor proteins.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, M I; Xu, H; Matthews, K S

    2001-07-10

    Purine repressor (PurR) binding to specific DNA is enhanced by complexing with purines, whereas lactose repressor (LacI) binding is diminished by interaction with inducer sugars despite 30% identity in their protein sequences and highly homologous tertiary structures. Nonetheless, in switching from low- to high-affinity DNA binding, these proteins undergo a similar structural change in which the hinge region connecting the DNA and effector binding domains folds into an alpha-helix and contacts the DNA minor groove. The differences in response to effector for these proteins should be manifest in the polyelectrolyte effect which arises from cations displaced from DNA by interaction with positively charged side chains on a protein and is quantitated by measurement of DNA binding affinity as a function of ion concentration. Consistent with structural data for these proteins, high-affinity operator DNA binding by the PurR-purine complex involved approximately 15 ion pairs, a value significantly greater than that for the corresponding state of LacI (approximately 6 ion pairs). For both proteins, however, conversion to the low-affinity state results in a decrease of approximately 2-fold in the number of cations released per dimeric DNA binding site. Heat capacity changes (DeltaC(p)) that accompany DNA binding, derived from buried apolar surface area, coupled folding, and restriction of motional freedom of polar groups in the interface, also reflect the differences between these homologous repressor proteins. DNA binding of the PurR-guanine complex is accompanied by a DeltaC(p) (-2.8 kcal mol(-1) K(-1)) more negative than that observed previously for LacI (-0.9 to -1.5 kcal mol(-1) K(-1)), suggesting that more extensive protein folding and/or enhanced structural rigidity may occur upon DNA binding for PurR compared to DNA binding for LacI. The differences between these proteins illustrate plasticity of function despite high-level sequence and structural homology and

  19. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chang, Ying; Guo, Jianjun; Zeng, Qingning; Ellis, Brian; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  20. Crystal Structure of the Arginine Repressor Protein in Complex With the DNA Operator From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, L.T.; Cherney, M.M.; Garen, C.R.; Lu, G.J.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-12

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) gene product encoded by open reading frame Rv1657 is an arginine repressor (ArgR). All genes involved in the L-arginine (hereafter arginine) biosynthetic pathway are essential for optimal growth of the Mtb pathogen, thus making MtbArgR a potential target for drug design. The C-terminal domains of arginine repressors (CArgR) participate in oligomerization and arginine binding. Several crystal forms of CArgR from Mtb (MtbCArgR) have been obtained. The X-ray crystal structures of MtbCArgR were determined at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution with bound arginine and at 2.15 {angstrom} resolution in the unliganded form. These structures show that six molecules of MtbCArgR are arranged into a hexamer having approximate 32 point symmetry that is formed from two trimers. The trimers rotate relative to each other by about 11{sup o} upon binding arginine. All residues in MtbCArgR deemed to be important for hexamer formation and for arginine binding have been identified from the experimentally determined structures presented. The hexamer contains six regular sites in which the arginine molecules have one common binding mode and three sites in which the arginine molecules have two overlapping binding modes. The latter sites only bind the ligand at high (200 mM) arginine concentrations.

  1. Modulation of Ultrafast Conformational Dynamics in Allosteric Interaction of Gal Repressor Protein with Different Operator DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Naiya, Gitashri; Singh, Priya; Lemmens, Peter; Roy, Siddhartha; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Although all forms of dynamical behaviour of a protein under allosteric interaction with effectors are predicted, little evidence of ultrafast dynamics in the interaction has been reported. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of a combined approach involving picosecond-resolved FRET and polarisation-gated fluorescence for the exploration of ultrafast dynamics in the allosteric interaction of the Gal repressor (GalR) protein dimer with DNA operator sequences OE and OI . FRET from the single tryptophan residue to a covalently attached probe IAEDANS at a cysteine residue in the C-terminal domain of GalR shows structural perturbation and conformational dynamics during allosteric interaction. Polarisation-gated fluorescence spectroscopy of IAEDANS and another probe (FITC) covalently attached to the operator directly revealed the essential dynamics for cooperativity in the protein-protein interaction. The ultrafast resonance energy transfer from IAEDANS in the protein to FITC also revealed different dynamic flexibility in the allosteric interaction. An attempt was made to correlate the dynamic changes in the protein dimers with OE and OI with the consequent protein-protein interaction (tetramerisation) to form a DNA loop encompassing the promoter segment.

  2. Binding of cellular repressor protein or the IE2 protein to a cis-acting negative regulatory element upstream of a human cytomegalovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Stinski, M F

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus early UL4 promoter has upstream negative and positive cis-acting regulatory elements. In the absence of the upstream negative regulatory region, the positive element confers strong transcriptional activity. The positive element contains a CCAAT box dyad symmetry and binds the cellular transcription factor NF-Y. The effect of the negative regulatory element is negated by the viral IE2 protein (L. Huang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 68:2108, 1994). We investigated the binding of cellular or viral IE2 protein to the negative regulatory region. The major cis-acting negative regulatory element was located between -168 and -134 bp relative to the transcription start site. This element could be transferred to a heterologous promoter, and it functioned in either orientation. Mutational analysis demonstrated that a core DNA sequence in the cis-acting negative regulatory element, 5'-GTTTGGAATCGTT-3', was required for the binding of either a cellular repressor protein(s) or the viral IE2 protein. The cellular DNA binding activity was present in both nonpermissive HeLa and permissive human fibroblast cells but more abundant in HeLa cells. Binding of the cellular repressor protein to the upstream cis-acting negative regulatory element correlates with repression of transcription from the early UL4 promoter. Binding of the viral IE2 protein correlates with negation of the repressive effect. PMID:7494269

  3. Conversion of the LIN-1 ETS protein of Caenorhabditis elegans from a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor to a phosphorylated transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Leight, Elizabeth R; Murphy, John T; Fantz, Douglas A; Pepin, Danielle; Schneider, Daniel L; Ratliff, Thomas M; Mohammad, Duaa H; Herman, Michael A; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    The LIN-1 ETS transcription factor plays a pivotal role in controlling cell fate decisions during development of the Caenorhabditis elegans vulva. Prior to activation of the RTK/Ras/ERK-signaling pathway, LIN-1 functions as a SUMOylated transcriptional repressor that inhibits vulval cell fate. Here we demonstrate using the yeast two-hybrid system that SUMOylation of LIN-1 mediates interactions with a protein predicted to be involved in transcriptional repression: the RAD-26 Mi-2β/CHD4 component of the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylation (NuRD) transcriptional repression complex. Genetic studies indicated that rad-26 functions to inhibit vulval cell fates in worms. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we showed that the EGL-27/MTA1 component of the NuRD complex binds the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 independently of LIN-1 SUMOylation. EGL-27 also binds UBC-9, an enzyme involved in SUMOylation, and MEP-1, a zinc-finger protein previously shown to bind LIN-1. Genetic studies indicate that egl-27 inhibits vulval cell fates in worms. These results suggest that LIN-1 recruits multiple proteins that repress transcription via both the SUMOylated amino-terminus and the unSUMOylated carboxy-terminus. Assays in cultured cells showed that the carboxy-terminus of LIN-1 was converted to a potent transcriptional activator in response to active ERK. We propose a model in which LIN-1 recruits multiple transcriptional repressors to inhibit the 1° vulval cell fate, and phosphorylation by ERK converts LIN-1 to a transcriptional activator that promotes the 1° vulval cell fate.

  4. Superinduction of metallothionein I by inhibition of protein synthesis: role of a labile repressor in MTF-1 mediated gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yongyi; Lin, Gary X; Millecchia, Lyndell; Ma, Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Induction of metallothioneins (MTs) through the metal-activated transcription factor-1 (MTF-1) provides a model response for analyzing transcriptional gene regulation by heavy metals. Here, we report inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide (CHX) increases induction of Mt1 by approximately five-fold, a phenomenon designated as "superinduction." Characterization of superinduction revealed it is time- and concentration-dependent of CHX, requires the presence of an MTF-1 activator, and occurs at a transcriptional level, suggesting a labile repressor in the control of Mt1 induction. Genetic analyses using Mtf1 null cells and a metal response element (MRE)-driven reporter construct showed that superinduction of Mt1 is mediated through MTF-1 and MRE-dependent transcription. Analyses of intracellular zinc content by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging demonstrated that treatment with CHX alone or CHX plus an inducer does not increase the total zinc accumulation or the concentration of free zinc in cells under the conditions in which superinduction occurs. Moreover, superinduction was observed in cells cultured in a zinc-depleted medium, suggesting that superinduction does not involve elevation of intracellular zinc concentration. Northern blotting showed that Cd, CHX, or Cd + CHX does not affect the expression of the mRNA of MTF-1. Immunoblotting using antibodies specific for MTF-1 demonstrated that Cd induces a down-regulation of the MTF-1 protein, whereas cotreatment with Cd and CHX blocked the Cd-induced degradation of MTF-1. The findings reveal a new mechanistic aspect of the superinduction of Mt1, in which a labile repressor negatively controls agonist-induced turnover of the MTF-1 protein. PMID:16615093

  5. Mesoscale modeling of multi-protein-DNA assemblies: the role of the catabolic activator protein in Lac-repressor-mediated looping

    PubMed Central

    Swigon, David; Olson, Wilma K.

    2009-01-01

    DNA looping plays a key role in the regulation of the lac operon in Escherichia coli. The presence of a tightly bent loop (between sequentially distant sites of Lac repressor protein binding) purportedly hinders the binding of RNA polymerase and subsequent transcription of the genetic message. The unexpectedly favorable binding interaction of this protein-DNA assembly with the catabolic activator protein (CAP), a protein that also bends DNA and paradoxically facilitates the binding of RNA polymerase, stimulated extension of our base-pair level theory of DNA elasticity to the treatment of DNA loops formed in the presence of several proteins. Here we describe in detail a procedure to determine the structures and free energies of multi-protein-DNA assemblies and illustrate the predicted effects of CAP binding on the configurations of the wild-type 92-bp Lac repressor-mediated O3-O1 DNA loop. We show that the DNA loop adopts an antiparallel orientation in the most likely structure and that this loop accounts for the published experimental observation that, when CAP is bound to the loop, one of the arms of LacR binds to an alternative site that is displaced from the original site by 5 bp. PMID:23874000

  6. Mouse cytomegalovirus immediate-early protein 1 binds with host cell repressors to relieve suppressive effects on viral transcription and replication during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiyi; Maul, Gerd G

    2003-01-01

    Herpesviruses start their transcriptional cascade at nuclear domain 10 (ND10). The deposition of virus genomes at these nuclear sites occurs due to the binding of the interferon-inducible repressor protein promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) and/or Daxx to a viral DNA-protein complex. However, the presence of repressive proteins at the nuclear site of virus transcription has remained unexplained. We investigated the mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) immediate-early 1 protein (IE1), which is necessary for productive infection at low multiplicities of infection and therefore likely to be involved in overcoming cellular repression. Temporal analysis of IE1 distribution revealed its initial segregation into ND10 by binding to PML and/or Daxx and IE1-dependent recruitment of the transcriptional repressor histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC-2) to this site. However, these protein aggregates are dissociated in cells producing sufficient IE1 through titration of PML, Daxx, and HDAC-2. Importantly, binding of IE1 to HDAC-2 decreased deacetylation activity. Moreover, inhibition of HDAC by trichostatin-A resulted in an increase in viral protein synthesis, an increase in cells starting the formation of prereplication compartments, and an increase in the total infectious viruses produced. Thus, IE1, like trichostatin-A, reverses the repressive effect of HDAC evident in the presence of acetylated histones in the immediate-early promoter region. Since HDAC also binds to the promoter region of IE1, as determined by the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, these combined results suggest that IE1 inhibits or reverses HDAC-mediated repression of the infecting viral genomes, possibly by a process akin to activation of heterochromatin. We propose that even permissive cells can repress transcription of infecting viral genomes through repressors, including HDAC, Daxx, and PML, and the segregation of IE1 to ND10 that would inactivate those repressors. The virus can counter this repression by

  7. Identification of amino acids in lac repressor protein cross-linked to operator DNA specifically substituted with bromodeoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Allen, T D; Wick, K L; Matthews, K S

    1991-04-01

    Amino acids in lac repressor protein which form cross-links to lac operator DNA specifically substituted with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) have been identified. Five sites of cross-linking in BrdU-substituted operator DNA were found at positions +3, +4, +14, +18, and +19 relative to the initiation site for transcription (Wick, K.L., and Matthews, K.S. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 6106-6112). Irradiation of complexes of repressor and each of these five singly substituted operator DNAs was executed under large scale conditions to generate sufficient complex for proteolysis, separation of the peptide-DNA, and peptide sequencing. The DNAs substituted with BrdU for thymidine at positions +3, +18, and +19 yielded cross-links to the peptide spanning residues 23-33, with the cross-link identified at His-29. Substitution at position +14 resulted in a cross-link to Tyr-17 within the peptide containing amino acids 13-22. These results are consistent with the structure determined by NMR and molecular dynamics calculations of the NH2-terminal headpiece-symmetric operator complex (Lamerichs, R.M.J.N., Boelens, R., van der Marel, G.A., van Boom, J.H., Kaptein, R., Buck, F., Fera, B., and Rüterjans, H. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 2895-2991; de Vlieg, J., Berendsen, H.J.C., and van Gunsteren, W.F. (1989) Proteins 6, 104-127). This structure indicates proximity of His-29 in the major groove to thymidines at positions +3 and +4. Since base pairs at positions +18 and +19 occupy symmetrical positions to +3 and +4 in the promoter distal region of the operator, it would be anticipated that cross-links similar to the +3 and +4 positions would form at these sites; this prediction is not borne out by the behavior at +4/+18, as no peptide could be identified cross-linked to DNA substituted at +4. Molecular dynamics simulations and the NMR data indicate that Tyr-17 interacts with the thymine at position +8, which is symmetrically related to position +14. Although BrdU-associated strand scission at +8

  8. Hexokinase 2 Is an Intracellular Glucose Sensor of Yeast Cells That Maintains the Structure and Activity of Mig1 Protein Repressor Complex.

    PubMed

    Vega, Montserrat; Riera, Alberto; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2) fromSaccharomyces cerevisiaeis a bi-functional enzyme, being both a catalyst in the cytosol and an important regulator of the glucose repression signal in the nucleus. Despite considerable recent progress, little is known about the regulatory mechanism that controls nuclear Hxk2 association with theSUC2promoter chromatin and how this association is necessary forSUC2gene repression. Our data indicate that in theSUC2promoter context, Hxk2 functions through a variety of structurally unrelated factors, mainly the DNA-binding Mig1 and Mig2 repressors and the regulatory Snf1 and Reg1 factors. Hxk2 sustains the repressor complex architecture maintaining transcriptional repression at theSUC2gene. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we discovered that the Hxk2 in its open configuration, at low glucose conditions, leaves the repressor complex that induces its dissociation and promotesSUC2gene expression. In high glucose conditions, Hxk2 adopts a close conformation that promotes Hxk2 binding to the Mig1 protein and the reassembly of theSUC2repressor complex. Additional findings highlight the possibility that Hxk2 constitutes an intracellular glucose sensor that operates by changing its conformation in response to cytoplasmic glucose levels that regulate its interaction with Mig1 and thus its recruitment to the repressor complex of theSUC2promoter. Thus, our data indicate that Hxk2 is more intimately involved in gene regulation than previously thought.

  9. Hexokinase 2 Is an Intracellular Glucose Sensor of Yeast Cells That Maintains the Structure and Activity of Mig1 Protein Repressor Complex.

    PubMed

    Vega, Montserrat; Riera, Alberto; Fernández-Cid, Alejandra; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Hexokinase 2 (Hxk2) fromSaccharomyces cerevisiaeis a bi-functional enzyme, being both a catalyst in the cytosol and an important regulator of the glucose repression signal in the nucleus. Despite considerable recent progress, little is known about the regulatory mechanism that controls nuclear Hxk2 association with theSUC2promoter chromatin and how this association is necessary forSUC2gene repression. Our data indicate that in theSUC2promoter context, Hxk2 functions through a variety of structurally unrelated factors, mainly the DNA-binding Mig1 and Mig2 repressors and the regulatory Snf1 and Reg1 factors. Hxk2 sustains the repressor complex architecture maintaining transcriptional repression at theSUC2gene. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we discovered that the Hxk2 in its open configuration, at low glucose conditions, leaves the repressor complex that induces its dissociation and promotesSUC2gene expression. In high glucose conditions, Hxk2 adopts a close conformation that promotes Hxk2 binding to the Mig1 protein and the reassembly of theSUC2repressor complex. Additional findings highlight the possibility that Hxk2 constitutes an intracellular glucose sensor that operates by changing its conformation in response to cytoplasmic glucose levels that regulate its interaction with Mig1 and thus its recruitment to the repressor complex of theSUC2promoter. Thus, our data indicate that Hxk2 is more intimately involved in gene regulation than previously thought. PMID:26865637

  10. Enhanced bacterial protein expression during auto-induction obtained by alteration of lac repressor dosage and medium composition.

    PubMed

    Blommel, Paul G; Becker, Katie J; Duvnjak, Petar; Fox, Brian G

    2007-01-01

    The auto-induction method of protein expression in E. coli is based on diauxic growth resulting from dynamic function of lac operon regulatory elements (lacO and LacI) in mixtures of glucose, glycerol, and lactose. The results show that successful execution of auto-induction is strongly dependent on the plasmid promoter and repressor construction, on the oxygenation state of the culture, and on the composition of the auto-induction medium. Thus expression hosts expressing high levels of LacI during aerobic growth exhibit reduced ability to effectively complete the auto-induction process. Manipulation of the promoter to decrease the expression of LacI altered the preference for lactose consumption in a manner that led to increased protein expression and partially relieved the sensitivity of the auto-induction process to the oxygenation state of the culture. Factorial design methods were used to optimize the chemically defined growth medium used for expression of two model proteins, Photinus luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein, including variations for production of both unlabeled and selenomethionine-labeled samples. The optimization included studies of the expression from T7 and T7-lacI promoter plasmids and from T5 phage promoter plasmids expressing two levels of LacI. Upon the basis of the analysis of over 500 independent expression results, combinations of optimized expression media and expression plasmids that gave protein yields of greater than 1000 mug/mL of expression culture were identified. PMID:17506520

  11. Dissociation of SERPINE1 mRNA from the translational repressor proteins Ago2 and TIA-1 upon platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Corduan, Aurélie; Plé, Hélène; Laffont, Benoit; Wallon, Thérèse; Plante, Isabelle; Landry, Patricia; Provost, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Platelets play an important role in haemostasis, as well as in thrombosis and coagulation processes. They harbour a wide variety of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), that can template de novo protein synthesis, and an abundant array of microRNAs, which are known to mediate mRNA translational repression through proteins of the Argonaute (Ago) family. The relationship between platelet microRNAs and proteins capable of mediating translational repression, however, remains unclear. Here, we report that half of platelet microRNAs is associated to mRNA-regulatory Ago2 protein complexes, in various proportions. Associated to these Ago2 complexes are platelet mRNAs known to support de novo protein synthesis. Reporter gene activity assays confirmed the capacity of the platelet microRNAs, found to be associated to Ago2 complexes, to regulate translation of these platelet mRNAs through their 3'UTR. Neither the microRNA repertoire nor the microRNA composition of Ago2 complexes of human platelets changed upon activation with thrombin. However, under conditions favoring de novo synthesis of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) protein, we documented a rapid dissociation of the encoding platelet SERPINE1 mRNA from Ago2 protein complexes as well as from the translational repressor protein T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1). These findings are consistent with a scenario by which lifting of the repressive effects of Ago2 and TIA-1 protein complexes, involving a rearrangement of proteinmRNA complexes rather than disassembly of Ago2microRNA complexes, would allow translation of SERPINE1 mRNA into PAI-1 in response to platelet activation. PMID:25673011

  12. Sulfur deficiency–induced repressor proteins optimize glucosinolate biosynthesis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Aarabi, Fayezeh; Kusajima, Miyuki; Tohge, Takayuki; Konishi, Tomokazu; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Takamune, Makiko; Sasazaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Nakashita, Hideo; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Hideki; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Hoefgen, Rainer; Maruyama-Nakashita, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) in the plant order of the Brassicales are sulfur-rich secondary metabolites that harbor antipathogenic and antiherbivory plant-protective functions and have medicinal properties, such as carcinopreventive and antibiotic activities. Plants repress GSL biosynthesis upon sulfur deficiency (−S); hence, field performance and medicinal quality are impaired by inadequate sulfate supply. The molecular mechanism that links –S to GSL biosynthesis has remained understudied. We report here the identification of the –S marker genes sulfur deficiency induced 1 (SDI1) and SDI2 acting as major repressors controlling GSL biosynthesis in Arabidopsis under –S condition. SDI1 and SDI2 expression negatively correlated with GSL biosynthesis in both transcript and metabolite levels. Principal components analysis of transcriptome data indicated that SDI1 regulates aliphatic GSL biosynthesis as part of –S response. SDI1 was localized to the nucleus and interacted with MYB28, a major transcription factor that promotes aliphatic GSL biosynthesis, in both yeast and plant cells. SDI1 inhibited the transcription of aliphatic GSL biosynthetic genes by maintaining the DNA binding composition in the form of an SDI1-MYB28 complex, leading to down-regulation of GSL biosynthesis and prioritization of sulfate usage for primary metabolites under sulfur-deprived conditions. PMID:27730214

  13. The experimental folding landscape of monomeric lactose repressor, a large two-domain protein, involves two kinetic intermediates.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Corey J; Das, Payel; Clementi, Cecilia; Matthews, Kathleen S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2005-10-11

    To probe the experimental folding behavior of a large protein with complex topology, we created a monomeric variant of the lactose repressor protein (MLAc), a well characterized tetrameric protein that regulates transcription of the lac operon. Purified MLAc is folded, fully functional, and binds the inducer isopropyl beta-d-thiogalactoside with the same affinity as wild-type LacI. Equilibrium unfolding of MLAc induced by the chemical denaturant urea is a reversible, apparent two-state process (pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). However, time-resolved experiments demonstrate that unfolding is single-exponential, whereas refolding data indicate two transient intermediates. The data reveal the initial formation of a burst-phase (tau < ms) intermediate that corresponds to approximately 50% of the total secondary-structure content. This step is followed by a rearrangement reaction that is rate-limited by an unfolding process (tau approximately 3 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C) and results in a second intermediate. This MLAc intermediate converts to the native structure (tau approximately 30 s; pH 7.5, 20 degrees C). Remarkably, the experimental folding-energy landscape for MLAc is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions using a simple topology-based C(alpha)-model as presented in a companion article in this issue. PMID:16203983

  14. Radiation response in Deinococcus deserti: IrrE is a metalloprotease that cleaves repressor protein DdrO.

    PubMed

    Ludanyi, Monika; Blanchard, Laurence; Dulermo, Rémi; Brandelet, Géraldine; Bellanger, Laurent; Pignol, David; Lemaire, David; de Groot, Arjan

    2014-10-01

    Deinococcus bacteria are famous for their extreme radiation tolerance. The IrrE protein was shown to be essential for radiation tolerance and, in an unelucidated manner, for induction of a number of genes in response to radiation, including recA and other DNA repair genes. Earlier studies indicated that IrrE could be a zinc peptidase, but proteolytic activity was not demonstrated. Here, using several in vivo and in vitro experiments, IrrE from Deinococcus deserti was found to interact with DdrO, a predicted regulator encoded by a radiation-induced gene that is, like irrE, highly conserved in Deinococcus. Moreover, IrrE was found to cleave DdrO in vitro and when the proteins were coexpressed in Escherichia coli. This cleavage was not observed in the presence of metal chelator EDTA or when IrrE contains a mutation in the conserved active-site motif of metallopeptidases. In D. deserti, IrrE-dependent cleavage of DdrO was observed after exposure to radiation. Furthermore, DdrO-dependent repression of the promoter of a radiation-induced gene was shown. These results demonstrate that IrrE is a metalloprotease and we propose that IrrE-mediated cleavage inactivates repressor protein DdrO, leading to transcriptional induction of various genes required for repair and survival after exposure of Deinococcus to radiation.

  15. Specific interactions between lactose repressor protein and DNA affected by ligand binding: ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Shin; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2011-06-01

    Transcription mechanisms of gene information from DNA to mRNA are essentially controlled by regulatory proteins such as a lactose repressor (LacR) protein and ligand molecules. Biochemical experiments elucidated that a ligand binding to LacR drastically changes the mechanism controlled by LacR, although the effect of ligand binding has not been clarified at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated the effect of ligand binding on the specific interactions between LacR and operator DNA by the molecular simulations combined with classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results indicate that the binding of anti-inducer ligand strengthens the interaction between LacR and DNA, which is consistent with the fact that the binding of anti-inducer enhances the repression of gene transcription by LacR. It was also elucidated that hydrating water molecules existing between LacR and DNA contribute to the specific interactions between LacR and DNA. PMID:21328406

  16. Drosophila melanogaster cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal protein essential for fly development

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski-Nimmerfall, Elisabeth; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Rendic, Dubravko; Krämer, Helmut; Mach, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. The genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster encodes a putative orthologue (dCREG), suggesting evolutionarily conserved physiological functions of this protein. In D. melanogaster S2 cells, dCREG was found to localize in lysosomes. Further studies revealed that intracellular dCREG is subject of proteolytic maturation. Processing and turnover could be substantially reduced by RNAi-mediated silencing of cathepsin L. In contrast to mammalian cells, lysosomal delivery of dCREG does not depend on its carbohydrate moiety. Furthermore, depletion of the putative D. melanogaster lysosomal sorting receptor lysosomal enzyme receptor protein did not compromise cellular retention of dCREG. We also investigated the developmental consequences of dCREG ablation in whole D. melanogaster flies. Ubiquitous depletion of dCREG proved lethal at the late pupal stage once a knock-down efficiency of > 95% was achieved. These results demonstrate that dCREG is essential for proper completion of fly development. PMID:25173815

  17. Structure of the lambda tof repressor protein in solution. Heat stability and its relation to binding ability to DNA.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, H; Akutsu, H; Kobayashi, Y; Kyogoku, Y; Ono, T; Koga, H; Horiuchi, T

    1982-04-01

    The lambda tof repressor protein was purified from E. coli cells retaining lambda dv plasmids by applying DNA-cellulose chromatography. 3H-labeled lambda dv and lambda imm21dv DNA, carrying and lacking lambda operators, respectively, were prepared and the binding activity of the lambda tof protein to the DNA was examined. Non-specific binding to lambda imm21dv DNA is completely lost at 30 degrees C, whereas specific binding to the DNA carrying the operators is retained even above 40 degrees C. The conformation of the lambda tof protein was analysed by means of circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectra. The change in the molar ellipticity at 222 nm vs. temperature in CD spectra indicated a transition between two states with Tm at 42 degrees C. The 360 MHz 1H-NMR spectra revealed the presence at 20 degrees C of another change in local conformation of interaction which was not detected by the CD spectra. 1H-NMR also indicated the coexistence of thermal transitions with exchange rates faster and slower than the NMR time scale at about 50 degrees C, which is explained by the presence of domain structures. The NMR titration curve of the His residue gave a normal pK value showing its location on the surface of the protein. These conformational behaviors are well correlated to the specific and non-specific DNA binding activity of the lambda tof protein. The assignments of 1H resonance signals to some specific residues, including His 35 and Tyr 26, were established. It will be useful to determine the tof-DNA interaction.

  18. The transcriptional repressor ZBTB4 regulates EZH2 through a MicroRNA-ZBTB4-specificity protein signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Won Seok; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Cho, Sung-Gook; Lee, Syng-Ook; Jin, Un-Ho; Jutooru, Indira; Choi, Kwangmin; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Safe, Stephen; Kim, Kyounghyun

    2014-12-01

    ZBTB4 is a transcriptional repressor and examination of publically-available microarray data sets demonstrated an inverse relationship in the prognostic value and expression of ZBTB4 and the histone methyltransferase EZH2 in tumors from breast cancer patients. The possibility of functional interactions between EZH2 and ZBTB4 was investigated in breast cancer cells and the results showed that EZH2 is directly suppressed by ZBTB4 which in turn is regulated (suppressed) by miR-106b and other paralogues from the miR-17-92, miR-106b-25 and miR-106a-363 clusters that are highly expressed in breast and other tumors. ZBTB4 also acts a suppressor of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4, and RNA interference studies show that Sp proteins are required for EZH2 expression. The prediction analysis results from breast cancer patient array data sets confirm an association of Sp1-dependent EZH2 gene signature with decreased survival of breast cancer patients. Disruption of oncogenic miR-ZBTB4 signaling axis by anticancer agent such as betulinic acid that induce down-regulation of Sp proteins in breast cancer cells resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and colonization of breast cancer cells in a mouse model. Thus, EZH2 is reciprocally regulated by a novel signaling network consisting of Sp proteins, oncogenic miRs and ZBTB4, and modulation of this gene network is a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of breast cancer and possibly other cancers.

  19. Functional characterization of the interactions between endosomal adaptor protein APPL1 and the NuRD co-repressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Banach-Orlowska, Magdalena; Pilecka, Iwona; Torun, Anna; Pyrzynska, Beata; Miaczynska, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Multifunctional adaptor protein APPL1 [adaptor protein containing PH (pleckstrin homology) domain, PTB (phosphotyrosine binding) domain and leucine zipper motif] belongs to a growing group of endocytic proteins which actively participate in various stages of signalling pathways. Owing to its interaction with the small GTPase Rab5, APPL1 localizes predominantly to a subpopulation of early endosomes but is also capable of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Among its various binding partners, APPL1 was reported to associate with the nuclear co-repressor complex NuRD (nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase), containing both nucleosome remodelling and HDAC (histone deacetylase) activities, but the biochemical basis or functional relevance of this interaction remained unknown. Here we characterized the binding between APPL1 and NuRD in more detail, identifying HDAC2 as the key NuRD subunit responsible for this association. APPL1 interacts with the NuRD complex containing enzymatically active HDAC2 but not HDAC1 as the only deacetylase. However, the cellular levels of HDAC1 can regulate the extent of APPL1–NuRD interactions, which in turn modulates the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of APPL1. Increased binding of APPL1 to NuRD upon silencing of HDAC1 promotes the nuclear localization of APPL1, whereas HDAC1 overexpression exerts an opposite effect. Moreover, we also uncovered a NuRD-independent interaction of APPL1 with HDAC1. APPL1 overexpression affects the composition of the HDAC1-containing NuRD complex and the expression of HDAC1 target p21WAF1/CIP1. Cumulatively, these data reveal a surprising complexity of APPL1 interactions with HDACs, with functional consequences for the modulation of gene expression. In a broader sense, these results contribute to an emerging theme of endocytic proteins playing alternative roles in the cell nucleus. PMID:19686092

  20. Expression, Purification And Preliminary X-Ray Analysis of the C-Terminal Domain of An Arginine Repressor Protein From Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, G.J.; Garen, C.R.; Cherney, M.M.; Cherney, L.T.; Lee, C.; James, M.N.J.

    2009-06-03

    The gene product of an open reading frame Rv1657 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a putative arginine repressor protein (ArgR), a transcriptional factor that regulates the expression of arginine-biosynthetic enzymes. Rv1657 was expressed and purified and a C-terminal domain was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Diffraction data were collected and processed to a resolution of 2.15 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group P1 and the Matthews coefficient suggests that the crystals contain six C-terminal domain molecules per unit cell. Previous structural and biochemical studies on the arginine repressor proteins from other organisms have likewise shown the presence of six molecules per unit cell.

  1. Sliding and target location of DNA-binding proteins: an NMR view of the lac repressor system.

    PubMed

    Loth, Karine; Gnida, Manuel; Romanuka, Julija; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    In non-specific lac headpiece-DNA complexes selective NMR line broadening is observed that strongly depends on length and composition of the DNA fragments. This broadening involves amide protons found in the non-specific lac-DNA structure to be interacting with the DNA phosphate backbone, and can be ascribed to DNA sliding of the protein along the DNA. This NMR exchange broadening has been used to estimate the 1D diffusion constant for sliding along non-specific DNA. The observed 1D diffusion constant of 4×10(-12) cm(2)/s is two orders of magnitude smaller than derived from previous kinetic experiments, but falls in the range of values determined more recently using single molecule methods. This strongly supports the notion that sliding could play at most a minor role in the association kinetics of binding of lac repressor to lac operator and that other processes such as hopping and intersegment transfer contribute to facilitate the DNA recognition process.

  2. A repressor activator protein1 homologue from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis increases storage lipid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Dey, Prabuddha; Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-06-01

    The repressor activator protein1 (Rap1) has been studied over the years as a multifunctional regulator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, its role in storage lipid accumulation has not been investigated. This report documents the identification and isolation of a putative transcription factor CtRap1 gene from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis, and establishes the direct effect of its expression on the storage lipid accumulation in S. cerevisiae, usually a non-oleaginous yeast. In silico analysis revealed that the CtRap1 polypeptide binds relatively more strongly to the promoter of fatty acid synthase1 (FAS1) gene of S. cerevisiae than ScRap1. The expression level of CtRap1 transcript in vivo was found to correlate directly with the amount of lipid produced in oleaginous native host C. tropicalis. Heterologous expression of the CtRap1 gene resulted in ∼ 4-fold enhancement of storage lipid content (57.3%) in S. cerevisiae. We also showed that the functionally active CtRap1 upregulates the endogenous ScFAS1 and ScDGAT genes of S. cerevisiae, and this, in turn, might be responsible for the increased lipid production in the transformed yeast. Our findings pave the way for the possible utility of the CtRap1 gene in suitable microorganisms to increase their storage lipid content through transcription factor engineering.

  3. Identification of Glis1, a novel Gli-related, Kruppel-like zinc finger protein containing transactivation and repressor functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Lewandoski, Mark; Perantoni, Alan O; Kurebayashi, Shogo; Nakanishi, Gen; Jetten, Anton M

    2002-08-23

    In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of a novel Krüppel-like protein named Gli-similar 1 (Glis1). The Glis1 gene encodes an 84.3-kDa proline-rich protein. Its five tandem zinc finger motifs exhibit highest homology with those of members of the Gli and Zic subfamilies of Krüppel-like proteins. Glis1 was mapped to mouse chromosome 4C6. Northern blot analysis showed that expression of the 3.3-kb Glis1 mRNA is most abundant in placenta and adult kidney and expressed at lower levels in testis. Whole mount in situ hybridization on mouse embryos demonstrated that Glis1 is expressed in a temporal and spatial manner during development; expression was most prominent in several defined structures of mesodermal lineage, including craniofacial regions, branchial arches, somites, vibrissal and hair follicles, limb buds, and myotomes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that Glis1 is localized to the nucleus. The zinc finger region plays an important role in the nuclear localization of Glis1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that Glis1 is able to bind oligonucleotides containing the Gli-binding site consensus sequence GACCACCCAC. Although monohybrid analysis showed that in several cell types Glis1 was unable to induce transcription of a reporter, deletion mutant analysis revealed the presence of a strong activation function at the carboxyl terminus of Glis1. The activation through this activation function was totally suppressed by a repressor domain at its amino terminus. Constitutively active Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin kinase IV enhanced Glis1-mediated transcriptional activation about 4-fold and may be mediated by phosphorylation/activation of a co-activator. Our results suggest that Glis1 may play a critical role in the control of gene expression during specific stages of embryonic development.

  4. Btf, a Novel Death-Promoting Transcriptional Repressor That Interacts with Bcl-2-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kasof, Gary M.; Goyal, Lakshmi; White, Eileen

    1999-01-01

    The adenovirus E1B 19,000-molecular-weight (19K) protein is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis and cooperates with E1A to transform primary rodent cells. E1B 19K shows sequence and functional homology to the mammalian antiapoptotic gene product, Bcl-2. Like Bcl-2, the biochemical mechanism of E1B 19K function includes binding to and antagonization of cellular proapoptotic proteins such as Bax, Bak, and Nbk/Bik. In addition, there is evidence that E1B 19K can affect gene expression, but whether this contributes to its antiapoptotic function has not been determined. In an effort to further understand the functions of E1B 19K, we screened for 19K-associated proteins by the yeast two-hybrid system. A novel protein, Btf (Bcl-2-associated transcription factor), that interacts with E1B 19K as well as with the antiapoptotic family members Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL but not with the proapoptotic protein Bax was identified. btf is a widely expressed gene that encodes a protein with homology to the basic zipper (bZip) and Myb DNA binding domains. Btf binds DNA in vitro and represses transcription in reporter assays. E1B 19K, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL sequester Btf in the cytoplasm and block its transcriptional repression activity. Expression of Btf also inhibited transformation by E1A with either E1B 19K or mutant p53, suggesting a role in either promotion of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. Indeed, the sustained overexpression of Btf in HeLa cells induced apoptosis, which was inhibited by E1B 19K. Furthermore, the chromosomal localization of btf (6q22-23) maps to a region that is deleted in some cancers, consistent with a role for Btf in tumor suppression. Thus, btf may represent a novel tumor suppressor gene residing in a unique pathway by which the Bcl-2 family can regulate apoptosis. PMID:10330179

  5. A tale of two repressors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-05-27

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field, as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology in bacteria. The genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking the transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks. Jacob, F. & Monod, J. (1961). Genetic regulatory mechanisms in the synthesis of proteins. J. Mol. Biol. 3, 318-356. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation is presented. PMID:21392509

  6. Regulation of endothelial-specific transgene expression by the LacI repressor protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morton, Susan K; Chaston, Daniel J; Baillie, Brett K; Hill, Caryl E; Matthaei, Klaus I

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified mice have played an important part in elucidating gene function in vivo. However, conclusions from transgenic studies may be compromised by complications arising from the site of transgene integration into the genome and, in inducible systems, the non-innocuous nature of inducer molecules. The aim of the present study was to use the vascular system to validate a technique based on the bacterial lac operon system, in which transgene expression can be repressed and de-repressed by an innocuous lactose analogue, IPTG. We have modified an endothelium specific promoter (TIE2) with synthetic LacO sequences and made transgenic mouse lines with this modified promoter driving expression of mutant forms of connexin40 and an independently translated reporter, EGFP. We show that tissue specificity of this modified promoter is retained in the vasculature of transgenic mice in spite of the presence of LacO sequences, and that transgene expression is uniform throughout the endothelium of a range of adult systemic and cerebral arteries and arterioles. Moreover, transgene expression can be consistently down-regulated by crossing the transgenic mice with mice expressing an inhibitor protein LacI(R), and in one transgenic line, transgene expression could be de-repressed rapidly by the innocuous inducer, IPTG. We conclude that the modified bacterial lac operon system can be used successfully to validate transgenic phenotypes through a simple breeding schedule with mice homozygous for the LacI(R) protein. PMID:24755679

  7. Biophysical basis of the promiscuous binding of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 apoptotic repressor to BH3 ligands.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B; Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-10-01

    B-cell lymphoma protein 2 (Bcl2) apoptotic repressor carries out its function by virtue of its ability to bind to BH3 domains of various pro-apoptotic regulators in a highly promiscuous manner. Herein, we investigate the biophysical basis of such promiscuity of Bcl2 toward its cognate BH3 ligands. Our data show that although the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif bind to Bcl2 with submicromolar affinity, those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif afford weak interactions. This implies that the replacement of alanine at the fourth position (A + 4)-relative to the N-terminal leucine (L0) within the LXXXAD motif-to glycine/serine results in the loss of free energy of binding. Consistent with this notion, the A + 4 residue within the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif engages in key intermolecular van der Waals contacts with A149 lining the ligand binding groove within Bcl2, whereas A + 4G/S substitution results in the disruption of such favorable binding interactions. Of particular interest is the observation that although increasing ionic strength has little or negligible effect on the binding of high-affinity BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif, the binding of those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif in general experiences a varying degree of enhancement. This salient observation is indicative of the fact that hydrophobic forces not only play a dominant but also a universal role in driving the Bcl2-BH3 interactions. Taken together, our study sheds light on the molecular basis of the factors governing the promiscuous binding of Bcl2 to pro-apoptotic regulators and thus bears important consequences on the development of rational therapeutic approaches. PMID:23996493

  8. A novel member of the RING finger family, KRIP-1, associates with the KRAB-A transcriptional repressor domain of zinc finger proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Su; Chen, Yung-Ming; O’Leary, Eileen; Witzgall, Ralph; Vidal, Marc; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    1996-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box A (KRAB-A) domain is an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional repressor domain present in approximately one-third of zinc finger proteins of the Cys2-His2 type. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we report the isolation of a cDNA encoding a novel murine protein, KRAB-A interacting protein 1 (KRIP-1) that physically interacts with the KRAB-A region. KRIP-1 is a member of the RBCC subfamily of the RING finger, or Cys3HisCys4, family of zinc binding proteins whose other members are known to play important roles in differentiation, oncogenesis, and signal transduction. The KRIP-1 protein has high homology to TIF1, a putative modulator of ligand-dependent activation function of nuclear receptors. A 3.5-kb mRNA for KRIP-1 is ubiquitously expressed among all adult mouse tissues studied. When a GAL4–KRIP-1 fusion protein is expressed in COS cells with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct with five GAL4 binding sites, there is dose-dependent repression of transcription. Thus, KRIP-1 interacts with the KRAB-A region of C2H2 zinc finger proteins and may mediate or modulate KRAB-A transcriptional repressor activity. PMID:8986806

  9. Three in-frame N-terminally different proteins are produced from the repressor locus of the Streptomyces bacteriophage phi C31.

    PubMed

    Smith, M C; Owen, C E

    1991-11-01

    The sequence of the repressor locus, c, of the Streptomyces temperate phage, phi C31, was shown previously to contain an open reading frame encoding a 74 kDa protein. Further analysis of the transcriptional and translational products of the c gene shows a more complex pattern of expression. A nest of three in-frame N-terminally different, C-terminally identical proteins of 74, 54 and 42 kDa were found to be expressed from a corresponding nest of transcripts. The repressor proteins were produced in Escherichia coli and the 42 kDa protein was purified, verified by N-terminal sequencing, and used to raise antibody. The antibody cross-reacted in Western blots with the 74, 54 and 42 kDa proteins expressed in E. coli and Streptomyces lividans and from Streptomyces coelicolor phi C31 lysogens. Analysis of transcription of the c gene by S1 mapping and primer extension showed that the nest of transcripts encoding the repressor protein were induced after heat treatment of the cts locus (Sinclair and Bibb, 1989; this paper). Correspondingly, all three of the repressor proteins were induced. In addition to a promoter, cp1, which lies upstream of the 74 kDa open reading frame, the c locus contained at least one internal promoter, cp2, which transcribes DNA encoding the 54 and 42 kDa proteins. Transcripts initiating from cp3 were observed in RNA preparations from S. lividans containing the c gene deleted for cp1 and cp2, but gene fusions using DNA which should contain any putative promoting activity from this region transcriptionally fused to the xylE gene showed very low levels of expression of catechol 2,3 dioxygenase in S. lividans. The 74 kDa protein was not necessary for super-infection immunity. Data described here and current knowledge of the nature of other 'dual start' genes suggest a model for the regulation of lysis versus lysogeny in phi C31.

  10. Involvement of co-repressor LUH and the adapter proteins SLK1 and SLK2 in the regulation of abiotic stress response genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During abiotic stress many genes that are important for growth and adaptation to stress are expressed at elevated levels. However, the mechanisms that keep the stress responsive genes from expressing under non stress conditions remain elusive. Recent genetic characterization of the co-repressor LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH) and transcriptional adaptor proteins SEUSS-LIKE1 (SLK1) and SLK2 have been proposed to function redundantly in diverse developmental processes; however their function in the abiotic stress response is unknown. Moreover, the molecular functions of LUH, SLK1 and SLK2 remain obscure. Here, we show the molecular function of LUH, SLK1 and SLK2 and the role of this complex in the abiotic stress response. Results The luh, slk1 and slk2 mutant plants shows enhanced tolerance to salt and osmotic stress conditions. SLK1 and SLK2 interact physically with the LUFS domain in LUH forming SLK1-LUH and SLK2-LUH co-repressor complexes to inhibit the transcription. LUH has repressor activity, whereas SLK1 and SLK2 function as adaptors to recruit LUH, which in turn recruits histone deacetylase to the target sequences to repress transcription. The stress response genes RD20, MYB2 and NAC019 are expressed at elevated levels in the luh, slk1 and slk2 mutant plants. Furthermore, these stress response genes are associated with decreased nucleosome density and increased acetylation levels at H3K9 and H3K14 in the luh, slk1 and slk2 mutant plants. Conclusions Our results indicate that SLK1, SLK2 and LUH form a co-repressor complex. LUH represses by means of an epigenetic process involving histone modification to facilitate the condensation of chromatin thus preventing transcription at the target genes. PMID:24564815

  11. Evidence that the Dictyostelium Dd-STATa protein is a repressor that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation and is also required for efficient chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, S; Jermyn, K A; Early, A; Kawata, T; Aubry, L; Ceccarelli, A; Schaap, P; Williams, J G; Firtel, R A

    1999-08-01

    Dd-STATa is a structural and functional homologue of the metazoan STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) proteins. We show that Dd-STATa null cells exhibit several distinct developmental phenotypes. The aggregation of Dd-STATa null cells is delayed and they chemotax slowly to a cyclic AMP source, suggesting a role for Dd-STATa in these early processes. In Dd-STATa null strains, slug-like structures are formed but they have an aberrant pattern of gene expression. In such slugs, ecmB/lacZ, a marker that is normally specific for cells on the stalk cell differentiation pathway, is expressed throughout the prestalk region. Stalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium has been proposed to be under negative control, mediated by repressor elements present in the promoters of stalk cell-specific genes. Dd-STATa binds these repressor elements in vitro and the ectopic expression of ecmB/lacZ in the null strain provides in vivo evidence that Dd-STATa is the repressor protein that regulates commitment to stalk cell differentiation. Dd-STATa null cells display aberrant behavior in a monolayer assay wherein stalk cell differentiation is induced using the stalk cell morphogen DIF. The ecmB gene, a general marker for stalk cell differentiation, is greatly overinduced by DIF in Dd-STATa null cells. Also, Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to DIF for expression of ST/lacZ, a marker for the earliest stages in the differentiation of one of the stalk cell sub-types. We suggest that both these manifestations of DIF hypersensitivity in the null strain result from the balance between activation and repression of the promoter elements being tipped in favor of activation when the repressor is absent. Paradoxically, although Dd-STATa null cells are hypersensitive to the inducing effects of DIF and readily form stalk cells in monolayer assay, the Dd-STATa null cells show little or no terminal stalk cell differentiation within the slug. Dd-STATa null slugs remain

  12. Radiation abolishes inducer binding to lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Charlier, Michel

    2005-04-01

    The lactose operon functions under the control of the repressor-operator system. Binding of the repressor to the operator prevents the expression of the structural genes. This interaction can be destroyed by the binding of an inducer to the repressor. If ionizing radiations damage the partners, a dramatic dysfunction of the regulation system may be expected. We showed previously that gamma irradiation hinders repressor-operator binding through protein damage. Here we show that irradiation of the repressor abolishes the binding of the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-1-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to the repressor. The observed lack of release of the repressor from the complex results from the loss of the ability of the inducer to bind to the repressor due to the destruction of the IPTG binding site. Fluorescence measurements show that both tryptophan residues located in or near the IPTG binding site are damaged. Since tryptophan damage is strongly correlated with the loss of IPTG binding ability, we conclude that it plays a critical role in the effect. A model was built that takes into account the kinetic analysis of damage production and the observed protection of its binding site by IPTG. This model satisfactorily accounts for the experimental results and allows us to understand the radiation-induced effects. PMID:15799700

  13. Isotope-detected 1H NMR studies of proteins: a general strategy for editing interproton nuclear Overhauser effects by heteronuclear decoupling, with application to phage lambda repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, M A; Redfield, A G; Griffey, R H

    1986-01-01

    A strategy for editing interproton nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) in proteins is proposed and illustrated. Selective incorporation of 13C- (or 15N)-labeled amino acids into a protein permits NOEs involving the labeled residues to be identified by heteronuclear difference decoupling. Such heteronuclear editing simplifies the NOE difference spectrum and avoids ambiguities due to spin diffusion. Isotope-detected 1H NMR thus opens to study proteins too large for conventional one- and two-dimensional NMR methods (20-75 kDa). We have applied this strategy to the N-terminal domain of phage lambda repressor, a protein of dimer molecular mass 23 kDa. A tertiary NOE from an internal aromatic ring (Phe-51) to a beta-13C-labeled alanine residue (Ala-62) is demonstrated. PMID:3006046

  14. The functional BPV-1 E2 trans-activating protein can act as a repressor by preventing formation of the initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Dostatni, N; Lambert, P F; Sousa, R; Ham, J; Howley, P M; Yaniv, M

    1991-09-01

    The products encoded by the E2 open reading frame of the papillomaviruses are DNA-binding transcription factors involved in the positive or negative regulation of multiple viral promoters. To further understand the mechanisms by which the same transcription factor may act differentially, the full-length BPV-1 E2 protein was expressed and purified from yeast and assayed in vitro for its capacity to modulate transcription. E2 stimulated transcription of the HSV thymidine kinase (TK) promoter when E2-binding sites were positioned in an enhancer configuration approximately 100 bp upstream of the promoter start site. In contrast, the same full-length E2 protein repressed transcription of the HPV-18 E6/E7 P105 promoter. This repression was mediated through binding to the E2 DNA-binding site immediately upstream of the P105 promoter TATA box and could be abrogated by preincubation of the HPV-18 P105 promoter template with the nuclear extract allowing the formation of the preinitiation complex. In vitro DNA-binding experiments with purified E2 and TFIID showed that binding of E2 to its DNA target placed at different positions with respect to the TATA box differentially affects binding of TFIID to its cognate site. In these respects, E2 is similar to the bacteriophage lambda repressor, which can act either as a repressor or an activator of transcription depending on the position of its binding sites relative to the promoter sequences. PMID:1653173

  15. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a putative multiple antibiotic resistance repressor protein (MarR) from Xanthomonas campestris

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Zhi-Le; Li, Juo-Ning; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Shr, Hui-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Gao, Fei Philip; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2005-07-01

    A putative repressor for the multiple antibiotic resistance operon from a plant pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.3 Å with good quality. The multiple antibiotic resistance operon (marRAB) is a member of the multidrug-resistance system. When induced, this operon enhances resistance of bacteria to a variety of medically important antibiotics, causing a serious global health problem. MarR is a marR-encoded protein that represses the transcription of the marRAB operon. Through binding with salicylate and certain antibiotics, however, MarR can derepress and activate the marRAB operon. In this report, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1739, a putative MarR repressor protein present in the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a Gram-negative bacterium causing major worldwide disease of cruciferous crops, are described. The XC1739 crystals diffracted to a resolution of at least 1.8 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.5, b = 54.2 and c = 139.5 Å, respectively. They contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit from calculation of the self-rotation function.

  16. The LIM domain protein nTRIP6 acts as a co-repressor for the transcription factor MEF2C in myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kemler, Denise; Dahley, Oliver; Roßwag, Sven; Litfin, Margarethe; Kassel, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) plays a key role in the late differentiation of skeletal muscle progenitor cells, the so-called myoblasts. During myoblast differentiation, both MEF2C expression and transcriptional activity are regulated. We have reported that nTRIP6, the nuclear isoform of the focal adhesion LIM domain protein TRIP6, acts as an adaptor transcriptional co-activator for several transcription factors. It interacts with the promoter-bound transcription factors and consequently mediates the recruitment of other co-activators. Based on a described interaction between MEF2C and TRIP6 in a yeast-two-hybrid screen, we hypothesised a co-regulatory function of nTRIP6 for MEF2C. In proliferating myoblasts, nTRIP6 interacted with MEF2C and was recruited together with MEF2C to the MEF2-binding regions of the MEF2C target genes Myom2, Mb, Tnni2 and Des. Silencing nTRIP6 or preventing its interaction with MEF2C increased MEF2C transcriptional activity and increased the expression of these MEF2C target genes. Thus, nTRIP6 acts as a co-repressor for MEF2C. Mechanistically, nTRIP6 mediated the recruitment of the class IIa histone deacetylase HDAC5 to the MEF2C-bound promoters. In conclusion, our results unravel a transcriptional co-repressor function for nTRIP6. This adaptor co-regulator can thus exert either co-activator or co-repressor functions, depending on the transcription factor it interacts with. PMID:27292777

  17. Human Hand1 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein: extra-embryonic expression pattern, interaction partners and identification of its transcriptional repressor domains.

    PubMed

    Knöfler, Martin; Meinhardt, Gudrun; Bauer, Sandra; Loregger, Thomas; Vasicek, Richard; Bloor, Debra J; Kimber, Susan J; Husslein, Peter

    2002-02-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, Hand1, plays an important role in the development of the murine extra-embryonic trophoblast cell lineage. In the present study, we have analysed the expression of Hand1 in human extra-embryonic cell types and determined its binding specificity and transcriptional activity upon interaction with different class A bHLH factors. Northern blotting and in situ hybridization showed that Hand1 mRNA is specifically expressed in amnion cells at different stages of gestation. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the protein is exclusively produced in the amniotic epithelium in vivo and in purified amnion cells in vitro using a novel polyclonal Hand1 antiserum. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunohistochemical staining of blastocysts revealed the production of Hand1 mRNA and polypeptide in the trophectodermal cell layer. In the presence of E12/E47, Hand1 stimulated the transcription of luciferase reporters harbouring degenerate E-boxes, suggesting that E-proteins are potential dimerization partners in trophoblastic tumour and amnion cells. In contrast, Hand1 diminished E12/E47-dependent transcription of reporters containing perfect E-boxes by inhibiting the interaction of Hand1/E-protein heterodimers with the palindromic cognate sequence. Furthermore, we show that Hand1 down-regulated GAL-E12-dependent reporter expression, indicating that the protein can also act directly as a transcriptional repressor. Mutational analyses of GAL-Hand1 suggested that two protein regions located within its N-terminal portion mainly confer the repressing activity. In conclusion, human Hand1 may play an important role in the differentiation of the amniotic membrane and the pre-implanting trophoblast. Furthermore, the data suggest that Hand1 can act as a repressor by two independent mechanisms; sequestration of class A bHLH factors from E-boxes and inhibition of their transcriptional activity.

  18. Evidence for involvement of the C-terminal domain in the dimerization of the CopY repressor protein from Enterococcus hirae

    SciTech Connect

    Pazehoski, Kristina O.; Cobine, Paul A.; Winzor, Donald J.; Dameron, Charles T.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} A metal-binding protein domain is directly involved in protein dimerization. {yields} Fusing the metal-binding domain to a monomeric protein induces dimerization. {yields} Frontal size-exclusion chromatography measures the strength of dimer interaction. {yields} Ultracentrifugation studies confirm the influence of metal binding on dimerization. -- Abstract: Metal binding to the C-terminal region of the copper-responsive repressor protein CopY is responsible for homodimerization and the regulation of the copper homeostasis pathway in Enterococcus hirae. Specific involvement of the 38 C-terminal residues of CopY in dimerization is indicated by zonal and frontal (large zone) size-exclusion chromatography studies. The studies demonstrate that the attachment of these CopY residues to the immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) promotes dimerization of the monomeric protein. Although sensitivity of dimerization to removal of metal from the fusion protein is smaller than that found for CopY (as measured by ultracentrifugation studies), the demonstration that an unrelated protein (GB1) can be induced to dimerize by extending its sequence with the C-terminal portion of CopY confirms the involvement of this region in CopY homodimerization.

  19. Human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1: cloning, expression and characterization of its interaction with the B-cell translocation protein BTG1.

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, J A; Adams-Burton, C; Pedicord, D L; Sukovich, D A; Benfield, P A; Corjay, M H; Stoltenborg, J K; Dicker, I B

    1998-01-01

    The human BTG1 protein is thought to be a potential tumour suppressor because its overexpression inhibits NIH 3T3 cell proliferation. However, little is known about how BTG1 exerts its anti-proliferative activity. In this study, we used the yeast 'two-hybrid' system to screen for interacting protein partners and identified human carbon catabolite repressor protein (CCR4)-associative factor 1 (hCAF-1), a homologue of mouse CAF-1 (mCAF-1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yCAF-1/POP2. In vitro the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex formation was dependent on the phosphorylation of a putative p34cdc2 kinase site on BTG1 (Ser-159). In yeast, the Ala-159 mutant did not interact with hCAF-1. In addition, phosphorylation of Ser-159 in vitro showed specificity for the cell cycle kinases p34CDK2/cyclin E and p34CDK2/cyclin A, but not for p34CDK4/cyclin D1 or p34cdc2/cyclin B. Cell synchrony experiments with primary cultures of rat aortic smooth-muscle cells (RSMCs) demonstrated that message and protein levels of rat CAF-1 (rCAF-1) were up-regulated under conditions of cell contact, as previously reported for BTG1 [Wilcox, Scott, Subramanian, Ross, Adams-Burton, Stoltenborg and Corjay (1995) Circulation 92, I34-I35]. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis showed that rCAF-1 localizes to the nucleus of contact-inhibited RSMCs, where it was physically associated with BTG1, as determined by co-immunoprecipitation with anti-hCAF-1 antisera. Overexpression of hCAF-1 in NIH 3T3 and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells was itself anti-proliferative with colony formation reduced by 67% and 90% respectively. Taken together, these results indicate that formation of the hCAF-1/BTG1 complex is driven by phosphorylation at BTG1 (Ser-159) and implicates this complex in the signalling events of cell division that lead to changes in cellular proliferation associated with cell-cell contact. PMID:9820826

  20. RNA-interacting proteins act as site-specific repressors of ADAR2-mediated RNA editing and fluctuate upon neuronal stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Aamira; Garncarz, Wojciech; Handl, Cornelia; Balik, Ales; Pusch, Oliver; Jantsch, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) diversifies the transcriptome by changing adenosines to inosines. In mammals, editing levels vary in different tissues, during development, and also in pathogenic conditions. From a screen for repressors of editing we have isolated three proteins that repress ADAR2-mediated RNA editing. The three proteins RPS14, SFRS9 and DDX15 interact with RNA. Overexpression or depletion of these proteins can decrease or increase editing levels by 15%, thus allowing a modulation of RNA editing up to 30%. Interestingly, the three proteins alter RNA editing in a substrate-specific manner that correlates with their RNA binding preferences. In mammalian cells, SFRS9 significantly affects editing of the two substrates CFLAR and cyFIP2, while the ribosomal protein RPS14 mostly inhibits editing of cyFIP2 messenger RNA. The helicase DDX15, in turn, has a strong effect on editing in Caenorhabditis elegans. Expression of the three factors decreases during mouse brain development. Moreover, expression levels of SFRS9 and DDX15 respond strongly to neuronal stimulation or repression, showing an inverse correlation with editing levels. Colocalization and immunoprecipitation studies demonstrate a direct interaction of SFRS9 and RPS14 with ADAR2, while DDX15 associates with other helicases and splicing factors. Our data show that different editing sites can be specifically altered in their editing pattern by changing the local RNP landscape. PMID:23275536

  1. Design of High-Affinity Stapled Peptides To Target the Repressor Activator Protein 1 (RAP1)/Telomeric Repeat-Binding Factor 2 (TRF2) Protein-Protein Interaction in the Shelterin Complex.

    PubMed

    Ran, Xu; Liu, Liu; Yang, Chao-Yie; Lu, Jianfeng; Chen, Yong; Lei, Ming; Wang, Shaomeng

    2016-01-14

    Shelterin, a six-protein complex, plays a fundamental role in protecting both the length and the stability of telomeres. Repressor activator protein 1 (RAP1) and telomeric repeat-binding factor 2 (TRF2) are two subunits in shelterin that interact with each other. Small-molecule inhibitors that block the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction can disrupt the structure of shelterin and may be employed as pharmacological tools to investigate the biology of shelterin. On the basis of the cocrystal structure of RAP1/TRF2 complex, we have developed first-in-class triazole-stapled peptides that block the protein-protein interaction between RAP1 and TRF2. Our most potent stapled peptide binds to RAP1 protein with a Ki value of 7 nM and is >100 times more potent than the corresponding wild-type TRF2 peptide. On the basis of our high-affinity peptides, we have developed and optimized a competitive, fluorescence polarization (FP) assay for accurate and rapid determination of the binding affinities of our designed compounds and this assay may also assist in the discovery of non-peptide, small-molecule inhibitors capable of blocking the RAP1/TRF2 protein-protein interaction.

  2. The NDR Kinase Cbk1 Downregulates the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 through the mRNA-Binding Protein Ssd1 in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Jong-Myeong; Kang, Woo Kyu; Yang, Heebum; Kim, Jeong-Yoon

    2015-07-01

    NDR (nuclear Dbf2-related) kinases are essential components for polarized morphogenesis, cytokinesis, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The NDR kinase Cbk1 is required for the hyphal growth of Candida albicans; however, the molecular functions of Cbk1 in hyphal morphogenesis are largely unknown. Here, we report that Cbk1 downregulates the transcriptional repressor Nrg1 through the mRNA-binding protein Ssd1, which has nine Cbk1 phosphorylation consensus motifs. We found that deletion of SSD1 partially suppressed the defective hyphal growth of the C. albicans cbk1Δ/Δ mutant and that Ssd1 physically interacts with Cbk1. Cbk1 was required for Ssd1 localization to polarized growth sites. The phosphomimetic SSD1 allele (ssd1-9E) allowed the cbk1Δ/Δ mutant to form short hyphae, and the phosphodeficient SSD1 allele (ssd1-9A) resulted in shorter hyphae than did the wild-type SSD1 allele, indicating that Ssd1 phosphorylation by Cbk1 is important for hyphal morphogenesis. Furthermore, we show that the transcriptional repressor Nrg1 does not disappear during hyphal initiation in the cbk1Δ/Δ mutant but is completely absent in the cbk1Δ/Δ ssd1Δ/Δ double mutant. Deletion of SSD1 also increased Als3 expression and internalization of the cbk1Δ/Δ mutant in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Collectively, our results suggest that one of the functions of Cbk1 in the hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans is to downregulate Nrg1 through Ssd1.

  3. SCF Ubiquitin Ligase F-box Protein Fbx15 Controls Nuclear Co-repressor Localization, Stress Response and Virulence of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Jöhnk, Bastian; Bayram, Özgür; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Mattern, Derek J.; Brakhage, Axel A.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins share the F-box domain to connect substrates of E3 SCF ubiquitin RING ligases through the adaptor Skp1/A to Cul1/A scaffolds. F-box protein Fbx15 is part of the general stress response of the human pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Oxidative stress induces a transient peak of fbx15 expression, resulting in 3x elevated Fbx15 protein levels. During non-stress conditions Fbx15 is phosphorylated and F-box mediated interaction with SkpA preferentially happens in smaller subpopulations in the cytoplasm. The F-box of Fbx15 is required for an appropriate oxidative stress response, which results in rapid dephosphorylation of Fbx15 and a shift of the cellular interaction with SkpA to the nucleus. Fbx15 binds SsnF/Ssn6 as part of the RcoA/Tup1-SsnF/Ssn6 co-repressor and is required for its correct nuclear localization. Dephosphorylated Fbx15 prevents SsnF/Ssn6 nuclear localization and results in the derepression of gliotoxin gene expression. fbx15 deletion mutants are unable to infect immunocompromised mice in a model for invasive aspergillosis. Fbx15 has a novel dual molecular function by controlling transcriptional repression and being part of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, which is essential for stress response, gliotoxin production and virulence in the opportunistic human pathogen A. fumigatus. PMID:27649508

  4. SCF Ubiquitin Ligase F-box Protein Fbx15 Controls Nuclear Co-repressor Localization, Stress Response and Virulence of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jöhnk, Bastian; Bayram, Özgür; Abelmann, Anja; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Mattern, Derek J; Brakhage, Axel A; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H

    2016-09-01

    F-box proteins share the F-box domain to connect substrates of E3 SCF ubiquitin RING ligases through the adaptor Skp1/A to Cul1/A scaffolds. F-box protein Fbx15 is part of the general stress response of the human pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Oxidative stress induces a transient peak of fbx15 expression, resulting in 3x elevated Fbx15 protein levels. During non-stress conditions Fbx15 is phosphorylated and F-box mediated interaction with SkpA preferentially happens in smaller subpopulations in the cytoplasm. The F-box of Fbx15 is required for an appropriate oxidative stress response, which results in rapid dephosphorylation of Fbx15 and a shift of the cellular interaction with SkpA to the nucleus. Fbx15 binds SsnF/Ssn6 as part of the RcoA/Tup1-SsnF/Ssn6 co-repressor and is required for its correct nuclear localization. Dephosphorylated Fbx15 prevents SsnF/Ssn6 nuclear localization and results in the derepression of gliotoxin gene expression. fbx15 deletion mutants are unable to infect immunocompromised mice in a model for invasive aspergillosis. Fbx15 has a novel dual molecular function by controlling transcriptional repression and being part of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, which is essential for stress response, gliotoxin production and virulence in the opportunistic human pathogen A. fumigatus. PMID:27649508

  5. Protein-induced unwinding of DNA: measurement by gel electrophoresis of complexes with DNA minicircles. Application to restriction endonuclease EcoRI, catabolite gene activator protein and lac repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Douc-Rasy, S; Kolb, A; Prunell, A

    1989-01-01

    An electrophoretic procedure for the measurement of the helix unwinding induced by a sequence-specific protein is described. The method, which was applied here to EcoR I, CAP and lac repressor, involved the migration of the complexes with positively and negatively supercoiled DNA minicircles carrying a single protein binding site. Mobility shifts of complexes relative to naked DNAs appeared to be a result of i) the unwinding; of ii) an increase in the molecular frictional coefficient, which led to a retardation; of iii) bending, in the particular case of CAP, which induced an acceleration; and of iv) looping, in the case of lac repressor, which also resulted in an acceleration. Under conditions where the migration of the naked topoisomers was V-like (topoisomer mobility showed the same linear increase with both negative and positive supercoilings; Zivanovic et al. (1986) J. Mol. Biol., 192, 645-660), the protein unwinding contribution to mobility was assumed to be identical to that experimentally observed in the case of a thermal unwinding: all negatively supercoiled topoisomers were retarded and all positively supercoiled topoisomers were accelerated to the same extent. In contrast, the mobility contribution of the frictional term, as well as those of bending and looping, appeared to vary strongly with the magnitude of the supercoiling, but only weakly with its polarity. As a consequence, these latter contributions may approximately cancel when one is measuring the difference between the shifts observed for two comigrating, negatively and positively supercoiled, topoisomers, allowing the unwinding to be calculated. While estimates obtained for EcoR I, 23 +/- 3 degrees, and CAP, about 29 degrees, were in good agreement with previous measurements using topoisomerase I, the value found for lac repressor, 13 to 16 degrees, was significantly smaller. Images PMID:2548154

  6. When is a Distribution Not a Distribution, and Why Would You Care: Single-Molecule Measurements of Repressor Protein 1-D Diffusion on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. M.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Cox, E. C.; Austin, R. H.

    We address the long-standing puzzle of why some proteins find their targets faster than allowed by 3D diffusion. To this end, we measured the onedimensional diffusion of LacI repressor proteins along elongated Lambda DNA using single molecule imaging techniques. We find that (1) LacI diffuses along nonspecific sequences of DNA in the form of 1D Brownian motion; (2) the observed 1D diffusion coefficients DDNA vary over an unexpectedly large range, from 2.3×10-12 cm2/s to 1.3 × 10-9 cm2/s; (3) the lengths of DNA covered by these 1D diffusions vary from 120nm to 2920 nm; and (4) the mean values of DDNA and the diffusional lengths indeed predict a LacI target binding rate 90 times faster than the 3D diffusion limit. The first half of this chapter is a tutorial on the models we use to think about the physics, the limited and noisy data, and how to squeeze the maximum amount of physics from these data. The second half is about our experiments and results.

  7. Mechanism of Iron-Dependent Repressor (IdeR) Activation and DNA Binding: A Molecular Dynamics and Protein Structure Network Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Chandra, Nagasuma; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteins form a major class of enzymes in the living system that are involved in crucial biological functions such as catalysis, redox reactions and as ‘switches’ in signal transductions. Iron dependent repressor (IdeR) is a metal-sensing transcription factor that regulates free iron concentration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. IdeR is also known to promote bacterial virulence, making it an important target in the field of therapeutics. Mechanistic details of how iron ions modulate IdeR such that it dimerizes and binds to DNA is not understood clearly. In this study, we have performed molecular dynamic simulations and integrated it with protein structure networks to study the influence of iron on IdeR structure and function. A significant structural variation between the metallated and the non-metallated system is observed. Our simulations clearly indicate the importance of iron in stabilizing its monomeric subunit, which in turn promotes dimerization. However, the most striking results are obtained from the simulations of IdeR-DNA complex in the absence of metals, where at the end of 100ns simulations, the protein subunits are seen to rapidly dissociate away from the DNA, thereby forming an excellent resource to investigate the mechanism of DNA binding. We have also investigated the role of iron as an allosteric regulator of IdeR that positively induces IdeR-DNA complex formation. Based on this study, a mechanistic model of IdeR activation and DNA binding has been proposed. PMID:26699663

  8. Decoding transcriptional repressor complexes in the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Megumi; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2014-05-01

    Cells maintain precise gene expression by balancing transcriptional activation and repression. While much work has focused on elucidating transcriptional activation in the central nervous system (CNS), little is known about transcriptional repression. One means to repress gene expression is to initiate binding of transcription factors to DNA, which then recruit co-repressors as well as other accessory proteins, forming a multi-protein repressor complex. These multi-protein repressor complexes include histone modifying enzymes that trigger processes such as histone acetylation, methylation, and ubiquitylation, altering chromatin structures to impact gene expression. Within these complexes transcriptional repressor proteins per se do not exhibit enzymatic reactions to remodel chromatin structure, whereas histone modifying enzymes lack intrinsic DNA binding activity but have an ability to process post-translational modifications on histones. Thus, the mutual association between transcriptional repressors and histone modifying enzymes is essential to sculpt chromatin to favor transcriptional repression and down regulate gene expression. Additionally, co-repressors are integral components in the context of gene repression as they bridge the association of transcriptional repressors and histone modifying enzymes. In this review, we will discuss the roles of some of the major components of these repressor complex in the CNS as well as their cellular functions that may underlie fundamental behavior in animals.

  9. Vaccinia virus morphogenesis is interrupted when expression of the gene encoding an 11-kilodalton phosphorylated protein is prevented by the Escherichia coli lac repressor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y F; Moss, B

    1991-11-01

    A conditional lethal vaccinia virus mutant, which constitutively expresses the Escherichia coli lac repressor and has the lac operator controlling the F18R gene (the 18th open reading frame of the HindIII F fragment of the vaccinia virus strain WR genome) encoding an 11-kDa protein, was previously shown to be dependent on the inducer isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) for replication (Y. Zhang and B. Moss, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88:1511-1515, 1991). Further studies indicated that the yield of infectious virus could be regulated by titration with IPTG and that virus production was arrested by IPTG removal at appropriate times. Under nonpermissive conditions, an 11-kDa protein reactive with antiserum raised to a previously described DNA-binding phosphoprotein (S. Y. Kao and W. R. Bauer, Virology 159:399-407, 1987) was not synthesized, indicating that the latter is the product of the F18R gene. In the absence of IPTG, replication of viral DNA and the subsequent resolution of concatemeric DNA molecules appeared normal. Omission of IPTG did not alter the kinetics of early and late viral protein synthesis, although the absence of the 11-kDa polypeptide was noted by labeling infected cells with [35S]methionine or [32P]phosphate. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that proteolytic processing of the major viral structural proteins, P4a and P4b, was inhibited under nonpermissive conditions, suggesting a block in virus maturation. Without addition of IPTG, the failure of virus particle formation was indicated by sucrose gradient centrifugation of infected cell lysates and by the absence of vaccinia virus-mediated pH-dependent cell fusion. Electron microscopic examination of infected cells revealed that immature virus particles, with aberrant internal structures, accumulated when synthesis of the 11-kDa DNA-binding protein was prevented.

  10. RET finger protein is a transcriptional repressor and interacts with enhancer of polycomb that has dual transcriptional functions.

    PubMed

    Shimono, Y; Murakami, H; Hasegawa, Y; Takahashi, M

    2000-12-15

    RET finger protein (RFP) belongs to the large B-box RING finger protein family and is known to become oncogenic by fusion with RET tyrosine kinase. Although RFP is reported to be a nuclear protein that is present in the nuclear matrix, its function is largely unknown. Here we show that RFP interacts with Enhancer of Polycomb (EPC) and strongly represses the gene transcription. Yeast two-hybrid assays revealed that the coiled-coil domain of RFP was associated with the EPcA domain and the carboxyl-terminal region of EPC. In addition, both proteins were co-precipitated from the lysates of human cells and mostly colocalized in the nucleus. Using the luciferase reporter-gene assay, we found that they repress the gene transcription activity independent of the differences of enhancers and promoters used, although the repressive activity of RFP was much stronger than that of EPC. The coiled-coil domain of RFP and the carboxyl-terminal region of EPC were most important for the repressive activity of each protein, whereas the EPcA domain had the transcription activating ability that is unique as the Polycomb group protein function. These results suggested that RFP may be involved in the epigenetic gene silencing mechanism cooperating with Polycomb group proteins and that EPC is a unique molecule with both repressive and transactivating activities.

  11. A role for a highly conserved protein of unknown function in regulation of Bacillus subtilis purA by the purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Rappu, P; Shin, B S; Zalkin, H; Mäntsälä, P

    1999-06-01

    Regulation of the purine biosynthetic gene purA was examined by using a transcriptional fusion to a luciferase reporter gene. Transcription was repressed about 10-fold by the addition of adenine and increased approximately 4.5-fold by the addition of guanosine. This regulation is mediated by a purine repressor (PurR). In a purR mutant, basal expression was increased 10-fold, and there was no further stimulation by guanosine or repression by adenine. An open reading frame, yabJ, immediately downstream from purR was found to have a role in the repression of purA by adenine. Repression by adenine was perturbed in a purR+ yabJ mutant, although guanosine regulation was retained. Mutations in the PurR PRPP binding motif abolished guanosine regulation in the yabJ mutant. Thus, PRPP appears to be required for upregulation by guanosine. The amino acid sequence of YabJ is homologous to the YER057c/YjgF protein family of unknown function.

  12. Gene therapy of c-myc suppressor FUSE-binding protein-interacting repressor by Sendai virus delivery prevents tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Daisuke; Araki, Koji; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tomifuji, Masayuki; Yamashita, Taku; Ueda, Yasuji; Shimada, Hideaki; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Acquired tracheal stenosis remains a challenging problem for otolaryngologists. The objective of this study was to determine whether the Sendai virus (SeV)-mediated c-myc suppressor, a far upstream element (FUSE)-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor (FIR), modulates wound healing of the airway mucosa, and whether it prevents tracheal stenosis in an animal model of induced mucosal injury. A fusion gene-deleted, non-transmissible SeV vector encoding FIR (FIR-SeV/ΔF) was prepared. Rats with scraped airway mucosae were administered FIR-SeV/ΔF through the tracheostoma. The pathological changes in the airway mucosa and in the tracheal lumen were assessed five days after scraping. Untreated animals showed hyperplasia of the airway epithelium and a thickened submucosal layer with extensive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and collagen deposition causing lumen stenosis. By contrast, the administration of FIR-SeV/ΔF decreased the degree of tracheal stenosis (P < 0.05) and improved the survival rate (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining showed that c-Myc expression was downregulated in the tracheal basal cells of the FIR-SeV/ΔF-treated animals, suggesting that c-myc was suppressed by FIR-SeV/ΔF in the regenerating airway epithelium of the injured tracheal mucosa. The airway-targeted gene therapy of the c-myc suppressor FIR, using a recombinant SeV vector, prevented tracheal stenosis in a rat model of airway mucosal injury.

  13. Transcriptional co-repressors and memory storage

    PubMed Central

    Schoch, Hannah; Abel, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are a central mechanism for regulating chromatin structure and gene expression in the brain. A wide array of histone- and DNA-modifying enzymes have been identified as critical regulators of neuronal function, memory formation, and as causative agents in neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Chromatin modifying enzymes are frequently incorporated into large multi-protein co-activator and co-repressor complexes, where the activity of multiple enzymes is both spatially and temporally coordinated. In this review, we discuss negative regulation of gene expression by corepressor complexes, and the role of co-repressors and their binding partners in neuronal function, memory, and disease. PMID:24440532

  14. IscR of Rhodobacter sphaeroides functions as repressor of genes for iron-sulfur metabolism and represents a new type of iron-sulfur-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Remes, Bernhard; Eisenhardt, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-10-01

    IscR proteins are known as transcriptional regulators for Fe-S biogenesis. In the facultatively phototrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides IscR is the product of the first gene in the isc-suf operon. A major role of IscR in R. sphaeroides iron-dependent regulation was suggested in a bioinformatic study (Rodionov et al., PLoS Comput Biol 2:e163, 2006), which predicted a binding site in the upstream regions of several iron uptake genes, named Iron-Rhodo-box. Most known IscR proteins have Fe-S clusters featuring (Cys)3 (His)1 ligation. However, IscR proteins from Rhodobacteraceae harbor only a single-Cys residue and it was considered unlikely that they can ligate an Fe-S cluster. In this study, the role of R. sphaeroides IscR as transcriptional regulator and sensor of the Fe-S cluster status of the cell was analyzed. A mutant lacking IscR is more impaired in growth under iron limitation than the wild-type and exhibits significantly increased ROS levels in iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Expression studies reveal that R. sphaeroides IscR in its cluster-bound form functions as transcriptional repressor of genes involved in iron metabolism by direct binding to the promoter region of genes preceded by the motif. A total of 110 genes are directly or indirectly affected by IscR. Furthermore, IscR possesses a unique Fe-S cluster ligation scheme with only a single cysteine involved.

  15. Natural repressors of P-induced hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster: a model for repressor evolution.

    PubMed

    Corish, P; Black, D M; Featherston, D W; Merriam, J; Dover, G A

    1996-04-01

    Type I repressors control P element transposition and comprise full length elements and elements with small 3' deletions in the final exon. Using a sensitive assay for measuring the strength of repression of P element transposition in somatic and germline tissues, we have isolated and characterized a naturally occurring type I repressor element from a Q population of Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that the almost complete repression of transposition in this population is a mixture of KP elements with intermediate levels of repression, and the strong contribution of a single 2.6 kb P element deletion derivative, which we call SR (Strong Repressor). A deletion in the final intron of SR allows for the constitutive production of a putative 75 kDa repressor protein in germline tissues in addition to the production of the 66 kDa repressor in the soma, which would result in a biparental mode of inheritance of repression. Based on the four observed classes of natural Q populations, we propose a model in which populations containing SR-like elements, capable of producing strong type I repressor constitutively, have a selective advantage over populations which rely either on maternally transmitted P cytotype or on KP-induced weak levels of repression. Such populations may subsequently spread and constitute an evolutionary stable strategy for the repression of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:8801184

  16. Natural repressors of P-induced hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster: a model for repressor evolution.

    PubMed

    Corish, P; Black, D M; Featherston, D W; Merriam, J; Dover, G A

    1996-04-01

    Type I repressors control P element transposition and comprise full length elements and elements with small 3' deletions in the final exon. Using a sensitive assay for measuring the strength of repression of P element transposition in somatic and germline tissues, we have isolated and characterized a naturally occurring type I repressor element from a Q population of Drosophila melanogaster. We demonstrate that the almost complete repression of transposition in this population is a mixture of KP elements with intermediate levels of repression, and the strong contribution of a single 2.6 kb P element deletion derivative, which we call SR (Strong Repressor). A deletion in the final intron of SR allows for the constitutive production of a putative 75 kDa repressor protein in germline tissues in addition to the production of the 66 kDa repressor in the soma, which would result in a biparental mode of inheritance of repression. Based on the four observed classes of natural Q populations, we propose a model in which populations containing SR-like elements, capable of producing strong type I repressor constitutively, have a selective advantage over populations which rely either on maternally transmitted P cytotype or on KP-induced weak levels of repression. Such populations may subsequently spread and constitute an evolutionary stable strategy for the repression of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

  17. Interaction of NCOR/SMRT Repressor Complexes with Papillomavirus E8^E2C Proteins Inhibits Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; van de Poel, Saskia; Straub, Elke; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) such as HPV16 and 31 can lead to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers and HPV types from the beta genus have been implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. HPV replicate as nuclear extrachromosomal plasmids at low copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. HPV16 and 31 mutants have indicated that these viruses express an E8^E2C protein which negatively regulates genome replication. E8^E2C shares the DNA-binding and dimerization domain (E2C) with the essential viral replication activator E2 and the E8 domain replaces the replication/transcription activation domain of E2. The HR-HPV E8 domain is required for inhibiting viral transcription and the replication of the viral origin mediated by viral E1 and E2 proteins. We show now that E8^E2C also limits replication of HPV1, a mu-PV and HPV8, a beta-PV, in normal human keratinocytes. Proteomic analyses identified all NCoR/SMRT corepressor complex components (HDAC3, GPS2, NCoR, SMRT, TBL1 and TBLR1) as co-precipitating host cell proteins for HPV16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments revealed that NCoR/SMRT components interact with HPV1, 8, 16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins in an E8-dependent manner. SiRNA knock-down experiments confirm that NCoR/SMRT components are critical for both the inhibition of transcription and HPV origin replication by E8^E2C proteins. Furthermore, a dominant-negative NCoR fragment activates transcription and replication only from HPV16 and 31 wt but not from mutant genomes encoding NCoR/SMRT-binding deficient E8^E2C proteins. In summary, our data suggest that the repressive function of E8^E2C is highly conserved among HPV and that it is mediated by an E8-dependent interaction with NCoR/SMRT complexes. Our data also indicate for the first time that NCoR/SMRT complexes not only are involved in inhibiting cellular and viral transcription but also in controlling the replication of HPV origins

  18. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K.; Omoe, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637–2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP. PMID:26341202

  19. The translational repressor eIF4E-binding protein 2 (4E-BP2) correlates with selective delayed neuronal death after ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, María Irene; Martínez-Alonso, Emma; Cid, Cristina; de Leciñana, Maria Alonso; Alcázar, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Transient brain ischemia induces an inhibition of translational rates and causes delayed neuronal death in selective regions and cognitive deficits, whereas these effects do not occur in resistant areas. The translational repressor eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein-2 (4E-BP2) specifically binds to eIF4E and is critical in the control of protein synthesis. To link neuronal death to translation inhibition, we study the eIF4E association with 4E-BP2 under ischemia reperfusion in a rat model of transient forebrain ischemia. Upon reperfusion, a selective neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region was induced, while it did not occur in the cerebral cortex. Confocal microscopy analysis showed a decrease in 4E-BP2/eIF4E colocalization in resistant cortical neurons after reperfusion. In contrast, in vulnerable CA1 neurons, 4E-BP2 remains associated to eIF4E with a higher degree of 4E-BP2/eIF4E colocalization and translation inhibition. Furthermore, the binding of a 4E-BP2 peptide to eIF4E induced neuronal apoptosis in the CA1 region. Finally, pharmacological-induced protection of CA1 neurons inhibited neuronal apoptosis, decreased 4E-BP2/eIF4E association, and recovered translation. These findings documented specific changes in 4E-BP2/eIF4E association during ischemic reperfusion, linking the translation inhibition to selective neuronal death, and identifying 4E-BP2 as a novel target for protection of vulnerable neurons in ischemic injury. PMID:23591646

  20. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637-2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP.

  1. Response to copper stress in Streptomyces lividans extends beyond genes under direct control of a copper-sensitive operon repressor protein (CsoR).

    PubMed

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Chaplin, Amanda K; Hough, Michael A; Rigali, Sébastien; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2012-05-18

    A copper-sensitive operon repressor protein (CsoR) has been identified in Streptomyces lividans (CsoR(Sl)) and found to regulate copper homeostasis with attomolar affinity for Cu(I). Solution studies reveal apo- and Cu(I)-CsoR(Sl) to be a tetramer assembly, and a 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of apo-CsoR(Sl) reveals that a significant conformational change is necessary to enable Cu(I) binding. In silico prediction of the CsoR regulon was confirmed in vitro (EMSA) and in vivo (RNA-seq), which highlighted that next to the csoR gene itself, the regulon consists of two Cu(I) efflux systems involving a CopZ-like copper metallochaperone protein and a CopA P(1)-type ATPase. Although deletion of csoR has only minor effects on S. lividans development when grown under high copper concentrations, mutations of the Cu(I) ligands decrease tolerance to copper as a result of the Cu(I)-CsoR mutants failing to disengage from the DNA targets, thus inhibiting the derepression of the regulon. RNA-seq experiments carried out on samples incubated with exogenous copper and a ΔcsoR strain showed that the set of genes responding to copper stress is much wider than anticipated and largely extends beyond genes targeted by CsoR. This suggests more control levels are operating and directing other regulons in copper homeostasis beside the CsoR regulon.

  2. T cell receptor gene usage in the response to lambda repressor cI protein. An apparent bias in the usage of a V alpha gene element

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The T cell response to the lambda repressor cI protein is directed to the same region of the protein (residues 12-26) in both BALB/c and A/J mice. A panel of T cell hybridomas specific for P12-26 in the context of either I-Ek or I-Ad have been isolated To further understand the molecular interaction between the TCR and the Ia-P12-26 complex, the primary structures of the TCR of five T cell hybridomas have been determined. Southern and Northern analyses indicate that two members of the V alpha 3 gene family are used by 13 out of 14 I-Ek-restricted T cells. Four different V beta genes are used by these T cell hybridomas, while the majority (8 out of 13) express V beta 1 in combination with the J beta 2.1 element. No clear correlation can be seen in this system between gene usage and MHC restriction. In addition, the fine specificity of I-Ek-restricted T cells to a single amino acid substitution [Phe22/His22]P12-26 is not attributed to the usage of particular V alpha and V beta elements. The V alpha 3 family gene is also used by a few I-Ad-restricted T cells. Interestingly, these I-Ad T cells share a reactivity pattern more similar to that of I-Ek- restricted T cells than other I-Ad-restricted T cells. The nonrandom selection V alpha 3 is also demonstrated by the fact that V alpha 3 is used by P12-26-specific, but not by cytochrome c- or staphylococcal nucleus-specific, I-Ek-restricted T cells. This suggests that although antigen specificity may not be accounted for by either chain of the TCR, the members of V alpha 3 genes may be selected by the antigen (P12- 26). PMID:2971753

  3. Rocaglates convert DEAD-box protein eIF4A into a sequence-selective translational repressor.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shintaro; Floor, Stephen N; Ingolia, Nicholas T

    2016-06-23

    Rocaglamide A (RocA) typifies a class of protein synthesis inhibitors that selectively kill aneuploid tumour cells and repress translation of specific messenger RNAs. RocA targets eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A), an ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase; its messenger RNA selectivity is proposed to reflect highly structured 5' untranslated regions that depend strongly on eIF4A-mediated unwinding. However, rocaglate treatment may not phenocopy the loss of eIF4A activity, as these drugs actually increase the affinity between eIF4A and RNA. Here we show that secondary structure in 5' untranslated regions is only a minor determinant for RocA selectivity and that RocA does not repress translation by reducing eIF4A availability. Rather, in vitro and in cells, RocA specifically clamps eIF4A onto polypurine sequences in an ATP-independent manner. This artificially clamped eIF4A blocks 43S scanning, leading to premature, upstream translation initiation and reducing protein expression from transcripts bearing the RocA-eIF4A target sequence. In elucidating the mechanism of selective translation repression by this lead anti-cancer compound, we provide an example of a drug stabilizing sequence-selective RNA-protein interactions. PMID:27309803

  4. Rocaglates convert DEAD-box protein eIF4A into a sequence-selective translational repressor.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shintaro; Floor, Stephen N; Ingolia, Nicholas T

    2016-06-15

    Rocaglamide A (RocA) typifies a class of protein synthesis inhibitors that selectively kill aneuploid tumour cells and repress translation of specific messenger RNAs. RocA targets eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A), an ATP-dependent DEAD-box RNA helicase; its messenger RNA selectivity is proposed to reflect highly structured 5' untranslated regions that depend strongly on eIF4A-mediated unwinding. However, rocaglate treatment may not phenocopy the loss of eIF4A activity, as these drugs actually increase the affinity between eIF4A and RNA. Here we show that secondary structure in 5' untranslated regions is only a minor determinant for RocA selectivity and that RocA does not repress translation by reducing eIF4A availability. Rather, in vitro and in cells, RocA specifically clamps eIF4A onto polypurine sequences in an ATP-independent manner. This artificially clamped eIF4A blocks 43S scanning, leading to premature, upstream translation initiation and reducing protein expression from transcripts bearing the RocA-eIF4A target sequence. In elucidating the mechanism of selective translation repression by this lead anti-cancer compound, we provide an example of a drug stabilizing sequence-selective RNA-protein interactions.

  5. A tale of two repressors – a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Few proteins have had such a strong impact on a field as the lac repressor and λ repressor have had in Molecular Biology In bacteria, the genes required for lactose utilization are negatively regulated; the lac repressor binds to an upstream operator blocking transcription of the enzymes necessary for lactose utilization. A similar switch regulates the virus life cycle; λ repressor binds to an operator site and blocks transcription of the phage genes necessary for lytic development. It is now 50 years since Jacob and Monod first proposed a model for gene regulation, which survives essentially unchanged in contemporary textbooks1. This model provides a cogent depiction of how a set of genes can be coordinately transcribed in response to environmental conditions and regulates metabolic events in the cell. A historical perspective is presented that illustrates the role these two repressor molecules played and their contribution to our understanding of gene regulation. PMID:21392509

  6. The AT-hook/PPC domain protein TEK negatively regulates floral repressors including MAF4 and MAF5

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yifeng; Gan, Eng-Seng; Ito, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic regulations of transposable elements (TEs) and TE-like repeat sequences help to protect genomic integrity and control various developmental processes, including flowering time. This complex action of gene silencing requires the coordination of many key players including DNA methylases, histone deacetylases and histone methyltranferases. We have recently reported that an AT-hook DNA binding protein, TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT SILENCING VIA AT-HOOK (TEK), participates in silencing TEs and TE-like sequence containing genes, such as LerFLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FWA. TEK knockdown in amiTEK plants causes increased histone acetylation, reduced H3K9me2 and DNA hypomethylation in the target loci, which ultimately leads to the upregulation of FLC and FWA as well as TE reactivation. In this report, we show that, besides FLC, other FLC-like genes MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING 4 (MAF4) and MAF5 are also upregulated in amiTEK. Here we discuss the role of the nuclear matrix protein TEK in the maintenance of genome integrity and in the control of flowering. PMID:23733063

  7. An analysis of the binding of repressor protein ModE to modABCD (molybdate transport) operator/promoter DNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Grunden, A M; Self, W T; Villain, M; Blalock, J E; Shanmugam, K T

    1999-08-20

    Expression of the modABCD operon in Escherichia coli, which codes for a molybdate-specific transporter, is repressed by ModE in vivo in a molybdate-dependent fashion. In vitro DNase I-footprinting experiments identified three distinct regions of protection by ModE-molybdate on the modA operator/promoter DNA, GTTATATT (-15 to -8; region 1), GCCTACAT (-4 to +4; region 2), and GTTACAT (+8 to +14; region 3). Within the three regions of the protected DNA, a pentamer sequence, TAYAT (Y = C or T), can be identified. DNA-electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that the protected regions 1 and 2 are essential for binding of ModE-molybdate to DNA, whereas the protected region 3 increases the affinity of the DNA to the repressor. The stoichiometry of this interaction was found to be two ModE-molybdate per modA operator DNA. ModE-molybdate at 5 nM completely protected the modABCD operator/promoter DNA from DNase I-catalyzed hydrolysis, whereas ModE alone failed to protect the DNA even at 100 nM. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between the modA operator DNA and ModE-molybdate was 0.3 nM, and the K(d) increased to 8 nM in the absence of molybdate. Among the various oxyanions tested, only tungstate replaced molybdate in the repression of modA by ModE, but the affinity of ModE-tungstate for modABCD operator DNA was 6 times lower than with ModE-molybdate. A mutant ModE(T125I) protein, which repressed modA-lac even in the absence of molybdate, protected the same region of modA operator DNA in the absence of molybdate. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between modA operator DNA and ModE(T125I) was 3 nM in the presence of molybdate and 4 nM without molybdate. The binding of molybdate to ModE resulted in a decrease in fluorescence emission, indicating a conformational change of the protein upon molybdate binding. The fluorescence emission spectra of mutant ModE proteins, ModE(T125I) and ModE(Q216*), were unaffected by molybdate. The molybdate-independent mutant Mod

  8. Acetylation of Human TCF4 (TCF7L2) Proteins Attenuates Inhibition by the HBP1 Repressor and Induces a Conformational Change in the TCF4::DNA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Elfert, Susanne; Weise, Andreas; Bruser, Katja; Biniossek, Martin L.; Jägle, Sabine; Senghaas, Niklas; Hecht, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The members of the TCF/LEF family of DNA-binding proteins are components of diverse gene regulatory networks. As nuclear effectors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling they act as assembly platforms for multimeric transcription complexes that either repress or activate gene expression. Previously, it was shown that several aspects of TCF/LEF protein function are regulated by post-translational modification. The association of TCF/LEF family members with acetyltransferases and deacetylases prompted us to investigate whether vertebrate TCF/LEF proteins are subject to acetylation. Through co-expression with p300 and CBP and subsequent analyses using mass spectrometry and immunodetection with anti-acetyl-lysine antibodies we show that TCF4 can be acetylated at lysine K150 by CBP. K150 acetylation is restricted to TCF4E splice variants and requires the simultaneous presence of β-catenin and the unique TCF4E C-terminus. To examine the functional consequences of K150 acetylation we substituted K150 with amino acids representing the non-acetylated and acetylated states. Reporter gene assays based on Wnt/β-catenin-responsive promoter regions did not indicate a general role of K150 acetylation in transactivation by TCF4E. However, in the presence of CBP, non-acetylatable TCF4E with a K150R substitution was more susceptible to inhibition by the HBP-1 repressor protein compared to wild-type TCF4E. Acetylation of K150 using a bacterial expression system or amino acid substitutions at K150 alter the electrophoretic properties of TCF4E::DNA complexes. This result suggests that K150 acetylation leads to a conformational change that may also represent the mechanism whereby acetylated TCF4E acquires resistance against HBP1. In summary, TCF4 not only recruits acetyltransferases but is also a substrate for these enzymes. The fact that acetylation affects only a subset of TCF4 splice variants and is mediated preferentially by CBP suggests that the conditional acetylation of TCF4E is a novel

  9. DNA Methyltransferase 1-associated Protein (DMAP1) Is a Co-repressor That Stimulates DNA Methylation Globally and Locally at Sites of Double Strand Break Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gun E.; Kim, Joo Hee; Taylor, Michael; Muller, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Correction of double strand DNA breaks proceeds in an error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR), which can result in gene silencing of half of the DNA molecules caused by action by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) (Cuozzo, C., Porcellini, A., Angrisano, T., Morano, A., Lee, B., Di Pardo, A., Messina, S., Iuliano, R., Fusco, A., Santillo, M. R., Muller, M. T., Chiariotti, L., Gottesman, M. E., and Avvedimento, E. V. (2007) PLoS Genet. 3, e110). To explore the mechanism that leads to HR-induced silencing, a genetic screen was carried out based on the silencing of a GFP reporter to identify potential partners. DMAP1, a DNMT1 interacting protein, was identified as a mediator of this process. DMAP1 is a potent activator of DNMT1 methylation in vitro, suggesting that DMAP1 is a co-repressor that supports the maintenance and de novo action of DNMT1. To examine critical roles for DMAP1 in vivo, lentiviral shRNA was used to conditionally reduce cellular DMAP1 levels. The shRNA transduced cells grew poorly and eventually ceased their growth. Analysis of the tumor suppressor gene p16 methylation status revealed a clear reduction in methylated CpGs in the shRNA cells, suggesting that reactivation of a tumor suppressor gene pathway caused the slow growth phenotype. Analysis of HR, using a fluorescence-based reporter, revealed that knocking down DMAP1 also caused hypomethylation of the DNA repair products following gene conversion. DMAP1 was selectively enriched in recombinant GFP chromatin based on chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. The picture that emerges is that DMAP1 activates DNMT1 preferentially at sites of HR repair. Because DMAP1 depleted cells display enhanced HR, we conclude that it has additional roles in genomic stability. PMID:20864525

  10. DNA methyltransferase 1-associated protein (DMAP1) is a co-repressor that stimulates DNA methylation globally and locally at sites of double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gun E; Kim, Joo Hee; Taylor, Michael; Muller, Mark T

    2010-11-26

    Correction of double strand DNA breaks proceeds in an error-free pathway of homologous recombination (HR), which can result in gene silencing of half of the DNA molecules caused by action by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) (Cuozzo, C., Porcellini, A., Angrisano, T., Morano, A., Lee, B., Di Pardo, A., Messina, S., Iuliano, R., Fusco, A., Santillo, M. R., Muller, M. T., Chiariotti, L., Gottesman, M. E., and Avvedimento, E. V. (2007) PLoS Genet. 3, e110). To explore the mechanism that leads to HR-induced silencing, a genetic screen was carried out based on the silencing of a GFP reporter to identify potential partners. DMAP1, a DNMT1 interacting protein, was identified as a mediator of this process. DMAP1 is a potent activator of DNMT1 methylation in vitro, suggesting that DMAP1 is a co-repressor that supports the maintenance and de novo action of DNMT1. To examine critical roles for DMAP1 in vivo, lentiviral shRNA was used to conditionally reduce cellular DMAP1 levels. The shRNA transduced cells grew poorly and eventually ceased their growth. Analysis of the tumor suppressor gene p16 methylation status revealed a clear reduction in methylated CpGs in the shRNA cells, suggesting that reactivation of a tumor suppressor gene pathway caused the slow growth phenotype. Analysis of HR, using a fluorescence-based reporter, revealed that knocking down DMAP1 also caused hypomethylation of the DNA repair products following gene conversion. DMAP1 was selectively enriched in recombinant GFP chromatin based on chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. The picture that emerges is that DMAP1 activates DNMT1 preferentially at sites of HR repair. Because DMAP1 depleted cells display enhanced HR, we conclude that it has additional roles in genomic stability. PMID:20864525

  11. SAP155-mediated splicing of FUSE-binding protein-interacting repressor serves as a molecular switch for c-myc gene expression.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kajiwara, Toshiko; Tamura, Mai; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanaka, Nobuko; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Rei; Ito, Akihiro; Kubo, Shuji; Natsume, Tohru; Levens, David; Yoshida, Minoru; Nomura, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    The Far UpStream Element (FUSE)-binding protein-interacting repressor (FIR), a c-myc transcriptional suppressor, is alternatively spliced removing the transcriptional repression domain within exon 2 (FIRΔexon2) in colorectal cancers. SAP155 is a subunit of the essential splicing factor 3b (SF3b) subcomplex in the spliceosome. This study aims to study the significance of the FIR-SAP155 interaction for the coordination of c-myc transcription, pre-mRNA splicing, and c-Myc protein modification, as well as to interrogate FIRΔexon2 for other functions relating to altered FIR pre-mRNA splicing. Knockdown of SAP155 or FIR was used to investigate their reciprocal influence on each other and on c-myc transcription, pre-mRNA splicing, and protein expression. Pull down from HeLa cell nuclear extracts revealed the association of FIR, FIRΔexon2, and SF3b subunits. FIR and FIRΔexon2 were coimmunoprecipitated with SAP155. FIR and FIRΔexon2 adenovirus vector (Ad-FIR and Ad-FIRΔexon2, respectively) were prepared to test for their influence on c-myc expression. FIR, SAP155, SAP130, and c-myc were coordinately upregulated in human colorectal cancer. These results reveal that SAP155 and FIR/FIRΔexon2 form a complex and are mutually upregulating. Ad-FIRΔexon2 antagonized Ad-FIR transcriptional repression of c-myc in HeLa cells. Because FIRΔexon2 still carries RRM1 and RRM2 and binding activity to FUSE, it is able to displace repression competent FIR from FUSE in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, thus thwarting FIR-mediated transcriptional repression by FUSE. Thus aberrant FIRΔexon2 production in turn sustained c-Myc expression. In conclusion, altered FIR and c-myc pre-mRNA splicing, in addition to c-Myc expression by augmented FIR/FIRΔexon2-SAP155 complex, potentially contribute to colorectal cancer development.

  12. Methyl jasmonate induction of tanshinone biosynthesis in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots is mediated by JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN repressor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Jianlin; Huang, Shengxiong; Wang, Huizhong; Kai, Guoyin

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is an important plant hormone involved in regulation of many aspects of plant growth and development including secondary metabolism and JASMONATE ZIM-DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins are key components in JA signal processes. In this study, two new JAZ genes named SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 were cloned from S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots and characterized. Expression profiles under methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment revealed that SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 were both MJ-responsive. Subcellular localization assay showed that SmJAZ3 was located in nucleus while SmJAZ9 was preferentially in nucleus. Expression of SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots differently affected the production of tanshinone. Over-expression of SmJAZ3 or SmJAZ9 in hairy roots produced lower level of tanshinone compared with the control, tanshinone production was as low as 0.077 mg/g DW in line SmJAZ3-3 and 0.266 mg/g DW in line SmJAZ9-22. Whereas, down-regulation of SmJAZs enhanced tanshione production, the content of tanshinone increased to 2.48 fold in anti-SmJAZ3-3 line, and 1.35-fold in anti-SmJAZ9-23 line. Our work indicated that SmJAZ3 and SmJAZ9 are involved in regulation of tanshinone biosynthesis and act as repressive transcriptional regulators in the JA signaling pathway, which paves the way to further dissect molecular mechanism in details in the future. PMID:26875847

  13. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα), an oncogenic transcriptional repressor of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21WAF/CDKN1A) and tumor protein p53 (TP53) genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Koh, Dong-In; Licht, Jonathan D; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-07-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα) is an oncogene transcriptional repressor that is generated by a chromosomal translocation between the PLZF and RARα genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL-type) patients. The molecular interaction between PLZF-RARα and the histone deacetylase corepressor was proposed to be important in leukemogenesis. We found that PLZF-RARα can repress transcription of the p21WAF/CDKN1A gene, which encodes the negative cell cycle regulator p21 by binding to its proximal promoter Sp1-binding GC-boxes 3, 4, 5/6, a retinoic acid response element (RARE), and distal p53-responsive elements (p53REs). PLZF-RARα also acts as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53, RARα, and Sp1. PLZF-RARα interacts with co-repressors such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the CDKN1A promoter. PLZF-RARα also interacts with the MBD3-NuRD complex, leading to epigenetic silencing of CDKN1A through DNA methylation. Furthermore, PLZF-RARα represses TP53 and increases p53 protein degradation by ubiquitination, further repressing p21 expression. Resultantly, PLZF-RARα promotes cell proliferation and significantly increases the number of cells in S-phase.

  14. Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger-Retinoic Acid Receptor α (PLZF-RARα), an Oncogenic Transcriptional Repressor of Cyclin-dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1A (p21WAF/CDKN1A) and Tumor Protein p53 (TP53) Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Koh, Dong-In; Licht, Jonathan D.; Kim, Kunhong; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-retinoic acid receptor α (PLZF-RARα) is an oncogene transcriptional repressor that is generated by a chromosomal translocation between the PLZF and RARα genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL-type) patients. The molecular interaction between PLZF-RARα and the histone deacetylase corepressor was proposed to be important in leukemogenesis. We found that PLZF-RARα can repress transcription of the p21WAF/CDKN1A gene, which encodes the negative cell cycle regulator p21 by binding to its proximal promoter Sp1-binding GC-boxes 3, 4, 5/6, a retinoic acid response element (RARE), and distal p53-responsive elements (p53REs). PLZF-RARα also acts as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53, RARα, and Sp1. PLZF-RARα interacts with co-repressors such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the CDKN1A promoter. PLZF-RARα also interacts with the MBD3-NuRD complex, leading to epigenetic silencing of CDKN1A through DNA methylation. Furthermore, PLZF-RARα represses TP53 and increases p53 protein degradation by ubiquitination, further repressing p21 expression. Resultantly, PLZF-RARα promotes cell proliferation and significantly increases the number of cells in S-phase. PMID:24821728

  15. Crystal Structure of the Lactose Operon Repressor and Its Complexes with DNA and Inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Mitchell; Chang, Geoffrey; Horton, Nancy C.; Kercher, Michele A.; Pace, Helen C.; Schumacher, Maria A.; Brennan, Richard G.; Lu, Ponzy

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor, a product of the lacI gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-β-D-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21-base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in a stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quaternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites on the genomic DNA.

  16. Neisseria Prophage Repressor Implicated in Gonococcal Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Nadine; Yu, Chunxiao; Mcclure, Ryan; Gudino, Cynthia; Reed, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the causative agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, can infect and colonize multiple mucosal sites in both men and women. The ability to cope with different environmental conditions requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we identified and characterized a gonococcal transcriptional regulatory protein (Neisseria phage repressor [Npr]) that was previously annotated as a putative gonococcal phage repressor protein. Npr was found to repress transcription of NGNG_00460 to NGNG_00463 (NGNG_00460-00463), an operon present within the phage locus NgoΦ4. Npr binding sites within the NGNG_00460-00463 promoter region were found to overlap the −10 and −35 promoter motifs. A gonococcal npr mutant demonstrated increased adherence to and invasion of human endocervical epithelial cells compared to a wild-type gonococcal strain. Likewise, the gonococcal npr mutant exhibited enhanced colonization in a gonococcal mouse model of mucosal infection. Analysis of the gonococcal npr mutant using RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis demonstrated that the Npr regulon is limited to the operon present within the phage locus. Collectively, our studies have defined a new gonococcal phage repressor protein that controls the transcription of genes implicated in gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:23876804

  17. The CreA repressor is the sole DNA-binding protein responsible for carbon catabolite repression of the alcA gene in Aspergillus nidulans via its binding to a couple of specific sites.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, C; Cornillot, E; Felenbok, B

    1998-03-13

    Carbon catabolite repression is mediated in Aspergillus nidulans by the negative acting protein CreA. The CreA repressor plays a major role in the control of the expression of the alc regulon, encoding proteins required for the ethanol utilization pathway. It represses directly, at the transcriptional level, the specific transacting gene alcR, the two structural genes alcA and aldA, and other alc genes in all physiological growth conditions. Among the seven putative CreA sites identified in the alcA promoter region, we have determined the CreA functional targets in AlcR constitutive and derepressed genetic backgrounds. Two different divergent CreA sites, of which one overlaps a functional AlcR inverted repeat site, are largely responsible for alcA repression. Totally derepressed alcA expression is achieved when these two CreA sites are disrupted in addition to another single site, which overlaps the functional palindromic induction target. The fact that derepression is always associated with alcA overexpression is consistent with a competition model between AlcR and CreA for their cognate targets in the same region of the alcA promoter. Our results also indicate that the CreA repressor is necessary and sufficient for the total repression of the alcA gene.

  18. Extracellular signal-related kinase 2/specificity protein 1/specificity protein 3/repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor pathway is involved in Aroclor 1254-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Formisano, Luigi; Guida, Natascia; Laudati, Giusy; Boscia, Francesca; Esposito, Alba; Secondo, Agnese; Di Renzo, Gianfranco; Canzoniero, Lorella Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) cause a wide spectrum of toxic effects in the brain through undefined mechanisms. Exposure to the PCB mixture Aroclor-1254 (A1254) increases the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) expression, leading to neuronal death. This study sought to understand the sequence of some molecular mechanisms to determine whether A1254 could increase REST expression and the cytoprotective effect of the phorbol ester tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA) on A1254-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. As shown by Western blot analysis, A1254 (10 µg/ml) downregulates extracellular signal-related kinase 2 (ERK2) phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner, thereby triggering the binding of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and Sp3 to the REST gene promoter as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. This chain of events results in an increase in REST mRNA and cell death, as assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and dimethylthiazolyl-2-5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide assay, respectively. Accordingly, TPA prevented both the A1254-induced decrease in ERK2 phosphorylation and the A1254-induced increase in Sp1, Sp3, and REST protein expression. After 48 hr, TPA prevented A1254-induced cell death. ERK2 overexpression counteracted the A1254-induced increase in Sp1 and Sp3 protein expression and prevented A1254-induced Sp1 and Sp3 binding to the REST gene promoter, thus counteracting the increase in REST mRNA expression induced by the toxicant. In neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, ERK2/Sp1/SP3/REST is a new pathway underlying the neurotoxic effect of PCB. The ERK2/Sp1/Sp3/REST pathway, which underlies A1254-induced neuronal death, might represent a new drug signaling cascade in PCB-induced neuronal toxicity. PMID:25093670

  19. NINJA connects the co-repressor TOPLESS to jasmonate signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, Laurens; Barbero, Gemma Fernández; Geerinck, Jan; Tilleman, Sofie; Grunewald, Wim; Pérez, Amparo Cuellar; Chico, José Manuel; Bossche, Robin Vanden; Sewell, Jared; Gil, Eduardo; García-Casado, Gloria; Witters, Erwin; Inzé, Dirk; Long, Jeff A.; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto; Goossens, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) is a plant hormone that regulates a broad array of plant defence and developmental processes1–5. JA-Ile-responsive gene expression is regulated by the transcriptional activator MYC2 that interacts physically with the jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressor proteins. Upon JA-Ile perception, JAZ proteins are degraded and JA-Ile-dependent gene expression is activated6,7. The molecular mechanisms by which JAZ proteins repress gene expression remain unknown. Here we show that the JAZ proteins recruit the Groucho/Tup1-type co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL)8 and TPL-related proteins (TPRs) through a previously uncharacterized adaptor protein, designated Novel INteractor of JAZ (NINJA). NINJA acts as a transcriptional repressor of which the activity is mediated by a functional TPL-binding EAR repression motif. Accordingly, both NINJA and TPL proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonate responses. Our results point to TPL proteins as general co-repressors that affect multiple signalling pathways through the interaction with specific adaptor proteins. This new insight reveals how stress- and growth-related signalling cascades use common molecular mechanisms to regulate gene expression in plants. PMID:20360743

  20. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro {gamma}-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain.

  1. Ion effects on the lac repressor--operator equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Barkley, M D; Lewis, P A; Sullivan, G E

    1981-06-23

    The effects of ions on the interaction of lac repressor protein and operator DNA have been studied by the membrane filter technique. The equilibrium association constant was determined as a function of monovalent and divalent cation concentrations, anions, and pH. The binding of repressor and operator is extremely sensitive to the ionic environment. The dependence of the observed equilibrium constant on salt concentration is analyzed according to the binding theory of Record et al. [Record, M. T., Jr., Lohman, T. M., & deHaseth, P. L. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 107, 145]. The number of ionic interactions in repressor--operator complex is deduced from the slopes of the linear log-log plots. About 11 ionic interactions are formed between repressor and DNA phosphates at pH 7.4 and about 9 ionic interactions at pH 8.0, in reasonable agreement with previous estimates. A favorable nonelectrostatic binding free energy of about 9-12 kcal/mol is estimated from the extrapolated equilibrium constants at the 1 M standard state. The values are in good accord with recent results for the salt-independent binding of repressor core and operator DNA. The effects of pH on the repressor--operator interaction are small, and probably result from titration of functional groups in the DNA-binding site of the protein. For monovalent salts, the equilibrium constant is slightly dependent on cation type and highly dependent on anion type. At constant salt concentration, the equilibrium constant decreases about 10000-fold in the order CH3CO2- greater than or equal to F- greater than Cl- greater than Br- greater than NO3- greater than SCN- greater than I-. The wide range of accessible equilibrium constants provides a useful tool for in vitro studies of the repressor--operator interaction.

  2. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    SciTech Connect

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-10-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts.

  3. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  4. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages. PMID:27527206

  5. Binding Specificities of the Telomere Phage ϕKO2 Prophage Repressor CB and Lytic Repressor Cro.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Jäckel, Claudia; Lanka, Erich; Roschanski, Nicole; Hertwig, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a genetic switch which regulates the lytic and lysogenic cycle. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54, and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor (cI or cB), the lytic repressor (cro) and a putative antiterminator (q). The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI (CI prophage repressor), Cro (Cro repressor), and Q (antiterminator Q), respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are reminiscent of lambda-like phages. We determined binding sites of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor CB and lytic repressor Cro on the ϕKO2 genome in detail by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) studies. Unexpectedly, ϕKO2 CB and Cro revealed different binding specificities. CB was bound to three OR operators in the intergenic region between cB and cro, two OL operators between cB and the replication gene repA and even to operators of N15. Cro bound exclusively to the 16 bp operator site OR3 upstream of the ϕKO2 prophage repressor gene. The ϕKO2 genes cB and cro are regulated by several strong promoters overlapping with the OR operators. The data suggest that Cro represses cB transcription but not its own synthesis, as already reported for PY54 Cro. Thus, not only PY54, but also phage ϕKO2 possesses a genetic switch that diverges significantly from the switch of lambda-like phages.

  6. Phosphorylation of apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain by protein kinase CK2 contributes to chemotherapy resistance by inhibiting doxorubicin induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Sheng, Jianqiu; Arshad, Muhammad; Zhang, Xiaojie; Li, Peifeng

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer resistance to chemotherapy is the major obstacle to cancer therapy. Here, we identified that the phosphorylation of apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) at threonine 149 was essential to inhibit doxorubicin (DOX) induced apoptosis and mitochondrial fission in cancer cells. Our further study showed that casein kinase II (CK2) inhibitors could decrease the phosphorylation levels of ARC and make cancer cells sensitive to undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, CK2α and CK2α', catalytic subunits of CK2, were observed to translocate into nuclear in cancer cells with the treatment of DOX. Finally, the synergistically therapeutic effect by combining DOX and CK2 inhibitor was confirmed in tumor xenograft model. Taken together, our results revealed that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of ARC contributed to chemotherapy resistance by inhibiting DOX induced apoptosis and combining DOX with CK2 inhibitor could induce apoptosis of cancer cells synergistically by down-regulating the phosphorylation of ARC. Therefore, development of new therapeutic strategies based on ARC and CK2, is promising for overcoming cancer resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:26172393

  7. Concomitant expression of far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein (FBP) interacting repressor (FIR) and its splice variants induce migration and invasion of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Benedikt; Bovet, Michael; Yin, Yi; Stichel, Damian; Malz, Mona; González-Vallinas, Margarita; Middleton, Alistair; Ehemann, Volker; Schmitt, Jennifer; Muley, Thomas; Meister, Michael; Herpel, Esther; Singer, Stephan; Warth, Arne; Schirmacher, Peter; Drasdo, Dirk; Matthäus, Franziska; Breuhahn, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Transcription factors integrate a variety of oncogenic input information, facilitate tumour growth and cell dissemination, and therefore represent promising therapeutic target structures. Because over-expression of DNA-interacting far upstream element binding protein (FBP) supports non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) migration, we asked whether its repressor, FBP-interacting repressor (FIR) is functionally inactivated and how FIR might affect NSCLC cell biology. Different FIR splice variants were highly expressed in the majority of NSCLCs, with the highest levels in tumours carrying genomic gains of chromosome 8q24.3, which contained the FIR gene locus. Nuclear FIR expression was significantly enriched at the invasion front of primary NSCLCs, but this did not correlate with tumour cell proliferation. FIR accumulation was associated with worse patient survival and tumour recurrence; in addition, FIR over-expression significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). In vitro, we applied newly developed methods and modelling approaches for the quantitative and time-resolved description of the pro-migratory and pro-invasive capacities of SCC cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of all FIR variants significantly reduced the speed and directional movement of tumour cells in all phases of migration. Furthermore, sprouting efficiency and single cell invasiveness were diminished following FIR inhibition. Interestingly, the silencing of FIR isoforms lacking exon 2 (FIR(Δexon2)) alone was sufficient to reduce lateral migration and invasion. In summary, by using scale-spanning data derived from primary human tissues, quantitative cellular analyses and mathematical modelling, we have demonstrated that concomitant over-expression of FIR and its splice variants drives NSCLC migration and dissemination.

  8. An evolutionary link between sporulation and prophage induction in the structure of a repressor:anti-repressor complex.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Brannigan, J A; Offen, W A; Smith, I; Wilkinson, A J

    1998-11-13

    Spore formation is an extreme response of some bacteria to adversity. In Bacillus subtilis the proteins of the sin, sporulation inhibition, region form a component of an elaborate molecular circuitry that regulates the commitment to sporulation. SinR is a tetrameric repressor protein that binds to the promoters of genes essential for entry into sporulation and prevents their transcription. This repression is overcome through the activity of SinI, which disrupts the SinR tetramer through the formation of a SinI-SinR heterodimer. The interactions governing this curious quaternary transition are revealed in the crystal structure of the SinI-SinR complex. The most striking, and unexpected, finding is that the tertiary structure of the DNA-binding domain of SinR is identical with that of the corresponding domains of the repressor proteins, CI and Cro, of bacteriophage 434 that regulate lysis/lysogeny. This structural similarity greatly exceeds that between SinR and any bacterial protein or between the 434 repressor proteins and their homologues in the closely related bacteriophage lambda. The close evolutionary relationship implied by the structures of SinR and the 434 repressors provokes both comparison of their functions and a speculative consideration of the intriguing possibility of an evolutionary link between the two adaptive responses, sporulation and prophage induction.

  9. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    DOEpatents

    Meagher, Richard B.; Balish, Rebecca S.; Tehryung, Kim; McKinney, Elizabeth C.

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  10. The Vibrio harveyi master quorum-sensing regulator, LuxR, a TetR-type protein is both an activator and a repressor: DNA recognition and binding specificity at target promoters

    PubMed Central

    Pompeani, Audra J; Irgon, Joseph J; Berger, Michael F; Bulyk, Martha L; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2008-01-01

    Quorum sensing is the process of cell-to-cell communication by which bacteria communicate via secreted signal molecules called autoinducers. As cell population density increases, the accumulation of autoinducers leads to co-ordinated changes in gene expression across the bacterial community. The marine bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, uses three autoinducers to achieve intra-species, intra-genera and inter-species cell–cell communication. The detection of these autoinducers ultimately leads to the production of LuxR, the quorum-sensing master regulator that controls expression of the genes in the quorum-sensing regulon. LuxR is a member of the TetR protein superfamily; however, unlike other TetR repressors that typically repress their own gene expression and that of an adjacent operon, LuxR is capable of activating and repressing a large number of genes. Here, we used protein binding microarrays and a two-layered bioinformatics approach to show that LuxR binds a 21 bp consensus operator with dyad symmetry. In vitro and in vivo analyses of two promoters directly regulated by LuxR allowed us to identify those bases that are critical for LuxR binding. Together, the in silico and biochemical results enabled us to scan the genome and identify novel targets of LuxR in V. harveyi and thus expand the understanding of the quorum-sensing regulon. PMID:18681939

  11. An Unusual Phage Repressor Encoded by Mycobacteriophage BPs.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Valerie M; Oldfield, Lauren M; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages express transcription repressors that maintain lysogeny by down-regulating lytic promoters and confer superinfection immunity. Repressor regulation is critical to the outcome of infection-lysogenic or lytic growth-as well as prophage induction into lytic replication. Mycobacteriophage BPs and its relatives use an unusual integration-dependent immunity system in which the phage attachment site (attP) is located within the repressor gene (33) such that site-specific integration leads to synthesis of a prophage-encoded product (gp33103) that is 33 residues shorter at its C-terminus than the virally-encoded protein (gp33136). However, the shorter form of the repressor (gp33103) is stable and active in repression of the early lytic promoter PR, whereas the longer virally-encoded form (gp33136) is inactive due to targeted degradation via a C-terminal ssrA-like tag. We show here that both forms of the repressor bind similarly to the 33-34 intergenic regulatory region, and that BPs gp33103 is a tetramer in solution. The BPs gp33103 repressor binds to five regulatory regions spanning the BPs genome, and regulates four promoters including the early lytic promoter, PR. BPs gp33103 has a complex pattern of DNA recognition in which a full operator binding site contains two half sites separated by a variable spacer, and BPs gp33103 induces a DNA bend at the full operator site but not a half site. The operator site structure is unusual in that one half site corresponds to a 12 bp palindrome identified previously, but the other half site is a highly variable variant of the palindrome. PMID:26332854

  12. Repressors of reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Popowski, Melissa; Tucker, Haley

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been the focal point of ever increasing interest and scrutiny as they hold the promise of personalized regenerative medicine. However, creation of iPSCs is an inefficient process that requires forced expression of potentially oncogenic proteins. In order to unlock the full potential of iPSCs, both for basic and clinical research, we must broaden our search for more reliable ways of inducing pluripotency in somatic cells. This review surveys an area of reprogramming that does not receive as much focus, barriers to reprogramming, in the hope of stimulating new ideas and approaches towards developing safer and more efficient methods of reprogramming. Better methods of iPSC creation will allow for more reliable disease modeling, better basic research into the pluripotent state and safer iPSCs that can be used in a clinical setting. PMID:25914761

  13. Frameshift mutations in the bacteriophage Mu repressor gene can confer a trans-dominant virulent phenotype to the phage.

    PubMed Central

    Geuskens, V; Vogel, J L; Grimaud, R; Desmet, L; Higgins, N P; Toussaint, A

    1991-01-01

    Virulent mutations in the bacteriophage Mu repressor gene were isolated and characterized. Recombination and DNA sequence analysis have revealed that virulence is due to unusual frameshift mutations which change several C-terminal amino acids. The vir mutations are in the same repressor region as the sts amber mutations which, by eliminating several C-terminal amino acids, suppress thermosensitivity of repressor binding to the operators by its N-terminal domain (J. L. Vogel, N. P. Higgins, L. Desmet, V. Geuskens, and A. Toussaint, unpublished data). Vir repressors bind Mu operators very poorly. Thus the Mu repressor C terminus, either by itself or in conjunction with other phage or host proteins, tunes the DNA-binding properties at the repressor N terminus. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1833383

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of an Enterococcus faecalis repressor protein, CylR2, involved in regulating cytolysin production through quorum-sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Shuisong; McAteer, Kathleen; Bussiere, Dirksen E.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-06-01

    CylR2 is one of the two regulatory proteins associated with the quorum-sensing-dependent synthesis of cytolysin for the common pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. The protein was expressed with a C-terminal 6-histidine tag and purified to homogeneity with a cobalt affinity column followed by another size exclusion column. Both native and SeMet proteins were crystallized. A complete X-ray diffraction data set from the native crystal was collected to 2.3 resolution. The crystal was tetragonal, belonging to space group P41/43, with unit-cell dimensions a=b=66.2 , c=40.9 and a=b=g=90. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of CylR2.

  15. Expression of p27Kip1, a cell cycle repressor protein, is inversely associated with potential carcinogenic risk in the genetic rodent models of obesity and long-lived Ames dwarf mice

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Isao

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The association of genetic rodent models of obesity and cancer still remains a controversial issue. Although this controversy has largely been resolved in recent years for homozygous leptin receptor-deficient obese Zucker rats and homozygous long-lived Ames dwarf mice, it is still unresolved for homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice. Objective The objective of the present study described below was to investigate whether the expression of the cell cycle repressor protein p27(Kip1) is (a) down-regulated in the tumor-free homozygous leptin receptor-deficient obese Zucker rats as well as tumor-free homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice and (b) up-regulated in the tumor-free homozygous long-lived Ames dwarf mice. Methods To achieve this objective, we first performed western immunoblot analysis of the hepatic expression of p27. We then performed western immunoblot analysis and proteomic analysis of the hepatic expression of the proteins involved in the upstream molecular signaling pathways for the expression of p27. Lastly, we analyzed the serum levels of glucose, insulin, and branched-chain amino acids, all of which have been shown to regulate, causally and inversely, the expression of p27. Results/Conclusions The results indicated that the hepatic expression of p27 was down-regulated in the homozygous leptin receptor-deficient obese Zucker rats and up-regulated in the homozygous long-lived Ames dwarf mice as expected. We also found that the hepatic expression of p27 was down-regulated in the homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice. This last observation was not completely consistent with all of the results of the published studies where homozygous leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice were used. PMID:23357529

  16. Binding of the catabolite repressor protein CcpA to its DNA target is regulated by phosphorylation of its corepressor HPr.

    PubMed

    Jones, B E; Dossonnet, V; Küster, E; Hillen, W; Deutscher, J; Klevit, R E

    1997-10-17

    Catabolite repression of a number of catabolic operons in bacilli is mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA, the phosphocarrier protein HPr from the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system (PTS), and a cis-acting DNA sequence termed the catabolite-responsive element (cre). We present evidence that CcpA interacts with HPr that is phosphorylated at Ser46 (Ser(P) HPr) and that these proteins form a specific ternary complex with cre DNA. Titration experiments following the circular dichroism signal of the cre DNA indicate that this complex consists of two molecules of Ser(P) HPr, a CcpA dimer, and the cre sequence. Limited proteolysis experiments indicate that the domain structure of CcpA is similar to other members of the LacI/GalR family of helix-turn-helix proteins, comprised of a helix-turn-helix DNA domain and a C-terminal effector domain. NMR titration of Ser(P) HPr demonstrates that the isolated C-terminal domain of CcpA forms a specific complex with Ser(P) HPr but not with unphosphorylated HPr. Based upon perturbations to the NMR spectrum, we propose that the binding site of the C-terminal domain of CcpA on Ser(P) HPr forms a contiguous surface that encompasses both Ser(P)46 and His15, the site of phosphorylation by enzyme I of the PTS. This allows CcpA to recognize the phosphorylation state of HPr, effectively linking the process of sugar import via the PTS to catabolite repression in bacilli.

  17. Loss of the repressor REST in uterine fibroids promotes aberrant G protein-coupled receptor 10 expression and activates mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Binny V; Koohestani, Faezeh; McWilliams, Michelle; Colvin, Arlene; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Kinsey, William H; Nowak, Romana A; Nothnick, Warren B; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese M

    2013-02-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are the most common tumors of the female reproductive tract, occurring in up to 77% of reproductive-aged women, yet molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A role for atypically activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids has been suggested in several studies. We identified that G protein-coupled receptor 10 [GPR10, a putative signaling protein upstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-protein kinase B/AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT-mTOR) pathway] is aberrantly expressed in uterine fibroids. The activation of GPR10 by its cognate ligand, prolactin releasing peptide, promotes PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways and cell proliferation specifically in cultured primary leiomyoma cells. Additionally, we report that RE1 suppressing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF), a known tumor suppressor, transcriptionally represses GPR10 in the normal myometrium, and that the loss of REST in fibroids permits GPR10 expression. Importantly, mice overexpressing human GPR10 in the myometrium develop myometrial hyperplasia with excessive extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of uterine fibroids. We demonstrate previously unrecognized roles for GPR10 and its upstream regulator REST in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids. Importantly, we report a unique genetically modified mouse model for a gene that is misexpressed in uterine fibroids. PMID:23284171

  18. Structural Insight on the Mechanism of Regulation of the MarR Family of Proteins: High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Transcriptional Repressor from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum

    SciTech Connect

    Saridakis, Vivian; Shahinas, Dea; Xu, Xiaohui; Christendat, Dinesh

    2008-03-31

    Transcriptional regulators belonging to the MarR family are characterized by a winged-helix DNA binding domain. These transcriptional regulators regulate the efflux and influx of phenolic agents in bacteria and archaea. In Escherichia coli, MarR regulates the multiple antibiotic resistance operon and its inactivation produces a multiple antibiotic resistance phenotype. In some organisms, active efflux of drug compounds will produce a drug resistance phenotype, whereas in other organisms, active influx of chlorinated hydrocarbons results in their rapid degradation. Although proteins in the MarR family are regulators of important biological processes, their mechanism of action is not well understood and structural information about how phenolic agents regulate the activity of these proteins is lacking. This article presents the three-dimensional structure of a protein of the MarR family, MTH313, in its apo form and in complex with salicylate, a known inactivator. A comparison of these two structures indicates that the mechanism of regulation involves a large conformational change in the DNA binding lobe. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and biophysical analyses further suggest that salicylate inactivates MTH313 and prevents it from binding to its promoter region.

  19. Crystal structure of the lactose operon repressor and its complexes with DNA and inducer

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.; Chang, G.; Horton, N.C.

    1996-03-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli is the paradigm for gene regulation. Its key component is the lac repressor a product of the lacl gene. The three-dimensional structures of the intact lac repressor, the lac repressor bound to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl-B-D-1thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the lac repressor complexed with a 21 base pair symmetric operator DNA have been determined. These three structures show the conformation of the molecule in both the induced and the repressed states and provide a framework for understanding a wealth of biochemical and genetic information. The DNA sequence of the lac operon has three lac repressor recognition sites in stretch of 500 base pairs. The crystallographic structure of the complex with DNA suggests that the tetrameric repressor functions synergistically with catabolite gene activator protein (CAP) and participates in the quarternary formation of repression loops in which one tetrameric repressor interacts simultaneously with two sites in the genomic DNA. 76 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Strigolactone Signaling in Arabidopsis Regulates Shoot Development by Targeting D53-Like SMXL Repressor Proteins for Ubiquitination and Degradation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xue; Li, Xilong; Lu, Zefu; Meng, Xiangbing; Wang, Yonghong

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are carotenoid-derived phytohormones that control many aspects of plant development, including shoot branching, leaf shape, stem secondary thickening, and lateral root growth. In rice (Oryza sativa), SL signaling requires the degradation of DWARF53 (D53), mediated by a complex including D14 and D3, but in Arabidopsis thaliana, the components and mechanism of SL signaling involving the D3 ortholog MORE AXILLARY GROWTH2 (MAX2) are unknown. Here, we show that SL-dependent regulation of shoot branching in Arabidopsis requires three D53-like proteins, SUPPRESSOR OF MORE AXILLARY GROWTH2-LIKE6 (SMXL6), SMXL7, and SMXL8. The smxl6 smxl7 smxl8 triple mutant suppresses the highly branched phenotypes of max2 and the SL-deficient mutant max3. Overexpression of a mutant form of SMXL6 that is resistant to SL-induced ubiquitination and degradation enhances shoot branching. Exogenous application of the SL analog rac-GR24 causes ubiquitination and degradation of SMXL6, 7, and 8; this requires D14 and MAX2. D53-like SMXLs form complexes with MAX2 and TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEIN2 (TPR2) and interact with D14 in a GR24-responsive manner. Furthermore, D53-like SMXLs exhibit TPR2-dependent transcriptional repression activity and repress the expression of BRANCHED1. Our findings reveal that in Arabidopsis, D53-like SMXLs act with TPR2 to repress transcription and so allow lateral bud outgrowth but that SL-induced degradation of D53-like proteins activates transcription to inhibit outgrowth. PMID:26546446

  1. JmjC Domain-containing Protein 6 (Jmjd6) Derepresses the Transcriptional Repressor Transcription Factor 7-like 1 (Tcf7l1) and Is Required for Body Axis Patterning during Xenopus Embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuena; Gao, Yan; Lu, Lei; Zhang, Zan; Gan, Shengchun; Xu, Liyang; Lei, Anhua; Cao, Ying

    2015-08-14

    Tcf7l1 (also known as Tcf3) is a bimodal transcription factor that plays essential roles in embryogenesis and embryonic and adult stem cells. On one hand, Tcf7l1 works as transcriptional repressor via the recruitment of Groucho-related transcriptional corepressors to repress the transcription of Wnt target genes, and, on the other hand, it activates Wnt target genes when Wnt-activated β-catenin interacts with it. However, how its activity is modulated is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that a JmjC-domain containing protein, Jmjd6, interacts with Tcf7l and derepresses Tcf7l. We show that Jmjd6 binds to a region of Tcf7l1 that is also responsible for Groucho interaction, therefore making it possible that Jmjd6 binding displaces the Groucho transcriptional corepressor from Tcf7l1. Moreover, we show that Jmjd6 antagonizes the repression effect of Tcf7l1 on target gene transcription and is able to enhance β-catenin-induced gene activation and that, vice versa, inhibition of Jmjd6 activity compromises gene activation in both cells and Xenopus early embryos. We also show that jmjd6 is both maternally and zygotically transcribed during Xenopus embryogenesis. Loss of Jmjd6 function causes defects in anterioposterior body axis formation and down-regulation of genes that are involved in anterioposterior axis patterning. The results elucidate a novel mechanism underlying the regulation of Tcf7l1 activity and the regulation of embryonic body axis formation.

  2. The cold-inducible RNA-binding protein migrates from the nucleus to cytoplasmic stress granules by a methylation-dependent mechanism and acts as a translational repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Leeuw, Frederic de; Zhang Tong; Wauquier, Corinne; Huez, Georges; Kruys, Veronique; Gueydan, Cyril

    2007-12-10

    The cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a nuclear 18-kDa protein consisting of an amino-terminal RNA Recognition Motif (RRM) and a carboxyl-terminal domain containing several RGG motifs. First characterized for its overexpression upon cold shock, CIRP is also induced by stresses such as UV irradiation and hypoxia. Here, we investigated the expression as well as the subcellular localization of CIRP in response to other stress conditions. We demonstrate that oxidative stress leads to the migration of CIRP to stress granules (SGs) without alteration of expression. Stress granules are dynamic cytoplasmic foci at which stalled translation initiation complexes accumulate in cells subjected to environmental stress. Relocalization of CIRP into SGs also occurs upon other cytoplasmic stresses (osmotic pressure or heat shock) as well as in response to stresses of the endoplasmic reticulum. CIRP migration into SGs is independent from TIA-1 which has been previously reported to be a general mediator of SG formation, thereby suggesting the existence of multiple pathways leading to SG formation. Moreover, deletion mutants revealed that both RGG and RRM domains can independently promote CIRP migration into SGs. However, the methylation of arginine residues in the RGG domain is necessary for CIRP to exit the nucleus to be further recruited into SGs. By RNA-tethering experiments, we also show that CIRP down-regulates mRNA translation and that this activity is carried by the carboxyl-terminal RG-enriched domain. Altogether, our findings further reveal the diversity of mechanisms by which CIRP is regulated by environmental stresses and provide new insights into CIRP cytoplasmic function.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus IE72 protein interacts with the transcriptional repressor hDaxx to regulate LUNA gene expression during lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Matthew; Woodhall, David; Compton, Teresa; Sinclair, John

    2010-07-01

    A putative latency-associated transcript (LUNA) complementary to the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL81-82 region previously identified in seropositive donors' monocytes is also expressed during lytic infection. Thus, the LUNA promoter is active during both lytic and latent infection. Consequently, the mechanisms regulating this promoter may provide further insight into factors that determine whether the outcome of HCMV infection is latent or lytic. By transfection, the LUNA promoter exhibited low but reproducible activity. Substantial activation by virus infection suggested that a viral factor was important for LUNA expression during lytic infection. IE72, a known transactivator of viral promoters, activated the LUNA promoter in cotransfection assays. Furthermore, coinfection with wild-type HCMV but not an IE72 deletion virus (CR208) also activated the LUNA promoter. Finally, diminished LUNA gene expression in CR208 virus-infected cells supported a role for IE72 in LUNA gene expression. The initial regulation of herpesvirus immediate-early gene expression is associated with proteins found at cellular nuclear domain 10 (ND10) bodies, such as PML, hDaxx, and ATRX. hDaxx transfection repressed LUNA promoter activity. Furthermore, we observed binding of hDaxx to the LUNA promoter, which was abrogated by IE72 gene expression via direct interaction. Finally, we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of the hDaxx interaction partner ATRX rescued LUNA gene expression in CR208-infected cells. Overall, these data show that hDaxx/ATRX-mediated repression of LUNA during lytic infection absolutely requires IE72 gene expression. It also suggests that the targeting of cellular factors by IE72 is important throughout the different phases of HCMV gene expression during productive infection.

  4. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, S; Davidkova, M; Spotheim-Maurizot, M

    2009-08-21

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro gamma-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain. PMID:19520056

  5. Identification of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon repressor.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Nagy, P L; Zalkin, H

    1995-08-01

    Transcription of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon is repressed in response to a signal of excess adenine. We have purified the repressor protein and have identified, cloned, and overexpressed the purR regulatory gene that controls transcription initiation of the operon. B. subtilis purR encodes a 62-kDa homodimer that binds to the pur operon control region. The PurR binding site which overlaps the promoter encompasses approximately 110 bp. The protein-DNA interaction is inhibited by 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate. A mutation that deletes the repressor binding site or one that disrupts purR abolishes binding activity in vitro and repression of transcription in vivo in response to the excess adenine signal. These results lead to a model in which an excess-adenine signal is transmitted to PurR via the 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate pool. In addition, purR is autoregulated. There is no structural or mechanistic similarity between the B. subtilis and Escherichia coli purine repressors.

  6. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-10-06

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of /sup 14/C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of approx. 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA.

  7. TBLR1 regulates the expression of nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin-Min; Chang, Qing; Zeng, Lin; Gu, Judy; Brown, Stuart; Basch, Ross S

    2006-01-01

    Background Transcription is regulated by a complex interaction of activators and repressors. The effectors of repression are large multimeric complexes which contain both the repressor proteins that bind to transcription factors and a number of co-repressors that actually mediate transcriptional silencing either by inhibiting the basal transcription machinery or by recruiting chromatin-modifying enzymes. Results TBLR1 [GenBank: NM024665] is a co-repressor of nuclear hormone transcription factors. A single highly conserved gene encodes a small family of protein molecules. Different isoforms are produced by differential exon utilization. Although the ORF of the predominant form contains only 1545 bp, the human gene occupies ~200 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 3q and contains 16 exons. The genomic sequence overlaps with the putative DC42 [GenBank: NM030921] locus. The murine homologue is structurally similar and is also located on Chromosome 3. TBLR1 is closely related (79% homology at the mRNA level) to TBL1X and TBL1Y, which are located on Chromosomes X and Y. The expression of TBLR1 overlaps but is distinct from that of TBL1. An alternatively spliced form of TBLR1 has been demonstrated in human material and it too has an unique pattern of expression. TBLR1 and the homologous genes interact with proteins that regulate the nuclear hormone receptor family of transcription factors. In resting cells TBLR1 is primarily cytoplasmic but after perturbation the protein translocates to the nucleus. TBLR1 co-precipitates with SMRT, a co-repressor of nuclear hormone receptors, and co-precipitates in complexes immunoprecipitated by antiserum to HDAC3. Cells engineered to over express either TBLR1 or N- and C-terminal deletion variants, have elevated levels of endogenous N-CoR. Co-transfection of TBLR1 and SMRT results in increased expression of SMRT. This co-repressor undergoes ubiquitin-mediated degradation and we suggest that the stabilization of the co-repressors by TBLR1

  8. DNA sequence dependent and independent conformational changes in multipartite operator recognition by lambda-repressor.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Bandyopadhyay, S; Roy, S

    2000-03-28

    Binding of regulatory proteins to multipartite DNA binding sites often occurs with protein-protein interaction, resulting in cooperative binding. The operators of bacteriophage lambda have several pairs of repressor binding sites (O(R)1-O(R)2, O(R)2-O(R)3, O(L)1-O(L)2, and O(L)2-O(L)3) separated by a variable number of base pairs, and thus, bacteriophage lambda is a model system for studying multipartite operator recognition by DNA-binding proteins. Near-UV circular dichroism spectra show that the DNA is distorted in O(R)1-O(R)2 and O(L)2-O(L)3 but much less so in O(R)2-O(R)3. Upon titration of lambda-repressor with single-operator sites O(R)1, O(R)2, and O(R)3, it was observed that the tryptophan fluorescence quenches to different degrees, suggesting different conformations of the protein in the three DNA-protein complexes. Acrylamide quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of lambda-repressor bound to these single operators also shows different Stern-Volmer constants, supporting the above conclusions. Titration of lambda-repressor with oligonucleotides containing pairs of operator sites also causes different degrees of fluorescence quenching. In particular, fluorescence quenching induced by O(R)1-O(R)2 binding is less than the quenching induced by either of the single operators alone, suggesting additional conformational changes upon establishment of protein-protein contact. Stern-Volmer constants obtained from acrylamide quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of lambda-repressor bound cooperatively to pairs of operator sites are different from those of the single-operator-site-bound repressors. For example, O(R)2-O(R)3-bound repressor has significantly higher acrylamide quenchable components than either of the O(R)2- or O(R)3-bound proteins, again suggesting additional conformational changes upon establishment of protein-protein contact. We conclude that the strategy of recognition of multipartite operator by lambda-repressor is complex and varied, involving

  9. Engineering a root-specific, repressor-operator gene complex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tehryung; Balish, Rebecca S; Heaton, Andrew C P; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Meagher, Richard B

    2005-11-01

    Strong, tissue-specific and genetically regulated expression systems are essential tools in plant biotechnology. An expression system tool called a 'repressor-operator gene complex' (ROC) has diverse applications in plant biotechnology fields including phytoremediation, disease resistance, plant nutrition, food safety, and hybrid seed production. To test this concept, we assembled a root-specific ROC using a strategy that could be used to construct almost any gene expression pattern. When a modified E. coli lac repressor with a nuclear localization signal was expressed from a rubisco small subunit expression vector, S1pt::lacIn, LacIn protein was localized to the nuclei of leaf and stem cells, but not to root cells. A LacIn repressible Arabidopsis actin expression vector A2pot was assembled containing upstream bacterial lacO operator sequences, and it was tested for organ and tissue specificity using beta-glucuronidase (GUS) and mercuric ion reductase (merA) gene reporters. Strong GUS enzyme expression was restricted to root tissues of A2pot::GUS/S1pt::lacIn ROC plants, while GUS activity was high in all vegetative tissues of plants lacking the repressor. Repression of shoot GUS expression exceeded 99.9% with no evidence of root repression, among a large percentage of doubly transformed plants. Similarly, MerA was strongly expressed in the roots, but not the shoots of A2pot::merA/S1pt::lacIn plants, while MerA levels remained high in both shoots and roots of plants lacking repressor. Plants with MerA expression restricted to roots were approximately as tolerant to ionic mercury as plants constitutively expressing MerA in roots and shoots. The superiority of this ROC over the previously described root-specific tobacco RB7 promoter is demonstrated.

  10. Comparing native and irradiated E. coli lactose repressor-operator complex by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Aci-Sèche, Samia; Garnier, Norbert; Goffinont, Stéphane; Genest, Daniel; Spotheim-Maurizot, Mélanie; Genest, Monique

    2010-09-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of the tetrameric repressor protein to the operator DNA. We have previously shown that gamma-irradiation destabilises the repressor-operator complex because the repressor gradually loses its DNA-binding ability (Radiat Res 170:604-612, 2008). It was suggested that the observed oxidation of tyrosine residues and the concomitant structural changes of irradiated headpieces (DNA-binding domains of repressor monomers) could be responsible for the inactivation. To unravel the mechanisms that lead to repressor-operator complex destabilisation when tyrosine oxidation occurs, we have compared by molecular dynamic simulations two complexes: (1) the native complex formed by two headpieces and the operator DNA, and (2) the damaged complex, in which all tyrosines are replaced by their oxidation product 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). On a 20 ns time scale, MD results show effects consistent with complex destabilisation: increased flexibility, increased DNA bending, modification of the hydrogen bond network, and decrease of the positive electrostatic potential at the protein surface and of the global energy of DNA-protein interactions. PMID:20349312

  11. Transcriptional regulation of repressor synthesis in mycobacteriophage L5.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, C E; Levin, M E; Donnelly-Wu, M K; Hatfull, G F

    1995-09-01

    Mycobacteriophage L5 is a temperate phage of the mycobacteria that forms stable lysogens in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Lysogeny is maintained by the putative repressor, the gene 71 product, which also mediates immunity to superinfection. We show here that there are three promoters located upstream of gene 71 which are active in an L5 lysogen but which do not require any phage-encoded proteins. In early lytic growth, gene 71 is also transcribed from a promoter, Pleft, located at the right end of the genome and which appears to be a target of gp71 regulation. A model is given for the regulation of L5 life cycles. PMID:8594325

  12. Interconvertible lac repressor-DNA loops revealed by single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Kwan; Guthold, Martin; Erie, Dorothy A; Gelles, Jeff

    2008-09-30

    At many promoters, transcription is regulated by simultaneous binding of a protein to multiple sites on DNA, but the structures and dynamics of such transcription factor-mediated DNA loops are poorly understood. We directly examined in vitro loop formation mediated by Escherichia coli lactose repressor using single-molecule structural and kinetics methods. Small ( approximately 150 bp) loops form quickly and stably, even with out-of-phase operator spacings. Unexpectedly, repeated spontaneous transitions between two distinct loop structures were observed in individual protein-DNA complexes. The results imply a dynamic equilibrium between a novel loop structure with the repressor in its crystallographic "V" conformation and a second structure with a more extended linear repressor conformation that substantially lessens the DNA bending strain. The ability to switch between different loop structures may help to explain how robust transcription regulation is maintained even though the mechanical work required to form a loop may change substantially with metabolic conditions. PMID:18828671

  13. Timing is everything in plant development. The central role of floral repressors.

    PubMed

    Jarillo, Jose A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Progress in understanding the molecular basis of flowering time control has revealed that floral repressors play a central role in modulating the floral transition and are essential to prevent the precocious onset of flowering. A number of cellular processes including chromatin remodeling, selective protein degradation, and transcriptional regulation mediated by transcription factors are involved in repressing the initiation of flowering. Floral repressors interact at different levels with floral inductive pathways and prevent the premature onset of flowering that could impact negatively on the reproductive success of plants. Despite recent advances, further studies will be needed to understand how the interactions between floral repressors and the regulatory networks involved in the control of flowering time have evolved in different species. Recent data suggest that a diversity of regulatory proteins act as central floral repressors in different plants, and even in those species where regulatory modules are conserved new elements that modulate the function of these pathways have been recruited to mediate specific adaptive responses. The development of genomic tools and predictive models that can integrate large datasets related to the flowering behavior of plant species will facilitate the characterization of the repressor mechanisms underlying flowering responses, a trait with implications in the yield of crop species. In a scenario of global climate change, an in depth understanding of these gene circuits will be essential for the development of crop varieties with improved yield.

  14. Novel repressor regulates insulin sensitivity through interaction with Foxo1

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Jun; Cao, Yongheng; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takemori, Hiroshi; Kawano, Yoshinaga; Sekioka, Risa; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Sakai, Juro; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Forkhead box-containing protein o (Foxo) 1 is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We identified a Foxo1-CoRepressor (FCoR) protein in mouse adipose tissue that inhibits Foxo1's activity by enhancing acetylation via impairment of the interaction between Foxo1 and the deacetylase Sirt1 and via direct acetylation. FCoR is phosphorylated at Threonine 93 by catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and is translocated into nucleus, making it possible to bind to Foxo1 in both cytosol and nucleus. Knockdown of FCoR in 3T3-F442A cells enhanced expression of Foxo target and inhibited adipocyte differentiation. Overexpression of FCoR in white adipose tissue decreased expression of Foxo-target genes and adipocyte size and increased insulin sensitivity in Leprdb/db mice and in mice fed a high-fat diet. In contrast, Fcor knockout mice were lean, glucose intolerant, and had decreased insulin sensitivity that was accompanied by increased expression levels of Foxo-target genes and enlarged adipocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that FCoR is a novel repressor that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism in adipose tissue by acting to fine-tune Foxo1 activity. PMID:22510882

  15. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sau, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors. PMID:24747758

  16. The N-Terminal Domain of the Repressor of Staphylococcus aureus Phage Φ11 Possesses an Unusual Dimerization Ability and DNA Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Anindya; Mandal, Sukhendu; Sau, Subrata

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors. PMID:24747758

  17. Weak operator binding enhances simulated Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Andrew V; Grosner, Michael A; Perez, Pamela J; Clauvelin, Nicolas; Lu, Xiang-Jun; Olson, Wilma K

    2013-12-01

    The 50th anniversary of Biopolymers coincides closely with the like celebration of the discovery of the Escherichia coli (lac) lactose operon, a classic genetic system long used to illustrate the influence of biomolecular structure on function. The looping of DNA induced by the binding of the Lac repressor protein to sequentially distant operator sites on DNA continues to serve as a paradigm for understanding long-range genomic communication. Advances in analyses of DNA structures and in incorporation of proteins in computer simulations of DNA looping allow us to address long-standing questions about the role of protein-mediated DNA loop formation in transcriptional control. Here we report insights gained from studies of the sequence-dependent contributions of the natural lac operators to Lac repressor-mediated DNA looping. Novel superposition of the ensembles of protein-bound operator structures derived from NMR measurements reveals variations in DNA folding missed in conventional structural alignments. The changes in folding affect the predicted ease with which the repressor induces loop formation and the ways that DNA closes between the protein headpieces. The peeling of the auxiliary operators away from the repressor enhances the formation of loops with the 92-bp wildtype spacing and hints of a structural reason behind their weak binding. PMID:23818216

  18. Tolerance of Arc repressor to multiple-alanine substitutions.

    PubMed

    Brown, B M; Sauer, R T

    1999-03-01

    Arc repressor mutants containing from three to 15 multiple-alanine substitutions have spectral properties expected for native Arc proteins, form heterodimers with wild-type Arc, denature cooperatively with Tms equal to or greater than wild type, and, in some cases, fold as much as 30-fold faster and unfold as much as 50-fold slower than wild type. Two of the mutants, containing a total of 14 different substitutions, also footprint operator DNA in vitro. The stability of some of the proteins with multiple-alanine mutations is significantly greater than that predicted from the sum of the single substitutions, suggesting that a subset of the wild-type residues in Arc may interact in an unfavorable fashion. Overall, these results show that almost half of the residues in Arc can be replaced by alanine en masse without compromising the ability of this small, homodimeric protein to fold into a stable, native-like structure. PMID:10051581

  19. Site-specific DNA-affinity chromatography of the lac repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, G

    1980-01-01

    To test the feasibility of site-specific DNA-affinity chromatography, E. coli lac repressor was bound to an operator-containing DNA column, and in parallel to a non-operator DNA column. Salt gradient elution shows: 1) elution from non-operator DNA was near 250mM KCl or NaCl; interpretation of this result suggests the usefulness of the procedure for studying salt-dependence of DNA-protein affinities; 2) elution from operator-containing DNA was delayed (average elution = 1000mM salt), demonstrating a feasibility of site-specific DNA-affinity chromatography, if one provides a sufficiently favorable ratio of specific to non-specific DNA binding sites; 3) repressor eluted from operator-containing DNA over a very broad salt range, which may represent chromatography-generated repressor heterogeneity. PMID:7001362

  20. Optimized expression and purification of biophysical quantities of Lac repressor and Lac repressor regulatory domain.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Matthew A; Carter, Marie V; Wand, A Joshua

    2016-07-01

    The recombinant production of Lac repressor (LacI) in Escherichia coli is complicated by its ubiquitous use as a regulatory element in commercially-available expression vectors and host strains. While LacI-regulated expression systems are often used to produce recombinant LacI, the product can be heterogeneous and unsuitable for some studies. Alternative approaches include using unregulated vectors which typically suffer from low yield or vectors with promoters induced by metabolically active sugars which can dilute isotope labels necessary for certain biophysical studies. Here, an optimized expression system and isolation protocol for producing various constructs of LacI is introduced which eliminates these complications. The expression vector is an adaptation of the pASK backbone wherein expression of the lacI gene is regulated by an anhydrotetracyline inducible tetA promoter and the host strain lacks the lacI gene. Typical yields in highly deuterated minimal medium are nearly 2-fold greater than those previously reported. Notably, the new expression system is also able to produce the isolated regulatory domain of LacI without co-expression of the full-length protein and without any defects in cell viability, eliminating the inconvenient requirement for strict monitoring of cell densities during pre-culturing. Typical yields in highly deuterated minimal medium are significantly greater than those previously reported. Characterization by solution NMR shows that LacI constructs produced using this expression system are highly homogenous and functionally active. PMID:27064119

  1. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with gamma-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH* radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH. radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  2. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Nathalie; Goffinont, Stephane; Buré, Corinne; Davidkova, Marie; Maurizot, Jean-Claude; Cadene, Martine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the cellular effects of radiation-induced oxidation requires the unravelling of key molecular events, particularly damage to proteins with important cellular functions. The Escherichia coli lactose operon is a classical model of gene regulation systems. Its functional mechanism involves the specific binding of a protein, the repressor, to a specific DNA sequence, the operator. We have shown previously that upon irradiation with γ-rays in solution, the repressor loses its ability to bind the operator. Water radiolysis generates hydroxyl radicals (OH· radicals) which attack the protein. Damage of the repressor DNA-binding domain, called the headpiece, is most likely to be responsible of this loss of function. Using CD, fluorescence spectroscopy and a combination of proteolytic cleavage with MS, we have examined the state of the irradiated headpiece. CD measurements revealed a dose-dependent conformational change involving metastable intermediate states. Fluorescence measurements showed a gradual degradation of tyrosine residues. MS was used to count the number of oxidations in different regions of the headpiece and to narrow down the parts of the sequence bearing oxidized residues. By calculating the relative probabilities of reaction of each amino acid with OH· radicals, we can predict the most probable oxidation targets. By comparing the experimental results with the predictions we conclude that Tyr7, Tyr12, Tyr17, Met42 and Tyr47 are the most likely hotspots of oxidation. The loss of repressor function is thus correlated with chemical modifications and conformational changes of the headpiece. PMID:17263689

  3. Calorimetric analysis of lambda cI repressor binding to DNA operator sites.

    PubMed

    Merabet, E; Ackers, G K

    1995-07-11

    dimeric stoichiometry. (3) The thermal melting unit for N-terminal domains in the absence of DNA was found to reach values of 6-8 (monomer units) at concentrations where high-order oligomers of wild-type protein are formed [Senear et al. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 6179-6189]. However, in the presence of DNA operator sites, the cooperative unit for thermal unfolding was reduced to precisely two monomers, indicating that the N-terminal domain binds strictly as a dimer. (4) Significant nonadditivity was observed for the repressor binding enthalpies and heat capacities determined with multiple combinations of full-site operators.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  4. Purification and characterization of the diphtheria toxin repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, M P; Twiddy, E M; Holmes, R K

    1992-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor gene (dtxR) encodes a protein (DtxR) that regulates transcription of the diphtheria toxin gene (tox) by an iron-dependent mechanism. Cloned dtxR was expressed in Escherichia coli from the phage T7 gene 10 promoter, and DtxR was purified. Specific binding of DtxR to the tox+ operator was dependent on reduction of DtxR and the presence of ferrous ions. DtxR protected a sequence of approximately 30 nucleotide pairs, partially overlapping the tox promoter and containing a region of dyad symmetry, from digestion by DNase I. DtxR exhibited very little binding to the mutant tox-201 operator region and failed to bind to the promoter/operator region of the ferric uptake regulation (fur) gene of E. coli. Images PMID:1502169

  5. A System of Repressor Gradients Spatially Organizes the Boundaries of “Morphogen-dependent” Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongtao; Xu, Zhe; Mei, Constance; Yu, Danyang; Small, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Summary The homeodomain (HD) protein Bicoid (Bcd) is thought to function as a gradient morphogen that positions boundaries of target genes via threshold-dependent activation mechanisms. Here we analyze 66 Bcd-dependent regulatory elements, and show that their boundaries are positioned primarily by repressive gradients that antagonize Bcd-mediated activation. A major repressor is the pair-rule protein Runt, which is expressed in an opposing gradient, and is necessary and sufficient for limiting Bcd-dependent activation. Evidence is presented that Runt functions with the maternal repressor Capicua and the gap protein Kruppel as the principal components of a repression system that correctly orders boundaries throughout the anterior half of the embryo. These results put conceptual limits on the Bcd morphogen hypothesis, and demonstrate how the Bcd gradient functions within the gene network that patterns the embryo. PMID:22541432

  6. Loss of floral repressor function adapts rice to higher latitudes in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Ariza, Jorge; Galbiati, Francesca; Goretti, Daniela; Brambilla, Vittoria; Shrestha, Roshi; Pappolla, Andrea; Courtois, Brigitte; Fornara, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to discriminate variations in day length allows plants to align flowering with the most favourable season of the year. This capacity has been altered by artificial selection when cultivated varieties became adapted to environments different from those of initial domestication. Rice flowering is promoted by short days when HEADING DATE 1 (Hd1) and EARLY HEADING DATE 1 (Ehd1) induce the expression of florigenic proteins encoded by HEADING DATE 3a (Hd3a) and RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 (RFT1). Repressors of flowering antagonize such induction under long days, maintaining vegetative growth and delaying flowering. To what extent artificial selection of long day repressor loci has contributed to expand rice cultivation to Europe is currently unclear. This study demonstrates that European varieties activate both Hd3a and RFT1 expression regardless of day length and their induction is caused by loss-of-function mutations at major long day floral repressors. However, their contribution to flowering time control varies between locations. Pyramiding of mutations is frequently observed in European germplasm, but single mutations are sufficient to adapt rice to flower at higher latitudes. Expression of Ehd1 is increased in varieties showing reduced or null Hd1 expression under natural long days, as well as in single hd1 mutants in isogenic backgrounds. These data indicate that loss of repressor genes has been a key strategy to expand rice cultivation to Europe, and that Ehd1 is a central node integrating floral repressive signals. PMID:25732533

  7. Repressor for the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate regulon of Escherichia coli K-12: primary structure and identification of the DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, G; Ye, S; Larson, T J

    1996-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the glpEGR operon of Escherichia coli was determined. The translational reading frame at the beginning, middle, and end of each gene was verified. The glpE gene encodes an acidic, cytoplasmic protein of 108 amino acids with a molecular weight of 12,082. The glpG gene encodes a basic, cytoplasmic membrane-associated protein of 276 amino acids with a molecular weight of 31,278. The functions of GlpE and GlpG are unknown. The glpR gene encodes the repressor for the glycerol 3-phosphate regulon, a protein predicted to contain 252 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 28,048. The amino acid sequence of the glp repressor was similar to several repressors of carbohydrate catabolic systems, including those of the glucitol (GutR), fucose (FucR), and deoxyribonucleoside (DeoR) systems of E. coli, as well as those of the lactose (LacR) and inositol (IolR) systems of gram-positive bacteria and agrocinopine (AccR) system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. These repressors constitute a family of related proteins, all of which contain approximately 250 amino acids, possess a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif near the amino terminus, and bind a sugar phosphate molecule as the inducing signal. The DNA recognition helix of the glp repressor and the nucleotide sequence of the glp operator were very similar to those of the deo system. The presumptive recognition helix of the glp repressor was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to match that of the deo repressor or, in a separate construct, to abolish DNA binding. Neither altered form of the glp repressor recognized the glp or deo operator, either in vivo or in vitro. However, both altered forms of the glp repressor were negatively dominant to the wild-type glp repressor, indicating that the inability to bind DNA with high affinity was due to alteration of the DNA-binding domain, not to an inability to oligomerize or instability of the altered repressors. For the first time, analysis of repressors

  8. Mechanism of action of a repressor of dioxin-dependent induction of Cyp1a1 gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A J; Weir-Brown, K I; Bannister, R M; Chu, F F; Reisz-Porszasz, S; Fujii-Kuriyama, Y; Sogawa, K; Hankinson, O

    1992-01-01

    A dominant mutant of Hepa-1 cells, c31, expresses a repressor that prevents 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-dependent stimulation of Cyp1a1 transcription. The repressor acts via the xenobiotic-responsive elements (XREs), which are the DNA-binding sites for the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor-TCDD complex during transcriptional activation of the gene. High-salt nuclear extracts prepared from c31 cells grown with TCDD contained normal levels of the Ah receptor which bound the XRE with normal affinity, as judged by in vitro gel mobility shift assays. Furthermore, extracts prepared from these cells, grown either with or without TCDD, contained no novel XRE-binding proteins compared with extracts from wild-type Hepa-1 cells. However, in vivo genomic footprinting demonstrated that TCDD treatment leads to binding of the Ah receptor to the XREs in Hepa-1 but not mutant cells. This finding suggests that the repressor associates with the Ah receptor to prevent its binding to the XREs and that high-salt treatment either causes dissociation of the receptor/repressor complex or fails to extract the repressor from nuclei. The results underscore the importance of using both in vivo and in vitro assays for analyzing DNA-protein interactions. Images PMID:1314949

  9. Gene model 129 (Gm129) encodes a novel transcriptional repressor that modulates circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Annayev, Yunus; Adar, Sheera; Chiou, Yi-Ying; Lieb, Jason D; Sancar, Aziz; Ye, Rui

    2014-02-21

    The mammalian circadian clock is a molecular oscillator composed of a feedback loop that involves transcriptional activators CLOCK and BMAL1, and repressors Cryptochrome (CRY) and Period (PER). Here we show that a direct CLOCK·BMAL1 target gene, Gm129, is a novel regulator of the feedback loop. ChIP analysis revealed that the CLOCK·BMAL1·CRY1 complex strongly occupies the promoter region of Gm129. Both mRNA and protein levels of GM129 exhibit high amplitude circadian oscillations in mouse liver, and Gm129 gene encodes a nuclear-localized protein that directly interacts with BMAL1 and represses CLOCK·BMAL1 activity. In vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction results demonstrate that, like CRY1, GM129 functions as a repressor by binding to the CLOCK·BMAL1 complex on DNA. Although Gm129(-/-) or Cry1(-/-) Gm129(-/-) mice retain a robust circadian rhythm, the peaks of Nr1d1 and Dbp mRNAs in liver exhibit a significant phase delay compared with control. Our results suggest that, in addition to CRYs and PERs, the GM129 protein contributes to the transcriptional feedback loop by modulating CLOCK·BMAL1 activity as a transcriptional repressor.

  10. The tryptophan repressor sequence is highly conserved among the Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Arvidson, D N; Arvidson, C G; Lawson, C L; Miner, J; Adams, C; Youderian, P

    1994-01-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is regulated by the product of the trpR gene, the tryptophan (Trp) repressor. Trp aporepressor binds the corepressor, L-tryptophan, to form a holorepressor complex, which binds trp operator DNA tightly, and inhibits transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon. The conservation of trp operator sequences among enteric Gram-negative bacteria suggests that trpR genes from other bacterial species can be cloned by complementation in E. coli. To clone trpR homologues, a deletion of the E. coli trpR gene, delta trpR504, was made on a plasmid by site-directed mutagenesis, then crossed onto the E. coli genome. Plasmid clones of the trpR genes of Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae were isolated by complementation of the delta trpR504 allele, scored as the ability to repress beta-galactosidase synthesis from a prophage-borne trpE-lacZ gene fusion. The predicted amino acid sequences of four enteric TrpR proteins show differences, clustered on the backside of the folded repressor, opposite the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix substructures. These differences are predicted to have little effect on the interactions of the aporepressor with tryptophan, holorepressor with operator DNA, or tandemly bound holorepressor dimers with one another. Although there is some variation observed at the dimer interface, interactions predicted to stabilize the interface are conserved. The phylogenetic relationships revealed by the TrpR amino acid sequence alignment agree with the results of others. PMID:8208606

  11. Control of developmentally primed erythroid genes by combinatorial co-repressor actions

    PubMed Central

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Cico, Alba; Stephen, Tharshana; Thongjuea, Supat; Kolovos, Petros; Baymaz, H. Irem; Yu, Xiao; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maas, Alex; Barroca, Vilma; Kockx, Christel; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Lenhard, Boris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    How transcription factors (TFs) cooperate within large protein complexes to allow rapid modulation of gene expression during development is still largely unknown. Here we show that the key haematopoietic LIM-domain-binding protein-1 (LDB1) TF complex contains several activator and repressor components that together maintain an erythroid-specific gene expression programme primed for rapid activation until differentiation is induced. A combination of proteomics, functional genomics and in vivo studies presented here identifies known and novel co-repressors, most notably the ETO2 and IRF2BP2 proteins, involved in maintaining this primed state. The ETO2–IRF2BP2 axis, interacting with the NCOR1/SMRT co-repressor complex, suppresses the expression of the vast majority of archetypical erythroid genes and pathways until its decommissioning at the onset of terminal erythroid differentiation. Our experiments demonstrate that multimeric regulatory complexes feature a dynamic interplay between activating and repressing components that determines lineage-specific gene expression and cellular differentiation. PMID:26593974

  12. Control of developmentally primed erythroid genes by combinatorial co-repressor actions.

    PubMed

    Stadhouders, Ralph; Cico, Alba; Stephen, Tharshana; Thongjuea, Supat; Kolovos, Petros; Baymaz, H Irem; Yu, Xiao; Demmers, Jeroen; Bezstarosti, Karel; Maas, Alex; Barroca, Vilma; Kockx, Christel; Ozgur, Zeliha; van Ijcken, Wilfred; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Lenhard, Boris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    How transcription factors (TFs) cooperate within large protein complexes to allow rapid modulation of gene expression during development is still largely unknown. Here we show that the key haematopoietic LIM-domain-binding protein-1 (LDB1) TF complex contains several activator and repressor components that together maintain an erythroid-specific gene expression programme primed for rapid activation until differentiation is induced. A combination of proteomics, functional genomics and in vivo studies presented here identifies known and novel co-repressors, most notably the ETO2 and IRF2BP2 proteins, involved in maintaining this primed state. The ETO2-IRF2BP2 axis, interacting with the NCOR1/SMRT co-repressor complex, suppresses the expression of the vast majority of archetypical erythroid genes and pathways until its decommissioning at the onset of terminal erythroid differentiation. Our experiments demonstrate that multimeric regulatory complexes feature a dynamic interplay between activating and repressing components that determines lineage-specific gene expression and cellular differentiation. PMID:26593974

  13. Structure of the MecI repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in complex with the cognate DNA operator of mec

    SciTech Connect

    Safo, Martin K.; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Musayev, Faik N.; Zhao, Qixun; Archer, Gordon L.

    2006-04-01

    The up-and-down binding of dimeric MecI to mecA dyad DNA may account for the cooperative effect of the repressor. The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of β-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Å resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI–mec complex, but unlike the MecI–bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  14. The qa repressor gene of Neurospora crassa: wild-type and mutant nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Huiet, L; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    The qa-1S gene, one of two regulatory genes in the qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa, encodes the qa repressor. The qa-1S gene together with the qa-1F gene, which encodes the qa activator protein, control the expression of all seven qa genes, including those encoding the inducible enzymes responsible for the utilization of quinic acid as a carbon source. The nucleotide sequence of the qa-1S gene and its flanking regions has been determined. The deduced coding sequence for the qa-1S protein encodes 918 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 100,650 and is interrupted by a single 66-base-pair intervening sequence. Both constitutive and noninducible mutants occur in the qa-1S gene and two different mutations of each type have been cloned and sequenced. All four mutations occur within the predicted coding region of the qa-1S gene. This result strongly supports the hypothesis that the qa-1S gene encodes a repressor. All four mutations are located within codons for the last 300 amino acids of the qa-1S protein. The mutations in three of the mutants involve amino acid substitutions, while the fourth mutant, which has a constitutive phenotype, contains a frameshift mutation. The two constitutive mutations occur in the most distal region of the gene, possibly implicating the COOH-terminal region of the qa repressor in binding to its target. The two noninducible mutations occur in a region proximal to the constitutive mutations, possibly implicating this region of the qa repressor in binding the inducer. Images PMID:3010294

  15. Structure of wild-type and mutant repressors and of the control region of the rbt operon of Klebsiella aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Anderton-Loviny, T; Smith, C A; Hartley, B S

    1985-05-01

    Pentitol metabolism in Klebsiella aerogenes is encoded by continuous ribitol (rbt) and D-arabitol (dal) operons transcribed in bipolar fashion and sandwiched between long stretches of homologous DNA. The operons are separated by a central control region (2.2 kb) which encodes both the repressors and all the control sequences. The rbt repressor (270 amino acids) shows homology to the Escherichia coli lac repressor and other DNA-binding proteins. It is transcribed from the strand opposite the rbt operon and the intervening control region (254-bp) contains features which reflect the complex regulation. A rbt-constitutive mutant strain used in previous studies of experimental enzyme evolution encodes a truncated rbt-peptide of 133 residues due to a frameshift mutation. PMID:3891331

  16. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  17. Cleavage of a putative metal permease in Chlamydia trachomatis yields an iron-dependent transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher C; Nicod, Sophie S; Malcolm, Denise S; Grieshaber, Scott S; Carabeo, Rey A

    2012-06-26

    The regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for most organisms, because iron is required for a variety of conserved biochemical processes, yet can be toxic at high concentrations. Upon experiencing iron starvation in vitro, the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis exhibits elevated expression of a putative iron-transport system encoded by the ytg operon. The third component of the ytg operon, CT069 (YtgCR), encodes a protein with two distinct domains: a membrane-anchored metal ion permease and a diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR)-like transcriptional repressor. In this report, we demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of CT069 (YtgR) serves as an iron-dependent autorepressor of the ytg operon. Moreover, the nascent full-length metal permease-transcriptional repressor protein was processed during the course of infection, and heterologously when expressed in Escherichia coli. The products produced by heterologous cleavage in E. coli were functional in the repression of a reporter gene downstream of a putative YtgR operator. We report a bona fide mechanism of iron-dependent regulation of transcription in Chlamydia. Moreover, the unusual membrane permease-DNA-binding polypeptide fusion configuration was found in several bacteria. Therefore, the DNA-binding capability and liberation of the YtgR domain from a membrane-anchored permease in C. trachomatis could represent a previously uncharacterized mechanism for prokaryotic regulation of iron-homeostasis.

  18. The chromatin remodeling factor CHD5 is a transcriptional repressor of WEE1.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jinhua; Adelmant, Guillaume; Marto, Jarrod A; Look, A Thomas; Yusufzai, Timur

    2014-01-01

    Loss of the chromatin remodeling ATPase CHD5 has been linked to the progression of neuroblastoma tumors, yet the underlying mechanisms behind the tumor suppressor role of CHD5 are unknown. In this study, we purified the human CHD5 complex and found that CHD5 is a component of the full NuRD transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone deacetylases. The CHD5/NuRD complex appears mutually exclusive with the related CHD4/NuRD complex as overexpression of CHD5 results in loss of the CHD4 protein in cells. Following a search for genes that are regulated by CHD5 in neuroblastoma cells, we found that CHD5 binds to and represses the G2/M checkpoint gene WEE1. Reintroduction of CHD5 into neuroblastoma cells represses WEE1 expression, demonstrating that CHD5 can function as a repressor in cells. A catalytically inactive mutant version of CHD5 is able to associate with a NuRD cofactor but fails to repress transcription. Our study shows that CHD5 is a NuRD-associated transcriptional repressor and identifies WEE1 as one of the CHD5-regulated genes that may link CHD5 to tumor suppression.

  19. Cu(I)-mediated Allosteric Switching in a Copper-sensing Operon Repressor (CsoR)*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Ming James; Coyne, H. Jerome; Cubillas, Ciro; Vinuesa, Pablo; Fang, Xianyang; Ma, Zhen; Ma, Dejian; Helmann, John D.; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Wang, Yun-Xing; Dann, Charles E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR) is representative of a major Cu(I)-sensing family of bacterial metalloregulatory proteins that has evolved to prevent cytoplasmic copper toxicity. It is unknown how Cu(I) binding to tetrameric CsoRs mediates transcriptional derepression of copper resistance genes. A phylogenetic analysis of 227 DUF156 protein members, including biochemically or structurally characterized CsoR/RcnR repressors, reveals that Geobacillus thermodenitrificans (Gt) CsoR characterized here is representative of CsoRs from pathogenic bacilli Listeria monocytogenes and Bacillus anthracis. The 2.56 Å structure of Cu(I)-bound Gt CsoR reveals that Cu(I) binding induces a kink in the α2-helix between two conserved copper-ligating residues and folds an N-terminal tail (residues 12–19) over the Cu(I) binding site. NMR studies of Gt CsoR reveal that this tail is flexible in the apo-state with these dynamics quenched upon Cu(I) binding. Small angle x-ray scattering experiments on an N-terminally truncated Gt CsoR (Δ2–10) reveal that the Cu(I)-bound tetramer is hydrodynamically more compact than is the apo-state. The implications of these findings for the allosteric mechanisms of other CsoR/RcnR repressors are discussed. PMID:24831014

  20. The Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD5 Is a Transcriptional Repressor of WEE1

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Jinhua; Adelmant, Guillaume; Marto, Jarrod A.; Look, A. Thomas; Yusufzai, Timur

    2014-01-01

    Loss of the chromatin remodeling ATPase CHD5 has been linked to the progression of neuroblastoma tumors, yet the underlying mechanisms behind the tumor suppressor role of CHD5 are unknown. In this study, we purified the human CHD5 complex and found that CHD5 is a component of the full NuRD transcriptional repressor complex, which also contains methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone deacetylases. The CHD5/NuRD complex appears mutually exclusive with the related CHD4/NuRD complex as overexpression of CHD5 results in loss of the CHD4 protein in cells. Following a search for genes that are regulated by CHD5 in neuroblastoma cells, we found that CHD5 binds to and represses the G2/M checkpoint gene WEE1. Reintroduction of CHD5 into neuroblastoma cells represses WEE1 expression, demonstrating that CHD5 can function as a repressor in cells. A catalytically inactive mutant version of CHD5 is able to associate with a NuRD cofactor but fails to repress transcription. Our study shows that CHD5 is a NuRD-associated transcriptional repressor and identifies WEE1 as one of the CHD5-regulated genes that may link CHD5 to tumor suppression. PMID:25247294

  1. ARA67/PAT1 Functions as a Repressor To Suppress Androgen Receptor Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanqing; Yang, Yue; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2004-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) may recruit multiple coregulators for proper or optimal transactivation. Here we report the identification and characterization of ARA67/PAT1 as an AR coregulator from a prostate cDNA library. ARA67/PAT1 was screened out as an AR N terminus interacting protein. Interaction mapping shows that the cooperation of multiple domains within ARA67/PAT1 may be required for the maximal interaction with AR. ARA67/PAT1 functions as a repressor with better suppressive effects on AR compared to glucocorticoid receptor and estrogen receptor. Further mechanism dissection reveals that the interrupted AR cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling may play a major role in ARA67/PAT1 mediated suppression on AR. Together, these results suggest that ARA67/PAT1 may function as a novel repressor that can modulate AR function in prostate cancer. PMID:14729952

  2. The DNA replication and damage checkpoint pathways induce transcription by inhibition of the Crt1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Zhou, Z; Elledge, S J

    1998-09-01

    We have identified the yeast CRT1 gene as an effector of the DNA damage and replication checkpoint pathway. CRT1 encodes a DNA-binding protein that recruits the general repressors Ssn6 and Tup1 to the promoters of damage-inducible genes. Derepression of the Crt1 regulon suppresses the lethality of mec1 and rad53 null alleles and is essential for cell viability during replicative stress. In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, Crt1 becomes hyperphosphorylated and no longer binds DNA, resulting in transcriptional induction. CRT1 is autoregulated and is itself induced by DNA damage, indicating the existence of a negative feedback pathway that facilitates return to the repressed state after elimination of damage. The inhibition of an autoregulatory repressor in response to DNA damage is a strategy conserved throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

  3. Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Qüesta, Julia I; Song, Jie; Geraldo, Nuno; An, Hailong; Dean, Caroline

    2016-07-29

    The determinants that specify the genomic targets of Polycomb silencing complexes are still unclear. Polycomb silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) accelerates flowering and involves a cold-dependent epigenetic switch. Here we identify a single point mutation at an intragenic nucleation site within FLC that prevents this epigenetic switch from taking place. The mutation blocks nucleation of plant homeodomain-Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PHD-PRC2) and indicates a role for the transcriptional repressor VAL1 in the silencing mechanism. VAL1 localizes to the nucleation region in vivo, promoting histone deacetylation and FLC transcriptional silencing, and interacts with components of the conserved apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex. Sequence-specific targeting of transcriptional repressors thus recruits the machinery for PHD-PRC2 nucleation and epigenetic silencing.

  4. [Spatial structure of cro-repressor in a solution. II. Effect of ionized groups].

    PubMed

    Kurochkin, A V; Kirpichnikov, M P

    1986-01-01

    The technique of 1H NMR spectroscopy and absorption UV spectroscopy were used to study the ionization of the tyrosine phenol cycles and the effect of ionizable groups on the chemical shifts of signals from protons in the side chains of several amino acid residues. The microenvironment of these residues was established by analysing the titration curves. The mutual orientation of two functionally important adjacent alpha-helical protein regions was determined in solution. The signals from methionine residues belonging to different regions of the secondary structure were assigned in the NMR spectrum. The results indicate that the spatial structure of the repressor is similar in solution an in the crystal. They confirm the model proposed for the cro repressor interaction with DNA and based on the data of X-ray diffraction analysis.

  5. Purification and characterization of nucleolin and its identification as a transcription repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, T H; Tsai, W H; Lee, Y M; Lei, H Y; Lai, M Y; Chen, D S; Yeh, N H; Lee, S C

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the acute-phase response genes, such as that for alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP), involves both positive and negative transcription factors. A positive transcription factor, AGP/EBP, and a negative transcription factor, factor B, have been identified as the two most important factors responsible for the induction of the AGP gene. In this paper we report the purification, characterization, and identification of a B-motif-binding factor from the mouse hepatoma cell line 129p. The purified factor has been identified as nucleolin by amino acid sequence analysis. Biochemical and functional studies further established that nucleolin is a transcription repressor for regulation of AGP and possibly other acute-phase response genes. Thus, in addition to the many known functions of nucleolin, such as rRNA transcription, processing, ribosome biogenesis, and the shuttling of proteins between the cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, it may also function as a transcriptional repressor. Images PMID:8065340

  6. Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor VAL1 triggers Polycomb silencing at FLC during vernalization.

    PubMed

    Qüesta, Julia I; Song, Jie; Geraldo, Nuno; An, Hailong; Dean, Caroline

    2016-07-29

    The determinants that specify the genomic targets of Polycomb silencing complexes are still unclear. Polycomb silencing of Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) accelerates flowering and involves a cold-dependent epigenetic switch. Here we identify a single point mutation at an intragenic nucleation site within FLC that prevents this epigenetic switch from taking place. The mutation blocks nucleation of plant homeodomain-Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PHD-PRC2) and indicates a role for the transcriptional repressor VAL1 in the silencing mechanism. VAL1 localizes to the nucleation region in vivo, promoting histone deacetylation and FLC transcriptional silencing, and interacts with components of the conserved apoptosis- and splicing-associated protein (ASAP) complex. Sequence-specific targeting of transcriptional repressors thus recruits the machinery for PHD-PRC2 nucleation and epigenetic silencing. PMID:27471304

  7. Phosphorylation of trihelix transcriptional repressor ASR3 by MAP KINASE4 negatively regulates Arabidopsis immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Xiao; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Sixue; Cheng, Yanbing; Yuan, Joshua S; Jiang, Daohong; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-03-01

    Proper control of immune-related gene expression is crucial for the host to launch an effective defense response. Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) induces rapid and profound transcriptional reprogramming via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that ASR3 (ARABIDOPSIS SH4-RELATED3) functions as a transcriptional repressor and plays a negative role in regulating pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASR3 belongs to a plant-specific trihelix transcription factor family for which functional studies are lacking. MAMP treatments induce rapid phosphorylation of ASR3 at threonine 189 via MPK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates PTI responses downstream of multiple MAMP receptors. ASR3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity via its ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motifs and negatively regulates a large subset of flg22-induced genes. Phosphorylation of ASR3 by MPK4 enhances its DNA binding activity to suppress gene expression. Importantly, the asr3 mutant shows enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial pathogen infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing the wild-type or phospho-mimetic form of ASR3 exhibit compromised PTI responses. Our studies reveal a function of the trihelix transcription factors in plant innate immunity and provide evidence that ASR3 functions as a transcriptional repressor regulated by MAMP-activated MPK4 to fine-tune plant immune gene expression.

  8. DWARF 53 acts as a repressor of strigolactone signalling in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xue; Xiong, Guosheng; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Fulu; Wang, Lei; Meng, Xiangbing; Liu, Guifu; Yu, Hong; Yuan, Yundong; Yi, Wei; Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Honglei; He, Yuanzheng; Wu, Zhongshan; Melcher, Karsten; Qian, Qian; Xu, H. Eric; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-12-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCFD3 ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCFD3 ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.

  9. Co-repressor activity of scaffold attachment factor B1 requires sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Garee, Jason P.; Meyer, Rene; Oesterreich, Steffi

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} SAFB1 is sumoylated to two lysine residues K231 and K294. {yields} SAFB1 sumoylation is regulated by PIAS1 and SENP1. {yields} Sumoylation of SAFB1 regulates its transcriptional repressor activity. {yields} Mutation of sumoylation sites leads to decreased SAFB1 binding to HDAC3. -- Abstract: Sumoylation is an emerging modification associated with a variety of cellular processes including the regulation of transcriptional activities of nuclear receptors and their coregulators. As SUMO modifications are often associated with transcriptional repression, we examined if sumoylation was involved in modulation of the transcriptional repressive activity of scaffold attachment factor B1. Here we show that SAFB1 is modified by both the SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 family of proteins, on lysine's K231 and K294. Further, we demonstrate that SAFB1 can interact with PIAS1, a SUMO E3 ligase which mediates SAFB1 sumoylation. Additionally, SENP1 was identified as the enzyme desumoylating SAFB1. Mutation of the SAFB1 sumoylation sites lead to a loss of transcriptional repression, at least in part due to decreased interaction with HDAC3, a known transcriptional repressor and SAFB1 binding partner. In summary, the transcriptional repressor SAFB1 is modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO2/3, and this modification is necessary for its full repressive activity.

  10. Mechanism of promoter repression by Lac repressor-DNA loops.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James; Lionberger, Troy A

    2013-01-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose (lac) operon encodes the first genetic switch to be discovered, and lac remains a paradigm for studying negative and positive control of gene expression. Negative control is believed to involve competition of RNA polymerase and Lac repressor for overlapping binding sites. Contributions to the local Lac repressor concentration come from free repressor and repressor delivered to the operator from remote auxiliary operators by DNA looping. Long-standing questions persist concerning the actual role of DNA looping in the mechanism of promoter repression. Here, we use experiments in living bacteria to resolve four of these questions. We show that the distance dependence of repression enhancement is comparable for upstream and downstream auxiliary operators, confirming the hypothesis that repressor concentration increase is the principal mechanism of repression loops. We find that as few as four turns of DNA can be constrained in a stable loop by Lac repressor. We show that RNA polymerase is not trapped at repressed promoters. Finally, we show that constraining a promoter in a tight DNA loop is sufficient for repression even when promoter and operator do not overlap. PMID:23143103

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  12. Allosteric inhibition of a zinc-sensing transcriptional repressor: Insights into the arsenic repressor (ArsR) family

    PubMed Central

    Campanello, Gregory C.; Ma, Zhen; Grossoehme, Nicholas E.; Guerra, Alfredo J.; Ward, Brian P.; DiMarchi, Richard D.; Ye, Yuzhen; Dann, Charles E.; Giedroc, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular basis of allosteric regulation remains a subject of intense interest. Staphylococcus aureus CzrA is a member of the ubiquitous arsenic repressor (ArsR) family of bacterial homodimeric metal sensing proteins, and has emerged as a model system for understanding allosteric regulation of operator DNA binding by transition metal ions. Using unnatural amino acid substitution and a standard linkage analysis, we show that a His97’ NHε2•••O=C-His67 quaternary structural hydrogen bond is an energetically significant contributor to the magnitude of the allosteric coupling free energy, ΔGc. A “cavity” introduced just beneath this hydrogen bond in V66A/L68V CzrA results in a dramatic loss of regulation by Zn(II) despite adopting a wild-type global structure and Zn(II) binding and DNA binding affinities only minimally affected from wild-type. The energetics of Zn(II) binding and heterotropic coupling free energies (ΔHc, −TΔSc) of the double mutant are also radically altered and suggest that increased internal dynamics leads to poorer allosteric negative regulation in V66A/L68V CzrA. A statistical coupling analysis of 3000 ArsR proteins reveals a sector that links the DNA-binding determinants and the α5 Zn(II) sensing sites through V66/L68 in CzrA. We propose that distinct regulatory sites uniquely characteristic of individual ArsR proteins results from evolution of distinct connectivities to this sector, each capable of driving the same biological outcome, transcriptional derepression. PMID:23353829

  13. Structure of the Mecl Repressor from Staphylococcus aureus in Complex with the Cognate DNA Operator of mec

    SciTech Connect

    Safo,M.; Ko, T.; Musayev, F.; Zhao, Q.; Wang, A.; Archer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The dimeric repressor MecI regulates the mecA gene that encodes the penicillin-binding protein PBP-2a in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MecI is similar to BlaI, the repressor for the blaZ gene of {beta}-lactamase. MecI and BlaI can bind to both operator DNA sequences. The crystal structure of MecI in complex with the 32 base-pair cognate DNA of mec was determined to 3.8 Angstroms resolution. MecI is a homodimer and each monomer consists of a compact N-terminal winged-helix domain, which binds to DNA, and a loosely packed C-terminal helical domain, which intertwines with its counter-monomer. The crystal contains horizontal layers of virtual DNA double helices extending in three directions, which are separated by perpendicular DNA segments. Each DNA segment is bound to two MecI dimers. Similar to the BlaI-mec complex, but unlike the MecI-bla complex, the MecI repressors bind to both sides of the mec DNA dyad that contains four conserved sequences of TACA/TGTA. The results confirm the up-and-down binding to the mec operator, which may account for cooperative effect of the repressor.

  14. FLC, a repressor of flowering, is regulated by genes in different inductive pathways.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Dean T; Sheldon, Candice C; Bagnall, David J; Peacock, W James; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2002-01-01

    The MADS-box protein encoded by FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a repressor of flowering. Loci in the autonomous flowering pathway control FLC levels. We show the epistatic groupings of autonomous pathway mutants fca/fy and fve/fpa, based on their effects on flowering time, are consistent with their effects on FLC transcript and protein levels. We demonstrate that synergistic increases in FLC mRNA and protein expression occur in response to interactions between the autonomous pathway mutants fca and fpa and mutants in other pathways (fe, ft, fha) that do not regulate FLC when present as single mutants. These changes in FLC levels provide the molecular basis of the interactions previously shown in genetic analyses. The interactions between genes of multiple pathways emphasize the central position of FLC in the control of floral initiation. FLC protein levels match those of its mRNA for a range of genetic, developmental and environmental variables, indicating that control of FLC is at the level of transcription or transcript stability. The autonomous and photoperiod pathways also interact at the level of SOC1. FLC acts as a repressor of SOC1, and SOC1 levels are low when FLC levels are high. In C24 plants which have moderately high FLC levels, flowering occurs without a decrease in FLC level, but the SOC1 level does increase. Thus SOC1 levels can be upregulated through the activities of other pathways, despite the repression by FLC.

  15. The Gfi-1 proto-oncoprotein contains a novel transcriptional repressor domain, SNAG, and inhibits G1 arrest induced by interleukin-2 withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, H L; Chan, T O; Zweidler-McKay, P A; Tong, B; Tsichlis, P N

    1996-01-01

    The Gfi-1 proto-oncogene is activated by provirus insertion in T-cell lymphoma lines selected for interleukin-2 (IL-2) independence in culture and in primary retrovirus-induced thymomas and encodes a nuclear, sequence-specific DNA-binding protein. Here we show that Gfi-1 is a position- and orientation-independent active transcriptional repressor, whose activity depends on a 20-amino-acid N-terminal repressor domain, coincident with a nuclear localization motif. The sequence of the Gfi-1 repressor domain is related to the sequence of the repressor domain of Gfi-1B, a Gfi-1-related protein, and to sequences at the N termini of the insulinoma-associated protein, IA-1, the homeobox protein Gsh-1, and the vertebrate but not the Drosophila members of the Snail-Slug protein family (Snail/Gfi-1, SNAG domain). Although not functionally characterized, these SNAG-related sequences are also likely to mediate transcriptional repression. Therefore, the Gfi-1 SNAG domain may be the prototype of a novel family of evolutionarily conserved repressor domains that operate in multiple cell lineages. Gfi-1 overexpression in IL-2-dependent T-cell lines allows the cells to escape from the G1 arrest induced by IL-2 withdrawal. Since a single point mutation in the SNAG domain (P2A) inhibits both the Gfi-1-mediated transcriptional repression and the G1 arrest induced by IL-2 starvation, we conclude that the latter depends on the repressor activity of the SNAG domain. Induction of Gfi-1 may therefore contribute to T-cell activation and tumor progression by repressing the expression of genes that inhibit cellular proliferation. PMID:8887656

  16. Structural Basis for the Differential Regulation of DNA by the Methionine Repressor MetJ

    SciTech Connect

    Augustus, Anne; Reardon, Patrick; Heller, William T; Spicer, Leonard D.

    2006-01-01

    The Met regulon in Escherichia coli encodes several proteins responsible for the biosynthesis of methionine. Regulation of the expression of most of these proteins is governed by the methionine repressor protein MetJ and its co-repressor, the methionine derivative S-adenosylmethionine. Genes controlled by MetJ contain from two to five sequential copies of a homologous 8-bp sequence called the metbox. A crystal structure for one of the complexes, the repressor tetramer bound to two metboxes, has been reported (Somers, W. S., and S. E. Phillips (1992) Nature 359, 387-393), but little structural work on the larger assemblies has been done presumably because of the difficulties in crystallization and the variability in the number and sequences of metboxes for the various genes. Small angle neutron scattering was used to study complexes of MetJ and S-adenosylmethionine with double-stranded DNA containing two, three, and five metboxes. Our results demonstrate that the crystal structure of the two-metbox complex is not the native solution conformation of the complex. Instead, the system adopts a less compact conformation in which there is decreased interaction between the adjacent MetJ dimers. Models built of the higher order complexes from the scattering data show that the three-metbox complex is organized much like the two-metbox complex. However, the five-metbox complex differs significantly from the smaller complexes, providing much closer packing of the adjacent MetJ dimers and allowing additional contacts not available in the crystal structure. The results suggest that there is a structural basis for the differences observed in the regulatory effectiveness of MetJ for the various genes of the Met regulon.

  17. The TetR Family of Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Juan L.; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Molina-Henares, Antonio J.; Terán, Wilson; Watanabe, Kazuya; Zhang, Xiaodong; Gallegos, María Trinidad; Brennan, Richard; Tobes, Raquel

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a general profile for the proteins of the TetR family of repressors. The stretch that best defines the profile of this family is made up of 47 amino acid residues that correspond to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif and adjacent regions in the three-dimensional structures of TetR, QacR, CprB, and EthR, four family members for which the function and three-dimensional structure are known. We have detected a set of 2,353 nonredundant proteins belonging to this family by screening genome and protein databases with the TetR profile. Proteins of the TetR family have been found in 115 genera of gram-positive, α-, β-, and γ-proteobacteria, cyanobacteria, and archaea. The set of genes they regulate is known for 85 out of the 2,353 members of the family. These proteins are involved in the transcriptional control of multidrug efflux pumps, pathways for the biosynthesis of antibiotics, response to osmotic stress and toxic chemicals, control of catabolic pathways, differentiation processes, and pathogenicity. The regulatory network in which the family member is involved can be simple, as in TetR (i.e., TetR bound to the target operator represses tetA transcription and is released in the presence of tetracycline), or more complex, involving a series of regulatory cascades in which either the expression of the TetR family member is modulated by another regulator or the TetR family member triggers a cell response to react to environmental insults. Based on what has been learned from the cocrystals of TetR and QacR with their target operators and from their three-dimensional structures in the absence and in the presence of ligands, and based on multialignment analyses of the conserved stretch of 47 amino acids in the 2,353 TetR family members, two groups of residues have been identified. One group includes highly conserved positions involved in the proper orientation of the helix-turn-helix motif and hence seems to play a structural role. The other set of

  18. BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor with dual roles in brassinosteroid homeostasis and growth responses

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Xian; Gendron, Joshua M.; Sun, Yu; Gampala, Srinivas S. L.; Gendron, Nathan; Sun, Catherine Qing; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) homeostasis and signaling are crucial for normal growth and development of plants. BR signaling through cell-surface receptor kinases and intracellular components leads to dephosphorylation and accumulation of the nuclear protein BZR1. How BR signaling regulates gene expression, however, remains unknown. Here we show that BZR1 is a transcriptional repressor that has a previously unknown DNA binding domain and binds directly to the promoters of feedback-regulated BR biosynthetic genes. Microarray analyses identified additional potential targets of BZR1 and illustrated, together with physiological studies, that BZR1 coordinates BR homeostasis and signaling by playing dual roles in regulating BR biosynthesis and downstream growth responses. PMID:15681342

  19. High-Resolution Specificity from DNA Sequencing Highlights Alternative Modes of Lac Repressor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor–operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  20. SLUG is a Direct Transcriptional Repressor of PTEN Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Uygur, Berna; Abramo, Katrina; Leikina, Evgenia; Vary, Calvin; Liaw, Lucy; Wu, Wen-Shu

    2015-01-01

    BACGORUND PTEN/AKT signaling plays a key role in prostate cancer development and maintenance of prostate cancer stem cells. How other oncogenes or tumor suppressors interact with this pathway remain to be elucidated. SLUG is an zinc finger transcription factor of the Snail superfamily, and it promotes cancer metastasis and determines the mammary stem cell state. METHODS SLUG was overexpressed in cells by retroviral vector and knockdown of SLUG and PTEN was mediated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Expression level of SLUG and PTEN was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. PTEN promoter activity was measured by luciferase reporter assay. ChIP assay was used to measure the binding between SLUG and the PTEN promoter in vivo. RESULT We showed that overexpression of SLUG decreased expression of PTEN tumor repressor in prostate cancer cell lines 22RV1 and DU145; conversely, knockdown of SLUG expression elevated PTEN expresson at both protein and RNA level in these cells. We demonstrated that SLUG overexpression inhibits PTEN promoter activity through the proximal promoter region in prostate cancer cells. By ChIP assay, we confirmed that SLUG directly binds to the PTEN promoter region covering the E-box sites. We also showed that Slug deficiency leads to an increased expression of PTEN in mouse embryo fibroblasts and prostate tissues. Importantly, we found that overexpression of SLUG increases drug resistance of DU145 prostate cancer cell line and knockdown of SLUG by shRNA sensitizes DU145 cell line to chemotherapeutic drugs. We further demonstrated that PTEN knockdown converts drug sensitivity of DU145 cells expressing SLUG shRNA to anticancer drugs. CONCLUSION We provide compelling evidence showing that PTEN is a direct functional target of SLUG. Our findings offer new insight in the regulation of the PTEN/AKT pathway and provide a molecular basis for potential targeted therapies of prostate cancer PMID:25728608

  1. Oligomeric properties and DNA binding specificities of repressor isoforms from the Streptomyces bacteriophage phiC31.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S E; Smith, M C

    1998-05-15

    Three protein isoforms (74, 54 and 42 kDa) are expressed from repressor gene c in the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage phiC31. Because expression of the two smaller isoforms, 54 and 42 kDa, is sufficient for superinfection immunity, the interaction between these isoforms was studied. The native 42 kDa repressor (Nat42) and an N-terminally 6x histidine-tagged 54 kDa isoform (His54) were shown by co-purification on a Ni-NTA column to interact in Streptomyces lividans . In vitro three repressor preparations, containing Nat42, His54 and the native 54 and 42 kDa isoforms expressed together (Nat54&42), were subjected to chemical crosslinking and gel filtration analysis. Homo- and hetero-tetramers were observed. Previous work showed that the smallest isoform bound to 17 bp operators containing aconservedinvertedrepeat (CIR) and that the CIRs were located at 16 loci throughout the phiC31 genome. One of the CIRs (CIR6) is believed to be critical for regulating the lytic pathway. The DNA binding activities of the three repressor preparations were studied using fragments containing CIRs (CIR3-CIR6) from the essential early region as templates for DNase I footprinting. Whereas Nat42 bound to CIR6, poorly to CIR5 but undetectably to CIR3 or CIR4, the Nat54&42 preparation could bind to all CIRs tested, albeit poorly to CIR3 and CIR4. The His54 isoform bound all CIRs tested. Isoforms expressed from the phiC31 repressor gene, like those which are expressed from many eukaryotic transcription factor genes, apparently have different binding specificities.

  2. FBI-1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiajun; Yang, Yutao; Zhang, Chuanfu; Hu, Pinliang; Kan, Wei; Bai, Xianhong; Liu, Xuelin; Song, Hongbin

    2011-03-01

    The pro-oncogene FBI-1, encoded by Zbtb7a, is a transcriptional repressor that belongs to the POK (POZ/BTB and Krüppel) protein family. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between androgen receptor (AR) signaling and FBI-1 and demonstrated that overexpression of FBI-1 inhibited ligand-dependent AR activation. A protein-protein interaction was identified between FBI-1 and AR in a ligand-dependent manner. Furthermore, FBI-1, AR and SMRT formed a ternary complex and FBI-1 enhanced the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT to endogenous PSA upstream sequences. Our data also indicated that the FBI-1-mediated inhibition of AR transcriptional activity is partially dependent on HDAC. Interestingly, FBI-1 plays distinct roles in regulating LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and PC-3 cell (androgen-independent) proliferation.

  3. Variations in the Fast Folding Rates of the λ-Repressor: A Hybrid Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelov, Taras V.; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2004-01-01

    The ability to predict the effects of mutations on protein folding rates and mechanisms would greatly facilitate folding studies. Using a realistic full atom potential coupled with a G\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{{\\bar {o}}}}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}-like potential biased to the native state structure, we have investigated the effects of point mutations on the folding rates of a small single domain protein. The hybrid potential provides a detailed level of description of the folding mechanism that we correlate to features of the folding energy landscapes of fast and slow mutants of an 80-residue-long fragment of the λ-repressor. Our computational reconstruction of the folding events is compared to the recent experimental results of W. Y. Yang and M. Gruebele (see companion article) and T. G. Oas and co-workers on the λ-repressor, and helps to clarify the differences observed in the folding mechanisms of the various mutants. PMID:15240458

  4. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of purine repressor binding to corepressor and operator DNA.

    PubMed

    Xu, H; Moraitis, M; Reedstrom, R J; Matthews, K S

    1998-04-10

    The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for purine repressor (PurR)-operator and PurR-guanine binding were determined using fluorescence spectroscopy and nitrocellulose filter binding. Operator binding affinity was increased by the presence of guanine as demonstrated previously (Choi, K. Y., Lu, F., and Zalkin, H. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 24066-24072; Rolfes, R. J., and Zalkin, H. (1990) J. Bacteriol. 172, 5637-5642), and conversely guanine binding affinity was increased by the presence of operator. Guanine enhanced operator affinity by increasing the association rate constant and decreasing the dissociation rate constant for binding. Operator had minimal effect on the association rate constant for guanine binding; however, this DNA decreased the dissociation rate constant for corepressor by approximately 10-fold. Despite significant sequence and structural similarity between PurR and LacI proteins, PurR binds to its corepressor ligand with a lower association rate constant than LacI binds to its inducer ligand. However, the rate constant for PurR-guanine binding to operator is approximately 3-fold higher than for LacI binding to its cognate operator under the same solution conditions. The distinct metabolic roles of the enzymes under regulation by these two repressor proteins provide a rationale for the observed functional differences.

  5. Control of transcription of gal repressor and isorepressor genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, M J; Adhya, S

    1993-01-01

    Two regulatory proteins, Gal repressor and isorepressor, control the expression of the gal and mgl operons in Escherichia coli. The transcription start sites for galR and galS, the genes for the repressor and isorepressor, were determined by primer extension of in vivo transcripts. Study of the promoter-lacZ gene fusions introduced into the chromosome indicated that galS expression was elevated in cells in which the normal galS gene was interrupted, but not in cells in which the galR gene was deleted. When both genes were disrupted, galS expression was further elevated. Expression from the galS promoter was stimulated by the addition of D-fucose, repressed by glucose, and dependent on cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Expression of a similar gene fusion of the galR promoter to lacZ was unregulated. Both galR and galS genes contain two potential operator sites (OE and OI) and a CRP-binding site. The arrangement of OE, OI, and the CRP-binding site in the galS gene is analogous to the arrangement in the gal and mgl promoters, but the arrangement in galR is atypical. The increased concentration of the isorepressor when inducer is present may facilitate early shutoff of the isorepressor-regulated genes of the gal regulon when inducer (substrate) concentration falls. Images PMID:8416900

  6. Multiple photomorphogenic repressors work in concert to regulate Arabidopsis seedling development

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Terzaghi, William; Deng, Xing Wang; Chen, Haodong

    2015-01-01

    Light is both a source of energy and a critically important environmental signal for plant development. Through decades of research, 2 groups of photomorphogenic repressors have been identified. The first group is CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC/DE-ETIOLATED/FUSCA (COP/DET/FUS), which were first identified by genetic screening and then by purification of protein complexes. Another group is the Phytochrome-Interacting Factors (PIFs), which were identified by yeast 2-hybrid screens using phyB as bait. How so many factors work together to repress photomorphogenesis has long been an interesting question. Previously, we demonstrated that CULLIN4 (CUL4) works as a core factor connecting the COP1-SPA complexes, the COP9 signalosome (CSN), and the COP10-DDB1-DET1 (CDD) complex. Recently, we showed that DET1 represses photomorphogenesis through positively regulating the abundance of PIF proteins in the dark. Dr. Huq and his colleagues reported that PIFs may enhance the function of COP1-SPA complexes to promote the degradation of HY5, and thus they synergistically repress photomorphogenesis in the dark. Though much work still needs to be done, these recent breakthroughs shed light on the regulatory relationships among these multiple photomorphogenic repressors. PMID:25853593

  7. Cell cycle-related transformation of the E2F4-p130 repressor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Boris . E-mail: popov_478@hotmail.com; Chang, L.-S.; Serikov, Vladimir

    2005-10-28

    During G0 phase the p130, member of the pRb tumor suppressor protein family, forms a repressor complex with E2F4 which is inactivated in G1/S by hyperphosphorylation of the p130. The role of p130 after G1/S remains poorly investigated. We found that in nuclear extracts of T98G cells, the p130-E2F4-DNA (pp-E2F4) complex does not dissociate at G1/S transition, but instead reverts to the p130-E2F4-cyclin E/A-cdk2 (cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4) complex, which is detected in S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Hyperphosphorylation of the p130 at G1/S transition is associated with a decrease of its total amount; however, this protein is still detected during the rest of the cell cycle, and it is increasingly hyperphosphorylated in the cytosol, but continuously dephosphorylated in the nucleus. Both nuclear and cytosol cell fractions in T98G cells contain a hyperphosphorylated form of p130 in complex with E2F4 at S and G2/M cell cycle phases. In contrast to T98G cells, transformation of the p130 containing cyc/cdk-pp-E2F4 complex into the p130-pp-E2F4 repressor does not occur in HeLa cells under growth restriction conditions.

  8. Myeloid Translocation Gene-16 Co-Repressor Promotes Degradation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Parveen; Gullberg, Urban; Olsson, Inge; Ajore, Ram

    2015-01-01

    The myeloid translocation gene 16 (MTG16) co-repressor down regulates expression of multiple glycolytic genes, which are targets of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) heterodimer transcription factor that is composed of oxygen-regulated labile HIF1α and stable HIF1β subunits. For this reason, we investigated whether MTG16 might regulate HIF1 negatively contributing to inhibition of glycolysis and stimulation of mitochondrial respiration. A doxycycline Tet-On system was used to control levels of MTG16 in B-lymphoblastic Raji cells. Results from co-association studies revealed MTG16 to interact with HIF1α. The co-association required intact N-terminal MTG16 residues including Nervy Homology Region 1 (NHR1). Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated an association of MTG16 with hypoxia response elements (HREs) in PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and PDK1 promoters in-vitro. Results from chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed co-occupancy of these and other glycolytic gene promoters by HIF1α, HIF1β and MTG16 in agreement with possible involvement of these proteins in regulation of glycolytic target genes. In addition, MTG16 interacted with prolyl hydroxylase D2 and promoted ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of HIF1α. Our findings broaden the area of MTG co-repressor functions and reveal MTG16 to be part of a protein complex that controls the levels of HIF1α. PMID:25974097

  9. Does the repressor coping style predict lower posttraumatic stress symptoms?

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Hatch, John P; Cedillos, Elizabeth M; Luethcke, Cynthia A; Baker, Monty T; Peterson, Alan L; Litz, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    We tested whether a continuous measure of repressor coping style predicted lower posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 122 health care professionals serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Zero-order correlational analyses indicated that predeployment repressor coping scores negatively predicted postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.29, p = 0.001, whereas predeployment Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) scores did not predict postdeployment PTSD symptoms, r(s) = -0.13, p = 0.14. However, predeployment trait anxiety was chiefly responsible for the association between repressor coping and PTSD symptom severity, r(s) = 0.38, p = 0.001. Four percent of the subjects qualified for a probable PTSD diagnosis. Although service members with relatively higher PTSD scores had lower repressor coping scores than did the other subjects, their level of predeployment anxiety was chiefly responsible for this relationship. Knowing someone's predeployment level of trait anxiety permits better prediction of PTSD symptoms among trauma-exposed service members than does knowing his or her level of repressive coping. PMID:22128715

  10. Change of function of the wheat stress-responsive transcriptional repressor TaRAP2.1L by repressor motif modification.

    PubMed

    Amalraj, Amritha; Luang, Sukanya; Kumar, Manoj Yadav; Sornaraj, Pradeep; Eini, Omid; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Bazanova, Natalia; Li, Yuan; Yang, Nannan; Eliby, Serik; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2016-02-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stresses by changes in gene regulation, including stress-inducible expression of transcriptional activators and repressors. One of the best characterized families of drought-related transcription factors are dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) proteins, known as C-repeat binding factors (CBF). The wheat DREB/CBF gene TaRAP2.1L was isolated from drought-affected tissues using a dehydration-responsive element (DRE) as bait in a yeast one-hybrid screen. TaRAP2.1L is induced by elevated abscisic acid, drought and cold. A C-terminal ethylene responsive factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, known to be responsible for active repression of target genes, was identified in the TaRAP2.1L protein. It was found that TaRAP2.1L has a unique selectivity of DNA-binding, which differs from that of DREB activators. This binding selectivity remains unchanged in a TaRAP2.1L variant with an inactivated EAR motif (TaRAP2.1Lmut). To study the role of the TaRAP2.1L repressor activity associated with the EAR motif in planta, transgenic wheat overexpressing native or mutated TaRAP2.1L was generated. Overexpression of TaRAP2.1L under constitutive and stress-inducible promoters in transgenic wheat and barley led to dwarfism and decreased frost tolerance. By contrast, constitutive overexpression of the TaRAP2.1Lmut gene had little or no negative influence on wheat development or grain yield. Transgenic lines with the TaRAP2.1Lmut transgene had an enhanced ability to survive frost and drought. The improved stress tolerance is attributed to up-regulation of several stress-related genes known to be downstream genes of DREB/CBF activators.

  11. Tracking of controlled Escherichia coli replication fork stalling and restart at repressor-bound DNA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Possoz, Christophe; Filipe, Sergio R; Grainge, Ian; Sherratt, David J

    2006-06-01

    We report an efficient, controllable, site-specific replication roadblock that blocks cell proliferation, but which can be rapidly and efficiently reversed, leading to recovery of viability. Escherichia coli replication forks of both polarities stalled in vivo within the first 500 bp of a 10 kb repressor-bound array of operator DNA-binding sites. Controlled release of repressor binding led to rapid restart of the blocked replication fork without the participation of homologous recombination. Cytological tracking of fork stalling and restart showed that the replisome-associated SSB protein remains associated with the blocked fork for extended periods and that duplication of the fluorescent foci associated with the blocked operator array occurs immediately after restart, thereby demonstrating a lack of sister cohesion in the region of the array. Roadblocks positioned near oriC or the dif site did not prevent replication and segregation of the rest of the chromosome.

  12. The purine repressor of Bacillus subtilis: a novel combination of domains adapted for transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sangita C; Krahn, Joseph; Shin, Byung Sik; Tomchick, Diana R; Zalkin, Howard; Smith, Janet L

    2003-07-01

    The purine repressor from Bacillus subtilis, PurR, represses transcription from a number of genes with functions in the synthesis, transport, and metabolism of purines. The 2.2-A crystal structure of PurR reveals a two-domain protein organized as a dimer. The larger C-terminal domain belongs to the PRT structural family, in accord with a sequence motif for binding the inducer phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The PRT domain is fused to a smaller N-terminal domain that belongs to the winged-helix family of DNA binding proteins. A positively charged surface on the winged-helix domain likely binds specific DNA sequences in the recognition site. A second positively charged surface surrounds the PRPP site at the opposite end of the PurR dimer. Conserved amino acids in the sequences of PurR homologs in 21 gram-positive bacteria cluster on the proposed recognition surface of the winged-helix domain and around the PRPP binding site at the opposite end of the molecule, supporting a common function of DNA and PRPP binding for all of the proteins. The structure supports a binding mechanism in which extended regions of DNA interact with extensive protein surface. Unlike most PRT proteins, which are phosphoribosyltransferases (PRTases), PurR lacks catalytic activity. This is explained by a tyrosine side chain that blocks the site for a nucleophile cosubstrate in PRTases. Thus, B. subtilis has adapted an enzyme fold to serve as an effector-binding domain and has used it in a novel combination with the DNA-binding winged-helix domain as a repressor of purine genes.

  13. The Krüppel-associated box repressor domain can induce reversible heterochromatization of a mouse locus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Groner, Anna C; Tschopp, Patrick; Challet, Ludivine; Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Verp, Sonia; Offner, Sandra; Barde, Isabelle; Rodriguez, Ivan; Hiiragi, Takashi; Trono, Didier

    2012-07-20

    The study of chromatin and its regulators is key to understanding and manipulating transcription. We previously exploited the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) transcriptional repressor domain, present in hundreds of vertebrate-specific zinc finger proteins, to assess the effect of its binding to gene bodies. These experiments revealed that the ectopic and doxycycline (dox)-controlled tet repressor KRAB fusion protein (tTRKRAB) can induce reversible and long-range silencing of cellular promoters. Here, we extend this system to in vivo applications and use tTRKRAB to achieve externally controllable repression of an endogenous mouse locus. We employed lentiviral-mediated transgenesis with promoterless TetO-containing gene traps to engineer a mouse line where the endogenous kinesin family member 2A (Kif2A) promoter drives a YFP reporter gene. When these mice were crossed to animals expressing the TetO-binding tTRKRAB repressor, this regulator was recruited to the Kif2A locus, and YFP expression was reduced. This effect was reversed when dox was given to embryos or adult mice, demonstrating that the cellular Kif2A promoter was only silenced upon repressor binding. Molecular analyses confirmed that tTRKRAB induced transcriptional repression through the spread of H3K9me3-containing heterochromatin, without DNA methylation of the trapped Kif2A promoter. Therefore, we demonstrate that targeting of tTRKRAB to a gene body in vivo results in reversible transcriptional repression through the spreading of facultative heterochromatin. This finding not only sheds light on KRAB-mediated transcriptional processes, but also suggests approaches for the externally controllable and reversible modulation of chromatin and transcription in vivo. PMID:22605343

  14. Interactions between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and lambda repressor. Mutations in PRM affect repression of PR.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J J; Gussin, G N

    1988-04-20

    The rightward operator, OR, of bacteriophage lambda is part of a complex regulatory region that includes PRM, the promoter for repressor synthesis by a prophage, the rightward early promoter PR, and three repressor-binding sites, OR1, OR2 and OR3. By binding to OR2, repressor blocks transcription from PR and simultaneously stimulates the formation of open complexes between RNA polymerase and PRM. In this letter, we describe a test of the hypothesis that the interaction between RNA polymerase bound at PRM and repressor bound at OR2 increases the apparent affinity of repressor for OR. One implication of this hypothesis is that the amount of repressor required for repression of PR should be inversely correlated with PRM promoter strength. This is indeed the case. The amount of repressor required for 50% repression of PR is decreased by prmup-1, an "up" mutation of PRM, and is increased by prm- mutations. An unexpected finding is that in addition to their effect on the apparent affinity of repressor for OR, mutations in the -35 region of PRM alter the shape of repressor-titration curves. We propose that these mutations alter the interaction between RNA polymerase bound at PRM and repressor bound at OR2 in such a way that cooperativity in the binding of repressor to OR1 and OR2 is also disrupted.

  15. MLX Is a Transcriptional Repressor of the Mammalian Golgi Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Mai; Sasaki-Osugi, Kanae; Oku, Masaya; Sawaguchi, Shogo; Tanakura, Soichiro; Kawai, Yumeto; Wakabayashi, Sadao; Yoshida, Hiderou

    2016-07-30

    The Golgi stress response is a homeostatic mechanism that controls the capacity of the Golgi apparatus in accordance with cellular demands. When the capacity of the Golgi apparatus becomes insufficient (Golgi stress), transcription levels of Golgi-related genes encoding glycosylation enzymes, a Golgi structural protein, and components of vesicular transport are upregulated through a common cis-acting enhancer-the Golgi apparatus stress response element (GASE). Here, we identified the transcription factor MLX as a GASE-binding protein. MLX resides in the cytoplasm and does not bind to GASE in normal growth conditions, whereas MLX translocates into the nucleus and specifically binds to GASE in response to Golgi stress. Suppression of MLX expression increased transcriptional induction of target genes of the Golgi stress response, whereas overexpression of MLX reduced GASE-binding of TFE3 as well as transcriptional induction from GASE, suggesting that MLX is a transcriptional repressor of the mammalian Golgi stress response.

  16. Cross-regulation between an alternative splicing activator and a transcription repressor controls neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Raj, Bushra; O'Hanlon, Dave; Vessey, John P; Pan, Qun; Ray, Debashish; Buckley, Noel J; Miller, Freda D; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2011-09-01

    Neurogenesis requires the concerted action of numerous genes that are regulated at multiple levels. However, how different layers of gene regulation are coordinated to promote neurogenesis is not well understood. We show that the neural-specific Ser/Arg repeat-related protein of 100 kDa (nSR100/SRRM4) negatively regulates REST (NRSF), a transcriptional repressor of genes required for neurogenesis. nSR100 directly promotes alternative splicing of REST transcripts to produce a REST isoform (REST4) with greatly reduced repressive activity, thereby activating expression of REST targets in neural cells. Conversely, REST directly represses nSR100 in nonneural cells to prevent the activation of neural-specific splicing events. Consistent with a critical role for nSR100 in the inhibition of REST activity, blocking nSR100 expression in the developing mouse brain impairs neurogenesis. Our results thus reveal a fundamental role for direct regulatory interactions between a splicing activator and transcription repressor in the control of the multilayered regulatory programs required for neurogenesis. PMID:21884984

  17. A Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB1 Promotes Chromatin Remodeling and Translesion DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Adelmant, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Yang, Kailin; Marto, Jarrod A.; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Timely DNA replication across damaged DNA is critical for maintaining genomic integrity. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) allows bypass of DNA lesions using error-prone TLS polymerases. The E3 ligase RAD18 is necessary for PCNA monoubiquitination and TLS polymerase recruitment; however, the regulatory steps upstream of RAD18 activation are less understood. Here, we show that the UBZ4 domain-containing transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 is a critical upstream regulator of TLS. The UBZ4 motif is required for PCNA monoubiquitination and survival after UV damage. ZBTB1 associates with KAP-1, a transcriptional repressor whose phosphorylation relaxes chromatin after DNA damage. ZBTB1 depletion impairs formation of phospho-KAP-1 at UV damage sites and reduces RAD18 recruitment. Furthermore, phosphorylation of KAP-1 is necessary for efficient PCNA modification. We propose that ZBTB1 is required for PCNA monoubiquitination, by localizing phospho-KAP-1 to chromatin and enhancing RAD18 accessibility. Collectively, our study implicates a new ubiquitin-binding protein in orchestrating chromatin remodeling during DNA repair. PMID:24657165

  18. Transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 promotes chromatin remodeling and translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungjin; Dejsuphong, Donniphat; Adelmant, Guillaume; Ceccaldi, Raphael; Yang, Kailin; Marto, Jarrod A; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2014-04-10

    Timely DNA replication across damaged DNA is critical for maintaining genomic integrity. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) allows bypass of DNA lesions using error-prone TLS polymerases. The E3 ligase RAD18 is necessary for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) monoubiquitination and TLS polymerase recruitment; however, the regulatory steps upstream of RAD18 activation are less understood. Here, we show that the UBZ4 domain-containing transcriptional repressor ZBTB1 is a critical upstream regulator of TLS. The UBZ4 motif is required for PCNA monoubiquitination and survival after UV damage. ZBTB1 associates with KAP-1, a transcriptional repressor whose phosphorylation relaxes chromatin after DNA damage. ZBTB1 depletion impairs formation of phospho-KAP-1 at UV damage sites and reduces RAD18 recruitment. Furthermore, phosphorylation of KAP-1 is necessary for efficient PCNA modification. We propose that ZBTB1 is required for localizing phospho-KAP-1 to chromatin and enhancing RAD18 accessibility. Collectively, our study implicates a ubiquitin-binding protein in orchestrating chromatin remodeling during DNA repair.

  19. Subspecialization of R2R3-MYB Repressors for Anthocyanin and Proanthocyanidin Regulation in Forage Legumes

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of anthocyanin pigments and proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) is regulated by MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes in all angiosperms studied to date. Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 were isolated from Trifolium repens and encode R2R3-MYBs that antagonize the activity of MBW activation complexes. These two genes are conserved in other legume species, and form two sub-clades within the larger anthocyanin/proanthocyanidin clade of MYB repressors. However, unlike petunia and Arabidopsis, these R2R3-MYB repressors do not prevent ectopic accumulation of anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins. Instead, they are expressed when anthocyanins or proanthocyanidins are being synthesized, and provide feedback regulation to MBW complexes. This feedback occurs because Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 are themselves regulated by MBW complexes. Tr-MYB133 is regulated by MBW complexes containing anthocyanin-related R2R3-MYB proteins (Tr-RED LEAF), while Tr-MYB134 is regulated by complexes containing the proanthocyanidin R2R3-MYBs (Tr-MYB14). Other features of the MBW gene regulation networks are also conserved within legumes, including the ability for the anthocyanin MBW complexes to activate the expression of the AN1/TT8 clade bHLH factor. The regulation of Tr-MYB133 and Tr-MYB134 by distinct, pathway-specific MBW complexes has resulted in subspecialization for controlling anthocyanin or proanthocyanidin synthesis. PMID:26779194

  20. Genomic Mining of Prokaryotic Repressors for Orthogonal Logic Gates

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Brynne C.; Nielsen, Alec A.K.; Tamsir, Alvin; Clancy, Kevin; Peterson, Todd; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic circuits perform computational operations based on interactions between freely diffusing molecules within a cell. When transcription factors are combined to build a circuit, unintended interactions can disrupt its function. Here, we apply “part mining” to build a library of 73 TetR-family repressors gleaned from prokaryotic genomes. The operators of a subset were determined using an in vitro method and this information was used to build synthetic promoters. The promoters and repressors were screened for cross-reactions. Of these, 16 were identified that both strongly repress their cognate promoter (5- to 207-fold) and do not interact with other promoters. Each repressor:promoter pair was converted to a NOT gate and characterized. Used as a set of 16 NOR gates, there are >1054 circuits that could be built by changing the pattern of input and output promoters. This represents a large set of compatible gates that can be used to construct user-defined circuits. PMID:24316737

  1. Interaction of Bacillus subtilis purine repressor with DNA.

    PubMed

    Shin, B S; Stein, A; Zalkin, H

    1997-12-01

    A purine repressor (PurR) mediates adenine nucleotide-dependent regulation of transcription initiation of the Bacillus subtilis pur operon. This repressor has been purified for the first time, and binding to control site DNA was characterized. PurR binds in vitro to four operons. Apparent Kd values for binding were 7 nM for the pur operon, 8 nM for purA, 13 nM for purR, and 44 nM for the pyr operon. In each case, DNase I footprints exhibited a pattern of protected and hypersensitive sites that extended over more than 60 bp. A GAAC-N24-GTTC sequence in the pur operon was necessary but not sufficient for the PurR-DNA interaction. However, this motif, which is conserved in the four binding sites, was not required for binding of PurR to purA. Thus, the common DNA recognition element for binding of PurR to the four operons is not known. Multiple PurR-pur operon DNA complexes having a binding stoichiometry that was either approximately two or six repressor molecules per DNA fragment were detected. The results of a torsional constraint experiment suggest that control site DNA forms one right-handed turn around PurR.

  2. Structural and dynamics studies of a truncated variant of CI repressor from bacteriophage TP901-1

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta; Pedersen, Margit; Varming, Anders K.; Hammer, Karin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Blackledge, Martin; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    The CI repressor from the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 consists of two folded domains, an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal oligomerization domain (CTD), which we here suggest to be further divided into CTD1 and CTD2. Full-length CI is a hexameric protein, whereas a truncated version, CI∆58, forms dimers. We identify the dimerization region of CI∆58 as CTD1 and determine its secondary structure to be helical both within the context of CI∆58 and in isolation. To our knowledge this is the first time that a helical dimerization domain has been found in a phage repressor. We also precisely determine the length of the flexible linker connecting the NTD to the CTD. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and native mass spectrometry, we show that CI∆58 interacts with the OL operator site as one dimer bound to both half-sites, and with much higher affinity than the isolated NTD domain thus demonstrating cooperativity between the two DNA binding domains. Finally, using small angle X-ray scattering data and state-of-the-art ensemble selection techniques, we delineate the conformational space sampled by CI∆58 in solution, and we discuss the possible role that the dynamics play in CI-repressor function. PMID:27403839

  3. A Conserved Network of Transcriptional Activators and Repressors Regulates Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Eudicots[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Nick W.; Davies, Kevin M.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Montefiori, Mirco; Brendolise, Cyril; Boase, Murray R.; Ngo, Hanh; Jameson, Paula E.; Schwinn, Kathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Plants require sophisticated regulatory mechanisms to ensure the degree of anthocyanin pigmentation is appropriate to myriad developmental and environmental signals. Central to this process are the activity of MYB-bHLH-WD repeat (MBW) complexes that regulate the transcription of anthocyanin genes. In this study, the gene regulatory network that regulates anthocyanin synthesis in petunia (Petunia hybrida) has been characterized. Genetic and molecular evidence show that the R2R3-MYB, MYB27, is an anthocyanin repressor that functions as part of the MBW complex and represses transcription through its C-terminal EAR motif. MYB27 targets both the anthocyanin pathway genes and basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) ANTHOCYANIN1 (AN1), itself an essential component of the MBW activation complex for pigmentation. Other features of the regulatory network identified include inhibition of AN1 activity by the competitive R3-MYB repressor MYBx and the activation of AN1, MYB27, and MYBx by the MBW activation complex, providing for both reinforcement and feedback regulation. We also demonstrate the intercellular movement of the WDR protein (AN11) and R3-repressor (MYBx), which may facilitate anthocyanin pigment pattern formation. The fundamental features of this regulatory network in the Asterid model of petunia are similar to those in the Rosid model of Arabidopsis thaliana and are thus likely to be widespread in the Eudicots. PMID:24642943

  4. A genetic biosensor for identification of transcriptional repressors of target promoters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weishan; Li, Xiao; Li, Yue; Li, Shanshan; Fan, Keqiang; Yang, Keqian

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional repressors provide widespread biological significance in the regulation of gene expression. However, in prokaryotes, it is particularly difficult to find transcriptional repressors that recognize specific target promoters on genome-scale. To address this need, a genetic biosensor for identifying repressors of target promoters was developed in Escherichia coli from a de novo designed genetic circuit. This circuit can convert the negative input of repressors into positive output of reporters, thereby facilitating the selection and identification of repressors. After evaluating the sensitivity and bias, the biosensor was used to identify the repressors of scbA and aco promoters (PscbA and Paco), which control the transcription of signalling molecule synthase genes in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces avermitilis, respectively. Two previously unknown repressors of PscbA were identified from a library of TetR family regulators in S. coelicolor, and three novel repressors of Paco were identified from a genomic library of S. avermitilis. Further in vivo and in vitro experiments confirmed that these newly identified repressors attenuated the transcription of their target promoters by direct binding. Overall, the genetic biosensor developed here presents an innovative and powerful strategy that could be applied for identifying genome-wide unknown repressors of promoters in bacteria. PMID:26510468

  5. Identification of a cell-type-specific transcriptional repressor in the promoter region of the mouse hepatocyte growth factor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y; Beedle, A B; Lin, L; Bell, A W; Zarnegar, R

    1994-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a cytokine with multiple functions, exhibits cell-type-specific as well as cytokine- and steroid hormone-regulated expression. The HGF gene is known to be expressed predominately in mesenchymal but not in epithelial cells. In this study, we report the identification of a cell-type-specific transcriptional repressor in the promoter region of the mouse HGF gene, which is evidently responsible for the suppression of HGF expression in epithelial cells. Gel mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting studies revealed that a 27-bp element (-16 to +11) around the transcription initiation site is responsible for the binding of a nuclear protein which is present in epithelial but not in mesenchymally derived cells. Further analysis of the binding activity of the DNA region with nuclear protein revealed that an approximately 19-bp sequence containing a unique palindromic structure (5'-AACCGACCGGTT-3') overlapped by a CAP box is essential for binding. Substitution of a single base (the contact site) within this region by site-directed mutagenesis resulted in total abrogation of the binding of the nuclear protein and a concomitant increase in the transcriptional activity of various lengths of HGF-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase fused genes when transfected into the epithelial cell line RL95-2 but not the mesenchymal cell line NIH 3T3. Southwestern (DNA-protein) analyses revealed that the nuclear protein which binds to this repressor element is a single polypeptide of approximately 70 kDa. Analysis of the nuclear extract prepared from regenerating mouse liver at various times after two-thirds partial hepatectomy by gel mobility shift assay revealed a substantial reduction (more than 75% within 3 h) in the binding of the repressor to its cognate binding site. Our results suggest that a cis-acting transcriptional repressor in the promoter region of the mouse HGF gene is involved in cell-type-specific regulation through binding to its cognate

  6. Inhibition of Wilms tumor 1 transactivation by bone marrow zinc finger 2, a novel transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Ho; Lwu, Shelly; Kim, Jungho; Pelletier, Jerry

    2002-11-22

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene, wt1, encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that has been implicated in the regulation of a number of genes. Protein-protein interactions are known to modulate the transcription regulatory functions of Wilms tumor (WT1) and have also implicated WT1 in splicing. In this report, we identify a novel WT1-interacting protein, bone marrow zinc finger 2 (BMZF2), by affinity chromatography utilizing immobilized WT1 protein. BMZF2 is a potential transcription factor with 18 zinc fingers. The BMZF2 mRNA is mainly expressed in fetal tissues, and the protein is predominantly nuclear. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments are consistent with an in vivo association between WT1 and BMZF2. Glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays and far Western blots revealed that zinc fingers VI-X (amino acids 231-370) are required for interaction with the zinc finger region of WT1. Functionally, BMZF2 inhibits transcriptional activation by WT1. Moreover, a chimeric protein generated by fusion of BMZF2 to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain significantly decreases promoter activity of a reporter containing GAL4 DNA-binding sites, suggesting the presence of an active repressor domain within BMZF2. Our results suggest that BMZF2 interferes with the transactivation potential of WT1. PMID:12239212

  7. Water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator complex recognition process.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Fajar R; Rauch, Christine; Trieb, Michael; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Liedl, Klaus R

    2004-04-15

    Water-mediated contacts are known as an important recognition tool in trp-repressor operator systems. One of these contacts involves two conserved base pairs (G(6).C(-6) and A(5). T(-5)) and three amino acids (Lys 72, Ile 79, and Ala 80). To investigate the nature of these contacts, we analyzed the X-ray structure (PDB code: 1TRO) of the trp-repressor operator complex by means of molecular dynamics simulations. This X-ray structure contains two dimers that exhibit structural differences. From these two different starting structures, two 10 ns molecular dynamics simulations have been performed. Both of our simulations show an increase of water molecules in the major groove at one side of the dimer, while the other side remains unchanged compared to the X-ray structure. Though the maximum residence time of the concerned water molecules decreases with an increase of solvent at the interface, these water molecules continue to play an important role in mediating DNA-protein contacts. This is shown by new stable amino acids-DNA distances and a long water residence time compared to free DNA simulation. To maintain stability of the new contacts, the preferential water binding site on O6(G6) is extended. This extension agrees with mutation experiment data on A5 and G6, which shows different relative affinity due to mutation on these bases [A. Joachimiak, T. E. Haran, P. B. Sigler, EMBO Journal 1994, Vol. 13, No. (2) pp. 367-372]. Due to the rearrangements in the system, the phosphate of the base G6 is able to interconvert to the B(II) substate, which is not observed on the other half side of the complex. The decrease of the number of hydrogen bonds between protein and DNA backbone could be the initial step of the dissociation process of the complex, or in other words an intermediate complex conformation of the association process. Thus, we surmise that these features show the importance of water-mediated contacts in the trp-repressor operator recognition process. PMID

  8. Tight-binding repressors of the lac operon: selection system and in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfahl, M

    1979-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of altered repressors of the lac operon which have an increased affinity for an operator should give useful clues about the molecular basis for the very tight and specific interaction between repressor and operator. A selection system has been devised which allows the isolation of such repressor mutants. This system selects for mutant repressors which can overcome lac operator-constitutive (Oc) mutations. By using in vivo assays, 24 candidates were obtained which, compared with wild type, have an increased trans effect of their repressor on one or several Oc operators. Three of these candidates have been investigated in vitro; the affinity of their repressor for inducer was unchanged, whereas the affinity for wild-type operator was increased 15-, 86-, and 262-fold, respectively. PMID:104955

  9. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  10. Controlled transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes by a novel transcription factor derived from Escherichia coli purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Eun-Hee; Noh, Ju-Young; Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Min-Young; Yoon, Sarah; Park, Sang-Kyu; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2004-06-25

    Unlike the DNA-binding domains (DBD) of most eukaryotic transcription factors, Escherichia coli LacI family transcription factors are unable to bind to specific target DNA sequences without a cofactor-binding domain. In the present study, we reconstructed a novel DBD designated as PurHG, which binds constitutively to a 16bp purine repressor operator, by fusion of the purine repressor (PurR) DBD (residues 1-57) and the GAL4 dimerization domain (DD, residues 42-148). Binding of PurHG to DNA requires the dimerization and a hinge helix of PurR DBD. When the PurHG was expressed as a fusion protein in a form of a transcription activator (PurAD) or an artificial nuclear receptor (PurAPR or PurAER) responding to ligand, such as RU486 or beta-estradiol, it could regulate the expression of the reporter genes in NIH3T3 cells. The prerequisite region of the GAL4 DD for DNA-binding was amino acid residues from 42 to 98 in the form of PurAD, while the amino acid residues from 42 to 75 were sufficient for ligand-dependent regulation in the form of PurAPR. These results suggest that the dimerization function of the progesterone ligand-binding domain could be substituted for region 76-98 of the GAL4 DD. In summary, the fusion of the PurR DBD and the GAL4 DD generates fully active DNA-binding protein, PurHG, in vitro and in vivo, and these results provide the direct evidence of structural predictions that the proximate positioning of PurR hinge helical regions is critical for DNA-binding.

  11. Bacterial Effector Activates Jasmonate Signaling by Directly Targeting JAZ Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shushu; Yao, Jian; Ma, Ka-Wai; Zhou, Huanbin; Song, Jikui; He, Sheng Yang; Ma, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens deliver a variety of virulence proteins through the type III secretion system (T3SS) directly into the host cytoplasm. These type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) play an essential role in bacterial infection, mainly by targeting host immunity. However, the molecular basis of their functionalities remains largely enigmatic. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE HopZ1a, a member of the widely distributed YopJ effector family, directly interacts with jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins through the conserved Jas domain in plant hosts. JAZs are transcription repressors of jasmonate (JA)-responsive genes and major components of the jasmonate receptor complex. Upon interaction, JAZs can be acetylated by HopZ1a through a putative acetyltransferase activity. Importantly, P. syringae producing the wild-type, but not a catalytic mutant of HopZ1a, promotes the degradation of HopZ1-interacting JAZs and activates JA signaling during bacterial infection. Furthermore, HopZ1a could partially rescue the virulence defect of a P. syringae mutant that lacks the production of coronatine, a JA-mimicking phytotoxin produced by a few P. syringae strains. These results highlight a novel example by which a bacterial effector directly manipulates the core regulators of phytohormone signaling to facilitate infection. The targeting of JAZ repressors by both coronatine toxin and HopZ1 effector suggests that the JA receptor complex is potentially a major hub of host targets for bacterial pathogens. PMID:24204266

  12. NLRP7, Involved in Hydatidiform Molar Pregnancy (HYDM1), Interacts with the Transcriptional Repressor ZBTB16.

    PubMed

    Singer, Heike; Biswas, Arijit; Nuesgen, Nicole; Oldenburg, Johannes; El-Maarri, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the maternal effect gene NLRP7 cause biparental hydatidiform mole (HYDM1). HYDM1 is characterized by abnormal growth of placenta and lack of proper embryonic development. The molar tissues are characterized by abnormal methylation patterns at differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes. It is not known whether this occurs before or after fertilization, but the high specificity of this defect to the maternal allele indicates a possible maternal germ line-specific effect. To better understand the unknown molecular mechanism leading to HYDM1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen against an ovarian library using NLRP7 as bait. We identified the transcriptional repressor ZBTB16 as an interacting protein of NLRP7 and verified this interaction in mammalian cells by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Native protein analysis detected NLRP7 and ZBTB16 in a 480kD protein complex and both proteins co-localize in the cytoplasm in juxtanuclear aggregates. HYDM1-causing mutations in NLRP7 did not show altered patterns of interaction with ZBTB16. Hence, the biological significance of the NLRP7-ZBTB16 interaction remains to be revealed. However, a clear effect of harvesting ZBTB16 to the cytoplasm when the NLRP7 protein is overexpressed may be linked to the pathology of the molar pregnancy disease.

  13. Anaphase promoting complex–dependent degradation of transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostapenko, Denis; Solomon, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an essential ubiquitin ligase that targets cell cycle proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation in mitosis and G1. The APC regulates a number of cell cycle processes, including spindle assembly, mitotic exit, and cytokinesis, but the full range of its functions is still unknown. To better understand cellular pathways controlled by the APC, we performed a proteomic screen to identify additional APC substrates. We analyzed cell cycle–regulated proteins whose expression peaked during the period when other APC substrates were expressed. Subsequent analysis identified several proteins, including the transcriptional repressors Nrm1 and Yhp1, as authentic APC substrates. We found that APCCdh1 targeted Nrm1 and Yhp1 for degradation in early G1 through Destruction-box motifs and that the degradation of these repressors coincided with transcriptional activation of MBF and Mcm1 target genes, respectively. In addition, Nrm1 was stabilized by phosphorylation, most likely by the budding yeast cyclin–dependent protein kinase, Cdc28. We found that expression of stabilized forms of Nrm1 and Yhp1 resulted in reduced cell fitness, due at least in part to incomplete activation of G1-specific genes. Therefore, in addition to its known functions, APC-mediated targeting of Nrm1 and Yhp1 coordinates transcription of multiple genes in G1 with other cell cycle events. PMID:21562221

  14. FHL2 interacts with and acts as a functional repressor of Id2 in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weidong; Wu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yali; Meng, Yuanguang; Si, Yiling; Yang, Jie; Fu, Xiaobing; Yu, Li

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation 2 (Id2) is a natural inhibitor of the basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors. Although Id2 is well known to prevent differentiation and promote cell-cycle progression and tumorigenesis, the molecular events that regulate Id2 activity remain to be investigated. Here, we identified that Four-and-a-half LIM-only protein 2 (FHL2) is a novel functional repressor of Id2. Moreover, we demonstrated that FHL2 can directly interact with all members of the Id family (Id1–4) via an N-terminal loop–helix structure conserved in Id proteins. FHL2 antagonizes the inhibitory effect of Id proteins on basic helix–loop–helix protein E47-mediated transcription, which was abrogated by the deletion mutation of Ids that disrupted their interaction with FHL2. We also showed a competitive nature between FHL2 and E47 for binding Id2, whereby FHL2 prevents the formation of the Id2–E47 heterodimer, thus releasing E47 to DNA and restoring its transcriptional activity. FHL2 expression was remarkably up-regulated during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells, during which the expression of Id2 was opposite to that. Ectopic FHL2 expression in neuroblastoma cells markedly reduces the transcriptional and cell-cycle promoting functions of Id2. Altogether, these results indicate that FHL2 is an important repressor of the oncogenic activity of Id2 in neuroblastoma cells. PMID:19417068

  15. Ectopic expression and knockdown of a zebrafish sox21 reveal its role as a transcriptional repressor in early development.

    PubMed

    Argenton, Francesco; Giudici, Simona; Deflorian, Gianluca; Cimbro, Simona; Cotelli, Franco; Beltrame, Monica

    2004-02-01

    Sox proteins are DNA-binding proteins belonging to the HMG box superfamily and they play key roles in animal embryonic development. Zebrafish Sox21a is part of group B Sox proteins and its chicken and mouse orthologs have been described as transcriptional repressor and activator, respectively, in two different target gene contexts. Zebrafish sox21a is present as a maternal transcript in the oocyte and is mainly expressed at the developing midbrain-hindbrain boundary from the onset of neurulation. In order to understand its role in vivo, we ectopically expressed sox21a by microinjection. Ectopic expression of full length sox21a leads to dorsalization of the embryos. A subset of the dorsalized embryos shows a partial axis splitting, and hence an ectopic neural tube, as an additional phenotype. At gastrulation, injected embryos show expansion of the expression domains of organizer-specific genes, such as chordin and goosecoid. Molecular markers used in somitogenesis highlight that sox21a-injected embryos have shortened AP axis, undulating axial structures, enlarged or even radialized paraxial territory. The developmental abnormalities caused by ectopic expression of sox21a are suggestive of defects in convergence-extension morphogenetic movements. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, designed to functionally knockdown sox21a, cause ventralization of the embryos. Moreover, gain-of-function experiments with chimeric constructs, where Sox21a DNA-binding domain is fused to a transcriptional activator (VP16) or repressor (EnR) domain, suggests that zebrafish Sox21a acts as a repressor in dorso-ventral patterning.

  16. The product of the murine homolog of the Drosophila extra sex combs gene displays transcriptional repressor activity.

    PubMed Central

    Denisenko, O N; Bomsztyk, K

    1997-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein represents a novel class of proteins that may act as docking platforms that orchestrate cross-talk among molecules involved in signal transduction and gene expression. Using a fragment of K protein as bait in the yeast two-hybrid screen, we isolated a cDNA that encodes a protein whose primary structure has extensive similarity to the Drosophila melanogaster extra sex combs (esc) gene product, Esc, a putative silencer of homeotic genes. The cDNA that we isolated is identical to the cDNA of the recently positionally cloned mouse embryonic ectoderm development gene, eed. Like Esc, Eed contains six WD-40 repeats in the C-terminal half of the protein and is thought to repress homeotic gene expression during mouse embryogenesis. Eed binds to K protein through a domain in its N terminus, but interestingly, this domain is not found in the Drosophila Esc. Gal4-Eed fusion protein represses transcription of a reporter gene driven by a promoter that contains Gal4-binding DNA elements. Eed also represses transcription when recruited to a target promoter by Gal4-K protein. Point mutations within the eed gene that are responsible for severe embryonic development abnormalities abolished the transcriptional repressor activity of Eed. Results of this study suggest that Eed-restricted homeotic gene expression during embryogenesis reflects the action of Eed as a transcriptional repressor. The Eed-mediated transcriptional effects are likely to reflect the interaction of Eed with multiple molecular partners, including K protein. PMID:9234727

  17. Ultrafast force-clamp spectroscopy to probe lac repressor-DNA interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monico, Carina; Capitanio, Marco; Belcastro, Gionata; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-06-01

    We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap capable to probe, under controlled force, bimolecular interactions with unprecedented temporal resolution. Here we present the technique in the framework of protein-DNA interactions, specifically on Lactose repressor protein (LacI). The high temporal resolution of the method reveals the kinetics of both short- and long-lived interactions of LacI along the DNA template (from ˜100 μs to tens of seconds), as well the dependence on force of such interaction kinetics. The two kinetically well-distinct populations of interactions observed clearly represent specific interactions with the operator sequences and a fast scanning of LacI along non-cognate DNA. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the method to study the sequence-dependent affinity of DNA-binding proteins along the DNA and the effects of force on a wide range of interaction durations, including μs time scales not accessible to other single-molecule methods. This improvement in time resolution provides also important means of investigation on the long-puzzled mechanism of target search on DNA and possible protein conformational changes occurring upon target recognition.

  18. Kcnip1 a Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor regulates the size of the neural plate in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Néant, Isabelle; Mellström, Britt; Gonzalez, Paz; Naranjo, Jose R; Moreau, Marc; Leclerc, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    In amphibian embryos, our previous work has demonstrated that calcium transients occurring in the dorsal ectoderm at the onset of gastrulation are necessary and sufficient to engage the ectodermal cells into a neural fate by inducing neural specific genes. Some of these genes are direct targets of calcium. Here we search for a direct transcriptional mechanism by which calcium signals are acting. The only known mechanism responsible for a direct action of calcium on gene transcription involves an EF-hand Ca²⁺ binding protein which belongs to a group of four proteins (Kcnip1 to 4). Kcnip protein can act in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a specific DNA sequence, the Downstream Regulatory Element (DRE) site. In Xenopus, among the four kcnips, we show that only kcnip1 is timely and spatially present in the presumptive neural territories and is able to bind DRE sites in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner. The loss of function of kcnip1 results in the expansion of the neural plate through an increased proliferation of neural progenitors. Later on, this leads to an impairment in the development of anterior neural structures. We propose that, in the embryo, at the onset of neurogenesis Kcnip1 is the Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor that controls the size of the neural plate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  19. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Olszewski, Neil E; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein-protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors-PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development.

  20. Keeping things quiet: Roles of NuRD and Sin3 co-repressor complexes during mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    McDonel, Patrick; Costello, Ita; Hendrich, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Gene inactivation studies of mammalian histone and DNA-modifying proteins have demonstrated a role for many such proteins in embryonic development. Post-implantation embryonic lethality implies a role for epigenetic factors in differentiation and in development of specific lineages or tissues. However a handful of chromatin-modifying enzymes have been found to be required in pre- or peri-implantation embryos. This is significant as implantation is the time when inner cell mass cells of the blastocyst exit pluripotency and begin to commit to form the various lineages that will eventually form the adult animal. These observations indicate a critical role for chromatin-modifying proteins in the earliest lineage decisions of mammalian development, and/or in the formation of the first embryonic cell types. Recent work has shown that the two major class I histone deacetylase-containing co-repressor complexes, the NuRD and Sin3 complexes, are both required at peri-implantation stages of mouse development, demonstrating the importance of histone deacetylation in cell fate decisions. Over the past 10 years both genetic and biochemical studies have revealed surprisingly divergent roles for these two co-repressors in mammalian cells. In this review we will summarise the evidence that the two major class I histone deacetylase complexes in mammalian cells, the NuRD and Sin3 complexes, play important roles in distinct aspects of embryonic development. PMID:18775506

  1. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene.

  2. Activators and repressors: A balancing act for X-inactivation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, Leeanne; Panning, Barbara; Leung, Karen Nicole

    2016-08-01

    In early female embryos X-chromosome inactivation occurs concomitant with up regulation of the non-coding RNA, Xist, on the future inactive X-chromosome. Up regulation of Xist and coating of the future inactive X is sufficient to induce silencing. Therefore unlocking the mechanisms of X-chromosome inactivation requires thorough understanding of the transcriptional regulators, both activators and repressors, which control Xist. Mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells, which have two active X chromosomes, provide a tractable ex vivo model system for studying X-chromosome inactivation, since this process is triggered by differentiation signals in these cultured cells. Yet there are significant discrepancies found between ex vivo analyses in mouse embryonic stem cells and in vivo studies of early embryos. In this review we elaborate on potential models of how Xist is up regulated on a single X chromosome in female cells and how ex vivo and in vivo analyses enlighten our understanding of the activators and repressors that control this non-coding RNA gene. PMID:27223409

  3. The Arabidopsis transcriptional repressor ERF9 participates in resistance against necrotrophic fungi.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Yosuke; Yamoto, Natsuko; Suzuki, Yuya; Chiba, Yukako; Yamazaki, Ken-ichi; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2013-12-01

    Complex plant defenses that include the hypersensitive response (HR) are mediated by plant hormones, such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene. We previously isolated the Arabidopsis DEAR1 (DREB AND EAR MOTIF PROTEIN 1) regulator and showed that its overexpression DEAR1 (DEAR1ox) resulted in a dwarf phenotype and lesion-like cell death, accompanied by elevated expression of PR (PATHOGENESIS-RELATED) genes. Here, we show that transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing DEAR1 (DEAR1ox) has enhanced resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea). This result indicates that DEAR1 represses negative regulators of plant defense responses, including transcriptional repressors belonging to the ERF (ETHYLEN RESPONSE FACTOR) family. Knockout mutants of ERF9 (erf9), which were down-regulated in DEAR1ox plants, showed transcriptional promotion of PDF1.2 (PATHOGEN-INDUCIBLE PLANT DEFENSIN) genes, which serve as positive markers for the ethylene/jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway and provide enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the ERF9 in capable of binding to the GCC box, a cis-element contained in the promoters of the PDF1.2 gene that possesses trans-repression activity. Moreover, infection with B. cinerea resulted in the promotion of the PDF1.2 expression, coinciding with suppression of the ERF9 gene under the control of the DEAR1 gene. These results indicate that the transcriptional repressor ERF9 participates in plant defense mechanisms against necrotic fungi mediated by the DEAR1-dependent ethylene/JA signaling pathway.

  4. Binding of the N-terminal domain of the lactococcal bacteriophage TP901-1 CI repressor to its target DNA: a crystallography, small angle scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian H; Rasmussen, Kim K; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Hammer, Karin; Pedersen, Margit; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Arleth, Lise; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2013-10-01

    In most temperate bacteriophages, regulation of the choice of lysogenic or lytic life cycle is controlled by a CI repressor protein. Inhibition of transcription is dependent on a helix-turn-helix motif, often located in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which binds to specific DNA sequences (operator sites). Here the crystal structure of the NTD of the CI repressor from phage TP901-1 has been determined at 1.6 Å resolution, and at 2.6 Å resolution in complex with a 9 bp double-stranded DNA fragment that constitutes a half-site of the OL operator. This N-terminal construct, comprising residues 2-74 of the CI repressor, is monomeric in solution as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), small angle X-ray scattering, and gel filtration and is monomeric in the crystal structures. The binding interface between the NTD and the half-site in the crystal is very similar to the interface that can be mapped by NMR in solution with a full palindromic site. The interactions seen in the complexes (in the crystal and in solution) explain the observed affinity for the OR site that is lower than that for the OL site and the specificity for the recognized DNA sequence in comparison to that for other repressors. Compared with many well-studied phage repressor systems, the NTD from TP901-1 CI has a longer extended scaffolding helix that, interestingly, is strongly conserved in putative repressors of Gram-positive pathogens. On the basis of sequence comparisons, we suggest that these bacteria also possess repressor/antirepressor systems similar to that found in phage TP901-1. PMID:24047404

  5. The Transcriptional Repressor ZNF503/Zeppo2 Promotes Mammary Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Enhances Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Payam; Slorach, Euan M; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chou, Jonathan; Lu, Angela; Ruderisch, Aline; Werb, Zena

    2015-02-01

    The NET (nocA, Nlz, elB, TLP-1) subfamily of zinc finger proteins is an important mediator during developmental processes. The evolutionary conserved zinc finger protein ZNF503/Zeppo2 (zinc finger elbow-related proline domain protein 2, Zpo2) plays critical roles during embryogenesis. We found that Zpo2 is expressed in adult tissue and examined its function. We found that ZPO2 is a nuclearly targeted transcriptional repressor that is expressed in mammary epithelial cells. Elevated Zpo2 levels increase mammary epithelial cell proliferation. Zpo2 promotes cellular invasion through down-regulation of E-cadherin and regulates the invasive phenotype in a RAC1-dependent manner. We detect elevated Zpo2 expression during breast cancer progression in a MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model. Tumor transplant experiments indicated that overexpression of Zpo2 in MMTV-PyMT mammary tumor cell lines enhances lung metastasis. Our findings suggest that Zpo2 plays a significant role in mammary gland homeostasis and that deregulation of Zpo2 may promote breast cancer development.

  6. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional repressor EthR is negatively regulated by Serine/Threonine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Leiba, Jade; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Dimala, Martin Moune; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Baulard, Alain; Kremer, Laurent; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-18

    Recent efforts have underlined the role of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases (STPKs) in growth, pathogenesis and cell wall metabolism in mycobacteria. Herein, we demonstrated that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR, a transcriptional repressor that regulates the activation process of the antitubercular drug ethionamide (ETH) is a specific substrate of the mycobacterial kinase PknF. ETH is a prodrug that must undergo bioactivation by the monooxygenease EthA to exert its antimycobacterial activity and previous studies reported that EthR represses transcription of ethA by binding to the ethA-ethR intergenic region. Mass spectrometry analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified a set of four phosphoacceptors, namely Thr2, Thr3, Ser4 and Ser7. This was further supported by the complete loss of PknF-dependent phosphorylation of a phosphoablative EthR mutant protein. Importantly, a phosphomimetic version of EthR, in which all phosphosites were replaced by Asp residues, exhibited markedly decreased DNA-binding activity compared with the wild-type protein. Together, these findings are the first demonstration of EthR phosphorylation and indicate that phosphorylation negatively affects its DNA-binding activity, which may impact ETH resistance levels in M. tb.

  7. A knockdown with smoke model reveals FHIT as a repressor of Heme oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Boylston, Jennifer A; Brenner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene deletions are among the earliest and most frequent events in carcinogenesis, particularly in carcinogen-exposed tissues. Though FHIT has been established as an authentic tumor suppressor, the mechanism underlying tumor suppression remains opaque. Most experiments designed to clarify FHIT function have analyzed the consequence of re-expressing FHIT in FHIT-negative cells. However, carcinogenesis occurs in cells that transition from FHIT-positive to FHIT-negative. To better understand cancer development, we induced FHIT loss in human bronchial epithelial cells with RNA interference. Because FHIT is a demonstrated target of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, we combined FHIT silencing with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and measured gene expression consequences by RNA microarray. The data indicate that FHIT loss enhances the expression of a set of oxidative stress response genes after exposure to CSE, including the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) at the RNA and protein levels. Data are consistent with a mechanism in which Fhit protein is required for accumulation of the transcriptional repressor of HMOX1, Bach1 protein. We posit that by allowing superinduction of oxidative stress response genes, loss of FHIT creates a survival advantage that promotes carcinogenesis. PMID:25486479

  8. A repressor-antirepressor pair links two loci controlling light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, José Juan; Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco José

    2002-03-01

    The light-inducible carB operon encodes all but one of the structural genes for carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus. It is transcriptionally controlled by two proteins expressed from two unlinked genetic loci: CarS from the light-inducible carQRS operon, and CarA from the light-independent carA operon. CarA represses transcription from the carB promoter (P(B)) in the dark, and CarS counteracts this on illumination. The CarA sequence revealed a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif of the type found in bacterial MerR transcriptional factors, whereas CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif. Here, we examine the molecular interplay between CarA and CarS. We demonstrate the following. (i) Whereas CarS exhibits no DNA binding in vitro, CarA binds specifically to a region encompassing P(B) to form at least two distinct complexes. (ii) A palindrome located between positions -46 and -63 relative to the transcription start point is essential but not sufficient for the formation of the two CarA-DNA complexes observed. (iii) CarS abrogates the specific DNA binding of CarA. CarA is therefore a repressor and CarS an antirepressor. (iv) CarS physically interacts with CarA; thus, the functional interaction between them is mediated by protein-protein interactions.

  9. Inducing a Site Specific Replication Blockage in E. coli Using a Fluorescent Repressor Operator System.

    PubMed

    Mettrick, Karla A; Lawrence, Nikki; Mason, Claire; Weaver, Georgia M; Corocher, Tayla-Ann; Grainge, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Obstacles present on DNA, including tightly-bound proteins and various lesions, can severely inhibit the progression of the cell's replication machinery. The stalling of a replisome can lead to its dissociation from the chromosome, either in part or its entirety, leading to the collapse of the replication fork. The recovery from this collapse is a necessity for the cell to accurately complete chromosomal duplication and subsequently divide. Therefore, when the collapse occurs, the cell has evolved diverse mechanisms that take place to restore the DNA fork and allow replication to be completed with high fidelity. Previously, these replication repair pathways in bacteria have been studied using UV damage, which has the disadvantage of not being localized to a known site. This manuscript describes a system utilizing a Fluorescence Repressor Operator System (FROS) to create a site-specific protein block that can induce the stalling and collapse of replication forks in Escherichia coli. Protocols detail how the status of replication can be visualized in single living cells using fluorescence microscopy and DNA replication intermediates can be analyzed by 2-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis. Temperature sensitive mutants of replisome components (e.g. DnaBts) can be incorporated into the system to induce a synchronous collapse of the replication forks. Furthermore, the roles of the recombination proteins and helicases that are involved in these processes can be studied using genetic knockouts within this system. PMID:27583408

  10. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A.; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M.; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G.; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Olszewski, Neil E.; Sun, Tai-ping

    2016-01-01

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein–protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors—PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)—that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development. PMID:26773002

  11. Thermodynamic and alkylation interference analysis of the lac repressor-operator substituted with the analogue 7-deazaguanine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Gottlieb, P A

    1993-10-26

    Guanine residues in the lac operator were substituted with the isosteric analogue of 7-deazaguanine. The observed equilibrium dissociation constants for lac repressor binding to substituted operators were measured in 10 mM Tris, 150 mM KCl, 0.1 mM EDTA, and 0.1 mM DTE, pH 7.6, at 25 degrees C, using either a standard equilibrium assay or a competition assay. Of the seven individual sites tested, only three significantly altered the complex affinity. Two of these sites are symmetrically related and are positioned in the major grooves that are known to interact directly with repressor, and the third site is located in the central core region of the operator. The alkylation interference assay, which identifies essential phosphate sites, was used to define the extent of perturbation on the protein-DNA complex by the modified nucleotide. Chemical footprinting data for the singly substituted operator done at a single concentration of protein reflected the alignment of sterically incompatible groups or disruption in the local conformation, but did not appear to alter general phosphate backbone interactions. Similar experiments with a doubly substituted operator revealed that the free energy of binding was an additive combination of each of the individual sites, and the alkylation interference data were similar to the singly substituted and wild-type operators. A constitutive mutant which also had a higher binding constant had a similar alkylation interference pattern. PMID:8218202

  12. Transcriptional repressor domain of MBD1 is intrinsically disordered and interacts with its binding partners in a selective manner.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Umar Farook Shahul; Lim, Jackwee; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A; Yang, Daiwen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2014-05-09

    Methylation of DNA CpG sites is a major mechanism of epigenetic gene silencing and plays important roles in cell division, development and carcinogenesis. One of its regulators is the 64-residue C-terminal Transcriptional Repressor Domain (the TRD) of MBD1, which recruits several repressor proteins such as MCAF1, HDAC3 and MPG that are essential for the gene silencing. Using NMR spectroscopy, we have characterized the solution structure of the C-terminus of MBD1 (MBD1-c, residues D507 to Q605), which included the TRD (A529 to P592). Surprisingly, the MBD1-c is intrinsically disordered. Despite its lack of a tertiary folding, MBD1-c could still bind to different partner proteins in a selective manner. MPG and MCAF1Δ8 showed binding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal residues of MBD1-c but HDAC3 preferably bound to the C-terminal region. This study reveals how MBD1-c discriminates different binding partners, and thus, expands our understanding of the mechanisms of gene regulation by MBD1.

  13. A novel strategy to analyze L-tryptophan through allosteric Trp repressor based on rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guojie; Hu, Tianyu; Li, Jun; Wei, Hua; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2015-09-15

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been considered as a powerful tool for nucleic acids detection. Here, a novel repressor-RCA-based method for L-tryptophan (L-Trp) detection was developed. This method utilizes the specific interaction between the RCA circular template and the Trp repressor protein (TrpR) involved in trp operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In the absence of L-Trp, the TrpR protein could not bind to the RCA template, and the RCA process can be continued. When L-Trp is present, the activated TrpR will bind to the operon sequence on the RCA template and inhibit the RCA reaction. Thus, the concentration of L-Trp is correlated directly with the fluorescent RCA signals. We succeeded in detecting L-Trp in a single step in simple homogeneous reaction system. The detection limit was estimated to be 0.77 μM (S/N=3) with good linearity. The method can unambiguously distinguish L-Trp from other 19 standard amino acids and L-Trp analogs. This strategy is also promising for detecting many small molecules such as other amino acids and carbohydrates.

  14. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  15. A novel strategy to analyze L-tryptophan through allosteric Trp repressor based on rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guojie; Hu, Tianyu; Li, Jun; Wei, Hua; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2015-09-15

    Rolling circle amplification (RCA) has been considered as a powerful tool for nucleic acids detection. Here, a novel repressor-RCA-based method for L-tryptophan (L-Trp) detection was developed. This method utilizes the specific interaction between the RCA circular template and the Trp repressor protein (TrpR) involved in trp operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In the absence of L-Trp, the TrpR protein could not bind to the RCA template, and the RCA process can be continued. When L-Trp is present, the activated TrpR will bind to the operon sequence on the RCA template and inhibit the RCA reaction. Thus, the concentration of L-Trp is correlated directly with the fluorescent RCA signals. We succeeded in detecting L-Trp in a single step in simple homogeneous reaction system. The detection limit was estimated to be 0.77 μM (S/N=3) with good linearity. The method can unambiguously distinguish L-Trp from other 19 standard amino acids and L-Trp analogs. This strategy is also promising for detecting many small molecules such as other amino acids and carbohydrates. PMID:25889351

  16. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-08-17

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia.

  17. Lac Repressor Mediated DNA Looping: Monte Carlo Simulation of Constrained DNA Molecules Complemented with Current Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Biton, Yoav Y.; Kumar, Sandip; Dunlap, David; Swigon, David

    2014-01-01

    Tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments can be used to detect time-resolved loop formation in a single DNA molecule by measuring changes in the length of a DNA tether. Interpretation of such experiments is greatly aided by computer simulations of DNA looping which allow one to analyze the structure of the looped DNA and estimate DNA-protein binding constants specific for the loop formation process. We here present a new Monte Carlo scheme for accurate simulation of DNA configurations subject to geometric constraints and apply this method to Lac repressor mediated DNA looping, comparing the simulation results with new experimental data obtained by the TPM technique. Our simulations, taking into account the details of attachment of DNA ends and fluctuations of the looped subsegment of the DNA, reveal the origin of the double-peaked distribution of RMS values observed by TPM experiments by showing that the average RMS value for anti-parallel loop types is smaller than that of parallel loop types. The simulations also reveal that the looping probabilities for the anti-parallel loop types are significantly higher than those of the parallel loop types, even for loops of length 600 and 900 base pairs, and that the correct proportion between the heights of the peaks in the distribution can only be attained when loops with flexible Lac repressor conformation are taken into account. Comparison of the in silico and in vitro results yields estimates for the dissociation constants characterizing the binding affinity between O1 and Oid DNA operators and the dimeric arms of the Lac repressor. PMID:24800809

  18. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Erkan Y.; Miller, Madeline R.; Robbins, Kate L.; Lombardi, Abby M.; Atkinson, Arleigh K.; Brehm, Amanda J.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1MO-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection in the relatively severe mouse model of SMA (SMNΔ7 mouse model) elicited a robust induction of SMN protein, and mean life span was extended from an average survival of 13 to 54 days following a single dose, consistent with large weight gains and a correction of the neuronal pathology. Additionally, E1MO-ASO treatment in an intermediate SMA mouse (SMNRT mouse model) significantly extended life span by ∼700% and weight gain was comparable with the unaffected animals. While a number of experimental therapeutics have targeted the ISS-N1 element of SMN2 pre-mRNA, the development of E1 ASOs provides a new molecular target for SMA therapeutics that dramatically extends survival in two important pre-clinical models of disease. PMID:24781211

  19. Transcriptional Repressor DAXX Promotes Prostate Cancer Tumorigenicity via Suppression of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Puto, Lorena A; Brognard, John; Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-19

    The DAXX transcriptional repressor was originally associated with apoptotic cell death. However, recent evidence that DAXX represses several tumor suppressor genes, including the DAPK1 and DAPK3 protein kinases, and is up-regulated in many cancers argues that a pro-survival role may predominate in a cancer context. Here, we report that DAXX has potent growth-enhancing effects on primary prostatic malignancy through inhibition of autophagy. Through stable gene knockdown and mouse subcutaneous xenograft studies, we demonstrate that DAXX promotes tumorigenicity of human ALVA-31 and PC3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vivo. Importantly, DAXX represses expression of essential autophagy modulators DAPK3 and ULK1 in vivo, revealing autophagy suppression as a mechanism through which DAXX promotes PCa tumorigenicity. Furthermore, DAXX knockdown increases autophagic flux in cultured PCa cells. Finally, interrogation of the Oncomine(TM) database suggests that DAXX overexpression is associated with malignant transformation in several human cancers, including prostate and pancreatic cancers. Thus, DAXX may represent a new cancer biomarker for the detection of aggressive disease, whose tissue-specific down-regulation can serve as an improved therapeutic modality. Our results establish DAXX as a pro-survival protein in PCa and reveal that, in the early stages of tumorigenesis, autophagy suppresses prostate tumor formation.

  20. SPBP Is a Phosphoserine-Specific Repressor of Estrogen Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Gburcik, Valentina; Bot, Nathalie; Maggiolini, Marcello; Picard, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Multiple signaling pathways stimulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) by direct phosphorylation within its N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1). How phosphorylation affects AF1 activity remains poorly understood. We performed a phage display screen for human proteins that are exclusively recruited to the phosphorylated form of AF1 and found the stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element-binding protein (SPBP). In a purified system, SPBP bound only the in vitro-phosphorylated form of the ERα AF1 or the phosphoserine mimic S118E, and the interaction domain could be mapped to a 42-amino-acid fragment of SPBP. In cells, SPBP preferentially interacted with liganded and phosphorylated ERα. Functionally, SPBP behaved as a repressor of activated ERα, which extends its previously demonstrated roles as a DNA binding transactivation factor and coactivator of other transcription factors. By targeting the phosphorylated form of AF1, SPBP may contribute to attenuating and fine-tuning ERα activity. A functional consequence is that SPBP inhibits the proliferation of ERα-dependent but not ERα-independent breast cancer cell lines, mirroring a reported negative correlation with the ERα status of breast tumors. PMID:15831449

  1. SPBP is a phosphoserine-specific repressor of estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Gburcik, Valentina; Bot, Nathalie; Maggiolini, Marcello; Picard, Didier

    2005-05-01

    Multiple signaling pathways stimulate the activity of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) by direct phosphorylation within its N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1). How phosphorylation affects AF1 activity remains poorly understood. We performed a phage display screen for human proteins that are exclusively recruited to the phosphorylated form of AF1 and found the stromelysin-1 platelet-derived growth factor-responsive element-binding protein (SPBP). In a purified system, SPBP bound only the in vitro-phosphorylated form of the ERalpha AF1 or the phosphoserine mimic S118E, and the interaction domain could be mapped to a 42-amino-acid fragment of SPBP. In cells, SPBP preferentially interacted with liganded and phosphorylated ERalpha. Functionally, SPBP behaved as a repressor of activated ERalpha, which extends its previously demonstrated roles as a DNA binding transactivation factor and coactivator of other transcription factors. By targeting the phosphorylated form of AF1, SPBP may contribute to attenuating and fine-tuning ERalpha activity. A functional consequence is that SPBP inhibits the proliferation of ERalpha-dependent but not ERalpha-independent breast cancer cell lines, mirroring a reported negative correlation with the ERalpha status of breast tumors. PMID:15831449

  2. Distinct structural features of Rex-family repressors to sense redox levels in anaerobes and aerobes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingying; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Sun, Hong; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Pei, Jianjun; Qiu, Riyong; Wang, Andrew H-J; Wiegel, Juergen; Shao, Weilan; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2014-12-01

    The Rex-family repressors sense redox levels by alternative binding to NADH or NAD(+). Unlike other Rex proteins that regulate aerobic respiration, RSP controls ethanol fermentation in the obligate anaerobe Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus JW200(T). It is also found in other anaerobic microorganisms. Here we present the crystal structures of apo-RSP, RSP/NADH and RSP/NAD(+)/DNA, which are the first structures of Rex-family members from an obligate anaerobe. RSP functions as a homodimer. It assumes an open conformation when bound to the operator DNA and a closed conformation when not DNA-bound. The DNA binds to the N-terminal winged-helix domain and the dinucleotide, either reduced or oxidized, binds to the C-terminal Rossmann-fold domain. The two distinct orientations of nicotinamide ring, anti in NADH and syn in NAD(+), give rise to two sets of protein-ligand interactions. Consequently, NADH binding makes RSP into a closed conformation, which does not bind to DNA. Both the conserved residues and the DNA specificity of RSP show a number of variations from those of the aerobic Rex, reflecting different structural bases for redox-sensing by the anaerobic and aerobic Rex-family members. PMID:25463021

  3. KHDC1A, a Novel Translational Repressor, Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum-Dependent Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Congli; Liu, Jing; Wang, Chao

    2012-01-01

    RNA binding proteins are characterized as a new family of apoptosis inducers; however, the mechanism by which they induce apoptosis is poorly understood. KHDC1 family members were recently identified as K-homology (KH)-domain containing RNA binding proteins that are unique to eutherian mammals and highly expressed in oocytes. In this study, we report that the expression of KHDC1A induces caspase-3 dependent apoptosis and inhibits mRNA translation, and the translational repression is independent of apoptosis. We demonstrate that both the N-terminus and C-terminus of KHDC1A are required for its pro-apoptotic and translational repression activities. Furthermore, in the C-terminus of KHDC1A, a putative trans-membrane motif (TMM) is critical for these activities. In addition, the ectopically expressed KHDC1A is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and changes the morphology of the ER. The inhibition of ER-specific caspase-12 successfully rescues KHDC1A-induced apoptosis, but not Fas-induced apoptosis. Taken together, we conclude that KHDC1A functions as a global translational repressor and induces apoptosis through an ER-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:22731819

  4. The Mannitol Operon Repressor MTIR belongs to a new class of transcription regulators in bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Borovilos, M.; Zhou, M; Horer, S; Clancy, S; Moy, S; Volkart, LL; Sassoon, J; Baumann, U; Joachimiak, A

    2009-12-25

    Many bacteria express phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems (PTS). The mannitol-specific PTS catalyze the uptake and phosphorylation of d-mannitol. The uptake system comprises several genes encoded in the single operon. The expression of the mannitol operon is regulated by a proposed transcriptional factor, mannitol operon repressor (MtlR) that was first studied in Escherichia coli. Here we report the first crystal structures of MtlR from Vibrio parahemeolyticus (Vp-MtlR) and its homolog YggD protein from Shigella flexneri (Sf-YggD). MtlR and YggD belong to the same protein family (Pfam05068). Although Vp-MtlR and Sf-YggD share low sequence identity (22%), their overall structures are very similar, representing a novel all {alpha}-helical fold, and indicate similar function. However, their lack of any known DNA-binding structural motifs and their unfavorable electrostatic properties imply that MtlR/YggD are unlikely to bind a specific DNA operator directly as proposed earlier. This structural observation is further corroborated by in vitro DNA-binding studies of E. coli MtlR (Ec-MtlR), which detected no interaction of Ec-MtlR with the well characterized mannitol operator/promoter region. Therefore, MtlR/YggD belongs to a new class of transcription factors in bacteria that may regulate gene expression indirectly as a part of a larger transcriptional complex.

  5. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator. PMID:24413661

  6. The Translational Repressor 4E-BP1 Contributes to Diabetes-Induced Visual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William P.; Mihailescu, Maria L.; Yang, Chen; Barber, Alistair J.; Kimball, Scot R.; Jefferson, Leonard S.; Dennis, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The translational repressor 4E-BP1 interacts with the mRNA cap-binding protein eIF4E and thereby promotes cap-independent translation of mRNAs encoding proteins that contribute to diabetic retinopathy. Interaction of 4E-BP1 with eIF4E is enhanced in the retina of diabetic rodents, at least in part, as a result of elevated 4E-BP1 protein expression. In the present study, we examined the role of 4E-BP1 in diabetes-induced visual dysfunction, as well as the mechanism whereby hyperglycemia promotes 4E-BP1 expression. Methods Nondiabetic and diabetic wild-type and 4E-BP1/2 knockout mice were evaluated for visual function using a virtual optomotor test (Optomotry). Retinas were harvested from nondiabetic and type 1 diabetic mice and analyzed for protein abundance and posttranslational modifications. Similar analyses were performed on cells in culture exposed to hyperglycemic conditions or an O-GlcNAcase inhibitor (Thiamet G [TMG]). Results Diabetes-induced visual dysfunction was delayed in mice deficient of 4E-BP1/2 as compared to controls. 4E-BP1 protein expression was enhanced by hyperglycemia in the retina of diabetic rodents and by hyperglycemic conditions in retinal cells in culture. A similar elevation in 4E-BP1 expression was observed with TMG. The rate of 4E-BP1 degradation was significantly prolonged by either hyperglycemic conditions or TMG. A PEST motif in the C-terminus of 4E-BP1 regulated polyubiquitination, turnover, and binding of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing CUL3. Conclusions The findings support a model whereby elevated 4E-BP1 expression observed in the retina of diabetic rodents is the result of O-GlcNAcylation of 4E-BP1 within its PEST motif. PMID:26998719

  7. The Molecular Switch of Telomere Phages: High Binding Specificity of the PY54 Cro Lytic Repressor to a Single Operator Site.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Roschanski, Nicole; Lurz, Rudi; Johne, Reimar; Lanka, Erich; Hertwig, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a molecular switch, which regulates the lytic and lysogenic growth. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54 and ɸKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor, the lytic repressor and a putative antiterminator. The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI, Cro and Q, respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ɸKO2 are also reminiscent of lambda-like phages. By contrast, in silico analyses revealed the presence of only one operator (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\)3) in PY54. The purified PY54 Cro protein was used for EMSA studies demonstrating that it exclusively binds to a 16-bp palindromic site (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\)3) upstream of the prophage repressor gene. The O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\)3 operator sequences of PY54 and ɸKO2/N15 only differ by their peripheral base pairs, which are responsible for Cro specificity. PY54 cI and cro transcription is regulated by highly active promoters initiating the synthesis of a homogenious species of leaderless mRNA. The location of the PY54 Cro binding site and of the identified promoters suggests that the lytic repressor suppresses cI transcription but not its own synthesis. The results indicate an unexpected diversity of the growth regulation mechanisms in lambda-related phages. PMID:26043380

  8. Single molecule analysis of DNA wrapping and looping by a circular 14mer wheel of the bacteriophage 186 CI repressor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haowei; Dodd, Ian B; Dunlap, David D; Shearwin, Keith E; Finzi, Laura

    2013-06-01

    The lytic-lysogenic decision in bacteriophage 186 is governed by the 186 CI repressor protein in a unique way. The 186 CI is proposed to form a wheel-like oligomer that can mediate either wrapped or looped nucleoprotein complexes to provide the cooperative and competitive interactions needed for regulation. Although consistent with structural, biochemical and gene expression data, many aspects of this model are based on inference. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to reveal the various predicted wrapped and looped species, and new ones, for CI regulation of lytic and lysogenic transcription. Automated AFM analysis showed CI particles of the predicted dimensions on the DNA, with CI multimerization favoured by DNA binding. Measurement of the length of the wrapped DNA segments indicated that CI may move on the DNA, wrapping or releasing DNA on either side of the wheel. Tethered particle motion experiments were consistent with wrapping and looping of DNA by CI in solution, where in contrast to λ repressor, the looped species were exceptionally stable. The CI regulatory system provides an intriguing comparison with that of nucleosomes, which share the ability to wrap and release similar sized segments of DNA. PMID:23620280

  9. A SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 transcriptional repressor complex promotes TGF-β mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Theresa; Neve, Etienne P. A.; Johnson, Jill R.; Kukalev, Alexander; Rojo, Federico; Albanell, Joan; Pietras, Kristian; Virtanen, Ismo; Philipson, Lennart; Leopold, Philip L.; Crystal, Ronald G.; de Herreros, Antonio Garcia; Moustakas, Aristidis; Pettersson, Ralf F.; Fuxe, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) are essential for organogenesis and triggered in carcinoma progression into an invasive state1. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) cooperates with signalling pathways, such as Ras and Wnt, to induce EMT2-5, but the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Here, we report that SMAD3 and SMAD4 interact and form a complex with SNAIL1, a transcriptional repressor and promoter of EMT6, 7. The SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 complex was targeted to the gene promoters of CAR, a tight junction protein, and E-cadherin during TGF-β-driven EMT in breast epithelial cells. SNAIL1 and SMAD3/4 acted as co-repressors of CAR, occludin, claudin-3 and E-cadherin promoters in transfected cells. Conversely, co-silencing of SNAIL1 and SMAD4 by siRNA inhibited the repression of CAR and occludin during EMT. Moreover, loss of CAR and E-cadherin correlated with nuclear co-expression of SNAIL1 and SMAD3/4 in a mouse model of breast carcinoma and at the invasive fronts of human breast cancer. We propose that activation of a SNAIL1-SMAD3/4 transcriptional complex represents a novel mechanism of gene repression during EMT. PMID:19597490

  10. Molecular Binding Mechanism of TtgR Repressor to Antibiotics and Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Escamilla, Ana Maria; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Morel, Bertrand; Casares-Atienza, Salvador; Ramos, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    A disturbing phenomenon in contemporary medicine is the prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Efflux pumps contribute strongly to this antimicrobial drug resistance, which leads to the subsequent failure of clinical treatments. The TtgR protein of Pseudomonas putida is a HTH-type transcriptional repressor that controls expression of the TtgABC efflux pump, which is the main contributor to resistance against several antimicrobials and toxic compounds in this microbe. One of the main strategies to modulate the bacterial resistance is the rational modification of the ligand binding target site. We report the design and characterization of four mutants-TtgRS77A, TtgRE78A, TtgRN110A and TtgRH114A - at the active ligand binding site. The biophysical characterization of the mutants, in the presence and in the absence of different antimicrobials, revealed that TtgRN110A is the variant with highest thermal stability, under any of the experimental conditions tested. EMSA experiments also showed a different dissociation pattern from the operator for TtgRN110A, in the presence of several antimicrobials, making it a key residue in the TtgR protein repression mechanism of the TtgABC efflux pump. We found that TtgRE78A stability is the most affected upon effector binding. We also probe that one mutation at the C-terminal half of helix-α4, TtgRS77A, provokes a severe protein structure distortion, demonstrating the important role of this residue in the overall protein structure and on the ligand binding site. The data provide new information and deepen the understanding of the TtgR-effector binding mechanism and consequently the TtgABC efflux pump regulation mechanism in Pseudomonas putida. PMID:26422008

  11. Loss of the co-repressor GPS2 sensitizes macrophage activation upon metabolic stress induced by obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rongrong; Toubal, Amine; Goñi, Saioa; Drareni, Karima; Huang, Zhiqiang; Alzaid, Fawaz; Ballaire, Raphaelle; Ancel, Patricia; Liang, Ning; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios; Hainault, Isabelle; Soprani, Antoine; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Foufelle, Fabienne; Lawrence, Toby; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Venteclef, Nicolas; Treuter, Eckardt

    2016-07-01

    Humans with obesity differ in their susceptibility to developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This variation may relate to the extent of adipose tissue (AT) inflammation that develops as their obesity progresses. The state of macrophage activation has a central role in determining the degree of AT inflammation and thus its dysfunction, and these states are driven by epigenomic alterations linked to gene expression. The underlying mechanisms that regulate these alterations, however, are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that a co-repressor complex containing G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) crucially controls the macrophage epigenome during activation by metabolic stress. The study of AT from humans with and without obesity revealed correlations between reduced GPS2 expression in macrophages, elevated systemic and AT inflammation, and diabetic status. The causality of this relationship was confirmed by using macrophage-specific Gps2-knockout (KO) mice, in which inappropriate co-repressor complex function caused enhancer activation, pro-inflammatory gene expression and hypersensitivity toward metabolic-stress signals. By contrast, transplantation of GPS2-overexpressing bone marrow into two mouse models of obesity (ob/ob and diet-induced obesity) reduced inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity. Thus, our data reveal a potentially reversible disease mechanism that links co-repressor-dependent epigenomic alterations in macrophages to AT inflammation and the development of T2D. PMID:27270589

  12. Harnessing the master transcriptional repressor REST to reciprocally regulate neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nesti, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis begins in embryonic development and continues at a reduced rate into adulthood in vertebrate species, yet the signaling cascades regulating this process remain poorly understood. Plasma membrane-initiated signaling cascades regulate neurogenesis via downstream pathways including components of the transcriptional machinery. A nuclear factor that temporally regulates neurogenesis by repressing neuronal differentiation is the repressor element 1 (RE1) silencing transcription (REST) factor. We have recently discovered a regulatory site on REST that serves as a molecular switch for neuronal differentiation. Specifically, C-terminal domain small phosphatase 1, CTDSP1, present in non-neuronal cells, maintains REST activity by dephosphorylating this site. Reciprocally, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK, activated by growth factor signaling in neural progenitors, and peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1, decrease REST activity through phosphorylation-dependent degradation. Our findings further resolve the mechanism for temporal regulation of REST and terminal neuronal differentiation. They also provide new potential therapeutic targets to enhance neuronal regeneration after injury. PMID:27535341

  13. Dynamic multidrug recognition by multidrug transcriptional repressor LmrR.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koh; Tokunaga, Yuji; Imai, Misaki; Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-11-18

    LmrR is a multidrug transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of a major multidrug transporter, LmrCD, in Lactococcus lactis. However, the molecular mechanism by which LmrR binds to structurally unrelated compounds and is released from the promoter region remains largely unknown. Here, we structurally and dynamically characterized LmrR in the apo, compound-bound and promoter-bound states. The compound-binding site of LmrR exhibits ps-μs dynamics in the apo state, and compound ligation shifts the preexisting conformational equilibrium to varying extents to achieve multidrug recognition. Meanwhile, the compound binding induces redistribution of ps-ns dynamics to the allosteric sites, which entropically favors the high-affinity recognition. Furthermore, the reciprocal compound/promoter binding by LmrR is achieved by the incompatible conformational ensembles between the compound- and promoter-bound states. Collectively, the data show how LmrR can dynamically exert its functions through promiscuous multi-target interactions, in a manner that cannot be understood by a static structural view.

  14. Heat-Induced Fibrillation of BclXL Apoptotic Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B.; Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; Deegan, Brian J.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Kurouski, Dmitry; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Gupta, Vineet; Lednev, Igor K.; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-01-01

    The BclXL apoptotic repressor bears the propensity to associate into megadalton oligomers in solution, particularly under acidic pH. Herein, using various biophysical methods, we analyze the effect of temperature on the oligomerization of BclXL. Our data show that BclXL undergoes irreversible aggregation and assembles into highly-ordered rope-like homogeneous fibrils with length in the order of mm and a diameter in the μm-range under elevated temperatures. Remarkably, the formation of such fibrils correlates with the decay of a largely α-helical fold into a predominantly β-sheet architecture of BclXL in a manner akin to the formation of amyloid fibrils. Further interrogation reveals that while BclXL fibrils formed under elevated temperatures show no observable affinity toward BH3 ligands, they appear to be optimally primed for insertion into cardiolipin bicelles. This salient observation strongly argues that BclXL fibrils likely represent an on-pathway intermediate for insertion into mitochondrial outer membrane during the onset of apoptosis. Collectively, our study sheds light on the propensity of BclXL to form amyloid-like fibrils with important consequences on its mechanism of action in gauging the apoptotic fate of cells in health and disease. PMID:23714425

  15. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C; Selfridge, Andrew C; Keogh, Ciara E; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C; Nolan, Karen A; Rocha, Liliane M A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P; Taylor, Cormac T; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  16. Heat-induced fibrillation of BclXL apoptotic repressor.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B; Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Kurouski, Dmitry; Faridi, Mohd Hafeez; Shareef, Mohammed M; Gupta, Vineet; Lednev, Igor K; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-09-01

    The BclXL apoptotic repressor bears the propensity to associate into megadalton oligomers in solution, particularly under acidic pH. Herein, using various biophysical methods, we analyze the effect of temperature on the oligomerization of BclXL. Our data show that BclXL undergoes irreversible aggregation and assembles into highly-ordered rope-like homogeneous fibrils with length in the order of mm and a diameter in the μm-range under elevated temperatures. Remarkably, the formation of such fibrils correlates with the decay of a largely α-helical fold into a predominantly β-sheet architecture of BclXL in a manner akin to the formation of amyloid fibrils. Further interrogation reveals that while BclXL fibrils formed under elevated temperatures show no observable affinity toward BH3 ligands, they appear to be optimally primed for insertion into cardiolipin bicelles. This salient observation strongly argues that BclXL fibrils likely represent an on-pathway intermediate for insertion into mitochondrial outer membrane during the onset of apoptosis. Collectively, our study sheds light on the propensity of BclXL to form amyloid-like fibrils with important consequences on its mechanism of action in gauging the apoptotic fate of cells in health and disease. PMID:23714425

  17. REST is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional repressor

    PubMed Central

    Cavadas, Miguel A. S.; Mesnieres, Marion; Crifo, Bianca; Manresa, Mario C.; Selfridge, Andrew C.; Keogh, Ciara E.; Fabian, Zsolt; Scholz, Carsten C.; Nolan, Karen A.; Rocha, Liliane M. A.; Tambuwala, Murtaza M.; Brown, Stuart; Wdowicz, Anita; Corbett, Danielle; Murphy, Keith J.; Godson, Catherine; Cummins, Eoin P.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Cheong, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to hypoxia results in altered gene expression in a range of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. Discrete cohorts of genes can be either up- or down-regulated in response to hypoxia. While the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) is the primary driver of hypoxia-induced adaptive gene expression, less is known about the signalling mechanisms regulating hypoxia-dependent gene repression. Using RNA-seq, we demonstrate that equivalent numbers of genes are induced and repressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. We demonstrate that nuclear localization of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription factor (REST) is induced in hypoxia and that REST is responsible for regulating approximately 20% of the hypoxia-repressed genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that REST-dependent gene repression is at least in part mediated by direct binding to the promoters of target genes. Based on these data, we propose that REST is a key mediator of gene repression in hypoxia. PMID:27531581

  18. ZBTB20 is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of alpha-fetoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai; Cao, Dongmei; Zhou, Luting; Zhang, Ye; Guo, Xiaoqin; Li, Hui; Chen, Yuxia; Spear, Brett T; Wu, Jia-Wei; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J

    2015-07-15

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) represents a classical model system to study developmental gene regulation in mammalian cells. We previously reported that liver ZBTB20 is developmentally regulated and plays a central role in AFP postnatal repression. Here we show that ZBTB20 is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor of AFP. By ELISA-based DNA-protein binding assay and conventional gel shift assay, we successfully identified a ZBTB20-binding site at -104/-86 of mouse AFP gene, flanked by two HNF1 sites and two C/EBP sites in the proximal promoter. Importantly, mutation of the core sequence in this site fully abolished its binding to ZBTB20 in vitro, as well as the repression of AFP promoter activity by ZBTB20. The unique ZBTB20 site was highly conserved in rat and human AFP genes, but absent in albumin genes. These help to explain the autonomous regulation of albumin and AFP genes in the liver after birth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that transcriptional repression of AFP gene by ZBTB20 was liver-specific. ZBTB20 was dispensable for AFP silencing in other tissues outside liver. Our data define a cognate ZBTB20 site in AFP promoter which mediates the postnatal repression of AFP gene in the liver.

  19. The transcriptional repressor BLIMP1 curbs host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

    PubMed

    Severa, Martina; Islam, Sabina A; Waggoner, Stephen N; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Kim, Nancy D; Ryan, Glennice; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Charo, Israel; Caffrey, Daniel R; Boyartchuk, Victor L; Luster, Andrew D; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2014-03-01

    The transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (BLIMP1) is a master regulator of B and T cell differentiation. To examine the role of BLIMP1 in innate immunity, we used a conditional knockout (CKO) of Blimp1 in myeloid cells and found that Blimp1 CKO mice were protected from lethal infection induced by Listeria monocytogenes. Transcriptome analysis of Blimp1 CKO macrophages identified the murine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 8, CCL8, as a direct target of Blimp1-mediated transcriptional repression in these cells. BLIMP1-deficient macrophages expressed elevated levels of Ccl8, and consequently Blimp1 CKO mice had higher levels of circulating CCL8, resulting in increased neutrophils in the peripheral blood, promoting a more aggressive antibacterial response. Mice lacking the Ccl8 gene were more susceptible to L. monocytogenes infection than were wild-type mice. Although CCL8 failed to recruit neutrophils directly, it was chemotactic for γ/δ T cells, and CCL8-responsive γ/δ T cells were enriched for IL-17F. Finally, CCL8-mediated enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes was dependent on γ/δ T cells. Collectively, these data reveal an important role for BLIMP1 in modulating host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

  20. The Capicua repressor--a general sensor of RTK signaling in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Gerardo; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Paroush, Ze'ev

    2012-03-15

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways control multiple cellular decisions in metazoans, often by regulating the expression of downstream genes. In Drosophila melanogaster and other systems, E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors are considered to be the predominant nuclear effectors of RTK pathways. Here, we highlight recent progress in identifying the HMG-box protein Capicua (CIC) as a key sensor of RTK signaling in both Drosophila and mammals. Several studies have shown that CIC functions as a repressor of RTK-responsive genes, keeping them silent in the absence of signaling. Following the activation of RTK signaling, CIC repression is relieved, and this allows the expression of the targeted gene in response to local or ubiquitous activators. This regulatory switch is essential for several RTK responses in Drosophila, from the determination of cell fate to cell proliferation. Furthermore, increasing evidence supports the notion that this mechanism is conserved in mammals, where CIC has been implicated in cancer and neurodegeneration. In addition to summarizing our current knowledge on CIC, we also discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of RTK signaling specificity in different biological processes.

  1. Regulatable and Modulable Background Expression Control in Prokaryotic Synthetic Circuits by Auxiliary Repressor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Merulla, Davide; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-01-15

    Expression control in synthetic genetic circuitry, for example, for construction of sensitive biosensors, is hampered by the lack of DNA parts that maintain ultralow background yet achieve high output upon signal integration by the cells. Here, we demonstrate how placement of auxiliary transcription factor binding sites within a regulatable promoter context can yield an important gain in signal-to-noise output ratios from prokaryotic biosensor circuits. As a proof of principle, we use the arsenite-responsive ArsR repressor protein from Escherichia coli and its cognate operator. Additional ArsR operators placed downstream of its target promoter can act as a transcription roadblock in a distance-dependent manner and reduce background expression of downstream-placed reporter genes. We show that the transcription roadblock functions both in cognate and heterologous promoter contexts. Secondary ArsR operators placed upstream of their promoter can also improve signal-to-noise output while maintaining effector dependency. Importantly, background control can be released through the addition of micromolar concentrations of arsenite. The ArsR-operator system thus provides a flexible system for additional gene expression control, which, given the extreme sensitivity to micrograms per liter effector concentrations, could be applicable in more general contexts.

  2. Transcriptional repressor HipB regulates the multiple promoters in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Yi; Awano, Naoki; Masuda, Hisako; Park, Jung-Ho; Inouye, Masayori

    2013-01-01

    HipB is a DNA-binding protein in Escherichia coli and negatively regulates its own promoter by binding to the palindromic sequences [TATCCN8GGATA (N represents any nucleotides)] on the hipBA promoter. For such sequences, bioinformatic analysis revealed that there are a total of 39 palindromic sequences (TATCCN(x)GGATA: N is any nucleotides and x is the number of nucleotides from 1 to 30) in the promoter regions of 33 genes on the E. coli genome. Notably, eutH and fadH have two and three TATCCN(x)GGATA palindromic sequences located in their promoters, respectively. Another significant finding was that a palindromic sequence was also identified in the promoter region of hipAB locus, known to be involved in the RelA-dependent persister cell formation in bacteria. Here, we demonstrated that HipB binds to the palindromic structures in the eutH, fadH, as well as the relA promoter regions and represses their expressions. We further demonstrated that HipA enhances the repression of the relA promoter activity by HipB. This effect was not observed with D291A HipA mutant which was previously shown to lack an ability to interact with HipB, indicating that HipA enhances the HipB's repressor activity through direct interaction with HipB.

  3. JAZ Repressors: Potential Involvement in Nutrients Deficiency Response in Rice and Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajit P.; Pandey, Bipin K.; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Narnoliya, Laxmi; Parida, Swarup K.; Giri, Jitender

    2015-01-01

    Jasmonates (JA) are well-known phytohormones which play important roles in plant development and defense against pathogens. Jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are plant-specific proteins and act as transcriptional repressors of JA-responsive genes. JA regulates both biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants; however, its role in nutrient deficiency responses is very elusive. Although, JA is well-known for root growth inhibition, little is known about behavior of JAZ genes in response to nutrient deficiencies, under which root architectural alteration is an important adaptation. Using protein sequence homology and a conserved-domains approach, here we identify 10 novel JAZ genes from the recently sequenced Chickpea genome, which is one of the most nutrient efficient crops. Both rice and chickpea JAZ genes express in tissue- and stimuli-specific manners. Many of which are preferentially expressed in root. Our analysis further showed differential expression of JAZ genes under macro (NPK) and micronutrients (Zn, Fe) deficiency in rice and chickpea roots. While both rice and chickpea JAZ genes showed a certain level of specificity toward type of nutrient deficiency, generally majority of them showed induction under K deficiency. Generally, JAZ genes showed an induction at early stages of stress and expression declined at later stages of macro-nutrient deficiency. Our results suggest that JAZ genes might play a role in early nutrient deficiency response both in monocot and dicot roots, and information generated here can be further used for understanding the possible roles of JA in root architectural alterations for nutrient deficiency adaptations. PMID:26617618

  4. SV40 early-to-late switch involves titration of cellular transcriptional repressors.

    PubMed

    Wiley, S R; Kraus, R J; Zuo, F; Murray, E E; Loritz, K; Mertz, J E

    1993-11-01

    We have purified factors from HeLa cell nuclear extracts that bind to the transcriptional initiation site of the SV40 major late promoter (SV40-MLP). The resulting fraction consists predominantly of three proteins, collectively called initiator-binding protein of SV40 (IBP-s) with electrophoretic mobilities of approximately 45-55 kD. Gel mobility-shift and DNase I-protection analyses indicate that each of these three proteins associates with high affinity to sequences located at the initiation site and 55 bp downstream of it. IBP-s-binding sites with lower affinities are located at +5 and +30. Addition of purified IBP-s to a cell-free transcription system represses transcription from the SV40-MLP, but not the SV40 early promoter. SV40 mutants lacking the two strongest IBP-s-binding sites (1) are not repressed by the addition of IBP-s in vitro, (2) overproduce late RNA (relative to wild-type SV40) at low, but not high, template copy number in vitro, and (3) exhibit increased levels of late RNA at early, but not late, times after transfection into CV-1 cells. Therefore, IBP-s is a cellular repressor of transcription of the SV40-MLP that may, in large part, be responsible for the replication-dependent component of the early-to-late shift in SV40 gene expression. Partial amino acid sequence data obtained from the approximately 55-kD component of IBP-s indicate that it is hERR1, an orphan member of the steroid-thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. These findings suggest simple molecular mechanisms by which hormones may modulate expression of viral late genes. We speculate that activation of expression of the late genes of other viruses may occur by similar mechanisms.

  5. The Viral E8^E2C Repressor Limits Productive Replication of Human Papillomavirus 16

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Elke; Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; Iftner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Productive replication of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) occurs only in differentiated keratinocyte cells. In addition to the viral E2 activator protein, HPV16 and related HPV types express transcripts coding for an E8^E2C fusion protein, which limits genome replication in undifferentiated keratinocytes. To address E8^E2C's role in productive replication of HPV16, stable keratinocyte cell lines containing wild-type (wt), E8^E2C knockout (E8−), or E8 KWK mutant (mt) genomes, in which conserved E8 residues were inactivated, were established. Copy numbers of E8− and E8 KWK mt genomes and amounts of early and late viral transcripts were greatly increased compared to those for the wt in undifferentiated keratinocytes, suggesting that HPV16 E8^E2C activities are highly dependent upon the E8 part. Upon differentiation in organotypic cultures, E8 mt genomes displayed higher early viral transcript levels, but no changes in cellular differentiation or virus-induced cellular DNA replication in suprabasal cells were observed. E8 mt genomes were amplified to higher copy numbers and showed increased L1 transcripts compared to wt genomes. Furthermore, the number of cells expressing the viral late protein E4 or L1 or amplifying viral genomes was greatly increased in E8 mt cell lines. In wild-type cells, E8^E2C transcript levels did not decrease by differentiation. Our data indicate that the E8^E2C repressor limits viral transcription and replication throughout the complete life cycle of HPV16. PMID:24198405

  6. Characterization and purification of Adh distal promoter factor 2, Adf-2, a cell-specific and promoter-specific repressor in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Benyajati, C; Ewel, A; McKeon, J; Chovav, M; Juan, E

    1992-01-01

    Chromatin footprinting in Drosophila tissue culture cells has detected the binding of a non-histone protein at +8 of the distal Adh RNA start site, on a 10-bp direct repeat motif abutting a nucleosome positioned over the inactive Adh distal promoter. Alternatively the active promoter is bound by a transcription initiation complex. We have characterized and purified a protein Adf-2 that binds specifically to this direct repeat motif 5'TCTCAGTGCA3', present at +8 and -202 of the distal RNA start site. DNase I footprinting, methylation interference, and UV-crosslinking analyses showed that both direct repeats interact in vitro with a nuclear protein of approximately 120 kilodaltons (kDa). We purified Adf-2 through multiple rounds of sequence-specific DNA affinity chromatography. Southwestern analysis showed that the purified 120 KDa polypeptide binds the Adf-2 motif efficiently as a monomer or homomultimer. In vivo titrations of Adf-2 activity with the Adf-2 motif by transient co-transfection competitions in different Drosophila cell lines suggested that Adf-2 is a cell-specific repressor. Adf-2 has been detected ubiquitously in vitro, but is functional in vivo as a sequence-specific DNA binding protein and repressor only in the cells that have the inactive distal promoter. We discuss the possibility that an activation process is required for Adf-2 protein to bind DNA and function in vivo. Images PMID:1408750

  7. An NRSF/REST-like repressor downstream of Ebi/SMRTER/Su(H) regulates eye development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Leo; Kaido, Masako; Lim, Young-Mi; Kato, Kagayaki; Aigaki, Toshiro; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2006-01-01

    The corepressor complex that includes Ebi and SMRTER is a target of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and Notch signaling pathways and regulates Delta (Dl)-mediated induction of support cells adjacent to photoreceptor neurons of the Drosophila eye. We describe a mechanism by which the Ebi/SMRTER corepressor complex maintains Dl expression. We identified a gene, charlatan (chn), which encodes a C2H2-type zinc-finger protein resembling human neuronal restricted silencing factor/repressor element RE-1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST). The Ebi/SMRTER corepressor complex represses chn transcription by competing with the activation complex that includes the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). Chn represses Dl expression and is critical for the initiation of eye development. Thus, under EGF signaling, double negative regulation mediated by the Ebi/SMRTER corepressor complex and an NRSF/REST-like factor, Chn, maintains inductive activity in developing photoreceptor cells by promoting Dl expression. PMID:16763555

  8. Alanine screening mutagenesis establishes the critical inactivating damage of irradiated E. coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Goffinont, Stephane; Villette, Sandrine; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie

    2012-06-01

    The function of the E. coli lactose operon requires the binding of lactose repressor to operator DNA. We have previously shown that γ rradiation destabilizes the repressor-operator complex because the repressor loses its DNA-binding ability. It was suggested that the observed oxidation of the four tyrosines (Y7, Y12, Y17, Y47) and the concomitant structural changes of the irradiated DNA-binding domains (headpieces) could be responsible for the inactivation. To pinpoint the tyrosine whose oxidation has the strongest effect, four headpieces containing the product of tyrosine oxidation, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), were simulated by molecular dynamics. We have observed that replacing Y47 by DOPA triggers the largest change of structure and stability of the headpiece and have concluded that Y47 oxidation is the greatest contributor to the decrease of repressor binding to DNA. To experimentally verify this conclusion, we applied the alanine screening mutagenesis approach. Tetrameric mutated repressors bearing an alanine instead of each one of the tyrosines were prepared and their binding to operator DNA was checked. Their binding ability is quite similar to that of the wild-type repressor, except for the Y47A mutant whose binding is strongly reduced. Circular dichroism determinations revealed small reductions of the proportion of α helices and of the melting temperature for Y7A, Y12A and Y17A headpieces, but much larger ones were revealed for Y47A headpiece. These results established the critical role of Y47 oxidation in modifying the structure and stability of the headpiece, and in reduction of the binding ability of the whole lactose repressor. PMID:22551504

  9. The Transcription Repressor REST in Adult Neurons: Physiology, Pathology, and Diseases1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Baldelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract REST [RE1-silencing transcription factor (also called neuron-restrictive silencer factor)] is known to repress thousands of possible target genes, many of which are neuron specific. To date, REST repression has been investigated mostly in stem cells and differentiating neurons. Current evidence demonstrates its importance in adult neurons as well. Low levels of REST, which are acquired during differentiation, govern the expression of specific neuronal phenotypes. REST-dependent genes encode important targets, including transcription factors, transmitter release proteins, voltage-dependent and receptor channels, and signaling proteins. Additional neuronal properties depend on miRNAs expressed reciprocally to REST and on specific splicing factors. In adult neurons, REST levels are not always low. Increases occur during aging in healthy humans. Moreover, extensive evidence demonstrates that prolonged stimulation with various agents induces REST increases, which are associated with the repression of neuron-specific genes with appropriate, intermediate REST binding affinity. Whether neuronal increases in REST are protective or detrimental remains a subject of debate. Examples of CA1 hippocampal neuron protection upon depolarization, and of neurodegeneration upon glutamate treatment and hypoxia have been reported. REST participation in psychiatric and neurological diseases has been shown, especially in Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease, as well as epilepsy. Distinct, complex roles of the repressor in these different diseases have emerged. In conclusion, REST is certainly very important in a large number of conditions. We suggest that the conflicting results reported for the role of REST in physiology, pathology, and disease depend on its complex, direct, and indirect actions on many gene targets and on the diverse approaches used during the investigations. PMID:26465007

  10. Flexibility in the inducer binding region is crucial for allostery in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2009-06-01

    Lactose repressor protein (LacI) utilizes an allosteric mechanism to regulate transcription in Escherichia coli, and the transition between inducer- and operator-bound states has been simulated by targeted molecular dynamics (TMD). The side chains of amino acids 149 and 193 interact and were predicted by TMD simulation to play a critical role in the early stages of the LacI conformational change. D149 contacts IPTG directly, and variations at this site provide the opportunity to dissect its role in inducer binding and signal transduction. Single mutants at D149 or S193 exhibit a minimal change in operator binding, and alterations in inducer binding parallel changes in operator release, indicating normal allosteric response. The observation that the double mutant D149A/S193A exhibits wild-type properties excludes the requirement for inter-residue hydrogen bond formation in the allosteric response. The double mutant D149C/S193C purified from cell extracts shows decreased sensitivity to inducer binding while retaining wild-type binding affinities and kinetic constants for both operator and inducer. By manipulating cysteine oxidation, we show that the more reduced state of D149C/S193C responds to inducer more like the wild-type protein, whereas the more oxidized state displays diminished inducer sensitivity. These features of D149C/S193C indicate that the novel disulfide bond formed in this mutant impedes the allosteric transition, consistent with the role of this region predicted by TMD simulation. Together, these results establish the requirement for flexibility in the spatial relationship between D149 and S193 rather than a specific D149-S193 interaction in the LacI allosteric response to inducer. PMID:19368358

  11. Regulation of Pyrimidine Biosynthetic Gene Expression in Bacteria: Repression without Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Turnbough, Charles L.; Switzer, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: DNA-binding repressor proteins that govern transcription initiation in response to end products generally regulate bacterial biosynthetic genes, but this is rarely true for the pyrimidine biosynthetic (pyr) genes. Instead, bacterial pyr gene regulation generally involves mechanisms that rely only on regulatory sequences embedded in the leader region of the operon, which cause premature transcription termination or translation inhibition in response to nucleotide signals. Studies with Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis pyr genes reveal a variety of regulatory mechanisms. Transcription attenuation via UTP-sensitive coupled transcription and translation regulates expression of the pyrBI and pyrE operons in enteric bacteria, whereas nucleotide effects on binding of the PyrR protein to pyr mRNA attenuation sites control pyr operon expression in most gram-positive bacteria. Nucleotide-sensitive reiterative transcription underlies regulation of other pyr genes. With the E. coli pyrBI, carAB, codBA, and upp-uraA operons, UTP-sensitive reiterative transcription within the initially transcribed region (ITR) leads to nonproductive transcription initiation. CTP-sensitive reiterative transcription in the pyrG ITRs of gram-positive bacteria, which involves the addition of G residues, results in the formation of an antiterminator RNA hairpin and suppression of transcription attenuation. Some mechanisms involve regulation of translation rather than transcription. Expression of the pyrC and pyrD operons of enteric bacteria is controlled by nucleotide-sensitive transcription start switching that produces transcripts with different potentials for translation. In Mycobacterium smegmatis and other bacteria, PyrR modulates translation of pyr genes by binding to their ribosome binding site. Evidence supporting these conclusions, generalizations for other bacteria, and prospects for future research are presented. PMID:18535147

  12. Investigation of Changes in Tetracycline Repressor Binding upon Mutations in the Tetracycline Operator

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The tetracycline operon is an important gene network component, commonly used in synthetic biology applications because of its switch-like character. At the heart of this system is the highly specific interaction of the tet repressor protein (TetR) with its cognate DNA sequence (tetO). TetR binding on tetO practically stops expression of genes downstream of tetO by excluding RNA polymerase from binding the promoter and initiating transcription. Mutating the tetO sequence alters the strength of TetR–tetO binding and thus provides a tool to synthetic biologists to manipulate gene expression levels. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the free energy perturbation method to investigate the binding affinity of TetR to different tetO mutants. We also carry out in vivo tests in Escherichia coli for a series of promoters based on these mutants. We obtain reasonable agreement between experimental green fluorescent protein (GFP) repression levels and binding free energy differences computed from molecular simulations. In all cases, the wild-type tetO sequence yields the strongest TetR binding, which is observed both experimentally, in terms of GFP levels, and in simulation, in terms of free energy changes. Two of the four tetO mutants we tested yield relatively strong binding, whereas the other two mutants tend to be significantly weaker. The clustering and relative ranking of this subset of tetO mutants is generally consistent between our own experimental data, previous experiments with different systems and the free energy changes computed from our simulations. Overall, this work offers insights into an important synthetic biological system and demonstrates the potential, as well as limitations of molecular simulations to quantitatively explain biologically relevant behavior. PMID:25308994

  13. Investigation of Changes in Tetracycline Repressor Binding upon Mutations in the Tetracycline Operator.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Volzing, Katherine; Vivcharuk, Victor; Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Srivastava, Poonam; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2014-10-01

    The tetracycline operon is an important gene network component, commonly used in synthetic biology applications because of its switch-like character. At the heart of this system is the highly specific interaction of the tet repressor protein (TetR) with its cognate DNA sequence (tetO). TetR binding on tetO practically stops expression of genes downstream of tetO by excluding RNA polymerase from binding the promoter and initiating transcription. Mutating the tetO sequence alters the strength of TetR-tetO binding and thus provides a tool to synthetic biologists to manipulate gene expression levels. We employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the free energy perturbation method to investigate the binding affinity of TetR to different tetO mutants. We also carry out in vivo tests in Escherichia coli for a series of promoters based on these mutants. We obtain reasonable agreement between experimental green fluorescent protein (GFP) repression levels and binding free energy differences computed from molecular simulations. In all cases, the wild-type tetO sequence yields the strongest TetR binding, which is observed both experimentally, in terms of GFP levels, and in simulation, in terms of free energy changes. Two of the four tetO mutants we tested yield relatively strong binding, whereas the other two mutants tend to be significantly weaker. The clustering and relative ranking of this subset of tetO mutants is generally consistent between our own experimental data, previous experiments with different systems and the free energy changes computed from our simulations. Overall, this work offers insights into an important synthetic biological system and demonstrates the potential, as well as limitations of molecular simulations to quantitatively explain biologically relevant behavior.

  14. Tcf7l2/Tcf4 Transcriptional Repressor Function Requires HDAC Activity in the Developing Vertebrate CNS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Matise, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functionally distinct neuronal subtypes within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) requires the precise regulation of progenitor gene expression in specific neuronal territories during early embryogenesis. Accumulating evidence has implicated histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins in cell specification, proliferation, and differentiation in diverse embryonic and adult tissues. However, although HDAC proteins have shown to be expressed in the developing vertebrate neural tube, their specific role in CNS neural progenitor fate specification remains unclear. Prior work from our lab showed that the Tcf7l2/Tcf4 transcription factor plays a key role in ventral progenitor lineage segregation by differential repression of two key specification factors, Nkx2.2 and Olig2. In this study, we found that administration of HDAC inhibitors (Valproic Acid (VPA), Trichostatin-A (TSA), or sodium butyrate) in chick embryos in ovo disrupted normal progenitor gene segregation in the developing neural tube, indicating that HDAC activity is required for this process. Further, using functional and pharmacological approaches in vivo, we found that HDAC activity is required for the differential repression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 by Tcf7l2/Tcf4. Finally, using dominant-negative functional assays, we provide evidence that Tcf7l2/Tcf4 repression also requires Gro/TLE/Grg co-repressor factors. Together, our data support a model where the transcriptional repressor activity of Tcf7l2/Tcf4 involves functional interactions with both HDAC and Gro/TLE/Grg co-factors at specific target gene regulatory elements in the developing neural tube, and that this activity is required for the proper segregation of the Nkx2.2 (p3) and Olig2 (pMN) expressing cells from a common progenitor pool. PMID:27668865

  15. Knockdown of a Zebrafish Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Repressor (AHRRa) Affects Expression of Genes Related to Photoreceptor Development and Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Jenny, Matthew J.; Hahn, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor (AHRR) is a transcriptional repressor of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and is regulated by an AHR-dependent mechanism. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) possess two AHRR paralogs; AHRRa regulates constitutive AHR signaling during development, whereas AHRRb regulates polyaromatic hydrocarbon-induced gene expression. However, little is known about the endogenous roles and targets of AHRRs. The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of AHRRs during zebrafish development using a loss-of-function approach followed by gene expression analysis. Zebrafish embryos were microinjected with morpholino oligonucleotides against AHRRa or AHRRb to knockdown AHRR protein expression. At 72 h postfertilization (hpf), microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 279 and 116 genes was altered by knockdown of AHRRa and AHRRb, respectively. In AHRRa-morphant embryos, 97 genes were up-regulated and 182 genes were down-regulated. Among the down-regulated genes were several related to photoreceptor function, including cone-specific genes such as several opsins (opn1sw1, opn1sw2, opn1mw1, and opn1lw2), phosphodiesterases (pde6H and pde6C), retinol binding protein (rbp4l), phosducin, and arrestins. Down-regulation was confirmed by RT-PCR and with samples from an independent experiment. The four genes tested (opn1sw1, pde6H, pde6C, and arr3b) were not inducible by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. AHRRa knockdown also caused up-regulation of embryonic hemoglobin (hbbe3), suggesting a role for AHRR in regulating hematopoiesis. Knockdown of AHRRb caused up-regulation of 31 genes and down-regulation of 85 genes, without enrichment for any specific biological process. Overall, these results suggest that AHRRs may have important roles in development, in addition to their roles in regulating xenobiotic signaling. PMID:24675095

  16. Crystal structure of omega transcriptional repressor encoded by Streptococcus pyogenes plasmid pSM19035 at 1.5 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Murayama, K; Orth, P; de la Hoz, A B; Alonso, J C; Saenger, W

    2001-12-01

    The 71 amino acid residue omega protein encoded by the Streptococcus pyogenes non-conjugative plasmid pSM19035 is a transcriptional repressor that regulates expression of genes for copy number control and stable maintenance of plasmids. The crystal structure of omega protein has been determined by multiple isomorphous replacement, including anomalous scattering and refined to an R-factor of 21.1 % (R(free)=23.2 %) at 1.5 A resolution. Two monomers related by a non-crystallographic 2-fold axis form a homodimer that occupies the asymmetric unit. Each polypeptide chain is folded into two alpha-helices and one beta-strand forming an antiparallel beta-ribbon in the homodimer. The N-terminal regions (1-23 and 1-22 in subunits I and II, respectively) are not defined in the electron density due to proteolysis of the N-terminal 20 amino acid residues during crystallisation and partial disorder. The omega protein belongs to the structural superfamily of MetJ/Arc repressors featuring a ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding motif with the beta-ribbon located in and recognizing the major groove of operator DNA; according to a modelled omega protein-DNA complex, residues Arg31 and Arg31' on the beta-ribbon are in positions to interact with a nucleobase, especially guanine. PMID:11733997

  17. In Vitro Analysis of Predicted DNA-Binding Sites for the Stl Repressor of the Staphylococcus aureus SaPIBov1 Pathogenicity Island

    PubMed Central

    Nyíri, Kinga; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation model of the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPIbov1 transfer was recently reported. The repressor protein Stl obstructs the expression of SaPI proteins Str and Xis, latter which is responsible for mobilization initiation. Upon Φ11 phage infection of S. aureus. phage dUTPase activates the SaPI transfer via Stl-dUTPase complex formation. Our aim was to predict the binding sites for the Stl repressor within the S. aureus pathogenicity island DNA sequence. We found that Stl was capable to bind to three 23-mer oligonucleotides, two of those constituting sequence segments in the stl-str, while the other corresponding to sequence segment within the str-xis intergenic region. Within these oligonucleotides, mutational analysis revealed that the predicted binding site for the Stl protein exists as a palindromic segment in both intergenic locations. The palindromes are built as 6-mer repeat sequences involved in Stl binding. The 6-mer repeats are separated by a 5 oligonucleotides long, nonspecific sequence. Future examination of the interaction between Stl and its binding sites in vivo will provide a molecular explanation for the mechanisms of gene repression and gene activation exerted simultaneously by the Stl protein in regulating transfer of the SaPIbov1 pathogenicity island in S. aureus. PMID:27388898

  18. Crystal structure of omega transcriptional repressor encoded by Streptococcus pyogenes plasmid pSM19035 at 1.5 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Murayama, K; Orth, P; de la Hoz, A B; Alonso, J C; Saenger, W

    2001-12-01

    The 71 amino acid residue omega protein encoded by the Streptococcus pyogenes non-conjugative plasmid pSM19035 is a transcriptional repressor that regulates expression of genes for copy number control and stable maintenance of plasmids. The crystal structure of omega protein has been determined by multiple isomorphous replacement, including anomalous scattering and refined to an R-factor of 21.1 % (R(free)=23.2 %) at 1.5 A resolution. Two monomers related by a non-crystallographic 2-fold axis form a homodimer that occupies the asymmetric unit. Each polypeptide chain is folded into two alpha-helices and one beta-strand forming an antiparallel beta-ribbon in the homodimer. The N-terminal regions (1-23 and 1-22 in subunits I and II, respectively) are not defined in the electron density due to proteolysis of the N-terminal 20 amino acid residues during crystallisation and partial disorder. The omega protein belongs to the structural superfamily of MetJ/Arc repressors featuring a ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding motif with the beta-ribbon located in and recognizing the major groove of operator DNA; according to a modelled omega protein-DNA complex, residues Arg31 and Arg31' on the beta-ribbon are in positions to interact with a nucleobase, especially guanine.

  19. The Transcription Factor AmrZ Utilizes Multiple DNA Binding Modes to Recognize Activator and Repressor Sequences of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, Edward E.; Waligora, Elizabeth A.; Xu, Binjie; Dellos-Nolan, Sheri; Wozniak, Daniel J.; Hollis, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    AmrZ, a member of the Ribbon-Helix-Helix family of DNA binding proteins, functions as both a transcriptional activator and repressor of multiple genes encoding Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors. The expression of these virulence factors leads to chronic and sustained infections associated with worsening prognosis. In this study, we present the X-ray crystal structure of AmrZ in complex with DNA containing the repressor site, amrZ1. Binding of AmrZ to this site leads to auto-repression. AmrZ binds this DNA sequence as a dimer-of-dimers, and makes specific base contacts to two half sites, separated by a five base pair linker region. Analysis of the linker region shows a narrowing of the minor groove, causing significant distortions. AmrZ binding assays utilizing sequences containing variations in this linker region reveals that secondary structure of the DNA, conferred by the sequence of this region, is an important determinant in binding affinity. The results from these experiments allow for the creation of a model where both intrinsic structure of the DNA and specific nucleotide recognition are absolutely necessary for binding of the protein. We also examined AmrZ binding to the algD promoter, which results in activation of the alginate exopolysaccharide biosynthetic operon, and found the protein utilizes different interactions with this site. Finally, we tested the in vivo effects of this differential binding by switching the AmrZ binding site at algD, where it acts as an activator, for a repressor binding sequence and show that differences in binding alone do not affect transcriptional regulation. PMID:22511872

  20. Crystal Structure of the lamda Repressor and a Model for Pairwise Cooperative Operator Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stayrook,S.; Jaru-Ampornpan, P.; Ni, J.; Hochschild, A.; Lewis, M.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteriophage {lambda} has for many years been a model system for understanding mechanisms of gene regulation1. A 'genetic switch' enables the phage to transition from lysogenic growth to lytic development when triggered by specific environmental conditions. The key component of the switch is the cI repressor, which binds to two sets of three operator sites on the chromosome that are separated by about 2,400 base pairs (bp)2, 3. A hallmark of the system is the pairwise cooperativity of repressor binding4. In the absence of detailed structural information, it has been difficult to understand fully how repressor molecules establish the cooperativity complex. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the intact cI repressor dimer bound to a DNA operator site. The structure of the repressor, determined by multiple isomorphous replacement methods, reveals an unusual overall architecture that allows it to adopt a conformation that appears to facilitate pairwise cooperative binding to adjacent operator sites.

  1. Opine catabolism and conjugal transfer of the nopaline Ti plasmid pTiC58 are coordinately regulated by a single repressor.

    PubMed

    Beck von Bodman, S; Hayman, G T; Farrand, S K

    1992-01-15

    The Ti plasmids of Agrobacterium tumefaciens are conjugal elements whose transfer is strongly repressed. Transfer is induced by the conjugal opines, a group of unique carbon compounds synthesized in crown gall tumors. The opines also induce Ti plasmid-encoded genes required by the bacteria for opine catabolism. We have cloned and sequenced a gene from the Ti plasmid pTiC58, whose product mediates the opine-dependent regulation of conjugal transfer and catabolism of the conjugal opines, agrocinopines A and B. The gene, accR, is closely linked to the agrocinopine catabolic locus. A spontaneous mutant Ti plasmid, pTiC58Trac, which constitutively expresses conjugal transfer and opine catabolism, was complemented in trans by a clone of wild-type accR. Comparative sequence analysis identified a 5-base-pair deletion close to the 5' end of the mutant accR allele from pTiC58Trac. Analysis of lacZ fusions in conjugal transfer and opine catabolic structural genes demonstrated that the accR-encoded function is a transcriptional repressor. accR can encode a 28-kDa protein. This protein is related to a class of repressor proteins that includes LacR, GutR, DeoR, FucR, and GlpR that regulate sugar catabolic systems in several bacterial genera. PMID:1731335

  2. Plasticity in Repressor-DNA Interactions Neutralizes Loss of Symmetry in Bipartite Operators.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepti; Narayanan, Naveen; Nair, Deepak T

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to gene regulation. Many transcription factors regulate multiple target genes and can bind sequences that do not conform strictly to the consensus. To understand the structural mechanism utilized by the transcription regulators to bind diverse target sequences, we have employed the repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis as a model system. AraR is known to bind to eight different operator sites in the bacterial genome. Although there are differences in the sequences of four of these operators, ORE1, ORX1, ORA1, and ORR3, the AraR-DNA binding domain (AraR-DBD) as well as full-length AraR unexpectedly binds to each of these sequences with similar affinities as measured by fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We have determined crystal structures of AraR-DBD in complex with two different natural operators ORE1 and ORX1 up to 2.07 and 1.97 Å resolution, respectively. These structures were compared with the previously reported structures of AraR-DBD bound to two other natural operators (ORA1 and ORR3). Interactions of two molecules of AraR-DBD with the symmetric operator, ORE1, are identical, but their interaction with the non-symmetric operator ORX1 results in breakdown of the symmetry in protein-DNA interactions. The novel interactions observed are accompanied by local conformational change in the DNA. ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data on other transcription factors has shown that they can bind to diverse targets, and hence the plasticity exhibited by AraR may be a general phenomenon. The ability of transcription factors to form alternate interactions may be important for employment in new functions and evolution of novel regulatory circuits.

  3. Role of Bound Zn(II) in the CadC Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II)-Responsive Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kandegedara, A.; Thiyagarajan, S; Kondapalli, K; Stemmler, T; Rosen, B

    2009-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 cadCA operon encodes a P-type ATPase, CadA, that confers resistance to Cd(II)/Pb(II)/Zn(II). Expression is regulated by CadC, a homodimeric repressor that dissociates from the cad operator/promoter upon binding of Cd(II), Pb(II), or Zn(II). CadC is a member of the ArsR/SmtB family of metalloregulatory proteins. The crystal structure of CadC shows two types of metal binding sites, termed Site 1 and Site 2, and the homodimer has two of each. Site 1 is the physiological inducer binding site. The two Site 2 metal binding sites are formed at the dimerization interface. Site 2 is not regulatory in CadC but is regulatory in the homologue SmtB. Here the role of each site was investigated by mutagenesis. Both sites bind either Cd(II) or Zn(II). However, Site 1 has higher affinity for Cd(II) over Zn(II), and Site 2 prefers Zn(II) over Cd(II). Site 2 is not required for either derepression or dimerization. The crystal structure of the wild type with bound Zn(II) and of a mutant lacking Site 2 was compared with the SmtB structure with and without bound Zn(II). We propose that an arginine residue allows for Zn(II) regulation in SmtB and, conversely, a glycine results in a lack of regulation by Zn(II) in CadC. We propose that a glycine residue was ancestral whether the repressor binds Zn(II) at a Site 2 like CadC or has no Site 2 like the paralogous ArsR and implies that acquisition of regulatory ability in SmtB was a more recent evolutionary event.

  4. Small RNAs endow a transcriptional activator with essential repressor functions for single-tier control of a global stress regulon.

    PubMed

    Gogol, Emily B; Rhodius, Virgil A; Papenfort, Kai; Vogel, Jörg; Gross, Carol A

    2011-08-01

    The Escherichia coli σ(E) envelope stress response monitors and repairs the outer membrane, a function central to the life of Gram-negative bacteria. The σ(E) stress response was characterized as a single-tier activation network comprised of ~100 genes, including the MicA and RybB noncoding sRNAs. These highly expressed sRNAs were thought to carry out the specialized function of halting de novo synthesis of several abundant porins when envelope homeostasis was perturbed. Using a systematic target profiling and validation approach we discovered that MicA and RybB are each global mRNA repressors of both distinct and shared targets, and that the two sRNAs constitute a posttranscriptional repression arm whose regulatory scope rivals that of the protein-based σ(E) activation arm. Intriguingly, porin mRNAs constitute only ~1/3 of all targets and new nonporin targets predict roles for MicA and RybB in crosstalk with other regulatory responses. This work also provides an example of evolutionarily unrelated sRNAs that are coinduced and bind the same targets, but at different sites. Our finding that expression of either MicA or RybB sRNA protects the cell from the loss of viability experienced when σ(E) activity is inadequate illustrates the importance of the posttranscriptional repression arm of the response. σ(E) is a paradigm of a single-tier stress response with a clear division of labor in which highly expressed noncoding RNAs (MicA, RybB) endow a transcriptional factor intrinsically restricted to gene activation (σ(E)) with the opposite repressor function. PMID:21768388

  5. Small RNAs endow a transcriptional activator with essential repressor functions for single-tier control of a global stress regulon

    PubMed Central

    Gogol, Emily B.; Rhodius, Virgil A.; Papenfort, Kai; Vogel, Jörg; Gross, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    The Escherichia coli σE envelope stress response monitors and repairs the outer membrane, a function central to the life of Gram-negative bacteria. The σE stress response was characterized as a single-tier activation network comprised of ∼100 genes, including the MicA and RybB noncoding sRNAs. These highly expressed sRNAs were thought to carry out the specialized function of halting de novo synthesis of several abundant porins when envelope homeostasis was perturbed. Using a systematic target profiling and validation approach we discovered that MicA and RybB are each global mRNA repressors of both distinct and shared targets, and that the two sRNAs constitute a posttranscriptional repression arm whose regulatory scope rivals that of the protein-based σE activation arm. Intriguingly, porin mRNAs constitute only ∼1/3 of all targets and new nonporin targets predict roles for MicA and RybB in crosstalk with other regulatory responses. This work also provides an example of evolutionarily unrelated sRNAs that are coinduced and bind the same targets, but at different sites. Our finding that expression of either MicA or RybB sRNA protects the cell from the loss of viability experienced when σE activity is inadequate illustrates the importance of the posttranscriptional repression arm of the response. σE is a paradigm of a single-tier stress response with a clear division of labor in which highly expressed noncoding RNAs (MicA, RybB) endow a transcriptional factor intrinsically restricted to gene activation (σE) with the opposite repressor function. PMID:21768388

  6. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway Is Controlled at Different Branches by a Set of R2R3-MYB C2 Repressors in Grapevine1

    PubMed Central

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  7. The phenylpropanoid pathway is controlled at different branches by a set of R2R3-MYB C2 repressors in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista

    2015-04-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  8. Identification of BRCA1 Deficiency Using Multi-Analyte Estimation of BRCA1 and Its Repressors in FFPE Tumor Samples from Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Korlimarla, Aruna; Prabhu, Jyothi S.; Remacle, Jose; Rajarajan, Savitha; Raja, Uma; C. E., Anupama; Srinath, B. S.; Manjunath, Suraj; K. S., Gopinath; Correa, Marjorrie; M. S. N., Prasad; Sridhar, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Apart from germ-line BRCA1-mutated breast cancers, a significant proportion of women with sporadic triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) sub-type are known to harbour varying levels of BRCA1-dysfuction. There is currently no established diagnostic method to identify these patients. Methods The analysis was performed on 183 primary breast cancer tumor specimens from our longitudinal case-series archived as formalin-fixed-paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks comprising 71 TNBCs and 112 Hormone receptor positive HER2 negative (HR+HER2-) tumors. Transcript levels of BRCA1 and two of its repressors ID4 and microRNA182 were determined by TaqMan quantitative PCR. BRCA1 protein was detected immunohistochemically with the MS110 antibody. Results The representation of BRCA1 and its repressor ID4 as a ratio led to improved separation of TNBCs from HR+HER2- compared to either measure by itself. We then dichotomised the continuous distribution of each of the three measurements (Protein, MIRNA and transcript:repressor ratio) into categories of deficient (0) and adequate (1). A composite BRCA1 Deficiency Score (BDS) was computed by the addition of the score for all three measures. Samples deficient on 2 or more measures were deemed to be BRCA1 deficient; and 40% of all TNBCs met this criterion. Conclusion We propose here a simple multi-level assay of BRCA1 deficiency using the BRCA1:ID4 ratio as a critical parameter that can be performed on FFPE samples in clinical laboratories by the estimation of only 3 bio-markers. The ease of testing will hopefully encourage adoption and clinical validation. PMID:27077368

  9. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway by inorganic arsenic in human hepatocytes and the role of transcriptional repressor Bach1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Duan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Dandan; Bai, Caijun; Li, Xin; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have proved that the environmental toxicant, inorganic arsenic, activates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in many different cell types. This study tried to explore the hepatic Nrf2 pathway upon arsenic treatment comprehensively, since liver is one of the major target organs of arsenical toxicity. Our results showed that inorganic arsenic significantly induced Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in Chang human hepatocytes. We also observed a dose-dependent increase of antioxidant response element- (ARE-) luciferase activity. Both the mRNA and protein levels of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were all upregulated dramatically. On the other hand, entry and accumulation of Nrf2 protein in the nucleus, while exportting the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) from nucleus to cytoplasm, were also confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Our results therefore confirmed the arsenic-induced Nrf2 pathway activation in hepatocytes and also suggested that the translocation of Bach1 was associated with the regulation of Nrf2 pathway by arsenic. Hepatic Nrf2 pathway plays indispensable roles for cellular defenses against arsenic hepatotoxicity, and the interplay of Bach1 and Nrf2 may be helpful to understand the self-defensive responses and the diverse biological effects of arsenicals.

  10. Functional impact of polar and acidic substitutions in the lactose repressor hydrophobic monomer.monomer interface with a buried lysine.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hongli; Sun, Zhifei; Matthews, Kathleen Shive

    2009-02-17

    Despite predicted energetic penalties, the charged K84 side chains of tetrameric lactose repressor protein (LacI) are found buried within the highly hydrophobic monomer.monomer interface that includes side chains of V94 and V96. Once inducer binding has occurred, these K84 side chains move to interact with the more solvent-exposed side chains of D88 and E100'. Previous studies demonstrated that hydrophobic substitutions for K84 increased protein stability and significantly impaired the allosteric response. These results indicated that enhanced hydrophobic interactions at the monomer.monomer interface remove the energetic driving force of the buried charges, decreasing the likelihood of a robust conformational change and stabilizing the structure. We hypothesized that creating a salt bridge network with the lysine side chains by including nearby negatively charged residues might result in a similar outcome. To that end, acidic residues, D and E, and their neutral amides, N and Q, were substituted for the valines at positions 94 and 96. These variants exhibited one or more of the following functional changes: weakened inducer binding, impaired allosteric response, and diminished protein stability. For V96D and V96E, ion pair formation with K84 appears optimal, and the loss of inducer response exceeds that of the hydrophobic K84A and -L variants. However, impacts on functional properties indicate that stabilizing the buried positive charge with polar or ion pair interactions is not functionally equivalent to structural stabilization via hydrophobic enhancement. PMID:19166325

  11. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway by inorganic arsenic in human hepatocytes and the role of transcriptional repressor Bach1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Duan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Dandan; Bai, Caijun; Li, Xin; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have proved that the environmental toxicant, inorganic arsenic, activates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in many different cell types. This study tried to explore the hepatic Nrf2 pathway upon arsenic treatment comprehensively, since liver is one of the major target organs of arsenical toxicity. Our results showed that inorganic arsenic significantly induced Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in Chang human hepatocytes. We also observed a dose-dependent increase of antioxidant response element- (ARE-) luciferase activity. Both the mRNA and protein levels of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were all upregulated dramatically. On the other hand, entry and accumulation of Nrf2 protein in the nucleus, while exportting the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) from nucleus to cytoplasm, were also confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Our results therefore confirmed the arsenic-induced Nrf2 pathway activation in hepatocytes and also suggested that the translocation of Bach1 was associated with the regulation of Nrf2 pathway by arsenic. Hepatic Nrf2 pathway plays indispensable roles for cellular defenses against arsenic hepatotoxicity, and the interplay of Bach1 and Nrf2 may be helpful to understand the self-defensive responses and the diverse biological effects of arsenicals. PMID:23738048

  12. Contributions of a hydrogen bond/salt bridge network to the stability of secondary and tertiary structure in lambda repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Marqusee, S.; Sauer, R. T.

    1994-01-01

    In the N-terminal domain of lambda repressor, the Asp 14 side chain forms an intrahelical, hydrogen bond/salt bridge with the Arg 17 side chain and a tertiary hydrogen bond with the Ser 77 side chain. By measuring the stabilities to urea denaturation of the wild-type N-terminal domain and variants containing single, double, and triple alanine substitutions at positions 14, 17, and 77, the side-chain interaction energies, the coupling energy between interactions, and the intrinsic effects of each wild-type side chain on protein stability have been estimated. These studies indicate that the Asp 14-Arg 17 and Asp 14-Ser 77 interactions are stabilizing by roughly 0.8 and 1.5 kcal/mol, respectively, but that Asp 14, by itself, is destabilizing by roughly 0.9 kcal/mol. We also show that a peptide model of alpha-helix 1, which contains Asp 14 and Arg 17, forms a reasonably stable, monomeric helix in solution and responds to alanine mutations at positions 14 and 17 in the fashion expected from the intact protein studies. These studies suggest that it is possible to view the stability effects of mutations in intact proteins in a hierarchical fashion, with the stability of units of secondary structure being distinguishable from the stability of tertiary structure. PMID:7756981

  13. The Hinge Region Strengthens the Nonspecific Interaction between Lac-Repressor and DNA: A Computer Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lili; Tabaka, Marcin; Hou, Sen; Li, Lin; Burdzy, Krzysztof; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Maffeo, Christopher; Zhang, Xuzhu; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    LacI is commonly used as a model to study the protein-DNA interaction and gene regulation. The headpiece of the lac-repressor (LacI) protein is an ideal system for investigation of nonspecific binding of the whole LacI protein to DNA. The hinge region of the headpiece has been known to play a key role in the specific binding of LacI to DNA, whereas its role in nonspecific binding process has not been elucidated. Here, we report the results of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation and continuum electrostatic calculations suggesting that the hinge region strengthens the nonspecific interaction, accounting for up to 50% of the micro-dissociation free energy of LacI from DNA. Consequently, the rate of microscopic dissociation of LacI from DNA is reduced by 2~3 orders of magnitude in the absence of the hinge region. We find the hinge region makes an important contribution to the electrostatic energy, the salt dependence of electrostatic energy, and the number of salt ions excluded from binding of the LacI-DNA complex. PMID:27008630

  14. Activation of the Nrf2 Pathway by Inorganic Arsenic in Human Hepatocytes and the Role of Transcriptional Repressor Bach1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Duan, Xiaoxu; Dong, Dandan; Bai, Caijun; Li, Xin; Sun, Guifan; Li, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have proved that the environmental toxicant, inorganic arsenic, activates nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway in many different cell types. This study tried to explore the hepatic Nrf2 pathway upon arsenic treatment comprehensively, since liver is one of the major target organs of arsenical toxicity. Our results showed that inorganic arsenic significantly induced Nrf2 protein and mRNA expression in Chang human hepatocytes. We also observed a dose-dependent increase of antioxidant response element- (ARE-) luciferase activity. Both the mRNA and protein levels of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were all upregulated dramatically. On the other hand, entry and accumulation of Nrf2 protein in the nucleus, while exportting the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) from nucleus to cytoplasm, were also confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence assay. Our results therefore confirmed the arsenic-induced Nrf2 pathway activation in hepatocytes and also suggested that the translocation of Bach1 was associated with the regulation of Nrf2 pathway by arsenic. Hepatic Nrf2 pathway plays indispensable roles for cellular defenses against arsenic hepatotoxicity, and the interplay of Bach1 and Nrf2 may be helpful to understand the self-defensive responses and the diverse biological effects of arsenicals. PMID:23738048

  15. Effect of plasmid copy number and lac operator sequence on antibiotic-free plasmid selection by operator-repressor titration in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cranenburgh, Rocky M; Lewis, Kathryn S; Hanak, Julian A J

    2004-01-01

    The Escherichia coli strain DH1lacdapD enables plasmid selection and maintenance that is free from antibiotics and selectable marker genes. This is achieved by using only the lac operator sequence as a selectable element. This strain is currently used to generate high copy number plasmids with no antibiotic resistance genes for use as DNA vaccines and for expression of recombinant proteins. Until now these have been limited to pUC-based plasmids containing a high copy number pMB1-derived origin of replication, and the principle lacO(1) and auxiliary lacO(3) operators. In this study we have shown that this system can also be used to select and maintain pBR322-based plasmids with the lower copy number pMB1 origin of replication, and that lacO(1) alone or a palindromic version of lacO(1) can provide a sufficient level of repressor titration for plasmid selection. This is advantageous for recombinant protein production, where low copy number plasmids are often used and plasmid maintenance is important. The degree of repressor titration due to these plasmids was measured using the natural lactose operon in E. coli DH1 as a model. PMID:15383717

  16. Light-induced carotenogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus: evidence that CarS acts as an anti-repressor of CarA.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, D E; Hodgson, D A

    2001-11-01

    In the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus, carotenoids are produced in response to illumination, as a result of expression of the crt carotenoid biosynthesis genes. The majority of crt genes are clustered in the crtEBDC operon, which is repressed in the dark by CarA. Genetic data suggest that, in the light, CarS is synthesized and achieves activation of the crtEBDC operon by removing the repressive action of CarA. As CarS contains no known DNA-binding motif, the relief of CarA-mediated repression was postulated to result from a direct interaction between these two proteins. Use of the yeast two-hybrid system demonstrated direct interaction between CarA and CarS. The two-hybrid system also implied that CarA and, possibly, CarS are capable of homodimerization. Direct evidence for CarS anti-repressor action was provided in vitro. A glutathione S-transferase (GST)-CarA protein fusion was shown to bind specifically to a palindromic operator sequence within the crtEBDC promoter. CarA was prevented from binding to its operator, and prebound CarA was removed by the addition of purified CarS. CarS is therefore an anti-repressor.

  17. In vitro transcription accurately predicts lac repressor phenotype in vivo in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A multitude of studies have looked at the in vivo and in vitro behavior of the lac repressor binding to DNA and effector molecules in order to study transcriptional repression, however these studies are not always reconcilable. Here we use in vitro transcription to directly mimic the in vivo system in order to build a self consistent set of experiments to directly compare in vivo and in vitro genetic repression. A thermodynamic model of the lac repressor binding to operator DNA and effector is used to link DNA occupancy to either normalized in vitro mRNA product or normalized in vivo fluorescence of a regulated gene, YFP. An accurate measurement of repressor, DNA and effector concentrations were made both in vivo and in vitro allowing for direct modeling of the entire thermodynamic equilibrium. In vivo repression profiles are accurately predicted from the given in vitro parameters when molecular crowding is considered. Interestingly, our measured repressor–operator DNA affinity differs significantly from previous in vitro measurements. The literature values are unable to replicate in vivo binding data. We therefore conclude that the repressor-DNA affinity is much weaker than previously thought. This finding would suggest that in vitro techniques that are specifically designed to mimic the in vivo process may be necessary to replicate the native system. PMID:25097824

  18. Dynamical behavior of the activator-repressor circuit model under random fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Kwan; Cinar, Ali; Duan, Jinqiao

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible impact of uncertainty on dynamical evolution of an activator-repressor circuit model, for some gene regulatory networks. Escape probability and mean residence time are computed in order to gain insights on the role played by random fluctuations. Some changes or bifurcations in mean residence time are also observed when key model parameters vary.

  19. Effects of Task Familiarity on Stress Responses of Repressors and Sensitizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagano, Don F.

    1973-01-01

    R.S. Lazarus's theory of coping was used to investigate appraisal and reappraisal of threat in repressors and sensitizers. Two indexes of stress, self-report ratings of affect and palmar skin conductance, were measured prior to performance on a reaction time task, after one-third of the task was completed and after two-thirds of the task was…

  20. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  1. Probing the role of water in the tryptophan repressor-operator complex.

    PubMed

    Brown, M P; Grillo, A O; Boyer, M; Royer, C A

    1999-06-01

    The Escherichia coli tryptophan repressor protein (TR) represses the transcription of several genes in response to the concentration of tryptophan in the environment. In the co-crystal structure of TR bound to a DNA fragment containing its target very few direct contacts between TR and the DNA were observed. In contrast, a number of solvent mediated contacts were apparent. NMR solution structures, however, did not resolve any solvent mediated bonds at the complex interface. To probe for the role of water in TR operator recognition, the effect of osmolytes on the interactions between TR and a target oligonucleotide bearing the operator site was examined. In the absence of specific solvent mediated hydrogen bonding interactions between the protein and the DNA, increasing osmolyte concentration is expected to strongly stabilize the TR operator interaction due to the large amount of macromolecular surface area buried upon complexation. The results of our studies indicate that xylose did not alter the binding affinity significantly, while glycerol and PEG had a small stabilizing effect. A study of binding as a function of betaine concentration revealed that this osmolyte at low concentration results in a stabilization of the 1:1 TR/operator complex, but at higher concentrations leads to a switching between binding modes to favor tandem binding. Analysis of the effects of betaine on the 1:1 complex suggest that this osmolyte has about 78% of the expected effect. If one accepts the analysis in terms of the number of water molecules excluded upon complexation, these results suggest that about 75 water molecules remain at the interface of the 1:1 dimer/DNA complex. This value is consistent with the number of water molecules found at the interface in the crystallographically determined structure and supports the notion that interfacial waters play an important thermodynamic role in the specific complexation of one TR dimer with its target DNA. However, the complexity of the

  2. Candida albicans Hap43 Is a Repressor Induced under Low-Iron Conditions and Is Essential for Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Regulation and Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Po-Chen; Yang, Cheng-Yao; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that exists as normal flora in healthy human bodies but causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. In addition to innate and adaptive immunities, hosts also resist microbial infections by developing a mechanism of “natural resistance” that maintains a low level of free iron to restrict the growth of invading pathogens. C. albicans must overcome this iron-deprived environment to cause infections. There are three types of iron-responsive transcriptional regulators in fungi; Aft1/Aft2 activators in yeast, GATA-type repressors in many fungi, and HapX/Php4 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Aspergillus species. In this study, we characterized the iron-responsive regulator Hap43, which is the C. albicans homolog of HapX/Php4 and is repressed by the GATA-type repressor Sfu1 under iron-sufficient conditions. We provide evidence that Hap43 is essential for the growth of C. albicans under low-iron conditions and for C. albicans virulence in a mouse model of infection. Hap43 was not required for iron acquisition under low-iron conditions. Instead, it was responsible for repression of genes that encode iron-dependent proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We also demonstrated that Hap43 executes its function by becoming a transcriptional repressor and accumulating in the nucleus in response to iron deprivation. Finally, we found a connection between Hap43 and the global corepressor Tup1 in low-iron-induced flavinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a complex interplay among Hap43, Sfu1, and Tup1 to coordinately regulate iron acquisition, iron utilization, and other iron-responsive metabolic activities. PMID:21131439

  3. Noncanonical DNA-binding mode of repressor and its disassembly by antirepressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsik; Kim, Hee Jung; Son, Sang Hyeon; Yoon, Hye Jin; Lim, Youngbin; Lee, Jong Woo; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Kim, Seong Keun; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding repressors are involved in transcriptional repression in many organisms. Disabling a repressor is a crucial step in activating expression of desired genes. Thus, several mechanisms have been identified for the removal of a stably bound repressor (Rep) from the operator. Here, we describe an uncharacterized mechanism of noncanonical DNA binding and induction by a Rep from the temperate Salmonella phage SPC32H; this mechanism was revealed using the crystal structures of homotetrameric Rep (92–198) and a hetero-octameric complex between the Rep and its antirepressor (Ant). The canonical method of inactivating a repressor is through the competitive binding of the antirepressor to the operator-binding site of the repressor; however, these studies revealed several noncanonical features. First, Ant does not compete for the DNA-binding region of Rep. Instead, the tetrameric Ant binds to the C-terminal domains of two asymmetric Rep dimers. Simultaneously, Ant facilitates the binding of the Rep N-terminal domains to Ant, resulting in the release of two Rep dimers from the bound DNA. Second, the dimer pairs of the N-terminal DNA-binding domains originate from different dimers of a Rep tetramer (trans model). This situation is different from that of other canonical Reps, in which two N-terminal DNA-binding domains from the same dimeric unit form a dimer upon DNA binding (cis model). On the basis of these observations, we propose a noncanonical model for the reversible inactivation of a Rep by an Ant. PMID:27099293

  4. A new binding motif for the transcriptional repressor REST uncovers large gene networks devoted to neuronal functions.

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefanie J; McCorkle, Sean R; Hover, John; Conaco, Cecilia; Han, Jong-Jin; Impey, Soren; Yochum, Gregory S; Dunn, John J; Goodman, Richard H; Mandel, Gail

    2007-06-20

    The repressor element 1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor (REST) helps preserve the identity of nervous tissue by silencing neuronal genes in non-neural tissues. Moreover, in an epithelial model of tumorigenesis, loss of REST function is associated with loss of adhesion, suggesting the aberrant expression of REST-controlled genes encoding this property. To date, no adhesion molecules under REST control have been identified. Here, we used serial analysis of chromatin occupancy to perform genome-wide identification of REST-occupied target sequences (RE1 sites) in a kidney cell line. We discovered novel REST-binding motifs and found that the number of RE1 sites far exceeded previous estimates. A large family of targets encoding adhesion proteins was identified, as were genes encoding signature proteins of neuroendocrine tumors. Unexpectedly, genes considered exclusively non-neuronal also contained an RE1 motif and were expressed in neurons. This supports the model that REST binding is a critical determinant of neuronal phenotype.

  5. Multifunctional repressor KorB can block transcription by preventing isomerization of RNA polymerase-promoter complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, D R; Motallebi-Veshareh, M; Thomas, C M

    1993-01-01

    The KorB protein of broad-host-range plasmid RK2 is a transcriptional repressor involved in the control of genes for plasmid replication, conjugative transfer and stable maintenance. We have purified this protein close to homogeneity from cells harbouring an overexpression vector with the korB gene under the control of the tac promoter. KorB binds to restriction fragments bearing its proposed operator sequence, OB. Its interaction with this palindromic site was confirmed by DNaseI or hydroxyl radical footprinting at two OB sequences from RK2. Comparisons showed that the OB context affects the nature of the footprint. Our evidence suggests that KorB is a tetramer. As such, it may be able to bind two sites simultaneously on the same or on different DNA molecules. Using the korABF promoter, which is subject to KorB repression, we demonstrate by footprinting and restriction protection that KorB and RNA polymerase can bind simultaneously. Permanganate footprinting showed that KorB represses this promoter by preventing isomerization of the RNA polymerase-promoter complex from the closed to open form. Images PMID:8464698

  6. The BEN domain is a novel sequence-specific DNA-binding domain conserved in neural transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Serganov, Artem A.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Lai, Eric C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that Drosophila Insensitive (Insv) promotes sensory organ development and has activity as a nuclear corepressor for the Notch transcription factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)]. Insv lacks domains of known biochemical function but contains a single BEN domain (i.e., a “BEN-solo” protein). Our chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis confirmed binding of Insensitive to Su(H) target genes in the Enhancer of split gene complex [E(spl)-C]; however, de novo motif analysis revealed a novel site strongly enriched in Insv peaks (TCYAATHRGAA). We validate binding of endogenous Insv to genomic regions bearing such sites, whose associated genes are enriched for neural functions and are functionally repressed by Insv. Unexpectedly, we found that the Insv BEN domain binds specifically to this sequence motif and that Insv directly regulates transcription via this motif. We determined the crystal structure of the BEN–DNA target complex, revealing homodimeric binding of the BEN domain and extensive nucleotide contacts via α helices and a C-terminal loop. Point mutations in key DNA-contacting residues severely impair DNA binding in vitro and capacity for transcriptional regulation in vivo. We further demonstrate DNA-binding and repression activities by the mammalian neural BEN-solo protein BEND5. Altogether, we define novel DNA-binding activity in a conserved family of transcriptional repressors, opening a molecular window on this extensive gene family. PMID:23468431

  7. Conformational and thermodynamic hallmarks of DNA operator site specificity in the copper sensitive operon repressor from Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benedict G; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2014-01-01

    Metal ion homeostasis in bacteria relies on metalloregulatory proteins to upregulate metal resistance genes and enable the organism to preclude metal toxicity. The copper sensitive operon repressor (CsoR) family is widely distributed in bacteria and controls the expression of copper efflux systems. CsoR operator sites consist of G-tract containing pseudopalindromes of which the mechanism of operator binding is poorly understood. Here, we use a structurally characterized CsoR from Streptomyces lividans (CsoR(Sl)) together with three specific operator targets to reveal the salient features pertaining to the mechanism of DNA binding. We reveal that CsoR(Sl) binds to its operator site through a 2-fold axis of symmetry centred on a conserved 5'-TAC/GTA-3' inverted repeat. Operator recognition is stringently dependent not only on electropositive residues but also on a conserved polar glutamine residue. Thermodynamic and circular dichroic signatures of the CsoR(Sl)-DNA interaction suggest selectivity towards the A-DNA-like topology of the G-tracts at the operator site. Such properties are enhanced on protein binding thus enabling the symmetrical binding of two CsoR(Sl) tetramers. Finally, differential binding modes may exist in operator sites having more than one 5'-TAC/GTA-3' inverted repeat with implications in vivo for a mechanism of modular control.

  8. Holocarboxylase synthetase acts as a biotin-independent transcriptional repressor interacting with HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC7.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Gonzalez, Isis; Cervantes-Roldan, Rafael; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Michalak, Colette; Reyes-Carmona, Sandra; Barrios-Garcia, Tonatiuh; Meneses-Morales, Ivan; Leon-Del-Rio, Alfonso

    2014-03-01

    In human cells, HCS catalyzes the biotinylation of biotin-dependent carboxylases and mediates the transcriptional control of genes involved in biotin metabolism through the activation of a cGMP-dependent signal transduction pathway. HCS also targets to the cell nucleus in association with lamin-B suggesting additional gene regulatory functions. Studies from our laboratory in Drosophila melanogaster showed that nuclear HCS is associated with heterochromatin bands enriched with the transcriptionally repressive mark histone 3 trimethylated at lysine 9. Further, HCS was shown to be recruited to the core promoter of the transcriptionally inactive hsp70 gene suggesting that it may participate in the repression of gene expression, although the mechanism involved remained elusive. In this work, we expressed HCS as a fusion protein with the DNA-binding domain of GAL4 to evaluate its effect on the transcription of a luciferase reporter gene. We show that HCS possesses transcriptional repressor activity in HepG2 cells. The transcriptional function of HCS was shown by in vitro pull down and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation assays to depend on its interaction with the histone deacetylases HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC7. We show further that HCS interaction with HDACs and its function in transcriptional repression is not affected by mutations impairing its biotin-ligase activity. We propose that nuclear HCS mediates events of transcriptional repression through a biotin-independent mechanism that involves its interaction with chromatin-modifying protein complexes that include histone deacetylases.

  9. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Kateřina; Cermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Rezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector L-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The L-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K(d) value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of L-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  10. Altering residues N125 and D149 impacts sugar effector binding and allosteric parameters in Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Liu, Shirley; Chen, Mingzhi; Ma, Jianpeng; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2011-10-25

    Lactose repressor protein (LacI), a negative transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli, relies on an allosteric conformational change for its function. The LacI effector isopropyl-β,D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) promotes this allosteric response and engages the side chains of residues N125 and D149 based on the crystallographic structure of LacI·IPTG. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations have indicated involvement of these side chains during the protein structural changes in response to inducer binding. To examine this region further, we applied stochastic boundary molecular dynamics (SBMD) simulation and identified a transient interaction between residues N125 and D149. On the basis of these data, we introduced substitutions for either/both residues and analyzed their impact on protein function. The substitutions utilized were alanine to preclude hydrogen bonding or cysteine to allow disulfide bond formation, which was not observed for N125C/D149C. Minimal impacts were observed on operator affinity for all substitutions, but D149C, N125A/D149A, and N125C/D149C bound to IPTG with 5-8-fold lower affinity than wild-type LacI, and exhibited decreased allosteric amplitude (K(RI/O)/K(R/O)). Of interest, the double mutants did not exhibit an allosteric response to an alternate inducer, 2-phenylethyl-β,D-galactoside (PhEG), despite demonstration of PhEG binding. Further, the presence of the anti-inducer, o-nitrophenyl-β,D-fucoside (ONPF), enhanced operator affinity for wild-type LacI and all other mutant proteins examined, but behaved as an inducer for N125A/D149A, decreasing operator binding affinity. These results confirm the role of residues 125 and 149 in ligand binding and allosteric response and illustrate how readily the function of a regulatory protein can be altered. PMID:21928765

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of BigR, a transcription repressor from Xylella fastidiosa involved in biofilm formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Rosicler Lázaro; Rinaldi, Fábio Cupri; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. BigR (biofilm growth-associated repressor) is a novel repressor protein that regulates the transcription of an operon implicated in biofilm growth in both Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This protein binds to a palindromic TA-rich element located in the promoter of the BigR operon and strongly represses transcription of the operon. BigR contains a helix–turn–helix (HTH) domain that is found in some members of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, which control metal resistance in bacteria. Although functional studies have suggested that BigR does not act as a metal sensor, the presence of two cysteines and a methionine in its primary structure raised the possibility of BigR being a metal-ligand protein. In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and SeMet crystals to resolutions of 1.95 and 2.2 Å, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group P321 and contain one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  12. The basic helix-loop-helix region of the transcriptional repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 is preorganized to bind DNA.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Matija; Wienk, Hans; Coglievina, Maristella; Boelens, Rolf; Pongor, Sándor; Pintar, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1, one of the main downstream effectors in Notch signaling, is a transcriptional repressor of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family. Using nuclear magnetic resonance methods, we have determined the structure and dynamics of a recombinant protein, H1H, which includes an N-terminal segment, b1, containing functionally important phosphorylation sites, the basic region b2, required for binding to DNA, and the HLH domain. We show that a proline residue in the sequence divides the protein in two parts, a flexible and disordered N-terminal region including b1 and a structured, mainly helical region comprising b2 and the HLH domain. Binding of H1H to a double strand DNA oligonucleotide was monitored through the chemical shift perturbation of backbone amide resonances, and showed that the interaction surface involves not only the b2 segment but also several residues in the b1 and HLH regions.

  13. Conservation of the LexA repressor binding site in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Feroz; Singh, S P; Mishra, B N

    2008-01-01

    The LexA protein is a transcriptional repressor of the bacterial SOS DNA repair system, which comprises a set of DNA repair and cellular survival genes that are induced in response to DNA damage. Its varied DNA binding motifs have been characterized and reported in the Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, rhizobia family members, marine magnetotactic bacterium, Salmonella typhimurium and recently in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and this motifs information has been used in our theoretical analysis to detect its novel regulated genes in radio-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans genome. This bacterium showed presence of SOS-box like consensus sequence in the upstream sequences of 3166 genes with >60% motif score similarity percentage (MSSP) on both strands. Attempts to identify LexA-binding sites and the composition of the putative SOS regulon in D. radiodurans have been unsuccessful so far. To resolve the problem we performed theoretical analysis with modifications on reported data set of genes related to DNA repair (61 genes), stress response (145 genes) and some unusual predicted operons (21 clusters). Expression of some of the predicted SOS-box regulated operon members then was examined through the previously reported microarray data which confirm the expression of only single predicted operon i.e. DRB0143 (AAA superfamily NTPase related to 5-methylcytosine specific restriction enzyme subunit McrB) and DRB0144 (homolog of the McrC subunit of the McrBC restriction modification system). The methodology involved weight matrix construction through CONSENSUS algorithm using information of conserved upstream sequences of eight known genes including dinB, tagC, lexA, recA, uvrB, yneA of B. subtilis while lexA and recA of D. radiodurans through phylogenetic footprinting method and later detection of similar conserved SOS-box like LexA binding motifs through both RSAT & PoSSuMsearch programs. The resultant DNA consensus sequence had highly conserved 14 bp SOS-box like binding

  14. The TIE1 transcriptional repressor links TCP transcription factors with TOPLESS/TOPLESS-RELATED corepressors and modulates leaf development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qing; Guo, Dongshu; Wei, Baoye; Zhang, Fan; Pang, Changxu; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Jinzhe; Wei, Tong; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia; Qin, Genji

    2013-02-01

    Leaf size and shape are mainly determined by coordinated cell division and differentiation in lamina. The CINCINNATA (CIN)-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors are key regulators of leaf development. However, the mechanisms that control TCP activities during leaf development are largely unknown. We identified the TCP Interactor containing EAR motif protein1 (TIE1), a novel transcriptional repressor, as a major modulator of TCP activities during leaf development. Overexpression of TIE1 leads to hyponastic and serrated leaves, whereas disruption of TIE1 causes epinastic leaves. TIE1 is expressed in young leaves and encodes a transcriptional repressor containing a C-terminal EAR motif, which mediates interactions with the TOPLESS (TPL)/TOPLESS-RELATED (TPR) corepressors. In addition, TIE1 physically interacts with CIN-like TCPs. We propose that TIE1 regulates leaf size and morphology by inhibiting the activities of TCPs through recruiting the TPL/TPR corepressors to form a tertiary complex at early stages of leaf development.

  15. RflM functions as a transcriptional repressor in the autogenous control of the Salmonella Flagellar master operon flhDC.

    PubMed

    Singer, Hanna M; Erhardt, Marc; Hughes, Kelly T

    2013-09-01

    Motility of bacteria like Salmonella enterica is a highly regulated process that responds to a variety of internal and external stimuli. A hierarchy of three promoter classes characterizes the Salmonella flagellar system, and the onset of flagellar gene expression depends on the oligomeric regulatory complex and class 1 gene product FlhD(4)C(2). The flhDC promoter is a target for a broad range of transcriptional regulators that bind within the flhDC promoter region and either negatively or positively regulate flhDC operon transcription. In this work, we demonstrate that the RflM protein is a key component of flhDC regulation. Transposon mutagenesis was performed to investigate a previously described autoinhibitory effect of the flagellar master regulatory complex FlhD(4)C(2). RflM is a LuxR homolog that functions as a flagellar class 1 transcriptional repressor. RflM was found to be the negative regulator of flhDC expression that is responsible for the formerly described autoinhibitory effect of the FlhD(4)C(2) complex on flhDC operon transcription (K. Kutsukake, Mol. Gen. Genet. 254:440-448, 1997). We conclude that upon commencement of flagellar gene expression, the FlhD(4)C(2) complex initiates a regulatory feedback loop by activating rflM gene expression. rflM encodes a transcriptional repressor, RflM, which fine-tunes flhDC expression levels.

  16. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 are new targets of JAZ repressors negatively regulating JA responses.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Sandra; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Fernández, Guillermo M; Díez-Díaz, Monica; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; López-Vidriero, Irene; Godoy, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Van Leene, Jelle; De Jaeger, Geert; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Cell reprogramming in response to jasmonates requires a tight control of transcription that is achieved by the activity of JA-related transcription factors (TFs). Among them, MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 have been described as activators of JA responses. Here we characterized the function of bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 that conform a phylogenetic clade closely related to MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4. We found that these bHLHs form homo- and heterodimers and also interact with JAZ repressors in vitro and in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of JA-regulated processes, including root and rosette growth, anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll loss and resistance to Pseudomonas syringae, on mutants and overexpression lines, suggested that these bHLHs are repressors of JA responses. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 are mainly nuclear proteins and bind DNA with similar specificity to that of MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4, but lack a conserved activation domain, suggesting that repression is achieved by competition for the same cis-regulatory elements. Moreover, expression of bHLH017 is induced by JA and depends on MYC2, suggesting a negative feed-back regulation of the activity of positive JA-related TFs. Our results suggest that the competition between positive and negative TFs determines the output of JA-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:24465948

  17. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 Are New Targets of JAZ Repressors Negatively Regulating JA Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Sandra; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Fernández, Guillermo M.; Díez-Díaz, Monica; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; López-Vidriero, Irene; Godoy, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Van Leene, Jelle; De Jaeger, Geert; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Cell reprogramming in response to jasmonates requires a tight control of transcription that is achieved by the activity of JA-related transcription factors (TFs). Among them, MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 have been described as activators of JA responses. Here we characterized the function of bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 that conform a phylogenetic clade closely related to MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4. We found that these bHLHs form homo- and heterodimers and also interact with JAZ repressors in vitro and in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of JA-regulated processes, including root and rosette growth, anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll loss and resistance to Pseudomonas syringae, on mutants and overexpression lines, suggested that these bHLHs are repressors of JA responses. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 are mainly nuclear proteins and bind DNA with similar specificity to that of MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4, but lack a conserved activation domain, suggesting that repression is achieved by competition for the same cis-regulatory elements. Moreover, expression of bHLH017 is induced by JA and depends on MYC2, suggesting a negative feed-back regulation of the activity of positive JA-related TFs. Our results suggest that the competition between positive and negative TFs determines the output of JA-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:24465948

  18. Identification and characterization of a novel translational repressor of the steroid-inducible 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/carbonyl reductase gene in Comamonas testosteroni.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Guangming; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund

    2003-11-28

    Comamonas testosteroni 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/carbonyl reductase (3 alpha-HSD/CR) is a key enzyme in the degradation of steroid compounds in soil and may therefore play a significant role in the bioremediation of hormonally active compounds in the environment. The enzyme is also involved in the degradation of the steroid antibiotic fusidic acid. In addition, 3 alpha-HSD/CR mediates the carbonyl reduction of non-steroidal aldehydes and ketones. Because the gene of 3 alpha-HSD/CR (hsdA) is inducible by steroids, we were interested in the mode of its molecular regulation. Recently, we could identify the first molecular determinant in procaryotic steroid signaling, i.e. a repressor protein (RepA), which acts as a negative regulator by binding to upstream operator sequences of hsdA, thereby blocking hsdA transcription. In this work, we identified and cloned a second novel regulator gene that we named repB. The gene locates 932 bp downstream from hsdA on the C. testosteroni chromosome with an orientation opposite to that of hsdA. The open reading frame of repB consists of 237 bp and translates into a protein of 78 amino acids that was found to act as a repressor that regulates hsdA expression on the translational level. Northern blot analysis, UV-cross linking, gel-shift assays, and competition experiments proved that RepB binds to a 16-nucleotide sequence downstream of AUG at the 5' end of the 3 alpha-HSD/CR mRNA, thereby blocking hsdA translation. Testosterone, on the other hand, was shown to specifically bind to RepB, thereby yielding the release of RepB from the 3 alpha-HSD/CR mRNA such that hsdA translation could proceed. Data bank searches with the RepB primary structure yielded a 46.2% identity to the regulator of nucleoside diphosphate kinase, a formerly unknown protein from Escherichia coli that can restore a growth defect in alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In conclusion, the induction of hsdA by steroids in fact is a derepression

  19. The Arabidopsis PR-1 promoter contains multiple integration sites for the coactivator NPR1 and the repressor SNI1.

    PubMed

    Pape, Sebastian; Thurow, Corinna; Gatz, Christiane

    2010-12-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is a broad-spectrum plant immune response involving massive transcriptional reprogramming. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PATHOGENESIS-RELATED-1 (PR-1) gene has been used in numerous studies to elucidate transcriptional control mechanisms regulating systemic acquired resistance. WRKY transcription factors and basic leucine zipper proteins of the TGA family regulate the PR-1 promoter by binding to specific cis-elements. In addition, the promoter is under the control of two proteins that do not directly contact the DNA: the positive regulator NONEXPRESSOR OF PR GENES1 (NPR1), which physically interacts with TGA factors, and the repressor SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1, INDUCIBLE1 (SNI1). In this study, we analyzed the importance of the TGA-binding sites LS5 and LS7 and the WKRY box LS4 for regulation by NPR1 and SNI1. In the absence of LS5 and LS7, NPR1 activates the PR-1 promoter through a mechanism that requires LS4. Since transcriptional activation of WRKY genes is under the control of NPR1 and since LS4 is not sufficient for the activation of a truncated PR-1 promoter by the effector protein NPR1-VP16 in transient assays, it is concluded that the LS4-dependent activation of the PR-1 promoter is indirect. In the case of NPR1 acting directly through TGA factors at its target promoters, two TGA-binding sites are necessary but not sufficient for NPR1 function in transgenic plants and in the NPR-VP16-based trans-activation assay in protoplasts. SNI1 exerts its negative effect in the noninduced state by targeting unknown proteins associated with sequences between bp -816 and -573. Under induced conditions, SNI1 negatively regulates the function of WRKY transcription factors binding to WKRY boxes between bp -550 and -510.

  20. The Arabidopsis PR-1 Promoter Contains Multiple Integration Sites for the Coactivator NPR1 and the Repressor SNI1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Sebastian; Thurow, Corinna; Gatz, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is a broad-spectrum plant immune response involving massive transcriptional reprogramming. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PATHOGENESIS-RELATED-1 (PR-1) gene has been used in numerous studies to elucidate transcriptional control mechanisms regulating systemic acquired resistance. WRKY transcription factors and basic leucine zipper proteins of the TGA family regulate the PR-1 promoter by binding to specific cis-elements. In addition, the promoter is under the control of two proteins that do not directly contact the DNA: the positive regulator NONEXPRESSOR OF PR GENES1 (NPR1), which physically interacts with TGA factors, and the repressor SUPPRESSOR OF NPR1, INDUCIBLE1 (SNI1). In this study, we analyzed the importance of the TGA-binding sites LS5 and LS7 and the WKRY box LS4 for regulation by NPR1 and SNI1. In the absence of LS5 and LS7, NPR1 activates the PR-1 promoter through a mechanism that requires LS4. Since transcriptional activation of WRKY genes is under the control of NPR1 and since LS4 is not sufficient for the activation of a truncated PR-1 promoter by the effector protein NPR1-VP16 in transient assays, it is concluded that the LS4-dependent activation of the PR-1 promoter is indirect. In the case of NPR1 acting directly through TGA factors at its target promoters, two TGA-binding sites are necessary but not sufficient for NPR1 function in transgenic plants and in the NPR-VP16-based trans-activation assay in protoplasts. SNI1 exerts its negative effect in the noninduced state by targeting unknown proteins associated with sequences between bp −816 and −573. Under induced conditions, SNI1 negatively regulates the function of WRKY transcription factors binding to WKRY boxes between bp −550 and −510. PMID:20935179

  1. A Chlamydia-Specific C-Terminal Region of the Stress Response Regulator HrcA Modulates Its Repressor Activity▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Allan L.; Wilson, Adam C.; Tan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydial heat shock proteins have important roles in Chlamydia infection and immunopathogenesis. Transcription of chlamydial heat shock genes is controlled by the stress response regulator HrcA, which binds to its cognate operator CIRCE, causing repression by steric hindrance of RNA polymerase. All Chlamydia spp. encode an HrcA protein that is larger than other bacterial orthologs because of an additional, well-conserved C-terminal region. We found that this unique C-terminal tail decreased HrcA binding to CIRCE in vitro as well as HrcA-mediated transcriptional repression in vitro and in vivo. When we isolated HrcA from chlamydiae, we only detected the full-length protein, but we found that endogenous HrcA had a higher binding affinity for CIRCE than recombinant HrcA. To examine this difference further, we tested the effect of the heat shock protein GroEL on the function of HrcA since endogenous chlamydial HrcA has been previously shown to associate with GroEL as a complex. GroEL enhanced the ability of HrcA to bind CIRCE and to repress transcription in vitro, but this stimulatory effect was greater on full-length HrcA than HrcA lacking the C-terminal tail. These findings demonstrate that the novel C-terminal tail of chlamydial HrcA is an inhibitory region and provide evidence that its negative effect on repressor function can be counteracted by GroEL. These results support a model in which GroEL functions as a corepressor that interacts with HrcA to regulate chlamydial heat shock genes. PMID:21965565

  2. Situational Discrimination in Repressor-type and Sensitizer-type Approval Seekers and the Birth Order by Subject Sex Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Gilbert

    1970-01-01

    Five experiments are reported. One conclusion in that repressor-type high need-for-approval subjects made the discrimination and permitted less favorable self-description, but sensitizer-type high need-for-approval subjects did not. (DB)

  3. cAMP inducibility of transcriptional repressor ICER in developing and mature human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bodor, J; Spetz, A L; Strominger, J L; Habener, J F

    1996-04-16

    Stimulation of the cAMP-dependent signaling pathway exerts an inhibitory effect on the proliferation and effector functions of T cells. The ability of T cells to form high intracellular levels of cAMP is acquired during development in the human thymus and is retained by the majority of mature peripheral T lymphocytes. Here we show that elevated cAMP levels in T cells correlate with the expression of the potent transcriptional repressor ICER (inducible cAMP early repressor) previously described in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Further, in transcriptional assays in vivo, ICER inhibits calcineurin-mediated expression of the interleukin 2 promoter as well as Tax-mediated transactivation of the human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) promoter. Thus, the induction of ICER in T cells may play an important role in the cAMP-induced quiescence and the persistent latency of HTLV-I.

  4. LSD1 co-repressor Rcor2 orchestrates neurogenesis in the developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixuan; Wu, Qian; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chenfei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Wenyu; Liu, Wensu; Bai, Ye; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Hong; Gao, Shaorong; Wang, Xiaoqun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory complexes play key roles in the modulation of transcriptional regulation underlying neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and progeny specification. How specific cofactors guide histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1A complex to regulate distinct NSC-related gene activation and repression in cortical neurogenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Rcor2, a co-repressor of LSD1, is mainly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of cortical development. Depletion of Rcor2 results in reduced NPC proliferation, neuron population, neocortex thickness and brain size. We find that Rcor2 directly targets Dlx2 and Shh, and represses their expressions in developing neocortex. In addition, inhibition of Shh signals rescues the neurogenesis defects caused by Rcor2 depletion both in vivo and in vitro. Hence, our findings suggest that co-repressor Rcor2 is critical for cortical development by repressing Shh signalling pathway in dorsal telencephalon. PMID:26795843

  5. Folding λ-Repressor at Its Speed Limit

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei Yuan; Gruebele, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We show that the five-helix bundle λ6–85 can be engineered and solvent-tuned to make the transition from activated two-state folding to downhill folding. The transition manifests itself as the appearance of additional dynamics faster than the activated kinetics, followed by the disappearance of the activated kinetics when the bias toward the native state is increased. Our fastest value of 1 μs for the “speed” limit of λ6–85 is measured at low concentrations of a denaturant that smoothes the free-energy surface. Complete disappearance of the activated phase is obtained in stabilizing glucose buffer. Langevin dynamics on a rough free-energy surface with variable bias toward the native state provides a robust and quantitative description of the transition from activated to downhill folding. Based on our simulation, we estimate the residual energetic frustration of λ6–85 to be δ2 G ≈ 0.64 k2T2. We show that λ6–86, as well as very fast folding proteins or folding intermediates estimated to lie near the speed limit, provide a better rate-topology correlation than proteins with larger energetic frustration. A limit of β ≥ 0.7 on any stretching of λ6–85 barrier-free dynamics suggests that a low-dimensional free-energy surface is sufficient to describe folding. PMID:15240492

  6. T396I Mutation of Mouse Sufu Reduces the Stability and Activity of Gli3 Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Shigeru; Zhulyn, Olena; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Murata, Takuya; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Ishitsuka, Yuichi; Kotaki, Hayato; Matsumaru, Daisuke; Ishii, Shunsuke; Hui, Chi-Chung; Gondo, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling is primarily transduced by two transcription factors: Gli2, which mainly acts as a full-length activator, and Gli3, which tends to be proteolytically processed from a full-length form (Gli3FL) to an N-terminal repressor (Gli3REP). Recent studies using a Sufu knockout mouse have indicated that Sufu is involved in regulating Gli2 and Gli3 activator and repressor activity at multiple steps of the signaling cascade; however, the mechanism of specific Gli2 and Gli3 regulation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we established an allelic series of ENU-induced mouse strains. Analysis of one of the missense alleles, SufuT396I, showed that Thr396 residue of Sufu played a key role in regulation of Gli3 activity. SufuT396I/T396I embryos exhibited severe polydactyly, which is indicative of compromised Gli3 activity. Concomitantly, significant quantitative reductions of unprocessed Gli3 (Gli3FL) and processed Gli3 (Gli3REP) were observed in vivo as well as in vitro. Genetic experiments showed that patterning defects in the limb buds of SufuT396I/T396I were rescued by a constitutive Gli3REP allele (Gli3∆699), strongly suggesting that SufuT396I reduced the truncated Gli3 repressor. In contrast, SufuT396I qualitatively exhibited no mutational effects on Gli2 regulation. Taken together, the results of this study show that the Thr396 residue of Sufu is specifically required for regulation of Gli3 but not Gli2. This implies a novel Sufu-mediated mechanism in which Gli2 activator and Gli3 repressor are differentially regulated. PMID:25760946

  7. A chimeric NST repressor has the potential to improve glucose productivity from plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Akira; Hideno, Akihiro; Watanabe, Keiji; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-07-15

    Bioethanol might be produced more economically and with less ecological impact (with reduced exploitation of food crops) if we could increase the production of glucose from the cellulosic materials in plant cell walls. However, plant cell walls are relatively resistant to enzymatic and physicochemical hydrolysis and, therefore, it is necessary to develop methods for reducing such resistance. Changes in plant cell wall materials, by genetic engineering, that render them more easily hydrolyzable to glucose might be a valuable approach to this problem. We showed previously that, in Arabidopsis, NAC secondary wall thickening-promoting factor1 (NST1) and NST3 are key regulators of secondary wall formation. We report here that transgenic Arabidopsis plants that expressed a chimeric repressor derived from NST1 produced cell wall materials that were twice as susceptible to both enzymatic and physicochemical hydrolysis as those from wild-type plants. The yields of glucose from both fresh and dry biomass were increased in the chimeric repressor lines. Use of the NST1 chimeric repressor might enhance production of glucose from plant cell walls, by changing the nature of the cell walls themselves.

  8. Accurate genetic switch in Escherichia coli: novel mechanism of regulation by co-repressor.

    PubMed

    Tabaka, Marcin; Cybulski, Olgierd; Hołyst, Robert

    2008-04-01

    Understanding a biological module involves recognition of its structure and the dynamics of its principal components. In this report we present an analysis of the dynamics of the repression module within the regulation of the trp operon in Escherichia coli. We combine biochemical data for reaction rate constants for the trp repressor binding to trp operator and in vivo data of a number of tryptophan repressors (TrpRs) that bind to the operator. The model of repression presented in this report greatly differs from previous mathematical models. One, two or three TrpRs can bind to the operator and repress the transcription. Moreover, reaction rates for detachment of TrpRs from the operator strongly depend on tryptophan (Trp) concentration, since Trp can also bind to the repressor-operator complex and stabilize it. From the mathematical modeling and analysis of reaction rates and equilibrium constants emerges a high-quality, accurate and effective module of trp repression. This genetic switch responds accurately to fast consumption of Trp from the interior of a cell. It switches with minimal dispersion when the concentration of Trp drops below a thousand molecules per cell. PMID:18313075

  9. Structures of ω repressors bound to direct and inverted DNA repeats explain modulation of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Weihofen, Wilhelm Andreas; Cicek, Aslan; Pratto, Florencia; Alonso, Juan Carlos; Saenger, Wolfram

    2006-01-01

    Repressor ω regulates transcription of genes required for copy number control, accurate segregation and stable maintenance of inc18 plasmids hosted by Gram-positive bacteria. ω belongs to homodimeric ribbon-helix-helix (RHH2) repressors typified by a central, antiparallel β-sheet for DNA major groove binding. Homodimeric ω2 binds cooperatively to promotors with 7 to 10 consecutive non-palindromic DNA heptad repeats (5′-A/TATCACA/T-3′, symbolized by →) in palindromic inverted, converging (→←) or diverging (←→) orientation and also, unique to ω2 and contrasting other RHH2 repressors, to non-palindromic direct (→→) repeats. Here we investigate with crystal structures how ω2 binds specifically to heptads in minimal operators with (→→) and (→←) repeats. Since the pseudo-2-fold axis relating the monomers in ω2 passes the central C–G base pair of each heptad with ∼0.3 Å downstream offset, the separation between the pseudo-2-fold axes is exactly 7 bp in (→→), ∼0.6 Å shorter in (→←) but would be ∼0.6 Å longer in (←→). These variations grade interactions between adjacent ω2 and explain modulations in cooperative binding affinity of ω2 to operators with different heptad orientations. PMID:16528102

  10. The Arabidopsis bHLH Transcription Factors MYC3 and MYC4 Are Targets of JAZ Repressors and Act Additively with MYC2 in the Activation of Jasmonate Responses[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Chini, Andrea; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chico, José-Manuel; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Geerinck, Jan; Eeckhout, Dominique; Schweizer, Fabian; Godoy, Marta; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Pauwels, Laurens; Witters, Erwin; Puga, María Isabel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Goossens, Alain; Reymond, Philippe; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) trigger an important transcriptional reprogramming of plant cells to modulate both basal development and stress responses. In spite of the importance of transcriptional regulation, only one transcription factor (TF), the Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix MYC2, has been described so far as a direct target of JAZ repressors. By means of yeast two-hybrid screening and tandem affinity purification strategies, we identified two previously unknown targets of JAZ repressors, the TFs MYC3 and MYC4, phylogenetically closely related to MYC2. We show that MYC3 and MYC4 interact in vitro and in vivo with JAZ repressors and also form homo- and heterodimers with MYC2 and among themselves. They both are nuclear proteins that bind DNA with sequence specificity similar to that of MYC2. Loss-of-function mutations in any of these two TFs impair full responsiveness to JA and enhance the JA insensitivity of myc2 mutants. Moreover, the triple mutant myc2 myc3 myc4 is as impaired as coi1-1 in the activation of several, but not all, JA-mediated responses such as the defense against bacterial pathogens and insect herbivory. Our results show that MYC3 and MYC4 are activators of JA-regulated programs that act additively with MYC2 to regulate specifically different subsets of the JA-dependent transcriptional response. PMID:21335373

  11. Characterization of the interaction of the glp repressor of Escherichia coli K-12 with single and tandem glp operator variants.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, N; Oh, W; Trybul, D; Thrasher, K S; Kingsbury, T J; Larson, T J

    1994-01-01

    The glp operons of Escherichia coli are negatively controlled by the glp repressor. Comparison of the repressor-binding affinities for consensus and altered consensus operators in vivo showed that all base substitutions at positions 3, 4, 5, and 8 from the center of the palindromic operator caused a striking decrease in repressor binding. Substitutions at other positions had a severe to no effect on repressor binding, depending on the base substitution. The results obtained indicate that the repressor binds with highest affinity to operators with the half-site WATKYTCGWW, where W is A or T, K is G or T, and Y is C or T. Strong cooperative binding of the repressor to tandem operators was demonstrated in vivo. Cooperativity was maximal when two 20-bp operators were directly repeated or when 2 bp separated the two operators. Cooperativity decreased with the deletion of 2 bp or the addition of 4 bp between the individual operators. Cooperativity was eliminated with a 6-bp insertion between the operators. PMID:8157609

  12. Induction of Plasmid Conjugation in Bacillus subtilis Is Bistable and Driven by a Direct Interaction of a Rap/Phr Quorum-sensing System with a Master Repressor.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Thomas C; Graumann, Peter L

    2015-08-14

    Conjugation of plasmid pLS20 from Bacillus subtilis is limited to a time window between early and late exponential growth. Genetic evidence has suggested that pLS20-encoded protein RcoLS20 represses expression of a large conjugation operon, whereas Rap protein RapLS20 relieves repression. We show that RapLS20 is a true antirepressor protein that forms dimers in vivo and in vitro and that it directly binds to the repressor protein RcoLS20 in a 1:1 stoichiometry. We provide evidence that RapLS20 binds to the helix-turn-helix-containing domain of RcoLS20 in vivo, probably obstructing DNA binding of RcoLS20, as seen in competitive DNA binding experiments. The activity of RapLS20 in turn is counteracted by the addition of the cognate PhrLS20 peptide, which directly binds to the Rap protein and presumably induces a conformational change of the antirepressor. Thus, a Rap protein acts directly as an antirepressor protein during regulation of plasmid conjugation, turning on conjugation, and is counteracted by the PhrLS20 peptide, which, by analogy to known Rap/Phr systems, is secreted and taken back up into the cells, mediating cell density-driven regulation. Finally, we show that this switchlike process establishes a population heterogeneity, where up to 30% of the cells induce transcription of the conjugation operon.

  13. Studies on the interaction of REST4 with the cholinergic repressor element-1/neuron restrictive silencer element.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Shimojo, M; Chai, Y G; Hersh, L B

    2000-08-14

    REST4 is a neuron specific truncated form of the transcription factor REST/NRSE derived by alternative splicing. REST4 was previously shown to block the repressor activity of REST/NRSF by forming a hetero-oligomer, Shimojo et al. [Mol. Cell. Biol. 19 (1999) 6788-6795]. A series of deletion mutants have now been used to characterize REST4 in terms of its structure and DNA binding. REST4 was found to be O-glycosylated between between residues 87 and 152. Binding of REST4 to the cholinergic RE-1/NRSE was approximately 1/10 to 1/20 as strong as full length REST/NRSF. DNA binding was enhanced by deletion of the first 86 residues and was found to require all four of the C-terminal zinc fingers as well as a twelve amino acid sequence preceding the first of these zinc fingers. REST4 can form homo-oligomers, however only the monomer was found to bind to DNA. REST4 binds to the 3' sequence of the cholinergic NRSE suggesting an anti-parallel orientation of the protein to the DNA. PMID:11039732

  14. WRKY76 is a rice transcriptional repressor playing opposite roles in blast disease resistance and cold stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Naoki; Sato, Yuko; Tanabe, Shigeru; Chujo, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takafumi; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Shimono, Masaki; Sugano, Shoji; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Kaku, Hisatoshi; Minami, Eiichi; Nishizawa, Yoko

    2013-11-01

    OsWRKY76 encodes a group IIa WRKY transcription factor of rice. The expression of OsWRKY76 was induced within 48h after inoculation with rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe oryzae), and by wounding, low temperature, benzothiadiazole, and abscisic acid. Green fluorescent protein-fused OsWRKY76 localized to the nuclei in rice epidermal cells. OsWRKY76 showed sequence-specific DNA binding to the W-box element in vitro and exhibited W-box-mediated transcriptional repressor activity in cultured rice cells. Overexpression of OsWRKY76 in rice plants resulted in drastically increased susceptibility to M. oryzae, but improved tolerance to cold stress. Microarray analysis revealed that overexpression of OsWRKY76 suppresses the induction of a specific set of PR genes and of genes involved in phytoalexin synthesis after inoculation with blast fungus, consistent with the observation that the levels of phytoalexins in the transgenic rice plants remained significantly lower than those in non-transformed control plants. Furthermore, overexpression of OsWRKY76 led to the increased expression of abiotic stress-associated genes such as peroxidase and lipid metabolism genes. These results strongly suggest that OsWRKY76 plays dual and opposing roles in blast disease resistance and cold tolerance.

  15. T Cell Fates Zipped Up: How the Bach2 Basic Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Repressor Directs T Cell Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Richer, Martin J; Lang, Mark L; Butler, Noah S

    2016-08-15

    Recent data illustrate a key role for the transcriptional regulator bric-a-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and cap'n'collar homology (Bach)2 in orchestrating T cell differentiation and function. Although Bach2 has a well-described role in B cell differentiation, emerging data show that Bach2 is a prototypical member of a novel class of transcription factors that regulates transcriptional activity in T cells at super-enhancers, or regions of high transcriptional activity. Accumulating data demonstrate specific roles for Bach2 in favoring regulatory T cell generation, restraining effector T cell differentiation, and potentiating memory T cell development. Evidence suggests that Bach2 regulates various facets of T cell function by repressing other key transcriptional regulators such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1. In this review, we examine our present understanding of the role of Bach2 in T cell function and highlight the growing evidence that this transcriptional repressor functions as a key regulator involved in maintenance of T cell quiescence, T cell subset differentiation, and memory T cell generation.

  16. Deficiency of the transcriptional repressor B cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is accompanied by dysregulated lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Christopher R; Lin, Grace; Dent, Alexander L; Schwartz, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor B-cell Lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) was recently identified in a profile of genes regulated in adipocytes, suggesting a relationship between Bcl6 and metabolic regulation. As a representative target gene repressed by Bcl6, Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (Socs) 2 expression was elevated in Bcl6 deficient (KO) mice, including metabolic tissues liver, adipose tissue and muscle, as well as in spleen and thymus. Bcl6 occupied the Socs2 promoter in wild-type, but not Bcl6 KO mice, suggesting direct regulation of Socs2 by Bcl6 in vivo. Mice deficient in Bcl6 were found to exhibit multiple features of dysregulated lipid metabolism. Adipose tissue mass was dramatically reduced or absent in Bcl6 KO mice. Further, hepatic and serum triglycerides were low. Bcl6 deficiency was accompanied by decreased hepatic expression of Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1) and Fatty acid synthase (Fasn) genes which encode lipogenic enzymes. Expression of the gene for the transcription factor Carbohydrate-Responsive Element Binding Protein (Chrebp), which regulates expression of lipogenic genes, was also reduced in liver of Bcl6 KO mice. Bcl6 deficiency disrupted fasting-induced increases in hepatic triglyceride deposition, but not decreases in lipogenic gene expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that in addition to its well-recognized roles in immune regulation, Bcl6 plays a role in regulatory events of lipid metabolism, and that in the absence of Bcl6, lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue is dysregulated.

  17. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, Maria L; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  18. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  19. The LSD1 Family of Histone Demethylases and the Pumilio Posttranscriptional Repressor Function in a Complex Regulatory Feedback Loop

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Wayne O.; Lepesant, Julie M. J.; Bourdeaux, Jessie; Texier, Manuela; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Nakakido, Makoto; Hamamoto, Ryuji; Orkin, Stuart H.; Dyson, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    The lysine (K)-specific demethylase (LSD1) family of histone demethylases regulates chromatin structure and the transcriptional potential of genes. LSD1 is frequently deregulated in tumors, and depletion of LSD1 family members causes developmental defects. Here, we report that reductions in the expression of the Pumilio (PUM) translational repressor complex enhanced phenotypes due to dLsd1 depletion in Drosophila. We show that the PUM complex is a target of LSD1 regulation in fly and mammalian cells and that its expression is inversely correlated with LSD1 levels in human bladder carcinoma. Unexpectedly, we find that PUM posttranscriptionally regulates LSD1 family protein levels in flies and human cells, indicating the existence of feedback loops between the LSD1 family and the PUM complex. Our results highlight a new posttranscriptional mechanism regulating LSD1 activity and suggest that the feedback loop between the LSD1 family and the PUM complex may be functionally important during development and in human malignancies. PMID:26438601

  20. T Cell Fates Zipped Up: How the Bach2 Basic Leucine Zipper Transcriptional Repressor Directs T Cell Differentiation and Function.

    PubMed

    Richer, Martin J; Lang, Mark L; Butler, Noah S

    2016-08-15

    Recent data illustrate a key role for the transcriptional regulator bric-a-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and cap'n'collar homology (Bach)2 in orchestrating T cell differentiation and function. Although Bach2 has a well-described role in B cell differentiation, emerging data show that Bach2 is a prototypical member of a novel class of transcription factors that regulates transcriptional activity in T cells at super-enhancers, or regions of high transcriptional activity. Accumulating data demonstrate specific roles for Bach2 in favoring regulatory T cell generation, restraining effector T cell differentiation, and potentiating memory T cell development. Evidence suggests that Bach2 regulates various facets of T cell function by repressing other key transcriptional regulators such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1. In this review, we examine our present understanding of the role of Bach2 in T cell function and highlight the growing evidence that this transcriptional repressor functions as a key regulator involved in maintenance of T cell quiescence, T cell subset differentiation, and memory T cell generation. PMID:27496973

  1. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation.

  2. The auxin Sl-IAA17 transcriptional repressor controls fruit size via the regulation of endoreduplication-related cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Su, Liyan; Bassa, Carole; Audran, Corinne; Mila, Isabelle; Cheniclet, Catherine; Chevalier, Christian; Bouzayen, Mondher; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Chervin, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Auxin is known to regulate cell division and cell elongation, thus controlling plant growth and development. Part of the auxin signaling pathway depends on the fine-tuned degradation of the auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional repressors. Recent evidence indicates that Aux/IAA proteins play a role in fruit development in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.), a model species for fleshy fruit development. We report here on the functional characterization of Sl-IAA17 during tomato fruit development. Silencing of Sl-IAA17 by an RNA interference (RNAi) strategy resulted in the production of larger fruit than the wild type. Histological analyses of the fruit organ and tissues demonstrated that this phenotype was associated with a thicker pericarp, rather than larger locules and/or a larger number of seeds. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that the higher pericarp thickness in Sl-IAA17 RNAi fruits was not due to a larger number of cells, but to the increase in cell size. Finally, we observed that the cell expansion in the transgenic fruits is tightly coupled with higher ploidy levels than in the wild type, suggesting a stimulation of the endoreduplication process. In conclusion, this work provides new insights into the function of the Aux/IAA pathway in fleshy fruit development, especially fruit size and cell size determination in tomato.

  3. The CRE1 carbon catabolite repressor of the fungus Trichoderma reesei: a master regulator of carbon assimilation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The identification and characterization of the transcriptional regulatory networks governing the physiology and adaptation of microbial cells is a key step in understanding their behaviour. One such wide-domain regulatory circuit, essential to all cells, is carbon catabolite repression (CCR): it allows the cell to prefer some carbon sources, whose assimilation is of high nutritional value, over less profitable ones. In lower multicellular fungi, the C2H2 zinc finger CreA/CRE1 protein has been shown to act as the transcriptional repressor in this process. However, the complete list of its gene targets is not known. Results Here, we deciphered the CRE1 regulatory range in the model cellulose and hemicellulose-degrading fungus Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) by profiling transcription in a wild-type and a delta-cre1 mutant strain on glucose at constant growth rates known to repress and de-repress CCR-affected genes. Analysis of genome-wide microarrays reveals 2.8% of transcripts whose expression was regulated in at least one of the four experimental conditions: 47.3% of which were repressed by CRE1, whereas 29.0% were actually induced by CRE1, and 17.2% only affected by the growth rate but CRE1 independent. Among CRE1 repressed transcripts, genes encoding unknown proteins and transport proteins were overrepresented. In addition, we found CRE1-repression of nitrogenous substances uptake, components of chromatin remodeling and the transcriptional mediator complex, as well as developmental processes. Conclusions Our study provides the first global insight into the molecular physiological response of a multicellular fungus to carbon catabolite regulation and identifies several not yet known targets in a growth-controlled environment. PMID:21619626

  4. Decreased sucrase and lactase activity in iron deficiency is accompanied by reduced gene expression and upregulation of the transcriptional repressor PDX-1.

    PubMed

    West, Adrian R; Oates, Phillip S

    2005-12-01

    Disaccharidases are important digestive enzymes whose activities can be reduced by iron deficiency. We hypothesise that this is due to reduced gene expression, either by impairment to enterocyte differentiation or by iron-sensitive mechanisms that regulate mRNA levels in enterocytes. Iron-deficient Wistar rats were generated by dietary means. The enzyme activities and kinetics of sucrase and lactase were tested as well as the activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP)-II because it is unrelated to carbohydrate digestion. mRNA levels of beta-actin, sucrase, lactase, and the associated transcription factors pancreatic duodenal homeobox (PDX)-1, caudal-related homeobox (CDX)-2, GATA-binding protein (GATA)-4, and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1 were measured by real-time PCR. Spatial patterns of protein and gene expression were assessed by immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, respectively. It was found that iron-deficient rats had significantly lower sucrase (19.5% lower) and lactase (56.8% lower) but not IAP-II activity than control rats. Kinetic properties of both enzymes remained unchanged from controls, suggesting a decrease in the quantity of enzyme present. Sucrase and lactase mRNA levels were reduced by 44.5% and 67.9%, respectively, by iron deficiency, suggesting that enzyme activity is controlled primarily by gene expression. Iron deficiency did not affect the pattern of protein and gene expression along the crypt to villus axis. Expression of PDX-1, a repressor of sucrase and lactase promoters, was 4.5-fold higher in iron deficiency, whereas CDX-2, GATA-4, and HNF-1 levels were not significantly different. These data suggest that decreases in sucrase and lactase activities result from a reduction in gene expression, following from increased levels of the transcriptional repressor PDX-1.

  5. Widespread disruption of repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor occupancy at its target genes in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Zuccato, Chiara; Belyaev, Nikolai; Conforti, Paola; Ooi, Lezanne; Tartari, Marzia; Papadimou, Evangelia; MacDonald, Marcy; Fossale, Elisa; Zeitlin, Scott; Buckley, Noel; Cattaneo, Elena

    2007-06-27

    Huntingtin is a protein that is mutated in Huntington's disease (HD), a dominant inherited neurodegenerative disorder. We previously proposed that, in addition to the gained toxic activity of the mutant protein, selective molecular dysfunctions in HD may represent the consequences of the loss of wild-type protein activity. We first reported that wild-type huntingtin positively affects the transcription of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, a cortically derived survival factor for the striatal neurons that are mainly affected in the disease. Mutation in huntingtin decreases BDNF gene transcription. One mechanism involves the activation of repressor element 1/neuron-restrictive silencer element (RE1/NRSE) located within the BDNF promoter. We now show that increased binding of the RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) repressor occurs at multiple genomic RE1/NRSE loci in HD cells, in animal models, and in postmortem brains, resulting in a decrease of RE1/NRSE-mediated gene transcription. The same molecular phenotype is produced in cells and brain tissue depleted of endogenous huntingtin, thereby directly validating the loss-of-function hypothesis of HD. Through a ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-on-chip approach, we examined occupancy of multiple REST/NRSF target genes in the postmortem HD brain, providing the first example of the application of this technology to neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we show that attenuation of REST/NRSF binding restores BDNF levels, suggesting that relief of REST/NRSF mediated repression can restore aberrant neuronal gene transcription in HD. PMID:17596446

  6. The transcriptional repressor DREAM is involved in thyroid gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Barbara; Di Palma, Tina; Mascia, Anna; Motti, Maria Letizia; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Nitsch, Lucio; Zannini, Mariastella . E-mail: stella@szn.it

    2005-04-15

    Downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator (DREAM) was originally identified in neuroendocrine cells as a calcium-binding protein that specifically binds to downstream regulatory elements (DRE) on DNA, and represses transcription of its target genes. To explore the possibility that DREAM may regulate the endocrine activity of the thyroid gland, we analyzed its mRNA expression in undifferentiated and differentiated thyroid cells. We demonstrated that DREAM is expressed in the normal thyroid tissue as well as in differentiated thyroid cells in culture while it is absent in FRT poorly differentiated cells. In the present work, we also show that DREAM specifically binds to DRE sites identified in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the thyroid-specific transcription factors Pax8 and TTF-2/FoxE1 in a calcium-dependent manner. By gel retardation assays we demonstrated that thapsigargin treatment increases the binding of DREAM to the DRE sequences present in Pax8 and TTF-2/Foxe1 5' UTRs, and this correlates with a significant reduction of the expression of these genes. Interestingly, in poorly differentiated thyroid cells overexpression of exogenous DREAM strongly inhibits Pax8 expression. Moreover, we provide evidence that a mutated form of DREAM unable to bind Ca{sup 2+} interferes with thyroid cell proliferation. Therefore, we propose that in thyroid cells DREAM is a mediator of the calcium-signaling pathway and it is involved in the regulation of thyroid cell function.

  7. Repressor mutant forms of the Azospirillum brasilense NtrC protein.

    PubMed

    Huergo, Luciano F; Assumpção, Marcelo C; Souza, Emanuel M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Yates, M Geoffrey; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O

    2004-10-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense mutant strains FP8 and FP9, after treatment with nitrosoguanidine, showed a null Nif phenotype and were unable to use nitrate as their sole nitrogen source. Sequencing of the ntrC genes revealed single nucleotide mutations in the NtrC nucleotide-binding site. The phenotypes of these strains are discussed in relation to their genotypes.

  8. Complete 15N and 1H NMR assignments for the amino-terminal domain of the phage 434 repressor in the urea-unfolded form

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Dario; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    The amino-terminal domain of the phage 434 repressor consisting of residues 1-69 forms a globular structure of five tightly packed helices, with nearly identical molecular architectures in crystals and in solution. Upon addition of urea to an aqueous solution of this protein, the NMR spectrum of a second form of the protein appears in addition to the native form, and at a urea concentration of 7 M, this urea-unfolded form is the only species observed. At intermediate urea concentrations, the two forms of the protein inter-convert at a rate that allows the observation of the exchange process by NMR. Starting from the previous assignments for the native protein, we obtained nearly complete sequence-specific 1H and 15N NMR assignments for the unfolded form of the protein. For most amino acid residues, the 1H chemical shifts of the urea-unfolded protein are very similar to the random coil values, but some discrete regions of the polypeptide chain were identified that are likely to retain residual nonrandom spatial structure as evidenced by deviations of 1H chemical shifts and amide proton exchange rates from the expected random coil values. PMID:1584772

  9. The DeoR-type transcriptional regulator SugR acts as a repressor for genes encoding the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Gaigalat, Lars; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Hartmann, Michelle; Mormann, Sascha; Tauch, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2007-01-01

    Background The major uptake system responsible for the transport of fructose, glucose, and sucrose in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 is the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). The genes encoding PTS components, namely ptsI, ptsH, and ptsF belong to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, whereas ptsG and ptsS are located in two separate regions of the C. glutamicum genome. Due to the localization within and adjacent to the fructose-PTS gene cluster, two genes coding for DeoR-type transcriptional regulators, cg2118 and sugR, are putative candidates involved in the transcriptional regulation of the fructose-PTS cluster genes. Results Four transcripts of the extended fructose-PTS gene cluster that comprise the genes sugR-cg2116, ptsI, cg2118-fruK-ptsF, and ptsH, respectively, were characterized. In addition, it was shown that transcription of the fructose-PTS gene cluster is enhanced during growth on glucose or fructose when compared to acetate. Subsequently, the two genes sugR and cg2118 encoding for DeoR-type regulators were mutated and PTS gene transcription was found to be strongly enhanced in the presence of acetate only in the sugR deletion mutant. The SugR regulon was further characterized by microarray hybridizations using the sugR mutant and its parental strain, revealing that also the PTS genes ptsG and ptsS belong to this regulon. Binding of purified SugR repressor protein to a 21 bp sequence identified the SugR binding site as an AC-rich motif. The two experimentally identified SugR binding sites in the fructose-PTS gene cluster are located within or downstream of the mapped promoters, typical for transcriptional repressors. Effector studies using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) revealed the fructose PTS-specific metabolite fructose-1-phosphate (F-1-P) as a highly efficient, negative effector of the SugR repressor, acting in the micromolar range. Beside F-1-P, other sugar-phosphates like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P

  10. Selective repression of gene expression in neuropathic pain by the neuron-restrictive silencing factor/repressor element-1 silencing transcription (NRSF/REST).

    PubMed

    Willis, Dianna E; Wang, Meng; Brown, Elizabeth; Fones, Lilah; Cave, John W

    2016-06-20

    Neuropathic pain often develops following nerve injury as a result of maladaptive changes that occur in the injured nerve and along the nociceptive pathways of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms likely account for these changes; however, the exact nature of these mechanisms remain largely unknown. A growing number of studies suggest that alteration in gene expression is an important step in the progression from acute to chronic pain states and epigenetic regulation has been proposed to drive this change in gene expression. In this review, we discuss recent evidence that the DNA-binding protein neuron-restrictive silencing factor/repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST) is an important component in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain through its role as a transcriptional regulator for a select subset of genes that it normally represses during development. PMID:26679228

  11. Structural and genomic DNA analysis of the putative TetR transcriptional repressor SCO7518 from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sakai, Naoki; Okada, Ui; Yao, Min; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Isao

    2014-11-28

    SCO7518 is a protein of unknown function from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) that has been classified into the TetR transcriptional regulator family. In this study, a crystal structure of SCO7518 was determined at 2.29Å resolution. The structure is a homodimer of protomers that comprise an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization and regulatory domain, and possess a putative ligand-binding cavity. Genomic systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that SCO7518 specifically binds to an operator sequence located upstream of the sco7519 gene, which encodes a maltose O-acetyltransferase. These results suggest that SCO7518 is a transcriptional repressor of sco7519 expression.

  12. Ligand efficiency driven design of new inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional repressor EthR using fragment growing, merging, and linking approaches.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, Baptiste; Flipo, Marion; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Crauste, Céline; Malaquin, Sandra; Leroux, Florence; Piveteau, Catherine; Villeret, Vincent; Brodin, Priscille; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Sperandio, Olivier; Soror, Sameh H; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Wintjens, René; Deprez, Benoit; Baulard, Alain R; Willand, Nicolas

    2014-06-12

    Tuberculosis remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity, killing each year more than one million people. Although the combined use of first line antibiotics (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol) is efficient to treat most patients, the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis stresses the need for alternative therapies. Mycobacterial transcriptional repressor EthR is a key player in the control of second-line drugs bioactivation such as ethionamide and has been shown to impair the sensitivity of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis to this antibiotic. As a way to identify new potent ligands of this protein, we have developed fragment-based approaches. In the current study, we combined surface plasmon resonance assay, X-ray crystallography, and ligand efficiency driven design for the rapid discovery and optimization of new chemotypes of EthR ligands starting from a fragment. The design, synthesis, and in vitro and ex vivo activities of these compounds will be discussed.

  13. Phosphorylation of the Nuclear Receptor Co-repressor 1 by Protein Kinase B (PKB/Akt) Switches its Co-repressor Targets in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Young Suk; Ryu, Dongryeol; Maida, Adriano; Wang, Xu; Evans, Ronald M.; Schoonjans, Kristina; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1) is a transcriptional co-regulator that has wide-ranging effects on gene expression patterns. In the liver, NCoR1 represses lipid synthesis in the fasting state, whereas it inhibits the activation of PPARα upon feeding, thereby blunting ketogenesis. Here, we show that insulin via the activation of PKB/Akt induces the phosphorylation of NCoR1 on serine 1460, which selectively favors its interaction with PPARα and ERRα over LXRα. Phosphorylation of NCoR1 on S1460 selectively derepresses LXRα target genes, resulting in increased lipogenesis, while at the same time it inhibits PPARα and ERRα targets, thereby attenuating oxidative metabolism in the liver. The phosphorylation-gated differential recruitment of NCoR1 to different nuclear receptors explains the apparent paradox that liver-specific deletion of NCoR1 concurrently induces both lipogenesis and oxidative metabolism, due to a global derepression of LXRα, PPARα and ERRα activity. This phosphorylation-mediated recruitment switch of NCoR1 between nuclear receptor subsets hence provides a mechanism by which corepressors can selectively modulate liver energy metabolism during the fasting-feeding transition. PMID:25998209

  14. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  15. In PC12 cells, expression of neurosecretion and neurite outgrowth are governed by the transcription repressor REST/NRSF.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Rosalba; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2010-11-01

    A rapid drop of the transcription repressor REST/NRSF during precursor differentiation into nerve cells is known to release the repression of hundreds of specific genes and thus to orchestrate the acquisition of the specific phenotype. REST, however, is important not only for differentiation, but also for the maintenance of key properties in mature nerve cell. The PC12 line is uniquely favorable for studying REST because, in addition to the wild-type, low REST neurosecretory cells, it includes spontaneously defective clones lacking neurosecretion, where REST is as high as in non-nerve cells. In this article, we summarize our cell biologic studies of two nerve cell-specific processes dependent on REST, neurosecretion and neurite outgrowth. We demonstrate that, in wild-type PC12 transfected with REST constructs, expression of genes encoding proteins of dense-core and synaptic-like vesicles is decreased, though, to different extents, with chromogranins being the most and the SNAREs (except SNAP25) the least affected. Concomitantly, dense core-vesicles decrease markedly in size but can still be discharged by regulated exocytosis. When, in contrast, dominant-negative constructs of REST are transfected in high-REST PC12, and the main effector enzymes of REST, histone deacetylases, are blocked, dense-core vesicles reappear and are discharged upon stimulation. In high-REST PC12, also neurite outgrowth is inhibited by down regulation of the NGF receptor. Concomitantly, however, high REST induces the expression of proteins and of an exocytic organelle, the enlargeosome, which sustain a Rac1-dependent form of neurite outgrowth, unknown until now, operative in PC12, in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and also in neurons. PMID:21046448

  16. The switch from fermentation to respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the Ert1 transcriptional activator/repressor.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Najla; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Klimova, Natalia; Guo, Xiao; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Robert, François; Turcotte, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fermentation is the major pathway for energy production, even under aerobic conditions. However, when glucose becomes scarce, ethanol produced during fermentation is used as a carbon source, requiring a shift to respiration. This adaptation results in massive reprogramming of gene expression. Increased expression of genes for gluconeogenesis and the glyoxylate cycle is observed upon a shift to ethanol and, conversely, expression of some fermentation genes is reduced. The zinc cluster proteins Cat8, Sip4, and Rds2, as well as Adr1, have been shown to mediate this reprogramming of gene expression. In this study, we have characterized the gene YBR239C encoding a putative zinc cluster protein and it was named ERT1 (ethanol regulated transcription factor 1). ChIP-chip analysis showed that Ert1 binds to a limited number of targets in the presence of glucose. The strongest enrichment was observed at the promoter of PCK1 encoding an important gluconeogenic enzyme. With ethanol as the carbon source, enrichment was observed with many additional genes involved in gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial function. Use of lacZ reporters and quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that Ert1 regulates expression of its target genes in a manner that is highly redundant with other regulators of gluconeogenesis. Interestingly, in the presence of ethanol, Ert1 is a repressor of PDC1 encoding an important enzyme for fermentation. We also show that Ert1 binds directly to the PCK1 and PDC1 promoters. In summary, Ert1 is a novel factor involved in the regulation of gluconeogenesis as well as a key fermentation gene.

  17. The Bile Response Repressor BreR Regulates Expression of the Vibrio cholerae breAB Efflux System Operon▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cerda-Maira, Francisca A.; Ringelberg, Carol S.; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2008-01-01

    Enteric pathogens have developed several resistance mechanisms to survive the antimicrobial action of bile. We investigated the transcriptional profile of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strain C6706 under virulence gene-inducing conditions in the presence and absence of bile. Microarray analysis revealed that the expression of 119 genes was affected by bile. The mRNA levels of genes encoding proteins involved in transport were increased in the presence of bile, whereas the mRNA levels of genes encoding proteins involved in pathogenesis and chemotaxis were decreased. This study identified genes encoding transcriptional regulators from the TetR family (vexR and breR) and multidrug efflux pumps from the resistance-nodulation-cell division superfamily (vexB and vexD [herein renamed breB]) that were induced in response to bile. Further analysis regarding vexAB and breAB expression in the presence of various antimicrobial compounds established that vexAB was induced in the presence of bile, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or novobiocin and that the induction of breAB was specific to bile. BreR is a direct repressor of the breAB promoter and is able to regulate its own expression, as demonstrated by transcriptional and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). The expression of breR and breAB is induced in the presence of the bile salts cholate, deoxycholate, and chenodeoxycholate, and EMSA showed that deoxycholate is able to abolish the formation of BreR-PbreR complexes. We propose that deoxycholate is able to interact with BreR and induce a conformational change that interferes with the DNA binding ability of BreR, resulting in breAB and breR expression. These results provide new insight into a transcriptional regulator and a transport system that likely play essential roles in the ability of V. cholerae to resist the action of bile in the host. PMID:18776020

  18. Identification of the Flavonoid Luteolin as a Repressor of the Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Inoue, Jun; Choi, Jung-Min; Nakamura, Shugo; Yan, Zhen; Fushinobu, Shinya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Kato, Hisanori; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-09-25

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes involved in the secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and in glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified a naturally occurring flavonoid, luteolin, as a repressor of HNF4α by screening for effectors of the human microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) promoter. Luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the activity of the MTP gene promoter was suppressed by luteolin and that the mutation of HNF4α-binding element abolished luteolin responsiveness. Luteolin treatment caused a significant decrease in the mRNA levels of HNF4α target genes in HepG2 cells and inhibited apoB-containing lipoprotein secretion in HepG2 and differentiated Caco2 cells. The interaction between luteolin and HNF4α was demonstrated using absorption spectrum analysis and luteolin-immobilized beads. Luteolin did not affect the DNA binding of HNF4α to the promoter region of its target genes but suppressed the acetylation level of histone H3 in the promoter region of certain HNF4α target genes. Short term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed the expression of HNF4α target genes in the liver. In addition, long term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed their diet-induced obesity and improved their serum glucose and lipid parameters. Importantly, long term luteolin treatment lowered serum VLDL and LDL cholesterol and serum apoB protein levels, which was not accompanied by fat accumulation in the liver. These results suggest that the flavonoid luteolin ameliorates an atherogenic lipid profile in vivo that is likely to be mediated through the inactivation of HNF4α. PMID:26272613

  19. Identification of the Flavonoid Luteolin as a Repressor of the Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Inoue, Jun; Choi, Jung-Min; Nakamura, Shugo; Yan, Zhen; Fushinobu, Shinya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Kato, Hisanori; Hashidume, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the expression of genes involved in the secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins and in glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified a naturally occurring flavonoid, luteolin, as a repressor of HNF4α by screening for effectors of the human microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) promoter. Luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the activity of the MTP gene promoter was suppressed by luteolin and that the mutation of HNF4α-binding element abolished luteolin responsiveness. Luteolin treatment caused a significant decrease in the mRNA levels of HNF4α target genes in HepG2 cells and inhibited apoB-containing lipoprotein secretion in HepG2 and differentiated Caco2 cells. The interaction between luteolin and HNF4α was demonstrated using absorption spectrum analysis and luteolin-immobilized beads. Luteolin did not affect the DNA binding of HNF4α to the promoter region of its target genes but suppressed the acetylation level of histone H3 in the promoter region of certain HNF4α target genes. Short term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed the expression of HNF4α target genes in the liver. In addition, long term treatment of mice with luteolin significantly suppressed their diet-induced obesity and improved their serum glucose and lipid parameters. Importantly, long term luteolin treatment lowered serum VLDL and LDL cholesterol and serum apoB protein levels, which was not accompanied by fat accumulation in the liver. These results suggest that the flavonoid luteolin ameliorates an atherogenic lipid profile in vivo that is likely to be mediated through the inactivation of HNF4α. PMID:26272613

  20. Otx2 induction of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone promoter is modulated by direct interactions with Grg co-repressors.

    PubMed

    Larder, Rachel; Mellon, Pamela L

    2009-06-19

    Hormonal communication between the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads orchestrates the development and regulation of mammalian reproductive function. In mice, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) expression is limited to approximately 1000 neurons that originate in the olfactory placode then migrate to specific positions scattered throughout the hypothalamus. Coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is dependent upon correct migration of GnRH neurons into the hypothalamus followed by the appropriate synthesis and pulsatile secretion of GnRH. Defects in any one of these processes can cause infertility. Recently, substantial progress has been made in identifying transcription factors, and their cofactors, that regulate not only adult expression of GnRH, but also the maturation of GnRH neurons. Here, we show that expression of Otx2, a homeodomain protein required for the formation of the forebrain, is dramatically up-regulated during GnRH neuronal maturation and that overexpression of Otx2 increases GnRH promoter activity in GnRH neuronal cell lines. Furthermore, Otx2 transcriptional activity is modulated by Grg4, a member of the Groucho-related-gene (Grg) family. Using mutational analysis, we show that a WRPW peptide motif within the Otx2 protein is required for physical interaction between Otx2 and Grg4. Without this physical interaction, Grg4 cannot repress Otx2-dependent activation of GnRH gene transcription. Taken together, these data show that Otx2 is important for GnRH expression and that direct interaction between Otx2 and Grg co-repressors regulates GnRH gene expression in hypothalamic neurons.

  1. The Switch from Fermentation to Respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Is Regulated by the Ert1 Transcriptional Activator/Repressor

    PubMed Central

    Gasmi, Najla; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Klimova, Natalia; Guo, Xiao; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Robert, François; Turcotte, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fermentation is the major pathway for energy production, even under aerobic conditions. However, when glucose becomes scarce, ethanol produced during fermentation is used as a carbon source, requiring a shift to respiration. This adaptation results in massive reprogramming of gene expression. Increased expression of genes for gluconeogenesis and the glyoxylate cycle is observed upon a shift to ethanol and, conversely, expression of some fermentation genes is reduced. The zinc cluster proteins Cat8, Sip4, and Rds2, as well as Adr1, have been shown to mediate this reprogramming of gene expression. In this study, we have characterized the gene YBR239C encoding a putative zinc cluster protein and it was named ERT1 (ethanol regulated transcription factor 1). ChIP-chip analysis showed that Ert1 binds to a limited number of targets in the presence of glucose. The strongest enrichment was observed at the promoter of PCK1 encoding an important gluconeogenic enzyme. With ethanol as the carbon source, enrichment was observed with many additional genes involved in gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial function. Use of lacZ reporters and quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that Ert1 regulates expression of its target genes in a manner that is highly redundant with other regulators of gluconeogenesis. Interestingly, in the presence of ethanol, Ert1 is a repressor of PDC1 encoding an important enzyme for fermentation. We also show that Ert1 binds directly to the PCK1 and PDC1 promoters. In summary, Ert1 is a novel factor involved in the regulation of gluconeogenesis as well as a key fermentation gene. PMID:25123508

  2. Nuclear cathepsin D enhances TRPS1 transcriptional repressor function to regulate cell cycle progression and transformation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Derocq, Danielle; Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Montcourrier, Philippe; Sebti, Salwa; Orsetti, Béatrice; Theillet, Charles; Gongora, Céline; Pattingre, Sophie; Ibing, Eva; Roger, Pascal; Linares, Laetitia K; Reinheckel, Thomas; Meurice, Guillaume; Kaiser, Frank J; Gespach, Christian; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-29

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (Cath-D) is overproduced in breast cancer cells (BCC) and supports tumor growth and metastasis formation. Here, we describe the mechanism whereby Cath-D is accumulated in the nucleus of ERα-positive (ER+) BCC. We identified TRPS1 (tricho-rhino-phalangeal-syndrome 1), a repressor of GATA-mediated transcription, and BAT3 (Scythe/BAG6), a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling chaperone protein, as new Cath-D-interacting nuclear proteins. Cath-D binds to BAT3 in ER+ BCC and they partially co-localize at the surface of lysosomes and in the nucleus. BAT3 silencing inhibits Cath-D accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that Cath-D nuclear targeting is controlled by BAT3. Fully mature Cath-D also binds to full-length TRPS1 and they co-localize in the nucleus of ER+ BCC where they are associated with chromatin. Using the LexA-VP16 fusion co-activator reporter assay, we then show that Cath-D acts as a transcriptional repressor, independently of its catalytic activity. Moreover, microarray analysis of BCC in which Cath-D and/or TRPS1 expression were silenced indicated that Cath-D enhances TRPS1-mediated repression of several TRPS1-regulated genes implicated in carcinogenesis, including PTHrP, a canonical TRPS1 gene target. In addition, co-silencing of TRPS1 and Cath-D in BCC affects the transcription of cell cycle, proliferation and transformation genes, and impairs cell cycle progression and soft agar colony formation. These findings indicate that Cath-D acts as a nuclear transcriptional cofactor of TRPS1 to regulate ER+ BCC proliferation and transformation in a non-proteolytic manner. PMID:26183398

  3. Nuclear cathepsin D enhances TRPS1 transcriptional repressor function to regulate cell cycle progression and transformation in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Derocq, Danielle; Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Montcourrier, Philippe; Sebti, Salwa; Orsetti, Béatrice; Theillet, Charles; Gongora, Céline; Pattingre, Sophie; Ibing, Eva; Roger, Pascal; Linares, Laetitia K; Reinheckel, Thomas; Meurice, Guillaume; Kaiser, Frank J; Gespach, Christian; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2015-09-29

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (Cath-D) is overproduced in breast cancer cells (BCC) and supports tumor growth and metastasis formation. Here, we describe the mechanism whereby Cath-D is accumulated in the nucleus of ERα-positive (ER+) BCC. We identified TRPS1 (tricho-rhino-phalangeal-syndrome 1), a repressor of GATA-mediated transcription, and BAT3 (Scythe/BAG6), a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling chaperone protein, as new Cath-D-interacting nuclear proteins. Cath-D binds to BAT3 in ER+ BCC and they partially co-localize at the surface of lysosomes and in the nucleus. BAT3 silencing inhibits Cath-D accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that Cath-D nuclear targeting is controlled by BAT3. Fully mature Cath-D also binds to full-length TRPS1 and they co-localize in the nucleus of ER+ BCC where they are associated with chromatin. Using the LexA-VP16 fusion co-activator reporter assay, we then show that Cath-D acts as a transcriptional repressor, independently of its catalytic activity. Moreover, microarray analysis of BCC in which Cath-D and/or TRPS1 expression were silenced indicated that Cath-D enhances TRPS1-mediated repression of several TRPS1-regulated genes implicated in carcinogenesis, including PTHrP, a canonical TRPS1 gene target. In addition, co-silencing of TRPS1 and Cath-D in BCC affects the transcription of cell cycle, proliferation and transformation genes, and impairs cell cycle progression and soft agar colony formation. These findings indicate that Cath-D acts as a nuclear transcriptional cofactor of TRPS1 to regulate ER+ BCC proliferation and transformation in a non-proteolytic manner.

  4. The B-subdomain of the Xenopus laevis XFIN KRAB-AB domain is responsible for its weaker transcriptional repressor activity compared to human ZNF10/Kox1.

    PubMed

    Born, Nadine; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Lorenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain interacts with the nuclear hub protein TRIM28 to initiate or mediate chromatin-dependent processes like transcriptional repression, imprinting or suppression of endogenous retroviruses. The prototype KRAB domain initially identified in ZNF10/KOX1 encompasses two subdomains A and B that are found in hundreds of zinc finger transcription factors studied in human and murine genomes. Here we demonstrate for the first time transcriptional repressor activity of an amphibian KRAB domain. After sequence correction, the updated KRAB-AB domain of zinc finger protein XFIN from the frog Xenopus laevis was found to confer transcriptional repression in reporter assays in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney cells as well as in human HeLa, but not in the minnow Pimephales promelas fish cell line EPC. Binding of the XFIN KRAB-AB domain to human TRIM28 was demonstrated in a classical co-immunoprecipitation approach and visualized in a single-cell compartmentalization assay. XFIN-AB displayed reduced potency in repression as well as lower strength of interaction with TRIM28 compared to ZNF10 KRAB-AB. KRAB-B subdomain swapping between the two KRAB domains indicated that it was mainly the KRAB-B subdomain of XFIN that was responsible for its lower capacity in repression and binding to human TRIM28. In EPC fish cells, ZNF10 and XFIN KRAB repressor activity could be partially restored to low levels by adding exogenous human TRIM28. In contrast to XFIN, we did not find any transcriptional repression activity for the KRAB-like domain of human PRDM9 in HeLa cells. PRDM9 is thought to harbor an evolutionary older domain related to KRAB whose homologs even occur in invertebrates. Our results support the notion that functional bona fide KRAB domains which confer transcriptional repression and interact with TRIM28 most likely co-evolved together with TRIM28 at the beginning of tetrapode evolution.

  5. Nuclear cathepsin D enhances TRPS1 transcriptional repressor function to regulate cell cycle progression and transformation in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Derocq, Danielle; Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Montcourrier, Philippe; Salwa Sebti, Salwa; Orsetti, Béatrice; Theillet, Charles; Gongora, Céline; Pattingre, Sophie; Ibing, Eva; Roger, Pascal; Linares, Laetitia K.; Reinheckel, Thomas; Meurice, Guillaume; Kaiser, Frank J.; Gespach, Christian; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (Cath-D) is overproduced in breast cancer cells (BCC) and supports tumor growth and metastasis formation. Here, we describe the mechanism whereby Cath-D is accumulated in the nucleus of ERα-positive (ER+) BCC. We identified TRPS1 (tricho-rhino-phalangeal-syndrome 1), a repressor of GATA-mediated transcription, and BAT3 (Scythe/BAG6), a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling chaperone protein, as new Cath-D-interacting nuclear proteins. Cath-D binds to BAT3 in ER+ BCC and they partially co-localize at the surface of lysosomes and in the nucleus. BAT3 silencing inhibits Cath-D accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that Cath-D nuclear targeting is controlled by BAT3. Fully mature Cath-D also binds to full-length TRPS1 and they co-localize in the nucleus of ER+ BCC where they are associated with chromatin. Using the LexA-VP16 fusion co-activator reporter assay, we then show that Cath-D acts as a transcriptional repressor, independently of its catalytic activity. Moreover, microarray analysis of BCC in which Cath-D and/or TRPS1 expression were silenced indicated that Cath-D enhances TRPS1-mediated repression of several TRPS1-regulated genes implicated in carcinogenesis, including PTHrP, a canonical TRPS1 gene target. In addition, co-silencing of TRPS1 and Cath-D in BCC affects the transcription of cell cycle, proliferation and transformation genes, and impairs cell cycle progression and soft agar colony formation. These findings indicate that Cath-D acts as a nuclear transcriptional cofactor of TRPS1 to regulate ER+ BCC proliferation and transformation in a non-proteolytic manner. PMID:26183398

  6. Crystal Structures of the Global Regulator DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor: Implications for the Allosteric Regulation of GntR/HutC Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Fillenberg, Simon B.; Friess, Mario D.; Körner, Samuel; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Muller, Yves A.

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule effectors regulate gene transcription in bacteria by altering the DNA-binding affinities of specific repressor proteins. Although the GntR proteins represent a large family of bacterial repressors, only little is known about the allosteric mechanism that enables their function. DasR from Streptomyces coelicolor belongs to the GntR/HutC subfamily and specifically recognises operators termed DasR-responsive elements (dre-sites). Its DNA-binding properties are modulated by phosphorylated sugars. Here, we present several crystal structures of DasR, namely of dimeric full-length DasR in the absence of any effector and of only the effector-binding domain (EBD) of DasR without effector or in complex with glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P) and N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6-P). Together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a comparison with other GntR/HutC family members these data allowed for a structural characterisation of the different functional states of DasR. Allostery in DasR and possibly in many other GntR/HutC family members is best described by a conformational selection model. In ligand-free DasR, an increased flexibility in the EBDs enables the attached DNA-binding domains (DBD) to sample a variety of different orientations and among these also a DNA-binding competent conformation. Effector binding to the EBDs of DasR significantly reorganises the atomic structure of the latter. However, rather than locking the orientation of the DBDs, the effector-induced formation of β-strand β* in the DBD-EBD-linker segment merely appears to take the DBDs ‘on a shorter leash’ thereby impeding the ‘downwards’ positioning of the DBDs that is necessary for a concerted binding of two DBDs of DasR to operator DNA. PMID:27337024

  7. Overexpression of the Novel MATE Fluoroquinolone Efflux Pump FepA in Listeria monocytogenes Is Driven by Inactivation of Its Local Repressor FepR

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, François; Galimand, Marc; Tuambilangana, Fabrice; Courvalin, Patrice; Cattoir, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Whereas fluoroquinolone resistance mainly results from target modifications in gram-positive bacteria, it is primarily due to active efflux in Listeria monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to dissect a novel molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in this important human pathogen. Isogenic L. monocytogenes clinical isolates BM4715 and BM4716, respectively susceptible and resistant to fluoroquinolones, were studied. MICs of norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were determined in the presence or in the absence of reserpine (10 mg/L). Strain BM4715 was susceptible to norfloxacin (MIC, 4 mg/L) and ciprofloxacin (MIC, 0.5 mg/L) whereas BM4716 was highly resistant to both drugs (MICs 128 and 32 mg/L, respectively). Reserpine was responsible for a 16-fold decrease in both norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin MICs against BM4716 suggesting efflux associated resistance. Whole-genome sequencing of the strains followed by comparative genomic analysis revealed a single point mutation in the gene for a transcriptional regulator, designated fepR (for fluoroquinolone efflux protein regulator) belonging to the TetR family. The frame-shift mutation was responsible for the introduction of a premature stop codon resulting in an inactive truncated protein. Just downstream from fepR, the structural gene for an efflux pump of the MATE family (named FepA) was identified. Gene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR and demonstrated that fepA expression was more than 64-fold higher in BM4716 than in BM4715. The clean deletion of the fepR gene from BM4715 was responsible for an overexpression of fepA with resistance to norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, confirming the role of FepR as a local repressor of fepA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that overexpression of the new MATE efflux pump FepA is responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in L. monocytogenes and secondary to inactivation of the FepR repressor. PMID:25188450

  8. A nitrate-inducible GARP family gene encodes an auto-repressible transcriptional repressor in rice.

    PubMed

    Sawaki, Naoya; Tsujimoto, Ryoma; Shigyo, Mikao; Konishi, Mineko; Toki, Seiichi; Fujiwara, Toru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen is the most important macronutrient in plants and its supply induces responses in gene expression, metabolism and developmental processes. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the nitrogen responses remain poorly understood. Here we show that the supply of nitrate but not ammonium immediately induces the expression of a transcriptional repressor gene in rice, designated NIGT1 (Nitrate-Inducible, GARP-type Transcriptional Repressor 1). The results of DNA-binding site selection experiments and electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that NIGT1 binds to DNA containing either of two consensus sequences, GAATC or GAATATTC. In transient reporter assays, NIGT1 was found to repress transcription from the promoters containing the identified NIGT1-binding sequences in vivo. Furthermore, NIGT1 repressed the activity of its own promoter, suggesting an autorepression mechanism. Consistently, nitrate-induced NIGT1 expression was found to be down-regulated after a transient peak during nitrate treatment, and the nitrate-induced expression of NIGT1 decreased in transgenic rice plants in which this gene was constitutively overexpressed. Furthermore, the chlorophyll content that could be a marker of nitrogen utilization was found to be decreased in NIGT1 overexpressors of rice grown with nitrate medium but not with ammonium medium. Thus, we propose NIGT1 as a nitrate-inducible and autorepressible transcriptional repressor that may play a role in the nitrogen response in rice. Taken together with the fact that the NIGT1-binding sites are conserved in promoter sequences of Arabidopsis NIGT1 homologs, our findings imply the presence of a time-dependent complex system for nitrate-responsive transcriptional regulation that is conserved in both monocots and dicots.

  9. Genomic organization and promoter analysis of a transcriptional repressor gene from Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiaofang; Shen, Shanrui; Gao, Huan; Yan, Binlun

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we cloned and sequenced genomic sequences from a Fenneropenaeus chinensis transcriptional repressor gene, FcTR. The FcTR gene is 2,671 bp in length and has four exons and three introns. The 873 bp promoter contains several transcription factor binding sites, including a TATA box and a cyclic AMP-responsive element. Promoter deletion analysis using a luciferase reporter gene identified regulatory elements. Challenge with white spot syndrome virus increased expression from the promoter-deletion constructs. These results suggest that FcTR might play an important role in the shrimp immune response.

  10. Adrenergic signals direct rhythmic expression of transcriptional repressor CREM in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Stehle, J H; Foulkes, N S; Molina, C A; Simonneaux, V; Pévet, P; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1993-09-23

    Transcription factor CREM appears to play a key physiological and developmental role within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This axis is modulated by the pineal hormone melatonin, whose production is in turn driven by the endogenous clock. There is striking circadian fluctuation of a novel CREM isoform, ICER, which is expressed at high levels during the night. ICER is generated from an alternative, intronic promoter and functions as a powerful repressor of cyclic AMP-induced transcription. Rhythmic adrenergic signals originated by the clock direct ICER expression by stimulation of the cAMP signal transduction pathway.

  11. Feedback regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression in Escherichia coli: structural homology of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein MRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, M; Yates, J L; Dean, D; Post, L E

    1980-01-01

    Certain ribosomal proteins (r proteins) in Escherichia coli, such as S4 and S7, function as feedback repressors in the regulation of r-protein synthesis. These proteins inhibit the translation of their own mRNA. The repressor r proteins so far identified are also known to bind specifically to rRNA at an initial stage in ribosome assembly. We have found structural homology between the S7 binding region on 16S rRNA and a region of the mRNA where S7 acts as a translational repressor. Similarly, there is structural homology between one of the reported S4 binding regions on 16S rRNA and the mRNA target site for S4. The observed homology supports the concept that regulation by repressor r proteins is based on competition between rRNA and mRNA for these proteins and that the same structural features and of the r proteins are used in their interactions with both rRNA and mRNA. PMID:7012833

  12. Feedback regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression in Escherichia coli: structural homology of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal protein MRNA.

    PubMed

    Nomura, M; Yates, J L; Dean, D; Post, L E

    1980-12-01

    Certain ribosomal proteins (r proteins) in Escherichia coli, such as S4 and S7, function as feedback repressors in the regulation of r-protein synthesis. These proteins inhibit the translation of their own mRNA. The repressor r proteins so far identified are also known to bind specifically to rRNA at an initial stage in ribosome assembly. We have found structural homology between the S7 binding region on 16S rRNA and a region of the mRNA where S7 acts as a translational repressor. Similarly, there is structural homology between one of the reported S4 binding regions on 16S rRNA and the mRNA target site for S4. The observed homology supports the concept that regulation by repressor r proteins is based on competition between rRNA and mRNA for these proteins and that the same structural features and of the r proteins are used in their interactions with both rRNA and mRNA.

  13. Targeting of a histone acetyltransferase domain to a promoter enhances protein expression levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kwaks, T H J; Sewalt, R G A B; van Blokland, R; Siersma, T J; Kasiem, M; Kelder, A; Otte, A P

    2005-01-12

    Silencing of transfected genes in mammalian cells is a fundamental problem that probably involves the (in)accessibility status of chromatin. A potential solution to this problem is to provide a cell with protein factors that make the chromatin of a promoter more open or accessible for transcription. We tested this by targeting such proteins to different promoters. We found that targeting the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain to strong viral or cellular promoters is sufficient to result in higher expression levels of a reporter protein. In contrast, targeting the chromatin-remodeling factor Brahma does not result in stable, higher protein expression levels. The long-term effects of the targeted p300HAT domain on protein expression levels are positively reinforced, when also anti-repressor elements are applied to flank the reporter construct. These elements were previously shown to be potent blockers of chromatin-associated repressors. The simultaneous application of the targeted p300HAT domain and anti-repressor elements conveys long-term stability to protein expression. Whereas no copy number dependency is achieved by targeting of the p300HAT domain alone, copy number dependency is improved when anti-repressor elements are included. We conclude that targeting of protein domains such as HAT domains helps to facilitate expression of transfected genes in mammalian cells. However, the simultaneous application of other genomic elements such as the anti-repressor elements prevents silencing more efficiently.

  14. Human KZNF Gene Catalog - A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D. M.; Hamilton, A. T.; Tran-Gyamfi, M.; Yang, S.; Kim, J.; Gordon, L.; Branscomb, E.; Stubbs, L.

    Kruppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. [This abstract was copied from: S Huntley, DM Baggott, AT Hamilton, M Tran-Gyamfi, S Yang, J Kim, L Gordon, E Branscomb, and L Stubbs. 2006. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors, Genome Research 16(5):669 - 677] The website provides the

  15. Identification of a cellular repressor of transcription of the adenoviral late IVa(2) gene that is unaltered in activity in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, H J; Flint, S J

    2000-11-25

    The gene encoding the adenovirus type 2 IVa(2) protein, a sequence-specific activator of transcription from the viral major late promoter, is itself transcribed only during the late phase of infection. We previously identified a cellular protein (IVa(2)-RF) that binds specifically to an intragenic sequence of the IVa(2) transcription unit. We now report that precise substitutions within the IVa(2)-RF-binding site that decreased binding affinity increased the efficiency of IVa(2) transcription in in vitro reactions containing IVa(2)-RF. Consistent with the conclusion that this cellular protein represses IVa(2) transcription, mutations that led to more efficient transcription in the presence of IVa(2)-RF were without effect in reactions lacking this cellular protein. No change in the concentration or activity of IVa(2)-RF could be detected in adenovirus-infected cells during the period in which the IVa(2) gene is transcribed. We therefore propose that restriction of IVa(2) transcription to the late phase is the result of titration of this cellular repressor as the number of copies of the IVa(2) promoter increases upon replication of the viral genome.

  16. THAP5 is a DNA binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-01

    THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death. PMID:21110952

  17. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  18. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  19. Prophage repression as a model for the study of gene regulation. I. Titration of the lambda repressor.

    PubMed

    Wiesmeyer, H

    1966-01-01

    Wiesmeyer, Herbert (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn.). Prophage repression as a model for the study of gene regulation. I. Titration of the lambda repressor. J. Bacteriol. 91:89-94. 1966.-The concentration of lambda repressor molecules within a lambda lysogenic cell was estimated from the multiplicity of superinfecting homologous phage necessary to permit replication and release of plaque-forming units. A multiplicity of 20 superinfecting phage was found sufficient to permit replication to occur in the normal lambda lysogen. The phage released after lysis of the superinfected lysogen was composed of both prophage and superinfecting phage types. Superinfection of the lysogen at lower multiplicities resulted in the lysis of only a small percentage of infected cells and is thought to represent a possible heterogeneity of repressor concentration in the lysogenic population. Viability of the superinfecting particle was found to be unnecessary for titration of the repressor. The repressor concentration in three lysogens of the nonultraviolet-inducible mutant of lambda, lambda(ind-), was found to be greater than 20 regardless of the host bacterium. However, the number of cells yielding phage after superinfection was found to vary with the particular host. The specificity of the lambda repressor was shown to be limited to homologous phage, as determined following heterologous superinfection experiments with phages T6r, 82c, 434c, 434hy, and 424. In all instances except that of superinfection with phage 434hy, only heterologous phage replication occurred. Superinfection by phage 434hy resulted in the release of both prophage and superinfecting phage types. The latter type represented approximately 80% of the total phage released.

  20. Proton-linked contributions to site-specific interactions of lambda cI repressor and OR.

    PubMed

    Senear, D F; Ackers, G K

    1990-07-17

    The effects of proton activity on the site-specific interactions of cI repressors with operator sites OR were studied by using DNase I footprint titration. Individual-site binding isotherms were obtained for the binding of repressor to each site of wild-type OR and of mutant operators in which binding to some sites is eliminated. The Gibbs energies for binding and for cooperativity (in every operator configuration) were determined at each pH (range 5-8). The proton-linked effects clearly account for a significant fraction of the difference in affinities for the three operator sites. The most dramatic effects on the repressor-operator binding interactions are at acid pH, and therefore do not involve the basic groups in the repressor N-terminal arm known to contact the DNA. Also, the proton-linked effects are different at the three operator sites as indicated by significantly different derivative relationships, partial derivative of ln k versus partial derivative of ln aH = net proton absorption (delta nu bar(H)). These results implicate ionizable repressor groups which may not contact the DNA and conformational differences between the three repressor-operator site complexes as being important components to the mechanism of site specificity. The extensive data base generated by these studies was also used to reevaluate the traditional models used to describe cooperativity in this system. The results confirm the lack of significant cooperative interaction between OR1 and OR3 at all conditions. However, the data for some experimental conditions are clearly inconsistent with the (selection) rule, that cooperative interaction between OR2 and OR3 is eliminated by ligation at OR1.

  1. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya; Xiong, Xuelian; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Guang; Li, Xiaoying

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. {yields} DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. {yields} Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. {yields} DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1{alpha}. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.

  2. A hypomorphic mutation in the Gfi1 transcriptional repressor results in a novel form of neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Rueda, Diana; Jönsson, Friederike; Mancardi, David A; Zhao, Weidong; Malzac, Aurélie; Liang, Yinming; Bertosio, Elodie; Grenot, Pierre; Blanquet, Véronique; Sabrautzki, Sybille; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Méresse, Stéphane; Duprez, Estelle; Bruhns, Pierre; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie

    2012-09-01

    Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutagenesis, we established a mouse model with a novel form of neutropenia resulting from a point mutation in the transcriptional repressor Growth Factor Independence 1 (Gfi1). These mice, called Genista, had normal viability and no weight loss, in contrast to mice expressing null alleles of the Gfi1 gene. Furthermore, the Genista mutation had a very limited impact on lymphopoiesis or on T- and B-cell function. Within the bone marrow (BM), the Genista mutation resulted in a slight increase of monopoiesis and in a block of terminal granulopoiesis. This block occurred just after the metamyelocytic stage and resulted in the generation of small numbers of atypical CD11b(+) Ly-6G(int) neutrophils, the nuclear morphology of which resembled that of mature WT neutrophils. Unexpectedly, once released from the BM, these atypical neutrophils contributed to induce mild forms of autoantibody-induced arthritis and of immune complex-mediated lung alveolitis. They additionally failed to provide resistance to acute bacterial infection. Our study demonstrates that a hypomorphic mutation in the Gfi1 transcriptional repressor results in a novel form of neutropenia characterized by a split pattern of functional responses, reflecting the distinct thresholds required for eliciting neutrophil-mediated inflammatory and anti-infectious responses.

  3. Regulation of Cardiac Gene Expression by KLF15, a Repressor of Myocardin Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Joost J.; Wijnen, Wino J.; Hiller, Monika; van der Made, Ingeborg; Lentink, Viola; van Leeuwen, Rick E. W.; Herias, Veronica; Pokharel, Saraswati; Heymans, Stephane; de Windt, Leon J.; Høydal, Morten A.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Creemers, Esther E.

    2010-01-01

    Pathological forms of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) often progress to heart failure. Specific transcription factors have been identified that activate the gene program to induce pathological forms of LVH. It is likely that apart from activating transcriptional inducers of LVH, constitutive transcriptional repressors need to be removed during the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we report that the constitutive presence of Krüppel-like factor 15 (KLF15) is lost in pathological hypertrophy and that this loss precedes progression toward heart failure. We show that transforming growth factor-β-mediated activation of p38 MAPK is necessary and sufficient to decrease KLF15 expression. We further show that KLF15 robustly inhibits myocardin, a potent transcriptional activator. Loss of KLF15 during pathological LVH relieves the inhibitory effects on myocardin and stimulates the expression of serum response factor target genes, such as atrial natriuretic factor. This uncovers a novel mechanism where activated p38 MAPK decreases KLF15, an important constitutive transcriptional repressor whose removal seems a vital step to allow the induction of pathological LVH. PMID:20566642

  4. Antiproliferation activity of a small molecule repressor of liver receptor homolog 1.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cesar A; Mari, Yelenis; Chang, Mi Ra; Khan, Tanya; Kuruvilla, Dana; Nuhant, Philippe; Kumar, Naresh; West, Graham M; Duckett, Derek R; Roush, William R; Griffin, Patrick R

    2015-02-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) is a potent regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid homeostasis. Recently, LRH-1 has been shown to play an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the progression of estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancers and pancreatic cancer. Structural studies have revealed that LRH-1 can bind phospholipids and the dietary phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine activates LRH-1 activity in rodents. Here we characterize the activity of a novel synthetic nonphospholipid small molecule repressor of LRH-1, SR1848 (6-[4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-3-cyclohexyl-1H-pyrimidine-2,4-dione). In cotransfection studies, SR1848 reduced LRH-1-dependent expression of a reporter gene and in cells that endogenously express LRH-1 dose dependently reduced the expression of cyclin-D1 and -E1, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The cellular effects of SR1848 treatment are recapitulated after transfection of cells with small-interfering RNA targeting LRH-1. Immunocytochemistry analysis shows that SR1848 induces rapid translocation of nuclear LRH-1 to the cytoplasm. Combined, these results suggest that SR1848 is a functional repressor of LRH-1 that impacts expression of genes involved in proliferation in LRH-1-expressing cancers. Thus, SR1848 represents a novel chemical scaffold for the development of therapies targeting malignancies driven by LRH-1.

  5. Antiproliferation Activity of a Small Molecule Repressor of Liver Receptor Homolog 1

    PubMed Central

    Corzo, Cesar A.; Mari, Yelenis; Chang, Mi Ra; Khan, Tanya; Kuruvilla, Dana; Nuhant, Philippe; Kumar, Naresh; West, Graham M.; Duckett, Derek R.; Roush, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2) is a potent regulator of cholesterol metabolism and bile acid homeostasis. Recently, LRH-1 has been shown to play an important role in intestinal inflammation and in the progression of estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancers and pancreatic cancer. Structural studies have revealed that LRH-1 can bind phospholipids and the dietary phospholipid dilauroylphosphatidylcholine activates LRH-1 activity in rodents. Here we characterize the activity of a novel synthetic nonphospholipid small molecule repressor of LRH-1, SR1848 (6-[4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-3-cyclohexyl-1H-pyrimidine-2,4-dione). In cotransfection studies, SR1848 reduced LRH-1-dependent expression of a reporter gene and in cells that endogenously express LRH-1 dose dependently reduced the expression of cyclin-D1 and -E1, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The cellular effects of SR1848 treatment are recapitulated after transfection of cells with small-interfering RNA targeting LRH-1. Immunocytochemistry analysis shows that SR1848 induces rapid translocation of nuclear LRH-1 to the cytoplasm. Combined, these results suggest that SR1848 is a functional repressor of LRH-1 that impacts expression of genes involved in proliferation in LRH-1–expressing cancers. Thus, SR1848 represents a novel chemical scaffold for the development of therapies targeting malignancies driven by LRH-1. PMID:25473120

  6. Multi-petal cyclamen flowers produced by AGAMOUS chimeric repressor expression

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuri; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yamamura, Tomomichi; Sugiyama, Masao; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Terakawa, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cyclamen persicum (cyclamen) is a commercially valuable, winter-blooming perennial plant. We cloned two cyclamen orthologues of AGAMOUS (AG), CpAG1 and CpAG2, which are mainly expressed in the stamen and carpel, respectively. Cyclamen flowers have 5 petals, but expression of a chimeric repressor of CpAG1 (CpAG1-SRDX) caused stamens to convert into petals, resulting in a flower with 10 petals. By contrast, CpAG2-SRDX only caused incomplete formation of stamens and carpels. Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana showed similar effects on flower organ specification. Simultaneous expression of CpAG1-SRDX and CpAG2-SRDX in cyclamen induced rose-like, multi-petal flowers, a potentially valuable trait in commercial ornamental varieties. Expression of CpAG2-SRDX in a cyclamen mutant lacking expression of CpAG1 more effectively produced multi-petal flowers. Here, we controlled the number of petals in cyclamen by simple genetic engineering with a chimeric repressor. This strategy may be applicable useful for other ornamental plants with two distinct AG orthologues. PMID:24026510

  7. Safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline (SMART) vaccinia virus vectors for vaccines and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Patricia; Titong, Allison; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun D; Verardi, Paulo H

    2013-09-17

    Replication-competent viruses, such as Vaccinia virus (VACV), are powerful tools for the development of oncolytic viral therapies and elicit superior immune responses when used as vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors. However, severe complications from uncontrolled viral replication can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or in those with other predisposing conditions. VACVs constitutively expressing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) replicate in cell culture indistinguishably from control viruses; however, they replicate in vivo to low or undetectable levels, and are rapidly cleared even in immunodeficient animals. In an effort to develop safe and highly effective replication-competent VACV vectors, we established a system to inducibly express IFN-γ. Our SMART (safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline) vectors are designed to express the tetracycline repressor under a constitutive VACV promoter and IFN-γ under engineered tetracycline-inducible promoters. Immunodeficient SCID mice inoculated with VACVs not expressing IFN-γ demonstrated severe weight loss, whereas those given VACVs expressing IFN-γ under constitutive VACV promoters showed no signs of infection. Most importantly, mice inoculated with a VACV expressing the IFN-γ gene under an inducible promoter remained healthy in the presence of doxycycline, but exhibited severe weight loss in the absence of doxycycline. In this study, we developed a safety mechanism for VACV based on the conditional expression of IFN-γ under a tightly controlled tetracycline-inducible VACV promoter for use in vaccines and oncolytic cancer therapies.

  8. miRNAs control insulin content in pancreatic β-cells via downregulation of transcriptional repressors

    PubMed Central

    Melkman-Zehavi, Tal; Oren, Roni; Kredo-Russo, Sharon; Shapira, Tirosh; Mandelbaum, Amitai D; Rivkin, Natalia; Nir, Tomer; Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A; Dor, Yuval; Hornstein, Eran

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) were shown to be important for pancreas development, yet their roles in differentiated β-cells remain unclear. Here, we show that miRNA inactivation in β-cells of adult mice results in a striking diabetic phenotype. While islet architecture is intact and differentiation markers are maintained, Dicer1-deficient β-cells show a dramatic decrease in insulin content and insulin mRNA. As a consequence of the change in insulin content, the animals become diabetic. We provide evidence for involvement of a set of miRNAs in regulating insulin synthesis. The specific knockdown of miR-24, miR-26, miR-182 or miR-148 in cultured β-cells or in isolated primary islets downregulates insulin promoter activity and insulin mRNA levels. Further, miRNA-dependent regulation of insulin expression is associated with upregulation of transcriptional repressors, including Bhlhe22 and Sox6. Thus, miRNAs in the adult pancreas act in a new network that reinforces insulin expression by reducing the expression of insulin transcriptional repressors. PMID:21285947

  9. Physical Characterization of the Manganese-sensing Pneumococcal Surface Antigen Repressor (PsaR) from Streptococcus pneumoniae*

    PubMed Central

    Lisher, John P.; Higgins, Khadine A.; Maroney, Michael J.; Giedroc, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals, including manganese, are required for proper virulence and persistence of many pathogenic bacteria. In Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), manganese homeostasis is controlled by a high affinity Mn(II) uptake complex, PsaBCA, and a constitutively expressed efflux transporter, MntE. PsaBCA expression is transcriptionally regulated by the DtxR/MntR family metalloregulatory protein pneumococcal surface antigen repressor (PsaR) in Spn. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the metal and DNA-binding properties of PsaR. PsaR is a homodimer in the absence and presence of metals and binds two manganese or zinc per protomer (four per dimer) in two pairs of structurally distinct sites, termed site 1 and site 2. Site 1 is likely filled with Zn(II) in vivo (KZn1≥1013 M−1; KMn1≈108 M−1). The Zn(II)-site 1 complex adopts a pentacoordinate geometry by x-ray absorption spectroscopy containing a single cysteine, and appears analogous to the Cd(II) site observed in S. gordonii ScaR. Site 1 is necessary but not sufficient for full positive allosteric activation of DNA operator binding by metals as measured by ΔGc, the allosteric coupling free energy, since mutants in site 1 show intermediate ΔGc. Site 2 is the primary regulatory site and governs specificity for Mn(II) over Zn(II) in PsaR, with ΔGcZn,Mn>>ΔGcZn,Zn despite the fact that Zn(II) binds site 2 with 40-fold higher affinity relative to Mn(II), i.e., KZn2>KMn2. Mutational studies reveal that Asp7 in site 2 is a critical ligand for Mn(II)-dependent allosteric activation of DNA binding. These findings are discussed in the context of other well-studied DtxR/MntR Mn(II)/Fe(II) metallorepressors. PMID:24067066

  10. OxyR acts as a transcriptional repressor of hydrogen peroxide-inducible antioxidant genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum R.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Haruhiko; Inui, Masayuki; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    OxyR, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, has been established as a redox-responsive activator of antioxidant genes in bacteria. This study shows that OxyR acts as a transcriptional repressor of katA, dps, ftn and cydA in Corynebacterium glutamicum R. katA encodes H2O2-detoxifing enzyme catalase, dps and ftn are implicated in iron homeostasis and cydA encodes a subunit of cytochrome bd oxidase. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that expression of katA and dps, but not of ftn and cydA, was induced by H2O2. Disruption of the oxyR gene encoding OxyR resulted in a marked increase in katA and dps mRNAs to a level higher than that induced by H2O2, and the oxyR-deficient mutant showed a H2O2-resistant phenotype. This is in contrast to the conventional OxyR-dependent regulatory model. ftn and cydA were also upregulated by oxyR disruption but to a smaller extent. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that the OxyR protein specifically binds to all four upstream regions of the respective genes under reducing conditions. We observed that the oxidized form of OxyR similarly bound to not only the target promoter regions, but also nonspecific DNA fragments. Based on these findings, we propose that the transcriptional repression by OxyR is alleviated under oxidative stress conditions in a titration mechanism due to the decreased specificity of its DNA-binding activity. DNase I footprinting analyses revealed that the OxyR-binding site in the four target promoters is ~ 50 bp in length and has multiple T-N11-A motifs, a feature of LysR-type transcriptional regulators, but no significant overall sequence conservation. PMID:23621709

  11. Defining the E-cadherin repressor interactome in epithelial-mesenchymal transition: the PMC42 model as a case study.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Honor J; Kokkinos, Maria I; Blick, Tony; Ackland, M Leigh; Thompson, Erik W; Newgreen, Donald F

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a feature of migratory cellular processes in all stages of life, including embryonic development and wound healing. Importantly, EMT features cluster with disease states such as chronic fibrosis and cancer. The dissolution of the E-cadherin-mediated adherens junction (AJ) is a key preliminary step in EMT and may occur early or late in the growing epithelial tumour. This is a first step for tumour cells towards stromal invasion, intravasation, extravasation and distant metastasis. The AJ may be inactivated in EMT by directed E-cadherin cleavage; however, it is increasingly evident that the majority of AJ changes are transcriptional and mediated by an expanding group of transcription factors acting directly or indirectly to repress E-cadherin expression. A review of the current literature has revealed that these factors may regulate each other in a hierarchical pattern where Snail1 (formerly Snail) and Snail2 (formerly Slug) are initially induced, leading to the activation of Zeb family members, TCF3, TCF4, Twist, Goosecoid and FOXC2. Within this general pathway, many inter-regulatory relationships have been defined which may be important in maintaining the EMT phenotype. This may be important given the short half-life of Snail1 protein. We have investigated these inter-regulatory relationships in the mesenchymal breast carcinoma cell line PMC42 (also known as PMC42ET) and its epithelial derivative, PMC42LA. This review also discusses several newly described regulators of E-cadherin repressors including oestrogen receptor-α and new discoveries in hypoxia- and growth factor-induced EMT. Finally, we evaluated how these findings may influence approaches to current cancer treatment.

  12. The role of primary cilia in corpus callosum formation is mediated by production of the Gli3 repressor.

    PubMed

    Laclef, Christine; Anselme, Isabelle; Besse, Laurianne; Catala, Martin; Palmyre, Aurélien; Baas, Dominique; Paschaki, Marie; Pedraza, Maria; Métin, Christine; Durand, Bénédicte; Schneider-Maunoury, Sylvie

    2015-09-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a frequent brain disorder found in over 80 human congenital syndromes including ciliopathies. Here, we report a severe AgCC in Ftm/Rpgrip1l knockout mouse, which provides a valuable model for Meckel-Grüber syndrome. Rpgrip1l encodes a protein of the ciliary transition zone, which is essential for ciliogenesis in several cell types in mouse including neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain. We show that AgCC in Rpgrip1l(-/-) mouse is associated with a disturbed location of guidepost cells in the dorsomedial telencephalon. This mislocalization results from early patterning defects and abnormal cortico-septal boundary (CSB) formation in the medial telencephalon. We demonstrate that all these defects primarily result from altered GLI3 processing. Indeed, AgCC, together with patterning defects and mispositioning of guidepost cells, is rescued by overexpressing in Rpgrip1l(-/-) embryos, the short repressor form of the GLI3 transcription factor (GLI3R), provided by the Gli3(Δ699) allele. Furthermore, Gli3(Δ699) also rescues AgCC in Rfx3(-/-) embryos deficient for the ciliogenic RFX3 transcription factor that regulates the expression of several ciliary genes. These data demonstrate that GLI3 processing is a major outcome of primary cilia function in dorsal telencephalon morphogenesis. Rescuing CC formation in two independent ciliary mutants by GLI3(Δ699) highlights the crucial role of primary cilia in maintaining the proper level of GLI3R required for morphogenesis of the CC.

  13. Viral DNA synthesis-dependent titration of a cellular repressor activates transcription of the human adenovirus type 2 IVa2 gene.

    PubMed

    Iftode, C; Flint, S J

    2004-12-21

    Synthesis of progeny DNA genomes in cells infected by human subgroup C adenoviruses leads to several changes in viral gene expression. These changes include transcription from previously silent, late promoters, such as the IV(a2) promoter, and a large increase in the efficiency of major-late (ML) transcription. Some of these changes appear to take place sequentially, because the product of the IV(a2) gene has been implicated in stimulation of ML transcription. Our previous biochemical studies suggested that IV(a2) transcription is regulated by viral DNA synthesis-dependent relief of transcriptional repression by a cellular protein that we termed IV(a2)-RF. To test the relevance of such a repressor-titration mechanism during the viral infectious cycle, we introduced into the endogenous IV(a2) promoter two mutations that impair in vitro-binding of IV(a2)-RF, but introduce no change (Rep7) or one conservative amino acid substitution (Rep6) into the overlapping coding sequence for the viral DNA polymerase. The results of run-on transcription assays indicated that both mutations induced earlier-than-normal and more efficient IV(a2) transcription. Both mutations were also observed to result in modest increases in the efficiency of viral DNA synthesis. However, measurement of the concentration of IV(a2) transcripts as a function of IV(a2) template concentration demonstrated that the Rep mutations increased by up to 60-fold the efficiency with which IV(a2) templates were used during the initial period of the late phase of infection, as predicted by the repressor titration hypothesis. These mutations also increased the efficiency of ML transcription in infected cells.

  14. Two essential FtsH proteases control the level of the Fur repressor during iron deficiency in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Krynická, Vendula; Tichý, Martin; Krafl, Jaroslav; Yu, Jianfeng; Kaňa, Radek; Boehm, Marko; Nixon, Peter J; Komenda, Josef

    2014-11-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 expresses four different FtsH protease subunits (FtsH1-4) that assemble into specific homo- and heterocomplexes. The FtsH2/FtsH3 complex is involved in photoprotection but the physiological roles of the other complexes, notably the essential FtsH1/FtsH3 complex, remain unclear. Here we show that the FtsH1 and FtsH3 proteases are involved in the acclimation of cells to iron deficiency. A mutant conditionally depleted in FtsH3 was unable to induce normal expression of the IsiA chlorophyll-protein and FutA1 iron transporter upon iron deficiency due to a block in transcription, which is regulated by the Fur transcriptional repressor. Levels of Fur declined in the WT and the FtsH2 null mutant upon iron depletion but not in the FtsH3 downregulated strain. A similar stabilizing effect on Fur was also observed in a mutant conditionally depleted in the FtsH1 subunit. Moreover, a mutant overexpressing FtsH1 showed reduced levels of Fur and enhanced accumulation of both IsiA and FutA1 even under iron sufficiency. Analysis of GFP-tagged derivatives and biochemical fractionation supported a common location for FtsH1 and FtsH3 in the cytoplasmic membrane. Overall we propose that degradation of the Fur repressor mediated by the FtsH1/FtsH3 heterocomplex is critical for acclimation to iron depletion.

  15. The C-terminal repressor region of herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP27 is required for the redistribution of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and splicing factor SC35; however, these alterations are not sufficient to inhibit host cell splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Sandri-Goldin, R M; Hibbard, M K; Hardwicke, M A

    1995-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection results in a reorganization of antigens associated with the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), resulting in the formation of prominent clusters near the nuclear periphery. In this study, we show that the immediate-early protein ICP27, which is involved in the impairment of host cell splicing and in the changes in the distribution of snRNPs, is also required for reassorting the SR domain splicing factor SC35. Other viral processes, such as adsorption and penetration, shutoff of host protein synthesis, early and late gene expression, and DNA replication, do not appear to play a role in changing the staining pattern of splicing antigens. Furthermore, the C-terminal repressor region of ICP27, which is required for the inhibitory effects on splicing, also is involved in redistributing the snRNPs and SC35. During infection or transfection with five different repressor mutants, the speckled staining pattern characteristic of uninfected cells was seen and the level of a spliced target mRNA was not reduced. Infections in the presence of activator mutants showed a redistributed snRNP pattern and a decreased accumulation of spliced target mRNA. Moreover, two arginine-rich regions in the N-terminal half of ICP27 were not required for the redistribution of snRNPs or SC35. Substitution of these regions with a lysine-rich sequence from simian virus 40 large-T antigen resulted in a redistribution of splicing antigens. Unexpectedly, a repressor mutant with a ts phenotype showed a redistributed staining pattern like that seen with wild-type infected cells. During infections with this ts mutant, splicing was not inhibited, as shown in this and previous studies, confirming its repressor phenotype. Furthermore, both the mutant and the wild-type protein colocalized with snRNPs. Therefore, the redistribution of snRNPs and SC35 correlates with ICP27-mediated impairment of host cell splicing, but these alterations are not sufficient to

  16. The detection of DNA-binding proteins by protein blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, B; Steinberg, J; Laemmli, U K; Weintraub, H

    1980-01-01

    A method, called "protein blotting," for the detection of DNA-binding proteins is described. Proteins are separated on an SDA-polyacrylamide gel. The gel is sandwiched between 2 nitrocellulose filters and the proteins allowed to diffuse out of the gel and onto the filters. The proteins are tightly bound to each filter, producing a replica of the original gel pattern. The replica is used to detect DNA-binding proteins, RNA-binding proteins or histone-binding proteins by incubation of the filter with [32P]DNA, [125I]RNA, or [125I] histone. Evidence is also presented that specific protein-DNA interactions may be detected by this technique; under appropriate conditions, the lac repressor binds only to DNA containing the lac operator. Strategies for the detection of specific protein-DNA interactions are discussed. Images PMID:6243775

  17. The repressor MDBP-2 is a member of the histone H1 family that binds preferentially in vitro and in vivo to methylated nonspecific DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Jost, J P; Hofsteenge, J

    1992-01-01

    MDBP-2 is a repressor that binds preferentially to methylated DNA. Peptides derived from MDBP-2 were sequenced. The sequences of the two peptides, KPAGPS-VTELITK and ALAAGGYDVEK, are identical to those found in the chicken histone H1 core protein. In SDS/polyacrylamide gels MDBP-2 has an apparent molecular mass of 21 kDa, and antibodies directed against calf thymus total histone H1 cross-react with MDBP-2. The preferential binding of affinity-purified MDBP-2 to methylated DNA is not sequence-specific but requires a minimum length of 30 base pairs and one pair of symmetrically methylated (i.e., methylated on both strands) CpG dinucleotides. As previously shown, there is a decrease in the binding activity of MDBP-2 to methylated DNA upon estradiol treatment. Immunoblots show that upon estradiol treatment the amount of immunocrossreacting MDBP-2 protein remains unchanged. MDBP-2 enables another protein to bind DNA which by itself does not bind methylated DNA. Ultraviolet crosslinking and selective immunoadsorption assays with anti-histone H1 antibodies show that in vivo MDBP-2 preferentially binds to the methylated repressed vitellogenin gene. It is concluded that MDBP-2 may participate in the long-term silencing of genes (formation of heterochromatin) through selective binding to methylated DNA. Images PMID:1409659

  18. Specific binding sites in the alcR and alcA promoters of the ethanol regulon for the CREA repressor mediating carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Kulmburg, P; Mathieu, M; Dowzer, C; Kelly, J; Felenbok, B

    1993-03-01

    The CREA repressor responsible for carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans represses the transcription of the ethanol regulon. The N-terminal part of the CREA protein encompassing the two zinc fingers (C2H2 class family) and an alanine-rich region was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase. Our results show that CREA is a DNA-binding protein able to bind to the promoters of both the specific trans-acting gene, alcR, and of the structural gene, alcA, encoding the alcohol dehydrogenase I. DNase I protection footprinting experiments revealed several specific binding sites in the alcR and in the alcA promoters having the consensus sequence 5'-G/CPyGGGG-3'. The disruption of one of these CREA-binding sites in the alcR promoter overlapping the induction target for the trans-activator ALCR results in a partially derepressed alc phenotype and derepressed alcR transcription, showing that this binding site is functional in vivo. Our data suggest that CREA represses the ethanol regulon by a double lock mechanism repressing both the trans-acting gene, alcR, and the structural gene, alcA.

  19. The β-lactamase gene regulator AmpR is a tetramer that recognizes and binds the D-Ala-D-Ala motif of its repressor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, Grishma; Thomas, Misty D; Patel, Trushar R; Donald, Lynda J; Reeve, Thomas M; Stetefeld, Jörg; Standing, Kenneth G; Vocadlo, David J; Mark, Brian L

    2015-01-30

    Inducible expression of chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is induced by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR, which activates ampC expression in response to changes in peptidoglycan (PG) metabolite levels that occur during exposure to β-lactams. Under normal conditions, AmpR represses ampC transcription by binding the PG precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide. When exposed to β-lactams, however, PG catabolites (1,6-anhydroMurNAc-peptides) accumulate in the cytosol, which have been proposed to competitively displace UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide from AmpR and convert it into an activator of ampC transcription. Here we describe the molecular interactions between AmpR (from Citrobacter freundii), its DNA operator, and repressor UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Non-denaturing mass spectrometry revealed AmpR to be a homotetramer that is stabilized by DNA containing the T-N11-A LTTR binding motif and revealed that it can bind four repressor molecules in an apparently stepwise manner. A crystal structure of the AmpR effector-binding domain bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide revealed that the terminal D-Ala-D-Ala motif of the repressor forms the primary contacts with the protein. This observation suggests that 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-pentapeptide may convert AmpR into an activator of ampC transcription more effectively than 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-tripeptide (which lacks the D-Ala-D-Ala motif). Finally, small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that the AmpR·DNA complex adopts a flat conformation similar to the LTTR protein AphB and undergoes only a slight conformational change when binding UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Modeling the AmpR·DNA tetramer bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide predicts that the UDP-MurNAc moiety of the repressor participates in modulating AmpR function. PMID:25480792

  20. The β-Lactamase Gene Regulator AmpR Is a Tetramer That Recognizes and Binds the d-Ala-d-Ala Motif of Its Repressor UDP-N-acetylmuramic Acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide*

    PubMed Central

    Vadlamani, Grishma; Thomas, Misty D.; Patel, Trushar R.; Donald, Lynda J.; Reeve, Thomas M.; Stetefeld, Jörg; Standing, Kenneth G.; Vocadlo, David J.; Mark, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression of chromosomal AmpC β-lactamase is a major cause of β-lactam antibiotic resistance in the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae. AmpC expression is induced by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR, which activates ampC expression in response to changes in peptidoglycan (PG) metabolite levels that occur during exposure to β-lactams. Under normal conditions, AmpR represses ampC transcription by binding the PG precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc)-pentapeptide. When exposed to β-lactams, however, PG catabolites (1,6-anhydroMurNAc-peptides) accumulate in the cytosol, which have been proposed to competitively displace UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide from AmpR and convert it into an activator of ampC transcription. Here we describe the molecular interactions between AmpR (from Citrobacter freundii), its DNA operator, and repressor UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Non-denaturing mass spectrometry revealed AmpR to be a homotetramer that is stabilized by DNA containing the T-N11-A LTTR binding motif and revealed that it can bind four repressor molecules in an apparently stepwise manner. A crystal structure of the AmpR effector-binding domain bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide revealed that the terminal d-Ala-d-Ala motif of the repressor forms the primary contacts with the protein. This observation suggests that 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-pentapeptide may convert AmpR into an activator of ampC transcription more effectively than 1,6-anhydroMurNAc-tripeptide (which lacks the d-Ala-d-Ala motif). Finally, small angle x-ray scattering demonstrates that the AmpR·DNA complex adopts a flat conformation similar to the LTTR protein AphB and undergoes only a slight conformational change when binding UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. Modeling the AmpR·DNA tetramer bound to UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide predicts that the UDP-MurNAc moiety of the repressor participates in modulating AmpR function. PMID:25480792

  1. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  2. Cooperative non-specific DNA binding by octamerizing lambda cI repressors: a site-specific thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pray, T R; Burz, D S; Ackers, G K

    1998-10-01

    Relationships between dimerization and site-specific binding have been characterized previously for wild-type and mutant cI repressors at the right operator (OR) of bacteriophage lambda DNA. However, the roles of higher-order oligomers (tetramers and octamers) that are also formed from these cI molecules have remained elusive. In this study, a clear correlation has been established between repressor oligomerization and non-specific DNA-binding activity. A modification of the quantitative DNase I footprint titration technique has been used to evaluate the degree of saturation of non-specific, OR-flanking lambda DNA by cI repressor oligomers. With the exception of one mutant, only those repressors capable of octamerizing were found to exhibit non-specific DNA-binding activity. The non-specific interaction was accurately modeled using either a one-dimensional, univalent, site-specific Ising lattice approximation, or a more traditional, multivalent lattice approach. It was found that non-specific DNA-binding by repressor oligomers is highly cooperative and energetically independent from site-specific binding at OR. Furthermore, the coupling free energy resolved for non-specific binding was similar to that of site-specific binding for each repressor, suggesting that similar structural elements may mediate the cooperative component of both binding processes. It is proposed that the state of assembly of the repressor molecule modulates its relative affinity for specific and non-specific DNA sequences. These specificities are allosterically regulated by the transmission of assembly-state information from the C-terminal domain, which mediates self-association and cooperativity, to the N-terminal domain, which primarily mediates DNA-binding. While dimers have a high affinity for their cognate sites within OR, tetramers and octamers may preferentially recognize non-specific DNA sequences. The concepts and findings developed in this study may facilitate quantitative

  3. Waking up Streptomyces secondary metabolism by constitutive expression of activators or genetic disruption of repressors.

    PubMed

    Aigle, Bertrand; Corre, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Streptomycete bacteria are renowned as a prolific source of natural products with diverse biological activities. Production of these metabolites is often subject to transcriptional regulation: the biosynthetic genes remain silent until the required environmental and/or physiological signals occur. Consequently, in the laboratory environment, many gene clusters that direct the biosynthesis of natural products with clinical potential are not expressed or at very low level preventing the production/detection of the associated metabolite. Genetic engineering of streptomycetes can unleash the production of many new natural products. This chapter describes the overexpression of pathway-specific activators, the genetic disruption of pathway-specific repressors, and the main strategy used to identify and characterize new natural products from these engineered Streptomyces strains.

  4. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-07-11

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly.

  5. The transcriptional repressor Hes1 attenuates inflammation by regulating transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yingli; Coppo, Maddalena; He, Teng; Ning, Fei; Yu, Li; Kang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Ju, Chanyang; Qiao, Yu; Zhao, Baohong; Gessler, Manfred; Rogatsky, Inez; Hu, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-01

    Most of the known regulatory mechanisms that curb inflammatory gene expression target pre-transcription-initiation steps, and evidence for post-initiation regulation of inflammatory gene expression remains scarce. We found that the transcriptional repressor Hes1 suppressed production of CXCL1, a chemokine that is crucial for recruiting neutrophils. Hes1 negatively regulated neutrophil recruitment in vivo in a manner that was dependent on macrophage-produced CXCL1, and it attenuated the severity of inflammatory arthritis. Mechanistically, inhibition of Cxcl1 expression by Hes1 did not involve modification of transcription initiation. Instead, Hes1 inhibited signal-induced recruitment of the positive transcription-elongation complex P-TEFb and thereby prevented phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II at Ser2 and productive elongation. Thus, our results identify Hes1 as a homeostatic suppressor of inflammatory responses that exerts its suppressive function by regulating transcription elongation.

  6. Translation Repressors, an RNA Helicase, and Developmental Cues Control RNP Phase Transitions during Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Noble, Scott L.; Cameron, Cristiana; Evans, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Like membranous organelles, large-scale coassembly of macromolecules can organize functions in cells. Ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) can form liquid or solid aggregates, but control and consequences of these RNP states in living, developing tissue are poorly understood. Here, we show that regulated RNP factor interactions drive transitions among diffuse, semiliquid, or solid states to modulate RNP sorting and exchange in the Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte cytoplasm. Translation repressors induce an intrinsic capacity of RNP components to coassemble into either large semiliquids or solid lattices, whereas a conserved RNA helicase prevents polymerization into nondynamic solids. Developmental cues dramatically alter both fluidity and sorting within large RNP assemblies, inducing a transition from RNP segregation in quiescent oocytes to dynamic exchange in the early embryo. Therefore, large-scale organization of gene expression extends to the cytoplasm, where regulation of supramolecular states imparts specific patterns of RNP dynamics. PMID:24176641

  7. Beta-Lactamase Repressor BlaI Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Pence, Morgan A.; Haste, Nina M.; Meharena, Hiruy S.; Olson, Joshua; Gallo, Richard L.; Nizet, Victor; Kristian, Sascha A.

    2015-01-01

    BlaI is a repressor of BlaZ, the beta-lactamase responsible for penicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Through screening a transposon library in S. aureus Newman for susceptibility to cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, we discovered BlaI as a novel cathelicidin resistance factor. Additionally, through integrational mutagenesis in S. aureus Newman and MRSA Sanger 252 strains, we confirmed the role of BlaI in resistance to human and murine cathelidicin and showed that it contributes to virulence in human whole blood and murine infection models. We further demonstrated that BlaI could be a target for innate immune-based antimicrobial therapies; by removing BlaI through subinhibitory concentrations of 6-aminopenicillanic acid, we were able to sensitize S. aureus to LL-37 killing. PMID:26305782

  8. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Stuart; Baggott, Daniel M; Hamilton, Aaron T; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Yang, Shan; Kim, Joomyeong; Gordon, Laurie; Branscomb, Elbert; Stubbs, Lisa

    2006-05-01

    Krüppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets.

  9. The Conserved MAPK Site in E(spl)-M8, an Effector of Drosophila Notch Signaling, Controls Repressor Activity during Eye Development

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Mohna; Bishop, Clifton P.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of patterned R8 photoreceptors at the onset of eye development depends on timely inhibition of Atonal (Ato) by the Enhancer of split (E(spl) repressors. Repression of Ato by E(spl)-M8 requires the kinase CK2 and is inhibited by the phosphatase PP2A. The region targeted by CK2 harbors additional conserved Ser residues, raising the prospect of regulation via multi-site phosphorylation. Here we investigate one such motif that meets the consensus for modification by MAPK, a well-known effector of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling. Our studies reveal an important role for the predicted MAPK site of M8 during R8 birth. Ala/Asp mutations reveal that the CK2 and MAPK sites ensure that M8 repression of Ato and the R8 fate occurs in a timely manner and at a specific stage (stage-2/3) of the morphogenetic furrow (MF). M8 repression of Ato is mitigated by halved EGFR dosage, and this effect requires an intact MAPK site. Accordingly, variants with a phosphomimetic Asp at the MAPK site exhibit earlier (inappropriate) activity against Ato even at stage-1 of the MF, where a positive feedback-loop is necessary to raise Ato levels to a threshold sufficient for the R8 fate. Analysis of deletion variants reveals that both kinase sites (CK2 and MAPK) contribute to ‘cis’-inhibition of M8. This key regulation by CK2 and MAPK is bypassed by the E(spl)D mutation encoding the truncated protein M8*, which potently inhibits Ato at stage-1 of R8 birth. We also provide evidence that PP2A likely targets the MAPK site. Thus multi-site phosphorylation controls timely onset of M8 repressor activity in the eye, a regulation that appears to be dispensable in the bristle. The high conservation of the CK2 and MAPK sites in the insect E(spl) proteins M7, M5 and Mγ, and their mammalian homologue HES6, suggest that this mode of regulation may enable E(spl)/HES proteins to orchestrate repression by distinct tissue-specific mechanisms, and is likely to have broader

  10. Both Corynebacterium diphtheriae DtxR(E175K) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis IdeR(D177K) are dominant positive repressors of IdeR-regulated genes in M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yukari C; Hatem, Christine L; Kesavan, Anup K; Durack, Justin; Murphy, John R

    2005-09-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is an important iron-dependent transcriptional regulator of known virulence genes in Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The mycobacterial iron-dependent repressor (IdeR) is phylogenetically closely related to DtxR, with high amino acid similarity in the DNA binding and metal ion binding site domains. We have previously shown that an iron-insensitive, dominant-positive dtxR(E175K) mutant allele from Corynebacterium diphtheriae can be expressed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and results in an attenuated phenotype in mice. In this paper, we report the M. tuberculosis IdeR(D177K) strain that has the cognate point mutation. We tested four known and predicted IdeR-regulated gene promoters (mbtI, Rv2123, Rv3402c, and Rv1519) using a promoterless green fluorescent protein (GFP) construct. GFP expression from these promoters was abrogated under low-iron conditions in the presence of both IdeR(D177K) and DtxR(E175K), a result confirmed by reverse transcription-PCR. The IdeR regulon can be constitutively repressed in the presence of an integrated copy of ideR containing this point mutation. These data also suggest that mutant IdeR(D177K) has a mechanism similar to that of DtxR(E175K); iron insensitivity occurs as a result of SH3-like domain binding interactions that stabilize the intermediate form of the repressor after ancillary metal ion binding. This construct can be used to elucidate further the IdeR regulon and its virulence genes and to differentiate these from genes regulated by SirR, which does not have this domain. PMID:16113319

  11. Hes-1, a known transcriptional repressor, acts as a transcriptional activator for the human acid alpha-glucosidase gene in human fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bo; Raben, Nina; Plotz, Paul H

    2002-03-01

    Hes-1, the mammalian homologue 1 of Drosophila hairy and Enhancer of split proteins, belongs to a family of basic helix-loop-helix proteins that are essential to neurogenesis, myogenesis, hematopoiesis, and sex determination. Hes-1 is a transcriptional repressor for a number of known genes including the human acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) gene as we have previously shown in Hep G2 cells. The human GAA gene encodes the enzyme for glycogen breakdown in lysosomes, deficiency of which results in Glycogen Storage Disease type II (Pompe syndrome). Using constructs containing the DNA element that demonstrates repressive activity in Hep G2 cells and conditions in which the same transcription factors, Hes-1 and YY1, bind, we have shown that this element functions as an enhancer in human fibroblasts. Site-directed mutagenesis and overexpression of Hes-1 showed that Hes-1 functions as a transcriptional activator. The dual function of Hes-1 we have found is likely to contribute to the subtle tissue-specific control of this housekeeping gene.

  12. Changing a conserved amino acid in R2R3-MYB transcription repressors results in cytoplasmic accumulation and abolishes their repressive activity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meiliang; Sun, Zhanmin; Wang, Chenglong; Zhang, Xinquan; Tang, Yixiong; Zhu, Xuemei; Shao, Jirong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-10-01

    Sub-group 4 R2R3-type MYB transcription factors, including MYB3, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32, act as repressors in phenylpropanoid metabolism. These proteins contain the conserved MYB domain and the ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) repression domain. Additionally, MYB4, MYB7 and MYB32 possess a putative zinc-finger domain and a conserved GY/FDFLGL motif in their C-termini. The protein 'sensitive to ABA and drought 2' (SAD2) recognizes the nuclear pore complex, which then transports the SAD2-MYB4 complex into the nucleus. Here, we show that the conserved GY/FDFLGL motif contributes to the interaction between MYB factors and SAD2. The Asp → Asn mutation in the GY/FDFLGL motif abolishes the interaction between MYB transcription factors and SAD2, and therefore they cannot be transported into the nucleus and cannot repress their target genes. We found that MYB4(D261N) loses the capacity to repress expression of the cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) gene and biosynthesis of sinapoyl malate. Our results indicate conservation among MYB transcription factors in terms of their interaction with SAD2. Therefore, the Asp → Asn mutation may be used to engineer transcription factors. PMID:26332741

  13. Subdividing repressor function: DNA binding affinity, selectivity, and allostery can be altered by amino acid substitution of nonconserved residues in a LacI/GalR homologue.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Hongli; Taraban, Marc; Trewhella, Jill; Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2008-08-01

    Many mutations that impact protein function occur at residues that do not directly contact ligand. To understand the functional contributions from the sequence that links the DNA-binding and regulatory domains of the LacI/GalR homologues, we have created a chimeric protein (LLhP), which comprises the LacI DNA-binding domain, the LacI linker, and the PurR regulatory domain. Although DNA binding site residues are identical in LLhP and LacI, thermodynamic measurements of DNA binding affinity show that LLhP does not discriminate between alternative DNA ligands as well as LacI. In addition, small-angle scattering experiments show that LLhP is more compact than LacI. When DNA is released, LacI shows a 20 A increase in length that was previously attributed to unfolding of the linker. This change is not seen in apo-LLhP, even though the linker sequences of the two proteins are identical. Together, results indicate that long-range functional and structural changes are propagated across the interface that forms between the linker and regulatory domain. These changes could be mediated via the side chains of several linker residues that contact the regulatory domains of the naturally occurring proteins, LacI and PurR. Substitution of these residues in LLhP leads to a range of functional effects. Four variants exhibit altered affinity for DNA, with no changes in selectivity or allosteric response. Another two result in proteins that bind operator DNA with very low affinity and no allosteric response, similar to LacI binding nonspecific DNA sequences. Two more substitutions simultaneously diminish affinity, enhance allostery, and profoundly alter DNA ligand selectivity. Thus, positions within the linker can be varied to modulate different aspects of repressor function.

  14. A transcriptional activator, homologous to the Bacillus subtilis PurR repressor, is required for expression of purine biosynthetic genes in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Kilstrup, M; Martinussen, J

    1998-08-01

    A purR::pGh9:ISS1 mutant of Lactococcus lactis was obtained following transposon mutagenesis of strain MG1363 and selection for purine auxotrophs. After determination of the nucleotide sequence and deduction of the purR reading frame, the PurR product was found to be highly similar to the purR-encoded repressor from Bacillus subtilis. The wild-type purR gene complemented the purine auxotrophy of a purR::ISS1 mutant, and it was shown that the purR::ISS1 mutation lowered the level of transcription from the purine-regulated L. lactis purD promoter. In a parallel study on the regulation of purC and purD expression in L. lactis (M. Kilstrup, S. G. Jessing, S. B. Wichmand-Jorgensen, M. Madsen, and D. Nilsson, J. Bacteriol. 180:3900-3906, 1998), we identified regions (PurBox sequences: AWWWCCGAACWWT) upstream of the promoters with a central G residue at exactly position -76 relative to the transcriptional start site. The PurBox sequences were found to be required for high-level promoter activity and purine regulation. We identified a PurBox sequence overlapping the -35 region of the L. lactis purR promoter and found, by studies of a purR-lacLM fusion plasmid, that purR is autoregulated. Because of the high degree of similarity of the PurR proteins from B. subtilis and L. lactis, we looked for PurBox sequences in the promoter regions of the PurR-regulated genes in B. subtilis and identified a perfectly matching PurBox sequence in the purA promoter region and slightly degenerate PurBox-like sequences in the promoter regions for the pur operon and the purR gene. Interestingly, the PurBox in the pur operon of B. subtilis is located almost identically, with respect to the promoter, to the PurBox sequences located in front of purC and purD in L. lactis. We present a hypothesis to explain how an ancestral PurR protein in B. subtilis could have evolved from an activator of the pur operon into a repressor which regulates transcription initiation from the same pur promoter by using

  15. Intratesticular alpha1-adrenergic receptors mediate stress-disturbed transcription of steroidogenic stimulator NUR77 as well as steroidogenic repressors DAX1 and ARR19 in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Stojkov-Mimic, Natasa J; Bjelic, Maja M; Radovic, Sava M; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the role of testicular α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) in stress-triggered adaptation of testosterone-producing Leydig cells of adult rats. Results showed that in vivo blockade of testicular α1-ADRs prevented partial recovery of circulating androgen levels registered after 10× repeated immobilization stress (10 × IMO). Moreover, α1-ADR-blockade diminished 10 × IMO-triggered recovery of Leydig cell androgen production, and abolished mitochondrial membrane potential recovery. In the same cells, 10 × IMO-induced increase in Star transcript was abolished, Lhcgr transcript decreased, while transcription of other steroidogenic proteins was not changed. α1-ADR-blockade recovered stress-induced decrease of Nur77, one of the main steroidogenic stimulator, while significantly reduced 10 × IMO-increased in the transcription of the main steroidogenic repressors, Arr19 and Dax1. In vitro experiments revealed an adrenaline-induced α1-ADR-mediated decrease in Nur77 transcription in Leydig cells. Adrenaline-induced increase of repressor Dax1 also involves ADRs in Leydig cells. Accordingly, α1-ADRs participate in some of the stress-triggered effects on the steroidogenic machinery of Leydig cells. PMID:26003139

  16. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development.

  17. A Comprehensive Catalog of Human KRAB-associated Zinc Finger Genes: Insights into the Evolutionary History of a Large Family of Transcriptional Repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D M; Hamilton, A T; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Yang, S; Kim, J; Gordon, L; Branscomb, E; Stubbs, L

    2005-09-30

    Krueppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotic species. In mammals, most ZNF proteins comprise a single class of transcriptional repressors in which a chromatin interaction domain, called the Krueppel-associated box (KRAB) is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs. KRAB-ZNF loci are specific to tetrapod vertebrates, but have expanded dramatically in numbers through repeated rounds of segmental duplication to create a gene family with hundreds of members in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the human genome for key motifs and used them to construct and manually curate gene models. The resulting KRAB-ZNF gene catalog includes 326 known genes, 243 of which were structurally corrected by manual annotation, and 97 novel KRAB-ZNF genes; this single family therefore comprises 20% of all predicted human transcription factor genes. Many of the genes are alternatively spliced, yielding a total of 743 distinct predicted proteins. Although many human KRAB-ZNF genes are conserved in mammals, at least 136 and potentially more than 200 genes of this type are primate-specific including many recent segmental duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are active in a wide variety of human tissues suggesting roles in many key biological processes, but most member genes remain completely uncharacterized. Because of their sheer numbers, wide-ranging tissue-specific expression patterns, and remarkable evolutionary divergence we predict that KRAB-ZNF transcription factors have played critical roles in crafting many aspects of human biology, including both deeply conserved and primate-specific traits.

  18. Cyclin-dependent kinase-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 and pRb promotes their dissociation to mediate release of the SAP30·mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex.

    PubMed

    Suryadinata, Randy; Sadowski, Martin; Steel, Rohan; Sarcevic, Boris

    2011-02-18

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is mediated by phosphorylation of protein substrates by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). A critical substrate of CDKs is the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene, pRb, which inhibits G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression by binding and repressing E2F transcription factors. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of pRb alleviates this inhibitory effect to promote G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression. pRb represses transcription by binding to the E2F transactivation domain and recruiting the mSin3·histone deacetylase (HDAC) transcriptional repressor complex via the retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBP1). RBP1 binds to the pocket region of pRb via an LXCXE motif and to the SAP30 subunit of the mSin3·HDAC complex and, thus, acts as a bridging protein in this multisubunit complex. In the present study we identified RBP1 as a novel CDK substrate. RBP1 is phosphorylated by CDK2 on serines 864 and 1007, which are N- and C-terminal to the LXCXE motif, respectively. CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 or pRb destabilizes their interaction in vitro, with concurrent phosphorylation of both proteins leading to their dissociation. Consistent with these findings, RBP1 phosphorylation is increased during progression from G(1) into S-phase, with a concurrent decrease in its association with pRb in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into CDK-mediated regulation of the pRb tumor suppressor during cell cycle progression, demonstrating that CDK-mediated phosphorylation of both RBP1 and pRb induces their dissociation to mediate release of the mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex from pRb to alleviate transcriptional repression of E2F.

  19. Mutations in the Bacillus subtilis purine repressor that perturb PRPP effector function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Weng, M; Zalkin, H

    2000-07-01

    The Bacillus subtilis pur operon repressor (PurR) has a PRPP (5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate) binding motif at residues 199-211. Two PurR PRPP binding region mutations (D203A and D204A) were constructed, and the effects on binding of repressor to the pur operon control site in vitro and on regulation of pur operon expression in vivo were investigated. PRPP significantly inhibited the binding of wild-type but not mutant PurR to pur operon control site DNA. In strains with the D203A and D204A mutations, pur operon expression in vivo was super-repressed by addition of adenine to the growth medium. These results support the role of PRPP in modulating the regulatory function of PurR in vivo. YabJ, the product of the distal gene in the bicistronic purR operon, is also required for PurR function in vivo.

  20. Repression and activation of transcription by Gal and Lac repressors: involvement of alpha subunit of RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Choy, H E; Park, S W; Aki, T; Parrack, P; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Adhya, S

    1995-01-01

    Gal or Lac repressor binding to an upstream DNA segment, in the absence of DNA looping, represses the P1 promoter located on the same face and activates the P2 promoter situated on the opposite face of the DNA helix in the gal operon. Both inhibition and stimulation of transcription requires the physical presence of the C-terminal domain of the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase although the latter is not required for transcription itself. We propose that Gal and Lac repressors inhibit or stimulate transcription initiation by disabling or stimulating RNA polymerase activity at a post-binding step by directly or indirectly altering the C-terminal alpha domain to an unfavorable state at P1 or a more favorable state at P2, respectively. Images PMID:7556095

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the CARD domain of apoptosis repressor with CARD (ARC).

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Hyun; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruiting domain (ARC) is an apoptosis repressor that inhibits both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis signalling. Human ARC contains an N-terminal caspase-recruiting domain (CARD domain) and a C-terminal proline- and glutamic acid-rich (P/E-rich) domain. The CARD domain in ARC is the domain that is directly involved in inhibition of the extrinsic pathway. In this study, the N-terminal CARD domain of ARC was overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.1 Å and the crystals were found to belong to space group P6(1) or P65, with unit-cell parameters a=98.28, b=98.28, c=51.86 Å, α=90, β=90, γ=120°.

  2. Rett syndrome mutations abolish the interaction of MeCP2 with the NCoR/SMRT co-repressor.

    PubMed

    Lyst, Matthew J; Ekiert, Robert; Ebert, Daniel H; Merusi, Cara; Nowak, Jakub; Selfridge, Jim; Guy, Jacky; Kastan, Nathaniel R; Robinson, Nathaniel D; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Greenberg, Michael E; Bird, Adrian

    2013-07-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurological disorder that is caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. Many missense mutations causing RTT are clustered in the DNA-binding domain of MeCP2, suggesting that association with chromatin is critical for its function. We identified a second mutational cluster in a previously uncharacterized region of MeCP2. We found that RTT mutations in this region abolished the interaction between MeCP2 and the NCoR/SMRT co-repressor complexes. Mice bearing a common missense RTT mutation in this domain exhibited severe RTT-like phenotypes. Our data are compatible with the hypothesis that brain dysfunction in RTT is caused by a loss of the MeCP2 'bridge' between the NCoR/SMRT co-repressors and chromatin.

  3. TG-interacting factor 1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of sterol O-acyltransferase 2[S

    PubMed Central

    Pramfalk, Camilla; Melhuish, Tiffany A.; Wotton, David; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Eriksson, Mats; Parini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Acat2 [gene name: sterol O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2)] esterifies cholesterol in enterocytes and hepatocytes. This study aims to identify repressor elements in the human SOAT2 promoter and evaluate their in vivo relevance. We identified TG-interacting factor 1 (Tgif1) to function as an important repressor of SOAT2. Tgif1 could also block the induction of the SOAT2 promoter activity by hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α and 4α. Women have ∼30% higher hepatic TGIF1 mRNA compared with men. Depletion of Tgif1 in mice increased the hepatic Soat2 expression and resulted in higher hepatic lipid accumulation and plasma cholesterol levels. Tgif1 is a new player in human cholesterol metabolism. PMID:24478032

  4. Comparison of operator-specific and nonspecific DNA binding of the lambda cI repressor: [KCl] and pH effects.

    PubMed

    Senear, D F; Batey, R

    1991-07-01

    The effects of proton and KCl activity on the nonspecific lambda cI repressor-DNA interactions and on the site-specific repressor-O(R) interactions were compared, in order to assess their roles in site specificity. The repressor-O(R) interactions were studied by using DNase I footprint titration. The Gibbs free energy changes for binding and for cooperativity were determined between 25 and 300 mM KCl, from individual-site isotherms for the binding of repressor to O(R) and to reduced-valency mutants. The proton-linked effects on repressor-O(R) interactions have been published [Senear, D. F., & Ackers, G. K. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 6568-6577; Senear, D. F., & Bolen, D. W. (1991) Methods Enzymol. (in press)]. Nonspecific binding was studied by using a nitrocellulose filter binding assay, which proved advantageous in this case, due to the relatively weak nonspecific binding, and precipitation of repressor-DNA complexes. Filter binding provided measurements at low binding density where precipitation did not occur. The data provide estimates of the Gibbs free energy changes for nonspecific, intrinsic binding, but not for cooperativity. The KCl concentration dependencies of the intrinsic binding constants indicate that ion release plays similar roles in distinguishing between the operators and in discriminating operator from nonoperator DNA. Binding to DNA is accompanied by net proton absorption. Near neutral pH, proton linkages to operator and nonoperator binding are the same. Differences at acid and at basic pH implicate the same ionizable repressor groups in distinguishing between the operators and in discriminating operator from nonoperator DNA. The results indicate similar overall modes of operator and nonoperator binding of repressor, but implicate indirect effects of DNA sequence as important contributors to sequence recognition.

  5. Expression and functions of the repressor element 1 (RE-1)-silencing transcription factor (REST) in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui; Pan, Guoqing; Zheng, Guopei; Wu, Xiaoying; Ren, Hongzheng; Liu, Ying; Wen, Jifang

    2010-07-01

    The repressor element 1 (RE-1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), also known as the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) or repressor binding to the X2 box (XBR), REST/NRSF/XBR, is originally discovered as a transcriptional repressor of a large number of primarily terminal neuronal differentiation genes in non-neuronal cells and neural stem cells (NSCs). Recently, the tumor-suppressor function of REST is finally proved. However, the expression profile and function of REST in breast cancer are not very clear. In this study, the expression of REST was detected in breast cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that REST expression was significantly lower in breast cancer samples compared to normal and benign breast samples (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the shRNA approach was used to investigate the function of REST in human breast cancer cells. Knocking down REST expression by shRNA in the human breast cancer MCF-7 cells resulted in an increase in cell proliferation, suppression in apoptosis, and reduced sensitivity to anticancer drug with a concurrent significantly up-regulated expression of Bcl-2. These data implied a significant role of REST in breast cancer. The reduced expression of REST might contribute to the breast cancer pathogenesis. PMID:20564196

  6. Enhanced generation of myeloid lineages in hematopoietic differentiation from embryonic stem cells by silencing transcriptional repressor Twist-2.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2009-12-01

    The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1(+) and F4/80(+) cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor.

  7. Ttk69 acts as a master repressor of enteroendocrine cell specification in Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenhui; Guo, Xingting; Dou, Kun; Chen, Hongyan; Xi, Rongwen

    2015-10-01

    In adult Drosophila midgut, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) periodically produce progenitor cells that undergo a binary fate choice determined primarily by the levels of Notch activity that they receive, before terminally differentiating into enterocytes (ECs) or enteroendocrine (EE) cells. Here we identified Ttk69, a BTB domain-containing transcriptional repressor, as a master repressor of EE cell specification in the ISC lineages. Depletion of ttk69 in progenitor cells induced ISC proliferation and caused all committed progenitor cells to adopt EE fate, leading to the production of supernumerary EE cells in the intestinal epithelium. Conversely, forced expression of Ttk69 in progenitor cells was sufficient to prevent EE cell specification. The expression of Ttk69 was not regulated by Notch signaling, and forced activation of Notch, which is sufficient to induce EC specification of normal progenitor cells, failed to prevent EE cell specification of Ttk69-depleted progenitors. Loss of Ttk69 led to derepression of the acheate-scute complex (AS-C) genes scute and asense, which then induced prospero expression to promote EE cell specification. These studies suggest that Ttk69 functions in parallel with Notch signaling and acts as a master repressor of EE cell specification in Drosophila ISC lineages primarily by suppressing AS-C genes.

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent constitutive expression of gal operon: use of repressor titration to isolate operator mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Irani, M; Orosz, L; Busby, S; Taniguchi, T; Adhya, S

    1983-01-01

    When the gal operator region is present in a multicopy plasmid it binds to all ("titrates") the gal repressor and "induces" the chromosomal gal operon. To make operator mutations (Oa) with reduced affinity toward the repressor, plasmid DNA was irradiated with UV light and mutant derivatives were isolated that were unable to release the chromosomal gal genes from repression. Then with such an Oa plasmid operator revertants were isolated that had reacquired the ability to release repression. Both sets of mutations have been localized by DNA sequence analysis. When the Oa mutations were transferred from the plasmid to the chromosome by recombination these mutant operators were found to make gal expression constitutive (independent of repressor) but still dependent on cAMP, whereas the previously reported gal operator mutants (Oc) are constitutive both in the presence and in the absence of cAMP. The titration method of isolating mutants enables the isolation of strains with operator mutations that also affect normal promoter activity, and it provides an easy way to isolate revertants of operator mutations. Images PMID:6308647

  9. Cytotype regulation of P transposable elements in Drosophila melanogaster: repressor polypeptides or piRNAs?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Philip A; Stuart, Jeremy R; Goodpaster, Michael P; Goodman, Joseph W; Simmons, Michael J

    2008-08-01

    The telomeric P elements TP5 and TP6 are associated with the P cytotype, a maternally inherited condition that represses P-element-induced hybrid dysgenesis in the Drosophila germ line. To see if cytotype repression by TP5 and TP6 might be mediated by the polypeptides they could encode, hobo transgenes carrying these elements were tested for expression of mRNA in the female germ line and for repression of hybrid dysgenesis. The TP5 and TP6 transgenes expressed more germ-line mRNA than the native telomeric P elements, but they were decidedly inferior to the native elements in their ability to repress hybrid dysgenesis. These paradoxical results are inconsistent with the repressor polypeptide model of cytotype. An alternative model based on the destruction of P transposase mRNA by Piwi-interacting (pi) RNAs was supported by finding reduced P mRNA levels in flies that carried the native telomeric P elements, which are inserted in a known major piRNA locus. PMID:18579507

  10. The transcription factor p53: Not a repressor, solely an activator

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin; Steiner, Lydia; Engeland, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The predominant function of the tumor suppressor p53 is transcriptional regulation. It is generally accepted that p53-dependent transcriptional activation occurs by binding to a specific recognition site in promoters of target genes. Additionally, several models for p53-dependent transcriptional repression have been postulated. Here, we evaluate these models based on a computational meta-analysis of genome-wide data. Surprisingly, several major models of p53-dependent gene regulation are implausible. Meta-analysis of large-scale data is unable to confirm reports on directly repressed p53 target genes and falsifies models of direct repression. This notion is supported by experimental re-analysis of representative genes reported as directly repressed by p53. Therefore, p53 is not a direct repressor of transcription, but solely activates its target genes. Moreover, models based on interference of p53 with activating transcription factors as well as models based on the function of ncRNAs are also not supported by the meta-analysis. As an alternative to models of direct repression, the meta-analysis leads to the conclusion that p53 represses transcription indirectly by activation of the p53-p21-DREAM/RB pathway. PMID:25486564

  11. Inhibition of Snail Family Transcriptional Repressor 2 (SNAI2) Enhances Multidrug Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rong-Jie; Lv, Ya-Ping; Jin, Wei; Meng, Chao; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Huang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    China accounts for almost half of the total number of liver cancer cases and deaths worldwide, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most primary liver cancer. Snail family transcriptional repressor 2 (SNAI2) is known as an epithelial to mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor that drives neoplastic epithelial cells into mesenchymal phenotype. However, the roles of endogenous SNAI2 remain controversial in different types of malignant tumors. Herein, we surprisingly identify that anchorage-independent growth, including the formation of tumor sphere and soft agar colony, is significantly increased when SNAI2 expression is inhibited by shRNAs in HCC cells. Suppression of SNAI2 suffices to up-regulate several cancer stem genes. Although unrelated to the metastatic ability, SNAI2 inhibition does increase the efflux of Hoechst 33342 and enhance multidrug resistance in vitro and in vivo. In agreement with this data, we demonstrate for the first time that decreasing SNAI2 level can transcriptionally upregulate several ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes such as ABCB1. Moreover, ABC transporters’ inhibitor verapamil can rescue the multidrug resistance induced by SNAI2 inhibition. Our results implicate that SNAI2 behaves as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting multidrug resistance via suppressing ABC transporter genes in HCC cells. PMID:27760172

  12. The transcriptional repressor EUO regulates both subsets of Chlamydia late genes.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Christopher J; Hanson, Brett R; Tan, Ming

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenic bacterium Chlamydia replicates in a eukaryotic host cell via a developmental cycle marked by temporal waves of gene expression. We have previously shown that late genes transcribed by the major chlamydial RNA polymerase, σ(66) RNA polymerase, are regulated by a transcriptional repressor EUO. We now report that EUO also represses promoters for a second subset of late genes that are transcribed by an alternative polymerase called σ(28) RNA polymerase. EUO bound in the vicinity of six σ(28) -dependent promoters and inhibited transcription of each promoter. We used a mutational analysis to demonstrate that the EUO binding site functions as an operator that is necessary and sufficient for EUO-mediated repression of σ(28) -dependent transcription. We also verified specific binding of EUO to σ(66) -dependent and σ(28) -dependent promoters with a DNA immunoprecipitation assay. These findings support a model in which EUO represses expression of both σ(66) -dependent and σ(28) -dependent late genes. We thus propose that EUO is the master regulator of late gene expression in the chlamydial developmental cycle.

  13. The transcriptional repressor ICER binds to multiple loci throughout the genome.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Luis C; Molina, Carlos A

    2016-09-23

    The events culminating in ovulation are controlled by the cyclical actions of hormones such as Follical Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH). The secondary messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP) conveys the intracellular activity of these hormones. It is well established that a family of transcription factors facilitate cAMP mediated gene expression, yet it remains unknown how these factors directly affect ovulation. One of these factors, Inducible cAMP Early Repressor (ICER) has been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of cAMP inducible genes during folliculogenesis and ovulation. In order to better determine the role of ICER in ovarian function we have identified novel targets using a genome-wide approach. Using a modification of the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay we directly cloned and sequenced the immunoprecipitated ICER-associated DNAs from an immortalized mouse granulose cell line (GRMO2). The analysis of the immunoprecipitated DNA fragments has revealed that ICER's binding to DNA has the following distribution; 16% within the promoter region, 31% within an intron, 14% were not within a gene, 6% were within 20 kb of a promoter and 3% were within the 3' end of genes.

  14. Mapping the binding interface of ERK and transcriptional repressor Capicua using photocrosslinking.

    PubMed

    Futran, Alan S; Kyin, Saw; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Link, A James

    2015-07-14

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) coordinates cellular responses to a range of stimuli by phosphorylating its numerous substrates. One of these substrates, Capicua (Cic), is a transcriptional repressor that was first identified in Drosophila and has been implicated in a number of human diseases. Here we use a chemical biology approach to map the binding interface of ERK and Cic. The noncanonical amino acid p-azidophenylalanine (AzF) was introduced into the ERK-binding region of Drosophila Cic, and photocrosslinking and tandem mass spectrometry were used to pinpoint its binding site on ERK. We also identified the ERK-binding region of human Cic and showed that it binds to the same site on ERK despite lacking conservation with the Drosophila Cic binding region. Finally, we mapped the amino acids involved in human Cic binding to ERK using AzF-labeled ERK. These results reveal the molecular details of the ERK-Cic interaction and demonstrate that the photocrosslinking approach is complementary to existing methods for mapping kinase-substrate binding interfaces.

  15. MAFG is a transcriptional repressor of bile acid synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R; Romanoski, Casey E; Lee, Richard G; Graham, Mark J; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis, and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG(+/-) mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-seq analysis. Our studies identify a molecular mechanism for the complex feedback regulation of bile acid synthesis controlled by FXR.

  16. A GntR-type transcriptional repressor controls sialic acid utilization in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    PubMed

    Egan, Muireann; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of healthy, breast-fed infants. The metabolism of sialic acid, a ubiquitous monosaccharide in the infant and adult gut, by B. breve UCC2003 is dependent on a large gene cluster, designated the nan/nag cluster. This study describes the transcriptional regulation of the nan/nag cluster and thus sialic acid metabolism in B. breve UCC2003. Insertion mutagenesis and transcriptome analysis revealed that the nan/nag cluster is regulated by a GntR family transcriptional repressor, designated NanR. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli EC101 in which the nanR gene had been cloned and overexpressed was shown to bind to two promoter regions within this cluster, each of which containing an imperfect inverted repeat that is believed to act as the NanR operator sequence. Formation of the DNA-NanR complex is prevented in the presence of sialic acid, which we had previously shown to induce transcription of this gene cluster.

  17. Highly specific epigenome editing by CRISPR-Cas9 repressors for silencing of distal regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Pratiksha I; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Shivakumar, Nishkala K; Kabadi, Ami M; Reddy, Timothy E; Crawford, Gregory E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2015-12-01

    Epigenome editing with the CRISPR (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats)-Cas9 platform is a promising technology for modulating gene expression to direct cell phenotype and to dissect the causal epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Fusions of nuclease-inactive dCas9 to the Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) repressor (dCas9-KRAB) can silence target gene expression, but the genome-wide specificity and the extent of heterochromatin formation catalyzed by dCas9-KRAB are not known. We targeted dCas9-KRAB to the HS2 enhancer, a distal regulatory element that orchestrates the expression of multiple globin genes, and observed highly specific induction of H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) at the enhancer and decreased chromatin accessibility of both the enhancer and its promoter targets. Targeted epigenetic modification of HS2 silenced the expression of multiple globin genes, with minimal off-target changes in global gene expression. These results demonstrate that repression mediated by dCas9-KRAB is sufficiently specific to disrupt the activity of individual enhancers via local modification of the epigenome.

  18. Myeloid Deletion of Nemo Causes Osteopetrosis in Mice Owing to Upregulation of Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Shim, Kyuhwan; Nasir, Amjad M.; Seehra, Kuljeet; Chen, Hung-Po (Tim); Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to numerous physiologic processes including bone development, and its activation is controlled by IKKγ (also called NEMO), the regulatory subunit of IKK complex. NEMO is X-linked, and mutations in this gene result in Incontinentia Pigmenti in human hemizygous females. In mice, global deficiency causes embryonic lethality. In addition, certain point mutations in the NEMO (IKBKG) human gene manifest skeletal defects implicating NEMO in the regulation of bone homeostasis. To specifically investigate such role, we conditionally deleted Nemo from osteoclast and myeloid progenitors. Morphometric, histologic, and molecular analyses demonstrate that myeloid NEMO deletion causes osteopetrosis in mice. Mechanistically, NEMO deficiency hampered activation of IKK complex in osteoclast precursors, causing arrest of osteoclastogenesis and apoptosis. Interestingly, inhibiting apoptosis by genetic ablation of TNFr1 significantly increased cell survival, but failed to rescue osteoclastogenesis or reverse osteopetrosis. Based on this observation, we analyzed the expression of different regulators of osteoclastogenesis and discovered that NEMO deletion leads to increased RBPJ expression, resulting in a decrease of Blimp1 expression. Consequently, expression of IRF8 and Bcl6 which are targets of Blimp1 and potent osteoclastogenic transcriptional repressors, is increased. Thus, NEMO governs survival and osteoclast differentiation programs through serial regulation of multiple transcription factors. PMID:27435916

  19. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  20. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D.; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C.; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1−/− mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1−/− mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD+, and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD+ levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. PMID:25934505

  1. Differential signal transduction via TrmB, a sugar sensing transcriptional repressor of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Surma, Melanie; Seitz, Sabine; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2007-06-01

    TrmB is a transcriptional repressor of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus serving at least two operons. TrmB represses genes encoding an ABC transporter for trehalose and maltose (the TM system) with trehalose and maltose as inducers. TrmB also represses genes encoding another ABC transporter for maltodextrins (the MD system) with maltotriose and sucrose as inducers. Here we report that glucose which was also bound by TrmB acted as a corepressor (causing stronger repression) for both the TM and the MD system. Binding of glucose by TrmB was increased in the presence of TM promoter DNA. Maltose which acted as inducer for the TM system acted as a corepressor for the MD system intensifying repression. We propose that the differential conformational changes of TrmB in response to binding the different sugars governs the ability of TrmB to interact with the promoter region and represents a simple mechanism for selecting the usage of one carbon source over the other, reminiscent of catabolite repression in bacteria.

  2. Highly Specific Epigenome Editing by CRISPR/Cas9 Repressors for Silencing of Distal Regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Thakore, Pratiksha I.; D’Ippolito, Anthony M; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Shivakumar, Nishkala K.; Kabadi, Ami M.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Gersbach, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 platform is a promising technology to modulate gene expression to direct cell phenotype and to dissect the causal epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation. Fusions of the nuclease-inactive dCas9 to the KRAB repressor (dCas9-KRAB) can silence target gene expression, but the genome-wide specificity and the extent of heterochromatin formation catalyzed by dCas9-KRAB is not known. We targeted dCas9-KRAB to the HS2 enhancer, a distal regulatory element that orchestrates expression of multiple globin genes. Genome-wide analyses demonstrated that localization of dCas9-KRAB to HS2 specifically induced H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3) at the enhancer and reduced the chromatin accessibility of both the enhancer and its promoter targets. Targeted epigenetic modification of HS2 silenced the expression of multiple globin genes, with minimal off-target changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate that repression mediated by dCas9-KRAB is sufficiently specific to disrupt the activity of individual enhancers via local modification of the epigenome. PMID:26501517

  3. Fur-type transcriptional repressors and metal homeostasis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Chua, Tiing Tiing; Chew, Chyue Yie; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Metal homeostasis is a crucial cellular function for nearly all organisms. Some heavy metals (e.g., Fe, Zn, Co, Mo) are essential because they serve as cofactors for enzymes or metalloproteins, and chlorophototrophs such as cyanobacteria have an especially high demand for iron. At excessive levels, however, metals become toxic to cyanobacteria. Therefore, a tight control mechanism is essential for metal homeostasis. Metal homeostasis in microorganisms comprises two elements: metal acquisition from the environment and detoxification or excretion of excess metal ions. Different families of metal-sensing regulators exist in cyanobacteria and each addresses a more or less specific set of target genes. In this study the regulons of three Fur-type and two ArsR-SmtB-type regulators were investigated in a comparative approach in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. One Fur-type regulator controls genes for iron acquisition (Fur); one controls genes for zinc acquisition (Zur); and the third controls two genes involved in oxidative stress (Per). Compared to other well-investigated cyanobacterial strains, however, the set of target genes for each regulator is relatively small. Target genes for the two ArsR-SmtB transcriptional repressors (SmtB (SYNPCC7002_A2564) and SYNPCC7002_A0590) are involved in zinc homeostasis in addition to Zur. Their target genes, however, are less specific for zinc and point to roles in a broader heavy metal detoxification response. PMID:26582412

  4. MAFG Is a Transcriptional Repressor of Bile Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Ahn, Hannah; Hagey, Lee R.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Lee, Richard G.; Graham, Mark J.; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Edwards, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Specific bile acids are potent signaling molecules that modulate metabolic pathways affecting lipid, glucose and bile acid homeostasis and the microbiota. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver, and the key enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis (Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1) are regulated transcriptionally by the nuclear receptor FXR. We have identified an FXR-regulated pathway upstream of a transcriptional repressor that controls multiple bile acid metabolism genes. We identify MafG as an FXR target gene and show that hepatic MAFG overexpression represses genes of the bile acid synthetic pathway, and modifies the biliary bile acid composition. In contrast, loss-of-function studies using MafG+/− mice causes de-repression of the same genes with concordant changes in biliary bile acid levels. Finally, we identify functional MafG response elements in bile acid metabolism genes using ChIP-Seq analysis. Our s