Science.gov

Sample records for requirements doe order

  1. Integrating total quality management principles with the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, D.

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy has recently required its field offices, contractors, and subcontractors to implement DOE Order 5700.6C, ``Quality Assurance,`` for all work on waste management contracts. The order restructures the 18 criteria of NQA-1 and focuses on the role of management in achieving and assuring quality, performance of activities to achieve and assure quality, and management`s assessment of its performance for the purpose of identifying improvements to be made. The DOE order also introduces elements of the total quality management (TQM) philosophy, which were not present in DOE Order 5700.6B. The research community within DOE has recently issued a document entitled DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide, which is more explicit about the integration of TQM principles with the implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C in research facilities. The Environmental Protection Agency is sponsoring a quality assurance standard (ANSI/ASQC E-4) to replace EPA`s QAMS 005/80. The new standard is consistent with DOE Order 5700.6C, and it also stresses the integration of TQM principles within the quality assurance process. This paper discusses the intent and philosophy of the 10 criteria of the new DOE order, the status of ANSI/ASQC E-4, and how to effectively integrate TQM principles into the quality assurance process as the conversion is made from NQA-1 to DOE Order 5700.6C. The purpose and value of DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide for research will also be discussed.

  2. Exemptions form PSD Permit Requirements for Coal Conversions Resulting from DOE Prohibition Orders

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. 1994 annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, E.F.; Poligone, S.E.

    1995-10-16

    The Y-12 Plant serves as a key manufacturing technology center for the development and demonstration of unique materials, components, and services of importance to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. This is accomplished through the reclamation and storage of nuclear materials, manufacture of nuclear materials, manufacture of components for the nation`s defense capabilities, support to national security programs, and services provided to other customers as approved by DOE. We are recognized by our people, the community, and our customers as innovative, responsive, and responsible. We are a leader in worker health and safety, environmental protection, and stewardship of our national resources. As a DOE facility, Y-12 also supports DOE`s waste minimization mission. Data contained in this report represents waste generation in Tennessee.

  4. 46 CFR Section 1 - What this order does.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What this order does. Section 1 Section 1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Section 1 What this order does. This order requires that General Agents, appointed under...

  5. 46 CFR Section 1 - What this order does.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What this order does. Section 1 Section 1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Section 1 What this order does. This order requires that General Agents, appointed under...

  6. Quality Assurance Grading Guidelines for Research and Development at DOE Facilities (DOE Order 5700.6C)

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, T.B.

    1992-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPs) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community.

  7. Policy Perspective: Meeting the Challenge of the DOE Order 436.1 Departmental Sustainability - 12527

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Jennifer C.

    2012-07-01

    DOE's Sustainability Performance Office is working to meet sustainability goals at DOE by implementing Executive Orders, Departmental policy, the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) and legislation related to sustainability. Through implementation of Executive Orders, Departmental policy, the SSPP, statutory requirements and regular reporting, analysis and communication, DOE's SPO is working to maintain and expand DOE's leadership in sustainability. (authors)

  8. Quality assurance grading guidelines for research and development at DOE facilities. DOE Order 5700.6C

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, T.B.; Morris, R.N.

    1992-10-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPS) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community. This report discusses order 5700.6C in relation to research with DOE.

  9. Does Presentation Order Impact Choice After Delay?

    PubMed

    Berger, Jonah

    2016-07-01

    Options are often presented incidentally in a sequence, but does serial position impact choice after delay, and if so, how? We address this question in a consequential real-world choice domain. Using 25 years of citation data, and a unique identification strategy, we examine the relationship between article order (i.e., position in a journal issue) and citation count. Results indicate that mere serial position affects the prominence that research achieves: Earlier-listed articles receive more citations. Furthermore, our identification strategy allows us to cast doubt on alternative explanations (i.e., editorial placement) and instead indicate that the effect is driven by psychological processes of attention and memory. These findings deepen the understanding of how presentation order impacts choice, suggest that subtle presentation factors can bias an important scientific metric, and shed light on how psychological processes shape collective outcomes.

  10. ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED TO STORE THEM AND KEEP THEM AVAILABLE FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS ORDERS. THE BARRET/DOUGLAS LIFTING TRUCK IS USED TO REACH AND TRANSPORT PATTERNS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Impact assessment of draft DOE Order 5820.2B. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a revision to DOE Order 5820.2A, entitled ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` DOE issued DOE Order 5820.2A in September 1988 and, as the title implies, it covered only radioactive waste forms. The proposed draft order, entitled ``Waste Management,`` addresses the management of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste forms. It also includes spent nuclear fuel, which DOE does not consider a waste. Waste forms covered include hazardous waste, high-level waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, low-level radioactive waste, uranium and thorium mill tailings, mixed waste, and sanitary waste. The Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program (TSP) of Leached Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) is facilitating the revision of this order. The EM Regulatory Compliance Division (EM-331) has requested that TSP estimate the impacts and costs of compliance with the revised order. TSP requested Dames & Moore to aid in this assessment by comparing requirements in Draft Order 5820.2B to ones in DOE Order 5820.2A and other DOE orders and Federal regulations. The assessment started with a draft version of 5820.2B dated January 14, 1994. DOE has released three updated versions of the draft order since then (dated May 20, 1994; August 26, 1994; and January 23, 1995). Each time DOE revised the order, Dames and Moore updated the assessment work to reflect the text changes. This report reflects the January 23, 1995 version of the draft order.

  12. Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsun-Liang; Chun, Yong-Hee Patricia; MacEachern, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession represents a clinical condition in adults frequently encountered in the general dental practice. It is estimated that 23% of adults in the US have one or more tooth surfaces with ≥ 3 mm gingival recession. Clinicians often time face dilemmas of whether or not to treat such a condition surgically. Therefore, we were charged by the editorial board to answer this critical question: “Does gingival recession require surgical treatment?” An initial condensed literature search was performed using a combination of gingival recession and surgery controlled terms and keywords. An analysis of the search results highlights our limited understanding of the factors that often guide the treatment of gingival recession. Understanding the etiology, prognosis and treatment of gingival recession continues to offer many unanswered questions and challenges in the field of periodontics as we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. PMID:26427577

  13. Planned revision to DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Duggan, G.J.; Williams, R.E.; Kudera, D.E.; Bailey, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    US Department of Energy Headquarters initiated efforts to revise DOE Order 5820.2A, ``Radioactive Waste Management``. The purpose of the revision is to enhance DOE waste management requirements, reflect new DOE organizational responsibilities, and consolidate requirements for management of all waste, under the responsibility of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, into a single order. This paper discusses the revision philosophy, objectives of the revision, and strategy for the revision. Issues being considered for inclusion in the revision and recommended methods of resolving each issue are also discussed.

  14. DOE Order 5480.28 Hanford facilities database

    SciTech Connect

    Hayenga, J.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the development of a database of DOE and/or leased Hanford Site Facilities. The completed database will consist of structure/facility parameters essential to the prioritization of these structures for natural phenomena hazard vulnerability in compliance with DOE Order 5480.28, `Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation`. The prioritization process will be based upon the structure/facility vulnerability to natural phenomena hazards. The ACCESS based database, `Hanford Facilities Site Database`, is generated from current Hanford Site information and databases.

  15. 40 CFR 141.503 - What does subpart T require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does subpart T require? 141.503 Section 141.503 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Fewer Than 10,000 People General Requirements § 141.503 What does subpart T require? There are...

  16. DOE Order 5820.2A implementation status, progress and problems

    SciTech Connect

    Waldo, L.C.; Shepard, M.D.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1989-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s Order governing management of radioactive waste, DOE Order 5820.2A, was revised effective September 26, 1988. Chapter III of the Order contains prescriptive requirements for managing low-level waste. These requirements ensure that all DOE low-level radioactive and mixed waste will be managed in a systematic manner to achieve required performance., The Order defines performance objectives for low-level waste management to limit the dose received by the general public from waste operations, to protect groundwater resources, and to protect inadvertent intruders. For low-level waste disposal operations, the Order requires that a radiological performance assessment be prepared to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives. The Order also requires that the radiological performance assessments be reviewed by a Peer Review Panel, established by the Order. This paper will summarize the requirements for radioactive waste management and discuss the degree of compliance achieved to date. The Department`s preliminary schedule and anticipated cost to achieve full compliance with the requirements will also be discussed.

  17. Does the isolation effect require attention?

    PubMed

    Bireta, Tamra J; Mazzei, Colleen M

    2016-01-01

    An item that differs from the surrounding items is remembered better than an item that is consistent with its surroundings; this is known as the von Restorff effect or isolation effect (von Restorff, Psychologische Forschung, 18, 299-342, 1933). Theoretical explanations have proposed that the isolate is processed differently from control items, though some research has suggested that this processing might require more attention for semantic than for physical isolates. To test this possibility, in the present study we examined the isolation effects for physical isolates and semantic isolates under full and divided attention. Participants viewed lists of categorized words, with some lists containing either a physical or a semantic isolate, followed by immediate written free recall. Across three experiments, divided attention eliminated the semantic isolation effect but did not impact the physical isolation effect. Furthermore, semantic isolates were output earlier in recall than controls, whereas physical isolates were output more similarly to controls. These findings suggest that semantic isolation effects require attention during encoding, whereas physical isolation effects are relatively automatic.

  18. 21 CFR 1305.21 - Requirements for electronic orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for electronic orders. 1305.21... I AND II CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Electronic Orders § 1305.21 Requirements for electronic orders. (a) To be valid, the purchaser must sign an electronic order for a Schedule I or II controlled...

  19. Does perceptual learning require consciousness or attention?

    PubMed

    Meuwese, Julia D I; Post, Ruben A G; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-10-01

    , suggesting that the memory trace that is formed during inattention is latent until accessed. The results suggest that learning requires consciousness, and not attention, and further strengthen the idea that consciousness is separate from attention.

  20. 2006 Update for Implementing Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Lewis

    2007-09-01

    In accordance with Contract Data Requirements List F.19, this report addresses the Best Available Technology requirements per Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,” as they apply to radiological discharges to the soil for Calendar Year 2006. The report includes review of discharges for both, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC and CH2M WG Idaho, LLC. The Best Available Technology selection process is applicable to wastewater discharges containing process derived radionuclides to surface waters, sanitary sewerages greater than five times the Derived Concentration Guideline (found in DOE Order 5400.5), and to the soil. Wastewater at the Idaho National Laboratory Site is not discharged to surface water (Big Lost River and Birch Creek) nor is it discharged to sanitary sewerages at activity levels greater than five times a Derived Concentration Guideline. Therefore, this report focuses on radiological discharges to the soil.

  1. Assessment of documentation requirements under DOE 5481. 1, Safety Analysis and Review System (SARS)

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, E.T.

    1981-03-01

    This report assesses the requirements of DOE Order 5481.1, Safety Analysis and Review System for DOE Operations (SARS) in regard to maintaining SARS documentation. Under SARS, all pertinent details of the entire safety analysis and review process for each DOE operation are to be traceable from the initial identification of a hazard. This report is intended to provide assistance in identifying the points in the SARS cycle at which documentation is required, what type of documentation is most appropriate, and where it ultimately should be maintained.

  2. CERCLA reporting requirements, DOE occurrence reporting, and the DOE Emergency Management System. CERCLA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, R.

    1993-10-01

    The Emergency Management System (EMS) provides a structure for reporting and processing operations information related to DOE owned/operated facilities. Hazardous Substance (HS) releases are subject to reporting requirements under the EMS as well as under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA requires reporting of HS releases into the environment in amounts greater than or equal to Reportable Quantities (RQs). This Information Brief elaborates on earlier CERCLA reporting and response process information Briefs by providing a general explanation of these CERCLA or EMS requirements, procedures, and events as they pertain to releases of HS`s at DOE facilities.

  3. 2005 Update for Implementing Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5

    SciTech Connect

    INL

    2006-09-01

    The report addresses Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5 in relation to wastewater discharges to the soil. In accordance with Contract Data Requirements List F.19, this report addresses the Best Available Technology requirements per Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5, "Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment", as they apply to radiological discharges to the soil for Calendar Year 2005. The report includes review of discharges for both, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC and CH2M WG Idaho, LLC. The Best Available Technology selection process is applicable to wastewater discharges containing process derived radionuclides to surface waters, sanitary sewerages greater than five times the Derived Concentration Guideline (found in DOE Order 5400.5), and to the soil. Wastewater at the Idaho National Laboratory Site is not discharged to surface water (Big Lost River and Birch Creek) nor is it discharged to sanitary sewerages at activity levels greater than five times a Derived Concentration Guideline. Therefore, this report focuses on radiological discharges to the soil.

  4. 40 CFR 33.301 - What does this subpart require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What does this subpart require? 33.301 Section 33.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... financial assistance agreement, even if it has achieved its fair share objectives under subpart D of...

  5. Status Update for Implementing Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Michael George

    2001-09-01

    This report documents the Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LCC, operated facilities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory that require the Best Available Technology selection process in accordance with Department of Energy Order 5400.5, Chapter II (3), “Management and Control of Radioactive Materials in Liquid Discharges.”1 This report differs from previous reports in that only those liquid waste streams and facilities requiring the Best Available Technology selection process will be evaluated in detail. In addition, this report will be submitted to the DOE-ID Field Office Manager for approval in accordance with DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter II, Section 3.b.(1). The report also identifies facilities addressed in last year’s report that do not require the Best Available Technology selection process to be completed. These facilities will not be addressed in future reports. This report reviews the following facilities: • Auxiliary Reactor Area • Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Block Areas • Central Facilities Area • Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center • Idaho Falls Facilities • Power Burst Facility • Radioactive Waste Management Complex • Test Area North • Test Reactor Area. Three facilities (Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Percolation Ponds and Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Disposal Pond) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory required documentation of the Best Available Technology selection process. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Percolation Ponds and Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Disposal Pond discharge wastewater that may contain process-derived radionuclides to a soil column with average radionuclide concentrations below drinking water MCLs. At the request of the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office, Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC has included the 73.5acre

  6. 21 CFR 1.378 - What criteria does FDA use to order a detention?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? 1... General Provisions § 1.378 What criteria does FDA use to order a detention? An officer or qualified employee of FDA may order the detention of any article of food that is found during an...

  7. Report on inspection of compliance with DOE Order 2030.4B at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this inspection was to evaluate contractor compliance at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with Department of Energy (DOE) Order 2030.4B, {open_quotes}Reporting Fraud, Waste, And Abuse To The Office Of Inspector General.{close_quotes} The specific objective was to determine if the SRS management and operating (M&O) contractors were complying with the requirements in Paragraph 6.c. of DOE Order 2030.4B. These requirements are: (1) annual notification to employees of their duty to report allegations of fraud, waste, abuse, corruption, or mismanagement; (2) display and publish the DOE Office of Inspector General (OIG) Hotline telephone number in common areas of buildings; (3) display and publish the DOE OIG Hotline number in telephone books and newsletters; and (4) notify the OIG cases referred to other law enforcement entities.

  8. Status Update for Implementing Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5 (2003)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Lewis

    2004-09-01

    This report identifies discharges of liquid waste streams that require documentation of the best available technology selection process at Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, operated facilities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The best available technology selection process is conducted according to Department of Energy Order 5400.5, Chapter II (3), “Management and Control of Radioactive Materials in Liquid Discharges and Phaseout of Soil Columns” and Department of Energy guidance. This report evaluates only those liquid waste streams and facilities where the best available technology selection process was determined to apply. Two facilities (Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center New Percolation Ponds and Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Plant Disposal Pond) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory required documentation of the best available technology selection process. These two facilities required documentation of the best available technology selection process because they discharge wastewater that may contain process-derived radionuclides to a soil column even though the average radioactivity levels are typically below drinking water maximum contaminant levels. At the request of the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office, the 73.5-acre Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant land application site is included in this report to ensure the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter II, Section 3 are met. The Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant effluent contains process-derived radionuclides from radioactive tracers used in certain analytical procedures. The radioactivity levels of these radionuclides are below maximum contaminant levels. The Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office will submit this report to their field office manager for approval according to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter II, Section 3.b.(1).

  9. Parent-Child Quality Time: Does Birth Order Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the American Time Use Survey, I find that a first-born child receives 20-30 more minutes of quality time each day with his or her parent than a second-born child of the same age from a similar family. The birth-order difference results from parents giving roughly equal time to each child at any point in time while the amount of…

  10. 16 CFR 2.11 - Orders requiring access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.11 Orders requiring access. (a) In investigations other than those conducted under section 20 of the Federal Trade Commission Act, the...

  11. 16 CFR 2.11 - Orders requiring access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE NONADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Inquiries; Investigations; Compulsory Processes § 2.11 Orders requiring access. (a) In investigations other than those conducted under section 20 of the Federal Trade Commission Act, the...

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF DOE'S POST-CLOSURE MONITORING NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The 2006 plan sets an ambitious agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the remediation of sites contaminated by decades of nuclear weapons production activities. The plan's primary objective is to reduce overall clean up costs by first eliminating the environmental problems that are most expensive to control and safely maintain. In the context of the 2006 Plan, closure refers to the completion of area or facility specific cleanup projects. The cleanup levels are determined by the planned future use of the site or facility. Use restrictions are still undecided for most sites but are highly probable to exclude residential or agricultural activities. Most of the land will be remediated to ''industrial use'' levels with access restrictions and some areas will be closed-off through containment. Portions of the site will be reserved for waste disposal, either as a waste repository or the in-situ immobilization of contaminated soil and groundwater, and land use will be restricted to waste disposal only. The land used for waste disposal will require monitoring and maintenance activities after closure. Most of the land used for industrial use may also require such postclosure activities. The required postclosure monitoring and maintenance activities will be imposed by regulators and stakeholders. Regulators will not approve closure plans without clearly defined monitoring methods using approved technologies. Therefore, among all other more costly and labor-intensive closure-related activities, inadequate planning for monitoring and lack of appropriate monitoring technologies can prevent closure. The purpose of this project is to determine, document, and track the current and evolving postclosure monitoring requirements at DOE-EM sites. This information will aid CMST-CP in guiding its postclosure technology development and deployment efforts.

  13. Comparison of selected DOE and non-DOE requirements, standards, and practices for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, L.; Kudera, D.; Newberry, W.

    1995-12-01

    This document results from the Secretary of Energy`s response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94--2. The Secretary stated that the US Department of Energy (DOE) would ``address such issues as...the need for additional requirements, standards, and guidance on low-level radioactive waste management. `` The authors gathered information and compared DOE requirements and standards for the safety aspects Of low-level disposal with similar requirements and standards of non-DOE entities.

  14. Status Update for Implementing Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5 - September 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Michael George

    2002-09-01

    This report identifies discharges of liquid waste streams that require documentation of the Best Available Technology selection process at Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, operated facilities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Best Available Technology selection process is conducted according to Department of Energy Order 5400.5, Chapter II (3),“Management and Control of Radioactive Materials in Liquid Discharges and Phaseout of Soil Columns” and Department of Energy guidance. Only those liquid waste streams and facilities requiring the Best Available Technology selection process are evaluated in further detail. In addition, this report will be submitted to the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office Field Office manager for approval according to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter II, Section 3.b.(1). Two facilities (Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center existing Percolation Ponds and Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Disposal Pond) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory required documentation of the Best Available Technology selection process (Section 4). These two facilities required documentation of the Best Available Technology selection process because they discharge wastewater that may contain process-derived radionuclides to a soil column even though the average radioactivity levels are typically below drinking water maximum contaminant levels. At the request of the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office, the 73.5-acre Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant land application site is included in Section 4 of this report to ensure the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter II, Section 3 are met. The Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant effluent contains process-derived radionuclides from radioactive tracers used in certain analytical procedures. The radioactivity levels of these radionuclides are below maximum contaminant levels. According to Department of Energy

  15. Canister storage building compliance assessment DOE Order 6430.1A, General Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-12

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with DOE Order 6430.1A ''General Design Criteria.'' No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  16. Implementation guide for use with DOE Order 440.1: Occupational exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-30

    DOE O 440.1, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent accidental injuries and illnesses. One element of the worker protection program in DOE O 440.1 is Exposure Assessment (EA). This Guide provides acceptable methodologies for conducting EA for workers. Exposure assessment should be included in the DOE and contractor written worker protection program, as required by DOE O 440.1. EA documentation should describe the methods and rationale a site uses to characterize and monitor workers` potential and actual exposures to hazardous agents. DOE O 440.1 applies to all activities (including design, construction, operation, maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning, research and development, and environmental restoration activities) performed by DOE and its contractors (and their subcontractors).

  17. Status Update for Implementing Best Available Technology per DOE Order 5400.5

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. Lewis

    2003-09-01

    This report identifies discharges of liquid waste streams that require documentation of the best available technology selection process at Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, operated facilities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The best available technology selection process is conducted according to Department of Energy Order 5400.5, Chapter II (3), ''Management and Control of Radioactive Materials in Liquid Discharges and Phaseout of Soil Columns'' and Department of Energy guidance. This report evaluates only those liquid waste streams and facilities where the best available technology selection process was determined to be applicable. In addition, the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office will submit this report to their field office manager for approval according to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter II, Section 3.b.(1). According to Department of Energy guidance, ''If the liquid waste stream is below maximum contaminant levels, then the goals of the best available technology selection process are being met and the liquid waste stream is considered 'clean water.' However, it is necessary to document this through the best available technology selection process.'' Because liquid waste streams below drinking water maximum contaminant levels are already considered ''clean water,'' additional treatment technologies are considered unnecessary and unjustifiable on a cost-benefit basis and are not addressed in this report. Two facilities (Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center New Percolation Ponds and Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Disposal Pond) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory required documentation of the best available technology selection process (Section 4). These two facilities required documentation of the best available technology selection process because they discharge wastewater that may contain process-derived radionuclides to a soil column even though the average radioactivity levels

  18. Does massive intraabdominal free gas require surgical intervention?

    PubMed Central

    Furihata, Tadashi; Furihata, Makoto; Ishikawa, Kunibumi; Kosaka, Masato; Satoh, Naoki; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an 81-year-old man who presented with severe epigastralgia. A chest radiograph showed massive free gas bilaterally in the diaphragmatic spaces. Computed tomography (CT) scan also showed massive free gas in the peritoneal cavity with portal venous gas. We used a wait-and-see approach and carefully considered surgery again when the time was appropriate. The patient received conservative therapy with fasting, an intravenous infusion of antibiotics, and nasogastric intubation. The patient soon recovered and was able to start eating meals 4 d after treatment; thus, surgical intervention was avoided. Thereafter, colonoscopy examination showed pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis in the ascending colon. On retrospective review, CT scan demonstrated sporadic air-filled cysts in the ascending colon. The present case taught us a lesson: the presence of massive intraabdominal free gas with portal venous gas does not necessarily require surgical intervention. Pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis should be considered as a potential causative factor of free gas with portal venous gas when making the differential diagnosis. PMID:27621584

  19. 32 CFR 555.9 - Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of other cooperative work with DOE not falling under the MOU, will also be reported at those times... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE... DEVELOPMENT AND TESTS, WORK FOR OTHERS § 555.9 Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE....

  20. Hazardous Substance Release Reporting Under CERCLA, EPCR {section}304 and DOE Emergency Management System (EMS) and DOE Occurrence Reporting Requirements. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Traceski, T.T.

    1994-06-01

    Releases of various substances from DOE facilities may be subject to reporting requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), as well as DOE`s internal ``Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information`` and the ``Emergency Management System`` (EMS). CERCLA and EPCPA are Federal laws that require immediate reporting of a release of a Hazardous Substance (HS) and an Extremely Hazardous Substance (EHS), respectively, in a Reportable Quantity (RQ) or more within a 24-hour period. This guidance uses a flowchart, supplemental information, and tables to provide an overview of the process to be followed, and more detailed explanations of the actions that must be performed, when chemical releases of HSs, EHSs, pollutants, or contaminants occur at DOE facilities. This guidance should be used in conjunction with, rather than in lieu of, applicable laws, regulations, and DOE Orders. Relevant laws, regulations, and DOE Orders are referenced throughout this guidance.

  1. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, J.

    2007-11-06

    This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, administration facility, weigh scale, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facility for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams.

  2. 30 CFR 585.420 - What effect does a suspension order have on my payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What effect does a suspension order have on my payments? 585.420 Section 585.420 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL...

  3. 30 CFR 585.420 - What effect does a suspension order have on my payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What effect does a suspension order have on my payments? 585.420 Section 585.420 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL...

  4. 30 CFR 585.420 - What effect does a suspension order have on my payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What effect does a suspension order have on my payments? 585.420 Section 585.420 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL...

  5. 30 CFR 285.420 - What effect does a suspension order have on my payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What effect does a suspension order have on my payments? 285.420 Section 285.420 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES ON...

  6. 21 CFR 1.384 - When does a detention order terminate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When does a detention order terminate? 1.384 Section 1.384 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption...

  7. 21 CFR 1.384 - When does a detention order terminate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When does a detention order terminate? 1.384 Section 1.384 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL GENERAL ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS Administrative Detention of Food for Human or Animal Consumption...

  8. Enforcement handbook: Enforcement of DOE nuclear safety requirements

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This Handbook provides detailed guidance and procedures to implement the General Statement of DOE Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy). A copy of this Enforcement Policy is included for ready reference in Appendix D. The guidance provided in this Handbook is qualified, however, by the admonishment to exercise discretion in determining the proper disposition of each potential enforcement action. As discussed in subsequent chapters, the Enforcement and Investigation Staff will apply a number of factors in assessing each potential enforcement situation. Enforcement sanctions are imposed in accordance with the Enforcement Policy for the purpose of promoting public and worker health and safety in the performance of activities at DOE facilities by DOE contractors (and their subcontractors and suppliers) who are indemnified under the Price-Anderson Amendments Act. These indemnified contractors, and their suppliers and subcontractors, will be referred to in this Handbook collectively as DOE contractors. It should be remembered that the purpose of the Department`s enforcement policy is to improve nuclear safety for the workers and the public, and this goal should be the prime consideration in exercising enforcement discretion.

  9. Proposed Risk-Informed Seismic Hazard Periodic Reevaluation Methodology for Complying with DOE Order 420.1C

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerer, Annie

    2015-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities must comply with DOE Order 420.1C Facility Safety, which requires that all such facilities review their natural phenomena hazards (NPH) assessments no less frequently than every ten years. The Order points the reader to Standard DOE-STD-1020-2012. In addition to providing a discussion of the applicable evaluation criteria, the Standard references other documents, including ANSI/ANS-2.29-2008 and NUREG-2117. These documents provide supporting criteria and approaches for evaluating the need to update an existing probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). All of the documents are consistent at a high level regarding the general conceptual criteria that should be considered. However, none of the documents provides step-by-step detailed guidance on the required or recommended approach for evaluating the significance of new information and determining whether or not an existing PSHA should be updated. Further, all of the conceptual approaches and criteria given in these documents deal with changes that may have occurred in the knowledge base that might impact the inputs to the PSHA, the calculated hazard itself, or the technical basis for the hazard inputs. Given that the DOE Order is aimed at achieving and assuring the safety of nuclear facilities—which is a function not only of the level of the seismic hazard but also the capacity of the facility to withstand vibratory ground motions—the inclusion of risk information in the evaluation process would appear to be both prudent and in line with the objectives of the Order. The purpose of this white paper is to describe a risk-informed methodology for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA consistent with the DOE Order. While the development of the proposed methodology was undertaken as a result of assessments for specific SDC-3 facilities at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and it is expected that the application at INL will provide a demonstration of the

  10. Proposed Risk-Informed Seismic Hazard Periodic Reevaluation Methodology for Complying with DOE Order 420.1C

    SciTech Connect

    Kammerer, Annie

    2016-03-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities must comply with DOE Order 420.1C Facility Safety, which requires that all such facilities review their natural phenomena hazards (NPH) assessments no less frequently than every ten years. The Order points the reader to Standard DOE-STD-1020-2012. In addition to providing a discussion of the applicable evaluation criteria, the Standard references other documents, including ANSI/ANS-2.29-2008 and NUREG-2117. These documents provide supporting criteria and approaches for evaluating the need to update an existing probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). All of the documents are consistent at a high level regarding the general conceptual criteria that should be considered. However, none of the documents provides step-by-step detailed guidance on the required or recommended approach for evaluating the significance of new information and determining whether or not an existing PSHA should be updated. Further, all of the conceptual approaches and criteria given in these documents deal with changes that may have occurred in the knowledge base that might impact the inputs to the PSHA, the calculated hazard itself, or the technical basis for the hazard inputs. Given that the DOE Order is aimed at achieving and assuring the safety of nuclear facilities—which is a function not only of the level of the seismic hazard but also the capacity of the facility to withstand vibratory ground motions—the inclusion of risk information in the evaluation process would appear to be both prudent and in line with the objectives of the Order. The purpose of this white paper is to describe a risk-informed methodology for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA consistent with the DOE Order. While the development of the proposed methodology was undertaken as a result of assessments for specific SDC-3 facilities at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and it is expected that the application at INL will provide a demonstration of the

  11. 34 CFR 462.13 - What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for determining the suitability of tests? 462.13 Section 462.13 Education Regulations of the Offices... the Secretary Use To Review the Suitability of Tests for Use in the NRS? § 462.13 What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests? In order for the Secretary...

  12. 34 CFR 462.13 - What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for determining the suitability of tests? 462.13 Section 462.13 Education Regulations of the Offices... the Secretary Use To Review the Suitability of Tests for Use in the NRS? § 462.13 What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests? In order for the Secretary...

  13. 34 CFR 462.13 - What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for determining the suitability of tests? 462.13 Section 462.13 Education Regulations of the Offices... the Secretary Use To Review the Suitability of Tests for Use in the NRS? § 462.13 What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests? In order for the Secretary...

  14. 34 CFR 462.13 - What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for determining the suitability of tests? 462.13 Section 462.13 Education Regulations of the Offices... the Secretary Use To Review the Suitability of Tests for Use in the NRS? § 462.13 What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests? In order for the Secretary...

  15. 34 CFR 462.13 - What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for determining the suitability of tests? 462.13 Section 462.13 Education Regulations of the Offices... the Secretary Use To Review the Suitability of Tests for Use in the NRS? § 462.13 What criteria and requirements does the Secretary use for determining the suitability of tests? In order for the Secretary...

  16. A conceptual framework for using DOE 5700. 6C and the other DOE orders as an integrated management system; the Fermilab experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1992-06-01

    In this paper, I describe a conceptual framework that uses DOE Order 5700.6C and more than 140 other DOE Orders as an integrated management system -- but I describe it within the context of the broader sociological and cultural issues of doing research at DOE funded facilities. The conceptual framework has two components. The first involves an interpretation of the 10 criteria of DOE 5700.6C that is tailored for a research environment. The second component involves using the 10 criteria as functional categories that orchestrate and integrate the other DOE Orders into a total management system. The Fermilab approach aims at reducing (or eliminating) the redundancy and overlap within the DOE Orders system at the contractor level.

  17. A conceptual framework for using DOE 5700.6C and the other DOE orders as an integrated management system; the Fermilab experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1992-06-01

    In this paper, I describe a conceptual framework that uses DOE Order 5700.6C and more than 140 other DOE Orders as an integrated management system -- but I describe it within the context of the broader sociological and cultural issues of doing research at DOE funded facilities. The conceptual framework has two components. The first involves an interpretation of the 10 criteria of DOE 5700.6C that is tailored for a research environment. The second component involves using the 10 criteria as functional categories that orchestrate and integrate the other DOE Orders into a total management system. The Fermilab approach aims at reducing (or eliminating) the redundancy and overlap within the DOE Orders system at the contractor level.

  18. 25 CFR 42.6 - When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing? 42.6 Section 42.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION STUDENT RIGHTS § 42.6 When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing? Unless local school...

  19. 25 CFR 42.6 - When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing? 42.6 Section 42.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION STUDENT RIGHTS § 42.6 When does due process require a formal disciplinary hearing? Unless local school...

  20. 40 CFR 35.4170 - What kinds of reporting does EPA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What kinds of reporting does EPA require? 35.4170 Section 35.4170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... § 35.4170 What kinds of reporting does EPA require? There are several types of reports you need...

  1. 32 CFR 555.9 - Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE... RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES CORPS OF ENGINEERS, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, LABORATORY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AND TESTS, WORK FOR OTHERS § 555.9 Reporting requirements for work in support of DOE....

  2. Transitive Responding in Hooded Crows Requires Linearly Ordered Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazareva, Olga F.; Smirnova, Anna A.; Bagozkaja, Maria S.; Zorina, Zoya A.; Rayevsky, Vladimir V.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2004-01-01

    Eight crows were taught to discriminate overlapping pairs of visual stimuli (A+ B-, B+ C-, C+ D-, and D+ E-). For 4 birds, the stimuli were colored cards with a circle of the same color on the reverse side whose diameter decreased from A to E (ordered feedback group). These circles were made available for comparison to potentially help the crows…

  3. References for HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, ``System specification for the double-shell tank system: HNF-PROs, CFRs, DOE Orders, WACs``

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, C.P.

    1998-07-30

    HNF-SD-WM-TRD-O07, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System, (hereafter referred to as DST Specification), defines the requirements of the double-shell tank system at the Hanford Site for Phase 1 privatization. Many of the sections in this document reference other documents for design guidance and requirements. Referenced documents include Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) procedures (HNF-PROS), Codes of Federal Regulation (CFRs), DOE Orders, and Washington Administrative Codes (WACs). This document provides rationale for the selection and inclusion of HNF-PROS, CFRs, DOE Orders and WACs.

  4. Geographers as Planners: What Skills Does the Job Require.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, David T.

    A survey of 524 planning agencies and consultants in the Midwest and Southwest was undertaken in 1976 to identify skills required for planning and to assess current capabilities in those skill areas. The major purpose of the survey was to aid geographic educators as they prepare students for careers in the planning profession. One part of the…

  5. 40 CFR 33.301 - What does this subpart require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... too large for one of these firms to handle individually. (e) Use the services and assistance of the SBA and the Minority Business Development Agency of the Department of Commerce. (f) If the prime contractor awards subcontracts, require the prime contractor to take the steps in paragraphs (a) through...

  6. 40 CFR 141.503 - What does subpart T require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 141.503 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving.... These requirements are: (a) You must cover any finished water reservoir that you began to construct...

  7. 40 CFR 141.503 - What does subpart T require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 141.503 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving.... These requirements are: (a) You must cover any finished water reservoir that you began to construct...

  8. 40 CFR 141.503 - What does subpart T require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 141.503 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving.... These requirements are: (a) You must cover any finished water reservoir that you began to construct...

  9. 40 CFR 141.503 - What does subpart T require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 141.503 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving.... These requirements are: (a) You must cover any finished water reservoir that you began to construct...

  10. 48 CFR 411.101 - Order of precedence for requirements documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AGRICULTURE COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Selecting and Developing Requirements Documents 411.101 Order of precedence for requirements documents. (a) Office of Management and Budget...

  11. Communication requirements of sparse Cholesky factorization with nested dissection ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Vijay K.; Patrick, Merrell L.

    1989-01-01

    Load distribution schemes for minimizing the communication requirements of the Cholesky factorization of dense and sparse, symmetric, positive definite matrices on multiprocessor systems are presented. The total data traffic in factoring an n x n sparse symmetric positive definite matrix representing an n-vertex regular two-dimensional grid graph using n exp alpha, alpha not greater than 1, processors are shown to be O(n exp 1 + alpha/2). It is O(n), when n exp alpha, alpha not smaller than 1, processors are used. Under the conditions of uniform load distribution, these results are shown to be asymptotically optimal.

  12. The Timing of Acupuncture Stimulation Does Not Influence Anesthetic Requirement

    PubMed Central

    Chernyak, Grigory; Sengupta, Papiya; Lenhardt, Rainer; Liem, Edwin; Doufas, Anthony G.; Sessler, Daniel I.; Akça, Ozan

    2005-01-01

    Studies suggest that acupuncture is more effective when induced before induction of general anesthesia than afterwards. We tested the hypothesis that electro-acupuncture initiated 30 minutes before induction reduces anesthetic requirement more than acupuncture initiated after induction. Seven volunteers were each anesthetized with desflurane on 3 study days. Needles were inserted percutaneously at 4 acupuncture points thought to produce analgesia in the upper abdominal area and provide generalized sedative and analgesic effects: Zusanli (St36), Sanyinjiao (Sp6), Liangqiu (St34), and Hegu (LI4). Needles were stimulated at 2-Hz and 10-Hz, with frequencies alternating at two-second intervals. On Preinduction day, electro-acupuncture was started 30 minutes before induction of anesthesia and maintained throughout the study. On At-induction day, needles were positioned before induction of anesthesia, but electro-acupuncture stimulation was not initiated until after induction. On Control day, electrodes were positioned near the acupoints, but needles were not inserted. Noxious electrical stimulation was administered via 25-G needles on the upper abdomen (70 mA, 100 Hz, 10 seconds). Desflurane concentration was increased 0.5% when movement occurred and decreased 0.5% when it did not. These up-and-down sequences continued until volunteers crossed from movement to no-movement 4 times. The P50 of logistic regression identified desflurane requirement. Desflurane requirement was similar on the Control (5.2±0.6%, mean±SD), Preinduction (5.0±0.8%), and At-induction (4.7±0.3%, P=0.125) days. This type of acupuncture is thus unlikely to facilitate general anesthesia or decrease the need for anesthetic drugs. PMID:15673863

  13. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-12-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space.

  14. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-01-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space. PMID:27929105

  15. Eye movements and parafoveal preview of compound words: does morpheme order matter?

    PubMed

    Angele, Bernhard; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been considerable debate about whether readers can identify multiple words in parallel or whether they are limited to a serial mode of word identification, processing one word at a time (see, e.g., Reichle, Liversedge, Pollatsek, & Rayner, 2009). Similar questions can be applied to bimorphemic compound words: Do readers identify all the constituents of a compound word in parallel, and does it matter which of the morphemes is identified first? We asked subjects to read compound words embedded in sentences while monitoring their eye movements. Using the boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975), we manipulated the preview that subjects received of the compound word before they fixated it. In particular, the morpheme order of the preview was either normal (cowboy) or reversed (boycow). Additionally, we manipulated the preview availability for each of the morphemes separately. Preview was thus available for the first morpheme only (cowtxg), for the second morpheme only (enzboy), or for neither of the morphemes (enztxg). We report three major findings: First, there was an effect of morpheme order on gaze durations measured on the compound word, indicating that, as expected, readers obtained a greater preview benefit when the preview presented the morphemes in the correct order than when their order was reversed. Second, gaze durations on the compound word were influenced not only by preview availability for the first, but also by that for the second morpheme. Finally, and most importantly, the results show that readers are able to extract some morpheme information even from a reverse order preview. In summary, readers obtain preview benefit from both constituents of a short compound word, even when the preview does not reflect the correct morpheme order.

  16. Autophagy of cytoplasmic bulk cargo does not require LC3.

    PubMed

    Engedal, Nikolai; Seglen, Per O

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of LC3 in bulk autophagy we compared its autophagic-lysosomal processing (using an improved quantitative immunoblotting method) with autophagic-lysosomal bulk cargo flux (measured by our established LDH [lactate dehydrogenase] sequestration assay) in amino acid-starved rat hepatocytes treated with cycloheximide to prevent new LC3 influx. Block-release experiments with the reversible autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3MA) and thapsigargin (TG) showed that while only 3MA suppressed phagophoric LC3 attachment (lipidation), both inhibitors prevented phagophore closure (cargo sequestration). Upon release from closure blockade, some autophagic-lysosomal LC3 flux was resumed even in the presence of 3MA, i.e., without an accompanying bulk cargo flux. Conversely, whereas the autophagic-lysosomal flux of LC3 halted within ∼100 min of cycloheximide treatment, the bulk cargo flux continued at a high rate. siRNA-mediated knockdown of LC3 family proteins in LNCaP prostate carcinoma cells confirmed that autophagy of cytoplasmic bulk cargo was completely LC3 independent also in these cells, and in the absence of cycloheximide. However, a strong requirement for GABARAP family proteins was evident. Since bulk autophagy of cytoplasm (macroautophagy) and autophagic-lysosomal LC3 processing may apparently be mutually independent, LC3 would seem to be unsuitable as a general indicator of autophagy.

  17. Implementation of the Methamphetamine Anti-Proliferation Act; thresholds for retailers and for distributors required to submit mail order reports; changes to mail order reporting requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-10-07

    This regulation implements the new threshold requirements and mail order reporting requirements of the Methamphetamine Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000 (MAPA), which was enacted on October 17, 2000. DEA is amending its regulations to reduce the thresholds for pseudoephedrine and phenylpropanolamine for retail distributors and for distributors required to submit mail order reports. Also, DEA is amending its regulations to require mail order reports for certain export transactions. DEA is codifying exemptions from the mail order reporting requirements for certain distributions to nonregulated persons and certain export transactions. This rule is consistent with the intent of MAPA to prevent the diversion of drug products to the clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine and amphetamine, and simultaneously reduce the industry reporting burden.

  18. 41 CFR 102-192.95 - Why does GSA require annual mail management reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... annual mail management reports? 102-192.95 Section 102-192.95 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Reporting Requirements § 102-192.95 Why does GSA require annual mail management reports? GSA requires annual agency mail management reports to— (a) Ensure that Federal...

  19. 41 CFR 102-192.95 - Why does GSA require annual mail management reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... annual mail management reports? 102-192.95 Section 102-192.95 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Reporting Requirements § 102-192.95 Why does GSA require annual mail management reports? GSA requires annual agency mail management reports to— (a) Ensure that Federal...

  20. 41 CFR 102-192.95 - Why does GSA require annual mail management reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... annual mail management reports? 102-192.95 Section 102-192.95 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Reporting Requirements § 102-192.95 Why does GSA require annual mail management reports? GSA requires annual agency mail management reports to— (a) Ensure that Federal...

  1. 41 CFR 102-192.95 - Why does GSA require annual mail management reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... annual mail management reports? 102-192.95 Section 102-192.95 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Reporting Requirements § 102-192.95 Why does GSA require annual mail management reports? GSA requires annual agency mail management reports to— (a) Ensure that Federal...

  2. 41 CFR 102-192.95 - Why does GSA require annual mail management reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... annual mail management reports? 102-192.95 Section 102-192.95 Public Contracts and Property Management... PROGRAMS 192-MAIL MANAGEMENT Reporting Requirements § 102-192.95 Why does GSA require annual mail management reports? GSA requires annual agency mail management reports to— (a) Ensure that Federal...

  3. 13 CFR 123.513 - Does SBA require collateral on its Military Reservist EIDL?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION DISASTER LOAN PROGRAM Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loans § 123.513 Does SBA require... provide available collateral such as a lien on business property, a security interest in personal...

  4. DOE ORDER 435.1, IMPLEMENTATION AND COMPLIANCE DECLARATION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE AND ACROSS THE DOE COMPLEX IN CONTRAST TO CURRENT PUSHBACK EFFORTS FROM THE ''TOP-TO-BOTTOM'' REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    GOLDSTON, WELFORD T.; SMITH, WINCHESTER IV

    2003-02-27

    DOE issued Order 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' on July 9, 1999 for immediate implementation. The requirements for Low Level Mixed, Transuranic, and High Level Waste have been completely rewritten. The entire DOE complex has been struggling with how to implement these new requirements within the one year required timeframe. This paper will chronicle the implementation strategy and actual results of the work to carry out that strategy at the Savannah River Site. DOE-SR and the site contractors worked closely together to implement each of the new requirements across the SRS, crossing many barriers and providing innovative solutions to the many problems that surfaced throughout the year. The results are that SRS declared compliance with all of the requirements of the Order within the prescribed timeframe. The challenge included all waste types in SRS facilities and programs that handle LLW, MLLW, TRU, and HLW. This paper will describe the implementation details for development of Radioactive Waste Management Basis for each facility, Identification of Wastes with No Path to Disposal, Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determinations, Low Level Waste 90-Day Staging and One Year Limits for Storage Programs, to name a few of the requirements that were addressed by the SRS 435.1 Implementation Team. This paper will trace the implementation, problems (both technical and administrative), and the current pushback efforts associated with the DOE ''Top-to-Bottom'' review.

  5. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1

    SciTech Connect

    J. Simonds

    2006-09-01

    This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, admin facility, weigh scale, decon building, treatment systems, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and are being constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the central Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facilityyy for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams. This compliance demonstration document discusses the conceptual site model for the ICDF Complex area. Within this conceptual site model, the selection of the area for the ICDF Complex is discussed. Also, the subsurface stratigraphy in the ICDF Complex area is discussed along with the existing contamination beneath the ICDF Complex area. The designs for the various ICDF Complex facilities are also included in this compliance demonstration document. These design discussions are a summary of the design as presented in the Remedial Design/Construction Work Plans for the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond and the Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility. Each of the major facilities or systems is described including the design criteria.

  6. TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report Comparison Document and DOE Safety Evaluation Report Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Bond

    2001-04-01

    This document provides an overview of changes to the currently approved TA-55 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) that are included in the upgraded FSAR. The DOE Safety Evaluation Report (SER) requirements that are incorporated into the upgraded FSAR are briefly discussed to provide the starting point in the FSAR with respect to the SER requirements.

  7. 40 CFR 35.4170 - What kinds of reporting does EPA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What kinds of reporting does EPA require? 35.4170 Section 35.4170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... receive an advance payment: Type of report Required information Timing and frequency (a) Federal...

  8. 21 CFR 1311.50 - Requirements for recipients of digitally signed orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Obtaining and Using Digital Certificates for Electronic... digital certificate has not expired by checking the expiration date against the date the order was...

  9. 21 CFR 1311.50 - Requirements for recipients of digitally signed orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Obtaining and Using Digital Certificates for Electronic... digital certificate has not expired by checking the expiration date against the date the order was...

  10. What does education have to do with the New International Economic Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerij, Louis

    1982-12-01

    Greater equality in the distribution of incomes, both nationally and internationally, and more intervention to achieve this, both by national governments and international agencies, are identified as the key ideas in the proposed NIEO. Both ideas have provoked a reaction of new conservatism, aided by the current international recession. At least in part, the power of this reaction is the result of a failure in the educational professions and institutions to respond to the requirements of an NIEO in both domestic and global terms. Although the independent effects of education on social change and income distribution have indeed been over-estimated, it remains true, nevertheless, that education does have social and economic effects. Within states, education might be reorganized so as to dissolve the current dichotomy between a `learning' childhood/adolescence and a `non-learning' adulthood. Rather, learning geared to economic activity, change and restructuring might assist both developing and industrialized states to increase incomes and adjust to the requirements of the NIEO. On the international plane, the growth of development studies and of institutions concerned with the domestic effects of international relations and commerce should facilitate a more informed understanding of the balance between self-reliance and interdependence.

  11. Language learning: how much evidence does a child need in order to learn to speak grammatically?

    PubMed

    Page, Karen M

    2004-07-01

    In order to learn grammar from a finite amount of evidence, children must begin with in-built expectations of what is grammatical. They clearly are not born, however, with fully developed grammars. Thus early language development involves refinement of the grammar hypothesis until a target grammar is learnt. Here we address the question of how much evidence is required for this refinement process, by considering two standard learning algorithms and a third algorithm which is presumably as efficient as a child for some value of its memory capacity. We reformulate this algorithm in the context of Chomsky's 'principles and parameters' and show that it is possible to bound the amount of evidence required to almost certainly speak almost grammatically.

  12. 21 CFR 1311.55 - Requirements for systems used to process digitally signed orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Obtaining and Using Digital Certificates for... validated, as incorporated by reference in § 1311.08. (2) The digital signature system and hash function... linked records for orders signed with a CSOS digital certificate must meet the following requirements:...

  13. 48 CFR 8.405-2 - Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... services requiring a statement of work. 8.405-2 Section 8.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Federal Supply Schedules 8.405-2 Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work. (a)...

  14. 43 CFR 3216.14 - What filing fees and forms does a transfer require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What filing fees and forms does a transfer require? 3216.14 Section 3216.14 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) GEOTHERMAL...

  15. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... projected goals and implementation schedules, and energy and capacity benefits and renewable energy... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated...

  16. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... projected goals and implementation schedules, and energy and capacity benefits and renewable energy... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated...

  17. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... projected goals and implementation schedules, and energy and capacity benefits and renewable energy... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated...

  18. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... projected goals and implementation schedules, and energy and capacity benefits and renewable energy... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated...

  19. 10 CFR 905.14 - Does Western require annual IRP progress reports?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... projected goals and implementation schedules, and energy and capacity benefits and renewable energy... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does Western require annual IRP progress reports? 905.14 Section 905.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Integrated...

  20. 40 CFR 141.571 - What records does subpart T require my system to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What records does subpart T require my system to keep? 141.571 Section 141.571 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  1. 40 CFR 141.571 - What records does subpart T require my system to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What records does subpart T require my system to keep? 141.571 Section 141.571 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  2. 40 CFR 141.571 - What records does subpart T require my system to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What records does subpart T require my system to keep? 141.571 Section 141.571 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  3. 40 CFR 141.571 - What records does subpart T require my system to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What records does subpart T require my system to keep? 141.571 Section 141.571 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  4. 40 CFR 141.571 - What records does subpart T require my system to keep?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What records does subpart T require my system to keep? 141.571 Section 141.571 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration...

  5. 41 CFR 102-3.185 - What does this subpart require agencies to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What does this subpart require agencies to do? 102-3.185 Section 102-3.185 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL...

  6. 41 CFR 102-3.185 - What does this subpart require agencies to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What does this subpart require agencies to do? 102-3.185 Section 102-3.185 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL...

  7. 41 CFR 102-3.185 - What does this subpart require agencies to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What does this subpart require agencies to do? 102-3.185 Section 102-3.185 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 3-FEDERAL...

  8. 78 FR 64408 - Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan; Importer Membership Requirements and Referendum Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1210 Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan; Importer Membership Requirements and Referendum Order AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service... www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeanette Palmer, Marketing...

  9. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  10. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  11. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  12. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  13. 21 CFR 1305.03 - Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Distributions requiring a Form 222 or a digitally signed electronic order. Either a DEA Form 222 or its... laboratory or its agent approved by DEA. (d) Delivery from a central fill pharmacy, as defined in §...

  14. Does the Order of Invasive Species Removal Matter? The Case of the Eagle and the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul W.; Latta, Brian C.; Roemer, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Invasive species are recognized as a primary driver of native species endangerment and their removal is often a key component of a conservation strategy. Removing invasive species is not always a straightforward task, however, especially when they interact with other species in complex ways to negatively influence native species. Because unintended consequences may arise if all invasive species cannot be removed simultaneously, the order of their removal is of paramount importance to ecological restoration. In the mid-1990s, three subspecies of the island fox Urocyon littoralis were driven to near extinction on the northern California Channel Islands owing to heightened predation by golden eagles Aquila chrysaetos. Eagles were lured to the islands by an abundant supply of feral pigs Sus scrofa and through the process of apparent competition pigs indirectly facilitated the decline in foxes. As a consequence, both pigs and eagles had to be removed to recover the critically endangered fox. Complete removal of pigs was problematic: removing pigs first could force eagles to concentrate on the remaining foxes, increasing their probability of extinction. Removing eagles first was difficult: eagles are not easily captured and lethal removal was politically distasteful. Methodology/Principal Findings Using prey remains collected from eagle nests both before and after the eradication of pigs, we show that one pair of eagles that eluded capture did indeed focus more on foxes. These results support the premise that if the threat of eagle predation had not been mitigated prior to pig removal, fox extinction would have been a more likely outcome. Conclusions/Significance If complete eradication of all interacting invasive species is not possible, the order in which they are removed requires careful consideration. If overlooked, unexpected consequences may result that could impede restoration. PMID:19759894

  15. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DOE Federal Energy Usage Report DOE F 6200.2 Instructions. Ridesharing ... Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)? 102-74.200 Section 102-74.200...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy...

  16. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DOE Federal Energy Usage Report DOE F 6200.2 Instructions. Ridesharing ... Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)? 102-74.200 Section 102-74.200...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy...

  17. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... DOE Federal Energy Usage Report DOE F 6200.2 Instructions. Ridesharing ... Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)? 102-74.200 Section 102-74.200...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... DOE Federal Energy Usage Report DOE F 6200.2 Instructions. Ridesharing ... Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)? 102-74.200 Section 102-74.200...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy...

  19. 41 CFR 102-74.200 - What information are Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DOE Federal Energy Usage Report DOE F 6200.2 Instructions. Ridesharing ... Federal agencies required to report to the Department of Energy (DOE)? 102-74.200 Section 102-74.200...) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Facility Management Energy...

  20. Guidance document for revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kudera, D.E.; McMurtrey, C.D.; Meagher, B.G.

    1993-04-01

    This document provides guidance for the revision of DOE Order 5820.2A, ``Radioactive Waste Management.`` Technical Working Groups have been established and are responsible for writing the revised order. The Technical Working Groups will use this document as a reference for polices and procedures that have been established for the revision process. The overall intent of this guidance is to outline how the order will be revised and how the revision process will be managed. In addition, this document outlines technical issues considered for inclusion by a Department of Energy Steering Committee.

  1. Ezetimibe-sensitive cholesterol uptake by NPC1L1 protein does not require endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tory A.; Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    Human NPC1L1 protein mediates cholesterol absorption in the intestine and liver and is the target of the drug ezetimibe, which is used to treat hypercholesterolemia. Previous studies concluded that NPC1L1-GFP protein trafficking is regulated by cholesterol binding and that ezetimibe blocks NPC1L1-GFP function by inhibiting its endocytosis. We used cell surface biotinylation to monitor NPC1L1-GFP endocytosis and show that ezetimibe does not alter the rate of NPC1L1-GFP endocytosis in cultured rat hepatocytes grown under normal growth conditions. As expected, NPC1L1-GFP endocytosis depends in part on C-terminal, cytoplasmically oriented sequences, but endocytosis does not require cholesterol binding to NPC1L1’s N-terminal domain. In addition, two small- molecule inhibitors of general (and NPC1L1-GFP) endocytosis failed to inhibit the ezetimibe-sensitive uptake of [3H]cholesterol from taurocholate micelles. These experiments demonstrate that cholesterol uptake by NPC1L1 does not require endocytosis; moreover, ezetimibe interferes with NPC1L1’s cholesterol adsorption activity without blocking NPC1L1 internalization in RH7777 cells. PMID:27075173

  2. DOE Integrated Safeguards and Security (DISS) historical document archival and retrieval analysis, requirements and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Guyer, H.B.; McChesney, C.A.

    1994-10-07

    The overall primary Objective of HDAR is to create a repository of historical personnel security documents and provide the functionality needed for archival and retrieval use by other software modules and application users of the DISS/ET system. The software product to be produced from this specification is the Historical Document Archival and Retrieval Subsystem The product will provide the functionality to capture, retrieve and manage documents currently contained in the personnel security folders in DOE Operations Offices vaults at various locations across the United States. The long-term plan for DISS/ET includes the requirement to allow for capture and storage of arbitrary, currently undefined, clearance-related documents that fall outside the scope of the ``cradle-to-grave`` electronic processing provided by DISS/ET. However, this requirement is not within the scope of the requirements specified in this document.

  3. Using Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 To Find a Cost Effective Waste Management Option. - 12241

    SciTech Connect

    LaBarge, Matt; Frost, Matt

    2012-07-01

    The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Project in Portsmouth Ohio was faced with an interesting dilemma. During hot functional testing in August 2010, an upset condition caused gaseous depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) to come in contact with the hydrofluoric acid (HF) vapor stream. Although the resulting uranium contamination found in the condensed aqueous hydrofluoric acid was very low, it exceeded the Department of Energy (DOE) authorized release limit. After evaluating several commercial options for treatment and disposal using the guidelines found in DOE Order 435.1, Waste Control Specialists LLC was selected for the treatment of the waste, with EnergySolutions' Clive facility selected for disposal of the treated residues. The waste was safely transported from Piketon, Ohio to Andrews, Texas, where it was treated to meet the land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), and was disposed in EnergySolutions operational mixed waste cell. The entire effort was interesting for several reasons. The waste was generated during the last year of the first Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride contractor. The waste became additional scope for the new contractor, adding time delays and introducing new personnel into the project. The effort was also unique because it demonstrated the process mandated by DOE Order 435.1 to evaluate all options, including commercial options, could reveal solutions to waste management problems that are currently available and more cost effective, but not well know within the DOE complex. (authors)

  4. ASDC Ordering Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-08

    ... Ordering requires login , searching does not. Projects by science discipline: Aerosols | Clouds | Radiation Budget ... Tropospheric Composition | Field Campaigns All projects Details:  ASDC Ordering Tool ...

  5. DOE nuclear material packaging manual: storage container requirements for plutonium oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Veirs, D Kirk

    2009-01-01

    Loss of containment of nuclear material stored in containers such as food-pack cans, paint cans, or taped slip lid cans has generated concern about packaging requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials in working facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In response, DOE has recently issued DOE M 441.1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual' with encouragement from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. A unique feature compared to transportation containers is the allowance of filters to vent flammable gases during storage. Defining commonly used concepts such as maximum allowable working pressure and He leak rate criteria become problematic when considering vented containers. Los Alamos has developed a set of container requirements that are in compliance with 441.1 based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide. The pre and post drop-test He leak rates depend upon container size as well as the material contents. For containers that are routinely handled, ease of handling and weight are a major consideration. Relatively thin-walled containers with flat bottoms are desired yet they cannot be He leak tested at a differential pressure of one atmosphere due to the potential for plastic deformation of the flat bottom during testing. The He leak rates and He leak testing configuration for containers designed for plutonium bearing materials will be presented. The approach to meeting the other manual requirements such as corrosion and thermal degradation resistance will be addressed. The information presented can be used by other sites to evaluate if their conditions are bounded by LANL requirements when considering procurement of 441.1 compliant containers.

  6. 21 CFR 1311.55 - Requirements for systems used to process digitally signed orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirements for systems used to process digitally signed orders. 1311.55 Section 1311.55 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... system that is within five minutes of the official National Institute of Standards and Technology...

  7. 21 CFR 1311.55 - Requirements for systems used to process digitally signed orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirements for systems used to process digitally signed orders. 1311.55 Section 1311.55 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... system that is within five minutes of the official National Institute of Standards and Technology...

  8. 21 CFR 1311.55 - Requirements for systems used to process digitally signed orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and any other records required in part 1305 of this chapter, including any linked data. (10) The system must create an order that includes all data fields listed under § 1305.21(b) of this chapter. (c... access the private key. Activation data must not be displayed as they are entered. (5) The system...

  9. 19 CFR 210.34 - Protective orders; reporting requirement; sanctions and other actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Protective orders; reporting requirement; sanctions and other actions. 210.34 Section 210.34 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE... time or place; (3) That discovery may be had only by a method of discovery other than that selected...

  10. NERSC Cyber Security Challenges That Require DOE Development andSupport

    SciTech Connect

    Draney, Brent; Campbell, Scott; Walter, Howard

    2007-01-16

    Traditional security approaches do not adequately addressall the requirements of open, scientific computing facilities. Many ofthe methods used for more restricted environments, including almost allcorporate/commercial systems, do not meet the needs of today's science.Use of only the available "state of the practice" commercial methods willhave adverse impact on the ability of DOE to accomplish its sciencegoals, and impacts the productivity of the DOE Science community. Inparticular, NERSC and other high performance computing (HPC) centers havespecial security challenges that are unlikely to be met unless DOE fundsdevelopment and support of reliable and effective tools designed to meetthe cyber security needs of High Performance Science. The securitychallenges facing NERSC can be collected into three basic problem sets:network performance and dynamics, application complexity and diversity,and a complex user community that can have transient affiliations withactual institutions. To address these problems, NERSC proposes thefollowing four general solutions: auditing user and system activityacross sites; firewall port configuration in real time;cross-site/virtual organization identity management and access control;and detecting security issues in application middleware. Solutions arealsoproposed for three general long term issues: data volume,application complexity, and information integration.

  11. Arrival order among native plant functional groups does not affect invasibility of constructed dune communities.

    PubMed

    Mason, T J; French, K; Jolley, D

    2013-10-01

    Different arrival order scenarios of native functional groups to a site may influence both resource use during development and final community structure. Arrival order may then indirectly influence community resistance to invasion. We present a mesocosm experiment of constructed coastal dune communities that monitored biotic and abiotic responses to different arrival orders of native functional groups. Constructed communities were compared with unplanted mesocosms. We then simulated a single invasion event by bitou (Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata), a dominant exotic shrub of coastal communities. We evaluated the hypothesis that plantings with simultaneous representation of grass, herb and shrub functional groups at the beginning of the experiment would more completely sequester resources and limit invasion than staggered plantings. Staggered plantings in turn would offer greater resource use and invasion resistance than unplanted mesocosms. Contrary to our expectations, there were few effects of arrival order on abiotic variables for the duration of the experiment and arrival order was unimportant in final community invasibility. All planted mesocosms supported significantly more invader germinants and significantly less invader abundance than unplanted mesocosms. Native functional group plantings may have a nurse effect during the invader germination and establishment phase and a competitive function during the invader juvenile and adult phase. Arrival order per se did not affect resource use and community invasibility in our mesocosm experiment. While grass, herb and shrub functional group plantings will not prevent invasion success in restored communities, they may limit final invader biomass.

  12. Analysis of waste treatment requirements for DOE mixed wastes: Technical basis

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The risks and costs of managing DOE wastes are a direct function of the total quantities of 3wastes that are handled at each step of the management process. As part of the analysis of the management of DOE low-level mixed wastes (LLMW), a reference scheme has been developed for the treatment of these wastes to meet EPA criteria. The treatment analysis in a limited form was also applied to one option for treatment of transuranic wastes. The treatment requirements in all cases analyzed are based on a reference flowsheet which provides high level treatment trains for all LLMW. This report explains the background and basis for that treatment scheme. Reference waste stream chemical compositions and physical properties including densities were established for each stream in the data base. These compositions are used to define the expected behavior for wastes as they pass through the treatment train. Each EPA RCRA waste code was reviewed, the properties, chemical composition, or characteristics which are of importance to waste behavior in treatment were designated. Properties that dictate treatment requirements were then used to develop the treatment trains and identify the unit operations that would be included in these trains. A table was prepared showing a correlation of the waste physical matrix and the waste treatment requirements as a guide to the treatment analysis. The analysis of waste treatment loads is done by assigning wastes to treatment steps which would achieve RCRA compliant treatment. These correlation`s allow one to examine the treatment requirements in a condensed manner and to see that all wastes and contaminant sets are fully considered.

  13. Root growth regulation and gravitropism in maize roots does not require the epidermis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have earlier published observations showing that endogenous alterations in growth rate during gravitropism in maize roots (Zea mays L.) are unaffected by the orientation of cuts which remove epidermal and cortical tissue in the growing zone (Bjorkman and Cleland, 1988, Planta 176, 513-518). We concluded that the epidermis and cortex are not essential for transporting a growth-regulating signal in gravitropism or straight growth, nor for regulating the rate of tissue expansion. This conclusion has been challenged by Yang et al. (1990, Planta 180, 530-536), who contend that a shallow girdle around the entire perimeter of the root blocks gravitropic curvature and that this inhibition is the result of a requirement for epidermal cells to transport the growth-regulating signal. In this paper we demonstrate that the entire epidermis can be removed without blocking gravitropic curvature and show that the position of narrow girdles does not affect the location of curvature. We therefore conclude that the epidermis is not required for transport of a growth-regulating substance from the root cap to the growing zone, nor does it regulate the growth rate of the elongating zone of roots.

  14. Does Higher-Order Thinking Impinge on Learner-Centric Digital Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathew, Bincy; Raja, B. William Dharma

    2015-01-01

    Humans are social beings and the social cognition focuses on how one form impressions of other people, interpret the meaning of other people's behaviour and how people's behaviour is affected by our attitudes. The school provides complex social situations and in order to thrive, students must possess social cognition, the process of thinking about…

  15. Intimate Partner Violence, Relationship Status, and Protective Orders: Does "Living in Sin" Entail a Different Experience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Lisa; Logan, T. K.; Cole, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    The legal status of women's intimate relationships may allow for different experiences with intimate partner violence (IPV) and the protections received from the criminal justice system. There has been limited research examining differences in IPV and protective orders for women in marital and cohabiting intimate relationships. This study examines…

  16. 21 CFR 1.378 - What criteria does FDA use to order a detention?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....378 Section 1.378 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... employee of FDA may order the detention of any article of food that is found during an inspection... the article of food is adulterated or misbranded....

  17. 43 CFR 3195.25 - What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... order/contract for a major helium requirement? 3195.25 Section 3195.25 Public Lands: Interior... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.25 What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement? A purchase order/contract must...

  18. 43 CFR 3195.25 - What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... order/contract for a major helium requirement? 3195.25 Section 3195.25 Public Lands: Interior... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.25 What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement? A purchase order/contract must...

  19. 43 CFR 3195.25 - What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... order/contract for a major helium requirement? 3195.25 Section 3195.25 Public Lands: Interior... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.25 What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement? A purchase order/contract must...

  20. 43 CFR 3195.25 - What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... order/contract for a major helium requirement? 3195.25 Section 3195.25 Public Lands: Interior... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) HELIUM CONTRACTS Federal Agency Requirements § 3195.25 What information must be in my purchase order/contract for a major helium requirement? A purchase order/contract must...

  1. 10 CFR 727.5 - What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... information on DOE computers? 727.5 Section 727.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONSENT FOR ACCESS TO INFORMATION ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPUTERS § 727.5 What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers? An individual may not be granted access to information on a...

  2. 10 CFR 727.5 - What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... information on DOE computers? 727.5 Section 727.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONSENT FOR ACCESS TO INFORMATION ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPUTERS § 727.5 What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers? An individual may not be granted access to information on a...

  3. 10 CFR 727.5 - What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... information on DOE computers? 727.5 Section 727.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONSENT FOR ACCESS TO INFORMATION ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPUTERS § 727.5 What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers? An individual may not be granted access to information on a...

  4. 10 CFR 727.5 - What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... information on DOE computers? 727.5 Section 727.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONSENT FOR ACCESS TO INFORMATION ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPUTERS § 727.5 What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers? An individual may not be granted access to information on a...

  5. 10 CFR 727.5 - What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... information on DOE computers? 727.5 Section 727.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONSENT FOR ACCESS TO INFORMATION ON DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPUTERS § 727.5 What acknowledgment and consent is required for access to information on DOE computers? An individual may not be granted access to information on a...

  6. 43 CFR 404.60 - Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)? 404.60 Section 404.60 Public... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.60 Does this rule contain an information...

  7. 43 CFR 404.60 - Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)? 404.60 Section 404.60 Public... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.60 Does this rule contain an information...

  8. 43 CFR 404.60 - Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)? 404.60 Section 404.60 Public... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.60 Does this rule contain an information...

  9. 43 CFR 404.60 - Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)? 404.60 Section 404.60 Public... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.60 Does this rule contain an information...

  10. 43 CFR 404.60 - Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Does this rule contain an information collection that requires approval by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)? 404.60 Section 404.60 Public... RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.60 Does this rule contain an information...

  11. 20 CFR 411.410 - Does each referral from an EN to a State VR agency require its own agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does each referral from an EN to a State VR agency require its own agreement? 411.410 Section 411.410 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY...' Participation Agreements Between Employment Networks and State Vr Agencies § 411.410 Does each referral from...

  12. 20 CFR 411.410 - Does each referral from an EN to a State VR agency require its own agreement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does each referral from an EN to a State VR agency require its own agreement? 411.410 Section 411.410 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY...' Participation Agreements Between Employment Networks and State Vr Agencies § 411.410 Does each referral from...

  13. OCTET does not demonstrate a lack of effectiveness for community treatment orders.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David

    2014-02-01

    In the Oxford Community Treatment Order Evaluation Trial (OCTET), patients were randomised either to be made subject to a community treatment order (CTO) or to be managed with Section 17 leave and discharge. No differences in outcome between the two groups were observed. Here it is argued that the patients studied were not those who might have benefited from a CTO and that the psychiatrists involved were unlikely to have used the provisions of a CTO assertively. Consideration of the lengths of time for which both Section 17 leave and CTOs were used supports the notion that CTOs were not used appropriately for a group of patients who might have benefited from them. Hence the results of this study should not be taken to provide any evidence as to the effectiveness or otherwise of CTOs.

  14. Glycolipid Crosslinking Is Required for Cholera Toxin to Partition Into and Stabilize Ordered Domains.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Krishnan; Wong, Tiffany H; Chinnapen, Daniel J; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobling, Michael G; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2016-12-20

    Current models of lipid rafts propose that lipid domains exist as nanoscale compositional fluctuations and these fluctuations can potentially be stabilized into larger domains, consequently better compartmentalizing cellular functions. However, the mechanisms governing stabilized raft assembly and function remain unclear. Here, we test the role of glycolipid crosslinking as a raft targeting and ordering mechanism using the well-studied raft marker cholera toxin B pentamer (CTxB) that binds up to five GM1 glycosphingolipids to enter host cells. We show that when applied to cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles, a variant of CTxB containing only a single functional GM1 binding site exhibits significantly reduced partitioning to the ordered phase compared to wild-type CTxB with five binding sites. Moreover, monovalent CTxB does not stabilize membrane domains, unlike wild-type CTxB. These results support the long-held hypothesis that CTxB stabilizes raft domains via a lipid crosslinking mechanism and establish a role for crosslinking in the partitioning of CTxB to ordered domains.

  15. How does participation in inquiry-based activities influence gifted students' higher order thinking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reger, Barbara H.

    Inquiry-based learning is considered a useful technique to strengthen the critical thinking skills of students. The National Science Standards emphasize its use and the complexities and challenge it provides are well suited for meeting the needs of the gifted. While many studies have documented the effectiveness of this type of instruction, there is a lack of research on growth in higher-order thinking through participation in science inquiry. This study investigated such growth among a small group of gifted fifth-grade students. In this study a group of fifth-grade gifted science students completed a series of three forensics inquiry lessons, and documented questions, ideas and reflections as they constructed evidence to solve a crime. From this class of students, one small group was purposely selected to serve as the focus of the study. Using qualitative techniques, the questions and statements students made as they interacted in the activity were analyzed. Videotaped comments and student logs were coded for emerging patterns and also examined for evidence of increased levels of higher-order thinking based on a rubric that was designed using the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Evidence from this study showed marked increase in and deeper levels of higher-order thinking for two of the students. The other boy and girl showed progress using the inquiry activities, but it was not as evident. The social dynamics of the group seemed to hinder one girl's participation during some of the activities. The social interactions played a role in strengthening the exchange of ideas and thinking skills for the others. The teacher had a tremendous influence over the production of higher-level statements by modeling that level of thinking as she questioned the students. Through her practice of answering a question with a question, she gradually solicited more analytical thinking from her students.

  16. 12 CFR 1202.6 - What if my request does not have all the information FHFA requires?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What if my request does not have all the information FHFA requires? 1202.6 Section 1202.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1202.6 What if my request does not have all the information FHFA requires? If the FHFA...

  17. A reverse order interview does not aid deception detection regarding intentions

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Elise; McGuire, Mollie; Langben, Sara; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Promising recent research suggests that more cognitively demanding interviews improve deception detection accuracy. Would these cognitively demanding techniques work in the same way when discriminating between true and false future intentions? In Experiment 1 participants planned to complete a task, but instead were intercepted and interviewed about their intentions. Participants lied or told the truth, and were subjected to high (reverse order) or low (sequential order) cognitive load interviews. Third-party observers watched these interviews and indicated whether they thought the person was lying or telling the truth. Subjecting participants to a reverse compared to sequential interview increased the misidentification rate and the appearance of cognitive load in truth tellers. People lying about false intentions were not better identified. In Experiment 2, a second set of third-party observers rated behavioral cues. Consistent with Experiment 1, truth tellers, but not liars, exhibited more behaviors associated with lying and fewer behaviors associated with truth telling in the reverse than sequential interview. Together these results suggest that certain cognitively demanding interviews may be less useful when interviewing to detect false intentions. Explaining a true intention while under higher cognitive demand places truth tellers at risk of being misclassified. There may be such a thing as too much cognitive load induced by certain techniques PMID:26379610

  18. An in fiber experimental approach to photonic quantum digital signatures that does not require quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Robert J.; Donaldon, Ross J.; Dunjko, Vedran; Wallden, Petros; Clarke, Patrick J.; Andersson, Erika; Jeffers, John; Buller, Gerald S.

    2014-10-01

    Classical digital signatures are commonly used in e-mail, electronic financial transactions and other forms of electronic communications to ensure that messages have not been tampered with in transit, and that messages are transferrable. The security of commonly used classical digital signature schemes relies on the computational difficulty of inverting certain mathematical functions. However, at present, there are no such one-way functions which have been proven to be hard to invert. With enough computational resources certain implementations of classical public key cryptosystems can be, and have been, broken with current technology. It is nevertheless possible to construct information-theoretically secure signature schemes, including quantum digital signature schemes. Quantum signature schemes can be made information theoretically secure based on the laws of quantum mechanics, while classical comparable protocols require additional resources such as secret communication and a trusted authority. Early demonstrations of quantum digital signatures required quantum memory, rendering them impractical at present. Our present implementation is based on a protocol that does not require quantum memory. It also uses the new technique of unambiguous quantum state elimination, Here we report experimental results for a test-bed system, recorded with a variety of different operating parameters, along with a discussion of aspects of the system security.

  19. 20 CFR 10.909 - How does an employee designate a variation in the order or percentage of gratuity payable to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does an employee designate a variation in...' COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Death Gratuity § 10.909 How does an employee designate a variation in the order or...) Form CA-40 must be used to make a variation in the order or percentages of survivors under § 10.907...

  20. Assessing preferences about the DNR order: does it depend on how you ask?

    PubMed

    Percy, M E; Llewellyn-Thomas, H

    1995-01-01

    Despite increasing emphasis on advance directives, there has been little methodologic work to assess preferences about the "do not resuscitate" (DNR) order. This developmental work assessed, in a non-patient group, the performance of a probability-trade-off task designed to assess DNR attitudes, in terms of framing effects and stability of preferences. 105 female nursing students each completed one of two versions of the task. In version I (n = 58), the trade-off moved to increasingly negative descriptions of the outcomes of resuscitation (decreasing chance of survival and increasing risk of brain death), whereas in version II (n = 47), the trade-off moved to increasingly positive descriptions. One week later, repeat assessments were obtained for versions I (n = 35) and II (n = 28). The DNR preference scores were lower and more stable when the task moved to increasingly positive descriptions; perhaps this version of the task tends to weaken risk aversion. These results imply that care should be used in applying a probability trade-off task to the assessment of DNR preferences, since artefactual effects could be induced.

  1. Does order matter? Investigating the effect of sequence on glance duration during on-road driving

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Shannon C.; Reimer, Bryan; Mehler, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Previous literature has shown that vehicle crash risks increases as drivers’ off-road glance duration increases. Many factors influence drivers’ glance duration such as individual differences, driving environment, or task characteristics. Theories and past studies suggest that glance duration increases as the task progresses, but the exact relationship between glance sequence and glance durations is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of glance sequence on glance duration among drivers completing a visual-manual radio tuning task and an auditory-vocal based multi-modal navigation entry task. Eighty participants drove a vehicle on urban highways while completing radio tuning and navigation entry tasks. Forty participants drove under an experimental protocol that required three button presses followed by rotation of a tuning knob to complete the radio tuning task while the other forty participants completed the task with one less button press. Multiple statistical analyses were conducted to measure the effect of glance sequence on glance duration. Results showed that across both tasks and a variety of statistical tests, glance sequence had inconsistent effects on glance duration—the effects varied according to the number of glances, task type, and data set that was being evaluated. Results suggest that other aspects of the task as well as interface design effect glance duration and should be considered in the context of examining driver attention or lack thereof. All in all, interface design and task characteristics have a more influential impact on glance duration than glance sequence, suggesting that classical design considerations impacting driver attention, such as the size and location of buttons, remain fundamental in designing in-vehicle interfaces. PMID:28158301

  2. Does order matter? Investigating the effect of sequence on glance duration during on-road driving.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonbum; Roberts, Shannon C; Reimer, Bryan; Mehler, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Previous literature has shown that vehicle crash risks increases as drivers' off-road glance duration increases. Many factors influence drivers' glance duration such as individual differences, driving environment, or task characteristics. Theories and past studies suggest that glance duration increases as the task progresses, but the exact relationship between glance sequence and glance durations is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of glance sequence on glance duration among drivers completing a visual-manual radio tuning task and an auditory-vocal based multi-modal navigation entry task. Eighty participants drove a vehicle on urban highways while completing radio tuning and navigation entry tasks. Forty participants drove under an experimental protocol that required three button presses followed by rotation of a tuning knob to complete the radio tuning task while the other forty participants completed the task with one less button press. Multiple statistical analyses were conducted to measure the effect of glance sequence on glance duration. Results showed that across both tasks and a variety of statistical tests, glance sequence had inconsistent effects on glance duration-the effects varied according to the number of glances, task type, and data set that was being evaluated. Results suggest that other aspects of the task as well as interface design effect glance duration and should be considered in the context of examining driver attention or lack thereof. All in all, interface design and task characteristics have a more influential impact on glance duration than glance sequence, suggesting that classical design considerations impacting driver attention, such as the size and location of buttons, remain fundamental in designing in-vehicle interfaces.

  3. 24 CFR 1000.242 - When does the requirement for exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities? 1000.242 Section 1000.242 Housing and Urban... ACTIVITIES Indian Housing Plan (IHP) § 1000.242 When does the requirement for exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities? The requirement for exemption from taxation applies only to...

  4. 40 CFR 51.10 - How does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... are required by the NOX SIP Call? 51.10 Section 51.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call? The District of Columbia and states that are subject to the NOX SIP Call § 51.121) are subject to the emissions reporting...

  5. 40 CFR 51.10 - How does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... are required by the NOX SIP Call? 51.10 Section 51.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call? The District of Columbia and states that are subject to the NOX SIP Call § 51.121) are subject to the emissions reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 51.10 - How does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... are required by the NOX SIP Call? 51.10 Section 51.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call? The District of Columbia and states that are subject to the NOX SIP Call § 51.121) are subject to the emissions reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 51.10 - How does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... are required by the NOX SIP Call? 51.10 Section 51.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call? The District of Columbia and states that are subject to the NOX SIP Call § 51.121) are subject to the emissions reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 51.10 - How does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... are required by the NOX SIP Call? 51.10 Section 51.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... does my state report emissions that are required by the NOX SIP Call? The District of Columbia and states that are subject to the NOX SIP Call § 51.121) are subject to the emissions reporting...

  9. 21 CFR 1311.30 - Requirements for storing and using a private key for digitally signing orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Obtaining and Using Digital... signing orders. (a) Only the certificate holder may access or use his or her digital certificate...

  10. 21 CFR 1311.30 - Requirements for storing and using a private key for digitally signing orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS Obtaining and Using Digital... signing orders. (a) Only the certificate holder may access or use his or her digital certificate...

  11. Higher order thinking skills competencies required by outcomes-based education from learners.

    PubMed

    Chabeli, M M

    2006-08-01

    Outcomes-Based Education (OBE) brought about a significant paradigm shift in the education and training of learners in South Africa. OBE requires a shift from focusing on the teacher input (instruction offerings or syllabuses expressed in terms of content), to focusing on learner outcomes. OBE is moving away from 'transmission' models to constructivistic, learner-centered models that put emphasis on learning as an active process (Nieburh, 1996:30). Teachers act as facilitators and mediators of learning (Norms and Standards, Government Gazette vol 415, no 20844 of 2000). Facilitators are responsible to create the environment that is conducive for learners to construct their own knowledge, skills and values through interaction (Peters, 2000). The first critical cross-field outcome accepted by the South African Qualification Framework (SAQA) is that learners should be able to identify and solve problems by using critical and creative thinking skills. This paper seeks to explore some higher order thinking skills competencies required by OBE from learners such as critical thinking, reflective thinking, creative thinking, dialogic / dialectic thinking, decision making, problem solving and emotional intelligence and their implications in facilitating teaching and learning from the theoretical perspective. The philosophical underpinning of these higher order thinking skills is described to give direction to the study. It is recommended that a study focusing on the assessment of these intellectual concepts be made. The study may be qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods in nature (Creswell 2005).

  12. Material characterization for morphing purposes in order to match flight requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geier, Sebastian; Kintscher, Markus; Heintze, Olaf; Wierach, Peter; Monner, Hans-Peter; Wiedemann, Martin

    2012-04-01

    Natural laminar flow is one of the challenging aims of the current aerospace research. Main reasons for the aerodynamic transition from laminar into turbulent flow focusing on the airfoil-structure is the aerodynamic shape and the surface roughness. The Institute of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems at the German Aerospace Center in Braunschweig works on the optimization of the aerodynamic-loaded structure of future aircrafts in order to increase their efficiency. Providing wing structures suited for natural laminar flow is a step towards this goal. Regarding natural laminar flow, the structural design of the leading edge of a wing is of special interest. An approach for a gap-less leading edge was developed to provide a gap- and step-less high quality surface suited for natural laminar flow and to reduce slat noise. In a national project the first generation of the 3D full scale demonstrator was successfully tested in 2010. The prototype consists of several new technologies, opening up the issue of matching the long and challenging list of airworthiness requirements simultaneously. Therefore the developed composite structure was intensively tested for further modifications according to meet requirements for abrasion, impact and deicing basically. The former presented structure consists completely of glass-fiber-prepreg (GFRP-prepreg). New functions required the addition of a new material-mix, which has to fit into the manufacturing-chain of the composite structure. In addition the hybrid composites have to withstand high loadings, high bending-induced strains (1%) and environmentally influenced aging. Moreover hot-wet cycling tests are carried out for the basic GFRP-structure in order to simulate the long term behavior of the material under extrem conditions. The presented paper shows results of four-points-bending-tests of the most critical section of the morphing leading edge device. Different composite-hybrids are built up and processed. An experimental

  13. Water Balance Modelling - Does The Required Model Complexity Change With Scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blöschl, G.; Merz, R.

    An important issue in modelling the water balance of catchments is what is the suitable model complexity. Anecdotal evidence suggests that the model complexity required to model the water balance accurately decreases with catchment scale but so far very few studies have quantified these possible effects. In this paper we examine the model per- formance as a function of catchment scale for a given model complexity which allows us to infer, whether the required model complexity changes with scale. We also exam- ine whether the calibrated parameter values change with scale or are scale invariant. In a case study we analysed 700 catchments in Austria with catchment sizes ranging from 10 to 100 000 km2. 30 years of daily data (runoff, precipitation, air temperature, air humidity) were analysed. A spatially lumped, conceptual, HBV style soil mois- ture accounting scheme was used which involved fifteen model parameters including snow processes. Five parameters were preset and ten parameters were calibrated on observed daily streamflow. The calibration period was about 10 years and the verifi- cation period was about 20 years. Model performance (in terms of Nash-Sutcliffe effi- ciency) was examined both for the calibration and the verification periods. The mean efficiency over all catchments only decreased slightly when moving from the calibra- tion to the verification (from R2 = 0.65 to 0.60). The results suggest that the model efficiencies (both for the calibration and the verification) do not change which catch- ment scale for scales smaller than 10 000 km2 but beyond this scale there is a slight decrease in model performance. This means that for these very large scales, a spatial subdivision of the lumped model is needed to allow for spatial differences in rainfall. The results also suggest that the model parameters are not scale dependent. We con- clude that the complexity required for water balance models of catchments does not change with scale for catchment sizes

  14. EVALUATION OF STATE-OF-THE-ART MANIPULATORS AND REQUIREMENTS FOR DOE ROBOTICS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    BLACK, DEREK; GRUPINSKI, STEPHEN

    1998-10-08

    This report provides an overview of applications within the DOE complex which could benefit from the use of modular robotics technology during remediation operations. Each application area contains one or more specific tasks which are presently conducted by humans under hazardous conditions or which are deemed highly impractical, or are altogether impossible without automation. Five major areas were investigated for specific needs with respect to automation. Information was collected on Mixed Waste Operations, Contaminant Automated Analysis, Tanks, Decontamination and Dismantlement and Automated Plutonium Processing. During this investigation, information was gathered from available literature, telephone interviews with informed personnel and on-site visits. This data serves to provide design requirements and guidelines for the design of a family of modular actuators, which will be used to construct manipulators suited to each task. In addition, a survey of existing modular manipulator designs is presented. This survey addresses modular manipulators developed inside government labs and in universities for such applications as space exploration or controls research. It also addresses efforts at commercially viable industrial manipulators which have been built. This survey of robotic systems provides the reader with a glimpse into what technology currently exists in the way of modular manipulator automation and, to a degree, where this technology may be applicable or, more often, where these systems are unsuited to EM applications. From the information gathered during this study, it is possible to sufficiently define the requirements of one manipulator system which can be used to conduct automated transfer operations within Plutonium gloveboxes. This manipulator will be constructed from ARM Automation actuator modules and will provide this application with a viable option for automation within these gloveboxes. The design issues surrounding this manipulator and its

  15. The DDR at telomeres lacking intact shelterin does not require substantial chromatin decompaction.

    PubMed

    Timashev, Leonid A; Babcock, Hazen; Zhuang, Xiaowei; de Lange, Titia

    2017-03-15

    Telomeres are protected by shelterin, a six-subunit protein complex that represses the DNA damage response (DDR) at chromosome ends. Extensive data suggest that TRF2 in shelterin remodels telomeres into the t-loop structure, thereby hiding telomere ends from double-stranded break repair and ATM signaling, whereas POT1 represses ATR signaling by excluding RPA. An alternative protection mechanism was suggested recently by which shelterin subunits TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 mediate telomeric chromatin compaction, which was proposed to minimize access of DDR factors. We performed superresolution imaging of telomeres in mouse cells after conditional deletion of TRF1, TRF2, or both, the latter of which results in the complete loss of shelterin. Upon removal of TRF1 or TRF2, we observed only minor changes in the telomere volume in most of our experiments. Upon codeletion of TRF1 and TRF2, the telomere volume increased by varying amounts, but even those samples exhibiting small changes in telomere volume showed DDR at nearly all telomeres. Upon shelterin removal, telomeres underwent 53BP1-dependent clustering, potentially explaining at least in part the apparent increase in telomere volume. Furthermore, chromatin accessibility, as determined by ATAC-seq (assay for transposase-accessible chromatin [ATAC] with high-throughput sequencing), was not substantially altered by shelterin removal. These results suggest that the DDR induced by shelterin removal does not require substantial telomere decompaction.

  16. TYLCV-Is movement in planta does not require V2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hak, Hagit; Levy, Yael; Chandran, Sam A.; Belausov, Eduard; Loyter, Abraham; Lapidot, Moshe; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-03-15

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen causing extensive crop losses, is a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus. V2 mutants of TYLCV-Is and related viruses tend to induce symptomless infection with attenuated viral DNA levels, while accumulating close to wild-type DNA levels in protoplasts, suggesting V2 as a movement protein. The discovery of plant-silencing mechanisms and viral silencing suppressors, V2 included, led us to reconsider V2's involvement in viral movement. We studied two mutant versions of the virus, one impaired in V2 silencing-suppression activity, and another carrying a non-translatable V2. While both mutant viruses spread in the infected plant to newly emerged leaves at the same rate as the wild-type virus, their DNA-accumulation levels were tenfold lower than in the wild-type virus. Thus, we suggest that the setback in virus proliferation, previously ascribed to a movement impediment, is due to lack of silencing-suppression activity. - Highlights: • TYLCV-Is V2 protein is localized in distinct microbodies throughout the cell cytoplasm, around the nucleus and in association with cytoplasmic strands but is not associated with the plasmodesmata. • Disruption of RNA-silencing suppression activity of TYLCV-Is V2 protein causes low titer of the virus in the infected plants. • The movement of TYLCV-Is in planta does not require a functional V2 protein.

  17. Cholesteryl ester transfer between lipoproteins does not require a ternary tunnel complex with CETP.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Matthias E; Graff-Meyer, Alexandra; Rufer, Arne C; Maugeais, Cyrille; von der Mark, Elisabeth; Matile, Hugues; D'Arcy, Brigitte; Magg, Christine; Ringler, Philippe; Müller, Shirley A; Scherer, Sebastian; Dernick, Gregor; Thoma, Ralf; Hennig, Michael; Niesor, Eric J; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-05-01

    The cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) enables the transfer of cholesteryl ester (CE) from high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to low-density lipoproteins (LDL) in the plasma compartment. CETP inhibition raises plasma levels of HDL cholesterol; a ternary tunnel complex with CETP bridging HDL and LDL was suggested as a mechanism. Here, we test whether the inhibition of CETP tunnel complex formation is a promising approach to suppress CE transfer from HDL to LDL, for potential treatment of cardio-vascular disease (CVD). Three monoclonal antibodies against different epitopes of CETP are assayed for their potential to interfere with CE transfer between HDL and/or LDL. Surprisingly, antibodies that target the tips of the elongated CETP molecule, interaction sites sterically required to form the suggested transfer complexes, do not interfere with CETP activity, but an antibody binding to the central region does. We show that CETP interacts with HDL, but not with LDL. Our findings demonstrate that a ternary tunnel complex is not the mechanistic prerequisite to transfer CE among lipoproteins.

  18. Does the Chemical Diversity of the Order Haplosclerida (Phylum Porifera: Class Demospongia) Fit with Current Taxonomic Classification?

    PubMed

    Tribalat, Marie-Aude; Marra, Maria V; McCormack, Grace P; Thomas, Olivier P

    2016-06-01

    Sponges and their associated microbiota are well known to produce a large diversity of natural products, also called specialized metabolites. In addition to their potential use in the pharmaceutical industry, these rather species-specific compounds may help in the classification of some particular sponge groups. We review herein compounds isolated from haplosclerid sponges (Class Demospongia, Order Haplosclerida) in order to help in the revision of this large group of marine invertebrates. We focus only on 3-alkylpyridine derivatives and polyacetylenic compounds, as these two groups of natural products are characteristic of haplosclerid species and are highly diverse. A close collaboration between chemists and biologists is required in order to fully apply chemotaxonomical approaches, and whenever possible biological data should include morphological and molecular data and some insight into their microbial abundance.

  19. 42 CFR 137.298 - Are Self-Governance Tribes required to comply with Executive Orders to fulfill their...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....298 Are Self-Governance Tribes required to comply with Executive Orders to fulfill their environmental... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are Self-Governance Tribes required to comply with Executive Orders to fulfill their environmental responsibilities under section 509 of the Act ?...

  20. 12 CFR 1080.12 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity. 1080.12 Section 1080.12 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION RULES RELATING TO INVESTIGATIONS § 1080.12 Orders requiring witnesses...

  1. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  2. Does Every Necrotizing Granulomatous Inflammation Identified by NSCLC Resection Material Require Treatment?

    PubMed

    Yakar, Fatih; Yakar, Aysun; Büyükpınarbaşılı, Nur; Erelel, Mustafa

    2016-04-11

    BACKGROUND Lung cancer and tuberculosis (TB) are two major public health problems. They can coexist or appear sequentially. In patients with TB, lung cancer risk is increased. However, vice versa is not crystal clear. In this study, we aimed to determine the development of TB in patients with resectabled non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a 2-year postoperative follow-up period. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study at three university hospitals. Patients who had NSCLC surgery between 2009 and 2013 were included and patient records were reviewed for the presence of necrotizing granulomatous inflammation (NGI) in resected specimens. Demographic properties, tumor type, stage, location, type of surgery, tuberculosis history, and thorax CT findings were recorded. We searched for the development of tuberculosis within a 2-year period after surgery. RESULTS A total of 1027 patient cases were reviewed, of which 48 patients had NGI. The median age was 63 years. The most common type of cancer was squamous carcinoma; and lobectomy was the preferred operation (70.8%). Cancer involvement most commonly included the right lung (61.8%) and upper lobes (47,9%). Only 11 patients had anti-TB treatment postoperatively, which was based on radiological findings. Prior tuberculosis or anti-TB history, type, stage or localization of cancer, and adjuvant/neoadjuvant therapy were not found to be related to TB treatment. None of the study population had TB during the two-year follow-up period. Treatment decisions appeared mostly related to physician experience. There was no difference in the risk of developing TB between patients with or without treatment. This finding may change the management of our patients. CONCLUSIONS Every NGI discovered in NSCLC resected material does not always require anti-TB treatment.

  3. Aspergillus nidulans Ambient pH Signaling Does Not Require Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Lucena-Agell, Daniel; Galindo, Antonio; Arst, Herbert N.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus nidulans (Pal) ambient pH signaling takes place in cortical structures containing components of the ESCRT pathway, which are hijacked by the alkaline pH-activated, ubiquitin-modified version of the arrestin-like protein PalF and taken to the plasma membrane. There, ESCRTs scaffold the assembly of dedicated Pal proteins acting downstream. The molecular details of this pathway, which results in the two-step proteolytic processing of the transcription factor PacC, have received considerable attention due to the key role that it plays in fungal pathogenicity. While current evidence strongly indicates that the pH signaling role of ESCRT complexes is limited to plasma membrane-associated structures where PacC proteolysis would take place, the localization of the PalB protease, which almost certainly catalyzes the first and only pH-regulated proteolytic step, had not been investigated. In view of ESCRT participation, this formally leaves open the possibility that PalB activation requires endocytic internalization. As endocytosis is essential for hyphal growth, nonlethal endocytic mutations are predicted to cause an incomplete block. We used a SynA internalization assay to measure the extent to which any given mutation prevents endocytosis. We show that none of the tested mutations impairing endocytosis to different degrees, including slaB1, conditionally causing a complete block, have any effect on the activation of the pathway. We further show that PalB, like PalA and PalC, localizes to cortical structures in an alkaline pH-dependent manner. Therefore, signaling through the Pal pathway does not involve endocytosis. PMID:25841020

  4. 48 CFR 8.405-2 - Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... posted to GSA's electronic RFQ system, e-Buy (see 8.402(d)). (1) Orders at, or below, the micro-purchase threshold. Ordering activities may place orders at, or below, the micro-purchase threshold with any Federal... distribute orders among contractors. (2) For orders exceeding the micro-purchase threshold, but not...

  5. 36 CFR 902.51 - Records relating to matters that are required by Executive order to be kept secret.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that are required by Executive order to be kept secret. 902.51 Section 902.51 Parks, Forests, and... order to be kept secret. Records relating to matters that are specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign...

  6. 36 CFR 902.51 - Records relating to matters that are required by Executive order to be kept secret.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... that are required by Executive order to be kept secret. 902.51 Section 902.51 Parks, Forests, and... order to be kept secret. Records relating to matters that are specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign...

  7. 36 CFR 902.51 - Records relating to matters that are required by Executive order to be kept secret.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that are required by Executive order to be kept secret. 902.51 Section 902.51 Parks, Forests, and... order to be kept secret. Records relating to matters that are specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign...

  8. 36 CFR 902.51 - Records relating to matters that are required by Executive order to be kept secret.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that are required by Executive order to be kept secret. 902.51 Section 902.51 Parks, Forests, and... order to be kept secret. Records relating to matters that are specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign...

  9. 36 CFR 902.51 - Records relating to matters that are required by Executive order to be kept secret.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that are required by Executive order to be kept secret. 902.51 Section 902.51 Parks, Forests, and... order to be kept secret. Records relating to matters that are specifically authorized under criteria established by an Executive order to be kept secret in the interest of national defense or foreign...

  10. 48 CFR 8.405-2 - Ordering procedures for services requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... (3) For proposed orders exceeding the maximum order threshold or when establishing a BPA. In addition... is reasonable. Place the order, or establish the BPA, with the schedule contractor that...

  11. 34 CFR 403.184 - How does a State request a waiver of the maintenance of effort requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Financial Conditions Must Be Met by a State? § 403.184 How does... (b) Include in the request— (1) The reason for the request; (2) Information that demonstrates that a waiver is justified; and (3) Any additional information the Secretary may require. (Approved by...

  12. 34 CFR 403.184 - How does a State request a waiver of the maintenance of effort requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Financial Conditions Must Be Met by a State? § 403.184 How does... (b) Include in the request— (1) The reason for the request; (2) Information that demonstrates that a waiver is justified; and (3) Any additional information the Secretary may require. (Approved by...

  13. 45 CFR 286.230 - What if a Tribe does not have reasonable cause for failing to meet a requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What if a Tribe does not have reasonable cause for failing to meet a requirement? 286.230 Section 286.230 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  14. 14 CFR 382.97 - To which aircraft does the requirement to provide boarding and deplaning assistance through the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false To which aircraft does the requirement to... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and...

  15. 14 CFR 382.97 - To which aircraft does the requirement to provide boarding and deplaning assistance through the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false To which aircraft does the requirement to... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and...

  16. 14 CFR 382.97 - To which aircraft does the requirement to provide boarding and deplaning assistance through the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false To which aircraft does the requirement to... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and...

  17. 14 CFR 382.97 - To which aircraft does the requirement to provide boarding and deplaning assistance through the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false To which aircraft does the requirement to... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  3. 34 CFR 461.44 - How does a State request a waiver of the maintenance of effort requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does a State request a waiver of the maintenance of effort requirement? 461.44 Section 461.44 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT...

  4. 14 CFR 382.97 - To which aircraft does the requirement to provide boarding and deplaning assistance through the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false To which aircraft does the requirement to... Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR TRAVEL Boarding, Deplaning, and...

  5. The Knotted Sky II: does BICEP2 require a nontrivial primordial power spectrum?

    SciTech Connect

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Aslanyan, Grigor; Easther, Richard; Price, Layne C. E-mail: g.aslanyan@auckland.ac.nz E-mail: lpri691@aucklanduni.ac.nz

    2014-08-01

    An inflationary gravitational wave background consistent with BICEP2 is difficult to reconcile with a simple power-law spectrum of primordial scalar perturbations. Tensor modes contribute to the temperature anisotropies at multipoles with l∼< 100, and this effect — together with a prior on the form of the scalar perturbations — was the source of previous bounds on the tensor-to-scalar ratio. We compute Bayesian evidence for combined fits to BICEP2 and Planck for three nontrivial primordial spectra: a) a running spectral index, b) a cutoff at fixed wavenumber, and c) a spectrum described by a linear spline with a single internal knot. We find no evidence for a cutoff, weak evidence for a running index, and significant evidence for a ''broken'' spectrum. Taken at face-value, the BICEP2 results require two new inflationary parameters in order to describe both the broken scale invariance in the perturbation spectrum and the observed tensor-to-scalar ratio. Alternatively, this tension may be resolved by additional data and more detailed analyses.

  6. Does Pilocarpine-Induced Epilepsy in Adult Rats Require Status epilepticus?

    PubMed Central

    Navarro Mora, Graciela; Bramanti, Placido; Osculati, Francesco; Chakir, Asmaa; Nicolato, Elena; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fabene, Paolo Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Pilocarpine-induced seizures in rats provide a widely animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Some evidences reported in the literature suggest that at least 1 h of status epilepticus (SE) is required to produce subsequent chronic phase, due to the SE-related acute neuronal damage. However, recent data seems to indicate that neuro-inflammation plays a crucial role in epileptogenesis, modulating secondarily a neuronal insult. For this reason, we decided to test the following hypotheses: a) whether pilocarpine-injected rats that did not develop SE can exhibit long-term chronic spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) and b) whether acute neurodegeneration is mandatory to obtain chronic epilepsy. Therefore, we compared animals injected with the same dose of pilocarpine that developed or did not SE, and saline treated rats. We used telemetric acquisition of EEG as long-term monitoring system to evaluate the occurrence of seizures in non-SE pilocarpineinjected animals. Furthermore, histology and MRI analysis were applied in order to detect neuronal injury and neuropathological signs. Our observations indicate that non-SE rats exhibit SRS almost 8 (+/22) months after pilocarpine-injection, independently to the absence of initial acute neuronal injury. This is the first time reported that pilocarpine injected rats without developing SE, can experience SRS after a long latency period resembling human pathology. Thus, we strongly emphasize the important meaning of including these animals to model human epileptogenesis in pilocarpine induced epilepsy. PMID:19503612

  7. A DOE contractor`s perspective of environmental monitoring requirements at a low-level waste facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ferns, T.W.

    1989-11-01

    Environmental monitoring at a low-level waste disposal facility (LLWDF) should, (1) demonstrate compliance with environmental laws; (2) detect any spatial or temporal environmental changes; and (3) provide information on the potential or actual exposure of humans and/or the environment to disposed waste and/or waste by-products. Under the DOE Order system the LLWDF site manager has more freedom of implementation for a monitoring program than either the semi-prescriptive NRC, or the prescriptive EPA hazardous waste programs. This paper will attempt to compare and contrast environmental monitoring under the different systems (DOE, NRC, and EPA), and determine if the DOE might benefit from a more prescriptive system.

  8. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Hazardous Air Pollutant Requirements and the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; DePhillips, M.; Fthenakis, V.M. ); Hemenway, A. )

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the US Department of Energy -- Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCTP) is to provide the US energy marketplace with advanced, efficient, and environmentally sound coal-based technologies. The design, construction, and operation of Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects (CCTDP) will generate data needed to make informed, confident decisions on the commercial readiness of these technologies. These data also will provide information needed to ensure a proactive response by DOE and its industrial partners to the establishment of new regulations or a reactive response to existing regulations promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The objectives of this paper are to: (1) Present a preliminary examination of the potential implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) -- Title 3 Hazardous Air Pollutant requirements to the commercialization of CCTDP; and (2) help define options available to DOE and its industrial partners to respond to this newly enacted Legislation.

  9. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990: Hazardous Air Pollutant Requirements and the DOE Clean Coal Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; DePhillips, M.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Hemenway, A.

    1991-12-31

    The purpose of the US Department of Energy -- Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) Clean Coal Technology Program (CCTP) is to provide the US energy marketplace with advanced, efficient, and environmentally sound coal-based technologies. The design, construction, and operation of Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Projects (CCTDP) will generate data needed to make informed, confident decisions on the commercial readiness of these technologies. These data also will provide information needed to ensure a proactive response by DOE and its industrial partners to the establishment of new regulations or a reactive response to existing regulations promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The objectives of this paper are to: (1) Present a preliminary examination of the potential implications of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) -- Title 3 Hazardous Air Pollutant requirements to the commercialization of CCTDP; and (2) help define options available to DOE and its industrial partners to respond to this newly enacted Legislation.

  10. 40 CFR 763.122 - What does this subpart require me to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos Worker Protection § 763.122 What does this subpart... standards in 29 CFR 1910.1001. (c) Repair, cleaning, or replacement of asbestos-containing clutch plates and brake pads, shoes, and linings, or removal of asbestos-containing residue from brake drums or...

  11. 40 CFR 763.122 - What does this subpart require me to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos Worker Protection § 763.122 What does this subpart... standards in 29 CFR 1910.1001. (c) Repair, cleaning, or replacement of asbestos-containing clutch plates and brake pads, shoes, and linings, or removal of asbestos-containing residue from brake drums or...

  12. 40 CFR 763.122 - What does this subpart require me to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos Worker Protection § 763.122 What does this subpart... standards in 29 CFR 1910.1001. (c) Repair, cleaning, or replacement of asbestos-containing clutch plates and brake pads, shoes, and linings, or removal of asbestos-containing residue from brake drums or...

  13. 40 CFR 763.122 - What does this subpart require me to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos Worker Protection § 763.122 What does this subpart... standards in 29 CFR 1910.1001. (c) Repair, cleaning, or replacement of asbestos-containing clutch plates and brake pads, shoes, and linings, or removal of asbestos-containing residue from brake drums or...

  14. 40 CFR 763.122 - What does this subpart require me to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos Worker Protection § 763.122 What does this subpart... standards in 29 CFR 1910.1001. (c) Repair, cleaning, or replacement of asbestos-containing clutch plates and brake pads, shoes, and linings, or removal of asbestos-containing residue from brake drums or...

  15. 20 CFR 653.501 - Requirements for accepting and processing clearance orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... followed. (b) Intrastate and interstate job orders shall include the language of the first two sentences of..., national origin, age, sex, or mental or physical status unrelated to job performance (handicap); (2) The...-recruitment or other factors have changed the terms and conditions of employment. For orders submitted...

  16. 21 CFR 1271.45 - What requirements does this subpart contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... eligibility, including donor screening and testing. The requirements contained in this subpart are a component... on donor screening and testing for relevant communicable disease agents and diseases, is required for... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.45...

  17. 21 CFR 1271.45 - What requirements does this subpart contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... eligibility, including donor screening and testing. The requirements contained in this subpart are a component... on donor screening and testing for relevant communicable disease agents and diseases, is required for... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.45...

  18. 43 CFR 428.7 - What happens if a farm operator does not submit required forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN FARM OPERATIONS IN EXCESS OF 960 ACRES AND THE ELIGIBILITY OF CERTAIN FORMERLY EXCESS LAND § 428.7 What happens if a farm..., then: (1) The district must not deliver irrigation water before you submit the required RRA...

  19. Natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria for DOE sites: DOE Standard DOE-STD-1023-95

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-03-24

    This paper summarizes hazard assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95) for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. The DOE has established policy and requirements for NPH mitigation for DOE sites and facilities using a graded approach by DOE Order 5480.28. The graded approach is implemented by five performance categories established for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) at DOE facilities based on criteria provided by DOE-STD-1021-93. In applying the design/evaluation criteria of DOE-STD-1020-94 for DOE facilities subjected to one of the natural phenomena hazards, the establishment of design basis load levels consistent with the corresponding performance category is required. This standard provides general criteria as well as specific criteria for natural phenomena hazard assessments to ensure that adequate design basis load levels are established for design and/or evaluation of DOE facilities.

  20. 20 CFR 662.280 - Does title I require One-Stop partners to use their funds for individuals who are not eligible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does title I require One-Stop partners to use... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DESCRIPTION OF THE ONE-STOP SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT One-Stop Partners and the Responsibilities of Partners § 662.280 Does title I require...

  1. 19 CFR 210.34 - Protective orders; reporting requirement; sanctions and other actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Discovery and...) Issuance of protective order. Upon motion by a party or by the person from whom discovery is sought or by..., or undue burden or expense, including one or more of the following: (1) That discovery not be had;...

  2. 19 CFR 210.34 - Protective orders; reporting requirement; sanctions and other actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Discovery and...) Issuance of protective order. Upon motion by a party or by the person from whom discovery is sought or by..., or undue burden or expense, including one or more of the following: (1) That discovery not be had;...

  3. 19 CFR 210.34 - Protective orders; reporting requirement; sanctions and other actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Discovery and...) Issuance of protective order. Upon motion by a party or by the person from whom discovery is sought or by..., or undue burden or expense, including one or more of the following: (1) That discovery not be had;...

  4. 21 CFR 1311.50 - Requirements for recipients of digitally signed orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... signed. (3) Check the validity of the certificate holder's certificate by checking the Certificate Revocation List. (4) Check the certificate extension data to determine whether the sender has the authority to order the controlled substance. (b) A recipient may cache Certificate Revocation Lists for...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.45 - What requirements does this subpart contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.45 What... all donors of cells or tissue used in HCT/Ps, except as provided under § 1271.90. In the case of an embryo or of cells derived from an embryo, a donor-eligibility determination is required for both...

  6. Visual Literacy: Does It Enhance Leadership Abilities Required for the Twenty-First Century?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bintz, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The twenty-first century hosts a well-established global economy, where leaders are required to have increasingly complex skills that include creativity, innovation, vision, relatability, critical thinking and well-honed communications methods. The experience gained by learning to be visually literate includes the ability to see, observe, analyze,…

  7. 40 CFR 35.4170 - What kinds of reporting does EPA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... require? 35.4170 Section 35.4170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... complete at various points during the life of your group's grant; the number varies based on whether you... how you spent those funds Semiannually within 15 working days following the end of the...

  8. 40 CFR 35.4170 - What kinds of reporting does EPA require?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... require? 35.4170 Section 35.4170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND... complete at various points during the life of your group's grant; the number varies based on whether you... how you spent those funds Semiannually within 15 working days following the end of the...

  9. 21 CFR 1271.45 - What requirements does this subpart contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.45 What... all donors of cells or tissue used in HCT/Ps, except as provided under § 1271.90. In the case of an embryo or of cells derived from an embryo, a donor-eligibility determination is required for both...

  10. 41 CFR 102-3.185 - What does this subpart require agencies to do?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration (NAPA) under an agreement between the agency and an academy, if such advice or recommendation was...) of the Act; or (3) In the case of NAPA, the academy certifies that it has complied substantially with... with NAS or NAPA that are consistent with the requirements of this subpart to obtain advice...

  11. 21 CFR 1271.45 - What requirements does this subpart contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Donor Eligibility § 1271.45 What... all donors of cells or tissue used in HCT/Ps, except as provided under § 1271.90. In the case of an embryo or of cells derived from an embryo, a donor-eligibility determination is required for both...

  12. Does the Naked Neck Meat Type Chicken Yield Lower Methionine Requirement Data?

    PubMed

    Khan, Daulat R; Wecke, Christian; Liebert, Frank

    2015-03-25

    Methionine (Met) requirement studies with homozygous (Na/Na) and heterozygous (Na/na) naked neck meat type chicken utilized 144 birds of average weight (50% each genotype and sex) within two N balance experiments involving both the starter (d10-20) and grower period (d25-35). The birds were randomly allotted to five experimental diets with graded protein supply and Met as the limiting amino acid. The proportion of native feed protein sources (soy protein concentrate, maize, wheat, fishmeal and wheat gluten) was kept constant to ensure a uniform protein quality in all diets. The Met requirement depending on genotype, sex, age period and growth performance (protein deposition) was estimated using a non-linear modeling procedure of N utilization in monogastric animals. On average, 0.47% (Na/Na) and 0.45% (Na/na) dietary Met was established as adequate in the starter diet, as well as 0.37% (Na/Na) and 0.36% (Na/na) Met in the grower diet for both of the sexes. In conclusion, the Met requirement of the naked neck chicken is not significantly different from its normally-feathered counterparts. In addition, the low feather production was not reflected by reduced requirement for Met in naked neck birds. However, these conclusions are valid only at the given Met:Cys ratio (1:1) in the experimental diets.

  13. Low thrombogenicity of polyethylene glycol-grafted cellulose membranes does not influence heparin requirements in hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wright, M J; Woodrow, G; Umpleby, S; Hull, S; Brownjohn, A M; Turney, J H

    1999-07-01

    Heparin is the most commonly used anticoagulant for hemodialysis despite potentially serious side effects. Polyethylene glycol-grafted cellulose (PGC) membranes produce less activation of the coagulation cascade than cuprophane membranes. Anecdotally, we found some patients required a surprisingly low level of anticoagulation using these membranes. We compared the anticoagulant requirement of the PGC membrane with that of the cuprophane membrane in this randomized, prospective, crossover study. Sixty-three patients were randomized to treatment using either membrane, and heparin administration was progressively reduced to the lowest dose that prevented visible clotting in excess of that normally encountered. Patients underwent dialysis at this dose for 1 month, after which the heparin requirement and Kt/Vurea (1.162 x ln [urea pre/urea post]) were assessed. This process was then repeated for each patient using the other membrane, and the results were compared. Heparin administration during dialysis was reduced from a mean loading dose of 29.0 +/- 9.4 to 1.5 +/- 3.2 IU/kg for both membranes and a mean maintenance infusion of 14.0 +/- 6.7 to 0.77 +/- 1.6 IU/kg/h for both membranes (both P < 0.0001 v full anticoagulation; no difference between membranes). The Kt/Vurea was not significantly altered. Forty-six patients with PGC and 45 patients with cuprophane membranes underwent dialysis successfully without heparin during dialysis, and the other patients were using considerably reduced doses. Aspirin and warfarin had no effect on the heparin requirement. These results do not support the theory that PGC membranes have a lower anticoagulant requirement than cuprophane membranes; however, they suggest that dialysis can be performed successfully with much smaller anticoagulant doses than are currently in common use.

  14. Sustainable institutionalized punishment requires elimination of second-order free-riders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2012-03-01

    Although empirical and theoretical studies affirm that punishment can elevate collaborative efforts, its emergence and stability remain elusive. By peer-punishment the sanctioning is something an individual elects to do depending on the strategies in its neighborhood. The consequences of unsustainable efforts are therefore local. By pool-punishment, on the other hand, where resources for sanctioning are committed in advance and at large, the notion of sustainability has greater significance. In a population with free-riders, punishers must be strong in numbers to keep the ``punishment pool'' from emptying. Failure to do so renders the concept of institutionalized sanctioning futile. We show that pool-punishment in structured populations is sustainable, but only if second-order free-riders are sanctioned as well, and to a such degree that they cannot prevail. A discontinuous phase transition leads to an outbreak of sustainability when punishers subvert second-order free-riders in the competition against defectors.

  15. Does requiring continuing education units for professional licensing renewal assure quality patient care?

    PubMed

    Vaughn, H Todd; Rogers, Janet L; Freeman, Julie K

    2006-01-01

    Although most states in the United States require health care professionals to complete continuing education units (CEUs) for licensure renewal, little evidence to date has established a relationship between completing CEUs and clinical competency. Considering the high cost of health care delivery and services, it would be prudent for both managers and consumers of health care to review the costs and benefits of requiring CEUs for professional licensing renewal. This study features an extensive review of the literature to analyze the supportive as well as the opposing views of mandatory CEUs for professional license renewal. Most of the studies reviewed reported almost no relationship between participation in traditional continuing education courses and improved patient outcomes. Several recommendations evolved out of this study for improving patient outcomes following the attendance of continuing education courses.

  16. In vitro RNA editing in plant mitochondria does not require added energy.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Mizuki; Verbitskiy, Daniil; van der Merwe, Johannes A; Zehrmann, Anja; Plessmann, Uwe; Urlaub, Henning; Brennicke, Axel

    2007-06-12

    RNA editing in flowering plant mitochondria is investigated by in vitro assays. These cauliflower mitochondrial lysates require added NTP or dNTP. We have now resolved the reason for this requirement to be the inhibition of the RNA binding activity of the glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH). Both GDH1 and GDH2 were identified in RNA-protein cross-links. The inhibition of in vitro RNA editing by GDH is confirmed by the ability of the GDH-specific herbicide phosphinothricin to substitute for NTP. NADH and NADPH, but not NAD or NADP, can also replace NTP, suggesting that the NAD(P)H-binding-pocket configuration of the GDH contacts the RNA. RNA editing in plant mitochondria is thus intrinsically independent of added energy in the form of NTP.

  17. Spatiotemporal requirements of the Hainan gibbon: Does home range constrain recovery of the world's rarest ape?

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jessica V; Zeng, Xingyuan; Hong, Xiaojiang; Chatterjee, Helen J; Turvey, Samuel T

    2017-03-01

    Conservation management requires an evidence-based approach, as uninformed decisions can signify the difference between species recovery and loss. The Hainan gibbon, the world's rarest ape, reportedly exploits the largest home range of any gibbon species, with these apparently large spatial requirements potentially limiting population recovery. However, previous home range assessments rarely reported survey methods, effort, or analytical approaches, hindering critical evaluation of estimate reliability. For extremely rare species where data collection is challenging, it also is unclear what impact such limitations have on estimating home range requirements. We re-evaluated Hainan gibbon spatial ecology using 75 hr of observations from 35 contact days over 93 field-days across dry (November 2010-February 2011) and wet (June 2011-September 2011) seasons. We calculated home range area for three social groups (N = 21 individuals) across the sampling period, seasonal estimates for one group (based on 24 days of observation; 12 days per season), and between-group home range overlap using multiple approaches (Minimum Convex Polygon, Kernel Density Estimation, Local Convex Hull, Brownian Bridge Movement Model), and assessed estimate reliability and representativeness using three approaches (Incremental Area Analysis, spatial concordance, and exclusion of expected holes). We estimated a yearly home range of 1-2 km(2) , with 1.49 km(2) closest to the median of all estimates. Although Hainan gibbon spatial requirements are relatively large for gibbons, our new estimates are smaller than previous estimates used to explain the species' limited recovery, suggesting that habitat availability may be less important in limiting population growth. We argue that other ecological, genetic, and/or anthropogenic factors are more likely to constrain Hainan gibbon recovery, and conservation attention should focus on elucidating and managing these factors.

  18. GONAD: A Novel CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing Method that Does Not Require Ex Vivo Handling of Embryos.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthy, Channabasavaiah B; Takahashi, Gou; Wada, Kenta; Miura, Hiromi; Sato, Masahiro; Ohtsuka, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic technologies used for creating a desired genomic change in animals involve three critical steps: isolation of fertilized eggs, microinjection of transgenic DNA into them and their subsequent transfer to recipient females. These ex vivo steps have been widely used for over 3 decades and they were also readily adapted for the latest genome editing technologies such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. We recently developed a method called GONAD (Genome editing via Oviductal Nucleic Acids Delivery) that does not require all the three critical steps of transgenesis and therefore relieves the bottlenecks of widely used animal transgenic technologies. Here we provide protocols for the GONAD system.

  19. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the essential amino acid requirements of kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Rogers, Q R

    2006-08-01

    Essential amino acid (EAA) requirements of omnivores and herbivores (e.g. chicks, lambs, pigs and rats) are directly related to the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). When an EAA is limiting in the diet, addition of a mixture of EAA lacking the limiting one (which increases dietary CP) results in a decrease in food intake and weight gain. This interaction has been referred to as an AA imbalance and has not been studied in depth in strict carnivores. The objectives of these experiments were to examine the effects on growing kittens (2-week periods) of the addition to diets of a mixture of AA lacking the limiting one. The control diets were at the requirement of the respective limiting EAA (or about 85% of the 1986 National Research Council requirement). In experiment 1, with the dietary EAAs at the minimally determined requirements, the concentration of the essential or dispensable amino acids was increased to determine if CP or an EAA was limiting. Results of growth rates (n = 12) and plasma AA concentrations indicated that tryptophan was limiting, but increased body weight gain also occurred when the concentration of CP was increased as dispensable amino acids without additional tryptophan. Experiment 1 was repeated in experiment 2 using a crossover design. Again, when tryptophan was limiting additional concentrations of dispensable AAs increased body weight gain. This response is the opposite of that in herbivores and omnivores. Experiment 3 consisted of 10 separate crossover trials, one for each of the 10 EAA and examined the effect of two concentrations of dietary CP (200 and 300 g CP/kg diet) on body weight gain of kittens (n = 8) offered diets limiting in each respective EAA. Body weight gain was numerically greater when diets contained 300 g CP/kg than 200 g CP/kg for eight of 10 EAAs (p < 0.05 for only isoleucine and threonine) when each amino acid was limiting. This response is the reverse of that which occurs in chicks, lambs, pigs and rats when

  20. 78 FR 75442 - Emergency Order Under 49 U.S.C. 20104 Establishing Requirements for Controlling Passenger Train...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Emergency Order Under 49 U.S.C. 20104 Establishing Requirements for... Commuter Railroad Company AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation (DOT... Transportation Authority's Metro- North Commuter Railroad Company (Metro-North) take certain actions to...

  1. 76 FR 11529 - Gregory Desobry, Ph.D.; Order Requiring Notification of Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Gregory Desobry, Ph.D.; Order Requiring Notification of Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities I... Mr. Desobry, Ph.D., requests a hearing, that person shall set forth with particularity the manner...

  2. 16 CFR 1025.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 1025.39 Section 1025.39 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... Process § 1025.39 Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity... witness or deponent to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity from...

  3. 12 CFR 1080.12 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 1080.12 Section 1080.12 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF... testify or provide other information and granting immunity. (a) The Assistant Director of the Division of... issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information granting immunity under...

  4. 49 CFR 511.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... other information and granting immunity. 511.39 Section 511.39 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... testify or provide other information and granting immunity. (a) A party who desires the issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity...

  5. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C....

  6. 16 CFR 2.15 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 2.15 Section 2.15 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... and granting immunity. (a) The Bureau Director, Deputy Directors, and Assistant Directors in the... issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information granting immunity...

  7. 16 CFR 1025.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 1025.39 Section 1025.39 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... Process § 1025.39 Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity... witness or deponent to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity from...

  8. 16 CFR 2.15 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 2.15 Section 2.15 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... and granting immunity. (a) The Bureau Director, Deputy Directors, and Assistant Directors in the... issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information granting immunity...

  9. 49 CFR 511.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... other information and granting immunity. 511.39 Section 511.39 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... testify or provide other information and granting immunity. (a) A party who desires the issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity...

  10. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C....

  11. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C....

  12. 16 CFR 2.15 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 2.15 Section 2.15 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... and granting immunity. (a) The Bureau Director, Deputy Directors, and Assistant Directors in the... issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information granting immunity...

  13. 49 CFR 511.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... other information and granting immunity. 511.39 Section 511.39 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... testify or provide other information and granting immunity. (a) A party who desires the issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity...

  14. 16 CFR 2.15 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 2.15 Section 2.15 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... and granting immunity. (a) The Bureau Director, Deputy Directors, and Assistant Directors in the... issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information granting immunity...

  15. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C....

  16. 16 CFR 1025.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 1025.39 Section 1025.39 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... Process § 1025.39 Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity... witness or deponent to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity from...

  17. 16 CFR 1025.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 1025.39 Section 1025.39 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... Process § 1025.39 Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity... witness or deponent to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity from...

  18. 16 CFR 2.15 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 2.15 Section 2.15 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... and granting immunity. (a) The Bureau Director, Deputy Directors, and Assistant Directors in the... issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information granting immunity...

  19. 49 CFR 511.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... other information and granting immunity. 511.39 Section 511.39 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... testify or provide other information and granting immunity. (a) A party who desires the issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity...

  20. 16 CFR 1025.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 1025.39 Section 1025.39 Commercial Practices CONSUMER... Process § 1025.39 Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity... witness or deponent to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity from...

  1. 49 CFR 511.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... other information and granting immunity. 511.39 Section 511.39 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... testify or provide other information and granting immunity. (a) A party who desires the issuance of an order requiring a witness to testify or provide other information upon being granted immunity...

  2. 16 CFR 3.39 - Orders requiring witnesses to testify or provide other information and granting immunity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... provide other information and granting immunity. 3.39 Section 3.39 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE... granting immunity. (a) Where Commission complaint counsel desire the issuance of an order requiring a witness or deponent to testify or provide other information and granting immunity under 18 U.S.C....

  3. 34 CFR 222.63 - What other requirements must a local educational agency meet in order to be eligible for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet in order to be eligible for financial assistance under section 8003(f)(2)(A)? 222.63 Section 222... Local Educational Agencies Under Section 8003(f) of the Act § 222.63 What other requirements must a...)(A)? Subject to § 222.65, an LEA described in § 222.62(a), (b), or (c) is eligible for...

  4. 34 CFR 222.64 - What other requirements must a local educational agency meet in order to be eligible for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... meet in order to be eligible for financial assistance under section 8003(f)(2)(B)? 222.64 Section 222... Local Educational Agencies Under Section 8003(f) of the Act § 222.64 What other requirements must a...)(B)? Subject to § 222.65, an LEA described in § 222.62(d) is eligible for financial assistance...

  5. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ordering procedures for... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND... surveying at least three schedule contractors through the GSA Advantage! on-line shopping service,...

  6. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ordering procedures for... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND... surveying at least three schedule contractors through the GSA Advantage! on-line shopping service,...

  7. Phagocytosis of IgG-coated polystyrene beads by macrophages induces and requires high membrane order.

    PubMed

    Magenau, Astrid; Benzing, Carola; Proschogo, Nicholas; Don, Anthony S; Hejazi, Leila; Karunakaran, Denuja; Jessup, Wendy; Gaus, Katharina

    2011-12-01

    The biochemical composition and biophysical properties of cell membranes are hypothesized to affect cellular processes such as phagocytosis. Here, we examined the plasma membranes of murine macrophage cell lines during the early stages of uptake of immunoglobulin G (IgG)-coated polystyrene particles. We found that the plasma membrane undergoes rapid actin-independent condensation to form highly ordered phagosomal membranes, the biophysical hallmark of lipid rafts. Surprisingly, these membranes are depleted of cholesterol and enriched in sphingomyelin and ceramide. Inhibition of sphingomyelinase activity impairs membrane condensation, F-actin accumulation at phagocytic cups and particle uptake. Switching phagosomal membranes to a cholesterol-rich environment had no effect on membrane condensation and the rate of phagocytosis. In contrast, preventing membrane condensation with the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol, even in the presence of ceramide, blocked F-actin dissociation from nascent phagosomes and particle uptake. In conclusion, our results suggest that ordered membranes function to co-ordinate F-actin remodelling and that the biophysical properties of phagosomal membranes are essential for phagocytosis.

  8. Increasing dietary crude protein does not increase the methionine requirement in kittens.

    PubMed

    Strieker, M J; Morris, J G; Kass, P H; Rogers, Q R

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the methionine (met) requirement of kittens is correlated with the concentration of dietary crude protein (CP). The study used 48 male kittens in two replications of six 4 x 4 Latin squares, each representing one concentration of met (1.5, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 6.0 or 9.0 g/kg diet) with four CP concentrations (150, 200, 300 and 500 g/kg diet) in 2-week periods. Cystine was present in the lowest CP diet at 5.3 g/kg diet and increased as dietary CP increased. Body weight gain, food intake, nitrogen balance and plasma amino acids, glucose, insulin, cortisol, somatomedin C, T(3) and T(4) concentrations on day 12 were measured. From breakpoint analysis of the nitrogen retention curves, the met requirement of kittens was found to be 3.1, 3.8, 3.1 and 2.4 g met/kg for the 150, 200, 300 and 500 g CP/kg diets, respectively. When met was limiting (1.5 or 2.5 g/kg diet), increasing dietary CP did not decrease, but rather increased food intake, body weight gain and nitrogen retention. Plasma met concentrations increased as dietary met increased and at 2.5-3.5 g met/kg diet were not different among kittens fed the various CP diets. Total plasma T(3) and T(4) increased significantly as dietary CP increased in kittens given the 2.5 and 4.5 g met/kg diets. Results indicate that food intake and possibly altered hormonal secretion play a role in this growth response. In conclusion, the met requirement of growing kittens, unlike omnivores and herbivores studied, was not positively correlated with the concentration of dietary CP.

  9. Does protein relatedness require sequence matching? Alignment via networks in sequence space.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Zakharia M

    2008-10-01

    To establish possible function of a newly discovered protein, alignment of its sequence with other known sequences is required. When the similarity is marginal, the function remains uncertain. A principally new approach is suggested: to use networks in the protein sequence space. The functionality of the protein is firmly established via networks forming chains of consecutive pair-wise matching fragments. The distant relatives are, thus, considered as relatives, though in some cases, there is even no sequence match between the ends of the chain, while the entire chain belongs to the same functional and structural network.

  10. Activation of ara operons by a truncated AraC protein does not require inducer.

    PubMed

    Menon, K P; Lee, N L

    1990-05-01

    The araC gene of Escherichia coli encodes a protein that binds the inducer L-arabinose to activate the transcription of three ara operons. In a study to determine the functional domains within the AraC protein, we have generated a set of overlapping deletions from the proximal end of the araC gene. We found that the removal of up to nearly 60% of the coding sequence of this protein still allows transcriptional activation of the ara operons in vivo, up to 27% that of the wild type. These truncated proteins, however, no longer require arabinose for induction. The ligand-induced conformational change apparently either releases or unmasks an existing functional domain within AraC, rather than generating a new conformation that is required for activation of the promoter of araBAD. Since the truncated protein of the mutant C154 (which lacks 153 amino acid residues from the N terminus) retains DNA binding specificity, the DNA-recognition domain is localized in the C-terminal half of the AraC protein. Truncated proteins were unable to repress araBAD or araC in vivo, even though they were able to bind all ara operators. We propose that the N-terminal half of AraC is essential for the formation of the DNA loops that are responsible for repression of araBAD and for autoregulation of araC.

  11. Regulated membrane protein entry into flagella is facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules and does not require IFT.

    PubMed

    Belzile, Olivier; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Wang, Qian; Snell, William J

    2013-08-05

    The membrane protein composition of the primary cilium, a key sensory organelle, is dynamically regulated during cilium-generated signaling [1, 2]. During ciliogenesis, ciliary membrane proteins, along with structural and signaling proteins, are carried through the multicomponent, intensely studied ciliary diffusion barrier at the base of the organelle [3-8] by intraflagellar transport (IFT) [9-18]. A favored model is that signaling-triggered accumulation of previously excluded membrane proteins in fully formed cilia [19-21] also requires IFT, but direct evidence is lacking. Here, in studies of regulated entry of a membrane protein into the flagellum of Chlamydomonas, we show that cells use an IFT-independent mechanism to breach the diffusion barrier at the flagellar base. In resting cells, a flagellar signaling component [22], the integral membrane polypeptide SAG1-C65, is uniformly distributed over the plasma membrane and excluded from the flagellar membrane. Flagellar adhesion-induced signaling triggers rapid, striking redistribution of the protein to the apical ends of the cells concomitantly with entry into the flagella. Protein polarization and flagellar enrichment are facilitated by cytoplasmic microtubules. Using a conditional anterograde IFT mutant, we demonstrate that the IFT machinery is not required for regulated SAG1-C65 entry into flagella. Thus, integral membrane proteins can negotiate passage through the ciliary diffusion barrier without the need for a motor.

  12. Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans does not require an AG at the 3' splice acceptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Aroian, R V; Levy, A D; Koga, M; Ohshima, Y; Kramer, J M; Sternberg, P W

    1993-01-01

    The dinucleotide AG, found at the 3' end of virtually all eukaryotic pre-mRNA introns, is thought to be essential for splicing. Reduction-of-function mutations in two Caenorhabditis elegans genes, the receptor tyrosine kinase gene let-23 and the collagen gene dpy-10, both alter the AG at the end of a short (ca. 50-nucleotide) intron to AA. The in vivo effects of these mutations were studied by sequencing polymerase chain reaction-amplified reverse-transcribed RNA isolated from the two mutants. As expected, we find transcripts that splice to a cryptic AG, skip an exon, and retain an unspliced intron. However, we also find significant levels of splicing at the mutated 3' splice site (AA) and at nearby non-AG dinucleotides. Our results indicate that for short C. elegans introns an AG is not required for splicing at either the correct 3' splice site or incorrect sites. Analysis of a splice site mutant involving a longer, 316-nucleotide C. elegans intron indicates that an AG is also not required there for splicing. We hypothesize that elements besides the invariant AG, e.g., an A-U-rich region, a UUUC motif, and/or a potential branch point sequence, are directing the selection of the 3' splice site and that in wild-type genes these elements cooperate so that proper splicing occurs. Images PMID:8417357

  13. ePro-ClearSee: a simple immunohistochemical method that does not require sectioning of plant samples

    PubMed Central

    Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Yamaji, Naoki; Murata, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    Investigations into the epigenetic status of individual cells within tissues can produce both epigenetic data for different cell types and positional information of the cells. Thus, these investigations are important for understanding the intra- and inter-cellular control systems of developmental and environmental responses in plants. However, a simple method to detect epigenetic modifications of individual cells in plant tissues is not yet available because detection of the modifications requires immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies. In this study, we developed a simple immunohistochemical method that does not require sectioning to investigate epigenetic modifications. This method uses a clearing system to detect methylated histones, acetylated histones, methylated DNA and/or centromeric histone H3 variants. Analyses of four dicots and five monocots indicated that this method provides a universal technique to investigate epigenetic modifications in diverse plant species. PMID:28176832

  14. Ego depletion and positive illusions: does the construction of positivity require regulatory resources?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Peter; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Frey, Dieter

    2007-09-01

    Individuals frequently exhibit positive illusions about their own abilities, their possibilities to control their environment, and future expectations. The authors propose that positive illusions require resources of self-control, which is considered to be a limited resource similar to energy or strength. Five studies revealed that people with depleted self-regulatory resources indeed exhibited a less-optimistic sense of their own abilities (Study 1), a lower sense of subjective control (Study 2), and less-optimistic expectations about their future (Study 3). Two further studies shed light on the underlying psychological process: Ego-depleted (compared to nondepleted) individuals generated/retrieved less positive self-relevant attributes (Studies 4 and 5) and reported a lower sense of general self-efficacy (Study 5), which both partially mediated the impact of ego depletion on positive self-views (Study 5).

  15. Does It Help to Use Mathematically Superfluous Brackets When Teaching the Rules for the Order of Operations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Robert; Sönnerhed, Wang Wei; Hernell, Bernt

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that mathematically superfluous brackets can be useful when teaching the rules for the order of operations is challenged. The idea of the hypothesis is that with brackets it is possible to emphasize the order priority of one operation over another. An experiment was conducted where expressions with mixed operations were studied,…

  16. Students' Self-Assessment in Chemistry Examinations Requiring Higher- and Lower-Order Cognitive Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoller*, Uri; Fastow, Michal; Lubezky, Aviva; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    1999-01-01

    The development of students' higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) in the context of both chemistry and the complex interrelationships of science, technology, environment, and society is widely accepted as one of the most important goals of chemical education. Consequently, the translation of this goal into teaching, assessment, and learning strategies is a central issue in chemistry teaching. Students' self-assessment in chemistry examinations is a HOCS-promoting strategy. We evaluated the differences between students' self-assessment and their professors' assessment on midterm exams in introductory college courses in Israel and Greece, together with the students' appraisal of their capability for self- and peer-assessment. We found that (i) there were small (not significant) and large (significant) differences between students' self-grading and their professors' grading on LOCS and HOCS exam questions, respectively; (ii) students' estimates of their grades were higher than those of their professors, particularly for HOCS questions; and (iii) students believed that they were capable of self- and peer-assessment and were confident in making these assessments. Our results suggest that (i) students' self-assessment of LOCS-type exams can be successfully implemented immediately, whereas (ii) implementation of self-assessment for HOCS-type exam questions should be gradual, following appropriate preparation to close the gap between the future HOCS and contemporary dominant LOCS orientations in chemistry teaching and learning.

  17. Orderly progression through S-phase requires dynamic ubiquitylation and deubiquitylation of PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, Vanesa; Viñas, Laura; Gallego-Sánchez, Alfonso; Andrés, Sonia; Sacristán, María P.; Bueno, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a DNA sliding clamp with an essential function in DNA replication and a key role in tolerance to DNA damage by ensuring the bypass of lesions. In eukaryotes, DNA damage tolerance is regulated by ubiquitylation of lysine 164 of PCNA through a well-known control mechanism; however, the regulation of PCNA deubiquitylation remains poorly understood. Our work is a systematic and functional study on PCNA deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our study reveals that the deubiquitylation of PCNA in fission yeast cells is a complex process that requires several ubiquitin proteases dedicated to the deubiquitylation of a specific subnuclear fraction of mono- and di-ubiquitylated PCNA or a particular type of poly-ubiquitylated PCNA and that there is little redundancy among these enzymes. To understand how DUB activity regulates the oscillatory pattern of ubiquitylated PCNA in fission yeast, we assembled multiple DUB mutants and found that a quadruple mutation of ubp2+, ubp12+, ubp15+, and ubp16+ leads to the stable accumulation of mono-, di-, and poly-ubiquitylated forms of PCNA, increases S-phase duration, and sensitizes cells to DNA damage. Our data suggest that the dynamic ubiquitylation and deubiquitylation of PCNA occurs during S-phase to ensure processive DNA replication. PMID:27151298

  18. 1999 Annual Report on Waste Generation and Pollution Prevention Progress as Required by DOE Order 5400.1

    SciTech Connect

    SEGALL, P.

    2000-03-01

    Hanford's missions are to safely clean-up and manage the site's legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy science and technology. Through these missions Hanford will contribute to economic diversification of the region. Hanford's environmental management or clean-up mission is to protect the health and safety of the public, workers, and the environment; control hazardous materials; and utilize the assets (people, infrastructure, and site) for other missions. Hanford's science and technology mission is to develop and deploy science and technology in the service of the nation including stewardship of the Hanford Site. Pollution Prevention is a key to the success of these missions by reducing the amount of waste to be managed and identifying/implementing cost effective waste reduction projects. Hanford's original mission, the production of nuclear materials for the nation's defense programs, lasted more than 40 years, and like most manufacturing operations, Hanford's operations generated large quantities of waste and pollution. However, the by-products from Hanford operations pose unique problems like radiation hazards, vast volumes of contaminated water and soil, and many contaminated structures including reactors, chemical plants and evaporation ponds. The clean-up activity is an immense and challenging undertaking. Including characterization and decommissioning of 149 single shell storage tanks, treating 28 double shell tanks, safely disposing of over 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel stored on site, removing numerous structures, and dealing with significant solid waste, ground water, and land restoration issues.

  19. 1995 Annual report on waste generation and waste mainization progress as required by DOE order 5400.1, Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Betsch, M.D.

    1996-09-24

    While waste generation numbers are important, the true measure of success is waste minimized. Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention (WMin/P2) successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition as pollution prevention, as they have become part of a culture of best management practices. As an example, the success of the excess and reuse program, both informal and formal, documents the Wmin/P2 culture that exists in the pollution prevention representatives and employees at the facilities.

  20. 1994 Annual report on waste generation and waste minimization progress as required by DOE Order 5400.1, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Many Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention successes at the Hanford Site occur every day without formal recognition. A few of the successful projects are: T-Plant helps facilities reuse equipment by offering decontamination services for items such as gas cylinders, trucks, and railcars, thus saving disposal and equipment replacement costs. Custodial Services reviewed its use of 168 hazardous cleaning products, and, through a variety of measures, replaced them with 38 safer substitutes, one for each task. Scrap steel contaminated with low level radioactivity from the interim stabilization of 107-K and 107-C was decontaminated and sold to a vendor for recycling. Site-wide programs include the following: the Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (P2OA) program at the Hanford site was launched during 1994, including a training class, a guidance document, technical assistance, and goals; control over hazardous materials purchased was achieved by reviewing all purchase requisitions of a chemical nature; the Office Supply Reuse Program was established to redeploy unused or unwanted office supply items. In 1994, pollution prevention activities reduced approximately 274,000 kilograms of hazardous waste, 2,100 cubic meters of radioactive and mixed waste, 14,500,000 kilograms of sanitary waste, and 215,000 cubic meters off liquid waste and waste water. Pollution Prevention activities also saved almost $4.2 million in disposal, product, and labor costs. Overall waste generation increased in 1994 due to increased work and activity typical for a site with an environmental restoration mission. However, without any Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention activities, solid radioactive waste generation at Hanford would have been 25% higher, solid hazardous waste generation would have been 30% higher, and solid sanitary waste generation would have been 60% higher.

  1. Hyphal growth in Candida albicans does not require induction of hyphal-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Naseem, Shamoon; Araya, Esteban; Konopka, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Various stimuli, including N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), induce the fungal pathogen Candida albicans to switch from budding to hyphal growth. Previous studies suggested that hyphal morphogenesis is stimulated by transcriptional induction of a set of genes that includes known virulence factors. To better understand hyphal development, we examined the role of GlcNAc metabolism using a triple mutant lacking the genes required to metabolize exogenous GlcNAc (hxk1Δ nag1Δ dac1Δ). Surprisingly, at low ambient pH (∼pH 4), GlcNAc stimulated this mutant to form hyphae without obvious induction of hyphal genes. This indicates that GlcNAc can stimulate a separate signal to induce hyphae that is independent of transcriptional responses. Of interest, GlcNAc could induce the triple mutant to express hyphal genes when the medium was buffered to a higher pH (>pH 5), which normally occurs after GlcNAc catabolism. Catabolism of GlcNAc raises the ambient pH rather than acidifying it, as occurs after dextrose catabolism. This synergy between alkalinization and GlcNAc to induce hyphal genes involves the Rim101 pH-sensing pathway; GlcNAc induced rim101Δ and dfg16Δ mutants to form hyphae, but hyphal gene expression was partially defective. These results demonstrate that hyphal morphogenesis and gene expression can be regulated independently, which likely contributes to pathogenesis at different host sites. PMID:25609092

  2. Does the Discussion of Socio-Scientific Issues require a Paradigm Shift in Science Teachers' Thinking?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Stephen P.; Bryce, Tom G. K.

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterise secondary school science teachers' conceptual models of discussion, against the background that a number of researchers have found that discussion of socio-scientific issues in science classrooms is rare, somewhat discomforting for teachers and its purpose unclear. Recent research indicates that when science teachers do engage in socio-scientific discussion, the quality is poor and is teacher-centred where pupils' views do not figure prominently (far less be clarified and integrated with their scientific learning). This has led to calls for such dialogue to be conducted by humanities teachers. The question arising from such thinking is: Do science teachers hold different conceptual models of discussion from their humanities colleagues? Using semi-structured interviews, three groups each of six teachers (experienced science teachers, experienced humanities teachers, and newly qualified science teachers) were interviewed in-depth in order to characterise their conceptual understanding of discussion as a teaching strategy. Analysis of the interview transcripts utilised the constant comparison approach of grounded theory. Five conceptual models of discussion emerged from an analysis of the data-discussion: (1) as a teacher-mediated discourse; (2) as open-ended inquiry; (3) for the development of reasoning skills; (4) as mediated transfer of knowledge to real-life contexts; and (5) as practice for democratic citizenship. The results confirmed that the science teachers' emphasis tended to stress practice for democratic citizenship whereas the humanities teachers' emphasis was more towards open-ended inquiry and for the development of reasoning skills.

  3. Does murine spermatogenesis require WNT signalling? A lesson from Gpr177 conditional knockout mouse models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, J-X; Cheng, J-M; Hao, X-X; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X-X; Liu, Y-X

    2016-06-30

    Wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT) proteins and several other components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in the murine testes. However, mice mutant for WNT signalling effector β-catenin using different Cre drivers have phenotypes that are inconsistent with each other. The complexity and overlapping expression of WNT signalling cascades have prevented researchers from dissecting their function in spermatogenesis. Depletion of the Gpr177 gene (the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wntless), which is required for the secretion of various WNTs, makes it possible to genetically dissect the overall effect of WNTs in testis development. In this study, the Gpr177 gene was conditionally depleted in germ cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Mvh-Cre; Gpr177(flox/flox), Stra8-Cre) and Sertoli cells (Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre). No obvious defects in fertility and spermatogenesis were observed in these three Gpr177 conditional knockout (cKO) mice at 8 weeks. However, late-onset testicular atrophy and fertility decline in two germ cell-specific Gpr177 deletion mice were noted at 8 months. In contrast, we did not observe any abnormalities of spermatogenesis and fertility, even in 8-month-old Gpr177(flox/flox), Amh-Cre mice. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in Gpr177 cKO germ cells and Sertoli cells and exhibited an age-dependent manner. However, significant increase in the activity of Caspase 3 was only observed in germ cells from 8-month-old germ cell-specific Gpr177 knockout mice. In conclusion, GPR177 in Sertoli cells had no apparent influence on spermatogenesis, whereas loss of GPR177 in germ cells disrupted spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner via elevating ROS levels and triggering germ cell apoptosis.

  4. Transendothelial migration of effector T cells across inflamed endothelial barriers does not require heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Stoler-Barak, Liat; Barzilai, Sagi; Zauberman, Ayelet; Alon, Ronen

    2014-06-01

    Leukocyte diapedesis is a chemotactic multistep process that requires optimal chemoattractant presentation by the endothelial barrier. Recent studies have described a critical role for heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (HSGAGs) in the presentation and functions of chemokines essential for lymphocyte interactions with the lymph node vasculature. We wished to test whether HS expression by a prototypic endothelial cell type, i.e. human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), is critical for their ability to support neutrophil and lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration (TEM) under shear flow. We found that HUVECs deposit HS GAGs mainly at their basolateral compartments in both their resting and inflamed states. We next inactivated the key enzyme involved in HS biosynthesis, exostosin-1 (Ext1). Silencing Ext1 resulted in a complete loss of HS biosynthesis; nonetheless, TNF-α and IL-1β stimulation of key adhesion molecules and inflammatory chemokines necessary for neutrophil or lymphocyte adhesion and TEM remained intact. Ext1 silencing reduced neutrophil arrest and markedly impaired TEM, consistent with a role of basolateral HS GAGs in directing neutrophil crossing of inflamed endothelial barriers. Strikingly, however, the TEM of effector T cells across identically Ext1-silenced HUVECs remained normal. Importantly, the biosynthesis of the main promigratory chemokines for effector T cells and neutrophils, respectively, CCL2 and CXCL1, and their vesicle distributions were also Ext1 independent. These results suggest that transmigrating neutrophils must respond to chemokines transiently presented by apical and basolateral endothelial HS GAGs. In contrast, effector T cells can integrate chemotactic TEM signals directly from intra-endothelial chemokine stores rather than from externally deposited chemokines.

  5. Does murine spermatogenesis require WNT signalling? A lesson from Gpr177 conditional knockout mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Ren; Tang, J-X; Cheng, J-M; Hao, X-X; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X-X; Liu, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Wingless-related MMTV integration site (WNT) proteins and several other components of the WNT signalling pathway are expressed in the murine testes. However, mice mutant for WNT signalling effector β-catenin using different Cre drivers have phenotypes that are inconsistent with each other. The complexity and overlapping expression of WNT signalling cascades have prevented researchers from dissecting their function in spermatogenesis. Depletion of the Gpr177 gene (the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wntless), which is required for the secretion of various WNTs, makes it possible to genetically dissect the overall effect of WNTs in testis development. In this study, the Gpr177 gene was conditionally depleted in germ cells (Gpr177flox/flox, Mvh-Cre; Gpr177flox/flox, Stra8-Cre) and Sertoli cells (Gpr177flox/flox, Amh-Cre). No obvious defects in fertility and spermatogenesis were observed in these three Gpr177 conditional knockout (cKO) mice at 8 weeks. However, late-onset testicular atrophy and fertility decline in two germ cell-specific Gpr177 deletion mice were noted at 8 months. In contrast, we did not observe any abnormalities of spermatogenesis and fertility, even in 8-month-old Gpr177flox/flox, Amh-Cre mice. Elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in Gpr177 cKO germ cells and Sertoli cells and exhibited an age-dependent manner. However, significant increase in the activity of Caspase 3 was only observed in germ cells from 8-month-old germ cell-specific Gpr177 knockout mice. In conclusion, GPR177 in Sertoli cells had no apparent influence on spermatogenesis, whereas loss of GPR177 in germ cells disrupted spermatogenesis in an age-dependent manner via elevating ROS levels and triggering germ cell apoptosis. PMID:27362799

  6. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.130 - Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium need to be identified in an authorizing statute in order for a program or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? 1000.130... or element of a program to be included in a non-BIA AFA? No, the Act favors the inclusion of a...

  11. 42 CFR 136.404 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and Indian Tribes or Tribal organizations receiving funds under... Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.404 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family...

  12. 42 CFR 136.404 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and Indian Tribes or Tribal organizations receiving funds under... Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.404 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family...

  13. 42 CFR 136.404 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and Indian Tribes or Tribal organizations receiving funds under... Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.404 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family...

  14. 42 CFR 136.404 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and Indian Tribes or Tribal organizations receiving funds under... Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.404 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family...

  15. 42 CFR 136.404 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the IHS and Indian Tribes or Tribal organizations receiving funds under... Protection and Family Violence Prevention § 136.404 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family...

  16. 42 CFR 83.10 - If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? 83.10 Section 83.10 Public Health... for Adding Classes of Employees to the Cohort § 83.10 If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? Satisfying the...

  17. 42 CFR 83.10 - If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? 83.10 Section 83.10 Public Health... for Adding Classes of Employees to the Cohort § 83.10 If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? Satisfying the...

  18. 42 CFR 83.10 - If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? 83.10 Section 83.10 Public Health... for Adding Classes of Employees to the Cohort § 83.10 If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? Satisfying the...

  19. 42 CFR 83.10 - If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? 83.10 Section 83.10 Public Health... for Adding Classes of Employees to the Cohort § 83.10 If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? Satisfying the...

  20. 42 CFR 83.10 - If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? 83.10 Section 83.10 Public Health... for Adding Classes of Employees to the Cohort § 83.10 If a petition satisfies all relevant requirements under § 83.9, does this mean the class will be added to the Cohort? Satisfying the...

  1. 12 CFR 1202.6 - What if my request does not have all the information FHFA or FHFA-OIG requires?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What if my request does not have all the information FHFA or FHFA-OIG requires? 1202.6 Section 1202.6 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1202.6 What if my request does not have all...

  2. Preparation, review, and approval of implementation plans for nuclear safety requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This standard describes an acceptable method to prepare, review, and approve implementation plans for DOE Nuclear Safety requirements. DOE requirements are identified in DOE Rules, Orders, Notices, Immediate Action Directives, and Manuals.

  3. Oligogalacturonide-auxin antagonism does not require posttranscriptional gene silencing or stabilization of auxin response repressors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Savatin, Daniel V; Ferrari, Simone; Sicilia, Francesca; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2011-11-01

    α-1-4-Linked oligogalacturonides (OGs) derived from plant cell walls are a class of damage-associated molecular patterns and well-known elicitors of the plant immune response. Early transcript changes induced by OGs largely overlap those induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellin, a well-characterized microbe-associated molecular pattern, although responses diverge over time. OGs also regulate growth and development of plant cells and organs, due to an auxin-antagonistic activity. The molecular basis of this antagonism is still unknown. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), OGs inhibit adventitious root formation induced by auxin in leaf explants as well as the expression of several auxin-responsive genes. Genetic, biochemical, and pharmacological experiments indicate that inhibition of auxin responses by OGs does not require ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid signaling and is independent of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOGUE D-mediated reactive oxygen species production. Free indole-3-acetic acid levels are not noticeably altered by OGs. Notably, OG- as well as flg22-auxin antagonism does not involve any of the following mechanisms: (1) stabilization of auxin-response repressors; (2) decreased levels of auxin receptor transcripts through the action of microRNAs. Our results suggest that OGs and flg22 antagonize auxin responses independently of Aux/Indole-3-Acetic Acid repressor stabilization and of posttranscriptional gene silencing.

  4. Does the Noun Phrase Accessibility Hierarchy Predict the Difficulty Order in the Acquisition of Japanese Relative Clauses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozeki, Hiromi; Shirai, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Although Keenan and Comrie's (1977) noun phrase accessibility hierarchy (NPAH) has been shown to predict the difficulty order of relative clauses (RCs) in SLA, most studies of the NPAH have been on European languages. This paper tests the prediction for Japanese. Study 1 analyzes RCs in an oral interview corpus from 90 learners of Japanese at four…

  5. De novo centriole formation in human cells is error-prone and does not require SAS-6 self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Won-Jing; Acehan, Devrim; Kao, Chien-Han; Jane, Wann-Neng; Uryu, Kunihiro; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2015-11-26

    Vertebrate centrioles normally propagate through duplication, but in the absence of preexisting centrioles, de novo synthesis can occur. Consistently, centriole formation is thought to strictly rely on self-assembly, involving self-oligomerization of the centriolar protein SAS-6. Here, through reconstitution of de novo synthesis in human cells, we surprisingly found that normal looking centrioles capable of duplication and ciliation can arise in the absence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. Moreover, whereas canonically duplicated centrioles always form correctly, de novo centrioles are prone to structural errors, even in the presence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. These results indicate that centriole biogenesis does not strictly depend on SAS-6 self-assembly, and may require preexisting centrioles to ensure structural accuracy, fundamentally deviating from the current paradigm.

  6. What Does the WRAML2 Core Battery Measure? Utilizing Exploratory and Confirmatory Techniques to Disclose Higher Order Structure.

    PubMed

    McGill, Ryan J; Dombrowski, Stefan C

    2016-11-19

    The present study examined the factor structure of the Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning-Second Edition (WRAML2) core battery with participants from the normative sample aged 9 to 90 years (n = 880) using higher order exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic techniques that were not reported in the in the WRAML2 Administration and Technical Manual Exploratory factor analysis results suggested only one factor, whereas confirmatory factor analysis results favored the three factors posited by the test authors. Although model fit statistics were equivalent for the oblique, indirect hierarchical, and direct hierarchical measurement models, it was determined that the bifactor model best disclosed the influence of latent dimensions on WRAML2 manifest variables. In the three-factor bifactor model, the general factor accounted for 31% of the total variance and 69% of the common variance, whereas the three first-order factors combined accounted for 41% of the total variance and 31% of the common variance. Latent factor reliability coefficients (as estimated by ωh) indicated that only the general factor was measured with enough precision to warrant confident clinical interpretation. Implications for clinical interpretation of WRAML2 scores and the procedures utilized in the development of related measures are discussed.

  7. Quality assurance grading guidelines for research and development at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, T.B.; Morris, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    The quality assurance (QA) requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) are established in DOE Order 5700.6C. This order is applicable for all DOE departmental elements, management, and maintenance and operating contractors and requires that documented Quality Assurance Programs (QAPs) are prepared at all levels; it has one attachment. The DOE Office of Energy Research (DOE-ER) has issued a standard to ensure implementation of the full intent of this order in the ER community.

  8. Why does Steady-State Magnetic Reconnection have a Maximum Local Rate of Order 0.1?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, M.; Guo, F.; Daughton, W.; Li, H.; Cassak, P. A.; Shay, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Simulations suggest collisionless steady-state magnetic reconnection of Harris-type current sheets proceeds with a rate of order 0.1, independent of dissipation mechanism. We argue this long-standing puzzle is a result of constraints at the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scale. We predict the reconnection rate as a function of the opening angle made by the upstream magnetic fields, finding a maximum reconnection rate close to 0.2. The predictions compare favorably to particle-in-cell simulations of relativistic electron-positron and nonrelativistic electron-proton reconnection. The fact that simulated reconnection rates are close to the predicted maximum suggests reconnection proceeds near the most efficient state allowed at the MHD scale. The rate near the maximum is relatively insensitive to the opening angle, potentially explaining why reconnection has a similar fast rate in differing models.

  9. When the C in C P does not matter: Anatomy of order-4 C P eigenstates and their Yukawa interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, Alfredo; Ivanov, Igor P.; Jiménez, Enrique

    2017-03-01

    We explore the origin and Yukawa interactions of the scalars with peculiar C P properties which were recently found in a multi-Higgs model based on an order-4 C P symmetry. We relate the existence of such scalars to the enhanced freedom of defining C P , even beyond the well-known generalized C P symmetries, which arises in models with several zero-charge scalar fields. We also show that despite possessing exotic C P quantum numbers, these scalars do not have to be inert: they can have C P -conserving Yukawa interactions provided the C P acts on fermions by also mixing generations. This paper focuses on formal aspects—exposed in a pedagogical manner—and includes a brief discussion of possible phenomenological consequences.

  10. 40 CFR 62.14830 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.14830 Section 62.14830 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... Requirements § 62.14830 Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the...

  11. 40 CFR 62.14830 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.14830 Section 62.14830 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... Requirements § 62.14830 Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the...

  12. 40 CFR 62.14830 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.14830 Section 62.14830 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... Requirements § 62.14830 Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the...

  13. 40 CFR 62.14830 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.14830 Section 62.14830 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... Requirements § 62.14830 Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the...

  14. 40 CFR 62.14830 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.14830 Section 62.14830 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... Requirements § 62.14830 Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the...

  15. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 117(e)? 661.307... its business in an open manner as required by WIA section 117(e), by making available to the public... Local Governance Provisions § 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct...

  16. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 117(e)? 661.307... its business in an open manner as required by WIA section 117(e), by making available to the public... Local Governance Provisions § 661.307 How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct...

  17. Does Birth Order and Academic Proficiency Influence Perfectionistic Self-presentation Among Undergraduate Engineering Students? A Descriptive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Preeti Tabitha; Kumar, Navin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perfectionism is a multifaceted concept. It had both advantages and disadvantages. Perfectionistic traits have been associated with leadership and very intellectual people. The present study is an attempt to understand if engineering students possess perfectionistic orientation and whether it influences self-efficacy, social connectedness, and achievement motivation. Materials and Methods: The present study adopts a random sampling design to evaluate the presence of perfectionism as a personality trait among undergraduate engineering students (N = 320). Standardized inventories such as Almost Perfect Scale-Revised were administered first to identify perfectionists and second to differentiate the adaptive from the maladaptive perfectionists. Scheduled interviews were conducted with students to obtain information regarding birth order and family functioning. Results: Findings from the study reveal that there were a significant number of maladaptive perfectionists and that they experienced higher levels of personal and societal demands leading to a negative emotional well-being in comparison to the adaptive perfectionists. We also observed that first-born children were more likely to display a perfectionistic self-presentation and from scheduled interviews, we understood that paternal influences were stronger when it came to decision-making and display of conscientiousness. Conclusion: The study draws on important implications for helping students to understand perfectionism and to respond to demands of the family and societal subsystems in a positive and an adaptive manner. PMID:27833225

  18. 10 CFR 820.23 - Consent order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Consent order. 820.23 Section 820.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.23 Consent order. (a... consistent with the objectives of the Act and the DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements. The Director and a...

  19. L1-mediated colon cancer cell metastasis does not require changes in EMT and cancer stem cell markers.

    PubMed

    Gavert, Nancy; Vivanti, Alessia; Hazin, John; Brabletz, Thomas; Ben-Ze'ev, Avri

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is common in most sporadic and inherited colorectal cancer (CRC) cells leading to elevated β-catenin/TCF transactivation. We previously identified the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 as a target gene of β-catenin/TCF in CRC cells. Forced expression of L1 confers increased cell motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis, and the induction of human CRC cell metastasis to the liver. In human CRC tissue, L1 is exclusively localized at the invasive front of such tumors in a subpopulation of cells displaying nuclear β-catenin. We determined whether L1 expression confers metastatic capacities by inducing an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and whether L1 cosegregates with cancer stem cell (CSC) markers. We found that changes in L1 levels do not affect the organization or expression of E-cadherin in cell lines, or in invading CRC tissue cells, and no changes in other epithelial or mesenchymal markers were detected after L1 transfection. The introduction of major EMT regulators (Slug and Twist) into CRC cell lines reduced the levels of E-cadherin and induced fibronectin and vimentin, but unlike L1, Slug and Twist expression was insufficient for conferring metastasis. In CRC cells L1 did not specifically cosegregate with CSC markers including CD133, CD44, and EpCAM. L1-mediated metastasis required NF-κB signaling in cells harboring either high or low levels of endogenous E-cadherin. The results suggest that L1-mediated metastasis of CRC cells does not require changes in EMT and CSC markers and operates by activating NF-κβ signaling.

  20. Recovery of Precision Grasping after Motor Cortex Lesion does not require Forced use of the Impaired Hand in Macaca mulatta

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Warren G.; Morecraft, Robert J.; Rotella, Diane L.; Pizzimenti, Marc A.; Ge, Jizhi; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly S.; Zhang, Hongyu; Soliman, Hesham; Seecharan, Dave; Edwards, Ian; McNeal, David; Nudo, Randolph J.; Cheney, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether precision grasping of small objects between the index and thumb of the impaired hand recovers without forced use after surgically placed lesions to the hand/arm areas of M1 and M1 + lateral premotor cortex (LPMC) in two monkeys. The unilateral lesions were contralateral to the monkey's preferred hand, which was established in pre-lesion testing as the hand used most often to acquire raisins in a foraging board task in which the monkey was free to use either hand to acquire the treats. The lesions initially produced a clear paresis of the contralesional hand and use of only the ipsilesional hand to acquire raisins in the foraging board task. However, beginning about 3 weeks after the lesion the monkey spontaneously began using the impaired contralesional hand in the foraging board task and increased use of that hand over the next few tests. Moreover, the monkeys clearly used precision grasp to acquire the raisins in a similar manner to pre-lesion performances, although grasp durations were longer. Although the monkeys used the contralesional hand more often than the ipsilesional hand in some post-lesion testing sessions they did not recover to use the hand as often as in pre-lesion testing when the preferred hand was used almost exclusively. These findings suggest that recovery of fine hand/digit motor function after localized damage to the lateral frontal motor areas in rhesus monkeys does not require forced use of the impaired hand. PMID:25163672

  1. DOE standard: Firearms safety

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Information in this document is applicable to all DOE facilities, elements, and contractors engaged in work that requires the use of firearms as provided by law or contract. The standard in this document provides principles and practices for implementing a safe and effective firearms safety program for protective forces and for non-security use of firearms. This document describes acceptable interpretations and methods for meeting Order requirements.

  2. Pre-ordering of interfacial water in the pathway of heterogeneous ice nucleation does not lead to a two-step crystallization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Laura; Peters, Baron; Molinero, Valeria

    2016-12-01

    According to Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT), the transition from liquid to crystal occurs in a single activated step with a transition state controlled by the size of the crystal embryo. This picture has been challenged in the last two decades by several reports of two-step crystallization processes in which the liquid first produces pre-ordered or dense domains, within which the crystal nucleates in a second step. Pre-ordering preceding crystal nucleation has been recently reported in simulations of ice crystallization, raising the question of whether the mechanism of ice nucleation involves two steps. In this paper, we investigate the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on carbon surfaces. We use molecular simulations with efficient coarse-grained models combined with rare event sampling methods and free energy calculations to elucidate the role of pre-ordering of liquid water at the carbon surface in the reaction coordinate for heterogeneous nucleation. We find that ice nucleation proceeds through a classical mechanism, with a single barrier between liquid and crystal. The reaction coordinate that determines the crossing of the nucleation barrier is the size of the crystal nucleus, as predicted by CNT. Wetting of the critical ice nuclei within pre-ordered domains decreases the nucleation barrier, increasing the nucleation rates. The preferential pathway for crystallization involves the early creation of pre-ordered domains that are the birthplace of the ice crystallites but do not represent a minimum in the free energy pathway from liquid to ice. We conclude that a preferential pathway through an intermediate-order precursor does not necessarily result in a two-step mechanism.

  3. 31 CFR 30.7 - Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply with the certification and disclosure requirements under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply... Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.7 Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply with the certification and...

  4. 31 CFR 30.7 - Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply with the certification and disclosure requirements under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply... Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.7 Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply with the certification and...

  5. 31 CFR 30.7 - Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply with the certification and disclosure requirements under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply... Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.7 Q-7: How does a TARP recipient comply with the certification and...

  6. RCN1-regulated phosphatase activity and EIN2 modulate hypocotyl gravitropism by a mechanism that does not require ethylene signaling.

    PubMed

    Muday, Gloria K; Brady, Shari R; Argueso, Cristiana; Deruère, Jean; Kieber, Joseph J; DeLong, Alison

    2006-08-01

    The roots curl in naphthylphthalamic acid1 (rcn1) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has altered auxin transport, gravitropism, and ethylene response, providing an opportunity to analyze the interplay between ethylene and auxin in control of seedling growth. Roots of rcn1 seedlings were previously shown to have altered auxin transport, growth, and gravitropism, while rcn1 hypocotyl elongation exhibited enhanced ethylene response. We have characterized auxin transport and gravitropism phenotypes of rcn1 hypocotyls and have explored the roles of auxin and ethylene in controlling these phenotypes. As in roots, auxin transport is increased in etiolated rcn1 hypocotyls. Hypocotyl gravity response is accelerated, although overall elongation is reduced, in etiolated rcn1 hypocotyls. Etiolated, but not light grown, rcn1 seedlings also overproduce ethylene, and mutations conferring ethylene insensitivity restore normal hypocotyl elongation to rcn1. Auxin transport is unaffected by treatment with the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid in etiolated hypocotyls of wild-type and rcn1 seedlings. Surprisingly, the ethylene insensitive2-1 (ein2-1) and ein2-5 mutations dramatically reduce gravitropic bending in hypocotyls. However, the ethylene resistant1-3 (etr1-3) mutation does not significantly affect hypocotyl gravity response. Furthermore, neither the etr1 nor the ein2 mutation abrogates the accelerated gravitropism observed in rcn1 hypocotyls, indicating that both wild-type gravity response and enhanced gravity response in rcn1 do not require an intact ethylene-signaling pathway. We therefore conclude that the RCN1 protein affects overall hypocotyl elongation via negative regulation of ethylene synthesis in etiolated seedlings, and that RCN1 and EIN2 modulate hypocotyl gravitropism and ethylene responses through independent pathways.

  7. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Orders at or below the micro-purchase threshold. Ordering activities may place orders at, or below, the micro-purchase threshold with any Federal Supply Schedule contractor that can meet the agency's needs... attempt to distribute orders among contractors. (c) Orders exceeding the micro-purchase threshold but...

  8. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... establishing BPAs and for orders under BPAs see 8.405-3. (b) Orders at or below the micro-purchase threshold. Ordering activities may place orders at, or below, the micro-purchase threshold with any Federal Supply.... (c) Orders exceeding the micro-purchase threshold but not exceeding the simplified...

  9. 48 CFR 8.405-1 - Ordering procedures for supplies, and services not requiring a statement of work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... establishing BPAs and for orders under BPAs see 8.405-3. (b) Orders at or below the micro-purchase threshold. Ordering activities may place orders at, or below, the micro-purchase threshold with any Federal Supply.... (c) Orders exceeding the micro-purchase threshold but not exceeding the simplified...

  10. 10 CFR 1021.321 - Requirements for environmental assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to prepare an EA. As required by 40 CFR 1501.4(b), DOE shall prepare an EA for a proposed DOE action... to subpart D, except that an EA is not required if DOE has decided to prepare an EIS. DOE may prepare an EA on any action at any time in order to assist agency planning and decisionmaking. (b)...

  11. Quantifying and Addressing the DOE Material Reactivity Requirements with Analysis and Testing of Hydrogen Storage Materials & Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Y. F.

    2012-04-30

    The objective of this project is to examine safety aspects of candidate hydrogen storage materials and systems being developed in the DOE Hydrogen Program. As a result of this effort, the general DOE safety target will be given useful meaning by establishing a link between the characteristics of new storage materials and the satisfaction of safety criteria. This will be accomplished through the development and application of formal risk analysis methods, standardized materials testing, chemical reactivity characterization, novel risk mitigation approaches and subscale system demonstration. The project also will collaborate with other DOE and international activities in materials based hydrogen storage safety to provide a larger, highly coordinated effort.

  12. Requirements for canisters used for delivery of spent nuclear fuel and associated materials to DOE (Department of Energy) under standard disposal contracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is studying prospective changes to the waste acceptance criteria contained in the Standard Contract which involve consideration of the possible acceptance of failed fuel, consolidated fuel rods, compacted structural parts resulting from at reactor consolidation operations, and other non-fuel bearing materials on the same scheduling basis as used for standard fuel under the existing Standard Contract. During the course of these studies it has become clear that all such forms of spent fuel and related wastes would have to be delivered to DOE (and stored at the reactor) in a container having an envelope about the same as the fuel assemblies from which the fuel forms originated. Thus, the first objective of the DOE effort has been to develop draft requirements for canisters to be used by utilities (and others) to deliver the foregoing forms of spent fuel and related wastes. These draft requirements have been completed and are included in this paper.

  13. 14 CFR 39.9 - What if I operate an aircraft or use a product that does not meet the requirements of an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What if I operate an aircraft or use a product that does not meet the requirements of an airworthiness directive? 39.9 Section 39.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT...

  14. 20 CFR 411.375 - Does a State VR agency continue to provide services under the requirements of the State plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... approved under title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 720 et seq.), even when... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does a State VR agency continue to provide services under the requirements of the State plan approved under title I of the Rehabilitation Act of...

  15. 20 CFR 641.220 - Does title I of WIA require the SCSEP to use OAA funds for individuals who are not eligible for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Coordination With... training services under title I of WIA provided that the SCSEP participants have each received a community... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does title I of WIA require the SCSEP to...

  16. 20 CFR 641.220 - Does title I of WIA require the SCSEP to use OAA funds for individuals who are not eligible for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Coordination With... training services under title I of WIA provided that the SCSEP participants have each received a community... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does title I of WIA require the SCSEP to...

  17. 20 CFR 661.307 - How does the Local Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does the Local Board meet its requirement... Section 661.307 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) STATEWIDE AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE...

  18. 20 CFR 661.207 - How does the State Board meet its requirement to conduct business in an open manner under the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to conduct business in an open manner under the âsunshine provisionâ of WIA section 111(g)? 661.207... AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT State Governance Provisions § 661.207 How does the State Board meet its requirement to conduct...

  19. 25 CFR 39.219 - What happens if a residential program does not maintain residency levels required by this subpart?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of service per week as certified in its submitted school calendar. For each month that a school does not maintain 25 percent of the residency shown in its submitted calendar, the school will lose...

  20. Cross-Modal Plasticity in Higher-Order Auditory Cortex of Congenitally Deaf Cats Does Not Limit Auditory Responsiveness to Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Lomber, Stephen G.; Hubka, Peter; Kral, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    over the unused cortex and reassigns it to the remaining senses. Therefore, cross-modal plasticity might conflict with restoration of auditory function with cochlear implants. It is unclear whether the cross-modally reorganized auditory areas lose auditory responsiveness. We show that the presence of cross-modal plasticity in a higher-order auditory area does not reduce auditory responsiveness of that area. Visual reorganization was moderate, spatially scattered and there were no interactions between cross-modally reorganized visual and auditory inputs. These results indicate that cross-modal reorganization is less detrimental for neurosensory restoration than previously thought. PMID:27277796

  1. A discussion of higher order software concepts as they apply to functional requirements and specifications. [space shuttles and guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1973-01-01

    The entry guidance software functional requirements (requirements design phase), its architectural requirements (specifications design phase), and the entry guidance software verified code are discussed. It was found that the proper integration of designs at both the requirements and specifications levels are of high priority consideration.

  2. 34 CFR 636.11 - How does an applicant request a waiver of the planning consortium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... consortium requirement? 636.11 Section 636.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... consortium requirement? (a) An applicant may request that the Secretary waive the requirement for a planning consortium by submitting as part of the application a request that includes the following: (1) The...

  3. 34 CFR 636.11 - How does an applicant request a waiver of the planning consortium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... consortium requirement? 636.11 Section 636.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... consortium requirement? (a) An applicant may request that the Secretary waive the requirement for a planning consortium by submitting as part of the application a request that includes the following: (1) The...

  4. 34 CFR 636.11 - How does an applicant request a waiver of the planning consortium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... consortium requirement? 636.11 Section 636.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... consortium requirement? (a) An applicant may request that the Secretary waive the requirement for a planning consortium by submitting as part of the application a request that includes the following: (1) The...

  5. 34 CFR 636.11 - How does an applicant request a waiver of the planning consortium requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... consortium requirement? 636.11 Section 636.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... consortium requirement? (a) An applicant may request that the Secretary waive the requirement for a planning consortium by submitting as part of the application a request that includes the following: (1) The...

  6. 34 CFR 461.44 - How does a State request a waiver of the maintenance of effort requirement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... effort requirement? 461.44 Section 461.44 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... request a waiver of the maintenance of effort requirement? An SEA seeking a waiver of the maintenance of effort requirement in § 461.42 shall— (a) Submit to the Secretary a request for a waiver; and (b)...

  7. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  8. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  9. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  10. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  11. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  12. 39 CFR 762.42 - Request for substitute disbursement postal money orders; requirements for undertaking of indemnity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Request for substitute disbursement postal money... POSTAL SERVICE POSTAL SERVICE DEBT OBLIGATIONS; DISBURSEMENT POSTAL MONEY ORDERS DISBURSEMENT POSTAL MONEY ORDERS Issuance of Substitutes for Lost, Destroyed, Mutilated, and Defaced Disbursement...

  13. 39 CFR 762.42 - Request for substitute disbursement postal money orders; requirements for undertaking of indemnity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Request for substitute disbursement postal money... POSTAL SERVICE POSTAL SERVICE DEBT OBLIGATIONS; DISBURSEMENT POSTAL MONEY ORDERS DISBURSEMENT POSTAL MONEY ORDERS Issuance of Substitutes for Lost, Destroyed, Mutilated, and Defaced Disbursement...

  14. 78 FR 62930 - Order Providing Broker-Dealers a Temporary Exemption From the Requirements of Certain New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... paragraph (j)(2) to Rule 15c3-3 regarding the treatment of customers' free credit balances. Additionally... 8, 1998 staff no-action letter that addresses the net capital treatment of proprietary accounts of... requirements from Rule 15c3-2 (customers' free credit balances), including the requirement that...

  15. 20 CFR 655.1110 - What requirements does the NRDAA impose in the filing of an Attestation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655.1110 What...) requires a prospective employer of H-1C nurses to attest to the following: (1) That it qualifies as a “facility” (See § 655.1111); (2) That employment of H-1C nurses will not adversely affect the wages...

  16. Just-in-Time Logistics: Does It Fulfill the Surface Navy’s Requirements to Support the National Military Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    most prominent of the changes implemented from industry has been the Just - in - Time logistics model. This model requires reduced inventories and greater...repair parts distribution capabilities, and conditions of the battlefield with fleet requirements will provide a framework for determining if Just - in - Time logistics

  17. 45 CFR 286.270 - What happens if the Tribe does not satisfy the quarterly reporting requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL TANF PROVISIONS Data Collection and Reporting Requirements... determine that a Tribe has not submitted to us a complete and accurate Tribal TANF Data Report within the... rate targets since the data from the Tribal TANF Data Report is required to calculate...

  18. 36 CFR 1234.22 - How does an agency request a waiver from a requirement in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... September 28, 2005; and (3) The application of roof requirements in §§ 1234.10 and 1234.12 to underground... the information specified in paragraphs (c), (d), and/or (e) of this section to the Director, Space... for waiver of roof requirements for underground facility. The agency's waiver request must...

  19. 36 CFR 1234.22 - How does an agency request a waiver from a requirement in this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... September 28, 2005; and (3) The application of roof requirements in §§ 1234.10 and 1234.12 to underground... the information specified in paragraphs (c), (d), and/or (e) of this section to the Director, Space... for waiver of roof requirements for underground facility. The agency's waiver request must...

  20. Does Intrasession Concurrent Strength and Aerobic Training Order Influence Training-Induced Explosive Strength and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in Prepubescent Children?

    PubMed

    Alves, Ana R; Marta, Carlos C; Neiva, Henrique P; Izquierdo, Mikel; Marques, Mário C

    2016-12-01

    Alves, AR, Marta, C, Neiva, HP, Izquierdo, M, and Marques, MC. Does intrasession concurrent strength and aerobic training order influence training-induced explosive strength and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max in prepubescent children?. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3267-3277, 2016-The aim of this study was to analyze the interference of strength and aerobic training order over an 8-week period on explosive skills and maximal oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2max) in prepubescent children. One hundred twenty-eight prepubescent children aged 10-11 years (10.9 ± 0.5 years) were randomly selected and assigned to 1 of the 3 groups: intrasession concurrent aerobic before (GAS: n = 39) or after strength training (GSA: n = 45) or control group (GC: n = 44; no training program). The GC maintained their baseline level performance, and training-induced differences were found in the experimental groups. Increases were found in the 1-kg and 3-kg medicine ball throws: GAS: +3%, +5.5%, p ≤ 0.05, p < 0.001; GSA: +5.7%, +8.7%, p < 0.001, respectively; in the counter movement jump height and standing long jump length: GAS: +6.5%, +3.4%, p ≤ 0.05; GSA: +7%, +4.5%, p < 0.001, respectively; in the 20-m shuttle-run time: GAS: +2.3%; GSA: +4.6%, p < 0.001; and, in the V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: GAS: +7.3%, p < 0.001; GSA: +3.8%, p < 0.001 from pretraining to post-training. All programs were effective, but GSA produced better results than GAS for muscle strength variables, and GAS produced better results than GSA for aerobic capacity variables. The present study explored an unknown issue and added useful information to the literature in this area. These training methods should be taken into consideration to optimize explosive strength and cardiorespiratory fitness training in school-based programs and sports club programs.

  1. Compliance with the Clean Air Act Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program requirements at U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, M.P.; Atkins, E.M.

    1999-07-01

    The Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program of the Clean Air Act (CAA) requires promulgation of regulations to reduce and prevent damage to the earth's protective ozone layer. Regulations pursuant to Title VI of the CAA are promulgated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) at Title 40 CFR, Part 822. The regulations include ambitious production phaseout schedules for ozone depleting substances (ODS) including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), halons, carbon tetrachloride, and methyl chloroform under 40 CFR 82, Subpart A. The regulations also include requirements for recycling and emissions reduction during the servicing of refrigeration equipment and technician certification requirements under Subpart F; provisions for servicing of motor vehicle air conditioners under Subpart B; a ban on nonessential products containing Class 1 ODS under Subpart C; restrictions on Federal procurement of ODS under Subpart D; labeling of products using ODS under Subpart E; and the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program under Subpart G. This paper will provide details of initiatives undertaken at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title VI Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program. The Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plans include internal DOE requirements for: (1) maintenance of ODS inventories; (2) ODS procurement practices; (3) servicing of refrigeration and air conditioning equipment; (4) required equipment modifications or replacement; (5) technician certification training; (6) labeling of products containing ODS; (7) substitution of chlorinated solvents; and (8) replacement of halon fire protection systems. The plans also require establishment of administrative control systems which assure that compliance is achieved and maintained as the regulations continue to develop and become effective.

  2. Radiation Exposures for DOE and DOE Contractor Employees - 1990. Twenty-third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. H.; Hui, T. E.; Millet, W. H.; Scholes, V. A.

    1993-11-01

    All U.S. Department of Energy and DOE contractors are required by DOE Order 5484.1, Chapter IV, to submit occupational radiation exposure records to a central depository. For 1990, data were required to be submitted for all employees who were required to be monitored in accordance with DOE Order 5480.11 and for all visitors who had a positive exposure. The data required included the total effective dose equivalent, external penetrating whole-body dose equivalent, internal dose equivalent, the shallow dose equivalent, neutron dose equivalent, and extremity dose equivalent. Data regarding the exposed individuals included the individual's age, sex, and occupation category. This report is a summary of data reported by DOE and DOE contractors for the calendar year 1990.

  3. Implementation of the Clean Air Act, Title V operating permit program requirements for the U.S. DOE Oak Ridge Reservation facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, M.P.

    1998-12-31

    Title V of the Clean Air Act (CAA) establishes a new permit program requiring major sources and sources subject to Title III (Hazardous Air Pollutants) to obtain a state operating permit. Historically, most states have issued operating permits for individual emission units. Under the Title V permit program, a single permit will be issued for all of the emission units at the facility much like the current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program. The permit will specify all reporting, monitoring, and record-keeping requirements for the facility. Sources required to obtain permits include (a) major sources that emit 100 tons per year or more of any criteria air contaminant, (b) any source subject to the HAP provisions of Title III, (c) any source subject to the acid rain provisions of Title IV, (d) any source subject to New Source Performance Standards, and (e) any source subject to new source review under the nonattainment or Prevention of Significant Deterioration provisions. The State of Tennessee Title V Operating Permit Program was approved by EPA on August 28, 1996. This paper will provide details of initiatives underway at US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Facilities for implementation of requirements under the Title V Operating Permit Program. The ORR encompasses three DOE Facilities: the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The Y-12 Plant manufactures component parts for the national nuclear weapons program; the ORNL is responsible for research and development activities including nuclear engineering, engineering technologies, and the environmental sciences; and the ETTP conducts a variety of research and development activities and is the home of a mixed waste incinerator. Each of the three DOE Facilities is considered a major source under Title V of the CAA.

  4. Teaching to the Test…or Testing to Teach: Exams Requiring Higher Order Thinking Skills Encourage Greater Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jamie L.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Woodard, Steven M.; Kummer, Tyler A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to test the effect of exam-question level on fostering student conceptual understanding, low-level and high-level quizzes and exams were administered in two sections of an introductory biology course. Each section was taught in a high-level inquiry based style but was assigned either low-level questions (memory oriented) on the quizzes…

  5. Does the orbit-averaged theory require a scale separation between periodic orbit size and perturbation correlation length?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenlu; Lin, Zhihong

    2013-10-15

    Using the canonical perturbation theory, we show that the orbit-averaged theory only requires a time-scale separation between equilibrium and perturbed motions and verifies the widely accepted notion that orbit averaging effects greatly reduce the microturbulent transport of energetic particles in a tokamak. Therefore, a recent claim [Hauff and Jenko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 075004 (2009); Jenko et al., ibid. 107, 239502 (2011)] stating that the orbit-averaged theory requires a scale separation between equilibrium orbit size and perturbation correlation length is erroneous.

  6. 48 CFR 52.212-5 - Contract Terms and Conditions Required To Implement Statutes or Executive Orders-Commercial Items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... flow down any FAR clause, other than those in this paragraph (e)(1) of this paragraph in a subcontract for commercial items. Unless otherwise indicated below, the extent of the flow down shall be as...) (Pub. L. 110-247). Flow down required in accordance with paragraph (e) of FAR clause 52.226-6. (xiv)...

  7. 40 CFR 141.570 - What does subpart T require that my system report to the State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements....550-141.553) (1) The total number of filtered water turbidity measurements taken during the month...

  8. 40 CFR 141.570 - What does subpart T require that my system report to the State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements....550-141.553) (1) The total number of filtered water turbidity measurements taken during the month...

  9. 40 CFR 141.570 - What does subpart T require that my system report to the State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements....550-141.553) (1) The total number of filtered water turbidity measurements taken during the month...

  10. 40 CFR 141.570 - What does subpart T require that my system report to the State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements....550-141.553) (1) The total number of filtered water turbidity measurements taken during the month...

  11. 40 CFR 141.570 - What does subpart T require that my system report to the State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements....550-141.553) (1) The total number of filtered water turbidity measurements taken during the month...

  12. How Does the New TANF Work Requirement "Work" in Rural Minority Communities? A Case Study of the Northern Cheyenne Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Erin Feinauer; Ward, Carol; Villa, Rita Hiwalker; Davis, Judith

    2005-01-01

    In August of 1996 Congress passed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), which President Bill Clinton then signed into law. This essay will address the question, how have American Indian reservation residents fared in relation to the new work requirements? The authors are interested in the consequences of…

  13. Diverting stoma with anterior resection for rectal cancer: does it reduce overall anastomotic leakage and leaks requiring laparotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Zhi-Jie; Hu, Liang-Hao; Zhong, Ming; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) after resection for rectal carcinoma accelerates morbidity and mortality rates, extends hospital stay, and increases treatment costs, particularly when requiring laparotomy. The role of a protective diverting stoma (DS) in avoiding leakage has repeatedly been discussed, but prospective randomized studies on this subject are rare and their results contradictory. The MEDLINE database was searched for studies of AL requiring laparotomy and of the associated rate of protective DSs in initial anterior resection (AR) to review these studies systematically. The collected data were used to determine the average rate of AL requiring laparotomy after rectal cancer surgery in the DS group compared with that in the non-DS group. A total of 930 abstracts were retrieved from MEDLINE; 15 articles on AR and 22 on low/ultralow AR (LAR) were included in the review and analysis. The overall rate of AL requiring laparotomy was 6.57% (813/12, 376) in the AR studies and 4.13% (157/3, 802) in the LAR studies. In the AR studies, the pooled AL rate in the DS group was higher than that in the non-DS group (12.30% vs. 9.16%, P < 0.001). However, the pooled rate of AL requiring laparotomy in the DS group was lower than that in the non-DS group (3.69% vs. 7.42%, P < 0.001). In the LAR studies, the pooled AL rate in the DS group was lower than that in the non-DS group (7.74% vs. 9.64%, P = 0.045). The pooled rate of AL requiring laparotomy in the DS group was also lower than that in the non-DS group (2.67% vs. 5.21%, P < 0.001). By contrast, the pooled rate of definitive stomas and mortality caused by AL did not have any statistical difference between the DS and non-DS groups in both AR studies (definitive stomas: 0% vs. 0.65%; mortality: 0.95% vs. 1.19%) and LAR studies (definitive stomas: 1.03% vs. 1.01%; mortality: 0.35% vs. 0.36%). Protective DSs significantly decrease the rate of AL in LAR. AL requiring surgical correction was significantly reduced in the DS group

  14. Selection of a Propulsion System for Jason-CS in Order to Fulfil Space Debris Mitigation Requirements for ESA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthen, Bjoern; Beck, Jan; Duske, Norbert; Francis, Richard; Koeble, Klaus-Peter

    2013-08-01

    For two decades, the mission Topex-Poseidon and its successor mission Jason/Ocean Surface Topography Mission provide satellite data for the analysis of sea topography, wave heights and wind speeds. For the continuation of service mission Jason-CS, ESA's choice to rely on the CryoSat-2 platform design permits re-use of a well established product and proven processes. An industrial consortium led by Astrium GmbH has built the satellite CryoSat-2 which for over three years successfully provides altimeter measurements of the polar ice cap thickness evolutions. This platform is perfectly suited for accommodation of the Jason-CS instruments. Unlike CryoSat-2, Jason-CS is required to perform a post-mission disposal according to the Requirements for Space Debris Mitigation for ESA Projects. This paper discusses different technologies in terms of efficiency, feasibility and accommodation, aiming at minimizing necessary spacecraft design modifications.

  15. Delayed action does not always require the ventral stream: a study on a patient with visual form agnosia.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Constanze; Schenk, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    It has been suggested that while movements directed at visible targets are processed within the dorsal stream, movements executed after delay rely on the visual representations of the ventral stream (Milner & Goodale, 2006). This interpretation is supported by the observation that a patient with ventral stream damage (D.F.) has trouble performing accurate movements after a delay, but performs normally when the target is visible during movement programming. We tested D.F.'s visuomotor performance in a letter-posting task whilst varying the amount of visual feedback available. Additionally, we also varied whether D.F. received tactile feedback at the end of each trial (posting through a letter box vs posting on a screen) and whether environmental cues were available during the delay period (removing the target only vs suppressing vision completely with shutter glasses). We found that in the absence of environmental cues patient D.F. was unaffected by the introduction of delay and performed as accurately as healthy controls. However, when environmental cues and vision of the moving hand were available during and after the delay period, D.F.'s visuomotor performance was impaired. Thus, while healthy controls benefit from the availability of environmental landmarks and/or visual feedback of the moving hand, such cues seem less beneficial to D.F. Taken together our findings suggest that ventral stream damage does not always impact the ability to make delayed movements but compromises the ability to use environmental landmarks and visual feedback efficiently.

  16. The Olympic brain. Does corticospinal plasticity play a role in acquisition of skills required for high-performance sports?

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Bo; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2008-01-01

    Non-invasive electrophysiological and imaging techniques have recently made investigation of the intact behaving human brain possible. One of the most intriguing new research areas that have developed through these new technical advances is an improved understanding of the plastic adaptive changes in neuronal circuitries underlying improved performance in relation to skill training. Expansion of the cortical representation or modulation of corticomotor excitability of specific muscles engaged in task performance is required for the acquisition of the skill. These changes at cortical level appear to be paralleled by changes in transmission in spinal neuronal circuitries, which regulate the contribution of sensory feedback mechanisms to the execution of the task. Such adaptive changes also appear to be essential for the consolidation of a memory of performance of motor tasks and thus for the lasting ability of performing highly skilled movements such as those required for Olympic sports.

  17. Reversible Electrochemical Trapping of Carbon Dioxide Using 4,4'-Bipyridine That Does Not Require Thermal Activation.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Olson, Jarred; Singh, Poonam; Lorance, Edward D; Buttry, Daniel A; Gould, Ian R

    2015-12-17

    Sequestering carbon dioxide emissions by the trap and release of CO2 via thermally activated chemical reactions has proven problematic because of the energetic requirements of the release reactions. Here we demonstrate trap and release of carbon dioxide using electrochemical activation, where the reactions in both directions are exergonic and proceed rapidly with low activation barriers. One-electron reduction of 4,4'-bipyridine forms the radical anion, which undergoes rapid covalent bond formation with carbon dioxide to form an adduct. One-electron oxidation of this adduct releases the bipyridine and carbon dioxide. Reversible trap and release of carbon dioxide over multiple cycles is demonstrated in solution at room temperature, and without the requirement for thermal activation.

  18. Measurement and Development of Humanware and Technoware Competencies in Order to Meet Pintle Chain Product Requirements in Bandung Manufacture Polytechnic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Jodi; Akbar, Muhammad; Irianto, Dradjad

    2016-02-01

    Politeknik Manufaktur Bandung (Bandung Manufacture Polytechnic) is a polytechnic education that is not only to educate their students, but also manufactures order from customers at its teaching factory. This polytechnic is usually not responsive with the number of reject due to amateur operators from newcomer students. However, customers will be displeased if the reject rate is too high which can cause delay of delivery. At the foundry section, pintle chain is a product that has the highest amount of quantity but the lowest product standard fulfilment. Realizing this problem, it is a strong need to give more focus on quality improvement. The polytechnic considers that bad quality is not only related to low level of humanware (operator) but also related to low level of technoware (machine and equipment). In this research, QFD model was used as a tool for identifying target of improvement of non conforming factors of humanware and technoware using UNESCAP's technometric model. An improvement was done by implementing new scheduling strategy at foundry unit in order to minimize waiting time from molding to pouring process because of deterioration problem. This strategy provides an opportunity to reduce completion times about 50% and waiting time about 95% compared to the existing scheduling strategy.

  19. Inactivation of retinoblastoma protein does not overcome the requirement for human cytomegalovirus UL97 in lamina disruption and nuclear egress.

    PubMed

    Reim, Natalia I; Kamil, Jeremy P; Wang, Depeng; Lin, Alison; Sharma, Mayuri; Ericsson, Maria; Pesola, Jean M; Golan, David E; Coen, Donald M

    2013-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes one conventional protein kinase, UL97. During infection, UL97 phosphorylates the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) on sites ordinarily phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), inactivating the ability of pRb to repress host genes required for cell cycle progression to S phase. UL97 is important for viral DNA synthesis in quiescent cells, but this function can be replaced by human papillomavirus type 16 E7, which targets pRb for degradation. However, viruses in which E7 replaces UL97 are still defective for virus production. UL97 is also required for efficient nuclear egress of viral nucleocapsids, which is associated with disruption of the nuclear lamina during infection, and phosphorylation of lamin A/C on serine 22, which antagonizes lamin polymerization. We investigated whether inactivation of pRb might overcome the requirement of UL97 for these roles, as pRb inactivation induces CDK1, and CDK1 phosphorylates lamin A/C on serine 22. We found that lamin A/C serine 22 phosphorylation during HCMV infection correlated with expression of UL97 and was considerably delayed in UL97-null mutants, even when E7 was expressed. E7 failed to restore gaps in the nuclear lamina seen in wild-type but not UL97-null virus infections. In electron microscopy analyses, a UL97-null virus expressing E7 was as impaired as a UL97-null mutant in cytoplasmic accumulation of viral nucleocapsids. Our results demonstrate that pRb inactivation is insufficient to restore efficient viral nuclear egress of HCMV in the absence of UL97 and instead argue further for a direct role of UL97 in this stage of the infectious cycle.

  20. Medicare and Medicaid programs; changes in provider and supplier enrollment, ordering and referring, and documentation requirements; and changes in provider agreements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-04-27

    This final rule finalizes several provisions of the Affordable Care Act implemented in the May 5, 2010 interim final rule with comment period. It requires all providers of medical or other items or services and suppliers that qualify for a National Provider Identifier (NPI) to include their NPI on all applications to enroll in the Medicare and Medicaid programs and on all claims for payment submitted under the Medicare and Medicaid programs. In addition, it requires physicians and other professionals who are permitted to order and certify covered items and services for Medicare beneficiaries to be enrolled in Medicare. Finally, it mandates document retention and provision requirements on providers and supplier that order and certify items and services for Medicare beneficiaries.

  1. The infectivity of prM-containing partially mature West Nile virus does not require the activity of cellular furin-like proteases.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Swati; Lin, Tsai-Yu; Dowd, Kimberly A; Manhart, Carolyn J; Pierson, Theodore C

    2011-11-01

    Cleavage of the flavivirus prM protein by a cellular furin-like protease is a hallmark of virion maturation. While this cleavage is a required step in the viral life cycle, it can be inefficient. Virions that retain uncleaved prM may be infectious. We investigated whether cleavage by furin of prM on partially mature West Nile virus (WNV) during virus entry contributes to infectivity. Using quantitative assays of WNV infection, we found that virions incorporating considerable amounts of uncleaved prM protein were insensitive to treatment of cells with a potent inhibitor of furin activity. Thus, partially mature WNV does not require furin-like proteases for infectivity.

  2. Functional requirements of AID’s higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A.; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID’s structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions. PMID:26929374

  3. High-order adaptive optics requirements for direct detection of extrasolar planets: Application to the SPHERE instrument.

    PubMed

    Fusco, T; Rousset, G; Sauvage, J-F; Petit, C; Beuzit, J-L; Dohlen, K; Mouillet, D; Charton, J; Nicolle, M; Kasper, M; Baudoz, P; Puget, P

    2006-08-21

    The detection of extrasolar planets implies an extremely high-contrast, long-exposure imaging capability at near infrared and probably visible wavelengths. We present here the core of any Planet Finder instrument, that is, the extreme adaptive optics (XAO) subsystem. The level of AO correction directly impacts the exposure time required for planet detection. In addition, the capacity of the AO system to calibrate all the instrument static defects ultimately limits detectivity. Hence, the extreme AO system has to adjust for the perturbations induced by the atmospheric turbulence, as well as for the internal aberrations of the instrument itself. We propose a feasibility study for an extreme AO system in the frame of the SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetry High-contrast Exoplanet Research) instrument, which is currently under design and should equip one of the four VLT 8-m telescopes in 2010.

  4. 77 FR 12205 - Mevinphos; Order Revoking Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    .... (21 U.S.C. 346a(f)(1)(C)). Under the Administrative Procedures Act (APA), orders are expressly..., if applicable. C. Regulatory Flexibility Act Since this order is not a rule under the APA (5 U.S.C... Transfer and Advancement Act This action does not involve any technical standards that would require...

  5. Human coronavirus EMC does not require the SARS-coronavirus receptor and maintains broad replicative capability in mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Müller, Marcel A; Raj, V Stalin; Muth, Doreen; Meyer, Benjamin; Kallies, Stephan; Smits, Saskia L; Wollny, Robert; Bestebroer, Theo M; Specht, Sabine; Suliman, Tasnim; Zimmermann, Katrin; Binger, Tabea; Eckerle, Isabella; Tschapka, Marco; Zaki, Ali M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M; Haagmans, Bart L; Drosten, Christian

    2012-12-11

    highly critical, because the SARS-CoV receptor influenced pathology, and its localization in the deep respiratory tract is thought to have restricted the transmissibility of SARS. Our data show that hCoV-EMC does not need the SARS-CoV receptor to infect human cells. Moreover, the virus is capable of infecting human, pig, and bat cells. This is remarkable, as human CoVs normally cannot replicate in bat cells as a consequence of host adaptation. Our results implicate that the new virus might use a receptor that is conserved between bats, pigs and humans suggesting a low barrier against cross-host transmission.

  6. What is nursing in the 21st century and what does the 21st century health system require of nursing?

    PubMed

    Scott, P Anne; Matthews, Anne; Kirwan, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    It is frequently claimed that nursing is vital to the safe, humane provision of health care and health service to our populations. It is also recognized however, that nursing is a costly health care resource that must be used effectively and efficiently. There is a growing recognition, from within the nursing profession, health care policy makers and society, of the need to analyse the contribution of nursing to health care and its costs. This becomes increasingly pertinent and urgent in a situation, such as that existing in Ireland, where the current financial crisis has lead to public sector employment moratoria, staff cuts and staffing deficits, combined with increased patient expectation, escalating health care costs, and a health care system restructuring and reform agenda. Such factors, increasingly common internationally, make the identification and effective use of the nursing contribution to health care an issue of international importance. This paper seeks to explore the nature of nursing and the function of the nurse within a 21st century health care system, with a focus on the Irish context. However, this analysis fits into and is relevant to the international context and discussion regarding the nursing workforce. This paper uses recent empirical studies exploring the domains of activity and focus of nursing, together with nurses perceptions of their role and work environment, in order to connect those findings with core conceptual questions about the nature and function of nursing.

  7. Does Accidental Overcorrection of Symptomatic Hyponatremia in Chronic Heart Failure Require Specific Therapeutic Adjustments for Preventing Central Pontine Myelinolysis?

    PubMed Central

    De Vecchis, Renato; Noutsias, Michel; Ariano, Carmelina; Cesaro, Arturo; Cioppa, Carmela; Giasi, Anna; Maurea, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    This review aims at summarizing essential aspects of epidemiology and pathophysiology of hyponatremia in chronic heart failure (CHF), to set the ground for a practical as well as evidence-based approach to treatment. As a guide through the discussion of the available evidence, a clinical case of hyponatremia associated with CHF is presented. For this case, the severe neurological signs at presentation justified an emergency treatment with hypertonic saline plus furosemide, as indicated. Subsequently, as the neurological emergency began to subside, the reversion of the trend toward hyponatremia overcorrection was realized by continuous infusion of hypotonic solutions, and administration of desmopressin, so as to prevent the very feared risk of an osmotic demyelination syndrome. This very disabling complication of the hyponatremia correction is then briefly outlined. Moreover, the possible advantages related to systematic correction of the hyponatremia that occurs in the course of CHF are mentioned. Additionally, the case of tolvaptan, a vasopressin receptor antagonist, is concisely presented in order to underline the different views that have led to different norms in Europe with respect to the USA or Japan as regards the use of this drug as a therapeutic resource against the hyponatremia. PMID:28270885

  8. Ceramide kinase is required for a normal eicosanoid response and the subsequent orderly migration of fibroblasts[S

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Brentnall, Matthew; Mietla, Jennifer A.; Hoeferlin, L. Alexis; Diegelmann, Robert F.; Boise, Lawrence H.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    In these studies, the role of ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) in the wound-healing process was investigated. Specifically, fibroblasts isolated from mice with the known anabolic enzyme for C1P, ceramide kinase (CERK), ablated (CERK−/− mice) and their wild-type littermates (CERK+/+) were subjected to in vitro wound-healing assays. Simulation of mechanical trauma of a wound by scratching a monolayer of fibroblasts from CERK+/+ mice demonstrated steadily increasing levels of arachidonic acid in a time-dependent manner in stark contrast to CERK−/− fibroblasts. This observed difference was reflected in scratch-induced eicosanoid levels. Similar, but somewhat less intense, changes were observed in a more complex system utilizing skin biopsies obtained from CERK-null mice. Importantly, C1P levels increased during the early stages of human wound healing correlating with the transition from the inflammatory stage to the peak of the fibroplasia stage (e.g., proliferation and migration of fibroblasts). Finally, the loss of proper eicosanoid response translated into an abnormal migration pattern for the fibroblasts isolated from CERK−/−. As the proper migration of fibroblasts is one of the necessary steps of wound healing, these studies demonstrate a novel requirement for the CERK-derived C1P in the proper healing response of wounds. PMID:24823941

  9. M-phase-specific protein kinase from mitotic sea urchin eggs: cyclic activation depends on protein synthesis and phosphorylation but does not require DNA or RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Arion, D; Meijer, L

    1989-08-01

    Histone H1 kinase (H1K) undergoes a transient activation at each early M phase of both meiotic and mitotic cell cycles. The mechanisms underlying the transient activation of this protein kinase were investigated in mitotic sea urchin eggs. Translocation of active H1K from particulate to soluble fraction does not seem to be responsible for this activation. H1K activation cannot be accounted for by the transient disappearance of a putative H1K inhibitor present in soluble fractions of homogenates. Aphidicolin, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis, and actinomycin D, an inhibitor of RNA synthesis, do not impede the transient appearance of H1K activity. H1K activation therefore does not require DNA or RNA synthesis. Fertilization triggers a rise in intracellular pH responsible for the increase of protein synthesis. H1K activation is highly dependent on the intracellular pH. Ammonia triggers an increase of intracellular pH and stimulates protein synthesis and H1K activation. Acetate lowers the intracellular pH, decreases protein synthesis, and blocks H1K activation. Protein synthesis is an absolute requirement for H1K activation as demonstrated by their identical sensitivities to emetine concentration and to time of emetine addition. About 60 min after fertilization, H1K activation and cleavage become independent of protein synthesis. The concentration of p34, a homolog of the yeast cdc2 gene product which has been recently shown to be a subunit of H1K, does not vary during the cell cycle and remains constant in emetine-treated cells. H1K activation thus requires the synthesis of either a p34 postranslational modifying enzyme or another subunit. Finally, phosphatase inhibitors and ATP slow down in the in vitro inactivation rate of H1K. These results suggest that a subunit or an activator of H1K is stored as an mRNA in the egg before mitosis and that full activation of H1K requires a phosphorylation.

  10. Egress of budded virions of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus does not require activity of Spodoptera frugiperda HSP/HSC70 chaperones.

    PubMed

    Lyupina, Yulia V; Orlova, Olga V; Abaturova, Svetlana B; Beljelarskaya, Svetlana N; Lavrov, Andrey N; Mikhailov, Victor S

    2014-11-04

    The induction of heat shock proteins in baculovirus infected cells is well documented. However a role of these chaperones in infection cycle remains unknown. The observation that HSP70s are associated with virions of different baculoviruses reported by several researchers suggests that HSPs might be structural components of viruses or involved in virion assembly. These hypotheses were examined by using a novel inhibitor of the ATPase and chaperoning activity of HSP/HSC70s, VER-155008. When VER-155008 was added early in infection, the synthesis of viral proteins, genome replication and the production of budded virions (BV) were markedly inhibited indicating the dependence of virus reproduction on host chaperones. However, BV production was unaffected when VER-155008 was added in the mid-replication phase which is after accumulation of products required for completion of the viral DNA replication. These results suggest that the final stages in assembly of BV and their egress from cells do not depend on chaperone activity of host HSP/HSC70s.

  11. Subcellular propagation of calcium waves in Müller glia does not require autocrine/paracrine purinergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Phuong, Tam T T; Yarishkin, Oleg; Križaj, David

    2016-09-02

    The polarized morphology of radial glia allows them to functionally interconnect different layers of CNS tissues including the retina, cerebellum, and cortex. A likely mechanism involves propagation of transcellular Ca(2+) waves which were proposed to involve purinergic signaling. Because it is not known whether ATP release is required for astroglial Ca(2+) wave propagation we investigated this in mouse Müller cells, radial astroglia-like retinal cells in which in which waves can be induced and supported by Orai/TRPC1 (transient receptor potential isoform 1) channels. We found that depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores triggers regenerative propagation of transcellular Ca(2+) waves that is independent of ATP release and activation of P2X and P2Y receptors. Both the amplitude and kinetics of transcellular, depletion-induced waves were resistant to non-selective purinergic P2 antagonists such as pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS). Thus, store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) is itself sufficient for the initiation and subcellular propagation of calcium waves in radial glia.

  12. Crucial requirement for standardization during the development of novel recombinant BCG vaccines: Does the corresponding substrain background matter?

    PubMed

    Antas, P R Z

    2016-12-01

    The Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine is not a single organism, but consists of substrains that vary in genotypes and phenotypes. Actually, BCG is the common name given to a family of vaccines created in 1921 by the in vitro attenuation of a virulent Mycobacterium bovis in France. Even nearly a century of use, the BCG vaccine lingers generating confusion and debate due to its diversity and failure to protect against tuberculosis (TB). That is probably owing to the enduring lack of standardization during production, distribution and administration procedures. Since the 1940s, substantial sequence modifications among the BCG substrains have been described. To increase the level of complexity, even though that the prolific generation of recombinant BCG vaccines has been promising, the relationships between those candidates used in current clinical trials and their parental substrains are either unsatisfactorily connected or have been never fully delineated. Consequently, the use of the most protective BCG substrain as the background or platform in the development of all recombinant BCG vaccine candidates has not been standardized. In order to schematize and to clarify the subject regarding substrains commonly used to generate those novel vaccines, a sequential emergence of the parental BCG vaccine substrains and their matching recombinant ones, if any, was built. Hence, for a total of 24 BCG substrains currently in circulation worldwide, 9 have been used to sustain one or more genetic modifications, resulting in around 21 novel recombinant BCG vaccines. Although this is a remarkable success, only 2 out of the 21 recombinant BCG substrains harbor a background representative of the most immunogenic group. Systematizing the novel BCG vaccines and their parental strains may facilitate our understanding of protection provided by BCG immunizations.

  13. Does Elimination of a Laboratory Sample Clotting Stage Requirement Reduce Overall Turnaround Times for Emergency Department Stat Biochemical Testing?

    PubMed Central

    Compeau, Sarah; Howlett, Michael; Matchett, Stephanie; Shea, Jennifer; Fraser, Jacqueline; McCloskey, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Laboratory turnaround times (TAT) influence length of stay for emergency department (ED) patients. We studied biochemistry TATs around the implementation of a plasma separating tube (PST) that omitted a 20-minute clotting step in processing when compared to the standard serum separating tubes (SST). Methods: We compared laboratory TATs using PST vs SST in a prospective before-and-after study with a washout period. TATs for creatinine, urea, electrolytes, troponin, and N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as well as hemolysis rates, were collected for all ED patients. Results were excluded if the TAT was four minutes or less (data entry error). We recorded the 90th percentile response times (TAT90; the time for 90% of the tests to be completed). Statistical analysis used survival analyses, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Chi-square tests of independence. Results: SST and PST groups were matched for days of the week, critical values, or hemolysis. There was a statistically significant reduction in median TAT and proportion completed by 60 minutes. However, the effect size was only two to four minutes in the In-Lab-TAT90 with the PST tubes for all tests, except B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Conclusions: Reducing the machine processing time for stat blood work with PST tubes did not produce a clinically meaningful reduction of TAT. Clinically important improvement for Lab TAT requires process analysis and intervention that is inclusive of the entire system. Fractile response times at a 90th percentile for TAT within 60 minutes may be an accurate benchmark for analysis. PMID:27843737

  14. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  15. Medicare and Medicaid programs; changes in provider and supplier enrollment, ordering and referring, and documentation requirements; and changes in provider agreements. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2010-05-05

    This interim final rule with comment period implements several provisions set forth in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Affordable Care Act). It implements the provision which requires all providers of medical or other items or services and suppliers that qualify for a National Provider Identifier (NPI) to include their NPI on all applications to enroll in the Medicare and Medicaid programs and on all claims for payment submitted under the Medicare and Medicaid programs. This interim final rule with comment period also requires physicians and eligible professionals to order and refer covered items and services for Medicare beneficiaries to be enrolled in Medicare. In addition, it adds requirements for providers, physicians, and other suppliers participating in the Medicare program to provide documentation on referrals to programs at high risk of waste and abuse, to include durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies (DMEPOS), home health services, and other items or services specified by the Secretary.

  16. I am having problems with the ASDC Web Ordering Tool.

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    ... note that the minimum browser requirements for the ASDC Web Ordering Tool are as follows: - Internet Explorer 4.0 - Firefox 1.5 ... must be enabled You will be unable to access the ASDC Web Ordering Tool if your browser does not meet the minimum requirements. ...

  17. Does justice require genetic enhancements?

    PubMed

    Holtug, N

    1999-04-01

    It is argued that justice in some cases provides a pro tanto reason genetically to enhance victims of the genetic lottery. Various arguments--both to the effect that justice provides no such reason and to the effect that while there may be such reasons, they are overridden by certain moral constraints--are considered and rejected. Finally, it is argued that justice provides stronger reasons to perform more traditional medical tasks (treatments), and that therefore genetic enhancements should not play an important role in a public health care system.

  18. Tisseel does not reduce postoperative drainage, length of stay, and transfusion requirements for lumbar laminectomy with noninstrumented fusion versus laminectomy alone

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Typically, fibrin sealants (FSs) and fibrin glues (FGs) are used to strengthen dural repairs during spinal surgery. In 2014, Epstein demonstrated that one FS/FG, Tisseel (Baxter International Inc., Westlake Village, CA, USA) equalized the average times to drain removal and length of stay (LOS) for patients with versus without excess bleeding (e.g. who did not receive Tisseel) undergoing multilevel laminectomies with 1-2 level noninstrumented fusions (LamF).[6] Methods: Here Tisseel was utilized to promote hemostasis for two populations; 39 patients undergoing average 4.4 level lumbar laminectomies with average 1.3 level noninstrumented fusions (LamF), and 48 patients undergoing average 4.0 level laminectomies alone (Lam). We compared the average operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), postoperative drainage, LOS, and transfusion requirements for the LamF versus Lam groups. Results: The average operative times, EBL, postoperative drainage, LOS, and transfusion requirements were all greater for LamF versus Lam patients; operative times (4.1 vs. 3.0 h), average EBL (192.3 vs. 147.9 cc), drainage (e.g. day 1; 199.6 vs. 167.4 cc; day 2; 172.9 vs. 63.9 cc), average LOS (4.6 vs. 2.5 days), and transfusion requirements (11 LamF patients; 18 Units [U] RBC versus 2 Lam patients; 3 U RBC). Conclusions: Utilizing Tisseel to facilitate hemostasis in LamF versus Lam still resulted in greater operative times, EBL, postoperative average drainage, LOS, and transfusion requirements for patients undergoing the noninstrumented fusions. Although Tisseel decreases back bleeding within the spinal canal, it does not reduce blood loss from LamF decorticated transverse processes. PMID:26005579

  19. Promotion of oogenesis and embryogenesis in the C. elegans gonad by EFL-1/DPL-1 (E2F) does not require LIN-35 (pRB).

    PubMed

    Chi, Woo; Reinke, Valerie

    2006-08-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, EFL-1 (E2F), DPL-1 (DP) and LIN-35 (pRb) act coordinately in somatic tissues to inhibit ectopic cell division, probably by repressing the expression of target genes. EFL-1, DPL-1 and LIN-35 are also present in the germline, but do not always act together. Strong loss-of-function mutations in either efl-1 or dpl-1 cause defects in oogenesis that result in sterility, while lin-35 mutants are fertile with reduced broods. Microarray-based expression profiling of dissected gonads from efl-1, dpl-1 and lin-35 mutants reveals that EFL-1 and DPL-1 promote expression of an extensively overlapping set of target genes, consistent with the expectation that these two proteins function as a heterodimer. Regulatory regions upstream of many of these target genes have a canonical E2F-binding site, suggesting that their regulation by EFL-1/DPL-1 is direct. Many EFL-1/DPL-1 responsive genes encode proteins required for oogenesis and early embryogenesis, rather than cell cycle components. By contrast, LIN-35 appears to function primarily as a repressor of gene expression in the germline, and the genes that it acts on are for the most part distinct from those regulated by EFL-1 and/or DPL-1. Thus, in vivo, C. elegans E2F directly promotes oogenesis and embryogenesis through the activation of a tissue-specific transcriptional program that does not require LIN-35.

  20. The Influence of Prosodic Input in the Second Language Classroom: Does It Stimulate Child Acquisition of Word Order and Function Words?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campfield, Dorota E.; Murphy, Victoria A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on an intervention study with young Polish beginners (mean age: 8 years, 3 months) learning English at school. It seeks to identify whether exposure to rhythmic input improves knowledge of word order and function words. The "prosodic bootstrapping hypothesis", relevant in developmental psycholinguistics, provided the…

  1. Chromatin modification by PSC occurs at one PSC per nucleosome and does not require the acidic patch of histone H2A.

    PubMed

    Lo, Stanley M; McElroy, Kyle A; Francis, Nicole J

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin architecture is regulated through both enzymatic and non-enzymatic activities. For example, the Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins maintain developmental gene silencing using an array of chromatin-based mechanisms. The essential Drosophila PcG protein, Posterior Sex Combs (PSC), compacts chromatin and inhibits chromatin remodeling and transcription through a non-enzymatic mechanism involving nucleosome bridging. Nucleosome bridging is achieved through a combination of nucleosome binding and self-interaction. Precisely how PSC interacts with chromatin to bridge nucleosomes is not known and is the subject of this work. We determine the stoichiometry of PSC-chromatin interactions in compact chromatin (in which nucleosomes are bridged) using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). We find that full compaction occurs with one PSC per nucleosome. In addition to compacting chromatin, we show that PSC oligomerizes nucleosome arrays. PSC-mediated oligomerization of chromatin occurs at similar stoichiometry as compaction suggesting it may also involve nucleosome bridging. Interactions between the tail of histone H4 and the acidic patch of histone H2A are important for chromatin folding and oligomerization, and several chromatin proteins bind the histone H2A acidic patch. However, mutation of the acidic patch of histone H2A does not affect PSC's ability to inhibit chromatin remodeling or bridge nucleosomes. In fact, PSC does not require nucleosomes for bridging activity but can bridge naked DNA segments. PSC clusters nucleosomes on sparsely assembled templates, suggesting it interacts preferentially with nucleosomes over bare DNA. This may be due to the ability of PSC to bind free histones. Our data are consistent with a model in which each PSC binds a nucleosome and at least one other PSC to directly bridge nucleosomes and compact chromatin, but also suggest that naked DNA can be included in compacted structures. We discuss how our data highlight the diversity

  2. Federal Environmental Reporting Requirements Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    1990-05-01

    The Environmental Reporting Requirements Handbook has been developed by DOE Headquarters' Environmental Guidance Division (EH-231) in order to assist DOE Field Organizations in the identification of the various reporting the notification requirements mandated by Federal environmental laws, regulations, and Executive Orders. The Handbook makes a distinction between ''routine'' and ''non-routine'' reporting/notification requirements. Routine reporting requirements include the submission of documents that are required either on a regular basis, such as annual or biennial reports, or periodic notifications that result from what would be considered ''normal'' operations, such as Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) updates that are required when new information not contained on previous MSDS submissions is discovered. Non-routine reporting requirements are generally associated with occurrences that represent significant deviations from regulated or planned performance; examples include the unintentional discharge of oil or hazardous substances.

  3. Site characterization and hazard assessment criteria for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Lu, S.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1993-09-01

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements for site characterization and hazard assessment of Natural Phenomena Hazards for compliance with DOE Order 5480.28. The site characterization criteria for NPH evaluation are provided in a draft DOE-STD-1022-XX and the assessment criteria of natural phenomena hazards are provided in draft DOE-STD-1023-XX.

  4. Modulation of BAG3 Expression and Proteasomal Activity by sAPPα Does Not Require Membrane-Tethered Holo-APP.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Arpita; Milosch, Nelli; Antonietti, Patrick; Baumkötter, Frederik; Zymny, Andreas; Müller, Ulrike C; Kins, Stefan; Hajieva, Parvana; Behl, Christian; Kögel, Donat

    2016-11-01

    Maintenance of intracellular proteostasis is essential for neuronal function, and emerging data support the view that disturbed proteostasis plays an important role in brain aging and the pathogenesis of age-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). sAPPalpha (sAPPα), the extracellularly secreted N-terminal alpha secretase cleavage product of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), has an established function in neuroprotection. Recently, we provided evidence that membrane-bound holo-APP functionally cooperates with sAPPα to mediate neuroprotection via activation of the Akt survival signaling pathway and sAPPα directly affects proteostasis. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to its anti-apoptotic function, sAPPα has effects on neuronal proteostasis under conditions of proteasomal stress. In particular, recombinant sAPPα significantly suppressed MG132-triggered expression of the co-chaperone BAG3 and aggresome formation, and it partially rescued proteasomal activity in a dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In analogy, sAPPα was able to inhibit MG132-induced BAG3 expression in primary hippocampal neurons. Strikingly, these sAPPα-induced changes were unaltered in APP-depleted SH-SY5Y cells and APP-deficient neurons, demonstrating that holo-APP is not required for this particular function of sAPPα. Importantly, recombinant sAPPbeta (sAPPβ) failed to modulate BAG3 expression and proteostasis in APP-proficient wild-type (wt) cells, indicating that these biological effects are highly selective for sAPPα. In conclusion, we demonstrate that modulation of proteostasis is a distinct biological function of sAPPα and does not require surface-bound holo-APP. Our data shed new light on the physiological functions of APP and the interplay between APP processing and proteostasis during brain aging.

  5. Intermittent-access binge consumption of sweet high-fat liquid does not require opioid or dopamine receptors in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lardeux, Sylvie; Kim, James J.; Nicola, Saleem M.

    2015-01-01

    Binge eating disorders are characterized by episodes of intense consumption of high-calorie food. In recently developed animal models of binge eating, rats given intermittent access to such food escalate their consumption over time. Consumption of calorie-dense food is associated with neurochemical changes in the nucleus accumbens, including dopamine release and alterations in dopamine and opioid receptor expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that binge-like consumption on intermittent access schedules is dependent on opioid and/or dopamine neurotransmission in the accumbens. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether injection of dopamine and opioid receptor antagonists into the core and shell of the accumbens reduced consumption of a sweet high-fat liquid in rats with and without a history of intermittent binge access to the liquid. Although injection of a μ opioid agonist increased consumption, none of the antagonists (including μ opioid, δ opioid, κ opioid, D1 dopamine and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists, as well as the broad-spectrum opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone) reduced consumption, and this was the case whether or not the animals had a prior history of intermittent access. These results suggest that consumption of sweet, fatty food does not require opioid or dopamine receptor activation in the accumbens even under intermittent access conditions that resemble human binge episodes. PMID:26097003

  6. The Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 does not require an activator accessory protein for expression in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Misty L.; Martinez, Salette; Gumataotao, Natalie; Bornscheuer, Uwe; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C.

    2012-10-10

    We report herein the functional expression of an Fe-type nitrile hydratase (NHase) without the co-expression of an activator protein or the Escherichia coli chaperone proteins GroES/EL. Soluble protein was obtained when the {alpha}- and {beta}-subunit genes of the Fe-type NHase Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase) were synthesized with optimized E. coli codon usage and co-expressed. As a control, the Fe-type NHase from Rhodococcus equi TG328-2 (ReNHase) was expressed with (ReNHase{sup +Act}) and without (ReNHase{sup -Act}) its activator protein, establishing that expression of a fully functional, metallated ReNHase enzyme requires the co-expression of its activator protein, similar to all other Fe-type NHase enzymes reported to date, whereas the CtNHase does not. The X-ray crystal structure of CtNHase was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution revealing an {alpha}{beta} heterodimer, similar to other Fe-type NHase enzymes, except for two important differences. First, two His residues reside in the CtNHase active site that are not observed in other Fe-type NHase enzymes and second, the active site Fe(III) ion resides at the bottom of a wide solvent exposed channel. The solvent exposed active site, along with the two active site histidine residues, are hypothesized to play a role in iron incorporation in the absence of an activator protein.

  7. Depletion of rat cortical norepinephrine and the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine uptake by xylamine does not require monoamine oxidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of monoamine oxidase A through pretreatment of rats with clorgyline or the pro-drug MDL 72,394 did not block the amine-depleting action of xylamine. Xylamine treatment resulted in a loss of approximately 60% of the control level of norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex. A 1-hr pretreatment, but not a 24-hr pretreatment, with the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, L-deprenyl, prevented the depletion of norepinephrine by xylamine. In addition, pretreatment with MDL 72,974, a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor without amine-releasing or uptake - inhibiting effects, did not prevent cortical norepinephrine levels. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by either MDL 72,974 or MDL 72,394 did not prevent the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes by xylamine. These data indicate that monoamine oxidase does not mediate the amine-releasing or uptake inhibiting properties of xylamine. The protection afforded by L-deprenyl following a 1-hr pretreatment most probably was due to accumulation of its metabolite, L-amphetamine, which would inhibit the uptake carrier. A functional carrier is required for depletion since desipramine administered 1 hr prior to xylamine, was also able to prevent depletion of norepinephrine.

  8. The Fe-type nitrile hydratase from Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 does not require an activator accessory protein for expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Misty L; Martinez, Salette; Gumataotao, Natalie; Bornscheuer, Uwe; Liu, Dali; Holz, Richard C

    2012-08-03

    We report herein the functional expression of an Fe-type nitrile hydratase (NHase) without the co-expression of an activator protein or the Escherichia coli chaperone proteins GroES/EL. Soluble protein was obtained when the α- and β-subunit genes of the Fe-type NHase Comamonas testosteroni Ni1 (CtNHase) were synthesized with optimized E. coli codon usage and co-expressed. As a control, the Fe-type NHase from Rhodococcus equi TG328-2 (ReNHase) was expressed with (ReNHase(+Act)) and without (ReNHase(-Act)) its activator protein, establishing that expression of a fully functional, metallated ReNHase enzyme requires the co-expression of its activator protein, similar to all other Fe-type NHase enzymes reported to date, whereas the CtNHase does not. The X-ray crystal structure of CtNHase was determined to 2.4Å resolution revealing an αβ heterodimer, similar to other Fe-type NHase enzymes, except for two important differences. First, two His residues reside in the CtNHase active site that are not observed in other Fe-type NHase enzymes and second, the active site Fe(III) ion resides at the bottom of a wide solvent exposed channel. The solvent exposed active site, along with the two active site histidine residues, are hypothesized to play a role in iron incorporation in the absence of an activator protein.

  9. Intermittent-access binge consumption of sweet high-fat liquid does not require opioid or dopamine receptors in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Lardeux, Sylvie; Kim, James J; Nicola, Saleem M

    2015-10-01

    Binge eating disorders are characterized by episodes of intense consumption of high-calorie food. In recently developed animal models of binge eating, rats given intermittent access to such food escalate their consumption over time. Consumption of calorie-dense food is associated with neurochemical changes in the nucleus accumbens, including dopamine release and alterations in dopamine and opioid receptor expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that binge-like consumption on intermittent access schedules is dependent on opioid and/or dopamine neurotransmission in the accumbens. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether injection of dopamine and opioid receptor antagonists into the core and shell of the accumbens reduced consumption of a sweet high-fat liquid in rats with and without a history of intermittent binge access to the liquid. Although injection of a μ opioid agonist increased consumption, none of the antagonists (including μ opioid, δ opioid, κ opioid, D1 dopamine and D2 dopamine receptor antagonists, as well as the broad-spectrum opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone) reduced consumption, and this was the case whether or not the animals had a prior history of intermittent access. These results suggest that consumption of sweet, fatty food does not require opioid or dopamine receptor activation in the accumbens even under intermittent access conditions that resemble human binge episodes.

  10. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-12-01

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  11. Self-belief does make a difference: a reciprocal effects model of the causal ordering of physical self-concept and gymnastics performance.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Herbert W; Chanal, Julien P; Sarrazin, Philippe G

    2006-01-01

    A large body of research in support of the reciprocal effects model of causal ordering demonstrates that prior academic self-concept predicts subsequent academic achievement beyond what can be explained in terms of prior achievement. Here we evaluate the generalizability of this support for the reciprocal effects model to a physical activity context in which achievement is reflected in gymnastics skills on a standardized gymnastics performance test evaluated by expert judges. Based on the responses of 376 adolescents collected at the start (T1) and end (T2) of a gymnastics training programme, there is support for a reciprocal effects model in which there are significant paths leading from both T1 gymnastics self-concept to T2 gymnastics skills and from T1 gymnastics skills to T2 self-concept. Although there were gender and age effects (girls and older participants had better gymnastics skills, boys had higher self-concepts), multiple group structural equation models indicated that support for the reciprocal effects model generalized over responses by boys and girls. In summary, self-concept and performance are both determinants and consequences of each other.

  12. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  13. 25 CFR 63.13 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the Bureau of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of Character and Suitability for Employment § 63.13 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention...

  14. 25 CFR 63.13 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the Bureau of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of Character and Suitability for Employment § 63.13 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention...

  15. 25 CFR 63.13 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the Bureau of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of Character and Suitability for Employment § 63.13 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention...

  16. 25 CFR 63.13 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the Bureau of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of Character and Suitability for Employment § 63.13 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention...

  17. 25 CFR 63.13 - What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act require of the Bureau of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence... GOVERNMENT INDIAN CHILD PROTECTION AND FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION Minimum Standards of Character and Suitability for Employment § 63.13 What does the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention...

  18. Induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in cultured rat oligodendrocytes by murine coronavirus is mediated during cell entry and does not require virus replication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Cai, Yingyun; Zhang, Xuming

    2003-11-01

    Murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) causes demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) in rats and mice. Apoptotic oligodendrocytes have been detected in the vicinity of the CNS demyelinating lesions in these animals. However, whether MHV can directly induce oligodendrocyte apoptosis has not been documented. Here, we established a rat oligodendrocyte culture that is morphologically and phenotypically indistinguishable from the primary rat oligodendrocytes. Using this culture, we showed that mature rat oligodendrocytes were permissive to MHV infection but did not support productive virus replication. Significantly, oligodendrocytes infected with both live and ultraviolet light-inactivated viruses underwent apoptosis to a similar extent, which was readily detectable at 24 h postinfection as revealed by apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation, indicating that MHV-induced apoptosis is mediated during the early stages of the virus life cycle and does not require virus replication. Prior treatment of cells with the lysosomotropic agents NH(4)Cl and chloroquine as well as the vacuolar proton pump-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1, all of which block the acidification of the endosome, prevented oligodendrocytes from succumbing to apoptosis induced by MHV mutant OBLV60, which enters cells via endocytosis, indicating that fusion between the viral envelope and cell membranes triggers the apoptotic cascade. Treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk blocked MHV-induced apoptosis, suggesting an involvement of the caspase-dependent pathway. Our results, thus, for the first time provide unequivocal evidence that infection of oligodendrocytes with MHV directly results in apoptosis. This finding provides an explanation for the destruction of oligodendrocytes and the damage of myelin sheath in MHV-infected CNS and suggests that oligodendrocyte apoptosis may be one of the underlying mechanisms for the pathogenesis of MHV-induced demyelinating diseases in animals.

  19. G1 cell cycle arrest due to the inhibition of erbB family receptor tyrosine kinases does not require the retinoblastoma protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Andrea J. . E-mail: Andrea.Gonzales@pfizer.com; Fry, David W.

    2005-02-01

    The erbB receptor family (EGFr, erbB-2, erbB-3, and erbB-4) consists of transmembrane glycoproteins that transduce extracellular signals to the nucleus when activated. erbB family members are widely expressed in epithelial, mesenchymal, and neuronal cells and contribute to the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival of these cell types. The present study evaluates the effects of erbB family signaling on cell cycle progression and the role that pRB plays in regulating this process. ErbB family RTK activity was inhibited by PD 158780 in the breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. PD 158780 (0.5 {mu}M) inhibited EGF-stimulated and heregulin-stimulated autophosphorylation and caused a G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 h, which correlated with hypophosporylation of pRB. MCF10A cells lacking functional pRB retained the ability to arrest in G1 when treated with PD 158780. Both cell lines showed induction of p27{sup KIP1} protein when treated with PD 158780 and increased association of p27{sup KIP1} with cyclin E-CDK2. Furthermore, CDK2 kinase activity was dramatically inhibited with drug treatment. Changes in other pRB family members were noted with drug treatment, namely a decrease in p107 and an increase in p130. These findings show that the G1 arrest induced through inhibition of erbB family RTK activity does not require functional pRB.

  20. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 Is Adapted to Acetatogenic Growth but Does Not Require Acetate during Murine Urinary Tract Infection▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Anfora, Andrew T.; Halladin, David K.; Haugen, Brian J.; Welch, Rodney A.

    2008-01-01

    In vivo accumulation of d-serine by Escherichia coli CFT073 leads to elevated expression of PAP fimbriae and hemolysin by an unknown mechanism. Loss of d-serine catabolism by CFT073 leads to a competitive advantage during murine urinary tract infection (UTI), but loss of both d- and l-serine catabolism results in attenuation. Serine is the first amino acid to be consumed in closed tryptone broth cultures and precedes the production of acetyl phosphate, a high-energy molecule involved in intracellular signaling, and the eventual secretion of acetate. We propose that the colonization defect associated with the loss of serine catabolism is due to perturbations of acetate metabolism. CFT073 grows more rapidly on acetogenic substrates than does E. coli K-12 isolate MG1655. As shown by transcription microarray results, d-serine is catabolized into acetate via the phosphotransacetylase (pta) and acetate kinase (ackA) genes while downregulating expression of acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs). CFT073 acs, which is unable to reclaim secreted acetate, colonized mouse bladders and kidneys in the murine model of UTI indistinguishably from the wild type. Both pta and ackA are involved in the maintenance of intracellular acetyl phosphate. CFT073 pta and ackA mutants were screened to investigate the role of acetyl phosphate in UTI pathogenesis. Both single mutants are at a competitive disadvantage relative to the wild type in the kidneys but normally colonize the bladder. CFT073 ackA pta was attenuated in both the bladder and the kidneys. Thus, we demonstrate that CFT073 is adapted to acetate metabolism as a result of requiring a proper cycling of the acetyl phosphate pathway for colonization of the upper urinary tract. PMID:18838520

  1. An Algorithm Measuring Donor Cell-Free DNA in Plasma of Cellular and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients That Does Not Require Donor or Recipient Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Paul M. K.; Khan, Aneal; Sajid, Umair; Chang, Nicholas; Suresh, Varun; Dimnik, Leo; Lamont, Ryan E.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Martin, Steven R.; Pon, Richard T.; Weatherhead, Jene; Wegener, Shelly; Isaac, Debra; Greenway, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has significant potential in the diagnosis and monitoring of clinical conditions. However, accurately and easily distinguishing the relative proportion of DNA molecules in a mixture derived from two different sources (i.e., donor and recipient tissues after transplantation) is challenging. In human cellular transplantation, there is currently no useable method to detect in vivo engraftment, and blood-based non-invasive tests for allograft rejection in solid organ transplantation are either non-specific or absent. Elevated levels of donor cfDNA have been shown to correlate with solid organ rejection, but complex methodology limits implementation of this promising biomarker. We describe a cost-effective method to quantify donor cfDNA in recipient plasma using a panel of high-frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms, next-generation (semiconductor) sequencing, and a novel mixture model algorithm. In vitro, our method accurately and rapidly determined donor:recipient DNA admixture. For in vivo testing, donor cfDNA was serially quantified in an infant with a urea cycle disorder after receiving six daily infusions of donor liver cells. Donor cfDNA isolated from 1 to 2 ml of recipient plasma was detected as late as 24 weeks after infusion suggesting engraftment. The percentage of circulating donor cfDNA was also assessed in pediatric and adult heart transplant recipients undergoing routine endomyocardial biopsy with levels observed to be stable over time and generally measuring <1% in cases without moderate or severe cellular rejection. Unlike existing non-invasive methods used to define the proportion of donor cfDNA in solid organ transplant patients, our assay does not require sex mismatch, donor genotyping, or whole-genome sequencing and potentially has broad application to detect cellular engraftment or allograft injury after transplantation. PMID:27713880

  2. Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel S1P1 agonist that does not require S1P-like head-group interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of S1P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A S1P1 mutants neither bind S1P nor transduce S1P function. Because S1P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective S1P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating S1P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in S1P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for S1P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of S1P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of S1P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific S1P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for S1P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates S1P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of S1P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635

  3. Technical Safety Requirements for the Annular Core Research Reactor Faility (ACRRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Boldt, K.R.; McCrory, F.M.; Morris, F.M.; Talley, D.G.

    1998-09-01

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) document is prepared and issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements. The bases for the TSR are established in the ACRRF Safety Analysis Report issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The TSR identifies the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the facility.

  4. 49 CFR 40.160 - What does the MRO do when a valid test result cannot be produced and a negative result is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Medical Review Officers and the Verification Process § 40.160 What does the MRO do when a valid...

  5. 49 CFR 40.160 - What does the MRO do when a valid test result cannot be produced and a negative result is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Medical Review Officers and the Verification Process § 40.160 What does the MRO do when a valid...

  6. 49 CFR 40.160 - What does the MRO do when a valid test result cannot be produced and a negative result is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Medical Review Officers and the Verification Process § 40.160 What does the MRO do when a valid...

  7. 49 CFR 40.160 - What does the MRO do when a valid test result cannot be produced and a negative result is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Medical Review Officers and the Verification Process § 40.160 What does the MRO do when a valid...

  8. 31 CFR 30.6 - Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirement under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TARP STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.6 Q-6: How does a TARP recipient comply... months the terms of each employee compensation plan and identify and eliminate the features in...

  9. Recent laser upgrades at Sandia’s Z-backlighter facility in order to accommodate new requirements for magnetized liner inertial fusion on the Z-machine

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Armstrong, Darrell; Schollmeier, Marius; Smith, Ian; Shores, Jonathan; Geissel, Matthias; Kimmel, Mark; Porter, John

    2016-10-21

    The Z-backlighter laser facility primarily consists of two high energy, high-power laser systems. Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) (Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)) is a multi-kJ-class, nanosecond laser operating at 1054 nm which is frequency doubled to 527 nm in order to provide x-ray backlighting of high energy density events on the Z-machine. Z-Petawatt (ZPW) (Schwarz et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 032020 (2008)) is a petawatt-class system operating at 1054 nm delivering up to 500 J in 500 fs for backlighting and various short-pulse laser experiments (see also Figure 10 for a facility overview). With the development of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept on the Z-machine, the primary backlighting missions of ZBL and ZPW have been adjusted accordingly. As a result, we have focused our recent efforts on increasing the output energy of ZBL from 2 to 4 kJ at 527 nm by modifying the fiber front end to now include extra bandwidth (for stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression). The MagLIF concept requires a well-defined/behaved beam for interaction with the pressurized fuel. Hence we have made great efforts to implement an adaptive optics system on ZBL and have explored the use of phase plates. We are also exploring concepts to use ZPW as a backlighter for ZBL driven MagLIF experiments. Alternatively, ZPW could be used as an additional fusion fuel pre-heater or as a temporally flexible high energy pre-pulse. All of these concepts require the ability to operate the ZPW in a nanosecond long-pulse mode, in which the beam can co-propagate with ZBL. Finally, some of the proposed modifications are complete and most of them are well on their way.

  10. Recent laser upgrades at Sandia’s Z-backlighter facility in order to accommodate new requirements for magnetized liner inertial fusion on the Z-machine

    DOE PAGES

    Schwarz, Jens; Rambo, Patrick; Armstrong, Darrell; ...

    2016-10-21

    The Z-backlighter laser facility primarily consists of two high energy, high-power laser systems. Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) (Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)) is a multi-kJ-class, nanosecond laser operating at 1054 nm which is frequency doubled to 527 nm in order to provide x-ray backlighting of high energy density events on the Z-machine. Z-Petawatt (ZPW) (Schwarz et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 032020 (2008)) is a petawatt-class system operating at 1054 nm delivering up to 500 J in 500 fs for backlighting and various short-pulse laser experiments (see also Figure 10 for a facility overview). With the developmentmore » of the magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept on the Z-machine, the primary backlighting missions of ZBL and ZPW have been adjusted accordingly. As a result, we have focused our recent efforts on increasing the output energy of ZBL from 2 to 4 kJ at 527 nm by modifying the fiber front end to now include extra bandwidth (for stimulated Brillouin scattering suppression). The MagLIF concept requires a well-defined/behaved beam for interaction with the pressurized fuel. Hence we have made great efforts to implement an adaptive optics system on ZBL and have explored the use of phase plates. We are also exploring concepts to use ZPW as a backlighter for ZBL driven MagLIF experiments. Alternatively, ZPW could be used as an additional fusion fuel pre-heater or as a temporally flexible high energy pre-pulse. All of these concepts require the ability to operate the ZPW in a nanosecond long-pulse mode, in which the beam can co-propagate with ZBL. Finally, some of the proposed modifications are complete and most of them are well on their way.« less

  11. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  12. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-09-14

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  13. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment approach, training, and technical assistance for DOE contractors. FY 1995 report

    SciTech Connect

    Pemberton, S.

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy and its contractors are faced with environmental concerns and large waste management costs. Federal legislation and DOE Orders require sites to develop waste minimization/pollution prevention programs. In response to these requirements, the Kansas City Plant developed a pollution prevention tool called a pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA). Pilot assessments resulted in the development of a graded approach to reduce the amount of effort required for activities that utilized nonhazardous and/or low-volume waste streams. The project`s objectives in FY95 were to validate DOE`s PPOA Graded Approach methodology, provide PPOA training and technical assistance to interested DOE personnel and DOE contractors, enhance the methodology with energy analysis and tools for environmental restoration activities, implement a DOE-wide PPOA database, and provide support to DOE EM-334 in the completion of a report which estimates the future potential for pollution prevention and waste minimization in the DOE complex.

  14. Requirements Engineering and Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yijun; Niu, Nan; González-Baixauli, Bruno; Mylopoulos, John; Easterbrook, Steve; Do Prado Leite, Julio Cesar Sampaio

    A fundamental problem with requirements engineering (RE) is to validate that a design does satisfy stakeholder requirements. Some requirements can be fulfilled locally by designed modules, where others must be accommodated globally by multiple modules together. These global requirements often crosscut with other local requirements and as such lead to scattered concerns. We explore the possibility of borrowing concepts from aspect-oriented programming (AOP) to tackle these problems in early requirements. In order to validate the design against such early aspects, we propose a framework to trace them into coding and testing aspects. We demonstrate the approach using an open-source e-commerce platform. In the conclusion of this work, we reflect on the lessons learnt from the case study on how to fit RE and AOP research together.

  15. Segregated ordered lipid phases and protein-promoted membrane cohesivity are required for pulmonary surfactant films to stabilize and protect the respiratory surface.

    PubMed

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Vargas, Rodolfo; Picardi, Victoria; Cruz, Antonio; Arranz, Rocío; Valpuesta, José M; Mateu, Leonardo; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex essential to stabilize alveoli, by forming surface active films able to reach and sustain very low surface tensions (< 2 mN m(-1)) during the film compression that occurs at end-expiration. The particular lipid composition of surfactant, including a high proportion of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), induces segregation of fluid ordered and disordered phases in surfactant membranes and films at physiological temperatures. The segregation of DPPC-enriched ordered phase has been related with the ability of surfactant films to produce very low tensions, while the presence in surfactant of two specific hydrophobic polypeptides, SP-B and SP-C, is absolutely required to facilitate surfactant dynamics, including film formation and re-spreading during expansion at inspiration. In the present study, we have used X-ray scattering to analyze the structure of (1) whole native surfactant membranes purified from porcine lungs, (2) membranes reconstituted from the organic extract of surfactant containing the full lipid complement and the physiological proportion of SP-B and SP-C, and (3) membranes reconstituted from the lipid fraction of surfactant depleted of proteins. Small angle X-ray scattering data from whole surfactant or from membranes reconstituted from surfactant organic extract indicated the co-existence of two lamellar phases with different thicknesses. Such phase coexistence disappeared upon heating of the samples at temperatures above physiological values. When assessed in a captive bubble surfactometer, which mimics interfacial compression-expansion dynamics, the ability of surfactant films to produce very low tensions is only maintained at temperatures permitting the coexistence of the two lamellar phases. On the other hand, membranes reconstituted in the absence of proteins produced diffractograms indicative of the existence of a single dominant lamellar phase at all temperatures. These data suggest that SP

  16. Environmental Requirements Management

    SciTech Connect

    Cusack, Laura J.; Bramson, Jeffrey E.; Archuleta, Jose A.; Frey, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor responsible for the environmental cleanup of the Hanford Site Central Plateau. As part of this responsibility, the CH2M HILL is faced with the task of complying with thousands of environmental requirements which originate from over 200 federal, state, and local laws and regulations, DOE Orders, waste management and effluent discharge permits, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) response and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action documents, and official regulatory agency correspondence. The challenge is to manage this vast number of requirements to ensure they are appropriately and effectively integrated into CH2M HILL operations. Ensuring compliance with a large number of environmental requirements relies on an organization’s ability to identify, evaluate, communicate, and verify those requirements. To ensure that compliance is maintained, all changes need to be tracked. The CH2M HILL identified that the existing system used to manage environmental requirements was difficult to maintain and that improvements should be made to increase functionality. CH2M HILL established an environmental requirements management procedure and tools to assure that all environmental requirements are effectively and efficiently managed. Having a complete and accurate set of environmental requirements applicable to CH2M HILL operations will promote a more efficient approach to: • Communicating requirements • Planning work • Maintaining work controls • Maintaining compliance

  17. 31 CFR 30.5 - Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirements under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply... the TARP recipient, or that the employee compensation plans do not pose unnecessary risks to the TARP recipient? 30.5 Section 30.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury...

  18. 31 CFR 30.5 - Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirements under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply... the TARP recipient, or that the employee compensation plans do not pose unnecessary risks to the TARP recipient? 30.5 Section 30.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury...

  19. 31 CFR 30.5 - Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirements under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply... the TARP recipient, or that the employee compensation plans do not pose unnecessary risks to the TARP recipient? 30.5 Section 30.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury...

  20. 31 CFR 30.5 - Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirements under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply... the TARP recipient, or that the employee compensation plans do not pose unnecessary risks to the TARP recipient? 30.5 Section 30.5 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury...

  1. 31 CFR 30.5 - Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the requirements under § 30.4 (Q-4) of this part that...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR COMPENSATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE § 30.5 Q-5: How does a TARP recipient comply with the... recipient's senior risk officers any risks (including long-term as well as short-term risks) that the TARP... encourage behavior focused on short-term results and not on long-term value creation. The...

  2. 49 CFR 40.160 - What does the MRO do when a valid test result cannot be produced and a negative result is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cannot be produced and a negative result is required? 40.160 Section 40.160 Transportation Office of the... result cannot be produced and a negative result is required? (a) If a valid test result cannot be produced and a negative result is required, (under § 40.159 (a)(5)(iii) and (e)(4)), as the MRO, you...

  3. Treatment of municipal wastewater in full-scale on-site sand filter reduces BOD efficiently but does not reach requirements for nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Petteri; Sinkkonen, Aki; Zaitsev, Gennadi; Mäkinen, Esa; Grönroos, Timo; Romantschuk, Martin

    2017-03-18

    A traditional sand filter for treatment of household wastewater was constructed in the fall of 2012 at Biolinja 12, Turku, Finland. Construction work was led and monitored by an authorized wastewater treatment consultant. The filter was placed on a field bordered by open ditches from all sides in order to collect excess rain and snowmelt waters. The filter was constructed and insulated from the environment so that all outflowing water was accounted for. Untreated, mainly municipal, wastewater from Varissuo suburb was pumped from a sewer separately via three septic tanks (volume = 1 m(3) each) into the filters. Normally, wastewater was distributed to ground filters automatically according to pre-programmed schedule. Initially, the daily flow was 1200 L day(-1) to reflect the average organic load of a household of five persons (load: ca 237 g day(-1) BOD; 73 g day(-1) total N; and 10.4 g day(-1) total P). Later in the test, the flow rate was decreased first to 900 and then to 600 L day(-1) to better reflect the average volume produced by five persons. Volumes of inlet wastewater as well as treated water were monitored by magnetic flow meters. Samples were withdrawn from the inlet water, from the water entering the filters after the third septic tank, and from the outflowing water. After an initial adaption time, the reductions in BOD and chemical oxygen demand were constantly between 92 and 98%, showing that the biological degradation process in the filters functioned optimally and clearly comply with the national and EU standards. The reduction in total nitrogen and total phosphorus, however, reached required levels only during the first months of testing, apparently when buildup of microbial biomass was still ongoing. After this initial period of 3 months showing satisfactory reduction levels, the reduction of total nitrogen varied between 5 and 25% and total phosphorus mostly between 50 and 65%. Nitrification was efficient in the filter, but as

  4. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-03-23

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  5. High level waste storage tanks 242-A evaporator standards/requirement identification document

    SciTech Connect

    Biebesheimer, E.

    1996-01-01

    This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RIDS) for the subject facility, represents the necessary and sufficient requirements to provide an adequate level of protection of the worker, public health and safety, and the environment. It lists those source documents from which requirements were extracted, and those requirements documents considered, but from which no requirements where taken. Documents considered as source documents included State and Federal Regulations, DOE Orders, and DOE Standards

  6. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry; Miller, Gregory Hale

    2012-10-14

    Much of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FG02-03ER25579 was characterized by an exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). For example, Andy Nonaka, one of Professor Miller's graduate students in the Department of Applied Science at U. C. Davis (UCD) wrote his PhD thesis in an area of interest to researchers in the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG), which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. Dr. Nonaka collaborated closely with these researchers and subsequently published the results of this collaboration jointly with them, one article in a peer reviewed journal article and one paper in the proceedings of a conference. Dr. Nonaka is now a research scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE), which is also part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. This collaboration with researchers at LBNL also included having one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM) at UCD, Sarah Williams, spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren, who is a staff scientist in CCSE. As a result of this visit Sarah decided work on a problem suggested by the head of CCSE, Dr. John Bell, for her PhD thesis. Having finished all of the coursework and examinations required for a PhD, Sarah stayed at LBNL to work on her thesis under the guidance of Dr. Bell. Sarah finished her PhD thesis in June of 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is long established tradition at UC and Professor Puckett has always encouraged his students to consider doing this. Another one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the GGAM at UCD, Christopher Algieri, was partially supported with funds from DE-FG02-03ER25579 while he wrote his MS thesis in which he analyzed and extended work originally published by Dr

  7. 49 CFR 39.37 - May PVOs require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provide advance notice in order to obtain particular auxiliary aids and services or to arrange group... aids and services or to arrange group travel? (a) Except as provided in this section, as a PVO you must... particular auxiliary aids and services, you may request reasonable advance notice to guarantee...

  8. 49 CFR 39.37 - May PVOs require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provide advance notice in order to obtain particular auxiliary aids and services or to arrange group... aids and services or to arrange group travel? (a) Except as provided in this section, as a PVO you must... particular auxiliary aids and services, you may request reasonable advance notice to guarantee...

  9. 49 CFR 39.37 - May PVOs require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provide advance notice in order to obtain particular auxiliary aids and services or to arrange group... aids and services or to arrange group travel? (a) Except as provided in this section, as a PVO you must... particular auxiliary aids and services, you may request reasonable advance notice to guarantee...

  10. 49 CFR 39.37 - May PVOs require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provide advance notice in order to obtain particular auxiliary aids and services or to arrange group... aids and services or to arrange group travel? (a) Except as provided in this section, as a PVO you must... particular auxiliary aids and services, you may request reasonable advance notice to guarantee...

  11. 49 CFR 39.37 - May PVOs require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provide advance notice in order to obtain particular auxiliary aids and services or to arrange group... aids and services or to arrange group travel? (a) Except as provided in this section, as a PVO you must... particular auxiliary aids and services, you may request reasonable advance notice to guarantee...

  12. Does application of the Rosiwal Principle to lunar soils require that concentrations of solar-wind-implanted species be grain-size independent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A reconsideration of the application of the Rosiwal Principle to lunar soils indicates a flaw in arguments put forth previously by Criswell (1975). Specifically, by introducing a boundary condition which must exist at the lunar surface, it is shown that concentrations of solar-wind-implanted species showing a dependence on grain size may be able to develop in soils at concentration levels below those required for saturation of grain surfaces. As a result, observed grain-size-dependent concentrations of solar-wind species in lunar soils do not necessarily require the exposure time scales or solar-wind fluxes deduced from the arguments of Criswell.

  13. Cardiovascular devices; reclassification of nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass; effective date of requirement for premarket approval for nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pumps for temporary ventricular support. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-06-08

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify nonroller-type cardiopulmonary bypass blood pump (NRP) devices for cardiopulmonary and circulatory bypass, a preamendments class III device, into class II (special controls), and to require the filing of a premarket approval application (PMA) for NRP devices for temporary ventricular support. FDA is also revising the title and identification of the regulation for NRP devices in this order.

  14. 14 CFR 382.27 - May a carrier require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May a carrier require a passenger with a...? 382.27 Section 382.27 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR...

  15. 14 CFR 382.27 - May a carrier require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May a carrier require a passenger with a...? 382.27 Section 382.27 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR...

  16. 14 CFR 382.27 - May a carrier require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May a carrier require a passenger with a...? 382.27 Section 382.27 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR...

  17. 14 CFR 382.27 - May a carrier require a passenger with a disability to provide advance notice in order to obtain...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May a carrier require a passenger with a...? 382.27 Section 382.27 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN AIR...

  18. Nuclear waste: Quarterly report on DOE`s nuclear waste program as of March 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1988-12-31

    As part of the Department of Energy`s implementation of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, DOE is required to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and, if it determines that the site is suitable, recommend to the President its selection for a nuclear waste repository. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in considering development of the plan, issued five objections, one of which is DOE`s failure to recognize the range of alternative conceptual models of the Yucca Mountain site that can be supported by the limited existing technical data. At the end of the quarter DOE directed its project offices in Washington and Texas to begin an orderly phase-out of all site-specific repository activities. Costs for this phase-out are $53 million of the Deaf Smith site and $85 million for the Hanford site.

  19. 40 CFR 62.15395 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.15395 Section 62.15395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? Yes. If you are subject...

  20. 40 CFR 62.14480 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? 62.14480 Section... the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? This subpart requires you to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations (“title V permit”) unless you...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15395 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.15395 Section 62.15395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? Yes. If you are subject...

  2. 40 CFR 62.14480 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? 62.14480 Section... the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? This subpart requires you to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations (“title V permit”) unless you...

  3. 40 CFR 62.14480 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? 62.14480 Section... the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? This subpart requires you to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations (“title V permit”) unless you...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15395 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.15395 Section 62.15395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? Yes. If you are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15395 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.15395 Section 62.15395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? Yes. If you are subject...

  6. 40 CFR 62.14480 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? 62.14480 Section... the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? This subpart requires you to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations (“title V permit”) unless you...

  7. 40 CFR 62.14480 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? 62.14480 Section... the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations? This subpart requires you to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act and implementing regulations (“title V permit”) unless you...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15395 - Does this subpart require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? 62.15395 Section 62.15395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF... require me to obtain an operating permit under title V of the Clean Air Act? Yes. If you are subject...

  9. The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, does not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic POMC and CART activities in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2016-10-01

    The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, did not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and cocaine amphetamine regulated transcript activities in mice, although decrease in functional hypothalamic orexin activity might be involved in the acute anorexic effect of liraglutide.

  10. Knowledge Work, Working Time, and Use of Time among Finnish Dual-Earner Families: Does Knowledge Work Require the Marginalization of Private Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natti, Jouko; Anttila, Timo; Tammelin, Mia

    2012-01-01

    The industrial working-time regime is dissolving--not dramatically, but rather as a trend. A new trend is that those in dynamic sectors and in a good labor market position work long hours: Demanding knowledge work appears to require the marginalization of private life. This study investigates the family situation of knowledge workers, the…

  11. EVALUATING THE IMPORTANCE OF FACTORS IN ANY GIVEN ORDER OF FACTORING.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, L G; Tucker, L R; Dachler, P

    1970-04-01

    A methodology has been described and illustrated for obtaining an evaluation of the importance of the factors in a particular order of factoring that does not require faotoring beyond that order. For example, one can estimate the intercorrelations of the original measures with the perturbations of the first-order factor held constant or, the reverse, estimate the contribution to the intercorrelations of the originral measures from the first-order factors alone. Similar operations are possible at higher orders.

  12. Regulation of Wnt signaling by the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli does not require the ability to enter the nucleus or a particular cytoplasmic localization.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David M; Pronobis, Mira I; Poulton, John S; Kane, Eric G; Peifer, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Wnt signaling plays key roles in development and disease. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Its best-characterized role is as part of the destruction complex, targeting the Wnt effector β-catenin (βcat) for phosphorylation and ultimate destruction, but several studies suggested APC also may act in the nucleus at promoters of Wnt-responsive genes or to shuttle βcat out for destruction. Even in its role in the destruction complex, APC's mechanism of action remains mysterious. We have suggested APC positions the destruction complex at the appropriate subcellular location, facilitating βcat destruction. In this study, we directly tested APC's proposed roles in the nucleus or in precisely localizing the destruction complex by generating a series of APC2 variants to which we added tags relocalizing otherwise wild-type APC to different cytoplasmic locations. We tested these for function in human colon cancer cells and Drosophila embryos. Strikingly, all rescue Wnt regulation and down-regulate Wnt target genes in colon cancer cells, and most restore Wnt regulation in Drosophila embryos null for both fly APCs. These data suggest that APC2 does not have to shuttle into the nucleus or localize to a particular subcellular location to regulate Wnt signaling.

  13. Ketamine does not inhibit interleukin-6 synthesis in hepatic resections requiring a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre): a controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bonofiglio, Francisco Carlos; Molmenti, Ernesto P; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels correlated with mortality in critically ill patients. Goal To determine the effect of ketamine on IL-6 levels in liver resections patients with a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre). Materials and methods Controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. One group (n = 21) received ketamine whereas the other group (n = 17) received placebo. IL-6 levels were obtained at baseline, 4, 12, 24 h, 3 and 5 days. Results There were no significant differences in IL-6 levels between the groups (basal P = 089, 4 h P = 0.83, 12 h P = 0.39, 24 h, P = 0.55, 3 days P = 0.80 and 5 days P = 0.45). Both groups had elevated IL-6 levels that became almost undetectable by day 5. There was no major morbidity and no mortality in either group. Conclusions Ketamine does not seem to have an effect on plasma levels of IL-6. This could be interpreted as a potential finding associated with outcome as we did not encounter any deaths or major complications. Further studies will likely be needed to determine the range of IL-6 levels associated with survival and mortality, and whether it could be a predictor of survival. PMID:21929671

  14. Regulation of Wnt signaling by the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli does not require the ability to enter the nucleus or a particular cytoplasmic localization

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David M.; Pronobis, Mira I.; Poulton, John S.; Kane, Eric G.; Peifer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays key roles in development and disease. The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is an essential negative regulator of Wnt signaling. Its best-characterized role is as part of the destruction complex, targeting the Wnt effector β-catenin (βcat) for phosphorylation and ultimate destruction, but several studies suggested APC also may act in the nucleus at promoters of Wnt-responsive genes or to shuttle βcat out for destruction. Even in its role in the destruction complex, APC's mechanism of action remains mysterious. We have suggested APC positions the destruction complex at the appropriate subcellular location, facilitating βcat destruction. In this study, we directly tested APC's proposed roles in the nucleus or in precisely localizing the destruction complex by generating a series of APC2 variants to which we added tags relocalizing otherwise wild-type APC to different cytoplasmic locations. We tested these for function in human colon cancer cells and Drosophila embryos. Strikingly, all rescue Wnt regulation and down-regulate Wnt target genes in colon cancer cells, and most restore Wnt regulation in Drosophila embryos null for both fly APCs. These data suggest that APC2 does not have to shuttle into the nucleus or localize to a particular subcellular location to regulate Wnt signaling. PMID:22513088

  15. Differences in larval nutritional requirements and female oviposition preference reflect the order of fruit colonization of Zaprionus indianus and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Matavelli, Cristiane; Carvalho, Maria João A; Martins, Nelson E; Mirth, Christen K

    2015-11-01

    Species coexist using the same nutritional resource by partitioning it either in space or time, but few studies explore how species-specific nutritional requirements allow partitioning. Zaprionus indianus and Drosophila simulans co-exist in figs by invading the fruit at different stages; Z. indianus colonizes ripe figs, whereas D. simulans oviposits in decaying fruit. Larvae feed on yeast growing on the fruit, which serves as their primary protein source. Because yeast populations increase as fruit decays, we find that ripe fruit has lower protein content than rotting fruit. Therefore, we hypothesized that Z. indianus and D. simulans larvae differ in their dietary requirements for protein. We used nutritional geometry to assess the effects of protein and carbohydrate concentration in the larval diet on life history characters in both species. Survival, development time, and ovariole number respond differently to the composition of the larval diet, with Z. indianus generally performing better across a wider range of protein concentrations. Correspondingly, we found that Z. indianus females preferred to lay eggs on low protein foods, while D. simulans females chose higher protein foods for oviposition when competing with Z. indianus. We propose the different nutritional requirements and oviposition preference of these two species allows them to temporally partition their habitat.

  16. Command and Control: Does Current U.S. Army Tactical Command and Control Doctrine Meet the Requirement for Today’s High Intensity Battlefield?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-02

    units, organized to fully integrate the effects of combined arms, merging individual capabilities of mobility , protection, and fire power to provide a...maintained that to keep its command I." focus, staff size had to be kept to the absolute minimum to retain its high mobility and prevent the development... mobility and complete confidence in the armored division commander and his staff is required. The two conmanders must know each other and know how to

  17. Status of conversion of DOE standards to non-Government standards

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, H.L.

    1992-07-01

    One major goal of the DOE Technical Standards Program is to convert existing DOE standards into non-Government standards (NGS`s) where possible. This means that a DOE standard may form the basis for a standards-writing committee to produce a standard in the same subject area using the non-Government standards consensus process. This report is a summary of the activities that have evolved to effect conversion of DOE standards to NGSs, and the status of current conversion activities. In some cases, all requirements in a DOE standard will not be incorporated into the published non-Government standard because these requirements may be considered too restrictive or too specific for broader application by private industry. If requirements in a DOE standard are not incorporated in a non-Government standard and the requirements are considered necessary for DOE program applications, the DOE standard will be revised and issued as a supplement to the non-Government standard. The DOE standard will contain only those necessary requirements not reflected by the non-Government standard. Therefore, while complete conversion of DOE standards may not always be realized, the Department`s technical standards policy as stated in Order 1300.2A has been fully supported in attempting to make maximum use of the non-Government standard.

  18. Status of conversion of DOE standards to non-Government standards

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, H.L.

    1992-07-01

    One major goal of the DOE Technical Standards Program is to convert existing DOE standards into non-Government standards (NGS's) where possible. This means that a DOE standard may form the basis for a standards-writing committee to produce a standard in the same subject area using the non-Government standards consensus process. This report is a summary of the activities that have evolved to effect conversion of DOE standards to NGSs, and the status of current conversion activities. In some cases, all requirements in a DOE standard will not be incorporated into the published non-Government standard because these requirements may be considered too restrictive or too specific for broader application by private industry. If requirements in a DOE standard are not incorporated in a non-Government standard and the requirements are considered necessary for DOE program applications, the DOE standard will be revised and issued as a supplement to the non-Government standard. The DOE standard will contain only those necessary requirements not reflected by the non-Government standard. Therefore, while complete conversion of DOE standards may not always be realized, the Department's technical standards policy as stated in Order 1300.2A has been fully supported in attempting to make maximum use of the non-Government standard.

  19. Transport of the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein lgp120 (lgp-A) to lysosomes does not require appearance on the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have used stably transfected CHO cell lines to characterize the pathway of intracellular transport of the lgp120 (lgp-A) to lysosomes. Using several surface labeling and internalization assays, our results suggest that lgp120 can reach its final destination with or without prior appearance on the plasma membrane. The extent to which lgp120 was transported via the cell surface was determined by two factors: expression level and the presence of a conserved glycine-tyrosine motif in the cytoplasmic tail. In cells expressing low levels of wild-type lgp120, the majority of newly synthesized molecules reached lysosomes without becoming accessible to antibody or biotinylation reagents added extracellularly at 4 degrees C. With increased expression levels, however, an increased fraction of transfected lgp120, as well as some endogenous lgp-B, appeared on the plasma membrane. The fraction of newly synthesized lgp120 reaching the cell surface was also increased by mutations affecting the cytoplasmic domain tyrosine or glycine residues. A substantial fraction of both mutants reached the surface even at low expression levels. However, only the lgp120G----A7 mutant was rapidly internalized and delivered from the plasma membrane to lysosomes. Taken together, our results show that the majority of newly synthesized wild-type lgp120 does not appear to pass through the cell surface en route to lysosomes. Instead, it is likely that lysosomal targeting involves a saturable intracellular sorting site whose affinity for lgp's is dependent on a glycine-tyrosine motif in the lgp120 cytoplasmic tail. PMID:1560028

  20. Reexamining Sample Size Requirements for Multivariate, Abundance-Based Community Research: When Resources are Limited, the Research Does Not Have to Be

    PubMed Central

    Forcino, Frank L.; Leighton, Lindsey R.; Twerdy, Pamela; Cahill, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Community ecologists commonly perform multivariate techniques (e.g., ordination, cluster analysis) to assess patterns and gradients of taxonomic variation. A critical requirement for a meaningful statistical analysis is accurate information on the taxa found within an ecological sample. However, oversampling (too many individuals counted per sample) also comes at a cost, particularly for ecological systems in which identification and quantification is substantially more resource consuming than the field expedition itself. In such systems, an increasingly larger sample size will eventually result in diminishing returns in improving any pattern or gradient revealed by the data, but will also lead to continually increasing costs. Here, we examine 396 datasets: 44 previously published and 352 created datasets. Using meta-analytic and simulation-based approaches, the research within the present paper seeks (1) to determine minimal sample sizes required to produce robust multivariate statistical results when conducting abundance-based, community ecology research. Furthermore, we seek (2) to determine the dataset parameters (i.e., evenness, number of taxa, number of samples) that require larger sample sizes, regardless of resource availability. We found that in the 44 previously published and the 220 created datasets with randomly chosen abundances, a conservative estimate of a sample size of 58 produced the same multivariate results as all larger sample sizes. However, this minimal number varies as a function of evenness, where increased evenness resulted in increased minimal sample sizes. Sample sizes as small as 58 individuals are sufficient for a broad range of multivariate abundance-based research. In cases when resource availability is the limiting factor for conducting a project (e.g., small university, time to conduct the research project), statistically viable results can still be obtained with less of an investment. PMID:26058066

  1. Reexamining Sample Size Requirements for Multivariate, Abundance-Based Community Research: When Resources are Limited, the Research Does Not Have to Be.

    PubMed

    Forcino, Frank L; Leighton, Lindsey R; Twerdy, Pamela; Cahill, James F

    2015-01-01

    Community ecologists commonly perform multivariate techniques (e.g., ordination, cluster analysis) to assess patterns and gradients of taxonomic variation. A critical requirement for a meaningful statistical analysis is accurate information on the taxa found within an ecological sample. However, oversampling (too many individuals counted per sample) also comes at a cost, particularly for ecological systems in which identification and quantification is substantially more resource consuming than the field expedition itself. In such systems, an increasingly larger sample size will eventually result in diminishing returns in improving any pattern or gradient revealed by the data, but will also lead to continually increasing costs. Here, we examine 396 datasets: 44 previously published and 352 created datasets. Using meta-analytic and simulation-based approaches, the research within the present paper seeks (1) to determine minimal sample sizes required to produce robust multivariate statistical results when conducting abundance-based, community ecology research. Furthermore, we seek (2) to determine the dataset parameters (i.e., evenness, number of taxa, number of samples) that require larger sample sizes, regardless of resource availability. We found that in the 44 previously published and the 220 created datasets with randomly chosen abundances, a conservative estimate of a sample size of 58 produced the same multivariate results as all larger sample sizes. However, this minimal number varies as a function of evenness, where increased evenness resulted in increased minimal sample sizes. Sample sizes as small as 58 individuals are sufficient for a broad range of multivariate abundance-based research. In cases when resource availability is the limiting factor for conducting a project (e.g., small university, time to conduct the research project), statistically viable results can still be obtained with less of an investment.

  2. DOE`s Phytoremediation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation contains an outline of the US DOE`s phytoremediation program. A brief overview of the goals, infrastructure, and results of the program is presented. Environmental contaminants addressed include chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals, radionuclides, inorganic wastes, and mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes. Studies of soil remediation using phytoextraction and water remediation using rhizofiltration are briefly described.

  3. Leptin’s effect on puberty in mice is relayed by the ventral premammillary nucleus and does not require signaling in Kiss1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Jose; Cravo, Roberta M.; Frazão, Renata; Gautron, Laurent; Scott, Michael M.; Lachey, Jennifer; Castro, Inar A.; Margatho, Lisandra O.; Lee, Syann; Lee, Charlotte; Richardson, James A.; Friedman, Jeffrey; Chua, Streamson; Coppari, Roberto; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Elmquist, Joel K.; Elias, Carol F.

    2010-01-01

    Studies in humans and rodents indicate that a minimum amount of stored energy is required for normal pubertal development. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is a key metabolic signal to the neuroendocrine reproductive axis. Humans and mice lacking leptin or the leptin receptor (LepR) (ob/ob and db/db mice, respectively) are infertile and fail to enter puberty. Leptin administration to leptin-deficient subjects and ob/ob mice induces puberty and restores fertility, but the exact site or sites of leptin action are unclear. Here, we found that genetic deletion of LepR selectively from hypothalamic Kiss1 neurons in mice had no effect on puberty or fertility, indicating that direct leptin signaling in Kiss1 neurons is not required for these processes. However, bilateral lesions of the ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV) of ob/ob mice blunted the ability of exogenous leptin to induce sexual maturation. Moreover, unilateral reexpression of endogenous LepR in PMV neurons was sufficient to induce puberty and improve fertility in female LepR-null mice. This LepR reexpression also normalized the increased hypothalamic GnRH content characteristic of leptin-signaling deficiency. These data suggest that the PMV is a key site for leptin’s permissive action at the onset of puberty and support the hypothesis that the multiple actions of leptin to control metabolism and reproduction are anatomically dissociated. PMID:21183787

  4. LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation does not require the leucine-rich repeats and is reversed by p75(NTR) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bourikas, Dimitris; Mir, Anis; Walmsley, Adrian Robert

    2010-12-01

    LINGO-1 is a potent negative regulator of oligodendrocyte differentiation and hence may play a pivotal restrictive role during remyelination in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. However, little is known as to which stages of oligodendrocyte differentiation are inhibited by LINGO-1, which domains of the protein are involved and whether accessory proteins are required. Here, we show that LINGO-1 expression in the human oligodendroglial cell line MO3.13 inhibited process extension and this was reversed by an anti-LINGO-1 antibody or the antagonist LINGO-1-Fc. LINGO-1 expression was also found to inhibit myelin basic protein transcription in the rat oligodendroglial cell line CG4. Both of these inhibitory actions of LINGO-1 were abrogated by deletion of the entire ectodomain or cytoplasmic domains but, surprisingly, were unaffected by deletion of the leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). As in neurons, LINGO-1 physically associated with endogenous p75(NTR) in MO3.13 cells and, correspondingly, its inhibition of process extension was reversed by antagonists of p75(NTR). Thus, LINGO-1 inhibits multiple aspects of oligodendrocyte differentiation independently of the LRRs via a process that requires p75(NTR) signalling.

  5. The inhibitory effect of soy protein isolate on atherosclerosis in mice does not require the presence of LDL receptors or alteration of plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael R; Golden, Deborah L; Anthony, Mary S; Register, Thomas C; Williams, J Koudy

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms by which dietary soy favorably influences lipoprotein metabolism and inhibits atherosclerosis are uncertain. Studies of blood mononuclear cells and cultured hepatocytes have indicated that certain soy peptides (i.e., 7S globulins) stimulate expression of LDL receptors. This pathway represents a hypothetical mechanism by which soy's hypocholesterolemic and antiatherosclerotic effects may be mediated. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis is lacking. To address this, we compared effects of dietary soy protein isolate in two genetically engineered mouse models of atherosclerosis. One mouse [LDL receptor -/- + apolipoprotein (apo) B transgenic] is devoid of LDL receptors and overproduces apolipoprotein B, whereas the other (apoE -/-) has a normal complement of LDL receptors but does not produce apolipoprotein E. Male (n = 10-12/group) and ovariectomized female (n = 10-12/group) mice were studied. There were three treatment groups, which differed principally by the source of the protein component of the diet: 1) casein/lactalbumin (no isoflavones), 2) alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (total isoflavones = 0.04 mg/g), and 3) intact soy protein isolate (total isoflavones = 1.72 mg/g). Atherosclerosis was assessed by quantifying the aortic content of esterified cholesterol. Atherosclerosis was inhibited (relative to the casein/lactalbumin group) by both alcohol-washed (45 and 31%) (P < 0.05) and intact (65 and 41%) (P < 0.05) soy protein isolate in LDL receptor -/- and apoE -/- mice, respectively. There was no sex difference. In a two-way analysis, there were significant effects of type of soy isolate and type of mouse. The antiatherosclerosis effect was enhanced in LDL receptor -/- mice (P < 0.001) and diminished in mice fed alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (P < 0.001). Furthermore, inhibitory effects of soy on atherosclerosis were unrelated to plasma LDL, VLDL or HDL cholesterol concentrations. The results represent direct evidence for the

  6. Detection of coliforms in drinking water using skin patches: a rapid, reliable method that does not require an external energy source.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sehee; Kim, Min-jeong; Park, MinSun; Kim, Nuri; Lee, Yu-jin; Lee, Gyu-Cheol

    2014-02-01

    The detection of coliforms requires incubation in a laboratory, generally powered using electricity. In many parts of the developing world, however, external energy sources such as electricity are not readily available. To develop a fast, reliable method for detecting coliforms in water without an external energy source, we assessed the efficacy of six test kits for the identification of coliforms in water samples. To assess the possibility of using body temperature as the sole source of heat for incubation, bacterial samples were then mixed with the enzymatic test kit reagent and attached to the human body surface using a patch system. The patches were attached to the bodies of volunteers for 24 hours and the practicality and accuracy of the patches were assessed. Coliforms were detected within 24 hours in all patches. This innovation will facilitate the testing of water quality by researchers and by economically disadvantaged people without electricity.

  7. TLR9 is required for MAPK/NF-κB activation but does not cooperate with TLR2 or TLR6 to induce host resistance to Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marco Túlio; Campos, Priscila Carneiro; Pereira, Guilherme de Sousa; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Splitter, Gary; Oliveira, Sergio Costa

    2016-05-01

    Brucella abortus is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes a zoonosis of worldwide occurrence, leading to undulant fever in humans and abortion in domestic animals. B. abortus is recognized by several pattern-recognition receptors triggering pathways during the host innate immune response. Therefore, here, we determined the cooperative role of TLR9 with TLR2 or TLR6 receptors in sensing Brucella Furthermore, we deciphered the host innate immune response against B. abortus or its DNA, emphasizing the role of TLR9-MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathways in the production of proinflammatory cytokines. TLR9 is required for the initial host control of B. abortus, but this TLR was dispensable after 6 wk of infection. The susceptibility of TLR9(-/-)-infected animals to Brucella paralleled with lower levels of IFN-γ produced by mouse splenocytes stimulated with this pathogen compared with wild-type cells. However, no apparent cooperative interplay was observed between TLR2-TLR9 or TLR6-TLR9 receptors to control infection. Moreover, B. abortus or its DNA induced activation of MAPK/NF-κB pathways and production of IL-12 and TNF-α by macrophages partially dependent on TLR9 but completely dependent on MyD88. In addition, B. abortus-derived CpG oligonucleotides required TLR9 to promote IL-12 and TNF-α production by macrophages. By confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that TLR9 redistributed and colocalized with lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 upon Brucella infection. Thus, B. abortus induced TLR9 traffic, leading to cell signaling activation and IL-12 and TNF-α production. Although TLR9 recognized Brucella CpG motifs, our results suggest a new pathway of B. abortus DNA-activating macrophages independent of TLR9.

  8. HIV cell-to-cell transmission requires the production of infectious virus particles and does not proceed through env-mediated fusion pores.

    PubMed

    Monel, Blandine; Beaumont, Elodie; Vendrame, Daniela; Schwartz, Olivier; Brand, Denys; Mammano, Fabrizio

    2012-04-01

    Direct cell-to-cell transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a more potent and efficient means of virus propagation than infection by cell-free virus particles. The aim of this study was to determine whether cell-to-cell transmission requires the assembly of enveloped virus particles or whether nucleic acids with replication potential could translocate directly from donor to target cells through envelope glycoprotein (Env)-induced fusion pores. To this end, we characterized the transmission properties of viruses carrying mutations in the matrix protein (MA) that affect the incorporation of Env into virus particles but do not interfere with Env-mediated cell-cell fusion. By use of cell-free virus, the infectivity of MA mutant viruses was below the detection threshold both in single-cycle and in multiple-cycle assays. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of Env restored the incorporation of Env into MA mutant viruses and rescued their cell-free infectivity to different extents. In cell-to-cell transmission assays, MA mutations prevented HIV transmission from donor to target cells, despite efficient Env-dependent membrane fusion. HIV transmission was blocked at the level of virus core translocation into the cytosol of target cells. As in cell-free assays, rescue of Env incorporation by truncation of the Env CT restored the virus core translocation and cell-to-cell infectivity of MA mutant viruses. These data show that HIV cell-to-cell transmission requires the assembly of enveloped virus particles. The increased efficiency of this infection route may thus be attributed to the high local concentrations of virus particles at sites of cellular contacts rather than to a qualitatively different transmission process.

  9. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    SciTech Connect

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; Futscher, Bernard W.; Stampfer, Martha R.

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agents are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.

  10. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    DOE PAGES

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; ...

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agentsmore » are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.« less

  11. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, James C; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A; Watts, George; Futscher, Bernard W; Stampfer, Martha R

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agents are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization. PMID:25485586

  12. 76 FR 11440 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Decision and Order Granting a Waiver to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) gives notice of the decision and order (Case No. CW-017) that grants to Electrolux Home Products (Electrolux) a waiver from the DOE clothes washer test procedure for determining the energy consumption of clothes washers. Under today's decision and order, Electrolux shall be required to test and rate its clothes washers with larger clothes containers using an......

  13. 78 FR 33136 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; BATS Y-Exchange, Inc.; Order Granting Approval to Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ... the terms of the order with respect to price or side of market and the order does not originate from a.... Under the proposal, the Exchange would require that RMOs retain in their books and records adequate... to books and record-keeping requirements. Fourth, the commenter stated that the proposal may cause...

  14. Lessons learned by the DOE complex from recent earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Eli, M.W.

    1993-07-01

    Recent earthquake damage investigations at various industrial facilities have resulted in providing the DOE complex with reminders of practical lessons for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) involving: confinement of hazardous materials; continuous, safe operations; occupant safety; and protection of DOE investments and mission-dependent items. Recent assessments are summarized, showing examples of damage caused by the 1992 California Earthquakes (Cape Mendocino, Landers, and Big Bear) and the 1991 Costa Rica Earthquake (Valle de la Estrella). These lessons if applied along with the new DOE NPH Standards (1020--92 Series) can help assure that DOE facilities will meet the intent of the seismic requirements in the new DOE NPH Order 5480.28.

  15. Radiation Recordkeeping Practices at DOE Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Traub, R.J.

    1994-03-15

    In order to evaluate the radiation recordkeeping practices at DOE facilities, a questionnaire was sent to DOE and DOE contractor facilities which requested information concerning the record keeping systems. The questionnaire was sent to the DOE/DOE contractor facilities via DOE/HQ and the respective field offices. The questionnaire stipulated that at multiple contractor sites, only those facilities who kept the records should respond to the questionnaire; however, those responding should indicate the facilities for which they maintained records.

  16. Required Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janko, Edmund

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author insists that those seeking public office prove their literary mettle. As an English teacher, he does have a litmus test for all public officials, judges and senators included--a reading litmus test. He would require that all candidates and nominees have read and reflected on a nucleus of works whose ideas and insights…

  17. Does the bathing water classification depend on sampling strategy? A bootstrap approach for bathing water quality assessment, according to Directive 2006/7/EC requirements.

    PubMed

    López, Iago; Alvarez, César; Gil, José L; Revilla, José A

    2012-11-30

    Data on the 95th and 90th percentiles of bacteriological quality indicators are used to classify bathing waters in Europe, according to the requirements of Directive 2006/7/EC. However, percentile values and consequently, classification of bathing waters depend both on sampling effort and sample-size, which may undermine an appropriate assessment of bathing water classification. To analyse the influence of sampling effort and sample size on water classification, a bootstrap approach was applied to 55 bacteriological quality datasets of several beaches in the Balearic Islands (Spain). Our results show that the probability of failing the regulatory standards of the Directive is high when sample size is low, due to a higher variability in percentile values. In this way, 49% of the bathing waters reaching an "Excellent" classification (95th percentile of Escherichia coli under 250 cfu/100 ml) can fail the "Excellent" regulatory standard due to sampling strategy, when 23 samples per season are considered. This percentage increases to 81% when 4 samples per season are considered. "Good" regulatory standards can also be failed in bathing waters with an "Excellent" classification as a result of these sampling strategies. The variability in percentile values may affect bathing water classification and is critical for the appropriate design and implementation of bathing water Quality Monitoring and Assessment Programs. Hence, variability of percentile values should be taken into account by authorities if an adequate management of these areas is to be achieved.

  18. Does Vitamin D Sufficiency Equate to a Single Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Level or Are Different Levels Required for Non-Skeletal Diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, Simon; Vanlint, Simon; Morris, Howard; Scragg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Clarify the concept of vitamin D sufficiency, the relationship between efficacy and vitamin D status and the role of Vitamin D supplementation in the management of non-skeletal diseases. We outline reasons for anticipating different serum vitamin D levels are required for different diseases. Method: Review the literature for evidence of efficacy of supplementation and minimum effective 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels in non-skeletal disease. Results: Evidence of efficacy of vitamin supplementation is graded according to levels of evidence. Minimum effective serum 25-OHD levels are lower for skeletal disease, e.g., rickets (25 nmol/L), osteoporosis and fractures (50 nmol/L), than for premature mortality (75 nmol/L) or non-skeletal diseases, e.g., depression (75 nmol/L), diabetes and cardiovascular disease (80 nmol/L), falls and respiratory infections (95 nmol/L) and cancer (100 nmol/L). Conclusions: Evidence for the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation at serum 25-OHD levels ranging from 25 to 100 nmol/L has been obtained from trials with vitamin D interventions that change vitamin D status by increasing serum 25-OHD to a level consistent with sufficiency for that disease. This evidence supports the hypothesis that just as vitamin D metabolism is tissue dependent, so the serum levels of 25-OHD signifying deficiency or sufficiency are disease dependent. PMID:24352091

  19. Does the requirement of getting active consent from parents in school-based research result in a biased sample? An empirical study.

    PubMed

    Jelsma, Jennifer; Burgess, Theresa; Henley, Lesley

    2012-12-01

    Active parental consent is a requirement that may threaten the validity of including minors in research. This study investigated possible sources of bias between the responses of children whose parents actively consented to their participation in a school-based survey and those of children whose parents were nonresponders. Due to a serious administrative error in a study to examine health-related quality of life (HRQoL), all 514 eligible schoolchildren were tested, although only 177 parents signed consent. After deliberation, the relevant human research ethics committee gave permission to include all results in the analysis. The HRQoL was not different between the groups. Male children returned significantly fewer consent forms (p=.026). More of the nonresponding group reported that their parents "Never had enough time for them" (p=.023). The high nonresponse rate and associations between response and parental interest and gender indicate that some bias may be introduced through the need for active consent, but overall there were no differences in responses to the quality of life questionnaire.

  20. Expression from herpesvirus promoters does not relieve the intron requirement for cytoplasmic accumulation of human beta-globin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, X M; Gelembiuk, G W; Wang, C Y; Ryu, W S; Mertz, J E

    1991-01-01

    Expression plasmids were constructed in which the human beta-globin gene or a variant of it precisely lacking its two introns was transcribed from its own promoter, the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) promoter, or the immediate early promoter of human cytomegalovirus (CMV-IE). Forty two hours after transfection of these plasmids into monkey kidney cells, nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA were isolated. Quantitative S1 nuclease mapping and primer extension analysis were used to determine the relative abundances, cellular locations, and leader sizes of the accumulated beta-globin RNAs. Whereas transcripts of all of the intron-containing genes accumulated in the cytoplasm to high levels, transcripts of their cDNA variants were neither stably maintained in the nucleus nor accumulated in the cytoplasm, irrespective of the promoter from which transcription was driven. We conclude that the intron requirement for cytoplasmic accumulation of beta-globin RNA can not be circumvented by synthesis from either the promoter of the intronless HSV-tk gene or the CMV-IE promoter. Images PMID:1662815