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Sample records for requirement pmr review

  1. PmrD is required for modifications to escherichia coli endotoxin that promote antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Erica J; Herrera, Carmen M; Crofts, Alexander A; Trent, M Stephen

    2015-04-01

    In Salmonella enterica, PmrD is a connector protein that links the two-component systems PhoP-PhoQ and PmrA-PmrB. While Escherichia coli encodes a PmrD homolog, it is thought to be incapable of connecting PhoPQ and PmrAB in this organism due to functional divergence from the S. enterica protein. However, our laboratory previously observed that low concentrations of Mg(2+), a PhoPQ-activating signal, leads to the induction of PmrAB-dependent lipid A modifications in wild-type E. coli (C. M. Herrera, J. V. Hankins, and M. S. Trent, Mol Microbiol 76:1444-1460, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2010.07150.x). These modifications include phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) and 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (l-Ara4N), which promote bacterial resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) when affixed to lipid A. Here, we demonstrate that pmrD is required for modification of the lipid A domain of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under low-Mg(2+) growth conditions. Further, RNA sequencing shows that E. coli pmrD influences the expression of pmrA and its downstream targets, including genes coding for the modification enzymes that transfer pEtN and l-Ara4N to the lipid A molecule. In line with these findings, a pmrD mutant is dramatically impaired in survival compared with the wild-type strain when exposed to the CAMP polymyxin B. Notably, we also reveal the presence of an unknown factor or system capable of activating pmrD to promote lipid A modification in the absence of the PhoPQ system. These results illuminate a more complex network of protein interactions surrounding activation of PhoPQ and PmrAB in E. coli than previously understood.

  2. PmrD is Required for Modifications to Escherichia Coli Endotoxin that Promote Antimicrobial Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-20

    for modification of the lipid A domain of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under low-Mg(2+) growth conditions. Further, RNA sequencing shows that E...that pmrD is required for modifi- cation of the lipid A domain of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) under low-Mg2 growth conditions. Further, RNA ...as shown by RNA sequencing ( RNA -seq) analysis. Intriguingly, our findings also uncover the existence of a second PhoPQ-independent system that

  3. A review of dynamic mechanical characterization of high temperature PMR polyimides and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the applications of dynamic mechanical characterization for high-temperature PMR polyimides and their graphite-fiber-reinforced composites. This characterization technique provides insights into the processability, performance, and structure property relationships of the polyimides and composites. The dynamic mechanical properties of various molding powders, commercially obtained prepregs, neat resins, and as-fabricated as well as aged composites are presented. Some applied aspects of the dynamic mechanical data are discussed.

  4. The pmr gene, encoding a Ca2+-ATPase, is required for calcium and manganese homeostasis and normal development of hyphae and conidia in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Barry J; Abreu, Stephen; Johl, Jessica K; Bowman, Emma Jean

    2012-11-01

    The pmr gene is predicted to encode a Ca(2+)-ATPase in the secretory pathway. We examined two strains of Neurospora crassa that lacked PMR: the Δpmr strain, in which pmr was completely deleted, and pmr(RIP), in which the gene was extensively mutated. Both strains had identical, complex phenotypes. Compared to the wild type, these strains required high concentrations of calcium or manganese for optimal growth and had highly branched, slow-growing hyphae. They conidiated poorly, and the shape and size of the conidia were abnormal. Calcium accumulated in the Δpmr strains to only 20% of the wild-type level. High concentrations of MnCl(2) (1 to 5 mM) in growth medium partially suppressed the morphological defects but did not alter the defect in calcium accumulation. The Δpmr Δnca-2 double mutant (nca-2 encodes a Ca(2+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane) accumulated 8-fold more calcium than the wild type, and the morphology of the hyphae was more similar to that of wild-type hyphae. Previous experiments failed to show a function for nca-1, which encodes a SERCA-type Ca(2+)-ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum (B. J. Bowman, S. Abreu, E. Margolles-Clark, M. Draskovic, and E. J. Bowman, Eukaryot. Cell 10:654-661, 2011). The pmr(RIP) Δnca-1 double mutant accumulated small amounts of calcium, like the Δpmr strain, but exhibited even more extreme morphological defects. Thus, PMR can apparently replace NCA-1 in the endoplasmic reticulum, but NCA-1 cannot replace PMR. The morphological defects in the Δpmr strain are likely caused, in part, by insufficient concentrations of calcium and manganese in the Golgi compartment; however, PMR is also needed to accumulate normal levels of calcium in the whole cell.

  5. Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) Special Interest Group at OMERACT 11: outcomes of importance for patients with PMR.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Sarah L; Arat, Seher; da Silva, Jose; Duarte, Catia; Halliday, Sue; Hughes, Rod; Morris, Marianne; Pease, Colin T; Sherman, Jeffrey W; Simon, Lee S; Walsh, Maggie; Westhovens, René; Zakout, Samy; Kirwan, John R

    2014-04-01

    We worked toward developing a core outcome set for clinical research studies in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) by conducting (1) patient consultations using modified nominal group technique; (2) a systematic literature review of outcome measures in PMR; (3) a pilot observational study of patients presenting with untreated PMR, and further discussion with patient research partners; and (4) a qualitative focus group study of patients with PMR on the meaning of stiffness, using thematic analysis. (1) Consultations included 104 patients at 4 centers. Symptoms of PMR included pain, stiffness, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. Function, anxiety, and depression were also often mentioned. Participants expressed concerns about diagnostic delay, adverse effects of glucocorticoids, and fear of relapse. (2) In the systematic review, outcome measures previously used for PMR include pain visual analog scores (VAS), morning stiffness, blood markers, function, and quality of life; standardized effect sizes posttreatment were large. (3) Findings from the observational study indicated that asking about symptom severity at 7 AM, or "on waking," appeared more relevant to disease activity than asking about symptom severity "now" (which depended on the time of assessment). (4) Preliminary results were presented from the focus group qualitative study, encompassing broad themes of stiffness, pain, and the effect of PMR on patients' lives. It was concluded that further validation work is required before a core outcome set in PMR can be recommended. Nevertheless, the large standardized effect sizes suggest that pain VAS is likely to be satisfactory as a primary outcome measure for assessing response to initial therapy of PMR. Dissection of between-patient heterogeneity in the subsequent treatment course may require attention to comorbidity as a potential confounding factor.

  6. PMR polyimide composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    Fiber reinforced PMR polyimides are finding increased acceptance as engineering materials for high performance structural applications. Prepreg materials based on this novel class of highly processable, high temperature resistant polyimides, are commercially available and the PMR concept was incorporated in several industrial applications. The status of PMR polyimides is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the chemistry, processing, and applications of the first generation PMR polyimides known as PMR-15.

  7. Novel improved PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    A series of N-phenylnadimide (PN) modified PMR polyimide composites reinforced with graphite fibers was investigated. The improved flow matrix resins consist of N-phenylnadimide (PN), monomenthyl ester of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid (NE), dimethyl ester of 3,3, 4,4-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acide (BTDE), and 4,4 methylenedianiline (MDA). Five modified PMR resin systems were formulated by the addition of 4 to 20 mole percent N-phenylnadimide to the standard PMR-15 composition. These formulations and the control PMR resin were evaluated for rheological characteristics. The initial thermal and mechanical properties of the PN modified PMR and the control PMR/Celion 6000 composites were determined. The results show that the addition of N-phenylnadimide to PMR-15 significantly improved the resin flow characteristics without sacrificing the composites properties. Concentrations of 4 and 9 mole percent PN appear to improve the thermoxidative stability of PMR composites.

  8. Shelf Life of PMR Polyimide Monomer Solutions and Prepregs Extended

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2000-01-01

    PMR (Polymerization of Monomeric Reactants) technology was developed in the mid-1970's at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for fabricating high-temperature stable polyimide composites. This technology allowed a solution of polyimide monomers or prepreg (a fiber, such as glass or graphite, impregnated with PMR polyimide monomers) to be thermally cured without the release of volatiles that cause the formation of voids unlike the non-PMR technology used for polyimide condensation type resins. The initial PMR resin introduced as PMR 15 is still commercially available and is used worldwide by aerospace industries as the state-of-the-art resin for high-temperature polyimide composite applications. PMR 15 offers easy composite processing, excellent composite mechanical property retention, a long lifetime at use temperatures of 500 to 550 F, and relatively low cost. Later, second-generation PMR resin versions, such as PMR II 50 and VCAP 75, offer improvements in the upper-use temperature (to 700 F) and in the useful life at temperature without major compromises in processing and property retention but with significant increases in resin cost. Newer versions of nontoxic (non-methylene dianiline) PMR resins, such as BAX PMR 15, offer similar advantages as originally found for PMR 15 but also with significant increases in resin cost. Thus, the current scope of the entire PMR technology available meets a wide range of aeronautical requirements for polymer composite applications.

  9. A PmrB-Regulated Deacetylase Required for Lipid A Modification and Polymyxin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chui-Yoke; Gregg, Kelsey A; Napier, Brooke A; Ernst, Robert K; Weiss, David S

    2015-12-01

    Emerging resistance to "last-resort" polymyxin antibiotics in Gram-negative bacteria is a significant threat to public health. We identified the Acinetobacter baumannii NaxD deacetylase as a critical mediator of lipid A modification resulting in polymyxin resistance and demonstrated that naxD is regulated by the sensor kinase PmrB. This represents the first description of a specific PmrB-regulated gene contributing to polymyxin resistance in A. baumannii and highlights NaxD as a putative drug target to reverse polymyxin resistance.

  10. A PmrB-Regulated Deacetylase Required for Lipid A Modification and Polymyxin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Chui-Yoke; Gregg, Kelsey A.; Napier, Brooke A.; Ernst, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging resistance to “last-resort” polymyxin antibiotics in Gram-negative bacteria is a significant threat to public health. We identified the Acinetobacter baumannii NaxD deacetylase as a critical mediator of lipid A modification resulting in polymyxin resistance and demonstrated that naxD is regulated by the sensor kinase PmrB. This represents the first description of a specific PmrB-regulated gene contributing to polymyxin resistance in A. baumannii and highlights NaxD as a putative drug target to reverse polymyxin resistance. PMID:26459891

  11. High molecular weight first generation PMR polyimides for 343 C applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malarik, D. C.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of molecular weight on 343 C thermo-oxidative stability (TOS), mechanical properties, and processability, of the first generation PMR polyimides was studied. Graphite fiber reinforced PMR-15, PMR-30, PMR-50, and PMR-75 composites (corresponding to formulated molecular weights of 1500, 3000, 5000, and 7500, respectively) were fabricated using a simulated autoclave process. The data reveal that while alternate autoclave cure schedules are required for the high molecular weight resins, low void laminates can be fabricated which have significantly improved TDS over PMR-15, with only a small sacrifice in mechanical properties.

  12. High molecular weight first generation PMR polyimides for 343 C applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malarik, Diane C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of molecular weight on 343 C thermo-oxidative stability (TOS), mechanical properties, and processability, of the first generation PMR polyimides was studied. Graphite fiber reinforced PMR-15, PMR-30, PMR-50, and PMR-75 composites (corresponding to formulated molecular weights of 1500, 3000, 5000, and 7500, respectively) were fabricated using a simulated autoclave process. The data reveals that while alternate autoclave cure schedules are required for the high molecular weight resins, low void laminates can be fabricated which have significantly improved TOS over PMR-15, with only a small sacrifice in mechanical properties.

  13. Identification of cptA, a PmrA-Regulated Locus Required for Phosphoethanolamine Modification of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Lipopolysaccharide Core

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo, R.; Choudhury, B.; Septer, A.; Merighi, M.; Carlson, R.; Gunn, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    In response to the in vivo environment, the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modified. These modifications are controlled in part by the two-component regulatory system PmrA-PmrB, with the addition of 4-aminoarabinose (Ara4N) to the lipid A and phosphoethanolamine (pEtN) to the lipid A and core. Here we demonstrate that the PmrA-regulated STM4118 (cptA) gene is necessary for the addition of pEtN to the LPS core. pmrC, a PmrA-regulated gene necessary for the addition of pEtN to lipid A, did not affect core pEtN addition. Although imparting a similar surface charge modification as Ara4N, which greatly affects polymyxin B resistance and murine virulence, neither pmrC nor cptA plays a dramatic role in antimicrobial peptide resistance in vitro or virulence in the mouse model. Therefore, factors other than surface charge/electrostatic interaction contribute to resistance to antimicrobial peptides such as polymyxin B. PMID:15866924

  14. PMR Resin Compositions For High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to identify polymer matrix resins suitable for making graphite-fiber laminates used at 700 degree F (371 degree C) in such applications as aircraft engines to achieve higher thrust-to-weight ratios. Two particular high-molecular-weight formulations of PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) resins most promising. PMR compositions of higher FMW exhibit enhanced thermo-oxidative stability. Formation of high-quality laminates with these compositions requires use of curing pressures higher than those suitable for compositions of lower FMW.

  15. Review of Transporter-Related Postmarketing Requirement or Postmarketing Commitment Studies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Sun, Bo; Agarwal, Sheetal; Zhang, Lei

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this report are to summarize the content and status of transporter-related postmarketing requirement (PMR)/postmarketing commitment (PMC) studies in new drug applications (NDAs) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and to discuss the reasons for requesting such studies and the impact of PMR/PMC study results on labeling to guide the optimal use of the drugs. Multiple data sources were searched to collect information on transporter-related PMR/PMC studies between January 1999 and May 2015. A total of 40 transporter-related PMR/PMC study requests were issued for 35 NDAs. Among these PMR/PMC studies, 27 requested studies related to P-glycoprotein. As of May 31, 2015, 34 transporter-related PMR/PMC studies (85%) are considered "fulfilled" (per the FDA's PMR/PMC website), and 22 (65%) resulted in labeling updates. The majority of the PMR/PMC studies are for drugs in the therapeutic areas of anti-infectives, oncology, and neurology. The results from PMR/PMC studies are important for dosing optimization and are often included in the updated labeling. Because a significant lag time is anticipated between drug approval and PMR/PMC fulfillment, NDA applicants are encouraged to include transporter-related assessments in clinical drug development programs for drug products.

  16. Low-Toxicity PMR Polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Ely, Robert M.; Stanfield, Clarence E.; Dickerson, George E.; Snoha, John J.; Srinivasan, Krishna; Hou, Tan

    1994-01-01

    New low-toxicity PMR system developed and designated LaRC-RP46. Exhibits better processability, toughness, and thermo-oxidative stability than does PMR-15. Polyimide inexpensive and readily processed into high-quality graphite-fiber-reinforced composite. Used as high-performance, high-temperature-resistant adhesive, molding, composite, film, and coating material where low toxicity desired characteristic. Significantly extends applications of PMR-type polyimides.

  17. Quality assurance of PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, A. B.

    1979-01-01

    Controls on the PMR-15 resin and/or prepreg were established to ensure a solid base for the subsequent process development task. The effort was divided into subtasks which included evaluation of commercially available graphite/PMR-15 polyimide prepregs, detailed evaluation of materials and selection of chemical test procedures. During the initial phase of the program a variability problem was detected in the PMR-15 resin. The manufacturing and/or storage of the PMR-15 resin/esters was identified as the chief cause for the variability.

  18. Data Crosscutting Requirements Review

    SciTech Connect

    Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Shoshani, Arie; Plata, Charity

    2013-04-01

    In April 2013, a diverse group of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientific community assembled to assess data requirements associated with DOE-sponsored scientific facilities and large-scale experiments. Participants in the review included facilities staff, program managers, and scientific experts from the offices of Basic Energy Sciences, Biological and Environmental Research, High Energy Physics, and Advanced Scientific Computing Research. As part of the meeting, review participants discussed key issues associated with three distinct aspects of the data challenge: 1) processing, 2) management, and 3) analysis. These discussions identified commonalities and differences among the needs of varied scientific communities. They also helped to articulate gaps between current approaches and future needs, as well as the research advances that will be required to close these gaps. Moreover, the review provided a rare opportunity for experts from across the Office of Science to learn about their collective expertise, challenges, and opportunities. The "Data Crosscutting Requirements Review" generated specific findings and recommendations for addressing large-scale data crosscutting requirements.

  19. Dry PMR-15 Resin Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Roberts, Gary D.

    1988-01-01

    Shelf lives of PMR-15 polymides lengthened. Procedure involves quenching of monomer reactions by vacuum drying of PRM-15 resin solutions at 70 to 90 degree F immediately after preparation of solutions. Absence of solvent eliminates formation of higher esters and reduces formation of imides to negligible level. Provides fully-formulated dry PMR-15 resin powder readily dissolvable in solvent at room temperature immediately before use. Resins used in variety of aerospace, aeronautical, and commercial applications.

  20. Characterization of PMR polyimide resin and prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmeyer, P. H.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated into effective processing procedures for the production of high quality graphite composites. During the program the PMR monomers and selected model compounds representative of postulated PMR-15 solution chemistry were acquired and characterized. Based on these data, a baseline PMR-15 resin was formulated and evaluated for processing characteristics and composite properties. Commercially available PMR-15 resins were then obtained and chemically characterized. Composite panels were fabricated and evaluated.

  1. Essential role for the response regulator PmrA in Coxiella burnetii type 4B secretion and colonization of mammalian host cells.

    PubMed

    Beare, Paul A; Sandoz, Kelsi M; Larson, Charles L; Howe, Dale; Kronmiller, Brent; Heinzen, Robert A

    2014-06-01

    Successful host cell colonization by the Q fever pathogen, Coxiella burnetii, requires translocation of effector proteins into the host cytosol by a Dot/Icm type 4B secretion system (T4BSS). In Legionella pneumophila, the two-component system (TCS) PmrAB regulates the Dot/Icm T4BSS and several additional physiological processes associated with pathogenesis. Because PmrA consensus regulatory elements are associated with some dot/icm and substrate genes, a similar role for PmrA in regulation of the C. burnetii T4BSS has been proposed. Here, we constructed a C. burnetii pmrA deletion mutant to directly probe PmrA-mediated gene regulation. Compared to wild-type bacteria, C. burnetii ΔpmrA exhibited severe intracellular growth defects that coincided with failed secretion of effector proteins. Luciferase gene reporter assays demonstrated PmrA-dependent expression of 5 of 7 dot/icm operons and 9 of 11 effector-encoding genes with a predicted upstream PmrA regulatory element. Mutational analysis verified consensus sequence nucleotides required for PmrA-directed transcription. RNA sequencing and whole bacterial cell mass spectrometry of wild-type C. burnetii and the ΔpmrA mutant uncovered new components of the PmrA regulon, including several genes lacking PmrA motifs that encoded Dot/Icm substrates. Collectively, our results indicate that the PmrAB TCS is a critical virulence factor that regulates C. burnetii Dot/Icm secretion. The presence of PmrA-responsive genes lacking PmrA regulatory elements also suggests that the PmrAB TCS controls expression of regulatory systems associated with the production of additional C. burnetii proteins involved in host cell parasitism.

  2. Low toxicity high temperature PMR polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    In-situ polymerization of monomer reactants (PMR) type polyimides constitute an important class of ultra high performance composite matrix resins. PMR-15 is the best known and most widely used PMR polyimide. An object of the present invention is to provide a substantially improved high temperature PMR-15 system that exhibits better processability, toughness, and thermo-oxidative stability than PMR-15, as well as having a low toxicity. Another object is to provide new PMR polyimides that are useful as adhesives, moldings, and composite matrices. By the present invention, a new PMR polyimide comprises a mixture of the following compounds: 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), NE, and BTDE which are then treated with heat. This PMR was designated LaRC-RP46 and has a broader processing window, better reproducibility of high quality composite parts, better elevated temperature mechanical properties, and higher retention of mechanical properties at an elevated temperature, particularly, at 371 C.

  3. Second generation PMR polyimide/fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    A second generation polymerization monomeric reactants (PMR) polyimdes matrix system (PMR 2) was characterized in both neat resin and composite form with two different graphite fiber reinforcements. Three different formulated molecular weight levels of laboratory prepared PMR 2 were examined, in addition to a purchased experimental fully formulated PMR 2 precurser solution. Isothermal aging of graphite fibers, neat resin samples and composite specimens in air at 316 C were investigated. Humidity exposures at 65 C and 97 percent relative humidity were conducted for both neat resin and composites for eight day periods. Anaerobic char of neat resin and fire testing of composites were conducted with PMR 15, PMR 2, and an epoxy system. Composites were fire tested on a burner rig developed for this program. Results indicate that neat PMR 2 resins exhibit excellent isothermal resistance and that PMR 2 composite properties appear to be influenced by the thermo-oxidative stability of the reinforcing fiber.

  4. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  5. 75 FR 68802 - Report on the Performance of Drug and Biologics Firms in Conducting Postmarketing Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... * * *.'' According to the regulations, once a PMR has been required or a PMC has been agreed upon, an applicant must report on the progress of the PMR/PMC on the anniversary of the product's approval until the PMR/PMC is completed or terminated and FDA determines that the PMR/PMC has been fulfilled or that the PMR/PMC is...

  6. PMR Composites Of Increased Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Toughness increased without sacrificing processability or hot strength. Resin composition provides best overall balance of composite toughness and retention of mechanical properties at 600 degree F (316 degree C) with processability obtained by substituting 20 mole percent of diamine used in PMR-15 resins with diamine containing twice number of flexible phenyl connecting groups.

  7. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.

  8. PMR polyimides with improved high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, R. D.; Alston, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of substituting a hexafluoro isopropyl idene connecting group for a carbonyl group of a PMR polyimide monomeric reactant on the thermo-mechanical properties processability of graphite fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites. Composites were fabricated utilizing PMR methodology. Monomeric reactant solutions of various stoichiometric ratios were used to impregnate Hercules HTS graphite fiber. The processing characteristics and elevated temperature (600 F) mechanical properties of the composites are described.

  9. PMR polyimide prepreg with improved tack characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.

    1976-01-01

    Current PMR Polyimide prepreg technology utilizes methanol or ethanol solvents for preparation of the PMR prepreg solutions. The volatility of these solvents limits the tack and drape retention characteristics of unprotected prepreg exposed to ambient conditions. Studies conducted to achieve PMR 15 Polyimide prepreg with improved tack and drape characteristics were described. Improved tack and drape retention were obtained by incorporation of an additional monomer. The effects of various levels of the added monomer on the thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of graphite fiber reinforced PMR 15 composites exposed and tested at 316 C (600 F) were discussed.

  10. PMR polyimide/graphite fiber composite fan blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Ultrahigh speed fan blades, designed in accordance with the requirements of an ultrahigh tip speed blade axial flow compressor, were fabricated from a high strength graphite fiber tow and a PMR polyimide resin. The PMR matrix was prepared by combining three monomeric reactants in methyl alcohol, and the solution was applied directly to the reinforcing fiber for subsequent in situ polymerization. Some of the molded blades were completely finished by secondary bonding of root pressure pads and an electroformed nickel leading edge sheath prior to final machining. The results of the spin testing of nine PMR fan blades are given. Prior to blade fabrication, heat resin tensile properties of the PMR resin were examined at four formulated molecular weight levels. Additionally, three formulated molecular weight levels were investigated in composite form with both a high modulus and a high strength fiber, both as-molded and postcured, in room temperature and 232 C transverse tensile, flexure and short beam shear. Mixed fiber orientation panels simulating potential blade constructions were also evaluated. Flexure tests, short beam shear tests, and tensile tests were conducted on these angle-plied laminates.

  11. [Percutaneous myocardial laser revascularization (PMR)].

    PubMed

    Lauer, B; Stahl, F; Bratanow, S; Schuler, G

    2000-09-01

    In patients with severe angina pectoris due to coronary artery disease, who are not candidates for either percutaneous coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass surgery, transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) often leads to improvement of clinical symptoms and increased exercise capacity. One drawback of TMR is the need for surgical thoracotomy in order to gain access to the epicardial surface of the heart. Therefore, a catheter-based system has been developed, which allows creation of laser channels into the myocardium from the left ventricular cavity. Between January 1997 and November 1999, this "percutaneous myocardial laser revascularization" (PMR) has been performed in 101 patients at the Herzzentrum Leipzig. In 63 patients, only 1 region of the heart (anterior, lateral, inferior or septal) was treated with PMR, in 38 patients 2 or 3 regions were treated in 1 session. There were 12.3 +/- 4.5 (range 4 to 22) channels/region created into the myocardium. After 3 months, the majority of patients reported significant improvement of clinical symptoms (CCS class at baseline: 3.3 +/- 0.4, after 6 months: 1.6 +/- 0.8) (p < 0.001) and an increased exercise capacity (baseline: 397 +/- 125 s, after 6 months: 540 +/- 190 s) (p < 0.05). After 2 years, the majority of patients had experienced sustained clinical benefit after PMR, the CCS class after 2 years was 1.3 +/- 0.7, exercise capacity was 500 +/- 193 s. However, thallium scintigraphy failed to show increased perfusion in the PMR treated regions. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of myocardial laser revascularization is not yet understood. Most of the laser channels are found occluded after various time intervals after intervention. Other possible mechanisms include myocardial denervation or angioneogenesis after laser revascularization, however, unequivocal evidence for these theories is not yet available. In conclusion, PMR seems to be a safe and feasible new therapeutic option for patients with refractory

  12. Engineering bacterial two-component system PmrA/PmrB to sense lanthanide ions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Haihua; Deng, Xin; Bosscher, Mike; Ji, Quanjiang; Jensen, Mark P; He, Chuan

    2013-02-13

    The Salmonella PmrA/PmrB two-component system uses an iron(III)-binding motif on the cell surface to sense the environmental or host ferric level and regulate PmrA-controlled gene expression. We replaced the iron(III)-binding motif with a lanthanide-binding peptide sequence that is known to selectively recognize trivalent lanthanide ions. The newly engineered two-component system (PmrA/PmrB) can effectively sense lanthanide ion and regulate gene expression in E. coli . This work not only provides the first known lanthanide-based sensing and response in live cells but also demonstrates that the PmrA/PmrB system is a suitable template for future synthetic biology efforts to construct bacteria that can sense and respond to other metal ions in remediation or sequestration.

  13. Stability of PMR-polyimide monomer solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.; Alston, W. B.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The stability of alcohol solutions of norborneyl capped PMR-polyimide resins was monitored during storage at ambient and subambient temperatures. Chemical changes during storage were determined spectroscopically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Resin processability and cured resin quality were determined by fabrication of unidirectional, graphite fiber composites using aged solutions and testing of selected composite properties. PMR-15 solutions exhibit nominally two weeks of useful life and PMR-2 solutions exhibit nominally two days of useful life at ambient conditions. The limiting factor is precipitation of imide reaction produces from the monomer solutions. Both solutions exhibit substantially longer useful lifetimes in subambient storage. PMR-15 shows no precipitation after several months storage at subambient temperatures. PMR-2 solutions do exhibit precipitates after extended subambient storage, however, the precipitates formed under these conditions can be redissolved. The chemical implications of these observations are discussed.

  14. Titania Deposition on PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary B.; Sutter, James K.; Pizem, Hillel; Gershevitz, Olga; Goffer, Yossi; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Milhet, Xavier; McIlwain, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The formation, degree of crystallinity and adherence of dense titania (TiO2) thin film coatings on a high-temperature polyimide resin (PMR-15) can be influenced by the chemical composition of the polymer surface. Furthermore, solution deposition conditions can be adjusted to provide additional control over the morphology and crystallinity of the titania films. Recipes for solution-based titania deposition that used a slowly-hydrolyzing titanium fluoride salt in the presence of boric acid as a fluoride scavenger allowed growth of films up to 750 nm thick in 22 h. By adjusting solution pH and temperature, either amorphous titania or oriented crystalline anatase films could be formed. Surface sulfonate groups enhance the adhesion of solution-deposited oxide thin film coatings. While most sulfonation procedures severely damaged the PMR-15 surface, the use of chlorosulfonic acid followed by hydrolysis of the installed chlorosulfonyl groups provided effective surface sulfonation without significant surface damage. In some cases, the oxide deposition solution caused partial hydrolysis of the polymer surface, which itself was sufficient to allow adhesion of the titania film through chelation of titanium ions by exposed benzoic acid groups on the polymer surface.

  15. Benzonorbornadiene end caps for PMR resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panigot, Michael J.; Waters, John F.; Varde, Uday; Sutter, James K.; Sukenik, Chaim N.

    1992-01-01

    Several ortho-disubstituted benzonorbornadiene derivatives are described. These molecules contain acid, ester, or anhydride functionality permitting their use as end caps in PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide systems. The replacement of the currently used norbornenyl end caps with benzonorbornadienyl end caps affords resins of increased aromatic content. It also allows evaluation of some mechanistic aspects of PMR cross-linking. Initial testing of N-phenylimide model compounds and of actual resin formulations using the benzonorbornadienyl end cap reveals that they undergo efficient thermal crosslinking to give oligomers with physical properties and thermal stability comparable to commercial norbornene-end-capped PMR systems.

  16. A Method for Characterizing PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, G. D.; Lauver, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative analysis technique based on reverse-phase, highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and paired-ion chromatography (PIC) developed for PMR-15 resins. In reverse-phase HPLC experiment, polar solvent containing material to be analyzed passed through column packed with nonpolar substrate. Composition of PMR-15 Resin of 50 weight percent changes as resin ages at room temperature. Verification of proper resin formulation and analysis of changes in resin composition during storage important to manufacturers of PMR-15 polymer matrix composite parts. Technique especially suitable for commercial use by manufacturers of high-performance composite components.

  17. Molecular modeling of PMR-15 polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkada Ravindranath, Pruthul

    PMR-15 polyimide is a polymer that is used as a matrix in composites. These composites with PMR-15 matrices are called advanced polymer matrix composite that is abundantly used in the aerospace and electronics industries because of its high temperature resistivity. Apart from having high temperature sustainability, PMR-15 composites also display good thermal-oxidative stability, mechanical properties, processability and low costs, which makes it a suitable material for manufacturing aircraft structures. PMR-15 uses the reverse Diels-Alder (RDA) method for crosslinking which provides it with the groundwork for its distinctive thermal stability and a range of 280--300°C use temperature. Regardless of such desirable properties, this material has a number of limitations that compromises its application on a large scale basis. PMR-15 composites has been known to be very vulnerable to micro-cracking at inter and intra-laminar cracking. But the major factor that hinders its demand is PMR-15's carcinogenic constituent, methylene dianilineme (MDA), also a liver toxin. The necessity of providing a safe working environment during its production adds up to the cost of this material. In this study, Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization techniques are utilized to simulate a structure of PMR-15 at a given density of 1.324 g/cc and an attempt to recreate the polyimide to reduce the number of experimental testing and hence subdue the health hazards as well as the cost involved in its production. Even though this study does not involve in validating any mechanical properties of the model, it could be used in future for the validation of its properties and further testing for different properties like aging, microcracking, creep etc.

  18. Lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were performed to achieve a lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimide. The use of m-aminostyrene as the end-cap instead of the monoalkyl ester of 5-normbornene-2,3 dicarboxylic acid was investigated in typical PMR formulations. Model compound studies were also performed. Differential scanning calorimetry studies were performed on model compounds and neat resins to establish their melting and curing characteristics. The elevated temperature weight loss characteristics of neat resins and graphite fiber composites were determined. The room temperature and short-time 260 C (500 F) mechanical properties of the composites were also determined. The use of m-aminostyrene end-caps reduced the final cure temperature of PMR resins by about 55 C (100 F), but the composites prepared with these resins are limited to use temperatures of about 260 C (500 F).

  19. 22 CFR 309.10 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Collection Actions § 309.10 Review requirements. (a) For purposes of this section, whenever Peace Corps is required to afford a debtor a review within the agency, Peace Corps shall provide the debtor with an opportunity for an internal review of the existence or...

  20. 22 CFR 309.10 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Collection Actions § 309.10 Review requirements. (a) For purposes of this section, whenever Peace Corps is required to afford a debtor a review within the agency, Peace Corps shall provide the debtor with an opportunity for an internal review of the existence or...

  1. 22 CFR 309.10 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Collection Actions § 309.10 Review requirements. (a) For purposes of this section, whenever Peace Corps is required to afford a debtor a review within the agency, Peace Corps shall provide the debtor with an opportunity for an internal review of the existence or...

  2. 22 CFR 309.10 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Collection Actions § 309.10 Review requirements. (a) For purposes of this section, whenever Peace Corps is required to afford a debtor a review within the agency, Peace Corps shall provide the debtor with an opportunity for an internal review of the existence or...

  3. 22 CFR 309.10 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION Collection Actions § 309.10 Review requirements. (a) For purposes of this section, whenever Peace Corps is required to afford a debtor a review within the agency, Peace Corps shall provide the debtor with an opportunity for an internal review of the existence or...

  4. Data Requirements Review Boards and Their Importance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    Configuration and Data Management at Naval Air Systems Command, Tactical Airlift Program Office (PMA-207). He has the configuration and data management...Requirement Review Boards (DRRBs) are used to control the data requirements of a contract solicitation. Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), at Patuxent...River, Maryland, previously held a centralized review board that all Program Management Airs (PMAs) utilized to present their data requirements, but

  5. Improved PMR Polyimides For Heat-Stable Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, R. D.; Malarik, D. C.; Papadapoulos, D. S.; Waters, John F.

    1994-01-01

    Second-generation PMR-type polyimides (PMR-II polyimides) of enhanced thermo-oxidative stability prepared by substitution of para-aminostyrene (PAS) end caps for nadic-ester (NE) end caps used in prior PMR-II polyimides. Laminates unidirectionally reinforced with graphite fibers and made with PAS-capped resins exhibited thermo-oxidative stabilities significantly greater than those of similar laminates made with NE-capped PMR-II resins. One new laminate exhibited high retention of weight and strength after 1,000 h of exposure to air at 371 degrees C.

  6. Process For Autoclaving HMW PMR-II Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Cifani, Diane

    1990-01-01

    Parts made of graphite-reinforced, high-molecular-weight (HMW) PMR-II polyimide easy to fabricate by autoclaving. Study showed autoclaved HMW PMR-II parts equal in quality to those made by compression molding. Well suited to use at temperatures up to 700 degrees F (371 degrees C). In aircraft engines, they offer advantages of strength and light weight.

  7. Cyclopentadiene evolution during pyrolysis-gas chromatography of PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.; Gluyas, Richard E.; Snyder, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of formulated molecular weight (FMW), extent of cure, and cumulative aging on the amount of cyclopentadiene (CPD) evolved from Polymerization of Monomeric Reactants (PMR) polyimides were investigated by pyrolysis-gas chromotography (PY-GC). The PMR polyimides are additional crosslinked resins formed from an aromatic diamine, a diester of an aromatic tetracarboxylic acid and a monoester of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid. The PY-GC results were related to the degree of crosslinking and to the thermo-oxidative stability (weight loss) of PMR polyimides. Thus, PY-GC has shown to be a valid technique for the characterization of PMR polyimide resins and composites via correlation of the CPD evolved versus the thermal history of the PMR sample.

  8. A Comparison Study: The New Extended Shelf Life Isopropyl Ester PMR Technology versus The Traditional Methyl Ester PMR Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Sivko, Gloria S.

    2005-01-01

    Polymerization of Monomeric Reactants (PMR) monomer solutions and carbon cloth prepregs of PMR II-50 and VCAP-75 were prepared using both the traditional limited shelf life methanol based PMR approach and a novel extended shelf life isopropanol based PMR approach. The methyl ester and isopropyl ester based PMR monomer solutions and PMR prepregs were aged for up to four years at freezer and room temperatures. The aging products formed were monitored using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The composite processing flow characteristics and volatile contents of the aged prepregs were also correlated versus room temperature storage time. Composite processing cycles were developed and six ply cloth laminates were fabricated with prepregs after various extended room temperature storage times. The composites were then evaluated for glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal decomposition temperature (Td), initial flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), long term (1000 hours at 316 C) thermal oxidative stability (TOS), and retention of FS and FM after 1000 hours aging at 316 C. The results for each ester system were comparable. Freezer storage was found to prevent the formation of aging products for both ester systems. Room temperature storage of the novel isopropyl ester system increased PMR monomer solution and PMR prepreg shelf life by at least an order of magnitude while maintaining composite properties.

  9. 41 CFR 109-1.106-50 - Applicability of FPMR and DOE-PMR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and DOE-PMR. 109-1.106-50 Section 109-1.106-50 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 109-1.106-50 Applicability of FPMR and DOE-PMR. (a) The FPMR and DOE-PMR apply to all direct operations. (b) The DOE-PMR does not apply to facilities...

  10. Isothermal aging effects on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1993-01-01

    Specimens of PMR-15 polyimide neat resin were aged in air at temperatures of 288, 316, and 343 C. Weight losses and dimensional changes were monitored during the course of the exposure time. Physical changes were also observed by optical and electron microscopy. It was found that polyimide polymer degradation occurred within a thin surface layer that developed and grew during thermal aging. The cores of the polymer specimens were protected from oxidative degradation, and they were relatively unchanged by the thermal treatment. Surface cracking was observed at 343 C and was probably due to an interaction between voids and stresses that developed in the surface layer.

  11. Isothermal aging effects on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1992-01-01

    Specimens of PMR-15 polyimide neat resin were aged in air at temperatures of 288, 316, and 343 C. Weight losses and dimensional changes were monitored during the course of the exposure time. Physical changes were also observed by optical and electron microscopy. It was found that polyimide polymer degradation occurred within a thin surface layer that developed and grew during thermal aging. The cores of the polymer specimens were protected from oxidative degradation, and they were relatively unchanged by the thermal treatment. Surface cracking was observed at 343 C and was probably due to an interaction between voids and stresses that developed in the surface layer.

  12. Lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.

    1982-01-01

    Partial substitution of a p-aminostyrene end-cap for the monomethyl ester of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid lowered the final cure temperature of typical PMR resins from 600 F to 500 F. The weight loss characteristics of neat resins and graphite fiber composites prepared by using the mixed end-cap approach were determined at 600 F. The room temperature and short-time elevated temperature mechanical properties of the composites at 550 F and 600 F were determined. The mechanical property retention characteristics of the composites at 550 F and 600 F are discussed.

  13. Review of FEWS NET Biophysical Monitoring Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, K. W.; Brown, Molly E.; Verdin, J.; Underwood, L. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Famine Early Warning System Network (FEWS NET) provides monitoring and early warning support to decision makers responsible for responding to famine and food insecurity. FEWS NET transforms satellite remote sensing data into rainfall and vegetation information that can be used by these decision makers. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has recently funded activities to enhance remote sensing inputs to FEWS NET. To elicit Earth observation requirements, a professional review questionnaire was disseminated to FEWS NET expert end-users: it focused upon operational requirements to determine additional useful remote sensing data and; subsequently, beneficial FEWS NET biophysical supplementary inputs. The review was completed by over 40 experts from around the world, enabling a robust set of professional perspectives to be gathered and analyzed rapidly. Reviewers were asked to evaluate the relative importance of environmental variables and spatio-temporal requirements for Earth science data products, in particular for rainfall and vegetation products. The results showed that spatio-temporal resolution requirements are complex and need to vary according to place, time, and hazard: that high resolution remote sensing products continue to be in demand, and that rainfall and vegetation products were valued as data that provide actionable food security information.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.; McManus, Hugh L.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a non-uniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hours. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  15. PMR polyimide compositions for improved performance at 371 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to identify matrix resins which have potential for use at 371 C (700 F). Utilizing PMR methodology, neat resin moldings were prepared with various monomer reactants and screened for thermo-oxidative stability at 371 C (700 F) under both ambient and a four-atmosphere air pressure. The results of the resin screening studies indicate that high molecular weight (HMW) formulated resins of first (PMR-15) and second (PMR-II) generation PMR materials exhibit lower levels of weight loss at 371 C (700) than PMR-15 and PMR-II resins. The resin systems which exhibited the best overall balance of processability, Tg and thermo-oxidative stability at 371 C were used to prepare unidirectional Celion 6000 and T-40R graphite fiber laminates. Laminates were evaluated for thermo-oxidative stability and 371 C mechanical properties. Results of the laminate evaluation studies indicate that two of the resin compositions have potential for use in 371 C applications. The most promising resin composition provided laminates which exhibited no drop in 371 C mechanical properties and only 11 percent weight loss after 200 hr exposure to atmospheres of air at 371 C.

  16. PMR polyimide compositions for improved performance at 371 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to identify matrix resins which have potential for use at 371 C (700 F). Utilizing PMR methodology, neat resin moldings were prepared with various monomer reactants and screened for thermo-oxidative stability at 371 C (700 F) under both ambient and a four-atmosphere air pressure. The results of the resin screening studies indicate that high molecular weight (HMW) formulated resins of first (PMR-15) and second (PMR-II) generation PMR materials exhibit lower levels of weight loss at 371 C (700 F) than PMR-15 and PMR-II resins. The resin systems which exhibited the best overall balance of processability, Tg and thermo-oxidative stability at 371 C were used to prepare unidirectional Celion 6000 and T-40R graphite fiber laminates. Laminates were evaluated for thermo-oxidative stability and 371 C mechanical properties. Results of the laminate evaluation studies indicate that two of the resin compositions have potential for use in 371 C applications. The most promising resin composition provided laminates which exhibited no drop in 371 C mechanical properties and only 11 percent weight loss after 200 hr exposure to 4 atmospheres of air at 371 C.

  17. PSD Review Requirements for Modified Petroleum Refineries

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  18. Ocular inflammatory disease in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica: A case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Faez, Sepideh; Lobo, Ann-Marie; Unizony, Sebastian H; Stone, John H; Papaliodis, George N; Sobrin, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Scleritis and uveitis are potentially blinding conditions that can be associated with systemic inflammatory diseases. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a common rheumatic disorder of the elderly of uncertain etiology. Although there are a few published reports of scleritis and uveitis in PMR patients, the association of PMR to ocular inflammation has not been well established. The aim of this study is to report a series of PMR patients with scleritis and/or uveitis and review the prior published reports of this potential association. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of patients with PMR and scleritis or uveitis who were examined in the Ocular Immunology Service of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. We also performed a systematic literature search (PubMed; January 1990 until January 2014) to identify earlier published reports. Seven PMR patients with ocular inflammatory disease (OID) were included in our study: two with scleritis, three with anterior uveitis, and two with panuveitis. The onset of PMR preceded the occurrence of OID in six patients, and in one patient uveitis developed 2 months prior to PMR. Five patients demonstrated a temporal association between flares of PMR and OID. In four patients, OID flares developed during tapering of systemic prednisone prescribed for PMR. Four of the five patients who had relapsing PMR had recurrent or persistent uveitis over the course of follow-up. PMR may be associated with both scleritis and uveitis and should be considered as a possible underlying cause of OID.

  19. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Praitis, Vida; Simske, Jeffrey; Kniss, Sarah; Mandt, Rebecca; Imlay, Leah; Feddersen, Charlotte; Miller, Michael B; Mushi, Juliet; Liszewski, Walter; Weinstein, Rachel; Chakravorty, Adityarup; Ha, Dae-Gon; Schacht Farrell, Angela; Sullivan-Wilson, Alexander; Stock, Tyson

    2013-05-01

    Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR), which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA) is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600), a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family.

  20. The Secretory Pathway Calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 Has Essential Roles in Cell Migration during Caenorhabditis elegans Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Praitis, Vida; Simske, Jeffrey; Kniss, Sarah; Mandt, Rebecca; Imlay, Leah; Feddersen, Charlotte; Miller, Michael B.; Mushi, Juliet; Liszewski, Walter; Weinstein, Rachel; Chakravorty, Adityarup; Ha, Dae-Gon; Schacht Farrell, Angela; Sullivan-Wilson, Alexander; Stock, Tyson

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR), which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA) is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600), a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family. PMID:23696750

  1. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a nonuniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hr. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. The nitrogen-aged specimens were assumed to have the same properties as the interior material in the air-aged specimens. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  2. 41 CFR 109-1.104-50 - Publication and distribution of DOE-PMR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distribution of DOE-PMR. 109-1.104-50 Section 109-1.104-50 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 109-1.104-50 Publication and distribution of DOE-PMR. The DOE-PMR will be published in the Federal Register and will appear in the CFR as Chapter 109 of...

  3. 41 CFR 109-1.101-50 - DOE-PMR System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DOE-PMR System. 109-1.101-50 Section 109-1.101-50 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...-Regulation System § 109-1.101-50 DOE-PMR System. The DOE-PMR system described in this subpart is...

  4. 41 CFR 109-1.103-50 - DOE-PMR temporary policies and bulletins

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DOE-PMR temporary... GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 109-1.103-50 DOE-PMR temporary policies and bulletins (a... Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). (b) DOE-PMR Bulletins are used to disseminate information...

  5. 41 CFR 109-1.107-50 - Consultation regarding DOE-PMR.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Consultation regarding DOE-PMR. 109-1.107-50 Section 109-1.107-50 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property...-INTRODUCTION 1.1-Regulation System § 109-1.107-50 Consultation regarding DOE-PMR. The DOE-PMR shall be...

  6. Identification and functional analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium PmrA-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Rita; Prouty, Angela M; Gunn, John S

    2005-02-01

    The PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is activated in vivo and plays an important role in resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Resistance is partly mediated by modifications to the lipopolysaccharide. To identify new PmrA-regulated genes, microarray analysis was undertaken comparing cDNA derived from PmrA-constitutive and PmrA-null strains. A combination of RT-PCR and transcriptional analysis confirmed the inclusion of six new loci in the PmrA-PmrB regulon: STM1253, STM1269, STM4118, STM0459, STM3968 and STM4568. These loci did not affect the ability to grow in high iron conditions, the ability to modify lipid A with aminoarabinose, or virulence. STM4118, a putative phosphoethanolamine phosphotransferase, had a minor effect on polymyxin resistance, whereas the remaining genes had no role in polymyxin resistance. Although several of the identified loci lacked the consensus PmrA binding site, PmrA was demonstrated to bind the promoter of a PmrA-activated gene lacking the consensus site. A more complete definition of the PmrA-PmrB regulon will provide a better understanding of its role in host and non-host environments.

  7. Quality control developments for graphite/PMR15 polyimide composites materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, C. H.; Hoggatt, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of lot-to-lot and within-lot variability of graphite/PMR-15 prepreg was investigated. The PMR-15 chemical characterization data were evaluated along with the processing conditions controlling the manufacture of PMR-15 resin and monomers. Manufacturing procedures were selected to yield a consistently reproducible graphite prepreg that could be processed into acceptable structural elements.

  8. Management guidelines and outcome measures in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR).

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, B; Matteson, E L; Maradit-Kremers, H

    2007-01-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a common inflammatory rheumatic disease of the elderly that is subject to wide variations in clinical practice and is managed both in the primary and secondary care settings by general practitioners, rheumatologists and non-rheumatologists. Considerable uncertainty exists relating to diagnosis, management and outcome in patients with PMR. The guidelines presented here seek to improve outcomes for PMR patients by outlining a process to ensure more accurate diagnosis and timely specialist referral. The guidelines are directed to promote more conservative treatment and to ensure early bone protection in order to reduce the common morbidity of osteoporotic fractures. Furthermore, these guidelines specify the goals of treatment, including clinical and patient-based outcomes, and provide advice concerning monitoring for disease activity and complications.

  9. Quantitative analysis of PMR-15 polyimide resin by HPLC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Lauver, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of individual components and of total solids of 50 wt pct PMR-15 resin solutions was determined using reverse-phase HPLC to within + or - 8 percent accuracy. Acid impurities, the major source of impurities in 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), were eliminated by recrystallizing the BTDE prior to esterification. Triester formation was not a problem because of the high rate of esterification of the anhydride relative to that of the carboxylic acid. Aging of PMR-15 resin solutions resulted in gradual formation of the mononadimide and bisnadimide of 4,4'-methylenedianiline, with the BTDE concentration remaining constant. Similar chemical reactions occurred at a reduced rate in dried films of PMR-15 resin.

  10. Toughening of PMR composites by semi-interpenetrating networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Srinivansan, K.

    1991-01-01

    Polymerization of monomer reactants (PMR-15) type polyimide and RP46 prepregs were drum wound using IM-7 fibers. Prepregging and processing conditions were optimized to yield good quality laminates with fiber volume fractions of 60 percent (+/- 2 percent). Samples were fabricated and tested to determine comprehensive engineering properties of both systems. These included 0 deg flexure, short beam shear, transverse flexure and tension, 0 deg tension and compression, intralaminar shear, short block compression, mode 1 and 2 fracture toughness, and compression after impact properties. Semi-2-IPN (interpenetrating polymer networks) toughened PMR-15 and RP46 laminates were also fabricated and tested for the same properties.

  11. Toughening of PMR composites by gradient semi-interpenetrating networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.; Srinivasan, K.; Peter, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The toughening of the PMR-15 and LARC RP-46 high temperature thermosetting polyimides is presently attempted through the construction of a semiinterpenetrating network at ply interfaces through the use of the Matrimid 5218 thermoplastic polyimide powder, whose 315-320 glass transition temperature is compatible with the PMR matrices. The 60 vol pct fiber composites thus prepared for the two resins, with and without toughening, were comprehensively characterized in flexure, tension, intralaminar and short beam shear, compression and quasi-isotropic short-block compression, as well as modes I and II interlaminar fracture toughness and compression after impact.

  12. Graphite/PMR polyimide composites with improved toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, R. D.; Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The toughness of composites made with modified PMR (polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimides and Celion 6000 graphite fibers was studied. Various types/levels of monomer reactants containing flexible links were incorporated into PMR resin compositions used to prepare composites. The composites were evaluated for toughness using instrumented drop weight and 10 deg off axis tensile tests at room temperature, and for strength using flexure and short beam shear tests at room temperature and at elevated temperature. The effect of resin composition on composite processability, thermo-oxidative stability, toughness and mechanical properties are discussed.

  13. Dynamic Mechanical Properties of N-Phenylnadimide Modified PMR Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The rheological behavior of newly developd Celion 6000/N-phenylnadimide modified PMR polyimide and PMR-15 composites was investigated. The dynamic mechanical properties were correlated with the structure of N-phenylnadimide modified PMR polyimides. The storage modulus (G'), loss modulus (G''), and loss tangent (tan delta) of four composite systems were measured over a temperature range from -150 to 400 C. Three well defined peaks were seen in the regions of 360, 100, and -120 C, corresponding to the alpha, beta, and gamma relaxations, respectively, of the matrix resins. The activation energies of the alpha, beta, and gamma relaxations were estimated to be 232, 60, and 14 kcal/mole, respectively, for PMR-15. Addition of N-phenylnadimide to the PMR-15 composition lowered the glass transition temperature and the activation energies of PMR-15 polyimide. The dynamic mechanical data appear to be consistent with the formation of a copolymer from N-phenylnadimide and a PMR-15 prepolymer.

  14. 42 CFR 412.508 - Medical review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical review requirements. 412.508 Section 412.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.508 Medical review requirements. (a) Admission and quality review....

  15. 42 CFR 412.508 - Medical review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical review requirements. 412.508 Section 412.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.508 Medical review requirements. (a) Admission and quality review....

  16. 42 CFR 412.508 - Medical review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical review requirements. 412.508 Section 412.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.508 Medical review requirements. (a) Admission and quality review....

  17. 42 CFR 412.508 - Medical review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical review requirements. 412.508 Section 412.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.508 Medical review requirements. (a) Admission and quality review....

  18. 42 CFR 412.508 - Medical review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical review requirements. 412.508 Section 412.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.508 Medical review requirements. (a) Admission and quality review....

  19. ESCRT components regulate the expression of the ER/Golgi calcium pump gene PMR1 through the Rim101/Nrg1 pathway in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunying; Du, Jingcai; Xiong, Bing; Xu, Huihui; Jiang, Linghuo

    2013-10-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) complexes function to form multivesicular bodies for sorting of proteins destined for the yeast vacuole or the mammalian lysosome. ESCRT components are well conserved in eukaryotes, and their mutations cause neurodegenerative diseases and other cellular pathologies in humans. PMR1 is the orthologous gene of two human genes for calcium pumps secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPase (SPCA1, ATP2C1) and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA, ATP2A2), which are mutated in Hailey-Hailey and Darier genetic diseases, respectively. Here we show that deletion mutation of ESCRT components Snf7, Snf8, Stp22, Vps20, Vps25, Vps28, or Vps36 activates the calcium/calcineurin signaling in yeast cells, but surprisingly leads to a nearly 50% reduction in expression of the ER/Golgi calcium pump gene PMR1 independent of calcium stress. These ESCRT mutants are known to have a defect in Rim101 activation. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active form of Rim101 or further deletion of NRG1 in these mutants partially suppresses their calcium hypersensitivity. Deletion of NRG1 also completely rescues the expression of PMR1 in these mutants to the level of the wild type. Promoter mutagenesis, gel electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrate that Nrg1 binds to two motifs in the PMR1 promoter. In addition, expression of PMR1 under the control of its promoters with mutated Nrg1-binding motifs suppresses the calcium hypersensitivity of these ESCRT mutants. Collectively, these data have uncovered a function of ESCRT components in regulating PMR1 expression through the Nrg1/Rim101 pathway. Our findings provide important clues for understanding human diseases related to calcium homeostasis.

  20. FDEMS Sensing for Automated Intelligent Processing of PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, David E.; Hood, D. K.; Rogozinski, J.; Barksdale, R.; Loos, Alfred C.; McRae, Doug

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this grant was to develop frequency dependent dielectric measurements, often called FDEMS (frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing), to monitor and intelligently control the cure process in PMR-15, a stoichiometric mixture of a nadic ester, dimethyl ester, and methylendianiline in a monomor ratio.

  1. Application of Gr/PMR-15 to commercial aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postlewaite, J.; Porter, K.; Mclaren, D.

    1985-01-01

    Following from early experience with polyimides on the SST program and Shuttle aft flap studies the Boeing Company is now working on collaborative programs with its principal nacelle suppliers to pursue the development of Gr/PMR-15 nacelle components. Two programs are currently in effect. The first program is directed specifically towards the flight test and service evaluation at the earliest possible date of a 747 nacelle core cowl structure. The second program seeks to firmly establish the producibility and cost of a 757 thrust reverser C duct in a production environment. The near term objectives of these programs include: (1) the comparison of estimated cost and weight of Gr/PMR-15 versus metal structure, (2) the engine test of representative composite structure, (3) the preliminary design and analysis of the C duct structure, and (4) the preparation of cost data and time schedules for the development and producibility program. In addition to powerplant structure, the propulsion ducting system has shown to be a strong candidate for Gr/PMR-15 application. Currently, the Boeing 747 Organization is evaluating the use of PMR-15 matrix composites to replace nearly 800 lbs of titanium ducting per airplane.

  2. 42 CFR 412.46 - Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... Capital-Related Costs § 412.46 Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement. (a) Basis....

  3. 42 CFR 412.46 - Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... diagnoses and major procedures performed, as evidenced by the physician's entries in the patient's medical... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical review requirements: Physician... Capital-Related Costs § 412.46 Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement. (a) Basis....

  4. 42 CFR 412.46 - Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... diagnoses and major procedures performed, as evidenced by the physician's entries in the patient's medical... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical review requirements: Physician... Capital-Related Costs § 412.46 Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement. (a) Basis....

  5. 48 CFR 749.111-71 - Required review and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Required review and approval. 749.111-71 Section 749.111-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 749.111-71 Required review...

  6. 48 CFR 849.111-70 - Required review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Required review. 849.111-70 Section 849.111-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS General Principles 849.111-70 Required review. (a) FAR 49.111...

  7. Thermo-Elastic Nondestructive Evaluation of Fatigue Damage in PMR-15 Resin (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4365 THERMO-ELASTIC NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE IN PMR -15 RESIN (PREPRINT) J.T. Welter and E.A...Technical Paper 1 November 2011 – 1 November 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THERMO-ELASTIC NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE IN PMR -15 RESIN...largely been overlooked. In this paper we present studies of nondestructive evaluation of fatigue damage in a thermoset polyimide resin, PMR -15, performed

  8. Thermo-Elastic Nondestructive Evaluation of Fatigue Damage in PMR-15 Resin (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    To) 25 June 2009 – 17 July 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THERMO-ELASTIC NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE IN PMR -15 RESIN (POSTPRINT) 5a...nondestructive evaluation of fatigue damage in a thermoset polyimide resin, PMR -15, performed by measuring the changes in the evolution of heat in the samples...discussed in reference to utilizing this technique for detection and evaluation of fatigue in PMR -15 resin and composites. 15. SUBJECT TERMS fatigue

  9. New Endcaps for Improved Oxidation Resistance in PMR Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2003-01-01

    A polyimide is a polymer composed of alternating units of diamine and dianhydride, linked to each other via an imide bond. PMR polyimides, commonly used in the aerospace industry, are generally capped at each end by an endcap (such as the nadic endcap used in PMR 15) which serves a double function: (1) it limits the number of repeating units and, hence, the average molecular weight of the various polymer chains (oligomers), thereby improving processibility; (2) Upon further treatment (curing), the endcap crosslinks the various oligomer strands into a tough heat-resistant piece. It is this very endcap, so important to processing, that accounts for much of the weight loss in the polymer on aging in air at elevated temperatures. Understanding this degradation provides clues for designing new endcaps to slow down degradation, and prolong the lifetime of the material.

  10. Effects of graphite fiber stability on the properties of PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.; Alston, W. B.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of the stability of graphite fibers on composite properties after exposure in air at 600 F was investigated. Composites were fabricated from PMR-15 and PMR-2 monomer solutions, using HTS-2 and Celion 6000 graphite fibers as the reinforcement. The effect of long-term exposure in air at 600 F on composite weight loss and mechanical properties was determined. These composites exhibited a significantly increased lifetime at that temperature compared to composites fabricated from HTS fiber sold prior to 1975. The effect of the PMR-15 and PMR-II resin compositions on long-term composite performance at 600 F is also discussed.

  11. Transverse Microcracking in Celion 6000/PMR-15 Graphite-Polyimide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    strength of a ply is exceeded by the ply’s transverse stress.) The stress- and 83 Table 4. Predicted Transverse Residual Curing Stresses for [0/90]s Gr...strongly influences TVM density. 4. Laminate analysis using stress- and temperature-dependent material properties predicts that the residual curing stresses...Temperature and Curvature of a [03/903Js Lam’ na te 70 3 Material Property Polynomials for Celion 6000/PMR- 15 80 4 Predicted Transverse Residual

  12. Thermal analysis of PMR-polyimides by dielectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gluyas, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to determine the dielectric properties of glass fabric reinforced composites as influenced by the reactions occurring during the preparation of crosslinked polyimides by the PMR process. The variables studied included: formulated molecular weight, staging temperature and time; rate of temperature increase to cure temperature; and cure temperature and time. The changes of capacitance and, particularly, of dissipation factor were found to be strongly dependent on each of the variables studied.

  13. Transverse microcracking in Celion 6000/PMR-15 graphite-polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, J. S.; Herakovich, C. T.; Davis, J. G., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of room temperature tensile loading and five thermal loadings, in the range -320 F (-196C) to 625F (330CC), upon the development of transverse microcracks (TVM) in Celion 6000/PMR-15 graphite-polyimide laminates were investigated. Microcracks were observed using a replicating technique, microscopy and X-ray. The mechanical or thermal load at which microcracking initiates and the ply residual stresses were predicted using laminate analysis with stress- and temperature-dependent material properties.

  14. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of Celion 6000/PMR-15 unidirectional composites, PMR-15, and Celion 6000 fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Nowak, Gregory

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results on the influence of the thermooxidative resistance characteristics of the fiber and matrix resin on the thermal stability of isothermally aged Celion 6000/PMR-15 matrix resin composites are presented. SEM studies reveal that extreme oxidative erosion of the graphite fiber occurs at elevated temperatures in the presence of the polyimide matrix. The activation energy of oxidation of the composite was shown to be greater than those of the fiber and the matrix resin.

  15. 75 FR 63215 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7044. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: SBA Direct and SBA Online Community... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review AGENCY: Small Business...

  16. 78 FR 28010 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review AGENCY: Small Business Administration... Clearance Officer, Curtis Rich, Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor, Washington,...

  17. Review of perpendicular magnetic recording research at Fujitsu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiki, Mitsumasa

    2012-02-01

    Perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR) research and development (R&D) was carried out at Fujitsu for 32 years from 1978 to 2009, separated into three stages. We developed PMR for use in hard disk drives (HDDs). We sputtered Co-Cr alloy thin film onto a disk substrate and evaluated it using thin-film heads. Some interesting results were obtained at each stage. On the way we fabricated 1.8″ HDDs in 1992 and finally shipped the mass-produced PMR HDDs in 2006. Unfortunately, the HDD business at Fujitsu closed down. I would like to review the exceptional PMR research undertaken at Fujitsu.

  18. 40 CFR 6.403 - Environmental review and assessment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OF EPA ACTIONS Assessing the Environmental Effects Abroad of EPA Actions § 6.403 Environmental review and assessment requirements. (a) Research and demonstration projects. The appropriate Assistant Administrator is responsible for performing the necessary degree of environmental review on research...

  19. Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Requirements Review

    SciTech Connect

    Zurawski, Jason, W; Mace, Kathryn, P

    2016-08-11

    In August 2016 The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Colorado State University (CSU) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) located on the campus of Colorado State University. Several key findings highlighting the results from the review were discovered, with benefits to improve the overall scientific process for CIRA and CSU.

  20. 42 CFR 412.44 - Medical review requirements: Admissions and quality review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... Capital-Related Costs § 412.44 Medical review requirements: Admissions and quality review. Beginning...

  1. 42 CFR 493.555 - Federal review of laboratory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal review of laboratory requirements. 493.555... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Accreditation by a Private, Nonprofit Accreditation Organization or Exemption Under an Approved State Laboratory Program §...

  2. 42 CFR 493.555 - Federal review of laboratory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal review of laboratory requirements. 493.555... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Accreditation by a Private, Nonprofit Accreditation Organization or Exemption Under an Approved State Laboratory Program §...

  3. 42 CFR 493.555 - Federal review of laboratory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal review of laboratory requirements. 493.555... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Accreditation by a Private, Nonprofit Accreditation Organization or Exemption Under an Approved State Laboratory Program §...

  4. 42 CFR 493.555 - Federal review of laboratory requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Federal review of laboratory requirements. 493.555... SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Accreditation by a Private, Nonprofit Accreditation Organization or Exemption Under an Approved State Laboratory Program §...

  5. 78 FR 76886 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ...Under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), agencies are required to submit proposed reporting and recordkeeping requirements to OMB for review and approval, and to publish a notice in the Federal Register notifying the public that the agency has made such a...

  6. PMR Extended Shelf Life Technology Given 2000 R and D 100 Award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An approach developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for extending the shelf life of PMR polyimide solutions and prepregs received an R&D 100 Award this year. PMR polyimides, in particular PMR-15, have become attractive materials for a variety of aerospace applications because of their outstanding high-temperature stability and performance. PMR-15 can be used in components with exposures to temperatures as high as 290 C, which leads to substantial reductions in weight, as much as 30 percent over metal components. PMR-15 composites are used widely in aerospace applications ranging from ducts and external components in aircraft engines to an engine access door for the Space Shuttle Main Engine. A major barrier to more widespread use of these materials is high component costs. Recent efforts at Glenn have addressed the various factors that contribute to these costs in an attempt to more fully utilize these lightweight, high-temperature materials.

  7. FTIR characterization of thermally cycled PMR-15 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Philip R.; Chang, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical characterization results are presented for a variety of PMR-15/graphite composites, differentiated according to prepreg types and cure cycles, which were subjected to 1000 thermal cycles between 0 and 450 F. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy was used in conjunction with diffuse reflectance sampling to examine whether changes in the matrix resin chemistry due to environmental exposure may have contributed to microcracking. Analysis based on compound spectra revealed behavior associated with the oxidation of methylene groups to carbonyl groups on the composite surface; evidence of crosslinking also emerged, although the two phenomena do not appear to be related.

  8. Effect of ester impurities in PMR-polyimide resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral and chomatographic studies were conducted which established the presence of tri- and tetraester impurities in aged monomer solutions employed in fabrication of PMR-polyimide resin composites. The equilibrium constant and apparent rate of the esterification were determined. It was demonstrated, using differential scanning calorimetry, that the ortho-ester moiety of these impurities does not completely react at typical cure conditions. It is concluded that voids formed in composites fabricated with aged monomer solution are due to gaseous decomposition products evolved by ester impurities and/or unreacted amine during elevated temperature post-cure treatment.

  9. Design Allowables Test Program, Celion 3000/PMR-15 and Celion 6000/PMR-15, Graphite/Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.; Mccleskey, S. F.

    1982-01-01

    A design allowables test program was conducted on Celion 3000/PRM-15 and Celion 6000/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide composite to establish material performance over a 116 K (-250 F) to 589 K (600 F) temperature range. Effects of aging, thermal cycling and moisture were also evaluated. Tension, compression and in plane shear properties were determined for uniaxial, pseudoisotropic and +45 laminates. Test results show sufficient strength and stiffness to substantiate graphite/polyimide composites as an acceptable structural material for high temperature structural applications.

  10. Thermal stability relationships between PMR-15 resin and its composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Bors, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 matrix resin and the stability of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites that contain this resin as the matrix material. Three areas were investigated. The first was the effect of fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength on the isothermal aging weight loss of composites. By using type-A graphite fibers produced by Hercules, it was possible to study composites reinforced with fibers that were processed to receive different surface treatments. One of the fibers was untreated, a second fiber was treated by oxidation to enhance fiber/matrix bonding, and the third type of fiber was coated with an epoxy sizing. These treatments produced three significantly different interfacial bond strengths. The epoxy sizing on the third fiber was quickly oxidized from the bare fiber surfaces at 288, 316, and 343 C. The weight loss due to the removal of the sizing was constant at 1.5 percent. This initial weight loss was not observed in thermo-oxidative stability studies of composites. The PMR-15 matrix satisfactorily protected the reinforcemnt at all three temperatures.

  11. 700 F properties of autoclave cured PMR-II composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cifani, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Studies were conducted to develop autoclave processing parameters for graphite reinforced PMR-2 resin composite materials intended for use in applications at temperatures up to 371 degrees (700 F). The effect of resin composition on autoclaveability was investigated. The effect of various graphite fibers and resin composition on 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties was also investigated. The results of the processing studies show that PMR-2 resin composites can be easily fabricated under autoclave conditions. Autoclaved laminates exposed to 1 atm of air at 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) exhibited less than 5 percent weight loss after 750 hr exposure to 650 F air and 8 percent weight loss during exposure to 700 F air for 500 hr. After 500 hr exposure, autoclaved laminates exhibited greater than 90 percent retention of initial 650 and 700 F flexural and interlaminar shear strengths. The effect of resin formulated molecular weight and postcure conditions on laminate glass transition temperature is also discussed.

  12. The 700 F properties of autoclave cured PMR-2 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Cifani, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Studies were conducted to develop autoclave processing parameters for graphite reinforced PMR-2 resin composite materials intended for use in applications at temperatures up to 371 degrees (700 F). The effect of resin composition on autoclaveability was investigated. The effect of various graphite fibers and resin composition on 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties was also investigated. The results of the processing studies show that PMR-2 resin composites can be easily fabricated under autoclave conditions. Autoclaved laminates exposed to 1 atm of air at 343 C (650 F) and 371 C (700 F) exhibited less than 5 percent weight loss after 750 hr exposure to 650 F air and 8 percent weight loss during exposure to 700 F air for 500 hr. After 500 hr exposure, autoclaved laminates exhibited greater than 90 percent retention of initial 650 and 700 F flexural and interlaminar shear strengths. The effect of resin formulated molecular weight and postcure conditions on laminate glass transition temperature is also discussed.

  13. An investigation into the injection molding of PMR-15 polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaluca, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    The chemorheological behavior of the PRM-15 molding compounds were characterized, the range of suitable processing parameters for injection molding in a reciprocating screw injection molding machine was determined, and the effects of the injection molding processing parameters on the mechanical properties of molded PMR-15 parts were studied. The apparatus and procedures for measuring viscosity and for determining the physical response of the material during heating are described. Results show that capillary rheometry can be effectively used with thermosets if the equipment is designed to overcome some of the inherent problems of these materials. A uniform temperature was provided in the barrel by using a circulating hot oil system. Standard capillary rheometry methods can provide the dependence of thermoset apparent viscosity on shear rate, temperature, and time. Process conditions resulting in complete imidization should be carefully defined. Specification of controlled oven temperature is inadequate and can result in incomplete imidization. For completely imidized PMR-15 heat at 15 C/min melt flow without gas evolution occurs in the temperature range of 325 C to 400 C.

  14. 49 CFR 37.215 - Review of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.215 Review of requirements. (a) Beginning October 28, 2005... including, but not necessarily limited to, the following: (i) The percentage of accessible buses in the... accessible buses in a timely manner. (iii) The ridership of small and large operators'...

  15. 49 CFR 37.215 - Review of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.215 Review of requirements. (a) Beginning October 28, 2005... including, but not necessarily limited to, the following: (i) The percentage of accessible buses in the... accessible buses in a timely manner. (iii) The ridership of small and large operators'...

  16. 49 CFR 37.215 - Review of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.215 Review of requirements. (a) Beginning October 28, 2005... including, but not necessarily limited to, the following: (i) The percentage of accessible buses in the... accessible buses in a timely manner. (iii) The ridership of small and large operators'...

  17. 49 CFR 37.215 - Review of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.215 Review of requirements. (a) Beginning October 28, 2005... including, but not necessarily limited to, the following: (i) The percentage of accessible buses in the... accessible buses in a timely manner. (iii) The ridership of small and large operators'...

  18. 49 CFR 37.215 - Review of requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.215 Review of requirements. (a) Beginning October 28, 2005... including, but not necessarily limited to, the following: (i) The percentage of accessible buses in the... accessible buses in a timely manner. (iii) The ridership of small and large operators'...

  19. 33 CFR 230.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... concurrently with and utilize data from analyses required by other environmental laws and executive orders. A listing of environmental laws and orders is contained in table 3.4.3 of Economic and Environmental... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Environmental review...

  20. 33 CFR 230.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concurrently with and utilize data from analyses required by other environmental laws and executive orders. A listing of environmental laws and orders is contained in table 3.4.3 of Economic and Environmental... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Environmental review...

  1. 33 CFR 230.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concurrently with and utilize data from analyses required by other environmental laws and executive orders. A listing of environmental laws and orders is contained in table 3.4.3 of Economic and Environmental... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Environmental review...

  2. 33 CFR 230.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concurrently with and utilize data from analyses required by other environmental laws and executive orders. A listing of environmental laws and orders is contained in table 3.4.3 of Economic and Environmental... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Environmental review...

  3. 48 CFR 801.602-70 - General review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General review requirements. 801.602-70 Section 801.602-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career...

  4. 48 CFR 801.602-71 - Basic review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basic review requirements. 801.602-71 Section 801.602-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development,...

  5. 42 CFR 412.46 - Medical review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... performed, as evidenced by the physician's entries in the patient's medical record, physicians must complete... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical review requirements. 412.46 Section 412.46... Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient Operating Costs and Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.46...

  6. 40 CFR 35.3580 - Environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... consequences on the existing environment, the future environment, and individual sensitive environmental issues... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Environmental review requirements. 35.3580 Section 35.3580 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER...

  7. 40 CFR 35.3580 - Environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... consequences on the existing environment, the future environment, and individual sensitive environmental issues... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Environmental review requirements. 35.3580 Section 35.3580 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER...

  8. 40 CFR 35.3580 - Environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... consequences on the existing environment, the future environment, and individual sensitive environmental issues... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Environmental review requirements. 35.3580 Section 35.3580 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER...

  9. 77 FR 8942 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review AGENCY: Small Business Administration..., Jacqueline White, Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor, Washington, DC 20416; and...

  10. 33 CFR 230.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., 1979, 32 CFR part 197. Procedural requirements for Civil Works studies and projects are discussed below... Principles and Guidelines for Water and Related Land Resources Implementation Studies. Reviews and... of the ongoing studies are not expected to materially affect the decision on the proposed action,...

  11. PMR-15/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites For Improved Thermal Stability And Mechanical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi; Scheiman, Daniel; Faile, Michael; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Montmorillonite clay was organically modified by co-exchange of an aromatic diamine and a primary alkyl amine. The clay was dispersed into a PMR (Polymerization of Monomer Reactants)-15 matrix and the glass transition temperature and thermal oxidative stability of the resulting nanocomposites were evaluated. PMR-15/ silicate nanocomposites were also investigated as a matrix material for carbon fabric reinforced composites. Dispersion of the organically modified silicate into the PMR-15 matrix enhanced the thermal oxidative stability, the flexural strength, flexural modulus, and interlaminar shear strength of the polymer matrix composite.

  12. DMBZ Polyimides Provide an Alternative to PMR-15 for High-Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    PMR-15, a high-temperature polyimide developed in the mid-1970's at the NASA Lewis Research Center, offers the combination of ease of processing, low cost, and good stability and performance at temperatures up to 288 C (500 F). This material is widely regarded as one of the leading high-temperature matrix resins for polymer-matrix-composite aircraft engine components. PMR-15 is widely used in both military and civilian aircraft engines. The current worldwide market for PMR-15 is on the order of 50,000 lb, with a total sales of around $5 to $10 million. However, PMR-15 is made from methylene dianiline (MDA), a known animal mutagen and a suspected human mutagen. Recent concerns about the safety of workers involved in the manufacture and repair of PMR-15 components have led to the implementation of costly protective measures to limit worker exposure and ensure workplace safety. In some cases, because of safety and economic concerns, airlines have eliminated PMR-15 components from engines in their fleets. Current efforts at Lewis are focused on developing suitable replacements for PMR-15 that do not contain mutagenic constituents and have processability, stability, and mechanical properties comparable to that of PMR-15. A recent development from these efforts is a new class of thermosetting polyimides based on 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine (DMBZ). Autoclave processing developed for PMR-15 composites was used to prepare low-void-content T650-35 carbon-fiber-reinforced laminates from DMBZ-15 polyimides. The glass transition temperatures of these laminates were about 50 C higher than those of the T650- 35/PMR-15 composites (400 versus 348 C). In addition, DMBZ-15 polyimide composites aged for 1000 hr in air at 288 C (500 F) had weight losses close to those of comparable PMR-15 laminates (0.9 versus 0.7 percent). The elevated (288 C) and room temperature mechanical properties of T650-35-reinforced DMBZ-15 polyimide and PMR-15 laminates were comparable. Standard Ames tests are

  13. Feasibility of Kevlar 49/PMR-15 Polyimide for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Kevlar 49 aramid organic fiber reinforced PMR-15 polyimide laminates were characterized to determine the applicability of the material to high temperature aerospace structures. Kevlar 49/3501-6 epoxy laminates were fabricated and characterized for comparison with the Kevlar 49/PMR-15 polyimide material. Flexural strengths and moduli and interlaminar shear strengths were determined from 75 F to 600 F for the PMR-15 and from 75 F to 450 F for the Kevlar/3501-6 epoxy material. The effects of hydrothermal and long-term elevated temperature exposures on the flexural strengths and moduli and the interlaminar shear strengths were also studied.

  14. ESA-SSA Review of Space Weather Measurement Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntama, Juha-Pekka; Glover, Alexi; Hilgers, Alain

    2012-07-01

    The ESA Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Preparatory Programme was started in 2009. The objective of the programme is to support the European independent utilisation of and access to space. The first phase of the ESA SSA system development will be finished in 2012 and the next phase is foreseen to be started after the ESA Ministerial Council meeting in November 2012. The definition of measurement requirements for the Space Weather Segment (SWE) of the ESA SSA system has been based on the space weather service requirements defined the by expected users of the system. This document, SSA SWE Customer Requirements Document (CRD), has been defined in a iterative process together with the members of the SSA User Representative Group (URG) and the delegates representing the European states participating the programme. Based on the SWE CRD, ESA with the support of the European industry has produced two documents: SSA SWE System Requirements Document (SRD) and SSA SWE Product Specification (PS). SWE PS contains the requirements for the measurements data required by the SSA SWE system. The SWE PS document has been recently rigorously reviewed by the SSA URG in the framework of the SSA System Requirements Review (SRR). The support provided by the Steering Board of the ESA Space Weather Working Team (SWWT) in this review was extremely useful. The members of the SWWT SB representing the scientific community and the provisional service providers were able to give very detailed comments regarding the measurement requirements for accuracy, cadence, timeliness, etc. As these parameters will be provisional design and cost drivers for the ESA SSA system, definition of the appropriate values at this point in the programme is crucial. This paper provides an overview of the measurement requirements for the SWE Segment of the ESA SSA Programme. The paper discusses the requirement definition process, the customer and service provider inputs, and the critical requirements as they have

  15. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements: ASCR Network Requirements Review Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacon, Charles; Bell, Greg; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Goodwin, Dave; Lee, Jason; Hicks, Susan; Holohan, Ed; Klasky, Scott; Lauzon, Carolyn; Rogers, Jim; Shipman, Galen; Skinner, David; Tierney, Brian

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  16. A High T(sub g) PMR Polyimide Composites (DMBZ-15)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopoulos, Demitrios S.; Hardy-Green, DeNise; Mccorkle, Linda

    2000-01-01

    A high T(sub g) thermosetting PMR-type polyimide, designated as DMBZ-15, was developed by replacing methylene dianline (MDA) in PMR-15 with 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine. Polyimide/carbon fiber (T650-35) composites were fabricated from a formulation of 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester (BTDE) and 2,2'-dimethylbenzidine (DMBZ), along with nadic ester (NE) as the endcap. DMBZ-15 displays a higher glass transition temperature (T(sub g) = 414 C) than PMR-15 (T(sub g) = 345 C), and thus retains better mechanical properties for brief exposure above 400 C. The physical properties and longterm thermo-oxidative stability of the DMBZ-15 polyimide/carbon fiber composites are also compared to that of PMR-15.

  17. Graphite Sheet Coating for Improved Thermal Oxidative Stability of Carbon Fiber Reinforced/PMR-15 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Heimann, Paula; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Expanded graphite was compressed into graphite sheets and used as a coating for carbon fiber reinforced PMR-15 composites. BET analysis of the graphite indicated an increase in graphite pore size on compression, however the material was proven to be an effective barrier to oxygen when prepegged with PMR-15 resin. Oxygen permeability of the PMR-15/graphite was an order of magnitude lower than the compressed graphite sheet. By providing a barrier to oxygen permeation, the rate of oxidative degradation of PMR-15 was decreased. As a result, the composite thermo-oxidative stability increased by up to 25%. The addition of a graphite sheet as a top ply on the composites yielded little change in the material's flexural strength or interlaminar shear strength.

  18. Characterization of PMR-15 polyimide composition in thermo-oxidatively exposed graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    The contributions of individual resin components to total resin weight loss in 600 F air aged Celion 6000/PMR-15 polyimide composites were determined from the overall resin weight loss in the composite by chemically separating the PMR-15 matrix resin into its monomeric components. The individual resin components were also analyzed by spectroscopic techniques in order to elucidate curing and degradation mechanisms of the PMR-15 matrix resin. The isothermal weight loss of the individual resin components during prolonged 600 F thermo-oxidative aging of the composite was correlated to the changes observed in the Fourier Transform infrared spectra and Fourier Transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the individual resin components. The correlation was used to identify the molecular site of the thermo-oxidative changes in PMR-15 polyimide matrix resin during 600 F curing the prolonged 600 F thermo-oxidative aging.

  19. Crosslinking-property relationships in PMR polyimide composites. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.; Whitley, K.; Morgan, C.; Chang, A.

    1987-01-01

    The thermooxidatively-induced crosslinking/ physical and mechanical property relationships of graphite fiber-reinforced PMR polyimide-matrix composites were studied during isothermal exposure of the composite specimens at 288 C in air for periods of up to 5000 hr. The crosslinking densities due to this treatment were estimated on the basis of the kinetic theory of rubber elasticity and shifts in the glass transition temperature T(g). Several linear relationships are noted between crosslink density and physical and mechanical properties: T(g), initial weight loss, and elevated temperature interlaminar shear strength increase with crosslink density, while initial moisture absorption decreases. After achieving the highest crosslink density, several of the composite properties begin to decrease from their maximum values.

  20. PMR-15 polyimide modifications for improved prepreg tack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of mixed solvents and of modified monomeric ester reactants was investigated as a means of improving the tack and drape retention characteristics of PMR-15 polyimide prepreg. Methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol were used to prepare the esters, prepreg solutions, and T-300 graphite fabric and Celion 6000 unidirectional fiber prepregs. The tack retention characteristics of the T-300 fabric prepreg after exposure to simulated use conditions were determined using a simple lap shear test. Drape was qualitatively assessed by visually monitoring the deformability of the prepreg. Thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties retention of the Celion 6000 grahite fiber composites were determined as a function of exposure time in air at 600 F.

  1. Kinetics of imidization and crosslinking in PMR-polyimide resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were employed to study the imidization and crosslinking kinetics of norbornenyl-capped, addition-type polyimide resins (designated PMR for polymerization of monomer reactants). The spectral and thermal analyses were performed on resin specimens which had been isothermally aged at temperatures appropriate for imidization (120 to 204 C) and crosslinking (275 to 325 C). Imidization occurs rapidly (approximately 0.01/min) at short times, while at times longer than approximately 0.5 hour, the rate decreases significantly (approximately 0.0001/min). The crosslinking reaction exhibits first order kinetics during the initial portion of the reaction and its rate appears to be limited by the reversion of the norbornenyl Diels-Alder adduct. The total heat evolved per mole of endcap during crosslinking shows an inverse dependence on the molecular weight of the imide prepolymers. This reflects the effect of endcap dilution and decreased mobility of the larger oligomers.

  2. Characterization of PMR polyimides - Correlation of ester impurities with composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The presumed relationship of chemical impurities to final composite properties is the rationale for most chemical characterization studies. This study examines this relationship for PMR-polyimide resin. Ester/acid solutions of one monomer were aged at selected temperatures and chemical changes were monitored spectroscopically. At selected intervals, graphite fiber reinforced composite panels were fabricated. Changes in resin processing characteristics and composite properties were determined. The correlation of these data are discussed as are related characterization studies of PMR-polyimide resin.

  3. Characterization of PMR polyimides: Correlation of ester impurities with composite properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauver, R. W.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    The presumed relationship of chemical impurities to final composite properties was investigated for PMR-polyimide resin. Ester/acid solutions of one monomer were aged at selected temperatures and chemical changes were monitored spectroscopically. At selected intervals, graphite fiber reinforced composite panels were fabricated. Changes in resin processing characteristics and composite properties were determined. The correlation of these data are discussed as are related characterization studies of PMR-polyimide resin.

  4. Kevlar/PMR-15 reduced drag DC-9 reverser stang fairing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    A reduced drag fairing for the afterbody enclosing the thrust reverser actuators on the DC-9 has been developed with Kevlar-49/PMR-15 advanced composite material. The improved fairing reduces airplane drag 1% compared to the production baseline. Use of composites reduces weight 40% compared to an equivalent metal fairing. The Kevlar-49/PMR-15 advanced composite is an organic matrix material system that can be used at temperatures up to 500 F.

  5. Patients' views on the causes of their polymyalgia rheumatica: a content analysis of data from the PMR Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tshimologo, Maatla; Muller, Sara; Mallen, Christian D; Hider, Samantha L

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore primary care polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) patient beliefs about the causes of their PMR. Design Qualitative content analysis was conducted on patients' written responses to the question of what they thought had caused their PMR. All data were coded and emergent categories of causal beliefs identified. Setting Community patients receiving primary care at general practitioner (GP) practices across England. Participants Participants were recruited from a primary care PMR inception cohort (n=654). Between June 2012 and June 2014 GPs referred 739 people with a new PMR diagnosis in the past 3 years into the study. Patients were mailed a baseline self-completion questionnaire, which included the question, ‘What do you think caused your PMR?’. Responses to this question form the data set for the present study. Results 296 (45%) patients gave a possible cause for their PMR, while 276 (42%) respondents wrote ‘no idea’. Common attributions include ageing (45, 18%), medication (18, 5%) and personal stress (53, 14%). 24 respondents (6%) thought their PMR was as a result of another medical condition. Conclusions This is the first study to examine causation beliefs in PMR, identifying a number of possible causes such as ageing, stress and as a complication of other medical problems. Understanding these patient beliefs may impact on treatment adherence and patient outcome. PMID:28122836

  6. Rotorcraft aviation icing research requirements: Research review and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, A. A.; Dadone, L.; Bevan, A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of rotorcraft icing evaluation techniques and ice protection technology was assessed. Recommendations are made for near and long term icing programs that describe the needs of industry. These recommended programs are based on a consensus of the major U.S. helicopter companies. Specific activities currently planned or underway by NASA, FAA and DOD are reviewed to determine relevance to the overall research requirements. New programs, taking advantage of current activities, are recommended to meet the long term needs for rotorcraft icing certification.

  7. Role of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Two-Component System PreA/PreB in Modulating PmrA-Regulated Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Massimo; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Septer, Alecia N.; Bhatiya, Aditi; Gunn, John S.

    2006-01-01

    The PmrA/PmrB two-component system encoded by the pmrCAB operon regulates the modification of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide leading to polymyxin B resistance. PmrA and PhoP are the only known activators of pmrCAB. A transposon mutagenesis screen for additional regulators of a pmrC::MudJ fusion led to the identification of a two-component system, termed PreA/PreB (pmrCAB regulators A and B), that controls the transcription of the pmrCAB operon in response to unknown signals. The initial observations indicated that insertions in, or a deletion of, the preB sensor, but not the preA response regulator, caused upregulation of pmrCAB. Interestingly, the expression of pmrCAB was not upregulated in a preAB mutant grown in LB broth, implicating PreA in the increased expression of pmrCAB in the preB strain. This was confirmed by overexpression of preA+ in preAB or preB backgrounds, which resulted in significant upregulation or further upregulation of pmrCAB. No such effect was observed in any tested preB+ backgrounds. Additionally, an ectopic construct expressing a preA[D51A] allele also failed to upregulate pmrC in any of the pre backgrounds tested, which implies that there is a need for phosphorylation in the activation of the target genes. The observed upregulation of pmrCAB occurred independently of the response regulators PmrA and PhoP. Although a preB mutation led to increased transcription of pmrCAB, this did not result in a measurable effect on polymyxin B resistance. Our genetic data support a model of regulation whereby, in response to unknown signals, the PreB sensor activates PreA, which in turn indirectly upregulates pmrCAB transcription. PMID:16352830

  8. Dynamic mechanical properties of N-phenylnadimide modified PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-frequency dependence of alpha, beta, and gamma transitions was determined using a Rheometrics dynamic spectrometer on a series of unidirectional Celion 6000/N-phenylnadimide (PN) modified PMR polyimide composites. The objective was to see if any correlations exist between crosslinked network structure and dynamic mechanical properties. Variation in crosslinked network structures was achieved by altering the polyimide formulation through addition of various quantities of PN into the standard PMR-15 composition. As a control, PMR-15 composite system exhibited well-defined alpha, beta, and gamma transitions in the regions of 360, 100, and -120 C, respectively. Their activation energies were estimated to be 232, 60, and 14 kcal/mole, respectively. Increasing the amount of PN concentration caused lowering of the activation energies of the three relaxations, a decrease of the glass transition temperature, and increasing intensities of the three damping peaks, compared to the control PMR-15 counterpart. These dynamic mechanical responses were in agreement with formation of a more flexible copolymer from PN and PMR-15 prepolymer.

  9. Effect of polymyxin resistance (pmr) on biofilm formation of Cronobacter sakazakii.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuerui; Jia, Xiangyin; Chen, Lequn; Peters, Brian M; Lin, Chii-Wann; Chen, Dingqiang; Li, Lin; Li, Bing; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Zhenbo; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2016-12-22

    Cronobacter sakazakii (C.sakazakii) has been identified as a wide-spread conditioned pathogen associated with series of serious illnesses, such as neonatal meningitis, enterocolitis, bacteremia or sepsis. As food safety is concerned, microbial biofilm has been considered to be a potential source of food contamination. The current study aims to investigate the ability of biofilm formation of two C. sakazakii strains (wild type BAA 894 and pmrA mutant). Crystal violet (CV), XTT (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino carbonyl)-2H-(tetrazolium hydroxide)] assays, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are performed on different time points during biofilm formation of C. sakazakii strains. Furthermore, RNA-seq strategy is utilized and the transcriptome data is analyzed to study the expression of genes related to biofilm formation along with whole genome sequencing. For biomass, in the first 24 h, pmrA mutant produced approximately 5 times than wildtype. However, the wild type exhibited more biomass than pmrA mutant during the post maturation stage (7-14 d). In addition, the wildtype showed higher viability than pmrA mutant during the whole biofilm formation. This study represents the first evidence on the biofilm formation of C. sakazakii pmrA mutant, which may further aid in the prevention and control for the food contamination caused by C. sakazakii.

  10. Effects of Prior Aging on the Creep Response of Carbon Fiber Reinforced PMR-15 Neat Resin at 288 C in an Air Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    14 Figure 6: Shrinkage of T-650-35/PMR-15 composite ...used thermosetting polyimide resins for high-temperature polymer-matrix composite applications. Of the many high-temperature resins, PMR-15 has good...specifications for the use of this material, it was observed that the thermal oxidative stability of PMR-15 composites was not only influenced by the curing

  11. A review of medical image watermarking requirements for teleradiology.

    PubMed

    Nyeem, Hussain; Boles, Wageeh; Boyd, Colin

    2013-04-01

    Teleradiology allows medical images to be transmitted over electronic networks for clinical interpretation and for improved healthcare access, delivery, and standards. Although such remote transmission of the images is raising various new and complex legal and ethical issues, including image retention and fraud, privacy, malpractice liability, etc., considerations of the security measures used in teleradiology remain unchanged. Addressing this problem naturally warrants investigations on the security measures for their relative functional limitations and for the scope of considering them further. In this paper, starting with various security and privacy standards, the security requirements of medical images as well as expected threats in teleradiology are reviewed. This will make it possible to determine the limitations of the conventional measures used against the expected threats. Furthermore, we thoroughly study the utilization of digital watermarking for teleradiology. Following the key attributes and roles of various watermarking parameters, justification for watermarking over conventional security measures is made in terms of their various objectives, properties, and requirements. We also outline the main objectives of medical image watermarking for teleradiology and provide recommendations on suitable watermarking techniques and their characterization. Finally, concluding remarks and directions for future research are presented.

  12. Protein Requirements and Recommendations for Older People: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Nowson, Caryl; O’Connell, Stella

    2015-01-01

    Declines in skeletal muscle mass and strength are major contributors to increased mortality, morbidity and reduced quality of life in older people. Recommended Dietary Allowances/Intakes have failed to adequately consider the protein requirements of the elderly with respect to function. The aim of this paper was to review definitions of optimal protein status and the evidence base for optimal dietary protein. Current recommended protein intakes for older people do not account for the compensatory loss of muscle mass that occurs on lower protein intakes. Older people have lower rates of protein synthesis and whole-body proteolysis in response to an anabolic stimulus (food or resistance exercise). Recommendations for the level of adequate dietary intake of protein for older people should be informed by evidence derived from functional outcomes. Randomized controlled trials report a clear benefit of increased dietary protein on lean mass gain and leg strength, particularly when combined with resistance exercise. There is good consistent evidence (level III-2 to IV) that consumption of 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein combined with twice-weekly progressive resistance exercise reduces age-related muscle mass loss. Older people appear to require 1.0 to 1.3 g/kg/day dietary protein to optimize physical function, particularly whilst undertaking resistance exercise recommendations. PMID:26287239

  13. Development and demonstration of manufacturing processes for fabricating graphite/PMR-15 polyimide structural elements. [space shuttle aft body flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, C. H.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The processing requirements for graphite/PMR-15 polyimide composites developed to demonstrate the structural integrity of polyimide composite structural elements at temperatures up to 589K (600 F) are described. Major tasks included: quality assurance development; materials and process development; specification verification; flat panel fabrication; stiffened panel fabrication; honeycomb panel fabrication; chopped fiber moldings; and demonstration component fabrication. Materials, processing, and quality assurance documents were prepared from experimentally derived data. Structural elements consisting of flat panels, corrugated stiffeners, I-beams, hat stiffeners, honeycomb panels, and chopped fiber moldings were made and tested. Property data from 219K (-65 F) to 589K (600 F) were obtained. All elements were made in a production environment. The size of each element was sufficient to insure production capability and structural component applicability. Problems associated with adhesive bonding, laminate and structural element analysis, material variability, and test methods were addressed.

  14. Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR): clinical, laboratory, and immunofluorescence studies in 13 patients.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Shuzo; Shiigai, Tatsuo; Matsui, Yoshiki

    2002-01-01

    Thirteen elderly patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) are presented. The clinical and laboratory findings suggest that many progressive symptoms are due to the non-specific inflammatory changes in various organs of the body, especially in muscles and joints. An immunofluorescence study of muscle biopsy specimens revealed IgG, IgA, and fibrinogen deposits in the perifascicular area of the perimysium. This finding suggests that immune complexes play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition and that the pathophysiology of PMR is an interstitial inflammatory process. We think that the inflammatory findings affecting the interstitial tissue of muscles in the immunofluorescence study are relatively specific to PMR, and will be affected by steroid treatment.

  15. Thermal and mechanical interfacial properties of the DGEBA/PMR-15 blend system.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hwa-Young; Han, Mijeong; Hong, Sung-Kwon

    2004-02-15

    In this work, the blend system of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and PMR-15 polyimide is investigated in terms of thermal and dynamic mechanical interfacial properties of the casting specimens. The thermal stabilities are studied by thermogravimetric and thermomechanical analyses, and the dynamic mechanical properties are carried out by dynamic mechanical analysis. The results show that the thermal stabilities based on the initial decomposition temperature, the integral procedural decomposition temperature, and the glass transition temperature are increased with increasing PMR-15 content. The crosslinking density (rho) of the blend system is increased at 10 phr of PMR-15, compared with that of neat epoxy. Mechanical interfacial properties measured in the context of critical stress intensity factor and critical strain energy release rate show similar behaviors with E(a) and rho, probably due to the increase in intermolecular interactions or hydrogen bondings in polymer chains.

  16. Influence of excess diamine on properties of PMR polyimide resins and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, F. I.

    1980-01-01

    By varying the stoichiometry of the reactants in the preparation of PMR polyimide resin, changes occur in molecular weight distribution which influence the rheological properties and thus the processability of the resin, as well as the mechanical properties of the composite. The influence of 1-10 percent molar excess MDA on the molecular weight distribution and rheological properties of an imidized PMR system were exposed. Molecular weight distribution is characterized by gel permeation chromatography of the imidized molding compound; shear viscosity is related to changes in average molecular weight. The thermo-oxidative stability at 600 F, glass transition temperature, flexural and interlaminar shear properties of PMR polyimide/Celion 6000 graphite fiber composites are compared as a function of the percent excess MDA in the monomer reactant mixture.

  17. Effect of solution concentration and aging conditions on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, G. D.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography is utilized to evaluate the effect of temperature, solution concentration, and aging time on PMR-15 resin solutions. Fifty- and 70-wt percent PMR-15 resin solutions were prepared from the mixture of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic ester (NE) acid, 4.4'-methylenedianiline (MDA), methanol, and 3,3',4.4.-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dimethyl ester (BTDE) acid solution. It is observed that in PMR-15 resin solution aged for 35 days at room temperature NE and MDA react to form amide and imide intermediates. The precipitation data reveal that in the 70-wt percent solution precipitation occurs after 12 days and in the 50-wt percent solution after 20 days; however, at lower temperatures (-11 C, and 2 C) no precipitation is detected. It is concluded that storage of resin solutions and powders at reduced temperatures extends shelf life by reducing the rate of imide formation.

  18. Accuracy of musculoskeletal imaging for the diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Sarah Louise; Koduri, Gouri; Hill, Catherine L; Wakefield, Richard J; Hutchings, Andrew; Loy, Clement; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To review the evidence for accuracy of imaging for diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). Methods Searches included MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed. Evaluations of diagnostic accuracy of imaging tests for PMR were eligible, excluding reports with <10 PMR cases. Two authors independently extracted study data and three authors assessed methodological quality using modified QUADAS-2 criteria. Results 26 studies of 2370 patients were evaluated: 10 ultrasound scanning studies; 6 MRI studies; 1 USS and MRI study; 7 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) studies; 1 plain radiography and 1 technetium scintigraphy study. In four ultrasound studies, subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis had sensitivity 80% (95% CI 55% to 93%) and specificity 68% (95% CI 60% to 75%), whereas bilateral subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis had sensitivity 66% (95% CI 43% to 87%) and specificity 89% (95% CI 66% to 97%). Sensitivity for ultrasound detection of trochanteric bursitis ranged from 21% to 100%. In four ultrasound studies reporting both subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis and glenohumeral synovitis, detection of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis was more accurate than that of glenohumeral synovitis (p=0.004). MRI and PET/CT revealed additional areas of inflammation in the spine and pelvis, including focal areas between the vertebrae and anterior to the hip joint, but the number of controls with inflammatory disease was inadequate for precise specificity estimates. Conclusions Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis appears to be the most helpful ultrasound feature for PMR diagnosis, but interpretation is limited by study heterogeneity and methodological issues, including variability in blinding and potential bias due to case–control study designs. Recent MRI and PET/CT case–control studies, with blinded readers, yielded promising data requiring validation within a diagnostic cohort study. PMID:26535139

  19. High-Flow PMR-Polymide Composites Developed With Mechanical Properties Comparable to Other High-Temperature Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    PMR polyimides, in particular PMR-15, are well known for their excellent high-temperature stability and performance, and solvent resistance. However, the processing of these materials is limited, for the most part, to prepreg-based methods, such as compression or autoclave processing. These methods involve substantial amounts of hand labor, and as a result, manufacturing costs for components made from PMR polyimides can be high. In cost-sensitive applications, these high manufacturing costs can make the use of PMR polyimide-based components cost prohibitive. Lower cost manufacturing methods, such as resin transfer molding (RTM) and resin film infusion, have been demonstrated to reduce manufacturing costs by as much as 50 percent over prepreg-based methods. However, these processes are only amenable to materials with melt viscosities below 30 poise. Most PMR polyimides have melt viscosities on the order of 100 poise or higher. Recent efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center have focused on chemical modifications to PMR polyimides to reduce their melt viscosity to the point where they could be processed by these low-cost manufacturing methods without adversely affecting their high-temperature properties and performance. These efforts have led to a new family of PMR polyimides that have melt viscosities significantly lower than that of PMR-15. Reductions in melt viscosity are brought about through the introduction of molecular twists in the polymer backbone. Carbon fiber (T650- 35) composites were prepared from one of these polyimides, designated PMR-Flex, by compression molding. The properties of these composites are presented below and compared with comparable composites made from PMR-15 and PETI-RTM, a new low-melt-viscosity polyimide.

  20. Manufacturing processes for fabricating graphite/PMR 15 polyimide structural elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, C. H.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to obtain commercially available graphite/PMR-15 polyimide prepreg, develop an autoclave manufacturing process, and demonstrate the process by manufacturing structural elements. Controls were established on polymer, prepreg, composite fabrication, and quality assurance, Successful material quality control and processes were demonstrated by fabricating major structural elements including flat laminates, hat sections, I beam sections, honeycomb sandwich structures, and molded graphite reinforced fittings. Successful fabrication of structural elements and simulated section of the space shuttle aft body flap shows that the graphite/PMR-15 polyimide system and the developed processes are ready for further evaluation in flight test hardware.

  1. Influence of excess diamine on properties of PMR polyimide resins and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, F. I.

    1980-01-01

    This preliminary study explores the influence of 1-10 percent molar excess MDA on the molecular weight distribution and rheological properties of an imidized PMR system. Molecular weight distribution is characterized by gel permeation chromatography of the imidized molding compound; shear viscosity is related to changes in average molecular weight. The thermo-oxidative stability at 600 F glass transition temperature, flexural and interlaminar shear properties of PMR polyimide/Celion 6000 graphite fiber composites are compared as a function of the percent excess MDA in the monomer reactant mixture.

  2. The synthesis, characterization and thermal chemistry of modified norbornenyl PMR endcaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sukenik, C. N.; Ritchey, W. M.; Malhotra, V.; Varde, U.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a program to further the understanding of the polymerization of Nadic-Endcapped PMR systems, a series of model Norbornenyl-Imides has been synthesized and their thermal behavior explored. Their syntheses and characterizations as well as their rearrangement and polymerization chemistry are described. Monomer isomerization at temperatures as low as 125 C and oligomer formation at somewhat higher temperatures are observed. Approximate relative rates for competing isomerization pathways are established and some information is obtained about the details of oligomer formation. The relationship of this data to current PMR systems is briefly discussed.

  3. 42 CFR 476.71 - QIO review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... care) for the palliation and management of terminal illness; (2) Whether the quality of the services... Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review...

  4. A distinct alleles and genetic recombination of pmrCAB operon in species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate pmrCAB sequence divergence in 5 species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex, a total of 80 isolates from a Korean hospital were explored. We evaluated nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms of pmrCAB operon, and phylogenetic trees were constructed for each gene of prmCAB operon. Colistin and polymyxin B susceptibility was determined for all isolates, and multilocus sequence typing was also performed for A. baumannii isolates. Our results showed that each species of A. baumannii complex has divergent pmrCAB operon sequences. We identified a distinct pmrCAB allele allied with Acinetobacter nosocomialis in gene trees. Different grouping in each gene tree suggests sporadic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes among Acinetobacter species. Sequence polymorphisms among Acinetobacter species might not be associated with colistin resistance. We revealed that a distinct pmrCAB allele may be widespread across the continents such as North America and Asia and that sporadic genetic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes might occur.

  5. Development of DMBZ-15 High-Glass-Transition-Temperature Polyimides as PMR-15 Replacements Given R&D 100 Award

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    PMR-15, a high-temperature polyimide developed in the mid-1970s at the NASA Lewis Research Center,1 offers the combination of low cost, easy processing, and good high-temperature performance and stability. It has been recognized as the leading polymer matrix resin for carbon-fiber-reinforced composites used in aircraft engine components. The state-of-the-art PMR-15 polyimide composite has a glass-transition temperature (Tg) of 348 C (658 F). Since composite materials must be used at temperatures well below their glass-transition temperature, the long-term use temperatures of PMR-15 composites can be no higher than 288 C (550 F). In addition, PMR-15 is made from methylene dianiline (MDA), a known liver toxin. Concerns about the safety of workers exposed to MDA during the fabrication of PMR-15 components and about the environmental impact of PMR-15 waste disposal have led to the industry-wide implementation of special handling procedures to minimize the health risks associated with this material. These procedures have increased manufacturing and maintenance costs significantly and have limited the use of PMR-15 in commercial aircraft engine components.

  6. Structural Evolution and Mechanical Properties of PMR-15/Layered Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi (Technical Monitor); Dean, Derrick; Abdalla, Mohamed; Green, Keith; Small, Sharee

    2003-01-01

    In the first year of this research, we successfully synthesized and characterized Polymer/ Layered Silicate nanocomposite using the polyimide PMR-15 as the polymer and several layered silicate nanoparticles. We have scaled up the process to allow fabrication of monoliths using these nanocomposites. The morphology of these systems was found to evolve during processing to an exfoliated structure for one system and intercalated for the rest. Correlation with Transmission Electron Microscopy studies is underway. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed a significant increase in the thermomechanical properties (E' and E'') of 2.5 wt.% clay loaded nanocomposites in comparison to the neat polyimide. Increasing the clay loading to 5 wt.% decreased these properties. Higher glass transition temperatures were observed for 2.5 wt.% nanocomposites compared to the neat polyimide. A lower coefficient of thermal expansion was observed only for the PGV/PMR-15 nanocomposite. An improvement in the flexural properties (modulus, strength and elongation) was observed for the 2.5 wt.% nanocomposite but not for the 5 wt.% nanocomposites. The improved barrier properties polymer/ silicate nanocomposites suggest that moisture uptake should be decreased for PMR-15 nanocomposites. The results of some recent experiments to examine delineate the ability of the silicate nanoparticles in improving the hydrolytic degradation of PMR-15 will be discussed.

  7. Laboratory simulation of tropospheric pollution sensing with a pressure modulator radiometer /PMR/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, D. E.; Odell, E. L. G.

    1979-01-01

    The optical properties of carbon monoxide gas uniformly distributed in the atmosphere have been simulated in a 20.48 cm long cell in the laboratory. The altitude of the peak of the weighting function for several concentrations was found using a Pressure Modulator Radiometer (PMR). The effect of a fluctuating background radiance and gaseous nitrous oxide on the carbon monoxide signals were examined.

  8. 42 CFR 456.231 - Continued stay review required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan... a review of each recipient's continued stay in the mental hospital to decide whether it is...

  9. 42 CFR 456.231 - Continued stay review required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan... a review of each recipient's continued stay in the mental hospital to decide whether it is...

  10. [Percutaneous myocardial laser revascularization (PMR), a new therapeutic procedure for patients with refractory angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Lauer, B; Stahl, F; Bratanow, S; Schuler, G

    2000-01-01

    In patients with severe angina pectoris due to coronary artery disease, who are not candidates for either percutaneous coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass surgery, transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) often leads to improvement of clinical symptoms and increased exercise capacity. One drawback of TMR is the need for surgical thoracotomy in order to gain access to the epicardial surface of the heart. Therefore, a catheter-based system has been developed, which allows creation of laser channels into the myocardium from the left ventricular cavity. Between January 1997 and November 1999, this "percutaneous myocardial laser-revascularization" (PMR) was performed in 85 patients at the Herzzentrum Leipzig. In 43 patients, only one region of the heart (anterior, lateral, inferior or septal) was treated with PMR; in 42 patients two or three regions were treated in one session. 12.3 +/- 4.3 (range 4-22) channels/region were created into the myocardium. Six months after PMR, the majority of patients reported significant improvement of clinical symptoms (CCS class at baseline: 3.3 +/- 0.4; after 6 months: 1.6 +/- 0.9) (p < 0.001) and an increased exercise capacity (baseline: 349 +/- 138 s; after 6 months: 470 +/- 193 s) (p < 0.05); however, thallium scintigraphy failed to show increased perfusion in the PMR treated regions. PMR seems to be a safe and feasible new therapeutic option for patients with refractory angina pectoris due to end-stage coronary artery disease. The first results indicate improvement of clinical symptoms and increased exercise capacity; evidence of increased perfusion in the laser-treated regions is still lacking.

  11. [Percutaneous myocardial laserrevascularization (PMR), a new therapy for patients with refractory angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Lauer, B; Stahl, F; Bratanow, S; Schuler, G

    2000-10-01

    In patients with severe angina pectoris due to coronary artery disease, who are not candidates for either percutaneous coronary angioplasty or coronary artery bypass surgery, transmyocardial laser revascularization (TMR) often leads to improvement of clinical symptoms and increased exercise capacity. One drawback of TMR is the need for surgical thoracotomy in order to gain access to the epicardial surface of the heart. Therefore, a catheter-based system has been developed, which allows creation of laser channels into the myocardium from the left ventricular cavity.Between January 1997 and November 1999, this "percutaneous myocardial laser-revascularization" (PMR) was performed in 85 patients at the Herzzentrum Leipzig. In 43 patients, only one region of the heart (anterior, lateral, inferior or septal) was treated with PMR; in 42 patients two or three regions were treated in one session. 12.3±4.3 (range 4-22) channels/region were created into the myocardium.Six months after PMR, the majority of patients reported significant improvement of clinical symptoms (CCS class at baseline: 3.3±0.4; after 6 months: 1.6±0.9) (p < 0.001) and an increased exercise capacity (baseline: 349±138 s; after 6 months: 470±193 s) (p < 0.05); however, thallium scintigraphy failed to show increased perfusion in the PMR treated regions.PMR seems to be a safe and feasible new therapeutic option for patients with refractory angina pectoris due to end-stage coronary artery disease. The first results indicate improvement of clinical symptoms and increased exercise capacity; evidence of increased perfusion in the laser-treated regions is still lacking.

  12. 42 CFR 488.64 - Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.64 Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements. (a... conduct the utilization review required by § 405.1137 of this chapter or § 482.30 of this chapter, as... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remote facility variances for utilization...

  13. 42 CFR 488.64 - Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.64 Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements. (a... conduct the utilization review required by § 405.1137 of this chapter or § 482.30 of this chapter, as... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remote facility variances for utilization...

  14. 42 CFR 488.64 - Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.64 Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements. (a... conduct the utilization review required by § 405.1137 of this chapter or § 482.30 of this chapter, as... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remote facility variances for utilization...

  15. 42 CFR 488.64 - Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES Special Requirements § 488.64 Remote facility variances for utilization review requirements. (a... conduct the utilization review required by § 405.1137 of this chapter or § 482.30 of this chapter, as... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remote facility variances for utilization...

  16. 77 FR 66464 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Value Engineering Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Value Engineering Requirements AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve an extension of a previously approved information collection requirement concerning Value Engineering Requirements. A notice...

  17. 76 FR 52730 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7044. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: ``Personal Financial Statement''. Frequency: On Occasion. SBA Form Number: 413. Description of Respondents: Participating Lenders. Responses...), supporting statement, and other documents submitted to OMB for review may be obtained from the...

  18. 75 FR 47034 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Development Management Information System (EDMIS) Counseling Information. Frequency: On occasion. SBA Form... OMB Reviewer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, New... Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7044. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: SBIC Management...

  19. 78 FR 44185 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...: Entrepreneurial Development Management Information System (EDMIS) Customer Intake Form & Management Training..., DC 20416; and OMB Reviewer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis...

  20. 76 FR 45642 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Management Information System (EDMIS) Counseling Information Form & Management Training Report.'' Frequency... OMB Reviewer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jacqueline White,...

  1. In Vivo Evolution to Colistin Resistance by PmrB Sensor Kinase Mutation in KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Is Associated with Low-Dosage Colistin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cannatelli, Antonio; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Giani, Tommaso; Arena, Fabio; Ambretti, Simone; Gaibani, Paolo; D'Andrea, Marco Maria

    2014-01-01

    Colistin is a key drug for the treatment of infections caused by extensively drug-resistant strains of Enterobacteriaceae producing carbapenemases. However, the emergence of colistin resistance is being increasingly reported, especially among Klebsiella pneumoniae strains producing KPC-type carbapenemases (KPC-KP). In this work, we investigated colistin-susceptible (KPB-1) and colistin-resistant (KPB-2) sequential isolates obtained from a patient with a KPC-KP infection before and after low-dosage colistin treatment, respectively. By using a next-generation sequencing approach and comparative genomic analysis of the two isolates, we detected in KPB-2 a nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution in the gene encoding the PmrB sensor kinase, resulting in a leucine-to-arginine substitution at amino acid position 82. Compared with KPB-1, KPB-2 exhibited upregulated transcription of pmrA and of pmrK, which is part of the pmrHFIJKLM operon responsible for modification of the colistin lipopolysaccharide target. Complementation with wild-type pmrB in KPB-2 restored colistin susceptibility and reduced the transcription of pmrA and pmrK to basal levels, while expression of PmrBL82R in KPB-1 did not alter colistin susceptibility or upregulate pmrA and pmrK expression, confirming the dominance of wild-type PmrB versus the PmrBL82R mutant. The present results indicated that PmrB mutations mediating colistin resistance may be selected during low-dosage colistin treatment. The colistin-resistant phenotype of KPB-2 was stable for up to 50 generations in the absence of selective pressure and was not associated with a significant fitness cost in a competition experiment. PMID:24841267

  2. 76 FR 76359 - Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ...; ] AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review SUMMARY: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has submitted the...

  3. 43 CFR 10010.36 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR IMPLEMENTING THE... consultation requirements pursuant to other federal or state laws and regulations and will make this available... comply with the requirements of other federal or state laws and regulations, the associated...

  4. Preparation, review, and approval of implementation plans for nuclear safety requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This standard describes an acceptable method to prepare, review, and approve implementation plans for DOE Nuclear Safety requirements. DOE requirements are identified in DOE Rules, Orders, Notices, Immediate Action Directives, and Manuals.

  5. [3 cases of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), in which serum amyloid A was a useful index of the disease activity].

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Yamauchi, H; Imaizumi, Y; Senba, T

    2001-08-01

    We encountered 3 cases of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), in which serum amyloid A (SAA) levels were correlated with clinical pictures after normalization of ESR and CRP levels. Therefore, it is suggested that SAA may be a useful index for evaluating the severity of intractable PMR. Case 1: The patient was a 75-year-old man. Although ESR and CRP levels were normalized after the administration of PSL (20 mg/day), myalgia persisted. When the dose of PSL was reduced, PMR recurred, which was relieved by administering 15 mg/day of PSL. However, myalgia recurred again when the dose of PSL was reduced thereafter. The elevated SAA level (33.0 micrograms/ml) was normalized by continuous administration of PSL without reducing the dose, resulting in the relief of myalgia. Case 2: The patient was a 65-year-old woman. The administration of PSL was initiated at a dose of 15 mg/day. Although myalgia was relieved, the symptom and elevated SAA levels persisted for approximately 3 months. Thereafter, PMR recurred, and SAA levels were markedly increased to 78.2 micrograms/ml. However, the symptom of PMR was eliminated by continuously administering PSL without reducing the dose. Although the dose of PSL was then reduced after the decrease in SAA levels, PMR did not recur. Case 3: The patient was an 88-year-old woman. Although the symptom of PMR was relieved by administering 15 mg/day of PSL, myalgia persisted. Since SAA levels were increased to 106 micrograms/ml, PSL was continuously administered without reducing the dose, resulting in the disappearance of the symptom and normalization of SAA levels approximately 3 months later. Although the dose of PSL was then reduced to 12.5 mg/day, PMR did not recur.

  6. 40 CFR 6.403 - Environmental review and assessment requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... study. EPA shall afford the affected foreign nation or international body or organization an opportunity... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Environmental review and assessment... OF EPA ACTIONS Assessing the Environmental Effects Abroad of EPA Actions § 6.403 Environmental...

  7. 76 FR 408 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ...), supporting statement, and other documents submitted to OMB for review may be obtained from the Agency... Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7044. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Lender Advantage. Frequency: On... business applicants and participating lenders. Responses: 13,650. Annual Burden: 48,990. Title:...

  8. 21 CFR 814.124 - Institutional Review Board requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Humanitarian Use Devices § 814.124...) constituted and acting pursuant to part 56 of this chapter, including continuing review of use of the device.... In such an emergency situation, the physician shall, within 5 days after the use of the...

  9. 21 CFR 814.124 - Institutional Review Board requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Humanitarian Use Devices § 814.124...) constituted and acting pursuant to part 56 of this chapter, including continuing review of use of the device.... In such an emergency situation, the physician shall, within 5 days after the use of the...

  10. 21 CFR 814.124 - Institutional Review Board requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Humanitarian Use Devices § 814.124...) constituted and acting pursuant to part 56 of this chapter, including continuing review of use of the device.... In such an emergency situation, the physician shall, within 5 days after the use of the...

  11. 21 CFR 814.124 - Institutional Review Board requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET APPROVAL OF MEDICAL DEVICES Humanitarian Use Devices § 814.124...) constituted and acting pursuant to part 56 of this chapter, including continuing review of use of the device.... In such an emergency situation, the physician shall, within 5 days after the use of the...

  12. 7 CFR 1703.312 - RUS review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... supporting material is available at the borrower's premises for review by the RUS field accountant, borrower's certified public accountant, the Office of Inspector General, the General Accounting Office and any other accountant conducting an audit of the borrower's financial statements for this...

  13. 7 CFR 1703.312 - RUS review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... supporting material is available at the borrower's premises for review by the RUS field accountant, borrower's certified public accountant, the Office of Inspector General, the General Accounting Office and any other accountant conducting an audit of the borrower's financial statements for this...

  14. 42 CFR 476.71 - QIO review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... pneumococcal vaccine) for prevention of illness or (in the case of hospice care) for the palliation and... standards of health care, as determined through the resolution of oral beneficiary complaints as specified... quality of care reviews as specified in § 476.160. (3) Whether those services furnished or proposed to...

  15. 18 CFR 806.4 - Projects requiring review and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Hydroelectric projects, except to the extent that such projects involve a withdrawal, shall be exempt from the... construed as exempting hydroelectric projects from review and approval under any other category of project... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Projects...

  16. 18 CFR 806.4 - Projects requiring review and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Hydroelectric projects, except to the extent that such projects involve a withdrawal, shall be exempt from the... construed as exempting hydroelectric projects from review and approval under any other category of project... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Projects...

  17. 18 CFR 806.4 - Projects requiring review and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Hydroelectric projects, except to the extent that such projects involve a withdrawal, shall be exempt from the... construed as exempting hydroelectric projects from review and approval under any other category of project... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Projects...

  18. 18 CFR 806.4 - Projects requiring review and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Hydroelectric projects, except to the extent that such projects involve a withdrawal, shall be exempt from the... construed as exempting hydroelectric projects from review and approval under any other category of project... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Projects...

  19. 18 CFR 806.4 - Projects requiring review and approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Hydroelectric projects, except to the extent that such projects involve a withdrawal, shall be exempt from the... construed as exempting hydroelectric projects from review and approval under any other category of project... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Projects...

  20. 40 CFR 1502.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661 et seq.), the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.), the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other environmental review laws...

  1. 40 CFR 1502.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661 et seq.), the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.), the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other environmental review laws...

  2. 40 CFR 1502.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661 et seq.), the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.), the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other environmental review laws...

  3. 40 CFR 1502.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661 et seq.), the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.), the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other environmental review laws...

  4. 40 CFR 1502.25 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Coordination Act (16 U.S.C. 661 et seq.), the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 470 et seq.), the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), and other environmental review laws...

  5. 48 CFR 801.602-70 - General review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... extension of 60 days or more. (f) Unless otherwise stated, all dollar values in 801.602-71 through 801.602... Contract requiring payment from savings of $10,000,000 to the contractor over the life of the...

  6. Review of US Navy VSTOL handling qualities requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    Handling qualities requirements for V/STOL operations from small ships are considered in terms of the ship operating environment. Turbulence, wind over the deck, ship motion, visibility, and severe weather and sea conditions are among the factors discussed.

  7. Literature Review and Annotated Bibliography: Water Requirements of Desert Ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, James W.; Krausman, Paul R.; Rosenstock, Steven S.; Turner, Jack C.

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Ungulates adapted to desert areas are able to survive extreme temperatures and limited water availability. This ability is largely due to behavioral, morphological, and physiological adaptations that allow these animals to avoid or tolerate extreme environmental conditions. The physiological adaptations possessed by ungulates for thermoregulation and maintenance of water balance have been the subject of numerous studies involving a wide range of species. In this report we review the behavioral, morphological, and physiological mechanisms used by ungulates and other desert mammals to maintain water and temperature balance in arid environments. We also review some of the more commonly used methods for studying the physiological mechanisms involved in water balance and thermoregulation, and the influence of dehydration on these mechanisms.

  8. Sodium Intake Requirements for Preterm Neonates: Review and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Adrianne R; Tomlinson, Christopher; Belik, Jaques

    2016-12-01

    It is widely accepted that sodium is an essential nutritional electrolyte and its deficiency is associated with neurological sequelae and poor growth. The provision of an adequate sodium intake to preterm neonates is hampered by the technical difficulty in clinically assessing total body sodium content. As addressed in this review, there is a lack of consensus on the definition of hyponatremia early in life, but there is no evidence that it should deviate from the widely accepted normative data for adult subjects. A low urinary sodium content is accepted by many as reflecting total body sodium deficiency, yet spot urinary sodium measurements are of questionable clinical value. The hormonal regulation of sodium homeostasis is here reviewed and the mechanism accounting for sodium deficiency-induced growth impairment in preterm infants addressed. Lastly, we provide evidence-based gestational and postnatal age-dependent recommendations for the provision of adequate sodium intake to preterm neonates.

  9. 40 CFR 51.1011 - Requirements for mid-course review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for mid-course review. 51.1011 Section 51.1011 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards § 51.1011 Requirements for mid-course review. (a)...

  10. Advances in the study on nutrient requirements of grouper (Epinephelus sp.): a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhi; Liu, Yongjian; Mai, Kangsen; Tian, Lixia

    2005-04-01

    The paper reviews the recent advances in studying grouper nutrition requirement for the development of cost-effective and environmentally friendly artificial diets. It consists of seven parts: protein and amino acid, lipid and essential fatty acid, carbohydrate, vitamin, mineral, alternative protein source, broodstock and larval nutrition. The review provides some basic information for further investigation of nutrient requirements of groupers.

  11. 21 CFR 320.30 - Inquiries regarding bioavailability and bioequivalence requirements and review of protocols by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bioequivalence requirements and review of protocols by the Food and Drug Administration. 320.30 Section 320.30... Bioavailability or Bioequivalence of Drug Products § 320.30 Inquiries regarding bioavailability and bioequivalence requirements and review of protocols by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) The Commissioner of Food...

  12. 77 FR 73611 - Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... mean systematic review of the operation of a program compared to a set of explicit or implicit... DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review SUMMARY: U.S... for review and clearance under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, Public Law 104-13....

  13. Free and Compulsory School Age Requirements. ECS 50-State Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aragon, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers across the nation continue to push for expanded free and compulsory school age requirements. More states are considering granting students earlier access to a free education so that they can begin their academic pursuits earlier in life. Similarly, every year a number of states consider extending the upper limit for compulsory school…

  14. 76 FR 70527 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), agencies are required to submit proposed reporting and... Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7044. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: ``25-Model Corp.Resol.or GP Certif.33-Model Letter to Selling Agent. 34-Bank ID, 1065-Appl.Lic.Assure of Compliance. Form No's: 23, 33,...

  15. 76 FR 72019 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7044. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: ``Governor's Request for Disaster... Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35), agencies are required to submit proposed reporting and... Occasion. SBA Form Number's: 5, 1368. Description of Respondents: Applicants requesting Disaster...

  16. 22 CFR 161.11 - Environmental review and consultation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Preservation for comments. (c) Executive Order 11988 (Floodplains Management) and Executive Order 11990... consultation for these additional requirements concurrently with and integrated with preparation of assessments...) Coastal Zone Management Act of 1972, as amended, 16 U.S.C. 1451 et seq. (h) Marine Protection,...

  17. 78 FR 65744 - Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Clearance Officer, Curtis Rich, Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., 5th Floor, Washington, DC..., New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC 20503. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Curtis Rich, Agency Clearance Officer, (202) 205-7030 curtis.rich@sba.gov . Abstract: Government wide requirements...

  18. Studies on Hot-Melt Prepregging of PMR-II-50 Polyimide Resin with Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Sutter, James K.; Juhas, John; Veverka, Adrienne; Klans, Ojars; Inghram, Linda; Scheiman, Dan; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Zoha, John; Bubnick, Jim

    2003-01-01

    A Second generation PMR (in situ Polymerization of Monomer Reactants) polyimide resin, PMR-II-50, has been considered for high temperature and high stiffness space propulsion composites applications for its improved high temperature performance. As part of composite processing optimization, two commercial prepregging methods: solution vs. hot-melt processes were investigated with M40J fabrics from Toray. In a previous study a systematic chemical, physical, thermal and mechanical characterization of these composites indicated that poor resin-fiber interfacial wetting, especially for the hot-melt process, resulted in poor composite quality. In order to improve the interfacial wetting, optimization of the resin viscosity and process variables were attempted in a commercial hot-melt prepregging line. In addition to presenting the results from the prepreg quality optimization trials, the combined effects of the prepregging method and two different composite cure methods, i.e., hot press vs. autoclave on composite quality and properties are discussed.

  19. Crosslinking-property relationships in PMR polyimide composites. I. [polymerization of monomer reactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, R. H.; Whitley, K.; Morgan, C.; Chang, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the crosslink density of the matrix on physical and mechanical properties of a graphite-fiber-reinforced PMR (for polymerization of monomer reactants) polyimide composites during isothermal aging was investigated in experiments where unidirectional composite specimens of Celion 6000/PMR-P1 were isothermally exposed at 288 C in air for various time periods up to 5000 hrs. It was found that, as the crosslink density increased, the glass transition temperature, density, and elevated-temperature interlaminar shear strength of a composite increased, while the initial moisture absorption and the coefficient of thermal expansion decreased. However, after reaching the highest possible matrix crosslink density, several of the composite properties began to deteriorate rapidly.

  20. Surface protection of graphite fabric/PMR-15 composites subjected to thermal oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.; Serafini, T. T.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite fabric/PMR-15 laminates develop matrix cracks during long-term exposure in air at temperatures in the range of 500 to 600 F. This study was performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of incorporating graphite mat surface plies as a means of reducing the developing of matrix cracks. Celion 3000 graphite fabric/PMR-15 laminates were fabricated with graphite or graphite mat/325-mesh boron powder surface plies. Laminates without mat surface plies were also fabricated for control purposes. Composite flexural strength, flexural modulus, and interlaminar shear strength were determined at 288 C before and after long-term exposure (up to 1500 hr) in air at 316 C. The results of this study showed that the incorporation of graphite mat surface plies reduces matrix cracking and improves the elevated temperature mechanical property retention characteristics of the composites.

  1. Clinical characteristics and prognostic factors for relapse in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwa; Choi, Sang Tae; Kim, Jin Su; Yoon, Bo Young; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Yun Sung; Song, Jung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hae-Rim

    2013-06-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a common inflammatory disease of the elderly in western countries, but the prevalence is apparently different between races and countries. Until now, an epidemiologic study of PMR is limited in Korea. We retrospectively evaluated the clinical data of 78 patients with PMR who were treated in 5 tertiary hospitals, and analyzed initial laboratory data, symptoms, therapeutic responses, and prognostic factors for relapse 1 year after treatments. Sixty percent of patients had pain in both shoulder and hip girdles with 10.6 weeks of duration, 75.9 ± 32.7 mm/h of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and 6.2 ± 6.4 mg/dl of C-reactive protein. The rate of relapse and remission at 1 year was 38.4 and 2.5 %, respectively. The rate of overall relapse was 46.1 %, and the relapse occurred mostly in a year, especially between 6 and 12 months after diagnosis. There were more female in relapse group (88.9 %, p = 0.037), and cumulative steroid dose of 1 year was significantly higher in relapse group (5.5 ± 2.7 vs. 4.4 ± 2.5 g, p = 0.018). Independent risk factors for relapse were initial CRP ≥ 2.5 mg/dl (OR 6.296, p = 0.047) and the use of hydroxychloroquine (OR 6.798, p = 0.035). Initial dosage or tapering speed of steroid did not influence on prognosis. In Korean patients with PMR, baseline clinical characteristics and relapse rate were similar to previous studies, but our patients accompanied no giant cell arteritis and showed lower remission rate as well as delayed therapeutic response and later occurrence of relapse. More aggressive management would be needed according to the clinical status of patients.

  2. Differentiation between Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) and Elderly-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Using 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Is Enthesitis a New Pathological Lesion in PMR?

    PubMed Central

    Wakura, Daisuke; Kotani, Takuya; Takeuchi, Tohru; Komori, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Shuzo; Makino, Shigeki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background It is difficult to differentiate polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) from elderly-onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) in clinical practice. We compared FDG-PET/CT findings between patients with PMR and those with EORA and extracted factors useful for differentiating the two disorders. Methods We compared abnormal FDG accumulation sites and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) between 15 patients with PMR and 7 with EORA in whom FDG-PET/CT was performed. Results The proportion of patients in the PMR group with abnormal FDG accumulation at the following 9 sites on FDG-PET/CT was significantly higher than that in the EORA group: periarticular region of the scapulohumeral joint, enthesis of the pectineus muscle, vicinity of the enthesis of the rectus femoris muscle, lateral side of the greater trochanter, ischial tuberosity, hip joint, spinous process of the lower cervical vertebra, intervertebral joint of the lumbar vertebra, and spinous process of the lumbar vertebra. The PET/CT score was evaluated at 9 sites consisting of the abovementioned sites. The median score in the PMR group was 8, which was significantly higher than that of 0 in the EORA group (P = 0.0003). ROC curve analysis was performed with the PET/CT scores, and a score of 5 was shown to maximize the area under the ROC curve (sensitivity: 86.7%, specificity: 86.7%). Conclusions FDG-PET/CT is useful for differentiating PMR from EORA. In patients with PMR, abnormal FDG accumulation was observed at the entheses, suggesting the presence of enthesitis in addition to bursitis and synovitis. PMID:27384410

  3. Development of Processable PMR-Type Polymides with Star-Branched Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Eby, R. K.; Meador, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    In the last two decades, high temperature polyimide matrix composites have found broad applications in aerospace structural components, due to their high specific modulus and high specific strength. As matrix resins, aromatic polyimides exhibit exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties. However, their rodlike structures often result in poor solubility in most common organic solvents, as well as high melt temperature and melt viscosity, making them difficult to process. To overcome this difficulty, flexible linkages including O, SO2 or CH2 non coplanar biphenyl moieties, bulky lateral substituents, and crankshaft structures are often incorporated into the polymer backbones. Addition-curing of low molecular weight polyimides (resins) is another approach to improve processability. One of the most successfully developed materials has been PMR-15 (Polymerization of Monomer Reactants, molecular weight of 1500 g/mol), because of its good combination of thermal and mechanical properties and ease of processability. However, due to the high melt viscosity of PMR-type resins, use of more economical processing methods, such as resin transfer molding (RTM), is not possible. Recent research has focused on the incorporation of trifunctional monomers into addition-curing polyimides in an attempt to improve the processability of these polymers. The objective of this research is to use an aromatic triamine, 1,3,5 tris (4-aminophenoxy) benzene, to prepare new resin systems with starbranched structures. The glass transition temperatures (Tg's) and thermal oxidative stability TOS) of these polymers are compared to their linear counterparts and PMR-15.

  4. Spacecraft occupant protection requirements: a review of the recent changes.

    PubMed

    Somers, Jeffrey T; Gohmert, Dustin M; Brinkley, James W

    2014-09-01

    NASA has recently updated spacecraft design requirements for protecting crewmembers during dynamic spaceflight phases. The details of the update are available in a NASA publication (NASA TM-2013-217380) and are summarized here. Previously, NASA's occupant protection requirements relied primarily on the multiaxial dynamic response criterion, which NASA refers to as the Brinkley Dynamic Response Criteria (BDRC). Although simple to implement, there are several important ground rules that must be met for the injury predictions to be applicable. These include proper restraint, flail controls, proper seating support, pressure suit considerations, head protection including consideration of helmet mass, and spaceflight deconditioning. Even if these ground rules are met, there are limitations to the model that must be addressed, including: model validation, sex differences, age effects, anthropometry effects, and differences between the physical fitness of military test subjects and future crewmembers. To address these limitations, new injury assessment reference values (IARV) have been prescribed for the 5(th) percentile female and 95(th) percentile male Hybrid III anthropomorphic test devices (ATD). These metrics are head-injury criterion, head-rotational acceleration, neck injury criterion, neck-axial-force limits, flail prevention, and lumbar-axial compression force. Using these new ATD IARVs, NASA can have increased confidence that vehicle designs mitigate the risk of injury during dynamic phases of flight.

  5. Review of PREPA Technical Requirements for Interconnecting Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Gevorgian, Vahan; Booth, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority developed the minimum technical requirements for interconnection of wind turbine generation and photovoltaic power plants. NREL has conducted a review of these requirements based on generic technical aspects and electrical characteristics of wind and photovoltaic power plants, and on existing requirements from other utilities (both U.S. and European).

  6. Review of the SOR Development Process and the Requirement for SOR-Spec Maker Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    I DCIEM No. 98-CR- 55 REVIEW OF THE SOR DEVELOPMENT PROCESS AND THE REQUIREMENT FOR SOR-SPEC MAKER SOFTWARE by Michael P. Greenley and David...I Statement of Operational Requirement I I For I SOR-Spec Maker I Requirements Management Tool I I DRAFT I by I Mike Greenley April1998 I

  7. Review of power requirements for satellite remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, Stanley A.

    1988-01-01

    The space environment offers a multitude of attributes and opportunities to be used to enhance human life styles and qualities of life for all future generations, worldwide. Among the prospects having immense social as well as economic benefits are earth-observing systems capable of providing near real-time data in such areas as food and fiber production, marine fisheries, ecosystem monitoring, disaster assessment, and global environmental exchanges. The era of Space Station, the Shuttle program, the planned unmanned satellites in both high and low Earth orbit will transfer to operational status what, until now, has been largely research and development proof of concept for remotely sensing Earth's natural and cultural resources. An important aspect of this operational status focuses on the orbital designs and power requirements needed to optimally sense any of these important areas.

  8. Resolvase-In Vivo Expression Technology Analysis of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium PhoP and PmrA Regulons in BALB/c Mice†

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Massimo; Ellermeier, Craig D.; Slauch, James M.; Gunn, John S.

    2005-01-01

    Salmonella enterica modulates resistance to antimicrobial peptides in part via covalent modifications of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The two-component systems PhoP/PhoQ and PmrA/PmrB are activated during infection and regulate several genes involved in LPS modifications by responding to signals such as pH, iron, magnesium, and antimicrobial peptides. A recombination-based in vivo expression technology approach was adopted to analyze the spatial-temporal patterns of in vivo expression of genes of the PhoP and PmrA regulons and to identify the in vivo signals modulating their transcription. In vitro, we showed PhoP- and/or PmrA-dependent induction of pmrH (LPS aminoarabinose modification operon) by acidic pH, low levels of magnesium, or high levels of Fe(III). Upregulation in cultured J774A.1 macrophages was shown for pmrH, pagP (LPS palmitate addition), and ssaB (pathogenicity island II secretion) but not for prgH (pathogenicity island I secretion). Increased levels of pmrH, phoP, and prgH transcription but not ssaB were observed in bacteria isolated from the lumen of the distal ileum. Bacteria isolated from spleens of orally inoculated mice showed no further induction of prgH but had the highest expression of pmrH, pagP, and ssaB. In vivo induction of pmrH was fully dependent on pmrA and phoP, and buffering stomach acidity, iron chelation, or low-iron diets did not affect the expression of pmrH in the intestinal lumen. The observation of pmrH and pagP expression in the intestine refutes the paradigm of PhoP/PhoQ and PmrA/PmrB in vivo expression as solely intracellularly induced and supports previous data demonstrating peroral virulence attenuation of pmrH mutants. PMID:16237024

  9. Development of processable PMR-type polyimides for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Baochau Ngoc

    PMR-15 is an industrial standard polyimide for high temperature performance in aerospace applications. The objectives of this research were to develop environmentally friendly branched PMR-type polyimides with comparable thermal and mechanical properties and improved melt flow and processability compared to PMR-15. An aromatic triamine, 1,3,5-tris(4-aminophenoxy)benzene was used in the development of these branched polymers. This work consisted of three parts. The first part was a screening study of four different diamine-based branched polyimides of varying formulated molecular weights. In these series, the aromatic triamine was utilized as the hub of the polymer molecules which were endcapped with a nadic ester acid. Thermal and mechanical properties of oligomers (resins), neat polymers, and selected carbon fabric reinforced polyimide composites were investigated. Results showed that branched polymers displayed higher glass transition temperatures (Tg's) than their corresponding linear systems due to a higher crosslink density, but had lower thermal oxidative stability (TOS), due to higher nadic ester content and the presence of ether linkages in the triamine, TAB. Mechanical properties including interlaminar shear, flexural strength, flexural modulus, compression strengths, and compression modulus were comparable with those of composite PMR-15 at both ambient and elevated temperatures (288°C). The second part of the project focussed on isolating the effects of the aromatic triamine from nadic endcap on resins' Tg, TOS, and relative melt viscosity, using a statistical design of experiments (DOE). A pseudo classical design based upon a Face Centered Central Composite Model was used. DOE model generated response surfaces showed that incorporation of the triamine moieties into PMR-type polyimides slightly increased the Tg's of the polymers, due to higher crosslink density, but slightly decreased their thermal oxidative stability. It was also observed that added TAB

  10. 49 CFR 1013.3 - Review and reporting requirements for regulated carriers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... THE PROPER USE OF VOTING TRUSTS § 1013.3 Review and reporting requirements for regulated carriers. (a... applicant shows, by clear and convincing evidence, and the Board finds, that the failure to comply...

  11. 78 FR 13855 - Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review SUMMARY: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has submitted the following... Submission: New Information Collection. Purpose: United States Agency for International Development...

  12. 77 FR 26824 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Reporting Required for International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... Research & Innovative Technology Administration Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Reporting Required for International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) AGENCY: Research & Innovative..., Research and Innovative Technology Administration. BILLING CODE 4910-HY-P...

  13. Minor New Source Review Program Public Notice Requirements under 40 CFR 51.161(b)(3)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database.

  14. The evolution of Medicare financing policy for graduate medical education and implications for PM&R: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Verville, R; DeLisa, J A

    2001-04-01

    Currently, the only explicit payers for graduate medical education (GME) in the United States are the federal and state governments. Of these, Medicare is by far the largest and most predictable payer. Through the prospective payment system, Medicare reimburses teaching institutions for both their direct and indirect costs associated with their GME programs. Because a well-educated workforce benefits patients covered by private, as well as public insurance, various proposals have been advanced to establish an all-payer pool to distribute the financial burden more equitably. Furthermore, Medicare policy affects physician supply. There is increasing recognition of potential physician oversupply, raising policy questions about the government's longstanding support of GME. In comparison with other specialties, physical medical and rehabilitation (PM&R) may receive more favorable treatment under future GME funding plans, for 2 reasons. First, under the formulas used by Medicare, PM&R training slots typically bring in more indirect revenue to teaching hospitals than is consumed in indirect expenses. This makes PM&R a relatively more attractive program to retain in the face of mandated reductions in training slots. Second, in many parts of the country, PM&R is not threatened by oversupply, making cuts less likely. Nevertheless, the high percentage of non-US medical graduates entering PM&R training may make the specialty vulnerable to future reductions in funded training slots.

  15. 32 CFR 310.52 - Computer matching publication and review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computer matching publication and review... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Computer Matching Program Procedures § 310.52 Computer matching publication and review requirements. (a) DoD Components shall identify...

  16. 32 CFR 310.52 - Computer matching publication and review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Computer matching publication and review... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Computer Matching Program Procedures § 310.52 Computer matching publication and review requirements. (a) DoD Components shall identify...

  17. 32 CFR 310.52 - Computer matching publication and review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Computer matching publication and review... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Computer Matching Program Procedures § 310.52 Computer matching publication and review requirements. (a) DoD Components shall identify...

  18. 32 CFR 310.52 - Computer matching publication and review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Computer matching publication and review... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Computer Matching Program Procedures § 310.52 Computer matching publication and review requirements. (a) DoD Components shall identify...

  19. 32 CFR 310.52 - Computer matching publication and review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Computer matching publication and review... OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DOD PRIVACY PROGRAM Computer Matching Program Procedures § 310.52 Computer matching publication and review requirements. (a) DoD Components shall identify...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.365 - What are the requirements of the review team report?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Trust Evaluation Review Annual Trust Evaluations § 1000.365 What are the requirements of the review team report? A report summarizing the results of the trust evaluation will be prepared and copies provided to the Tribe/Consortium. The report must: (a) Be written...

  1. 24 CFR 1000.20 - Is an Indian tribe required to assume environmental review responsibilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... evaluation of the environmental issues and take responsibility for the scope and content of the EA in... assume environmental review responsibilities? 1000.20 Section 1000.20 Housing and Urban Development... § 1000.20 Is an Indian tribe required to assume environmental review responsibilities? (a) No. It is...

  2. 75 FR 66724 - Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review SUMMARY: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has submitted the following information collections to OMB.... Purpose: The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) needs to require applicants...

  3. 75 FR 65296 - Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review SUMMARY: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has submitted the following information collection to OMB... Report. Type of Submission: New Information Collection. Purpose: The required annual reports will be...

  4. 75 FR 65296 - Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review SUMMARY: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has submitted the following information collection to OMB.... Type of Submission: New Information Collection. Purpose: The mentors are required to report on...

  5. 14 CFR 420.27 - Launch site location review-information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Launch site location review-information... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LICENSE TO OPERATE A LAUNCH SITE Criteria and Information Requirements for Obtaining a License § 420.27 Launch site location review—information requirements....

  6. The effect of elevated temperature on the inelastic deformation behavior of PMR-15 solid polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryther, Chad E. C.

    The inelastic deformation behavior of PMR-15 neat resin, a high-temperature thermoset polymer, was investigated at temperatures in the 274--316 °C range. The experimental program was developed to explore the influence of temperature on strain-controlled tensile loading, relaxation and creep behaviors. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the mechanical behavior of PMR-15 polymer exhibits a strong dependence on temperature. During strain-controlled tensile loading, the slope of the stress-strain curve in the quasi-elastic region decreases and the slope of the stress-strain curve in the flow stress region increases with increasing temperature. At a given strain rate, the flow stress level decreases with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the transition from quasi-elastic behavior to inelastic flow becomes less pronounced with increasing temperature. During relaxation, the amount of the stress drop for a given prior strain rate decreases with increasing temperature. At a given prior strain rate and creep stress level, increasing temperature results in increased creep strain accumulation. Based on the experimental results the Viscoplasticity Based on Overstress for Polymers (VBOP) theory was augmented to account for the effects of elevated temperature. Several model parameters were determined to depend on temperature. Those parameters were developed into functions of temperature. The augmented VBOP was then employed to predict the response of the PMR-15 polymer under various test histories at temperatures in the 274--316 °C range. An enhanced procedure for determining VBOP model parameters that utilizes a McLean type dip test to assess the equilibrium stress was developed. Model predictions were considerably improved by employing an enhanced model characterization procedure. Additionally, the effects of prior isothermal aging at various temperatures in the 260--316 °C range on the inelastic deformation behavior of PMR-15 at 288 °C were evaluated. For

  7. The pmrCAB operon mediates polymyxin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 and clinical isolates through phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Luis A; Herrera, Carmen M; Fernandez, Lucia; Hankins, Jessica V; Trent, M Stephen; Hancock, Robert E W

    2011-08-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii is leading to an increasing dependence on the use of polymyxins as last-hope antibiotics. Here, we utilized genetic and biochemical methods to define the involvement of the pmrCAB operon in polymyxin resistance in this organism. Sequence analysis of 16 polymyxin B-resistant strains, including 6 spontaneous mutants derived from strain ATCC 17978 and 10 clinical isolates from diverse sources, revealed that they had independent mutations in the pmrB gene, encoding a sensor kinase, or in the response regulator PmrA. Knockout of the pmrB gene in two mutants and two clinical isolates led to a decrease in the polymyxin B susceptibility of these strains, which could be restored with the cloned pmrAB genes from the mutants but not from the wild type. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis also showed a correlation between the expression of pmrC and polymyxin B resistance. Characterization of lipid A species from the mutant strains, by thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, indicated that the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A correlated with resistance. This addition is performed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by the product of the pmrC gene, which is a homolog of the pmrC gene from Acinetobacter. Knockout of this gene in the mutant R2 [pmrB(T235I)] reversed resistance as well as phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A. These results demonstrate that specific alterations in the sequence of the pmrCAB operon are responsible for resistance to polymyxins in A. baumannii.

  8. The pmrCAB Operon Mediates Polymyxin Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 and Clinical Isolates through Phosphoethanolamine Modification of Lipid A▿

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Luis A.; Herrera, Carmen M.; Fernandez, Lucia; Hankins, Jessica V.; Trent, M. Stephen; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug resistance among Acinetobacter baumannii is leading to an increasing dependence on the use of polymyxins as last-hope antibiotics. Here, we utilized genetic and biochemical methods to define the involvement of the pmrCAB operon in polymyxin resistance in this organism. Sequence analysis of 16 polymyxin B-resistant strains, including 6 spontaneous mutants derived from strain ATCC 17978 and 10 clinical isolates from diverse sources, revealed that they had independent mutations in the pmrB gene, encoding a sensor kinase, or in the response regulator PmrA. Knockout of the pmrB gene in two mutants and two clinical isolates led to a decrease in the polymyxin B susceptibility of these strains, which could be restored with the cloned pmrAB genes from the mutants but not from the wild type. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis also showed a correlation between the expression of pmrC and polymyxin B resistance. Characterization of lipid A species from the mutant strains, by thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry, indicated that the addition of phosphoethanolamine to lipid A correlated with resistance. This addition is performed in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by the product of the pmrC gene, which is a homolog of the pmrC gene from Acinetobacter. Knockout of this gene in the mutant R2 [pmrB(T235I)] reversed resistance as well as phosphoethanolamine modification of lipid A. These results demonstrate that specific alterations in the sequence of the pmrCAB operon are responsible for resistance to polymyxins in A. baumannii. PMID:21646482

  9. Longtime Durability of PMR-15 Matrix Polymer at 204, 260, 288, and 316 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.; Inghram, Linda L.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Klan, Ojars V.

    2001-01-01

    Isothermal weight loss studies at the Glenn (Lewis) Research Center were conducted at four temperatures (204, 260, 288, and 316 C) with specimens of varied geometric shapes to investigate the mechanisms involved in the thermal degradation of PMR-15. Both neat resin behavior and composite behaviors were studied. Two points of interest in these studies are the role(s) of oxygen in the mechanisms involved in the thermo-oxidative degradation of these composite materials and the dimensional changes that occur during their useable lifetime. Specimen dimensional changes and surface layer growth were measured and recorded. It was shown that physical and chemical changes take place as a function of time and location in PMR-15 neat resin and composites as aging takes place in air at elevated temperatures. These changes initiate at the outer surfaces of both materials and progress inward following the oxygen as it proceeds by diffusion into the central core of each material. Microstructural changes cause changes in density, material shrinkage (strains), glass transition temperature, dimension, dynamic shear modulus, and compression properties. These changes also occur slowly dividing the polymer material into two distinct parts: a visibly undamaged core section between two visibly damaged surface layers. The surface layer has a significant effect on compression properties of thinner specimens, but the visibly undamaged core material controls these properties for specimens having eight or more plies. It was demonstrated that there are three different mechanisms involved in the degradation of PMR-15 during aging at elevated temperatures. These are a weight gain, a small weight fraction bulk material weight loss, and a large mass fraction weight loss concentrated at the surface of the polymer or composite. At the higher temperatures (260 C and above), the surface loss predominates. Below 260 C, the surface loss and the bulk core loss become more equivalent. Between 175 and 260 C

  10. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various continuous fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermooxidative stability of PMR-15 composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers studied include graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight-loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  11. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers that were studied included graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber-sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  12. Thermo-elastic nondestructive evaluation of fatigue damage in PMR-15 resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welter, J. T.; Sathish, S.; Tandon, G. P.; Schehl, N.; Cherry, M.; Nalladega, V.; Lindgren, E. A.; Hall, R.

    2012-05-01

    Thermoset polyimide resins are used as the polymer matrix in high temperature composites for aerospace applications such as engine shrouds. At these locations the components have to withstand high temperatures and significant vibration. A number of studies have investigated the effects of thermal exposure on mechanical properties of polyimide resins, and the effects of fatigue on thermoplastics have been discussed at length. However, the effects of fatigue on thermosets, in particular polyimides, have largely been overlooked. In this paper we present studies of nondestructive evaluation of fatigue damage in a thermoset polyimide resin, PMR-15, performed by measuring the changes in the evolution of heat in the samples during cyclic loading. The temperature changes are measured using a high sensitivity IR camera as a function of number of fatigue cycles. Interrupted fatigue tests were performed on four samples. The temperature rise during an increment of fatigue cycling shows two linear regions each with a different slope (region 1 and region 2). Region 1 remains constant for every increment of fatigue, while region 2 increases. The onset of region 2 occurs at the same increase in temperature due to hysteretic heating for all samples. Experimental observations are explained using a phenomenological two phase model based on crosslinking density variations in observed in other thermoset resins at microscopic scales. The results of these experiments are discussed in reference to utilizing this technique for detection and evaluation of fatigue in PMR-15 resin and composites.

  13. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging of the Spatial Distribution of Free Radicals in PMR-15 Polyimide Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Myong K.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    1997-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that free radicals generated by heating polyimides above 300 C are stable at room temperature and are involved in thermo-oxidative degradation in the presence of oxygen gas. Electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is a technique to determine the spatial distribution of free radicals. X-band (9.5 GHz) EPR images of PMR-15 polyimide were obtained with a spatial resolution of approximately 0.18 mm along a 2-mm dimension of the sample. In a polyimide sample that was not thermocycled, the radical distribution was uniform along the 2-mm dimension of the sample. For a polyimide sample that was exposed to thermocycling in air for 300 1-h cycles at 335 C, one-dimensional EPRI showed a higher concentration of free radicals in the surface layers than in the bulk sample. A spectral-spatial two-dimensional image showed that the EPR lineshape of the surface layer remained the same as that of the bulk. These EPRI results suggest that the thermo-oxidative degradation of PMR-15 resin involves free radicals present in the oxygen-rich surface layer.

  14. Forced torsional properties of PMR composites with varying nadic ester concentrations and processing histories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, F. I.

    1982-01-01

    PMR polyimide resin was prepared from 4,4'-methylenedianiline, the dimethyl ester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid and the monomethyl ester of 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (NE). The NE group serves as a chain terminator and crosslinking site. PMR/Celion 6000 composites were fabricated from resins having varying NE concentrations using two molding processes, and the laminates characterized in forced torsion. Glass transition temperatures (T(g)) of 360-390 C were observed in the crosslinked resins, as compared with the literature value of 284 C reported for the uncrosslinked system. T(g) did not decrease with decreasing NE concentrations over the range from 2.0 to 1.25 moles. Stoichiometry, within the range studied, showed little influence on shear properties; however, a 25% variation in matrix shear modulus with processing was observed. The G(12) values determined in forced torsion were in excellent agreement with those reported from tensile tests of + or - 45 deg laminates. A branching and possible secondary crosslink mechanism is proposed based on dynamic mechanical behavior and infrared spectra of the composites.

  15. Viscoelastic and Mechanical Properties of Thermoset PMR-type Polyimide-Clay Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdalla, Mohamed O.; Dean, Derrick; Campbell, Sandi

    2002-01-01

    High temperature thermoset polyimide-clay nanocomposites were prepared by blending 2.5 and 5 wt% of an unmodified Na(+-) montmorillonite (PGV) and two organically modified FGV (PGVCl0COOH, PGVC12) with a methanol solution of PMR-15 precursor. The methanol facilitated the dispersal of the unmodified clay. Dynamic mechanical analysis results showed a significant increase in the thermomechanical properties (E' and E") of 2.5 wt% clay loaded nanocomposites in comparison with the neat polyimide. Higher glass transition temperatures were observed for 2.5 wt% nanocomposites compared to the neat polyimide. Flexural properties measurements for the 2.5 wt% nanocomposites showed a significant improvement in the modulus and strength, with no loss in elongation. This trend was not observed for the 5 wt% nanocomposites. An improvement in the CTE was observed for the PGV/PMR-15 nanocomposites, while a decrease was observed for the organically modified samples. This was attributed to potential variations in the interface caused by modifier degradation.

  16. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging of the Spatial Distribution of Free Radicals in PMR-15 Polyimide Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Myong K.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    1997-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that free radicals generated by heating polyimides above 300 C are stable at room temperature and are involved in thermo-oxidative degradation in the presence of oxygen gas. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI) is a technique to determine the spatial distribution of free radicals. X-band (9.5 GHz) EPR images of PMR-15 polyimide were obtained with a spatial resolution of about 0.18 mm along a 2 mm dimension of the sample. In a polyimide sample that was not thermocycled, the radical distribution was uniform along the 2 mm dimension of the sample. For a polyimide sample that was exposed to thermocycling in air for 300 one-hour cycles at 335 C, one-dimensional EPRI showed a higher concentration of free radicals in the surface layers than in the bulk sample. A spectral-spatial two-dimensional image showed that the EPR lineshape of the surface layer remained the same as that of the bulk. These EPRI results suggest that the thermo-oxidative degradation of PMR-15 resin involves free radicals present in the oxygen-rich surface layer.

  17. Assessment of documentation requirements under DOE 5481. 1, Safety Analysis and Review System (SARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, E.T.

    1981-03-01

    This report assesses the requirements of DOE Order 5481.1, Safety Analysis and Review System for DOE Operations (SARS) in regard to maintaining SARS documentation. Under SARS, all pertinent details of the entire safety analysis and review process for each DOE operation are to be traceable from the initial identification of a hazard. This report is intended to provide assistance in identifying the points in the SARS cycle at which documentation is required, what type of documentation is most appropriate, and where it ultimately should be maintained.

  18. Resistance to colistin in Acinetobacter baumannii associated with mutations in the PmrAB two-component system.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark D; Nickel, Gabrielle C; Bajaksouzian, Saralee; Lavender, Heather; Murthy, A Rekha; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism of colistin resistance (Col(r)) in Acinetobacter baumannii was studied by selecting in vitro Col(r) derivatives of the multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate AB0057 and the drug-susceptible strain ATCC 17978, using escalating concentrations of colistin in liquid culture. DNA sequencing identified mutations in genes encoding the two-component system proteins PmrA and/or PmrB in each strain and in a Col(r) clinical isolate. A colistin-susceptible revertant of one Col(r) mutant strain, obtained following serial passage in the absence of colistin selection, carried a partial deletion of pmrB. Growth of AB0057 and ATCC 17978 at pH 5.5 increased the colistin MIC and conferred protection from killing by colistin in a 1-hour survival assay. Growth in ferric chloride [Fe(III)] conferred a small protective effect. Expression of pmrA was increased in Col(r) mutants, but not at a low pH, suggesting that additional regulatory factors remain to be discovered.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of nanoclay modified PMR type polyimide composites reinforced with 3D woven basalt fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jianfei; Qiu, Yiping

    2009-07-01

    Nanoclay modified PMR type polyimide composites were prepared from 3D orthogonal woven basalt fiber performs and nanoclay modified polyimide matrix resin, which derived from methylene dianiline (MDA), dimethyl ester of 3,3',4,4'- oxydiphthalic acid (ODPE), monomethyl ester of cis-5-norbornene-endo-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (NE) and nanoclay. The Na+-montmorillonite was organically treated using a 1:1 molar ratio mixture of dodecylamine (C12) and MDA. The rheological properties of neat B-stage PMR polyimide and 2% clay modified B-stage PMR polyimide were investigated. Based on the results obtained from the rheological tests, a two step compression molding process can be established for the composites. In the first step, the 3D fabric preforms were impregnated with polyimide resin in a vacuum oven and heated up for degassing the volatiles and by-products. In the second step, composites were compressed. The internal structure of the composites was observed by a microscope. Incorporation of 2% clay showed an improvement in the Tg and stiffness of the PMR polyimide. The resulting composites exhibited high thermal stability and good mechanical properties.

  20. Structure and dynamics of polymyxin-resistance-associated response regulator PmrA in complex with promoter DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yuan-Chao; Weng, Tsai-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Chuan; Kao, Yi-Fen; Lin, Wei-Feng; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chou, Shan-Ho; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Chen, Chinpan

    2015-01-01

    PmrA, an OmpR/PhoB family response regulator, manages genes for antibiotic resistance. Phosphorylation of OmpR/PhoB response regulator induces the formation of a symmetric dimer in the N-terminal receiver domain (REC), promoting two C-terminal DNA-binding domains (DBDs) to recognize promoter DNA to elicit adaptive responses. Recently, determination of the KdpE–DNA complex structure revealed an REC–DBD interface in the upstream protomer that may be necessary for transcription activation. Here, we report the 3.2-Å-resolution crystal structure of the PmrA–DNA complex, which reveals a similar yet different REC–DBD interface. However, NMR studies show that in the DNA-bound state, two domains tumble separately and an REC–DBD interaction is transiently populated in solution. Reporter gene analyses of PmrA variants with altered interface residues suggest that the interface is not crucial for supporting gene expression. We propose that REC–DBD interdomain dynamics and the DBD–DBD interface help PmrA interact with RNA polymerase holoenzyme to activate downstream gene transcription. PMID:26564787

  1. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) Under-The-Wing (UTW) graphite/PMR cowl development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    The PMR process development, tooling concepts, testing conducted to generate materials properties data, and the fabrication of a subscale model of the inner cowl are presented. It was concluded that the materials, processes, and tooling concepts were satisfactory for making an inner cowl with adequate structural integrity.

  2. 48 CFR 215.407-5-70 - Disclosure, maintenance, and review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to the contractor's failure to meet one or more of the estimating system criteria in the clause at..., and review requirements to large business contractors meeting the criteria in paragraph (b)(2)(i) of... with the system criteria for an acceptable estimating system as prescribed in the clause at...

  3. 42 CFR 475.104 - Requirements for demonstrating ability to perform review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... review. 475.104 Section 475.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organizations § 475.104 Requirements for...

  4. 75 FR 31447 - Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management and Budget Title: State Personal Responsibility... Application to include program narrative........ 59 1 40 2360 Performance Progress Reports 59 2 10 1180 Year...

  5. 75 FR 65297 - Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collection Requirements Submitted to OMB for Review SUMMARY: U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has submitted the following information collection to OMB... Application. Type of Submission: New information collection. Purpose: Entities interested in participating...

  6. 40 CFR 6.201 - Coordination with other environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... determine the applicability of other environmental laws and executive orders, to the fullest extent possible... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coordination with other environmental review requirements. 6.201 Section 6.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  7. 40 CFR 6.201 - Coordination with other environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... determine the applicability of other environmental laws and executive orders, to the fullest extent possible... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination with other environmental review requirements. 6.201 Section 6.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  8. 40 CFR 6.201 - Coordination with other environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... determine the applicability of other environmental laws and executive orders, to the fullest extent possible... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coordination with other environmental review requirements. 6.201 Section 6.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  9. 40 CFR 6.201 - Coordination with other environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... determine the applicability of other environmental laws and executive orders, to the fullest extent possible... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coordination with other environmental review requirements. 6.201 Section 6.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  10. 40 CFR 6.201 - Coordination with other environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... determine the applicability of other environmental laws and executive orders, to the fullest extent possible... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coordination with other environmental review requirements. 6.201 Section 6.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION...

  11. 10 CFR 1021.341 - Coordination with other environmental review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coordination with other environmental review requirements. 1021.341 Section 1021.341 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT IMPLEMENTING PROCEDURES Implementing Procedures § 1021.341 Coordination with...

  12. 48 CFR 801.602-74 - Review requirements for an interagency agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Review requirements for an interagency agreement. 801.602-74 Section 801.602-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career...

  13. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee Review: Review of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guidance on the GLP Requirements for Peer Review of Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Fikes, James D; Patrick, Daniel J; Francke, Sabine; Frazier, Kendall S; Reindel, James F; Romeike, Annette; Spaet, Robert H; Tomlinson, Lindsay; Schafer, Kenneth A

    2015-10-01

    In 2014, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) issued guidance no. 16, Guidance on the GLP Requirements for Peer Review of Histopathology. The stated purpose of the guidance document is "to provide guidance to pathologists, test facility management, study directors and quality assurance personnel on how the peer review of histopathology should be planned, managed, documented, and reported in order to meet Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) expectations and requirements." On behalf of and in collaboration with the global societies of toxicologic pathology, the Society of Toxicologic Pathology initiated a review of OECD guidance no. 16. The objectives of this review are to provide a unified interpretation of the guidance, to recommend compliant processes for organizations to implement, and to avoid inconsistent process adaptations across the industry. This review of the guidance document is the product of a global collaboration with other societies of toxicologic pathology and provides a section-by-section international consensus view and interpretation of the OECD guidance on peer review.

  14. Quality Control and Peer Review of Data Sets: Mapping Data Archiving Processes to Data Publication Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayernik, M. S.; Daniels, M.; Eaker, C.; Strand, G.; Williams, S. F.; Worley, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    ? What data set review can be done pre-publication, and what must be done post-publication? What components of the data sets review processes can be automated, and what components will always require human expertise and evaluation?

  15. Part D New Source Review Requirements for Areas Requesting Redesignation to Attainment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/nsr/new-source-review-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  16. AB 93. Presentation of the statistical data during hospitilization of PMR patients. A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Eleftheria, Argyriou; Vasiliki, Atmatidou; Panagiota, Stefanopoulou; Nikos, Kareklas

    2012-01-01

    Background In PMR (Intensive Care Unit) of the DDA. of G.P.N.G. Pap hospitalized patients with prolonged hospitalization in ICU or a step prior to hospitalization in the ICU with very special attention clinical status. Patients and methods Specifically in 2011 admitted 158 patients, of whom 21 died people diakomisthikan 22 ICU patients in other clinics and 4 patients took part or surreptitiously leaving 38 patients. Results The main causes of hospitalization were the AAII (type II respiratory failure), respiratory acidosis and tracheostomy management. Often ACCOMPANYING clinical problems of these patients were resistant bedsores and nosocomial infections resulting in persistent and high febrile. Conclusions Nevertheless with the best efforts of medical and nursing staff and despite the poor conditions logistics and training done very important work, saved lives, which is why everyone involved is extremely proud.

  17. Intelligent sensor-model automated control of PMR-15 autoclave processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S.; Kranbuehl, D.; Loos, A.; Hinds, B.; Koury, J.

    1992-01-01

    An intelligent sensor model system has been built and used for automated control of the PMR-15 cure process in the autoclave. The system uses frequency-dependent FM sensing (FDEMS), the Loos processing model, and the Air Force QPAL intelligent software shell. The Loos model is used to predict and optimize the cure process including the time-temperature dependence of the extent of reaction, flow, and part consolidation. The FDEMS sensing system in turn monitors, in situ, the removal of solvent, changes in the viscosity, reaction advancement and cure completion in the mold continuously throughout the processing cycle. The sensor information is compared with the optimum processing conditions from the model. The QPAL composite cure control system allows comparison of the sensor monitoring with the model predictions to be broken down into a series of discrete steps and provides a language for making decisions on what to do next regarding time-temperature and pressure.

  18. Test and analysis of Celion 3000/PMR-15, graphite/polyimide bonded composite joints: Data report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushman, J. B.; Mccleskey, S. F.; Ward, S. H.

    1982-01-01

    Standard single lap, double lap and symmetric step lap bonded joints of Celion 3000/PMR-15 graphite/polyimide composite were evaluated. Composite to composite and composite to titanium joints were tested at 116 K (-250 F), 294 K (70 F) and 561 K (550 F). Joint parameters evaluated are lap length, adherend thickness, adherend axial stiffness, lamina stacking sequence and adherend tapering. Advanced joint concepts were examined to establish the change in performance of preformed adherends, scalloped adherends and hybrid systems. The material properties of the high temperature adhesive, designated A7F, used for bonding were established. The bonded joint tests resulted in interlaminar shear or peel failures of the composite and there were very few adhesive failures. Average test results agree with expected performance trends for the various test parameters. Results of finite element analyses and of test/analysis correlations are also presented.

  19. A review of helicopter control-display requirements for decelarating instrument approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebacqz, J. V.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews research and operational test programs that have dealt with control and display requirements for helicopters performing decelerating approaches in the terminal area under instrument flight conditions. A survey of literature concentrating on flight programs resulted in approximately 50 applicable references which were summarized and classified according to the type of stability/control augmentation that was emphasized. On this basis, display information requirements for each control system type were hypothesized consistent with documented results of these programs. Nine control-display combinations that appear to warrant further ground simulation and flight testing are defined and discussed.

  20. Radioactive waste management: review on clearance levels and acceptance criteria legislation, requirements and standards.

    PubMed

    Maringer, F J; Suráň, J; Kovář, P; Chauvenet, B; Peyres, V; García-Toraño, E; Cozzella, M L; De Felice, P; Vodenik, B; Hult, M; Rosengård, U; Merimaa, M; Szücs, L; Jeffery, C; Dean, J C J; Tymiński, Z; Arnold, D; Hinca, R; Mirescu, G

    2013-11-01

    In 2011 the joint research project Metrology for Radioactive Waste Management (MetroRWM)(1) of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) started with a total duration of three years. Within this project, new metrological resources for the assessment of radioactive waste, including their calibration with new reference materials traceable to national standards will be developed. This paper gives a review on national, European and international strategies as basis for science-based metrological requirements in clearance and acceptance of radioactive waste.

  1. Round Table Part 1: Review of future manned missions and Identification key ECLSS requirements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Wheeler, Raymond; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Joshi, Jitendra; Dussap, Gilles; Godia, Francesc

    2016-07-01

    All forecast an end of ISS in 2024. What so ever will be the exact date date the main part of the space agencies are currently elaborating plans for future manned missions. So far mainly 3 destination are considered :" Moon, Mars and Lagrange point L2. Depending of the missions duration, crew size, safety .. the ECLSS will have major difference . In this first part of the round table it is proposed to review the main missions scenario and elaborate top level requirements.

  2. Effects of Prior Aging at 288 deg C in Argon Environment on Creep Response of Carbon Fiber Reinforced PMR-15 Composite with + or - 45 deg Fiber Orientation at 288 deg C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    PMR-15 COMPOSITE WITH ±45° FIBER ORIENTATION AT 288 °C Tyler Gruters AFIT/GAE/ENY/09-J02 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY AIR...CREEP RESPONSE OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PMR-15 COMPOSITE WITH ±45° FIBER ORIENTATION AT 288 °C THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department...RESPONSE OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PMR-15 COMPOSITE WITH ±45° FIBER ORIENTATION AT 288 °C Tyler Gruters Approved

  3. Influence of Critical Current Density on Magnetic Force of Htsc Bulk above Pmr with 3D-MODELING Numerical Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiyun; Lu, Bingjuan; Ge, Yunwang; Chen, Wenqing

    Numerical electromagnetic field simulations of high-temperature superconductors (HTSC) bulk were carried out to calculate the magnetic force between the HTSC bulk and the permanent magnet railway (PMR). A 3D-modeling numerical calculation method is proposed using the finite element method. The model is formulated with the magnetic field vector (H-method). The resulting code was written with FORTRAN language. The electric field intensity E and the current density J constitutive relation of HTSC were described with E-J power law. The Kim macro-model is used to describe critical current density Jc of HTSC bulk. Two virtual HTSC bulks were used to solve the critical current density Jc anisotropic properties of HTSC materials. A superconducting levitation system composed of one HTSC bulk and PMR is successfully investigated using the proposed method. By this method, the influence of critical current density on magnetic levitation force of the superconducting levitation system is mathematically studied.

  4. Characterization of and sensor-model verification and control of the properties of PMR-13 during processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D.; Prettyman, T.; Robillard, K.; Smith, J.; Nicoletti, A.; Hart, S.; Loos, A.; Koury, Jim

    1991-01-01

    This study presents an in situ sensor and a process-simulation model developed for monitoring and controlling the cure process of PMR-15. The time-temperature dependence of the buildup in the molecular network structure, extent of reaction, viscosity, flow, and consolidation during the cure of PMR-15 are discussed. The relationship of the time-temperature cycle used during imidization to the length of the endcapped chains formed is examined. The relationship of the time-temperature cure-processing cycle to the reaction kinetics, viscosity, flow, and consolidation during crosslinking is analyzed using frequency-dependent electromagnetic sensors and the Loos processing model. Application of the FDEMS sensing technique and the process-simulation model for quality assurance processing and automated on-line control of cure is discussed.

  5. Understanding of Essential Elements Required in Informed Consent Form among Researchers and Institutional Review Board Members.

    PubMed

    Koonrungsesomboon, Nut; Laothavorn, Junjira; Karbwang, Juntra

    2015-06-01

    The process of informed consent remains a constant challenge in clinical research. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the understanding of researchers and members of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) regarding the essential elements of an Informed Consent Form (ICF) as required by internationally recognized regulations. Using eight case studies to illustrate basic ethical elements, the study involved 107 participants, mainly from the Asia Pacific and African regions. The results showed that most of the participants had general knowledge regarding the essential elements required in an ICF. However, the issues of confidentiality of data and payment for study participation proved to be problematic for some participants, accounting for 35% and 28% of all incorrect answers respectively. This suggests that participants' understanding of the underlying concepts of the required ICF elements is limited. Ethical training of researchers and IRB members, particularly in the Asia Pacific and African regions, concerning valid informed consent is still needed.

  6. Oligomerization and DNA-binding capacity of Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded on IncP-7 carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chiho; Yun, Choong-Soo; Umeda, Takashi; Terabayashi, Tsuguno; Watanabe, Kazuya; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded on plasmid pCAR1, is a key factor in optimizing gene transcription on both pCAR1 and the host chromosome. To clarify the mode of function of Pmr, we performed gel filtration chromatography analysis and protein-protein cross-linking, and found that Pmr forms homo-oligomers, consisting of its homodimers. We also found, by atomic force microscopy, that Pmr has DNA-bridging capacity. From these results, Pmr was deduced to have features common to H-NS family proteins. Additionally, evaluating protein-DNA affinity is important to clarify the mode of function of Pmr, and hence we performed an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Though Pmr formed high-order protein-DNA complexes and did not show preference for nucleic acid sequences, the C-terminal region of Pmr did, suggesting that the DNA-binding affinity of Pmr can be evaluated by using its C-terminal region.

  7. Guidance on the Appropriate Injunctive Relief for Violations of Major New Source Review Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Thermal management in heavy vehicles : a review identifying issues and research requirements.

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M. W.

    1999-01-15

    Thermal management in heavy vehicles is cross-cutting because it directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, engine/component life, driver comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and aerodynamics. It follows that thermal management is critical to the design of large (class 6-8) trucks, especially in optimizing for energy efficiency and emissions reduction. Heat rejection requirements are expected to increase, and it is industry's goal to develop new, innovative, high-performance cooling systems that occupy less space and are lightweight and cost-competitive. The state of the art in heavy vehicle thermal management is reviewed, and issues and research areas are identified.

  9. Review of current practices and requirements for the inspection of prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, K.J.

    1980-12-01

    Code requirements for pre- and in-service inspection of prestressed concrete pressure vessels as utilized in gas-cooled reactors are reviewed and compared with practices and experiences during construction, commissioning, and operation of such reactors. The pre-service inspection relies heavily on embedded instrumentation for measurements of stresses, temperatures, and displacements. The same instrumentation is later used for in-service surveillance, which additionally includes visual examination of exposed surfaces, monitoring of tendon conditions, and measurement of tendon loads. Improvement of present monitoring instrumentation and/or techniques, rather than development of new in-service inspection methods, is recommended.

  10. When is a Source Required to Undergo Review For Both Offsets and PSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  11. Tumefactive multiple sclerosis requiring emergency craniotomy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Munarriz, Pablo M; Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hernandez-Lain, Aurelio; Ramos, Ana; Lagares, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by focal neurological dysfunction with a relapsing and remitting course. Tumor-like presentation of MS (or "tumefactive"/"pseudotumoral" presentation) has been described before with a certain frequency; it consists of a large single plaque (>2cm) with presence of edema and mass effect and it is hard to distinguish from a brain tumor. However, we present a very rare case of a 53-year-old woman with a right temporal mass that turned out to be a MS plaque, who deteriorated within hours (brain herniation with loss of consciousness and unilateral mydriasis) and required an emergency craniotomy. We also present a review of the literature. It appears that only 4 cases of emergency craniotomy/craniectomy required in a patient with a tumor-like MS plaque have been reported before.

  12. 77 FR 54567 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request: Requirements for Baby-Bouncers and Walker-Jumpers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... for OMB Review; Comment Request: Requirements for Baby-Bouncers and Walker-Jumpers AGENCY: Consumer... seek extension of approval of the collection of information in the requirements for baby-bouncers and.... Requirements for Baby-Bouncers and Walker-Jumpers One CPSC regulation bans any product known as a...

  13. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are two computer software packages: "Introduction to Spectroscopy, IR, NMR & CMR," and "ASYSTANT" (a mathematical and statistical analysis software tool). Discussed are the functions, strengths, weaknesses, hardware requirements, components, level, and cost for each package. (CW)

  14. Thermomechanical Properties of M40J Carbon/PMR-II-50 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Shin, E. Eugene; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Wheeler, Donald; Sutter, James K.

    2003-01-01

    To increase performance and durability of high-temperature composites for potential rocket engine components, it is necessary to optimize wetting and interfacial bonding between high modulus carbon fibers and high-temperature polyimide resins. It has been previously demonstrated that the electro-oxidative shear treatments used by fiber manufacturers are not effective on higher modulus fibers that have fewer edge and defect sites in the surface crystallites. In addition, sizings commercially supplies on most carbon fibers are not compatible with polyimides. In this study, the surface chemistry and energy of high modulus carbon fibers (M40J and M60J, Torray) and typical fluorinated polyimide resins, such as PMR-II-50 were characterized. A continuous desizing system that uses an environmentally friendly chemical-mechanical process was developed for tow level fiber. Composites were fabricated with fibers containing the manufacturer's sizing, desized, and further treated with a reactive finish. Results of room temperature tests show that desizing reduces interface sensitive properties compared to the manufacturer's sizing and that subsequent surface re-treatment with reactive finish increases interface sensitive properties. Properties of thermally aged composites and composites with varying finish concentrations are also discussed.

  15. Thermomechanical Fatigue Durability of T650-35/PMR-15 Sheet-Molding Compound Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1999-01-01

    High-performance polymer matrix composites (PMC's) continue to be the focus of a number of research efforts aimed at developing cost-effective, lightweight material alternatives for advanced aerospace and aeropropulsion applications. These materials not only offer significant advantages in specific stiffness and strength over their current metal counterparts, but they can be designed and manufactured to eliminate joints and fasteners by combining individual components into integral subassemblies, thus making them extremely attractive for commercial applications. With much emphasis on the low-cost manufacturing aspects of advanced composite structures, there is heightened interest in high-performance sheet-molding compounds (SMC's). Researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center, in cooperation with the Allison Advanced Development Company, completed an investigation examining the use of T650-35/PMR-15 SMC for a midstage inner-vane endwall application within a gas turbine engine compressor. This component resides in the engine flow path and is subjected not only to high airflow rates, but also to elevated temperatures and pressures. This application is unique in that it represents a very aggressive use of high-performance SMC's, raising obvious concerns related to durability and property retention in the presence of microstructural damage. Therefore, it was necessary to evaluate the fatigue behavior and damage tolerance of this material subjected to a representative thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) mission-cycle loading spectrum.

  16. Specimen geometry effects on graphite/PMR-15 composites during thermo-oxidative aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.; Meyers, A.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to establish the effects of specimen geometry on the thermo-oxidative stability and the mechanical properties retention of unidirectional Celion 12000 graphite fiber reinforced PMR-15 polyimide composites. Weight loss, flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength are measured at isothermal aging times as long as 1639 hr at a temperature of 316 C for three different specimen geometries. It is found that the three different types of specimen surfaces exhibit different values of weight loss/unit area. The mechanical properties retention is also found to be dependent on geometry for these composites. The interlaminar shear strength decreases significantly over the complete range of aging times. The flexural strength retention starts showing geometric dependency after about 1000 hr of aging at 316C. Weight loss fluxes, associated with the three different types of exposed surfaces, are calculated and used to develop an empirical mathematical model for predicting the weight loss behavior of unidirectional composites of arbitrary geometries. Data are presented comparing experimentally determined weight loss with weight loss values predicted using the empirical model.

  17. Thermomechanical Properties of Interface Modified M40J Carbon/PMR-II-50 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda; Inghram, Linda; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Wheeler, Don; Sutter, James K.

    2003-01-01

    To increase performance and durability of high-temperature composites for potential rocket engine components, it is necessary to optimize wetting and interfacial bonding between high modulus carbon fibers and high-temperature polyimide resins. It has been previously demonstrated that the electro-oxidative shear treatments used by fiber manufacturers are not effective on higher modulus fibers that have fewer edge and defect sites in the surface crystallites. In addition, sizings commercially supplied on most carbon fibers are not compatible with polyimides. In this study, the surface chemistry and energy of high modulus carbon fibers (M40J and M60J, Torray) and typical fluorinated polyimide resins, such as PMR-11-50 were characterized. A continuous desizing system that uses an environmentally friendly chemical- mechanical process was developed for tow level fiber. Composites were fabricated with fibers containing the manufacturer's sizing, desized, and further treated with a reactive finish. Results of room temperature tests show that desizing reduces interface sensitive properties compared to the manufacturer's sizing and that subsequent surface re-treatment with reactive finish increases interface sensitive properties. Properties of thermally aged composites and composites with varying finish concentrations will also be discussed.

  18. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon -Cherl

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connecting the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.

  19. Long-Term Isothermal Aging Effects on Carbon Fabric-Reinforced PMR-15 Composites: Compression Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Roberts, Gary D.; Kamvouris, John E.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of long-term isothermal thermo-oxidative aging on the compressive properties of T-650-35 fabric reinforced PMR-15 composites. The temperatures that were studied were 204, 260, 288, 316, and 343 C. Specimens of different geometries were evaluated. Cut edge-to-surface ratios of 0.03 to 0.89 were fabricated and aged. Aging times extended to a period in excess of 15,000 hours for the lower temperature runs. The unaged and aged specimens were tested in compression in accordance with ASTM D-695. Both thin and thick (plasma) specimens were tested. Three specimens were tested at each time/temperature/geometry condition. The failure modes appeared to be initiated by fiber kinking with longitudinal, interlaminar splitting. In general, it appears that the thermo-oxidative degradation of the compression strength of the composite material may occur by both thermal (time-dependent) and oxidative (weight-loss) mechanisms. Both mechanisms appear to be specimen-thickness dependent.

  20. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jeong -Hun; Yoon, Su -Jong; Cho, Hyoung -Kyu; ...

    2015-04-16

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connectingmore » the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.« less

  1. A Limited Comparison of the Thermal Durability of Polyimide Candidate Matrix Polymers with PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Inghram, Linda L.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Klans, Ojars V.

    2003-01-01

    Studies were conducted with six different candidate high-temperature neat matrix resin specimens of varied geometric shapes to investigate the mechanisms involved in the thermal degradation of polyimides like PMR-15. The metrics for assessing the quality of these candidates were chosen to be glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), thermo-oxidative stability, dynamic mechanical properties, microstructural changes, and dimensional stability. The processing and mechanical properties were not investigated in the study reported herein. The dimensional changes and surface layer growth were measured and recorded. The data were in agreement with earlier published data. An initial weight increase reaction was observed to be dominating at the lower temperatures. However, at the more elevated temperatures, the weight loss reactions were prevalent and probably masked the weight gain reaction. These data confirmed the findings of the existence of an initial weight gain reaction previously reported. Surface- and core-dependent weight losses were shown to control the polymer degradation at the higher temperatures.

  2. Fe(3+)-dependent epistasis between the CpxR-activated loci and the PmrA-activated LPS modification loci in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akinori; Higashino, Nami; Utsumi, Ryutaro

    2017-01-25

    Bacteria utilize varying combinations of two-component regulatory systems, many of which respond and adapt closely to stress conditions, thus expanding their niche steadily. While mechanisms of recognition and avoidance of the specific Fe(3+) signal by the PmrA/PmrB system is well understood, those of the CpxR/CpxA system are more complex because they can be induced by various stress conditions, which, in turn, expresses a variety of phenotypes. Here, we highlight another aspect of the CpxR/CpxA system; mutations in degP and yqjA genes, which are under the control of the system, exhibit an iron sensitive phenotype in the mutant background defective in the PmrA-dependent gene products that alter the pyrophosphate status of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide in Salmonella enterica. Therefore, after the PmrA/PmrB-mediated Fe(3+)-dependent control of the pyrophosphate status on the cell surface, the CpxR/CpxA system is one of the second layers of envelope stress response that allows adaptation to high Fe(3+) conditions in this bacterium.

  3. A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation Modelling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Beattie - Bridgeman Virial expansion The above equations are suitable for moderate pressures and are usually based on either empirical constants...CR 2010-013 October 2009 A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation...Defence R&D Canada. A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation

  4. Fractured rock modeling in the National Waste Terminal Storage Program: a review of requirements and status

    SciTech Connect

    St. John, C.; Krug, A.; Key, S.; Monsees, J.

    1983-05-01

    Generalized computer codes capable of forming the basis for numerical models of fractured rock masses are being used within the NWTS program. Little additional development of these codes is considered justifiable, except in the area of representation of discrete fractures. On the other hand, model preparation requires definition of medium-specific constitutive descriptions and site characteristics and is therefore legitimately conducted by each of the media-oriented projects within the National Waste Terminal Storage program. However, it is essential that a uniform approach to the role of numerical modeling be adopted, including agreement upon the contribution of modeling to the design and licensing process and the need for, and means of, model qualification for particular purposes. This report discusses the role of numerical modeling, reviews the capabilities of several computer codes that are being used to support design or performance assessment, and proposes a framework for future numerical modeling activities within the NWTS program.

  5. Trading Land: A Review of Approaches to Accounting for Upstream Land Requirements of Traded Products

    PubMed Central

    Haberl, Helmut; Kastner, Thomas; Wiedenhofer, Dominik; Eisenmenger, Nina; Erb, Karl‐Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Summary Land use is recognized as a pervasive driver of environmental impacts, including climate change and biodiversity loss. Global trade leads to “telecoupling” between the land use of production and the consumption of biomass‐based goods and services. Telecoupling is captured by accounts of the upstream land requirements associated with traded products, also commonly referred to as land footprints. These accounts face challenges in two main areas: (1) the allocation of land to products traded and consumed and (2) the metrics to account for differences in land quality and land‐use intensity. For two main families of accounting approaches (biophysical, factor‐based and environmentally extended input‐output analysis), this review discusses conceptual differences and compares results for land footprints. Biophysical approaches are able to capture a large number of products and different land uses, but suffer from a truncation problem. Economic approaches solve the truncation problem, but are hampered by the limited disaggregation of sectors and products. In light of the conceptual differences, the overall similarity of results generated by both types of approaches is remarkable. Diametrically opposed results for some of the world's largest producers and consumers of biomass‐based products, however, make interpretation difficult. This review aims to provide clarity on some of the underlying conceptual issues of accounting for land footprints. PMID:27547028

  6. Trading Land: A Review of Approaches to Accounting for Upstream Land Requirements of Traded Products.

    PubMed

    Schaffartzik, Anke; Haberl, Helmut; Kastner, Thomas; Wiedenhofer, Dominik; Eisenmenger, Nina; Erb, Karl-Heinz

    2015-10-01

    Land use is recognized as a pervasive driver of environmental impacts, including climate change and biodiversity loss. Global trade leads to "telecoupling" between the land use of production and the consumption of biomass-based goods and services. Telecoupling is captured by accounts of the upstream land requirements associated with traded products, also commonly referred to as land footprints. These accounts face challenges in two main areas: (1) the allocation of land to products traded and consumed and (2) the metrics to account for differences in land quality and land-use intensity. For two main families of accounting approaches (biophysical, factor-based and environmentally extended input-output analysis), this review discusses conceptual differences and compares results for land footprints. Biophysical approaches are able to capture a large number of products and different land uses, but suffer from a truncation problem. Economic approaches solve the truncation problem, but are hampered by the limited disaggregation of sectors and products. In light of the conceptual differences, the overall similarity of results generated by both types of approaches is remarkable. Diametrically opposed results for some of the world's largest producers and consumers of biomass-based products, however, make interpretation difficult. This review aims to provide clarity on some of the underlying conceptual issues of accounting for land footprints.

  7. Comparison of Graphite Fabric Reinforced PMR-15 and Avimid N Composites After Long Term Isothermal Aging at Various Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; McCorkle, Linda; Ingrahm, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Extensive effort is currently being expended to demonstrate the feasibility of using high-performance, polymer-matrix composites as engine structural materials over the expected operating lifetime of the aircraft, which can extend from 18,000 to 30,000 hr. The goal is to develop light-weight, high-strength, and high-modulus materials for use in higher temperature sections of advanced 21 st century aircraft propulsion systems. To accomplish this goal, it is necessary to pursue the development of thermal and mechanical durability models for graphite-fiber-reinforced, polymer-matrix composites. Numerous investigations have been reported regarding the thermo-oxidative stability (TOS) of the polyimide PMR-15 (1-5). A significant amount of this work has been directed at edge and geometry effects, reinforcement fiber influences, and empirical modeling of high-temperature weight loss behavior. It is yet to be determined if the information obtained from the PMR-15 composite tests is applicable to other polyimide-matrix composites. The condensation-curing polymer Avimid N is another advanced composite material often considered for structural applications at high temperatures. Avimid N has better thermo-oxidative stability than PMR-15 (6), but the latter is more easily processed. The most comprehensive study of the thermo-oxidative stability of Avimid N neat resin and composites at 371 (infinity)C is found in Salin and Seferis (7). The purposes of the work described herein were to compare the thermal aging behavior of these two matrix polymers and to determine the reasons for and the consequences of the difference in thermal durability. These results might be of some use in improving future polymer development through the incorporation of the desirable characteristics of both polyimides.

  8. 34 CFR 86.102 - What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review? 86.102 Section 86.102 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.102 What is required of an...

  9. 34 CFR 86.102 - What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review? 86.102 Section 86.102 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.102 What is required of an...

  10. 34 CFR 86.102 - What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review? 86.102 Section 86.102 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.102 What is required of an...

  11. 34 CFR 86.102 - What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review? 86.102 Section 86.102 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.102 What is required of an...

  12. 34 CFR 86.102 - What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is required of an IHE that the Secretary selects for annual review? 86.102 Section 86.102 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.102 What is required of an...

  13. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  14. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  15. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  16. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  17. 21 CFR 610.48 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback” requirements based on review of historical testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis C virus (HCV) âlookbackâ requirements... STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.48 Hepatitis C virus (HCV) “lookback... the following actions: (1) You must: (i) Review all records of donor testing for hepatitis C...

  18. Efficacy and safety concerns are important reasons why the FDA requires multiple reviews before approval of new drugs.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joseph S; Dzara, Kristina; Downing, Nicholas S

    2015-04-01

    The regulatory approval of new drugs by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is a long and complex process and often requires multiple cycles of review, potentially delaying patients' access to new and effective therapeutics. We used qualitative methods to characterize the safety and efficacy reasons why applications for novel therapeutics approved by the FDA between 2001 and 2011 required multiple review cycles prior to approval. Among ninety-six applications approved between 2001 and 2011 that required multiple review cycles, safety concerns contributed to seventy-four (77.1 percent) and efficacy concerns to forty-three (44.8 percent). Our study suggests that multiple review cycles appear to play an important role in allowing the FDA to protect public health and in ensuring adequate understanding of clinical benefits and risks prior to approval.

  19. NESC Review of the 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) Oxygen Storage Pressure Vessel Inspection Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael; Raju, Ivatury; Piascik, Robert; Cameron, Kenneth; Kirsch, Michael; Hoffman, Eric; Murthy, Pappu; Hopson, George; Greulich, Owen; Frazier, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The 8-Foot HTT (refer to Figure 4.0-1) is used to conduct tests of air-breathing hypersonic propulsion systems at Mach numbers 4, 5, and 7. Methane, Air, and LOX are mixed and burned in a combustor to produce test gas stream containing 21 percent by volume oxygen. The NESC was requested by the NASA LaRC Executive Safety Council to review the rationale for a proposed change to the recertification requirements, specifically the internal inspection requirements, of the 8-Foot HTT LOX Run Tank and LOX Storage Tank. The Run Tank is an 8,000 gallon cryogenic tank used to provide LOX to the tunnel during operations, and is pressured during the tunnel run to 2,250 pounds per square inch gage (psig). The Storage Tank is a 25,000 gallon cryogenic tank used to store LOX at slightly above atmospheric pressure as a external shell, with space between the shells maintained under vacuum conditions.

  20. A Review of Safety and Design Requirements of the Artificial Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Blauw, Helga; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Koops, Robin; DeVries, J Hans

    2016-11-01

    As clinical studies with artificial pancreas systems for automated blood glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes move to unsupervised real-life settings, product development will be a focus of companies over the coming years. Directions or requirements regarding safety in the design of an artificial pancreas are, however, lacking. This review aims to provide an overview and discussion of safety and design requirements of the artificial pancreas. We performed a structured literature search based on three search components-type 1 diabetes, artificial pancreas, and safety or design-and extended the discussion with our own experiences in developing artificial pancreas systems. The main hazards of the artificial pancreas are over- and under-dosing of insulin and, in case of a bi-hormonal system, of glucagon or other hormones. For each component of an artificial pancreas and for the complete system we identified safety issues related to these hazards and proposed control measures. Prerequisites that enable the control algorithms to provide safe closed-loop control are accurate and reliable input of glucose values, assured hormone delivery and an efficient user interface. In addition, the system configuration has important implications for safety, as close cooperation and data exchange between the different components is essential.

  1. PMR Characterization of the Water Structure in Tibetan Milk Mushroom Zooglea: Influence of Medium Hydration and Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupskaya, T. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu. I.; Evstigneev, M. P.; Tsapko, M. D.; Turov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The state of water in Tibetan milk mushroom zooglea with different degrees of hydration (h) was investigated using low-temperature PMR spectroscopy in air and in contact with the hydrophobic media polydimethylsiloxane PDMS-1000 and CHCl3 with added trifl uoroacetic acid (TFA). The maximum hydration of the zooglea amounted to h = 32 g/g (of dry matter). Water existed as polyassociates (clusters or domains) of strongly and weakly associated water. Bound water decomposed into clusters in the presence of TFA. The NMR spectra showed six types of bound water at h = 0.3 g/g.

  2. SAR compliance assessment of PMR 446 and FRS walkie-talkies.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2015-10-01

    The vast amount of studies on radiofrequency dosimetry deal with exposure due to mobile devices and base station antennas for cellular communication systems. This study investigates compliance of walkie-talkies to exposure guidelines established by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and the Federal Communications Committee. The generic walkie-talkie consisted of a helical antenna and a ground plane and was derived by reverse engineering of a commercial walkie-talkie. Measured and simulated values of antenna characteristics and electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie were within 2% and 8%, respectively. We also validated normalized electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie against a commercial device and observed a very good agreement (deviation <6%). We showed that peak localized specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the oval flat phantom by the generic walkie-talkie is in agreement with four commercial devices if input power of the generic walkie-talkie is rescaled based on magnetic near field. Finally, we found that SAR of commercial devices is within current SAR limits for general public exposure for a worst-case duty cycle of 100%, that is, about 3 times and 6 times lower than the limit on the 1 g SAR (1.6 W/kg) and 10 g SAR (2 W/kg), respectively. But, an effective radiated power as specified by the Private Mobile Radio at 446 MHz (PMR 446) radio standard can cause localized SAR exceeding SAR limits for 1 g of tissue.

  3. Refractory PMR with aortitis: life-saving treatment with anti-IL6 monoclonal antibody (tocilizumab) and surgical reconstruction of the ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Fahd Adeeb Mohamed; Anjum, Shakeel; Hussaini, Abid; Fraser, Alexander

    2013-06-18

    Aortitis is uncommon but well described in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). While glucocorticoid remains the mainstay therapy for large-vessel vasculitis, there have been cases where tocilizumab therapy led to clinical and serological improvement in patients with relapsing or refractory disease. We report a case of life-threatening PMR with aortitis in the absence of manifestations related to giant cell arteritis, which, having failed to respond to corticosteroid therapy, was successfully treated with tocilizumab and emergency reconstruction of the ascending aorta. This case adds to the literature supporting the potential value of interleukin-6 inhibition in rare rheumatological conditions such as inflammatory aortitis.

  4. The European Union's REACH regulation: a review of its history and requirements.

    PubMed

    Williams, E Spencer; Panko, Julie; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, the European Union (EU) promulgated a monumental regulatory initiative for the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). To date, several thousand pages of text have been needed to describe the expectations of this regulation. There were numerous reasons for the promulgation of REACH, but, by and large, it is an extension of the global desire to produce fewer industrial chemicals, to understand the possible human and ecological hazards of those that are produced, and to insure that any major threat is anticipated, as well as prevented. Most industry-related groups consider it the most wide-ranging and costly regulatory initiatives related to health risk assessment ever to be promulgated. This review presents a description of REACH that should inform scientists, managers, and others about its objectives and the means to satisfy them. Registration is required for all chemicals manufactured or imported into the EU, unless specifically exempted. Registration is expected to be a collaborative process among companies, which will generate a dossier containing data on physicochemical characteristics, as well as toxicological and ecotoxicological properties. Though the magnitude of the gaps in the data required for registration is uncertain at this point, it is clear that basic toxicology testing will have to be conducted for many chemical substances that have not undergone formal review up to this point. For many chemicals, an examination of hazards and risks arising from the use of these substances will also be required in the form of a chemical safety report (CSR). Beginning with the dual processes of dossier and substance evaluation, the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), the Member States of the EU, and the European Commission will identify chemicals that may pose unacceptable hazards to human health and/or the environment, and will curtail or restrict their usage. The implementation of REACH will expand and deepen the

  5. Review of chamber design requirements for testing of personal protective clothing ensembles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pengfei; King, William P; Shaffer, Ronald

    2007-08-01

    This review focuses on the physical requirements for conducting ensemble testing and describes the salient issues that organizations involved in the design, test, or certification of personal protective equipment (PPE) and protective clothing ensembles need to consider for strategic planning. Several current and proposed PPE ensemble test practices and standards were identified. The man-in-simulant test (MIST) is the primary procedure used by the military to evaluate clothing ensembles for protection against chemical and biological warfare agents. MIST has been incorporated into the current editions of protective clothing and equipment standards promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). ASTM has recently developed a new test method (ASTM F 2588-06) for MIST evaluation of protective ensembles. Other relevant test methods include those described in International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards. The primary differences among the test methods were the choice of test challenge material (e.g., sulfur hexafluoride, methyl salicylate, sodium chloride particles, corn oil, fluorophore-impregnated silica) and the exercise protocol for the subject(s). Although ensemble test methods and standards provide detailed descriptions of the test procedures, none give specific requirements for chamber design. A literature survey identified 28 whole-body exposure chambers that have been or could potentially be used for testing protective clothing ensembles using human test subjects. Median chamber size, median floor space, and median volume per subject were calculated from 15 chambers (involving human test subjects), where size information is available. Based on the literature survey of existing chambers and the review of the current and proposed standards and test methods, chamber design requirements will be dictated by the test methods selected. Due to widely different test conditions for aerosol/particulate and vapor ensemble testing, it is

  6. Oligomerization mechanisms of an H-NS family protein, Pmr, encoded on the plasmid pCAR1 provide a molecular basis for functions of H-NS family members.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chiho; Kawazuma, Kohei; Horita, Shoichiro; Terada, Tohru; Tanokura, Masaru; Okada, Kazunori; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacterial H-NS-like proteins and Pseudomonas MvaT-like proteins share low homology at the amino acid sequence level, but both can function as xenogeneic silencers and are included in the H-NS family of proteins. H-NS family members have dimerization/oligomerization and DNA-binding domains connected by a flexible linker and form large nucleoprotein complexes using both domains. Pmr, an MvaT-like protein encoded on the IncP-7 carbazole-degradative plasmid pCAR1, is a key regulator of an interaction between pCAR1 and its host Pseudomonas putida KT2440. KT2440 has two transcribed genes that encode the MvaT-like proteins TurA and TurB. Our previous transcriptome analyses suggested that the functions of Pmr, TurA and TurB are non-equivalent, although the detailed underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the protein-protein interactions of Pmr, and assessed the homo-oligomerization capacity of various substituted and truncated Pmr derivatives by protein-protein cross-linking analysis. Six of the seven residues identified as important for homo-oligomerization in Pmr were located near the N-terminus, and the putative flexible linker or the region near that was not involved in homo-oligomerization, suggesting that Pmr homo-oligomerization is different from that of enterobacterial H-NS and that the functional mechanism differs between H-NS-like and MvaT-like proteins. In addition, we assessed homo- and hetero-oligomerization of Pmr by surface plasmon resonance analysis and found that the coupling ratio of TurB-Pmr oligomers is smaller than that of Pmr-Pmr or TurA-Pmr oligomers. These results raised the possibility that composition of the hetero-oligomers of Pmr, TurA, and TurB could explain why the different gene sets were affected by either pmr, turA, or turB disruption in our previous studies.

  7. Genetic Variations as Modifying Factors to Dietary Zinc Requirements-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Day, Kaitlin J; Adamski, Melissa M; Dordevic, Aimee L; Murgia, Chiara

    2017-02-17

    Due to reduced cost and accessibility, the use of genetic testing has appealed to health professionals for personalising nutrition advice. However, translation of the evidence linking polymorphisms, dietary requirements, and pathology risk proves to be challenging for nutrition and dietetic practitioners. Zinc status and polymorphisms of genes coding for zinc-transporters have been associated with chronic diseases. The present study aimed to systematically review the literature to assess whether recommendations for zinc intake could be made according to genotype. Eighteen studies investigating 31 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to zinc intake and/or status were identified. Five studies examined type 2 diabetes; zinc intake was found to interact independently with two polymorphisms in the zinc-transporter gene SLC30A8 to affect glucose metabolism indicators. While the outcomes were statistically significant, the small size of the effect and lack of replication raises issues regarding translation into nutrition and dietetic practice. Two studies assessed the relationship of polymorphisms and cognitive performance; seven studies assessed the association between a range of outcomes linked to chronic conditions in aging population; two papers described the analysis of the genetic contribution in determining zinc concentration in human milk; and two papers assessed zinc concentration in plasma without linking to clinical outcomes. The data extracted confirmed a connection between genetics and zinc requirements, although the direction and magnitude of the dietary modification for carriers of specific genotypes could not be defined. This study highlights the need to summarise nutrigenetics studies to enable health professionals to translate scientific evidence into dietary recommendations.

  8. Comparison of SMR, PMR, and PCMR in a cohort of union members potentially exposed to diesel exhaust emissions.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, O; Morgan, R W; Kheifets, L; Larson, S R

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of cause specific standarised mortality ratios (SMRs) and proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs) or proportionate cancer mortality ratios (PCMRs) was made based on the mortality experience of a cohort of 34 156 members of a heavy equipment operators union. Two types of PMRs or PCMRs were used in the comparison: those based on all deaths and those based on deaths known to the union only. The comparison indicated that, for the entire cohort, both types of PMRs were poor indicators for cancer risk and produced a large number of false positives. On the other hand, PCMRs appeared to be better than PMRs for assessing the direction of site specific cancer risk, but they tended to overstate the magnitude of risk. Analysis by duration of union membership or latency indicated that PMRs or PCMRs based on deaths known to the union tended to overestimate the risk of lung cancer by disproportionately larger amounts in groups with shorter time than in groups with longer time. This differential bias had the net effect of reducing the gradient of any trend or eliminating the trend entirely. In conclusion, PMR or PCMR, based on reasonably sufficient death ascertainment, has a certain usefulness in generating hypotheses, but they are not useful or reliable in measuring the magnitude of risk or in detecting trends in dose response analysis. No conclusion should be drawn from either PMR or PCMR. PMID:2410011

  9. The 34th Walter J. Zeiter lecture: creating the future of PM&R: building on our past.

    PubMed

    Gans, Bruce M

    2003-07-01

    The founders of the field of physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) took advantage of a confluence of political, technical, and economic opportunities to launch our specialty. In the process, they expressed their values of belief in the importance of function, the team approach to health care, the utility of physical agents and modalities in the management of neuromuscular conditions, the impact of education for our patients and their families, the rights of persons with a disability (PWD), and the responsibility of our field to advocate for public policy issues concerned with the needs of PWD. Advances in the technology of health care delivery and biomedicine will shape our future. Specific trends and factors are addressed. Equally important will be the political dimension, including the aging of our global population, and the economic consequences of health insurance pressures. The field of PM&R should focus on activities that take advantage of emerging trends but are rooted in our traditional values. In particular, the field should look forward to the massive growth of populations in need of our services because of aging and longevity, the emerging global health community, and our increasing technical capacity to impact improvements in health and function. The field is charged to preserve awareness of our core values, to support the common good of research, to keep the use of new and emerging technology in check to serve the needs of our patients, to continue our advocacy for social justice for PWD, and to embrace the emerging global community.

  10. A review method for UML requirements analysis model employing system-side prototyping.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shinpei; Matsuura, Saeko

    2013-12-01

    User interface prototyping is an effective method for users to validate the requirements defined by analysts at an early stage of a software development. However, a user interface prototype system offers weak support for the analysts to verify the consistency of the specifications about internal aspects of a system such as business logic. As the result, the inconsistency causes a lot of rework costs because the inconsistency often makes the developers impossible to actualize the system based on the specifications. For verifying such consistency, functional prototyping is an effective method for the analysts, but it needs a lot of costs and more detailed specifications. In this paper, we propose a review method so that analysts can verify the consistency among several different kinds of diagrams in UML efficiently by employing system-side prototyping without the detailed model. The system-side prototype system does not have any functions to achieve business logic, but visualizes the results of the integration among the diagrams in UML as Web pages. The usefulness of our proposal was evaluated by applying our proposal into a development of Library Management System (LMS) for a laboratory. This development was conducted by a group. As the result, our proposal was useful for discovering the serious inconsistency caused by the misunderstanding among the members of the group.

  11. 42 CFR 476.74 - General requirements for the assumption of review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 476.74 Section 476.74 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) QUALITY IMPROVEMENT ORGANIZATIONS UTILIZATION AND QUALITY CONTROL REVIEW Review Responsibilities of Utilization and Quality Control Quality Improvement Organizations...

  12. Thermomechanical Fatigue Durability of T650-35/PMR-15 Sheet Molding Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.; Sutter, James K.; Benson, Dianne

    1998-01-01

    Although polyimide based composites have been used for many years in a wide variety of elevated temperature applications, very little work has been done to examine the durability and damage behavior under more prototypical thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) loadings. Synergistic effects resulting from simultaneous temperature and load cycling can potentially lead to enhanced, if not unique, damage modes and contribute to a number of nonlinear deformation responses. The goal of this research was to examine the effects of a TMF loading spectrum, representative of a gas turbine engine compressor application, on a polyimide sheet molding compound (SMC). High performance SMCs present alternatives to prepreg forms with great potential for low cost component production through less labor intensive, more easily automated manufacturing. To examine the issues involved with TMF, a detailed experimental investigation was conducted to characterize the durability of a T650-35/PMR-15 SMC subjected to TMF mission cycle loadings. Fatigue damage progression was tracked through macroscopic deformation and elastic stiffness. Additional properties, such as the glass transition temperature (T(sub g) and dynamic mechanical properties were examined. The fiber distribution orientation was also characterized through a detailed quantitative image analysis. Damage tolerance was quantified on the basis of residual static tensile properties after a prescribed number of TMF missions. Detailed microstructural examinations were conducted using optical and scanning electron microscopy to characterize the local damage. The imposed baseline TMF missions had only a modest impact on inducing fatigue damage with no statistically significant degradation occurring in the measured macroscopic properties. Microstructural damage was, however, observed subsequent to 100 h of TMF cycling which consisted primarily of fiber debonding and transverse cracking local to predominantly transverse fiber bundles. The TMF

  13. Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded by the IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1, is a key global regulator that alters host function.

    PubMed

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Suzuki, Chiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Takeda, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Yurika; Sai, Fumiya; Terabayashi, Tsuguno; Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Shintani, Masaki; Nishida, Hiromi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2010-09-01

    Histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family proteins are nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) conserved among many bacterial species. The IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1 is transmissible among various Pseudomonas strains and carries a gene encoding the H-NS family protein, Pmr. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a host of pCAR1, which harbors five genes encoding the H-NS family proteins PP_1366 (TurA), PP_3765 (TurB), PP_0017 (TurC), PP_3693 (TurD), and PP_2947 (TurE). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the presence of pCAR1 does not affect the transcription of these five genes and that only pmr, turA, and turB were primarily transcribed in KT2440(pCAR1). In vitro pull-down assays revealed that Pmr strongly interacted with itself and with TurA, TurB, and TurE. Transcriptome comparisons of the pmr disruptant, KT2440, and KT2440(pCAR1) strains indicated that pmr disruption had greater effects on the host transcriptome than did pCAR1 carriage. The transcriptional levels of some genes that increased with pCAR1 carriage, such as the mexEF-oprN efflux pump genes and parI, reverted with pmr disruption to levels in pCAR1-free KT2440. Transcriptional levels of putative horizontally acquired host genes were not altered by pCAR1 carriage but were altered by pmr disruption. Identification of genome-wide Pmr binding sites by ChAP-chip (chromatin affinity purification coupled with high-density tiling chip) analysis demonstrated that Pmr preferentially binds to horizontally acquired DNA regions. The Pmr binding sites overlapped well with the location of the genes differentially transcribed following pmr disruption on both the plasmid and the chromosome. Our findings indicate that Pmr is a key factor in optimizing gene transcription on pCAR1 and the host chromosome.

  14. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews two computer programs: "Molecular Graphics," which allows molecule manipulation in three-dimensional space (requiring IBM PC with 512K, EGA monitor, and math coprocessor); and "Periodic Law," a database which contains up to 20 items of information on each of the first 103 elements (Apple II or IBM PC). (MVL)

  15. Renewable energy data requirements: A review of user opinions and data collection efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, G.G.

    1991-11-01

    Interest in the contribution of renewable energy to US energy supply is growing. This interest stems from environmental and energy security concerns and the desire to develop domestic resources. In order to plan for the use of renewable energy, data are essential to a variety of users both inside and outside the government. The purpose of this study is to identify priorities and requirements for gathering different types of renewable energy data. Results of this study are to be used by the US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA), in planning and evaluating its ongoing and future renewable energy information programs. The types of renewable energy addressed in this study include biomass (wood, agricultural residues, and crops grown for energy), municipal solid waste, geothermal energy, solar energy, and wind. To assess the relative importance of different types of information, we reviewed existing renewable energy data collection efforts and asked the opinions of renewable energy data users. Individuals in government, private industry, research organizations, industry trade associations, and public interest research groups were contacted and questioned about particular renewable energy data items. An analysis of their responses provides the basis for the conclusions in this report. The types of information; about which we asked each respondent included resource stock and flow information; quantities of energy inputs (e.g., wood) and outputs (e.g., electricity, heat); energy input and output costs and prices; numbers, location, and production capacities of energy conversion facilities; quantities and costs of energy conversion equipment; and quantities of pollutant emissions from energy conversion. 5 refs., 25 tabs.

  16. 78 FR 25445 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Quality Assurance Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...), General Services Administration (GSA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION... of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve an extension of a previously...

  17. 21 CFR 111.560 - What requirements apply to the review and investigation of a product complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... result in a risk of illness or injury; and (2) Investigate any product complaint that involves a possible..., including those specifications and other requirements that, if not met, may result in a risk of illness or injury. (b) Quality control personnel must review and approve decisions about whether to investigate...

  18. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? 111.113 Section 111.113 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT...

  19. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? 111.113 Section 111.113 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT...

  20. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? 111.113 Section 111.113 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT...

  1. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? 111.113 Section 111.113 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT...

  2. 24 CFR 570.901 - Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pertaining to loan guarantees (subpart M) and urban renewal completions (subpart N). ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements. 570.901 Section 570.901 Housing and...

  3. 24 CFR 570.901 - Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pertaining to loan guarantees (subpart M) and urban renewal completions (subpart N). ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements. 570.901 Section 570.901 Housing and...

  4. 24 CFR 570.901 - Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pertaining to loan guarantees (subpart M) and urban renewal completions (subpart N). ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements. 570.901 Section 570.901 Housing and...

  5. 24 CFR 570.901 - Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pertaining to loan guarantees (subpart M) and urban renewal completions (subpart N). ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements. 570.901 Section 570.901 Housing and...

  6. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for...

  7. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for...

  8. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for...

  9. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for...

  10. 48 CFR 801.602-73 - Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for health-care resources. 801.602-73 Section 801.602... VETERANS AFFAIRS ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 801.602-73 Review requirements for scarce medical specialist contracts and contracts for...

  11. Direct Loan System Requirements: Checklist for Reviewing Systems under the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act. Financial Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Accounting and Information Management Div.

    This checklist reflects the requirements of the revised Direct Loan System of the Joint Financial Management Improvement Program to assist agencies in implementing and monitoring their direct loan system and to help managers and auditors review their direct loan systems to determine if they comply with the Federal Financial Management Improvement…

  12. 24 CFR 570.901 - Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pertaining to loan guarantees (subpart M) and urban renewal completions (subpart N). ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review for compliance with the primary and national objectives and other program requirements. 570.901 Section 570.901 Housing and...

  13. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  14. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  15. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  16. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  17. 40 CFR 51.914 - What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas? 51.914 Section 51.914 Protection of Environment... OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Provisions for Implementation of 8-hour Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard § 51.914 What new source review requirements apply for 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas?...

  18. 21 CFR 111.113 - What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What quality control operations are required for a material review and disposition decision? 111.113 Section 111.113 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT...

  19. 34 CFR 222.95 - How are Indian policies and procedures reviewed to ensure compliance with the requirements in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are Indian policies and procedures reviewed to ensure compliance with the requirements in section 8004(a) of the Act? 222.95 Section 222.95 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY...

  20. 21 CFR 111.560 - What requirements apply to the review and investigation of a product complaint?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What requirements apply to the review and investigation of a product complaint? 111.560 Section 111.560 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD...

  1. A Review of Realizing the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) Goals by 2030: Part 1- Status quo, Requirements, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Rada

    2015-07-01

    This paper is the first part of a review of how to realize the Universal Health Coverage (UHC) goals by 2030. The objective of this review is to investigate the role of eHealth and technology in achieving UHC, focusing on four aspects: 1) identifying the importance of UHC and highlighting how UHC is influenced by health systems and eHealth, 2) investigating the current status of UHC worldwide and indicating the current challenges facing the realization of UHC, 3) reviewing the current research activities in the UHC domain and emphasizing the role of eHealth and technology in achieving UHC, and 4) discussing the results of the review to identify the current gaps in UHC implantation and the corresponding research lines for future investigation.This part covers the first two aspects through: providing the required background on UHC, highlighting the potential benefits of eHealth utilization in UHC, addressing the current status quo of UHC implementation worldwide, and finally concluding the lessons learned in terms of the UHC challenges and requirements.This part also described the used search methodology and selection criteria to synthesize this review. It also indicates the limitations of conducting a systematic review in this early stage of deploying UHC-oriented eHealth solutions.

  2. 21 CFR 320.30 - Inquiries regarding bioavailability and bioequivalence requirements and review of protocols by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Drugs strongly recommends that, to avoid the conduct of an improper study and unnecessary human research, any person planning to conduct a bioavailability or bioequivalence study submit the proposed protocol for the study to FDA for review prior to the initiation of the study. (b) FDA may review a...

  3. Practical and Theoretical Requirements for Controlling Rater Stringency in Peer Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Gerald J.; Cason, Carolyn L.

    This study describes a computer based, performance rating information processing system, performance rating theory, and programs for the application of the theory to obtain ratings free from the effects of reviewer stringency in reviewing abstracts of conference papers. Originally, the Performance Rating (PR) System was used to evaluate the…

  4. 78 FR 35191 - 2000 Biennial Regulatory Review, Separate Affiliate Requirements of the Commission's Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ...: In this document, the Commission seeks comment on the structural separation requirements of the... consistent with the Act, we evaluate in this Second FNPRM the structural separation requirements of section... Companies (BOCs) from a regulatory framework with similar structural separation requirements as section...

  5. Off-axis tensile properties and fracture in a unidirectional graphite/polyimide composite (Celion 6000/PMR 15)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, J.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hurwitz, F. I.

    1984-01-01

    Tensile properties of unidirectional Celion 6000 graphite/PMR 15 polyimide composites prepared by hot molding and cold molding processes were measured at room temperature and 316 C, the upper use temperature of the polyimide resin, at both 45 and 90 deg to the fiber axis. The resulting fractures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and materialographic techniques. Variation in tensile properties with processing history occurred in the elastic modulus and strain to failure for specimens loaded at 90 deg at 316 C, and in the fracture stress, and hence the in-plane shear stress, for those loaded at 45 deg at room temperature. Significant plastic deformation was observed in the 45 deg orientation at 316 C for material produced by both processing methods. In general, fracture occurred by both failure within the matrix and at the fiber-matrix interface; the degree of interfacial failure increased with temperature. Secondary cracking below the primary fracture surface was also observed.

  6. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

  7. Packing interactions between transmembrane helices alter ion selectivity of the yeast Golgi Ca2+/Mn2+-ATPase PMR1.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Debjani; Rulli, Samuel J; Rao, Rajini

    2003-09-12

    PMR1 is the yeast secretory pathway pump responsible for high affinity transport of Mn2+ and Ca2+ into the Golgi, where these ions are sequestered and effectively removed from the cytoplasm. Phenotypic growth assays allow for convenient screening of side chains important for Ca2+ and Mn2+ transport. Earlier we demonstrated that mutant Q783A at the cytoplasmic interface of M6 could transport Ca2+, but not Mn2+. Scanning mutagenesis of side chains proximal to residue Gln-783 in membrane helices M2, M4, M5, and M6 revealed additional residues near the cytoplasmic interface, notably Leu-341 (M5), Phe-738 (M5), and Leu-785 (M6) that are sensitive to substitution. Importantly, we obtained evidence for a packing interaction between Val-335 in M4 and Gln-783 in M6 that is critical for Mn2+ transport. Thus, mutant V335G mimics the Mn2+ transport defect of Q783A and mutant V335I can effectively suppress the Mn2+-defective phenotype of Q783A. These changes in ion selectivity were confirmed by cation-dependent ATP hydrolysis using purified enzyme. Other substitutions at these sites are tolerated individually, but not in combination. Exchange of side chains at 335 and 783 also results in ion selectivity defects, suggesting that the packing interaction may be conformation-sensitive. Homology models of M4, M5, and M6 of PMR1 have been generated, based on the structures of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. The models are supported by data from mutagenesis and reveal that Gln-783 and Val-335 show conformation-sensitive packing at the cytoplasmic interface. We suggest that this region may constitute a gate for access of Mn2+ ions.

  8. 48 CFR 801.602-72 - Exceptions and additional review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... review of all proposed contracts with hotels or similar facilities for conferences or similar functions... conference at a particular hotel is a procurement and procurement laws and regulations must be followed....

  9. 48 CFR 801.602-72 - Exceptions and additional review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... review of all proposed contracts with hotels or similar facilities for conferences or similar functions... conference at a particular hotel is a procurement and procurement laws and regulations must be followed....

  10. 44 CFR 10.8 - Determination of requirement for environmental review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... effort and concentrate resources on significant environmental issues. (1) Criteria. The criteria used for... for environmental review. 10.8 Section 10.8 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS Agency...

  11. The Female Post-Mating Response Requires Genes Expressed in the Secondary Cells of the Male Accessory Gland in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, Jessica L; Gligorov, Dragan; Maeda, Robert K; Karch, François; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2016-03-01

    Seminal proteins from the Drosophila male accessory gland induce post-mating responses (PMR) in females. The PMR comprise behavioral and physiological changes that include increased egg laying, decreased receptivity to courting males, and changes in the storage and use of sperm. Many of these changes are induced by a "sex peptide" (SP) and are maintained by SP's binding to, and slow release from, sperm. The accessory gland contains two secretory cell types with distinct morphological and developmental characteristics. Products of these "main" and "secondary" cells work interdependently to induce and maintain the PMR. To identify individual genes needed for the morphology and function of secondary cells, we studied iab-6(cocu) males, whose secondary cells have abnormal morphology and fail to provide products to maintain the PMR. By RNA-seq, we identified 77 genes that are downregulated by a factor of >5× in iab-6(cocu) males. By functional assays and microscopy, we tested 20 candidate genes and found that at least 9 are required for normal storage and release of SP in mated females. Knockdown of each of these 9 genes consequently leads to a reduction in egg laying and an increase in receptivity over time, confirming a role for the secondary cells in maintaining the long-term PMR. Interestingly, only 1 of the 9 genes, CG3349, encodes a previously reported seminal fluid protein (Sfp), suggesting that secondary cells may perform essential functions beyond the production and modification of known Sfps. At least 3 of the 9 genes also regulate the size and/or abundance of secondary cell vacuoles, suggesting that the vacuoles' contents may be important for the machinery used to maintain the PMR.

  12. Polymyalgia rheumatica and risk of coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Ungprasert, Patompong; Koster, Matthew J; Warrington, Kenneth J; Matteson, Eric L

    2017-01-01

    Several chronic inflammatory disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, are associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) as a result of accelerated atherosclerosis. However, the data on CAD risk of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), one of the most common chronic inflammatory disorders in older adults, remain unclear due to limited number of epidemiological studies. To further investigate this possible association, this systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies was performed to compare the risk of CAD in patients with PMR versus subjects without it. Published studies indexed in MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from inception to April 2016 using the terms "polymyalgia rheumatica" combined with the terms for CAD. The inclusion criteria were: (1) observational studies published as original studies to evaluate the risk of CAD among patients with PMR; (2) published odds ratios, relative risk or hazard ratio or standardized incidence ratio with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) in the studies; and (3) subjects without PMR were used as comparators in cohort studies and cross-sectional studies, while subjects without CAD were used as comparators in case-control studies. Point estimates and standard errors were extracted from individual studies and were combined by the generic inverse variance method of DerSimonian and Laird. Four studies with 34,569 patients with PMR were identified and included in this meta-analysis. The pooled risk ratio of CAD in patients with PMR was 1.72 (95 % CI 1.21-2.45). The statistical heterogeneity of this meta-analysis was high with an I (2) of 97 %.

  13. Submittal Requirements for Review of Planning, Bidding and Construction Documents for Georgia Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Facilities Services Unit.

    This document presents the Georgia Department of Education's submittal requirements for documents addressing the planning and construction of educational facilities. Requirements cover such areas as project funding sources, copies and format, site plan, floor plans, elevations and sections, construction delivery method, and heating, air…

  14. 78 FR 5452 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Qualification Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... award of a contract. Under the qualification requirements, an end item, or a component thereof, may be...'s name, the item name, service identification, and test number (to the extent known). This... offeror before award of a contract. Under the qualification requirements, an end item, or a...

  15. 76 FR 78662 - Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... training and data grants are governed by the ``new grant'' PI and the basic grant is governed by the ``basic grant'' PI. Current PIs require separate applications and program assessment reports for each... by consolidating the PIs into one single PI and requiring one single, consolidated application...

  16. Review of surface-equipment requirements for geothermal-well stimulation. Geothermal-reservoir well-stimulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    A summary of stimulation equipment available to geothermal industry is presented and some modifications from which it could benefit are discussed. Equipment requirements for hydraulic fracturing, acid fracturing, acidizing, and other chemical treatments are included. Designs for the following are reviewed: equipment for premixing and storing treatment fluids, proppant handling equipment, pump trucks, special equipment for foam fracturing, intensifier pumps, manifolding, and monitoring and control devices.

  17. Fall 2014 SEI Research Review Eliciting Unstated Requirements at Scale (EURS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    introducing ideation • Affinitize visually as well as virtually • Automate identification of relevant ideas to keep others informed of what might...Review Konrad Stoddard Oct. 28, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Contact Information Presenter / Point of Contact Mike Konrad Software

  18. 17 CFR 39.5 - Review of swaps for Commission determination on clearing requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., standard practices for managing any life cycle events associated with the swap, and the extent to which the... agrees to an extension. The determination of when such submission is complete shall be at the sole..., category, type, or class of swaps agrees to an extension. (5) Upon completion of its review, the...

  19. 75 FR 81273 - Public Information Collection Requirement Submitted to OMB for Review and Approval, Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ...(d), Daily Newspaper Cross-Ownership. Form Number: FCC Form 303-S. Type of Review: Revision of a... certification for licensees to certify that their advertising sales agreements do not discriminate on the basis... advertising sales agreements do not discriminate on the basis of race or ethnicity and that all...

  20. 75 FR 42283 - Review of Arbitration Awards; Miscellaneous and General Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... concern that the proposed rule would require parties to present ``the entire Law Library of Congress'' to... adverse effects on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation, or on the ability...

  1. Tax-exempt hospitals and community benefits: a review of state reporting requirements.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred Joseph

    2009-02-01

    In June 2007 the Internal Revenue Service proposed a major overhaul of its reporting requirements for tax-exempt hospitals and released draft Form 990 (the IRS form filed by tax-exempt organizations each year). In December 2007 the IRS promulgated the final Form 990 after incorporating some of the recommendations made in the almost seven hundred public comments on the discussion draft. One recommendation adopted in the final Form 990 is the postponement until tax year 2009 (returns filed in 2010) of the requirement for hospitals to submit detailed information on the percentage of total expenses attributable to charity care, unreimbursed Medicaid costs, and community-health improvement programs (the discussion draft required this information for tax year 2007). Although the IRS will not require tax-exempt hospitals to provide detailed information about community benefits until the 2009 tax year, sixteen states have laws requiring tax-exempt hospitals to enumerate the benefits that they provide to the community. Information about the impact of these laws on the provision of community benefits (e.g., charity and uncompensated care) is examined in this study whose primary purpose is to highlight information policy makers may glean from states that have adopted community-benefit reporting laws.

  2. An easy, simple inexpensive test for the specific detection of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum based on sequence analysis of the pmrA gene

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The species Pectobacterium carotovorum includes a diverse subspecies of bacteria that cause disease on a wide variety of plants. In Morocco, approximately 95% of the P. carotovorum isolates from potato plants with tuber soft rot are P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. However, identification of this pathogen is not always related to visual disease symptoms. This is especially true when different pathogen cause similar diseases on potato, citing as an example, P. carotovorum, P. atrosepticum and P. wasabiae. Numerous conventional methods were used to characterize Pectobacterium spp., including biochemical assays, specific PCR-based tests, and construction of phylogenetic trees by using gene sequences. In this study, an alternative method is presented using a gene linked to pathogenicity, in order to allow accuracy at subspecies level. The pmrA gene (response regulator) has been used for identification and analysis of the relationships among twenty nine Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and other Pectobacterium subspecies. Results Phylogenetic analyses of pmrA sequences compared to ERIC-PCR and 16S rDNA sequencing, demonstrated that there is considerable genetic diversity in P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum strains, which can be divided into two distinct groups within the same clade. Conclusions pmrA sequence analysis is likely to be a reliable tool to identify the subspecies Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and estimate their genetic diversity. PMID:23890050

  3. Aspirated safety pin requiring thoracotomy: report of a case and review.

    PubMed

    Causey, A L; Talton, D S; Miller, R C; Warren, E T

    1997-12-01

    Foreign body aspirations in children are relatively uncommon occurrences, but they can be a serious events, causing respiratory distress, atelectasis, chronic pulmonary infections, or death. Safety pins are not commonly aspirated objects and account for less than 3% of all foreign bodies found in the tracheobronchial tree. Fewer than 2% of patients require thoracotomy, and most aspirated materials can be removed by bronchoscopy, with low morbidity and mortality. A discussion of airway foreign bodies follows the presentation of a case of an older child who aspirated a safety pin, which required open thoracostomy for removal.

  4. One third of the world - A review of Pacific islands telecommunications requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurd, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the Pacific Basin Communications Study, an assessment of Pacific islands telecommunications requirements, recently completed by the Public Service Satellite Consortium under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The study describes extant and planned telecommunications systems in the region, examines user needs in terms of the development of governmental, social and commercial activities, and proposes and describes alternative technological solutions to communications problems. Questions of financing, implementation, management, costs and benefits of a regional telecommunications system are discussed. This paper describes user requirements based on six months of field investigation and technological options for improving telecommunications in the Pacific islands.

  5. A Template for Spiritual Assessment: A Review of the JCAHO Requirements and Guidelines for Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.

    2006-01-01

    Growing consensus exists regarding the importance of spiritual assessment. For instance, the largest health care accrediting body in the United States, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), now requires the administration of a spiritual assessment. Although most practitioners endorse the concept of spiritual…

  6. 76 FR 79688 - Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) have launched a national evaluation called the... characteristics including: The type of home visiting model, geography, urbanicity, target population, and...

  7. 48 CFR 215.407-5-70 - Disclosure, maintenance, and review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... management systems (e.g., production control or cost accounting) with the estimating system so that the...) Definitions. (1) Acceptable estimating system is defined in the clause at 252.215-7002, Cost Estimating System... in the clause at 252.215-7002, Cost Estimating System Requirements. (4) Significant estimating...

  8. 78 FR 14095 - Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting Requirements Under Emergency Review by the Office of Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Administration for Children and Families' (ACF) 196 form for periodic financial reporting under the Temporary... required by Congress. Financial reporting under the TANF program is governed by 45 CFR part 265. This... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Agency Recordkeeping/Reporting...

  9. Relationship between vitamin E requirement and polyunsaturated fatty acid intake in man: a review.

    PubMed

    Valk, E E; Hornstra, G

    2000-03-01

    Vitamin E is the general term for all tocopherols and tocotrienols, of which alpha-tocopherol is the natural and biologically most active form. Although gamma-tocopherol makes a significant contribution to the vitamin E CONTENT in foods, it is less effective in animal and human tissues, where alpha-tocopherol is the most effective chain-breaking lipid-soluble antioxidant. The antioxidant function of vitamin E is critical for the prevention of oxidation of tissue PUFA. Animal experiments have shown that increasing the degree of dietary fatty acid unsaturation increases the peroxidizability of the lipids and reduces the time required to develop symptoms of vitamin E deficiency. From these experiments, relative amounts of vitamin E required to protect the various fatty acids from being peroxidized, could be estimated. Since systematic studies on the vitamin E requirement in relation to PUFA consumption have not been performed in man, recommendations for vitamin E intake are based on animal experiments and human food intake data. An intake of 0.6 mg alpha-tocopherol equivalents per gram linoleic acid is generally seen as adequate for human adults. The minimum vitamin E requirement at consumption of fatty acids with a higher degree of unsaturation can be calculated by a formula, which takes into account the peroxidizability of unsaturated fatty acids and is based on the results of animal experiments. There are, however, no clear data on the vitamin E requirement of humans consuming the more unsaturated fatty acids as for instance EPA (20:5, n-3) and DHA (22:6, n-3). Studies investigating the effects of EPA and DHA supplementation have shown an increase in lipid peroxidation, although amounts of vitamin E were present that are considered adequate in relation to the calculated oxidative potential of these fatty acids. Furthermore, a calculation of the vitamin E requirement, using recent nutritional intake data, shows that a reduction in total fat intake with a concomitant

  10. Advanced Materials Research Status and Requirements. Volume 2. Appendix: Material Properties Data Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    APPENDIX: MATERIAL PROPERTIES DATA REVIEW FINAL REPORT CONTRACT DASG60-85-C-0087 SPONSORED BY: U.S. ARMY STRATEGIC DEFENSE COMMAND DTIC c. ELECTE... properties of general interest advanced metal matrix and polymer matrix systems. qa .1 ./’r ;) 20. ;is,-icI.rON/AIAiLAS16iT’fr. ASSTRACT 1.AaSTRAZT "C...thermal, and physical properties of general interest advanced metal matrix and polymer matrix composites. 4. .Accession For r., ~~NTIS ... I By-4

  11. The rate of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome in a clinic where primary care physicians are working in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Tanno, Satoshi; Ohhira, Masumi; Nozu, Tsukasa

    2012-06-01

    We analyzed the rate of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome, both characterized as seronegative inflammatory arthritis in elderly, in an outpatient unit where primary care physicians are working in Japan to better understand the epidemiological characteristics of the diseases in Japan. Consecutive outpatients who newly visited at Department of General Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Japan, between April 2004 and March 2010 were analyzed. Each parameter such as age, sex, diagnosis, and biochemical examination was investigated. During the 6 years, 10 or 3 patients were diagnosed as PMR or RS3PE syndrome, respectively. The patients with PMR were 7 women and 3 men, and the average age at diagnosis was 69. Out of all patients aged over 50 (n = 3,347), the rate of PMR was 0.22% in men or 0.36% in women, respectively. On the other hand, RS3PE syndrome was diagnosed in 3 men (76, 76, and 81 years old). The rate of patients with RS3PE syndrome was 0.09% among outpatients aged over 50 indicating that the rate of PMR in an outpatient clinic in Japan is not far from previous findings reported from western countries. When compared with PMR, the rate of RS3PE syndrome was approximately one-third, providing for the first time the rate of RS3PE syndrome when compared with PMR. These epidemilogical data might help us pick up the diseases in primary care setting in Japan.

  12. Panel results of the solar thermal program research requirement assessment review. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1983-11-01

    The objectives of the assessment were to identify: research needs by topic and activity, relative priority of research needs, options for performing needed research, potential performers, costs and duration of R and D activities, gaps and duplications within the R and D program, and activities underway that appear to be of low priority. To achieve these objectives, research programs of the Division of Solar Thermal Technologies within the Office of Renewable Energy and Conservation and the Materials and Advanced Energy Programs of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences were reviewed. Several recent assessments of solar thermal research needs made within the past two years by various groups were also reviewed, and the key research issues and needs were extracted. The primary results from the assessment are a set of prioritized activities to meet the most important research needs for solar thermal technologies. These activities belong to four disciplines: materials science, thermal science, thermochemistry, and engineering. Further, priorities associated with the needs for research result from the various activities allow the recommended activities to be grouped into two categories; a core group which should be at the heart of any future program developed by the department, and a set of important needs that should, at least, find their way into a program at some time during its existence. The recommended research program is outlined, and the complete set of ranked research needs is listed.

  13. Reserve Component General and Flag Officers: A Review of Requirements and Authorized Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    any time been assigned to (filled) this billet? □ Data not available □ Never □ Yes ; provide dates____________________ (YYYYMMDD to YYYYM- MDD) b.2...articulate under what circumstances, if able to do so in an UNCLASSIFIED manner (e.g., yes ; supports CONPLAN 4299/4269). 26. Are there any other unique...use only, as long as it is unaltered and complete. Permission is required from RAND to reproduce, or reuse in another form, any of its research

  14. Soil erosion and sediment control laws. A review of state laws and their natural resource data requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty states, the District of Columbia, and the Virgin Islands enacted erosion and sediment control legislation during the past decade to provide for the implementation or the strengthening of statewide erosion and sediment control plans for rural and/or urban lands. That legislation and the state programs developed to implement these laws are quoted and reviewed. The natural resource data requirements of each program are also extracted. The legislation includes amendments to conservation district laws, water quality laws, and erosion and sediment control laws. Laws which provides for legislative review of administrative regulations and LANDSAT applications and/or information systems that were involved in implementing or gathering data for a specific soil erosion and sediment control program are summarized as well as principal concerns affecting erosion and sediment control laws.

  15. New Source Review (NSR) Program Supplemental Transitional Guidance on Applicability of New Part D NSR Permit Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  16. A Review of Radiation Protection Requirements and Dose Estimation for Staff and Patients in CT Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Teles, P; Nikodemová, D; Bakhanova, E; Becker, F; Knežević, Ž; Pereira, M F; Sarmento, S

    2016-08-13

    The combination of fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures with computed tomography (CTF) has become widespread around the world. The benefits of CTF include the ability to obtain a real-time visualization of the entire body, increased target accuracy and improved visualization of biopsy needles. Modern CTF units work with variable frame rates for image selection, and therefore the dose distributions for patients and staff can considerably vary, creating growing concern in terms of the occupational exposure of interventionists and the drawback of a higher exposure of the patient. A literature review of the latest CTF publications is summarized in this article. A wide range of CTF studies reveal different treatment methods used in clinical practice, and therefore the differences in the exposures between them; as well as in the radiation protection tools and dose monitoring. Further optimization of radiation protection methods, harmonization of exposure patterns as well as training and education of CTF staff on the basis of the information in the survey, are strongly recommended.

  17. Getting published well requires fulfilling editors' and reviewers' needs and desires.

    PubMed

    Schoenwolf, Gary C

    2013-12-01

    Publication in international scientific journals provides an unparalleled opportunity for authors to showcase their work. Where authors publish affects how the community values the work. This value directly determines the impact of the work on the field-papers must be read and cited to advance the field, and because the scientific literature is vast, only a subset of the literature is widely read and cited. Moreover, the value placed on the work also affects the authors' scientific reputation and career advancement. Consequently, it is essential that manuscripts receive the recognition they deserve by being published in one of the "best" journals that the scientific findings allow. Several factors determine where a paper is published: how well the topic of the paper fits the scope of the journal, the quality of the study and the manuscript describing it, the advance the paper makes in its field, the importance of the advance, and the extent to which the paper impacts the broader community of science. As scientists, we assume that our papers will be assessed objectively using only well defined scientific standards, but editors and reviewers also view papers subjectively, having biases of what defines a high-quality publication based on Western standards. Therefore, scientists trained in other parts of the world can be significantly disadvantaged in getting their papers published in the best journals. Here, I present concrete suggestions for improving the perception of a paper in the reader's minds, increasing the likelihood that it will get published well.

  18. Regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection in Malaysia-a review.

    PubMed

    Basri, N A; Hashim, S; Ramli, A T; Bradley, D A; Hamzah, K

    2016-12-01

    Malaysia has initiated a range of pre-project activities in preparation for its planned nuclear power programme. Clearly one of the first steps is the selection of sites that are deemed suitable for the construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Here we outline the Malaysian regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection, emphasizing details of the selection procedures and site characteristics needed, with a clear focus on radiation safety and radiation protection in respect of the site surroundings. The Malaysia Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) site selection guidelines are in accord with those provided in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and United Stated Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents. To enhance the suitability criteria during selection, as well as to assist in the final decision making process, possible assessments using the site selection characteristics and information are proposed.

  19. Benefits and requirements of vitamin D for optimal health: a review.

    PubMed

    Grant, William B; Holick, Micael F

    2005-06-01

    Vitamin D sufficiency is required for optimal health. The conditions with strong evidence for a protective effect of vitamin D include several bone diseases, muscle weakness, more than a dozen types of internal cancers, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes mellitus. There is also weaker evidence for several other diseases and conditions. There are good reasons that vitamin D sufficiency be maintained during all stages of life, from fetal development to old age. Adequate calcium intake is also recommended. The current vitamin D requirements in the United States are based on protection against bone diseases. These guidelines are being revised upward in light of new findings, especially for soft-tissue health. The consensus of scientific understanding appears to be that vitamin D deficiency is reached for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels less than 20 ng/mL (50 nmol/L), insufficiency in the range from 20-32 ng/mL, and sufficiency in the range from 33-80 ng/mL, with normal in sunny countries 54-90 ng/mL, and excess greater than 100 ng/mL. Solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is the primary source of vitamin D for most people. In general, the health benefits accruing from moderate UV irradiation, without erythema or excess tanning, greatly outweigh the health risks, with skin pigmentation (melanin) providing much of the protection. In the absence of adequate solar UVB irradiation due to season, latitude, or lifestyle, vitamin D can be obtained from fortified food, oily fish, vitamin D supplements, and artificial sources of UVB radiation.

  20. A research review on clinical needs, technical requirements, and normativity in the design of surgical robots.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Carlos Eduardo; Fernández, Roemi; Armada, Manuel; García, Felipe

    2017-01-20

    Nowadays robots play an important role in society, mainly due to the significant benefits they provide when utilized for assisting human beings in the execution of dangerous or repetitive tasks. Medicine is one of the fields in which robots are gaining greater use and development, especially those employed in minimally invasive surgery (MIS). However, due to the particular conditions of the human body where robots have to act, the design of these systems is complex, not only from a technical point of view, but also because the clinical needs and the normativity aspects are important considerations that have to be taken into account in order to achieve better performances and more secure systems for patients and surgeons. Thus, this paper explores the clinical needs and the technical requirements that will trace the roadmap for the next scientific and technological advances in the field of robotic surgery, the metrics that should be defined for safe technology development and the standards that are being elaborated for boosting the industry and facilitating systems integration.

  1. A Review of Engine Seal Performance and Requirements for Current and Future Army Engine Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Proctor, Margaret P.

    2008-01-01

    Sand ingestion continues to impact combat ground and air vehicles in military operations in the Middle East. The T-700 engine used in Apache and Blackhawk helicopters has been subjected to increased overhauls due to sand and dust ingestion during desert operations. Engine component wear includes compressor and turbine blades/vanes resulting in decreased engine power and efficiency. Engine labyrinth seals have also been subjected to sand and dust erosion resulting in tooth tip wear, increased clearances, and loss in efficiency. For the current investigation, a brief overview is given of the history of the T-700 engine development with respect to sand and dust ingestion requirements. The operational condition of labyrinth seals taken out of service from 4 different locations of the T-700 engine during engine overhauls are examined. Collaborative efforts between the Army and NASA to improve turbine engine seal leakage and life capability are currently focused on noncontacting, low leakage, compliant designs. These new concepts should be evaluated for their tolerance to sand laden air. Future R&D efforts to improve seal erosion resistance and operation in desert environments are recommended

  2. International requirements for consent in biobank research: qualitative review of research guidelines.

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, Irene; Kahrass, Hannes; Strech, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Several stakeholders in the field of biobank research are currently developing and evaluating innovative consent procedures, and in doing so refer to national and international guidelines that regulate biomedical research. The objectives of this study were to present (1) a synthesis of all consent issues mentioned or required in guidelines that are of potential relevance to biobank research and (2) a detailed overview of similarities and differences between these guidelines. This analysis considered a purposive sample of the nine most internationally recognised research guidelines plus a national checklist for developing consent forms. The synthesis of all included research guidelines found 41 issues of potential relevance to consent procedures in biobank research. The guidelines differ substantially with respect to (1) how comprehensively they address these consent issues, (2) their definition and explanation of the issues and (3) how directly or indirectly the issues are mentioned. The set of 41 consent issues presented in this paper should be further developed in a continuous process. Our findings on the differences among major research guidelines also raise the issue of a more systematic development and revision process for these guidelines. The presented set of content issues potentially relevant to consent in biobank research can inform the balanced development or evaluation of consent forms, as well as the development and revision of corresponding research guidelines.

  3. A review of US EPA and FDA requirements for electronic records, electronic signatures, and electronic submissions.

    PubMed

    Keatley, K L

    1999-01-01

    Both the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have issued regulatory documents that address the issues and requirements concerning electronic reporting to the Agencies. EPA has published two comprehensive and useful electronic data interchange (EDI) guidelines: 1) the EPA Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Implementation Guideline, Draft of September 23, 1994 and October 18, 1994 that is available at the following EPA web site address: www.epa.gov/oppeedi1/guidelines/general.pdf and 2) the Interim Final Notice, Filing of Electronic Reports via Electronic Data Interchange, September 4, 1996, Federal Register Notice [FRL-5601-4, Volume 61, Number 172, page 46684], also available at: www.epa.gov/oppeedi1/edipoli.htm. The FDA has published a guidance document titled, "Guidance for Industry, Computerized Systems Used in Clinical Trials, April 1999" that is available at FDA's web site: www.fda.gov/ora/compliance_ref/bimo/ffinalcct.++ +htm. FDA's guidance document addresses a number of issues for electronic records that are applicable to all areas of GLP compliance. Another FDA document presently under development is titled, "Electronic Standards for the Transmission of Regulatory Information (ESTRI) Gateway." The ESTRI document defines strategic plans for electronic submissions to FDA. FDA has published a guidance document in this area titled, "Guidance for Industry: Providing Regulatory Submissions in Electronic Format--General Considerations, January 1999." This guidance document is available at: www.fda.gov/cder/guidance/index.htm. FDA has also published an important final rule applicable to all electronic records and signatures that is part of the U.S. Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 11, titled, "FDA's Final Rule, Electronic Records; Electronic Signatures, effective August 20, 1997." This FDA ruling is discussed below and is available at: www.fda.gov/cder/esig/index.htm.

  4. Improvements Needed in U.S. Special Operations Command Global Battlestaff and Program Support Contract Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-26

    Acquisition Regulation GBPS Global Battlestaff and Program Support IDIQ Indefinite-Delivery Indefinite-Quantity PMR Procurement Management Review...Procurement Management Review ( PMR ). We requested documentation to support these actions. USSOCOM officials responded and stated they provided... PMRs . However, USSOCOM officials stated no metrics have been established to assess compliance with FAR requirements to perform fair and reasonable

  5. A review of the literature pertaining to the efficacy, safety, educational requirements, uses and usage of mechanical adjusting devices

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Shane H; Arnold, Nicole D; Biggs, Lesley; Colloca, Christopher J; Mierau, Dale R; Symons, Bruce P; Triano, John J

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, mechanical adjusting devices (MADs) were a major source of debate within the Chiropractors’ Association of Saskatchewan (CAS). Since Saskatchewan was the only jurisdiction in North America to prohibit the use of MADs, the CAS established a committee in 2001 to review the literature on MADs. The committee evaluated the literature on the efficacy, safety, and uses of moving stylus instruments within chiropractic practice, and the educational requirements for chiropractic practice. Following the rating criteria for the evaluation of evidence, as outlined in the Clinical Guidelines for Chiropractic Practice in Canada (1994), the committee reviewed 55 articles – all of which pertained to the Activator. Of the 55 articles, 13 were eliminated from the final study. Of the 42 remaining articles, 6 were rated as class 1 evidence; 11 were rated as class 2 evidence and 25 were rated as class 3 evidence. In this article – the first in a series of two – the background and the methods utilized by the MAD committee’s activities are described, as well as the results for the review of the literature on efficacy. Of the 21 articles related to efficacy, five were identified as Class 1 evidence; 4 were identified as Class 2 evidence; and 12 were identified as Class 3. Overall, the committee reached consensus that the MAD procedures using the Activator were as effective as manual (HVLA) procedures in producing clinical benefit and biological change. A minority report was also written, arguing that there was not enough evidence to support or refute the efficacy of MADs. PMID:17549220

  6. Involvement of pmrAB and phoPQ in Polymyxin B Adaptation and Inducible Resistance in Non-Cystic Fibrosis Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Schurek, Kristen N.; Sampaio, Jorge L. M.; Kiffer, Carlos R. V.; Sinto, Sumiko; Mendes, Caio M. F.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2009-01-01

    During investigation of susceptibility testing methods for polymyxins, 24 multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were observed to have a distinct, reproducible phenotype in which skipped wells were observed during broth microdilution testing for polymyxin B. Possible mechanisms underlying this phenotype were investigated. The effects of various concentrations of polymyxin B on growth, the expression of resistance genes, and outer-membrane permeability were observed. Real-time PCR was performed to compare the expression, in response to selected concentrations of polymyxin B, of genes related to the PhoP-PhoQ and PmrA-PmrB two-component regulatory systems in polymyxin B-susceptible isolate PAO1, polymyxin B-resistant isolate 9BR, and two isolates (19BR and 213BR) exhibiting the skipped-well phenotype. 19BR and 213BR appeared to have similar basal levels of expression compared to that of PAO1 for phoQ, arnB, and PA4773 (from the pmrAB operon), and in contrast, 9BR had 52- and 280-fold higher expression of arnB and PA4773, respectively. The expression of arnB and PA4773 increased in response to polymyxin B in a concentration-dependent manner for 9BR but not for 19BR and 213BR. For these isolates, expression was significantly increased for arnB and PA4773, as well as phoQ, only upon exposure to 2 μg/ml polymyxin B but not at a lower concentration of 0.125 μg/ml. The sequencing of the pmrAB and phoPQ operons for all three isolates revealed a number of unique mutations compared to that for PAO1. 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN) was used to study the effect of preincubation with polymyxin B on the self-promoted uptake of polymyxin B across the outer membrane. The preincubation of cells with 2 μg/ml polymyxin B affected baseline membrane permeability in 19BR and 213BR and also resulted in a reduced rate of NPN uptake in these isolates and in PAO1 but not in 9BR. The results presented here suggest that the skipped-well isolates have the ability to

  7. Thermo-Oxidative Stability of Graphite/PMR-15 Composites: Effect of Fiber Surface Modification on Composite Shear Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopolous, Demetrios S.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to establish a correlation between the weight loss of a polyimide (PMR- 15) matrix and graphite fibers and the in-plane shear properties of their unidirectional composites subjected to different isothermal aging times up to 1000 hr at 316 C. The role of fiber surface treatment on the composite degradation during the thermo-oxidative aging was investigated by using A4 graphite fibers with three surface modifications: untreated (AU-4), surface treated (AS-4), and surface treated and sized with an epoxy-compatible sizing (AS-4G). The weight loss of the matrix fibers, and composites was determined during the aging. The effect of thermal aging was seen in all the fiber samples in terms of weight loss and reduction in fiber diameter. Calculated values of weight loss fluxes for different surfaces of rectangular unidirectional composite plates showed that the largest weight loss occurred at those cut surfaces where fibers were perpendicular to the surface. Consequently, the largest amount of damage was also noted on these cut surfaces. Optical observation of the neat matrix and composite plates subjected to different aging times revealed that the degradation (such as matrix microcracking and void growth) occurred in a thin surface layer near the specimen edges. The in-plane shear modulus of the composites was unaffected by the fiber surface treatment and the thermal aging. The shear strength of the composites with the untreated fibers was the lowest and it decreased with aging. A fracture surface examination of the composites with untreated fibers suggested that the weak interface allowed the oxidation reaction to proceed along the interface and thus expose the inner material to further oxidation. The results indicated that the fiber-matrix interface affected the composite degradation process during its thermal aging and that the the weak interface accelerated the composite degradation.

  8. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  9. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  10. Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    CD REVIEWS (346) Spectrum 7 Physics - Waves SOFTWARE REVIEW (347) Sound Packages BOOK REVIEW (350) Measured Tones, 2nd edition WEB WATCH (351) What’s the frequency, Kenneth? BOOK REVIEW (354) We know what you did last summer ... now do something better this summer

  11. Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-07-01

    A-LEVEL RESOURCES REVIEWS SPECIAL AS and A2 books and resources: deciding what to buy? SUMMARY Exam boards, specifications and support materials OCR (Oxford Cambridge and RSA Examinations) CORRECTION BOOK REVIEW Good Practice in Science Teaching WEB WATCH Astronomy and cosmology DVD REVIEW The Video Encyclopedia of Physics Demonstrations SOFTWARE REVIEW Graph Paper Printer

  12. Introducing malaria rapid diagnostic tests in private medicine retail outlets: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Theodoor; Bruxvoort, Katia; Maloney, Kathleen; Leslie, Toby; Barat, Lawrence M.; Allan, Richard; Ansah, Evelyn K.; Anyanti, Jennifer; Boulton, Ian; Clarke, Siân E.; Cohen, Jessica L.; Cohen, Justin M.; Cutherell, Andrea; Dolkart, Caitlin; Eves, Katie; Fink, Günther; Goodman, Catherine; Hutchinson, Eleanor; Lal, Sham; Mbonye, Anthony; Onwujekwe, Obinna; Petty, Nora; Pontarollo, Julie; Poyer, Stephen; Schellenberg, David; Streat, Elizabeth; Ward, Abigail; Wiseman, Virginia; Whitty, Christopher J. M.; Yeung, Shunmay; Cunningham, Jane; Chandler, Clare I. R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Many patients with malaria-like symptoms seek treatment in private medicine retail outlets (PMR) that distribute malaria medicines but do not traditionally provide diagnostic services, potentially leading to overtreatment with antimalarial drugs. To achieve universal access to prompt parasite-based diagnosis, many malaria-endemic countries are considering scaling up malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in these outlets, an intervention that may require legislative changes and major investments in supporting programs and infrastructures. This review identifies studies that introduced malaria RDTs in PMRs and examines study outcomes and success factors to inform scale up decisions. Methods Published and unpublished studies that introduced malaria RDTs in PMRs were systematically identified and reviewed. Literature published before November 2016 was searched in six electronic databases, and unpublished studies were identified through personal contacts and stakeholder meetings. Outcomes were extracted from publications or provided by principal investigators. Results Six published and six unpublished studies were found. Most studies took place in sub-Saharan Africa and were small-scale pilots of RDT introduction in drug shops or pharmacies. None of the studies assessed large-scale implementation in PMRs. RDT uptake varied widely from 8%-100%. Provision of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for patients testing positive ranged from 30%-99%, and was more than 85% in five studies. Of those testing negative, provision of antimalarials varied from 2%-83% and was less than 20% in eight studies. Longer provider training, lower RDT retail prices and frequent supervision appeared to have a positive effect on RDT uptake and provider adherence to test results. Performance of RDTs by PMR vendors was generally good, but disposal of medical waste and referral of patients to public facilities were common challenges. Conclusions Expanding services of PMRs to

  13. Transverse flexural tests as a tool for assessing damage to PMR-15 composites from isothermal aging in air at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    To date, the effect of thermo-oxidative aging on unidirectional composite mechanical properties has been monitored by the measurement of interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and either three or four point longitudinal flexural strength (LFS) of the composites being tested. Both results are affected by the fiber-to-matrix bonding, the former being dependent on the shear resistance of the interface and the latter on the degree of load sharing by the fibers through the fiber/matrix interface. Recently, fiber/matrix interfacial bond strengths have been monitored using a transverse flexural strength (TFS) test method. This test method was used to evaluate the effect of fiber surface treatment on the fiber/matrix bond. The interface bonding was varied in these tests using Hercules A-fibers with three-types of surfaces that produce bonds of poor, better, and good quality. The TFS was found not only to be sensitive to the bonding, but also to the aging time of unidirectional A-fiber/PMR-15 composites. This relationship reflects the mechanism by which the PMR-15 degrades during thermal aging.

  14. Tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is linked to metabolically active cells, and depends on the pmr and mexAB-oprM genes.

    PubMed

    Pamp, Sünje Johanna; Gjermansen, Morten; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-04-01

    Bacteria living as biofilm are frequently reported to exhibit inherent tolerance to antimicrobial compounds, and might therefore contribute to the persistence of infections. Antimicrobial peptides are attracting increasing interest as new potential antimicrobial therapeutics; however, little is known about potential mechanisms, which might contribute to resistance or tolerance development towards these compounds in biofilms. Here we provide evidence that a spatially distinct subpopulation of metabolically active cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is able to develop tolerance to the antimicrobial peptide colistin. On the contrary, biofilm cells exhibiting low metabolic activity were killed by colistin. We demonstrate that the subpopulation of metabolically active cells is able to adapt to colistin by inducing a specific adaptation mechanism mediated by the pmr operon, as well as an unspecific adaptation mechanism mediated by the mexAB-oprM genes. Mutants defective in either pmr-mediated lipopolysaccharide modification or in mexAB-oprM-mediated antimicrobial efflux were not able to develop a tolerant subpopulation in biofilms. In contrast to the observed pattern of colistin-mediated killing in biofilms, conventional antimicrobial compounds such as ciprofloxacin and tetracycline were found to specifically kill the subpopulation of metabolically active biofilm cells, whereas the subpopulation exhibiting low metabolic activity survived the treatment. Consequently, targeting the two physiologically distinct subpopulations by combined antimicrobial treatment with either ciprofloxacin and colistin or tetracycline and colistin almost completely eradicated all biofilm cells.

  15. A comprehensive review on learning curve associated problems in endoscopic vein harvesting and the requirement for a standardised training programme.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Bhuvaneswari; Critchley, William R; Venkateswaran, Rajamiyer V; Barnard, James; Caress, Ann; Fildes, James E; Yonan, Nizar

    2016-04-08

    Endoscopic vein harvesting is becoming one of the most favourable vein harvesting techniques in multiple bypass coronary surgery, due to its short term post-operative benefits with high patient satisfaction. However, long-term graft patency has been both supported and questioned in the literature. Graft failure can be affected by harvesting methods and operator's experience. Endoscopic vein harvesting is associated with a learning curve period, during which the incidence of vein trauma is high due to unfamiliarity with the surgical technique. There is a paucity of structured learning tools for novice practitioners, meaning that training differs significantly between hospital centres. Inconsistent training methods can lead to poor surgical technique, which can have a significant impact on vein quality and stress level of the practitioner. In turn, this can lead to increased postoperative complications and longer surgical duration. The main aim of this literature review is to understand the impact of the learning curve on the vein conduit and whether there is a requirement for a standardised training programme for the novice practitioners.

  16. Review of the Constellation Level II Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Documents during Participation in the Constellation Level II SR&QA Forum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, Kenneth D.; Gentz, Steven J.; Beil, Robert J.; Minute, Stephen A.; Currie, Nancy J.; Scott, Steven S.; Thomas, Walter B., III; Smiles, Michael D.; Schafer, Charles F.; Null, Cynthia H.; Bay, P. Michael

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) and the Constellation Program (CxP) Safety, Reliability; and Quality Assurance (SR&QA) Requirements Director, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) participated in the Cx SR&QA Requirements forum. The Requirements Forum was held June 24-26; 2008, at GRC's Plum Brook Facility. The forums purpose was to gather all stakeholders into a focused meeting to help complete the process of refining the CxP to refine its Level II SR&QA requirements or defining project-specific requirements tailoring. Element prime contractors had raised specific questions about the wording and intent of many requirements in areas they felt were driving costs without adding commensurate value. NESC was asked to provide an independent and thorough review of requirements that contractors believed were driving Program costs, by active participation in the forum. This document contains information from the forum.

  17. 75 FR 22805 - Submission for OMB Review; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-One-Time Reporting Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act--One-Time Reporting Requirements for Prime Contractors AGENCIES... Recovery and Reinvestment Act--One-time Reporting Requirements for Prime Contractors published in...

  18. Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schodde, P.; Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews 17 books and curriculum materials of interest to secondary science teachers. Topics include plant science, pollution, fishes, science investigations, general zoology, neurobiology, electronics, and the environment. (MLH)

  19. Impact of a Revised Curriculum Focusing on Clinical Neurology and Musculoskeletal Care on a Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

    PubMed Central

    Faulk, Clinton E.; Harrell, Kelly M.; Lawson, Luan E.; Moore, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. A Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) Clerkship was found to increase students' knowledge of PM&R; however the students' overall rotation evaluations were consistently lower than the other 8 required clerkships at the medical school. Objective. To describe the impact of a revised curriculum based upon Entrustable Professional Activities and focusing on basic pain management, musculoskeletal care, and neurology. Setting. Academic Medical Center. Participants. 73 fourth-year medical students. Methods. The curriculum changes included a shift in the required readings from rehabilitation specific topics toward more general content in the areas of clinical neurology and musculoskeletal care. Hands-on workshops on neurological and musculoskeletal physical examination techniques, small group case-based learning, an anatomy clinical correlation lecture, and a lecture on pain management were integrated into the curriculum. Main Outcome Measurements. Student evaluations of the clerkship. Results. Statistically significant improvements were found in the students' evaluations of usefulness of lecturers, development of patient interviewing skills, and diagnostic and patient management skills (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions. This study suggests that students have a greater satisfaction with a required PM&R clerkship when lecturers utilize a variety of pedagogic methods to teach basic pain, neurology and musculoskeletal care skills in the rehabilitation setting rather than rehabilitation specific content. PMID:28025624

  20. Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    CD-ROM REVIEWS (449) It's Physics Furry Elephant: Electricity Explained BOOK REVIEWS (450) What Are the Chances? Voodoo Deaths, Office Gossip and Other Adventures in Probability Dictionary of Mechanics: A handbook for teachers and students Intermediate 2 Physics PLACES TO VISIT (452) Spaceguard Centre WEB WATCH (455) Risk

  1. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews three computer software packages for Apple II computers. Includes "Simulation of Hemoglobin Function,""Solution Equilibrium Problems," and "Thin-Layer Chromatography." Contains ratings of ease of use, subject matter content, pedagogic value, and student reaction according to two separate reviewers for each…

  2. Toward a risk assessment of the spent fuel and high-level nuclear waste disposal system. Risk assessment requirements, literature review, methods evaluation: an interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Hill, D.; Rowe, M.D.; Stern, E.

    1986-04-01

    This report provides background information for a risk assessment of the disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). It contains a literature review, a survey of the statutory requirements for risk assessment, and a preliminary evaluation of methods. The literature review outlines the state of knowledge of risk assessment and accident consequence analysis in the nuclear fuel cycle and its applicability to spent fuel and HLW disposal. The survey of statutory requirements determines the extent to which risk assessment may be needed in development of the waste-disposal system. The evaluation of methods reviews and evaluates merits and applicabilities of alternative methods for assessing risks and relates them to the problems of spent fuel and HLW disposal. 99 refs.

  3. 7 CFR 1484.11 - Has the Office of Management and Budget reviewed the paperwork and record keeping requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Has the Office of Management and Budget reviewed the... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN MARKETS FOR AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES General Information § 1484.11 Has the Office of Management and Budget reviewed the paperwork...

  4. 7 CFR 1484.11 - Has the Office of Management and Budget reviewed the paperwork and record keeping requirements...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Has the Office of Management and Budget reviewed the... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS PROGRAMS TO HELP DEVELOP FOREIGN MARKETS FOR AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES General Information § 1484.11 Has the Office of Management and Budget reviewed the paperwork...

  5. Long-term Isothermal Aging Effects on Weight Loss, Compression Properties, and Dimensions of T650-35 Fabric-reinforced PMR-15 Composites-data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Tsuji, Luis; Kamvouris, John; Roberts, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    A cooperative program was conducted with the General Electric Aircraft Engines plant in Evendale, Ohio, to study the effects of long-term isothermal aging at elevated temperatures on compression and thermal durability properties of T650 35 fabric-reinforced PMR 15 composites. This degradation study was conducted over an approximate time period of 3 1/2 yr. The aging temperatures were 204, 260, 288, 316, and 343 C. Specimens of different dimensions were evaluated. Specimens with ratios of the cut edge to total surface area of 0.03 to 0.89 were fabricated and aged. The aged and unaged specimens were tested in compression as specified in Test Method for Compressive Properties of Rigid Plastics (ASTM D695M). Thickness changes, degraded surface layer growth, weight loss, and failure modes were monitored and recorded. All property changes were thickness dependent.

  6. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four software packages available for IBM PC or Apple II. Includes "Graphical Analysis III"; "Space Max: Space Station Construction Simulation"; "Guesstimation"; and "Genetic Engineering Toolbox." Focuses on each packages' strengths in a high school context. (CW)

  7. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenleaf, Floyd; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews eight textbooks, readers, and books. Topics include Latin America, colonial America, the Carolinians, women in French textbooks, the Vikings, the Soviet Union, nineteenth-century Black America, and Ernest Rutherford. (TRS)

  8. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliffe, George; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews three software packages: 1) a package containing 68 programs covering general topics in chemistry; 2) a package dealing with acid-base titration curves and allows for variables to be changed; 3) a chemistry tutorial and drill package. (MVL)

  9. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides a review of both the Apple and IBM versions of ENZPACK, a software package which is designed to assist in the teaching of enzyme kinetics in courses where this topic is treated in some depth. (TW)

  10. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides reviews of four computer software packages designed for use in science education. Describes courseware dealing with a variety of tips for teaching physics concepts, chemical reactions in an aqueous solution, mitosis and meiosis, and photosynthesis. (TW)

  11. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Reviews seven software programs: (1) "Science Baseball: Biology" (testing a variety of topics); (2) "Wildways: Understanding Wildlife Conservation"; (3) "Earth Science Computer Test Bank"; (4) "Biology Computer Test Bank"; (5) "Computer Play & Learn Series" (a series of drill and test…

  12. 75 FR 17919 - Submission for OMB Review; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-One-time Reporting Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ...; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act--One-time Reporting Requirements for Prime Contractors AGENCY... collection requirement concerning the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act--One-time Reporting Requirements... information on those who are to respond, through the use of appropriate technological collection techniques...

  13. Report: EPA Regional Offices Need to More Consistently Conduct Required Annual Reviews of Clean Water State Revolving Funds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #16-P-0222, July 7, 2016. Conducting annual reviews in accordance with applicable guidance allows EPA regions to assess state CWSRF performance, and provide for better use of the billions of dollars in CWSRF funding.

  14. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repak, Arthur J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Computer software, audiovisuals, and books are reviewed. Includes topics on interfacing, ionic equilibrium, space, the classification system, Acquired Immune Disease Syndrome, evolution, human body processes, energy, pesticides, teaching school, cells, and geological aspects. Availability, price, and a description of each are provided. (RT)

  15. Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-05-01

    DISTANCE-LEARNING COURSES (263) Planetary Science and Astronomy BOOK REVIEWS (263) A New Kind of Science Planetary Science: The Science of Planets Around Stars EQUIPMENT (265) The Science Enhancement Program (SEP) Geiger Counter WEB WATCH (265) Revision sites SOFTWARE (267) Exploration of Physics Volume 1

  16. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Robert J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four organic chemistry computer programs and three books. Software includes: (1) NMR Simulator 7--for IBM or Macintosh, (2) Nucleic Acid Structure and Synthesis--for IBM, (3) Molecular Design Editor--for Apple II, and (4) Synthetic Adventure--for Apple II and IBM. Book topics include physical chemistry, polymer pioneers, and the basics of…

  17. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Jennifer L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews multicultural books under the subject categories of history, biography, social sciences, reference, juvenile works, and nonprint materials, with subcategories where appropriate (for example, age-group categories for children's books). Thesaurus citations in the author index indicate relevant ethnic groups, races, religions, and geographic…

  18. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Reviews a software planetarium package called "Sky Travel." Includes two audiovisuals: "Conquest of Space" and "Windows on Science: Earth Science"; and four books: "Small Energy Sources: Choices that Work,""Stonehenge Complete,""Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science…

  19. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews three computer software packages for chemistry education including "Osmosis and Diffusion" and "E.M.E. Titration Lab" for Apple II and "Simplex-V: An Interactive Computer Program for Experimental Optimization" for IBM PC. Summary ratings include ease of use, content, pedagogic value, student reaction, and…

  20. Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Presents information and concerns regarding computer courseware, books, and audiovisual materials reviewed by teachers. Covers a variety of topics including dissection of common classroom specimens, medicine, acid rain projects, molecules, the water cycle, erosion, plankton, and evolution. Notes on availability, price, and needed equipment, where…

  1. 75 FR 17918 - Submission for OMB Review; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-One-Time Reporting Requirements...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ...; American Recovery and Reinvestment Act--One-Time Reporting Requirements for First-Tier Subcontractors...--One-time Reporting Requirements for First-tier Subcontractors. A request for public comments was... technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. DATES: Submit comments on...

  2. Standardisation of delivery and assessment of research training for specialty trainees based on curriculum requirements: recommendations based on a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Pitchford, James; Williams, Penny; Wood, Brian; Robson, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives (1) To conduct a scoping review of postgraduate specialty training (ST) curricula for doctors within Health Education England in order to identify common themes and variations in requirements for training and assessment of research competencies. (2) To make recommendations on standardisation of training for clinical research across ST programmes. Setting Health Education England North East and National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network (CRN)—North East and North Cumbria. Methods Annual Review of Competence Progression (ARCP); Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) checklists and curricula for ST were obtained from Health Education England North East and reviewed between June and September 2015. Research competence requirements based on knowledge, skills or behaviour-based domains were identified and entered onto a spreadsheet for analysis. Common themes with levels of competence required were identified. This information was used to construct and propose a model for delivery of training in clinical research across ST programmes. Results Sixty-two ST curricula were reviewed and seven common themes for research training were found in up to 97% of the curricula. Requirement for good clinical practice (GCP) in research training was included in 15% of curricula. One of the common themes involved knowledge-based competency, and three each of the remaining seven involved skills or behaviour-based competencies. There was less clarity and larger variation between specialties in how research competencies were assessed; and what evidence was required for ARCP and CCT to assure competence. 63% (19/30) of curricula from medical specialties had no mention of research requirements within their ARCP guidelines. Conclusions Given that the majority of specialty curricula contain consistent themes around core research knowledge, consideration should be given to standardising the delivery and assessment of generic research competencies within ST

  3. 75 FR 81998 - Meeting of the Independent Panel To Review the Judge Advocate Requirements of the Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meetings; correction. SUMMARY: The Independent Panel to Review... Panel) published a document in the Federal Register of December 17, 2010, concerning an open meeting... Doc. 2010-32758 Filed 12-28-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 3810-FF-P...

  4. Assessment of Soil Moisture Data Requirements by the Potential SMAP Data User Community: Review of SMAP Mission User Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Escobar, Vanessa M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission is planned for launch in October 2014 and will provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze thaw state. The project is driven by both basic research and applied science goals. Understanding how application driven end-users will apply SMAP data, prior to the satellite's launch, is an important goal of NASA's applied science program and SMAP mission success. Because SMAP data are unique, there are no direct proxy data sets that can be used in research and operational studies to determine how the data will interact with existing processes. The objective of this study is to solicit data requirements, accuracy needs, and current understanding of the SMAP mission from the potential user community. This study showed that the data to be provided by the SMAP mission did substantially meet the user community needs. Although there was a broad distribution of requirements stated, the SMAP mission fit within these requirements.

  5. 77 FR 56565 - Independent Review of Applications Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... Applications Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In accordance with Section 304 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of... APEC and RORA and the Department, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, Public Law 111-296,...

  6. 34 CFR 222.95 - How are Indian policies and procedures reviewed to ensure compliance with the requirements in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ensure compliance with the requirements in section 8004(a) of the Act? 222.95 Section 222.95 Education... Children Residing on Indian Lands Indian Policies and Procedures § 222.95 How are Indian policies and... comply with the provisions of section 8004(a) and § 222.94. (b) If the Director determines either...

  7. Propagation Techniques and Agronomic Requirements for the Cultivation of Barbados Aloe (Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F.)—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cristiano, Giuseppe; Murillo-Amador, Bernardo; De Lucia, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Barbados aloe (Aloe vera (L.) Burm. F.) has traditionally been used for healing in natural medicine. However, aloe is now attracting great interest in the global market due to its bioactive chemicals which are extracted from the leaves and used in industrial preparations for pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food products. Aloe originated from tropical and sub-tropical Africa, but it is also now cultivated in warm climatic areas of Asia, Europe, and America. In this review, the most important factors affecting aloe production are described. We focus on propagation techniques, sustainable agronomic practices and efficient post harvesting and processing systems. PMID:27721816

  8. Evaluating the effectiveness of exercise training on elderly patients who require haemodialysis: study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Ryota; Hoshi, Keika; Yoneki, Kei; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As the average age of haemodialysis patients rapidly increases around the world, the number of frail, elderly patients has increased. Frailty is well known to be an indicator of disability and a poor prognosis for haemodialysis patients. Exercise interventions have been safely and successfully implemented for middle-aged or younger patients undergoing haemodialysis. However, the benefits of exercise interventions on elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis remain controversial. The main objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of exercise training on the physical function, exercise capacity and quality of life of elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis, and to provide an update on the relevant evidence. Methods and analyses Published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the effectiveness of exercise training on haemodialysis patients with respect to physical function, exercise tolerance and quality of life will be included. Bibliographic databases include MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO and PEDro. The risk of bias of the included RCTs will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool and TESTEX. The primary outcome will be physical function and exercise tolerance. This review protocol is reported according to the PRISMA-P 2015 checklist. Statistical analysis will be performed using review manager software (RevMan V.5.3, Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, England). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required because this study does not include confidential personal data nor does it perform interventions on patients. This review is expected to inform readers on the effectiveness of exercise training in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis. Findings will be presented at conferences and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. PROSPERO registration number CRD42015020701

  9. Discrimination and Proper Use of Polygoni Multiflori Radix, Cynanchi Wilfordii Radix, and Cynanchi Auriculati Radix in Korea: A Descriptive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Beom-Joon; Lee, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    Polygoni Multiflori Radix (PMR), Cynanchi Wilfordii Radix (CWR), and Cynanchi Auriculati Radix (CAR) are very popular herbal medicines in Traditional Korean Medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Kampo Medicine. However, the plant origins, efficacies, and traditional uses of these herbal medicines differ. In Korea, PMR is called Ha Su O (He Shou Wu in China), and CWR is called Baek Ha Su O or Baek Su O (Bai Shou Wu in China). Baek Su O refers to CWR in Korea and CAR in China. CAR has not been used as a traditional herbal medicine, and it cannot be legally used as a food or food ingredient in Korea. However, CAR is cultivated in Korea and imported from China. Because the morphology of CWR and CAR is very similar, they are often confused and misused in Korea. This review discusses the reasons for the confusion and misuse of these substances in Korea and provides the exact plant origins, efficacies, uses, components, and toxicities of PMR, CWR, and CAR so that they can be correctly understood and used. PMID:26539235

  10. Moving the worksite health promotion profession forward: is the time right for requiring standards? A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Cecilia; English, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Standards in any profession are adopted to assure that the individuals hired are adequately trained and the programs that they oversee are of the highest quality. Worksite health promotion should be no different from any other field. A review of the research conducted by experts in worksite health promotion is examined, along with an assessment of skills needed to ensure that wellness programs are effective and employees, their families, and even their communities are educated on the ways to best prevent chronic diseases and occupational incidences through healthy and safe behaviors. This article is consistent with Health Promotion Practice's mission and focuses on the exploration of the processes used to plan effective worksite health promotion programs, and it suggests initial discussions on whether these processes should become standards for professionals in the worksite health promotion field.

  11. Cardiac failure in very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) treatment: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Katz, Sharon; Landau, Yuval; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Pessach, Itai M; Rubinshtein, Marina; Anikster, Yair; Salem, Yishay; Paret, Gideon

    2017-03-01

    Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) defects often present with multi-system involvement, including several life-threatening cardiac manifestations, such as cardiomyopathy, pericardial effusion and arrhythmias. We report herein a fatal case of cardiac dysfunction and rapid-onset tamponade following an acute illness in a neonate with molecularly proven very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency (harboring the known del799_802 mutation), requiring 15 days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) treatment. As data regarding the use of ECMO in FAO defects in general, and VLCAD in particular, are scarce, we review the literature and discuss insights from in vitro models and several successful reported cases.

  12. The effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model, for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with the increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  13. Effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Roberts, G. D.; Papadopoulos, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  14. Properties of M40J Carbon/PMR-II-50 Composites Fabricated with Desized and Surface Treated Fibers. Characterization of M40J Desized and Finished Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald E.; Gosau, Jan M.; Shin, E. Eugene; McCorkle, Linda S.; Sutter, James K.; OMalley, Michelle; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    To increase performance and durability of high temperature composites for potential rocket engine components, it is necessary to optimize wetting and interfacial bonding between high modulus carbon fibers and high temperature polyimide resins. It has been previously demonstrated that the electro-oxidative shear treatments used by fiber manufacturers are not effective on higher modulus fibers that have fewer edge and defect sites in the surface crystallites. In addition, sizings commercially supplied on most carbon fibers are not compatible with polyimides. This study was an extension of prior work characterizing the surface chemistry and energy of high modulus carbon fibers (M40J and M60J, Torray) with typical fluorinated polyimide resins, such as PMR-II-50. A continuous desizing system which utilizes environmentally friendly chemical- mechanical processes was developed for tow level fiber and the processes were optimized based on weight loss behavior, surface elemental composition (XPS) and morphology (FE-SEM) analyses, and residual tow strength of the fiber, and the similar approaches have been applied on carbon fabrics. Both desized and further treated with a reactive finish were investigated for the composite reinforcement. The effects of desizing and/or subsequent surface retreatment on carbon fiber on composite properties and performance including fiber-matrix interfacial mechanical properties, thermal properties and blistering onset behavior will be discussed in this presentation.

  15. A Critical Review of Biosimilars in IBD: The Confluence of Biologic Drug Development, Regulatory Requirements, Clinical Outcomes, and Big Business.

    PubMed

    Ha, Christina Y; Kornbluth, Asher

    2016-10-01

    On February 9, 2016, the Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee recommended by a vote of 21 to 3, that the biosimilar to infliximab, CT-P13, be approved for rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis and, by extrapolation, for all the indications for which infliximab is currently approved, including adult and pediatric ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. On April 5, 2016, the Food and Drug Administration concurred with this recommendation and approved CT-P13 (Inflectra; Pfizer Inc.) for all diseases for which infliximab had previously been approved, including adult and pediatric moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and pediatric and adult moderate to severe and fistulizing Crohn's disease. This was despite the absence of any randomized controlled trials studying the infliximab biosimilar in any inflammatory bowel disease. This highly controversial approach has been criticized by various rheumatology and gastroenterology professional societies around the world. This review will cover the stepwise approach to biosimilar development, issues of extrapolation and interchangeability, and conclude with a discussion of the regulatory, intellectual property issues, and financial implications, which will all intersect in the decision and ability to prescribe a biosimilar or reference anti-tumor necrosis factor drug.

  16. Kava and kava hepatotoxicity: requirements for novel experimental, ethnobotanical and clinical studies based on a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Teschke, Rolf; Qiu, Samuel X; Xuan, Tran Dang; Lebot, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    Kava hepatotoxicity is a well described disease entity, yet there is uncertainty as to the culprit(s). In particular, there is so far no clear evidence for a causative role of kavalactones and non-kavalactone constituents, such as pipermethystine and flavokavain B, identified from kava. Therefore, novel enzymatic, analytical, toxicological, ethnobotanical and clinical studies are now required. Studies should focus on the identification of further potential hepatotoxic constituents, considering in particular possible adulterants and impurities with special reference to ochratoxin A and aflatoxins (AFs) producing Aspergillus varieties, which should be urgently assessed and published. At present, Aspergillus and other fungus species producing hepatotoxic mycotoxins have not yet been examined thoroughly as possible contaminants of some kava raw materials. Its occurence may be facilitated by high humidity, poor methods for drying procedures and insufficient storage facilities during the time after harvest. Various experimental studies are recommended using aqueous, acetonic and ethanolic kava extracts derived from different plant parts, such as peeled rhizomes and peeled roots including their peelings, and considering both noble and non-noble kava cultivars. In addition, ethnobotanical studies associated with local expertise and surveillance are required to achieve a good quality of kava as the raw material. In clinical trials of patients with anxiety disorders seeking herbal anxiolytic treatment with kava extracts, long-term safety and efficacy should be tested using traditional aqueous extracts obtained from peeled rhizomes and peeled roots of a noble kava cultivar, such as Borogu, to evaluate the risk: benefit ratio. Concomitantly, more research should be conducted on the bioavailability of kavalactones and non-kavalactones derived from aqueous kava extracts. To be on the side of caution and to ensure lack of liver injury, kava consuming inhabitants of the kava

  17. Extraordinary Claims Require Extraordinary Evidence: The Case of Non-Local Perception, a Classical and Bayesian Review of Evidences

    PubMed Central

    Tressoldi, Patrizio E.

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the famous phrase “extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence,” we will present the evidence supporting the concept that human visual perception may have non-local properties, in other words, that it may operate beyond the space and time constraints of sensory organs, in order to discuss which criteria can be used to define evidence as extraordinary. This evidence has been obtained from seven databases which are related to six different protocols used to test the reality and the functioning of non-local perception, analyzed using both a frequentist and a new Bayesian meta-analysis statistical procedure. According to a frequentist meta-analysis, the null hypothesis can be rejected for all six protocols even if the effect sizes range from 0.007 to 0.28. According to Bayesian meta-analysis, the Bayes factors provides strong evidence to support the alternative hypothesis (H1) over the null hypothesis (H0), but only for three out of the six protocols. We will discuss whether quantitative psychology can contribute to defining the criteria for the acceptance of new scientific ideas in order to avoid the inconclusive controversies between supporters and opponents. PMID:21713069

  18. Effects of thermal and mechanical fatigue on the flexural strength of G40-600/PMR-15 cross-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Ho, Barry Ping Hsiao; Wallace, John F.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of thermal and mechanical fatigue on the flexural strength of G40-600/PMR-15 cross-ply laminates with ply orientation of (0(2),90(2))2S and (90(2),0(2))2S are examined. The relative importance of shear and tensile stresses is examined by varying the span-to-depth ratios of flexural test specimens from 8 to 45. Acoustic emission signals are measured during the flexural tests in order to monitor the initiation and growth of damage. Optical microscopy is used to examine specimens for resin cracking, delamination, and fiber breaks after testing. Transverse matrix cracks and delaminations occur in all specimens, regardless of ply orientation, span-to-depth ratio, or previous exposure of specimens to thermal and mechanical fatigue. A small amount of fiber tensile fracture occurs in the outer 0 deg ply of specimens with high span-to-depth ratios. Because of the complex failure modes, the flexural test results represent the 'apparent' strengths rather than the true flexural or shear strengths for these cross-ply laminates. Thermal cycling of specimens prior to flexural testing does not reduce the apparent flexural strength or change the mode of failure. However, fewer acoustic events are recorded at all strains during flexural testing of specimens exposed to prior thermal cycling. High temperature thermal cycling (32 to 260 C, 100 cycles) causes a greater reduction in acoustic events than low temperature thermal cycling (-85 to +85 C, 500 cycles). Mechanical cycling (0 to 50 percent of the flexural strength, 100 cycles) has a similar effect, except that acoustic events are reduced only at strains less than the maximum strain applied during flexural fatigue.

  19. Requirements and Waivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodin, James Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Good requirements are the first step for good communications, and good communications are central to insure an understanding between the customer and contractor. Failure to generate good requirements is unfortunately commonplace and repeated. Waivers to requirements are discussed from a risk based point of view. The assumption that every requirement will eventually be waived is used to establish a critical review of a draft safety requirement. Validation methods of requirements are addressed. Value added that safety requirements contribute to the Project is estimated to further our critical review of draft requirements.

  20. 77 FR 33469 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... submissions (average annual): 38 premarket approval applications (PMA, PDP, PMR, BLA),\\1\\ 3,561 premarket... development protocol, PMR means postmarketing requirements, and BLA means biologics license applications....

  1. Treatment as Required versus Regular Monthly Treatment in the Management of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Christine M.; Rücker, Gerta; Sommer, Harriet; Virgili, Gianni; Loke, Yoon K.; Oeller, Patrick; Agostini, Hansjuergen; Ehlken, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background To investigate whether treatment as required ‘pro re nata’ (PRN) versus regular monthly treatment regimens lead to differences in outcomes in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Regular monthly administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors is an established gold standard treatment, but this approach is costly. Replacement of monthly by PRN treatment can only be justified if there is no difference in patient relevant outcomes. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis. The intervention was PRN treatment and the comparator was monthly treatment with VEGF-inhibitors. Four bibliographic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials comparing both treatment regimens directly (head-to-head studies). The last literature search was conducted in December 2014. Risk of bias assessment was performed after the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Findings We included 3 head-to-head studies (6 reports) involving more than 2000 patients. After 2 years, the weighted mean difference in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 1.9 (95% CI 0.5 to 3.3) ETDRS letters in favour of monthly treatment. Systemic adverse events were higher in PRN treated patients, but these differences were not statistically significant. After 2 years, the total number of intravitreal injections required by the patients in the PRN arms were 8.4 (95% CI 7.9 to 8.9) fewer than those having monthly treatment. The studies were considered to have a moderate risk of bias. Conclusions PRN treatment resulted in minor but statistically significant decrease in mean BCVA which may not be clinically meaningful. There is a small increase in risk of systemic adverse events for PRN treated patients. Overall, the results indicate that an individualized treatment approach with anti-VEGF using visual acuity and OCT-guided re-treatment criteria may be appropriate for most patients with nAMD. PMID:26368921

  2. A systematic review of the use of dosage form manipulation to obtain required doses to inform use of manipulation in paediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Richey, Roberta H; Hughes, Clare; Craig, Jean V; Shah, Utpal U; Ford, James L; Barker, Catrin E; Peak, Matthew; Nunn, Anthony J; Turner, Mark A

    2017-02-25

    This study sought to determine whether there is an evidence base for drug manipulation to obtain the required dose, a common feature of paediatric clinical practice. A systematic review of the data sources, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, IPA and the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, was used. Studies that considered the dose accuracy of manipulated medicines of any dosage form, evidence of safety or harm, bioavailability, patient experience, tolerability, contamination and comparison of methods of manipulation were included. Case studies and letters were excluded. Fifty studies were eligible for inclusion, 49 of which involved tablets being cut, split, crushed or dispersed. The remaining one study involved the manipulation of suppositories of one drug. No eligible studies concerning manipulation of oral capsules or liquids, rectal enemas, nebuliser solutions, injections or transdermal patches were identified. Twenty four of the tablet studies considered dose accuracy using weight and/or drug content. In studies that considered weight using adapted pharmacopoeial specifications, the percentage of halved tablets meeting these specifications ranged from 30% to 100%. Eighteen studies investigated bioavailability, pharmacokinetics or clinical outcomes following manipulations which included nine delayed or modified release formulations. In each of these nine studies the entirety of the dosage form was administered. Only one of the 18 studies was identified where drugs were manipulated to obtain a proportion of the dosage form, and that proportion administered. The five studies that considered patient perception found that having to manipulate the tablets did not have a negative impact on adherence. Of the 49 studies only two studies reported investigating children. This review yielded limited evidence to support manipulation of medicines for children. The results cannot be extrapolated between dosage forms, methods of manipulation or between different brands of the same

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Antifibrinolytic Agents in Reducing Perioperative Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirements in Scoliosis Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zheng, Xin-Feng; Jiang, Lei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine use of antifibrinolytic agents in spine surgery is still an issue of debate. Objective To gather scientific evidence for the efficacy and safety of antifibrinolytic agents including aprotinin, tranexamic acid (TXA) and epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA, traditionally known as Amicar) in reducing perioperative blood loss and transfusion requirements in scoliosis surgery. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), retrospective case-control studies, and retrospective cohort studies on the use of antifibrinolytic agents in scoliosis surgery by searching in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Controlled Trials of papers published from January 1980 through July 2014. Safety of the antifibrinolytic agents was evaluated in all included studies, while efficacy was evaluated in RCTs. Results Eighteen papers with a total of 1,158 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Among them, 8 RCTs with 450 patients were included for evaluation of pharmacologic efficacy (1 RCT was excluded because of a lack of standard deviation data). Mean blood loss was reduced in patients with perioperative use of antifibrinolytic agents by 409.25 ml intraoperatively (95% confidence interval [CI], 196.57–621.94 ml), 250.30 ml postoperatively (95% CI, 35.31–465.30), and 601.40 ml overall (95% CI, 306.64–896.16 ml). The mean volume of blood transfusion was reduced by 474.98 ml (95% CI, 195.30–754.67 ml). The transfusion rate was 44.6% (108/242) in the patients with antifibrinolytic agents and 68.3% (142/208) in the patients with placebo. (OR 0.38; 95% CI; 0.25–0.58; P<0.00001, I2 = 9%). All studies were included for evaluation of safety, with a total of 8 adverse events reported overall (4 in the experimental group and 4 in the control group). Conclusion The systematic review and meta-analysis indicated that aprotinin, TXA, and EACA all significantly reduced

  4. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  5. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Annabel; Kerr, Cicely; Breheny, Katie; Wild, Diane

    2013-03-11

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  6. Impact of a program combining pre-authorization requirement and post-prescription review of carbapenems: an interrupted time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Delory, T; De Pontfarcy, A; Emirian, A; About, F; Berdougo, B; Brun-Buisson, C; Lesprit, P

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact on carbapenems use of a program combining pre-authorization requirement and systematic post-prescription review of carbapenems prescriptions. The program was implemented in a 1,230-bed teaching tertiary hospital. Monthly carbapenems consumption was analyzed using a controlled interrupted time-series method and compared to that of vancomycin before and after implementation of the intervention. Compared to the pre-intervention period (14 monthly points), a significant and sustained decrease of carbapenems consumption [1.66 defined daily doses (DDD)/1,000 patient-days; p = 0.048] was observed during the intervention period (12 monthly points), despite an increasing trend in incidence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) isolates (0.02/1,000 patient-days per month; p = 0.093). As expected, vancomycin consumption was unaffected by the intervention. A total of 337 prescriptions were reviewed in the intervention period; most were microbiologically documented (81.3%; ESBL-PE: 39.2%). Three of four (76.6%) carbapenems prescriptions were modified within a median [interquartile range] of 2 [1; 4] days, either after infectious disease physician (IDP) advice (48.4%) or by ward physicians (28.2%). Most changes included de-escalating (52.2%) or reducing the planned duration (22.2%), which resulted in a median duration of treatment of only 3 [2; 7] days. The median length of stay and mortality rate were not influenced by the intervention. This reasonably practicable antimicrobial stewardship program including controlled delivery and systematic reevaluation of carbapenems prescriptions was able to reduce their use in our hospital, despite a rising ESBL-PE incidence.

  7. Design Requirements for Annulus Fibrosus Repair: Review of Forces, Displacements, and Material Properties of the Intervertebral Disk and a Summary of Candidate Hydrogels for Repair

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rose G.; Torre, Olivia M.; Hom, Warren W.; Assael, Dylan J.; Iatridis, James C.

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a lack of clinically available solutions to restore functionality to the intervertebral disk (IVD) following herniation injury to the annulus fibrosus (AF). Microdiscectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure to alleviate pain caused by herniation; however, AF defects remain and can lead to accelerated degeneration and painful conditions. Currently available AF closure techniques do not restore mechanical functionality or promote tissue regeneration, and have risk of reherniation. This review determined quantitative design requirements for AF repair materials and summarized currently available hydrogels capable of meeting these design requirements by using a series of systematic PubMed database searches to yield 1500+ papers that were screened and analyzed for relevance to human lumbar in vivo measurements, motion segment behaviors, and tissue level properties. We propose a testing paradigm involving screening tests as well as more involved in situ and in vivo validation tests to efficiently identify promising biomaterials for AF repair. We suggest that successful materials must have high adhesion strength (∼0.2 MPa), match as many AF material properties as possible (e.g., approximately 1 MPa, 0. 3 MPa, and 30 MPa for compressive, shear, and tensile moduli, respectively), and have high tensile failure strain (∼65%) to advance to in situ and in vivo validation tests. While many biomaterials exist for AF repair, few undergo extensive mechanical characterization. A few hydrogels show promise for AF repair since they can match at least one material property of the AF while also adhering to AF tissue and are capable of easy implantation during surgical procedures to warrant additional optimization and validation. PMID:26720265

  8. Basic Energy Sciences Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Basic Energy Sciences, November 3-5, 2015, Rockville, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Aurora; Millis, Andy; Gagliardi, Laura; Panagiotopoulos, Thanos; Siepmann, Ilja; Wolverton, Chris; Vashishta, Priya; Stevens, Mark; Gordon, Mark; Kent, Paul; va DAm, Kerstin Kleese; Proffen, Thomas; Tull, Craig; Diachin, Lori; Sethian, Jamie; Benali, Anouar; Chen, Jackie; Antypas, Katie; Gerber, Richard; Riley, Katherine; Straatsma, Tjerk

    2015-12-31

    Computers have revolutionized every aspect of our lives. Yet in science, the most tantalizing applications of computing lie just beyond our reach. The current quest to build an exascale computer with one thousand times the capability of today’s fastest machines (and more than a million times that of a laptop) will take researchers over the next horizon. The field of materials, chemical reactions, and compounds is inherently complex. Imagine millions of new materials with new functionalities waiting to be discovered — while researchers also seek to extend those materials that are known to a dizzying number of new forms. We could translate massive amounts of data from high precision experiments into new understanding through data mining and analysis. We could have at our disposal the ability to predict the properties of these materials, to follow their transformations during reactions on an atom-by-atom basis, and to discover completely new chemical pathways or physical states of matter. Extending these predictions from the nanoscale to the mesoscale, from the ultrafast world of reactions to long-time simulations to predict the lifetime performance of materials, and to the discovery of new materials and processes will have a profound impact on energy technology. In addition, discovery of new materials is vital to move computing beyond Moore’s law. To realize this vision, more than hardware is needed. New algorithms to take advantage of the increase in computing power, new programming paradigms, and new ways of mining massive data sets are needed as well. This report summarizes the opportunities and the requisite computing ecosystem needed to realize the potential before us. In addition to pursuing new and more complete physical models and theoretical frameworks, this review found that the following broadly grouped areas relevant to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) would directly affect the Basic Energy

  9. Discovering system requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bahill, A.T.; Bentz, B.; Dean, F.F.

    1996-07-01

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirements process. This report provides a high-level overview of the system requirements process, explaining types, sources, and characteristics of good requirements. System requirements, however, are seldom stated by the customer. Therefore, this report shows ways to help you work with your customer to discover the system requirements. It also explains terminology commonly used in the requirements development field, such as verification, validation, technical performance measures, and the various design reviews.

  10. High Energy Physics Exascale Requirements Review. An Office of Science review sponsored jointly by Advanced Scientific Computing Research and High Energy Physics, June 10-12, 2015, Bethesda, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Salman; Roser, Robert; Gerber, Richard; Antypas, Katie; Riley, Katherine; Williams, Tim; Wells, Jack; Straatsma, Tjerk

    2015-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) convened a programmatic Exascale Requirements Review on June 10–12, 2015, in Bethesda, Maryland. This report summarizes the findings, results, and recommendations derived from that meeting. The high-level findings and observations are as follows. JJ Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude — and in some cases greater — than that available currently. JJ The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability of both facilities and researchers to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. JJ Data rates and volumes from experimental facilities are also straining the current HEP infrastructure in its ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. JJ A close integration of high-performance computing (HPC) simulation and data analysis will greatly aid in interpreting the results of HEP experiments. Such an integration will minimize data movement and facilitate interdependent workflows. JJ Long-range planning between HEP and ASCR will be required to meet HEP’s research needs. To best use ASCR HPC resources, the experimental HEP program needs (1) an established, long-term plan for access to ASCR computational and data resources, (2) the ability to map workflows to HPC resources, (3) the ability for ASCR facilities to accommodate workflows run by collaborations potentially comprising thousands of individual members, (4) to transition codes to the next-generation HPC platforms that will be

  11. A Study to Identify and Consolidate Manpower, Personnel and Training Requirements for Materiel Systems at ASARC (Army System Acquisition Review Council) Milestones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    PROGRAM PROGRAM DESCRIPTION ACQUISITION STATUS AD HOC WORKING GROUP (AHWG) ESTABLISHED DEPARTMENT OF ARMY PRELIMINARY REVIEW (DAPR) PRE ASARC ASARC DSARC...ii] PROGRAM PROGRAM DESCRIPTION ,.- Ioc °’[[)" ACQUISITION STATUS AHWG ESTABLISHED DAPR PRE ASARC II ASARC II DSARC II * ASARC I MANNING - ESTIMATE...for "" DSCPER use. 15. i o . *MPT REVIEW PLAN AND QUESTIONS MILESTONE M PROGRAM DATA PROGRAM PROGRAM DESCRIPTION IOC ACQUISITION STATUS AHWG

  12. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six computer software packages including "Lunar Greenhouse,""Dyno-Quest,""How Weather Works,""Animal Trackers,""Personal Science Laboratory," and "The Skeletal and Muscular Systems." Availability, functional, and hardware requirements are discussed. (CW)

  13. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are three computer software packages including "Martin Luther King, Jr.: Instant Replay of History,""Weeds to Trees," and "The New Print Shop, School Edition." Discussed are hardware requirements, costs, grade levels, availability, emphasis, strengths, and weaknesses. (CW)

  14. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnaman, Daniel E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reviews four educational software packages for Apple, IBM, and Tandy computers. Includes "How the West was One + Three x Four,""Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing,""Math and Me," and "Write On." Reviews list hardware requirements, emphasis, levels, publisher, purchase agreements, and price. Discusses the strengths…

  15. A Review of ETS Differential Item Functioning Assessment Procedures: Flagging Rules, Minimum Sample Size Requirements, and Criterion Refinement. Research Report. ETS RR-12-08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is a key component in the evaluation of the fairness and validity of educational tests. The goal of this project was to review the status of ETS DIF analysis procedures, focusing on three aspects: (a) the nature and stringency of the statistical rules used to flag items, (b) the minimum sample size…

  16. Anthropometric Requirements for Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raulu, Sudhakar; Margerum, Sarah; Dory, Jonathan; Rochlis, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the requirement from an Anthropometric standpoint for the development of the Constellation's programs hardware, specifically the Orion crew exploration vehicle. The NASA JSC Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) provides anthropometry, strength, mobility, and mass properties requirements; gathers, interprets, manages and maintains the flight crew anthropometry database; and participates and provides input during crew selection. This is used to assist in requirements for vehicle and space suit design and for crew selection.

  17. Cleaning up hazardous waste disposal sites in the coastal zone: A review of the federal and state legal requirements for remediation at Allen Harbor, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.K.

    1992-04-01

    In many coastal areas past hazardous waste disposal practices have created current pollution problems. Cleanup and restoration of these sites poses significant technical, social, political, and legal questions. The wide diversity of coastal areas and the complexity of various federal, state, and local laws and regulations makes it necessary to focus this review on the specific requirements pertaining to a hazardous waste site investigation being conducted by the Navy at the Naval Construction Battalion Center Davisville, located adjacent to Allen Harbor in Narragansett Bay, RI. The cleanup requirements specified by the Comprehensive Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the National Contingency Plan (NCP) are reviewed in the context of other federal and state laws and regulations including the Glean Water Act (CWA), Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), natural resource protection (fisheries, endangered species, migratory birds, etc.), federal facility agreements (FFA) and Rhode Island statutes which define applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) for remediation. The cleanup requirements common to all coastal disposal sites, the relationship between cleanup and other coastal zone management issues, and the need for development of an effective policy strategy for coastal cleanup projects are presented and discussed.

  18. Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins; Biennial Review of the List of Select Agents and Toxins and Enhanced Biosafety Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-19

    In accordance with the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 (the Bioterrorism Response Act), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has reviewed the list of biological agents and toxins that have the potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. Following the review, HHS has decided: Not to finalize the proposed changes to the list of select agents and toxins at this time; to finalize provisions to address toxin permissible limits and the inactivation of select agents; to finalize specific provisions to the section of the regulations addressing biosafety; and to clarify regulatory language concerning security, training, incident response, and records. In a companion document published in this issue of the Federal Register, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has made parallel regulatory changes.

  19. A review of nuclear data needs and their status for fusion reactor technology with some suggestions on a strategy to satisfy the requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L. ); Cheng, E.T. )

    1991-09-01

    A review was performed on the needs and status of nuclear data for fusion-reactor technology. Generally, the status of nuclear data for fusion has been improved during the past two decades due to the dedicated effort of the nuclear data developers. However, there are still deficiencies in the nuclear data base, particularly in the areas of activation and neutron scattering cross sections. Activation cross sections were found to be unsatisfactory in 83 of the 153 reactions reviewed. The scattering cross sections for fluorine and boron will need to be improved at energies above 1 MeV. Suggestions concerning a strategy to address the specific fusion nuclear data needs for dosimetry and activation are also provided.

  20. Research and Development in the Computer and Information Sciences. Volume 2, Processing, Storage, and Output Requirements in Information Processing Systems: A Selective Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Mary Elizabeth

    Areas of concern with respect to processing, storage, and output requirements of a generalized information processing system are considered. Special emphasis is placed on multiple-access systems. Problems of system management and control are discussed, including hierarchies of storage levels. Facsimile, digital, and mass random access storage…

  1. The Requirements Generation System: A tool for managing mission requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, Sylvia B.

    1994-01-01

    Historically, NASA's cost for developing mission requirements has been a significant part of a mission's budget. Large amounts of time have been allocated in mission schedules for the development and review of requirements by the many groups who are associated with a mission. Additionally, tracing requirements from a current document to a parent document has been time-consuming and costly. The Requirements Generation System (RGS) is a computer-supported cooperative-work tool that assists mission developers in the online creation, review, editing, tracing, and approval of mission requirements as well as in the production of requirements documents. This paper describes the RGS and discusses some lessons learned during its development.

  2. A Review of Major Nursing Vocabularies and the Extent to Which They Have the Characteristics Required for Implementation in Computer-based Systems

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Suzanne Bakken; Warren, Judith J.; Lange, Linda; Button, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Building on the work of previous authors, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) Work Group on Codes and Structures has described features of a classification scheme for implementation within a computer-based patient record. The authors of the current study reviewed the evaluation literature related to six major nursing vocabularies (the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association Taxonomy 1, the Nursing Interventions Classification, the Nursing Outcomes Classification, the Home Health Care Classification, the Omaha System, and the International Classification for Nursing Practice) to determine the extent to which the vocabularies include the CPRI features. None of the vocabularies met all criteria. The Omaha System, Home Health Care Classification, and International Classification for Nursing Practice each included five features. Criteria not fully met by any systems were clear and non-redundant representation of concepts, administrative cross-references, syntax and grammar, synonyms, uncertainty, context-free identifiers, and language independence. PMID:9670127

  3. An evaluation of the documented requirements of the SSP UIL and a review of commercial software packages for the development and testing of UIL prototypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Esther Naomi

    1986-01-01

    A review was conducted of software packages currently on the market which might be integrated with the interface language and aid in reaching the objectives of customization, standardization, transparency, reliability, maintainability, language substitutions, expandability, portability, and flexibility. Recommendations are given for best choices in hardware and software acquisition for inhouse testing of these possible integrations. Software acquisition in the line of tools to aid expert-system development and/or novice program development, artificial intelligent voice technology and touch screen or joystick or mouse utilization as well as networking were recommended. Other recommendations concerned using the language Ada for the user interface language shell because of its high level of standardization, structure, and ability to accept and execute programs written in other programming languages, its DOD ownership and control, and keeping the user interface language simple so that multiples of users will find the commercialization of space within their realm of possibility which is, after all, the purpose of the Space Station.

  4. Power System Concepts for the Lunar Outpost: A Review of the Power Generation, Energy Storage, Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) System Requirements and Potential Technologies for Development of the Lunar Outpost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Z.; Vranis, A.; Zavoico, A.; Freid, S.; Manners, B.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will review potential power system concepts for the development of the lunar outpost including power generation, energy storage, and power management and distribution (PMAD). In particular, the requirements of the initial robotic missions will be discussed and the technologies considered will include cryogenics and regenerative fuel cells (RFC), AC and DC transmission line technology, high voltage and low voltage power transmission, conductor materials of construction and power beaming concepts for transmitting power to difficult to access locations such as at the bottom of craters. Operating conditions, component characteristics, reliability, maintainability, constructability, system safety, technology gaps/risk and adaptability for future lunar missions will be discussed for the technologies considered.

  5. Response to Question Concerning whether the Requirements for Preconstruction Review of New or Modified Air Pollution Sources Apply to the Relocation of an Existing Asphalt Concrete Plant when such Relocation does not Result in any Increase in Emissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  6. Training Requirements Determination.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    IdentificationDa a ..... ......9 APPENDIX M. NITRAS Class Schedule/Quotas by CDP . . . . . 99 APPENDIX N. PNEC /SNEC Requirements vs. Inventory Report .104...Plan manually, using the PNEC /SNEC3 Billet Requirements/Personnel Inventory Report. Appendix N is a sample of a single page from this report, which is...Program Development Review Committee PE - Program Element PEDS - Program Evaluation and Decision Summary PNEC - Primary Navy Enlisted Classification POA&M

  7. Mobile Applications for Diabetics: A Systematic Review and Expert-Based Usability Evaluation Considering the Special Requirements of Diabetes Patients Age 50 Years or Older

    PubMed Central

    Quade, Mandy; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Background A multitude of mhealth (mobile health) apps have been developed in recent years to support effective self-management of patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2. Objective We carried out a systematic review of all currently available diabetes apps for the operating systems iOS and Android. We considered the number of newly released diabetes apps, range of functions, target user groups, languages, acquisition costs, user ratings, available interfaces, and the connection between acquisition costs and user ratings. Additionally, we examined whether the available applications serve the special needs of diabetes patients aged 50 or older by performing an expert-based usability evaluation. Methods We identified relevant keywords, comparative categories, and their specifications. Subsequently, we performed the app review based on the information given in the Google Play Store, the Apple App Store, and the apps themselves. In addition, we carried out an expert-based usability evaluation based on a representative 10% sample of diabetes apps. Results In total, we analyzed 656 apps finding that 355 (54.1%) offered just one function and 348 (53.0%) provided a documentation function. The dominating app language was English (85.4%, 560/656), patients represented the main user group (96.0%, 630/656), and the analysis of the costs revealed a trend toward free apps (53.7%, 352/656). The median price of paid apps was €1.90. The average user rating was 3.6 stars (maximum 5). Our analyses indicated no clear differences in the user rating between free and paid apps. Only 30 (4.6%) of the 656 available diabetes apps offered an interface to a measurement device. We evaluated 66 apps within the usability evaluation. On average, apps were rated best regarding the criterion “comprehensibility” (4.0 out of 5.0), while showing a lack of “fault tolerance” (2.8 out of 5.0). Of the 66 apps, 48 (72.7%) offered the ability to read the screen content aloud. The number of

  8. Interventional pain management for spinal disorders: a review of injection techniques.

    PubMed

    Wewalka, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Chronic spinal pain has a high prevalence and a severe economic, societal and health impact. In the last decades the practice and research of interventional techniques for the diagnosis and treatment of spinal pain has increased sharply. The level of evidence of the most common techniques is well documented. With image-guided precise diagnostic blocks it is possible to identify the source of chronic spinal pain in well over 60% of the cases. Nonsurgical specialties such as PM&R increasingly resort to the possibilities of interventional pain management for musculoskeletal disorders. For many forms of spinal pain there is at least fair evidence for long-term pain relief after a guided therapeutic injection often reducing the intake of analgesic medication or the need for surgery. This review focuses on the evidence, the application spectrum and special considerations of injection techniques for the treatment of spinal disorders.

  9. NASA Product Peer Review Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenks, Ken

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASA's product peer review process. The contents include: 1) Inspection/Peer Review at NASA; 2) Reasons for product peer reviews; 3) Different types of peer reviews; and 4) NASA requirements for peer reviews. This presentation also includes a demonstration of an actual product peer review.

  10. Required High School Internships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Kate; Morrow, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Through a literature review, and in the words of internees, this article describes the value of required internship for career growth. It notes that an internship experience ensures that students have a mentor who can be a professional reference, having actually witnessed what Mojkowski and Washor call the students' "non-academic"…

  11. NASA Orbital Debris Requirements and Best Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Limitation of orbital debris accumulation is an international and national concern, reflectedin NASA debris limitation requirements. These requirements will be reviewed, along with some practices that can be employed to achieve the requirements.

  12. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are computer software packages: "Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego,""The Bio Sci Videodisc," and "Bio Sci Stacks." Included are hardware requirements, costs, emphasis, grade level, and availability. Functions of the packages are discussed including strengths and weaknesses and teaching suggestions. (CW)

  13. Courseware Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risley, John S.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews software produced by Cross Educational Software to teach college-advanced high school students how to determine forces/torques acting on rigid bodies in static equilibrium. Designed for use with Apple II/II+ (Applesoft), 10 minutes to one hour are required for the five low to moderate interactive tutorial programs. (Author/JN)

  14. Courseware Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risley, John S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews courseware (Apple II) providing laboratory simulations in atomic physics. Although material is not user-friendly and requires some background, the animations are good representations of electron mass, Thompson e/m, Millikan oil-drop, and mass spectrometer. Recommended for classroom demonstration purposes at high school or introductory…

  15. Software Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Diane, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed is a computer software package entitled "Audubon Wildlife Adventures: Grizzly Bears" for Apple II and IBM microcomputers. Included are availability, hardware requirements, cost, and a description of the program. The murder-mystery flavor of the program is stressed in this program that focuses on illegal hunting and game…

  16. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six software packages for Apple and/or IBM computers. Included are "Autograph,""The New Game Show,""Science Probe-Earth Science,""Pollution Patrol,""Investigating Plant Growth," and "AIDS: The Investigation." Discussed are the grade level, function, availability, cost, and hardware requirements of each. (CW)

  17. STEP Experiment Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    A plan to develop a space technology experiments platform (STEP) was examined. NASA Langley Research Center held a STEP Experiment Requirements Workshop on June 29 and 30 and July 1, 1983, at which experiment proposers were invited to present more detailed information on their experiment concept and requirements. A feasibility and preliminary definition study was conducted and the preliminary definition of STEP capabilities and experiment concepts and expected requirements for support services are presented. The preliminary definition of STEP capabilities based on detailed review of potential experiment requirements is investigated. Topics discussed include: Shuttle on-orbit dynamics; effects of the space environment on damping materials; erectable beam experiment; technology for development of very large solar array deployers; thermal energy management process experiment; photovoltaic concentrater pointing dynamics and plasma interactions; vibration isolation technology; flight tests of a synthetic aperture radar antenna with use of STEP.

  18. 14 CFR 1274.105 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... an electronic mail (e-mail) message to the following address at NASA Headquarters: can@hq.nasa.gov..., for which the total NASA resources to be expended equal or exceed $10 million (cash plus non-cash... Center procurement office (as applicable). For any CAN where NASA's cash contributions are expected...

  19. 14 CFR 1274.105 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... an electronic mail (e-mail) message to the following address at NASA Headquarters: can@hq.nasa.gov..., for which the total NASA resources to be expended equal or exceed $10 million (cash plus non-cash... Center procurement office (as applicable). For any CAN where NASA's cash contributions are expected...

  20. 14 CFR 1274.105 - Review requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... an electronic mail (e-mail) message to the following address at NASA Headquarters: can@hq.nasa.gov..., for which the total NASA resources to be expended equal or exceed $10 million (cash plus non-cash... Center procurement office (as applicable). For any CAN where NASA's cash contributions are expected...