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Sample records for requirements specification srs

  1. Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS) software requirements specification (SRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Glasscock, J.A.; Flanagan, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    This document is the primary document establishing requirements for the Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS) Database, an Impact Level 3Q system. The purpose is to provide the customer and the performing organization with the requirements for the SACS Project.

  2. Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS): Software requirements specification (SRS). Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Glasscock, J.A.

    1995-03-08

    This document is the primary document establishing requirements for the Surveillance Analysis Computer System (SACS) database, an Impact Level 3Q system. SACS stores information on tank temperatures, surface levels, and interstitial liquid levels. This information is retrieved by the customer through a PC-based interface and is then available to a number of other software tools. The software requirements specification (SRS) describes the system requirements for the SACS Project, and follows the Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Software Practices (WHC-CM-3-10) and Quality Assurance (WHC-CM-4-2, QR 19.0) policies.

  3. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-08-04

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document.

  4. Recognition of SUMO-modified PCNA requires tandem receptor motifs in Srs2

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Anthony A.; Mohideen, Firaz; Lima, Christopher D.

    2013-04-08

    Ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like (Ubl) modifiers such as SUMO (also known as Smt3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mediate signal transduction through post-translational modification of substrate proteins in pathways that control differentiation, apoptosis and the cell cycle, and responses to stress such as the DNA damage response. In yeast, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen PCNA (also known as Pol30) is modified by ubiquitin in response to DNA damage and by SUMO during S phase. Whereas Ub-PCNA can signal for recruitment of translesion DNA polymerases, SUMO-PCNA signals for recruitment of the anti-recombinogenic DNA helicase Srs2. It remains unclear how receptors such as Srs2 specifically recognize substrates after conjugation to Ub and Ubls. Here we show, through structural, biochemical and functional studies, that the Srs2 carboxy-terminal domain harbors tandem receptor motifs that interact independently with PCNA and SUMO and that both motifs are required to recognize SUMO-PCNA specifically. The mechanism presented is pertinent to understanding how other receptors specifically recognize Ub- and Ubl-modified substrates to facilitate signal transduction.

  5. SU-E-T-413: Dose Verification for Linac-Based SRS Commissioning and Patient Specific QA.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Wu, H

    2012-06-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) program commissioning is currently relied on Radiological Physics Center (RPC) Head Neck phantom with Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs) for dose verification. However, due to the limited accessibility of RPC Head Neck phantom, ongoing QA or patient specific dose verification is not performed in most clinics. In this study, we proposed an SRS dose verification approach for both SRS commissioning and patient specific dose verification with widely available clinical instruments. SRS treatment plans were imposed onto a 14cm thick conventional solid water phantom (30cm × 30cm), with a PTW micro-chamber in the middle. Treatment couch angles were renormalized to 90 or 270 degrees for two reasons: 1) micro-chamber's axis was parallel to gantry rotation axis during all the arc beam delivery, which minimizes the angle dependence effect (axis tilt) of micro-chamber. 2) Any collision between the cone and conventional solid water phantom would be avoided and there would be minimum attenuation effect from the couch. The arc verification plan was then recalculated and compared to the measured absolute dose by PTW micro-chamber. An End-to-End test with a CyberKnife Head Neck phantom and GAFChromic EBT2 film was utilized as secondary dose delivery verification. Cones with all twelve different sizes in SRS commissioning were tested. For the cone size from 10mm to 30mm, the micro-chamber measurements agreed with the computer calculations within 3%. However, when the cone size was reduced to 5mm, micro-chamber measurement was 10% lower than planned dose, indicating underdose effect for small cone size. Additional measurements with Cyberknife head phantom confirmed the dose delivery accuracy was within 5%. A simple SRS dose verification method which only requires micro-chamber and conventional solid water phantom has been presented and verified. This approach will be valuable for SRS commissioning and ongoing SRS QA. © 2012 American Association of

  6. Age-gender matched comparison of SRS instrument scores between adult deformity and normal adults: are all SRS domains disease specific?

    PubMed

    Baldus, Christine; Bridwell, Keith H; Harrast, John; Edwards, Charles; Glassman, Steven; Horton, William; Lenke, Lawrence G; Lowe, Thomas; Mardjetko, Steve; Ondra, Stephen; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher

    2008-09-15

    Prospective, observational study. To further validate the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) instrument by comparing scores of adult deformity patients with no prior history of spine surgery to the scores of normal adult volunteers in age-gender matched groups. Efforts have been made to validate the SRS questionnaire in adolescent and adult deformity patients. An important psychometric attribute of any quality of life tool is its ability to discriminate between subjects with and without the condition of interest. Discriminate validity of the SRS questionnaire has not been established in the primary (no prior surgical treatment) adult deformity population. The SRS questionnaire was issued prospectively to 935 primary adult deformity patients with a diagnosis of idiopathic or de novo scoliosis and minimum Cobb angle of 30 degrees (average Cobb angle: 54 degrees; range: 30 degrees-132 degrees). Five hundred forty-three patients were treated nonsurgically while 392 patients underwent surgical intervention. Baseline SRS scores of the deformity population were compared to 1222 volunteers with no history of spine disease randomly sampled from the US population. Analysis between the 2 populations was broken down into 6 age-gender groups: male/female; 20-40, 41-60, 61-80 years of age. SRS domain scores of the deformity subgroups demonstrated significant statistical differences from their corresponding age-gender matched normative group. The only exceptions were the mental health domain in the older males, 61-80 years of age. The average SRS subscore for each age-gender subgroup was less than the tenth percentile in the corresponding normative population, indicating substantial limitations in these patients. Our findings confirm the SRS instrument has excellent discriminate validity in the adult population. It appears to be disease-specific in the domains of pain, appearance and activity in adult spinal deformity patients who have not had prior surgery.

  7. Pro-recombination Role of Srs2 Protein Requires SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) but Is Independent of PCNA (Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Peter; Altmannova, Veronika; Silva, Sonia; Lisby, Michael; Krejci, Lumir

    2016-04-01

    Srs2 plays many roles in DNA repair, the proper regulation and coordination of which is essential. Post-translational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is one such possible mechanism. Here, we investigate the role of SUMO in Srs2 regulation and show that the SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) of Srs2 is important for the interaction with several recombination factors. Lack of SIM, but not proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-interacting motif (PIM), leads to increased cell death under circumstances requiring homologous recombination for DNA repair. Simultaneous mutation of SIM in asrs2ΔPIMstrain leads to a decrease in recombination, indicating a pro-recombination role of SUMO. Thus SIM has an ambivalent function in Srs2 regulation; it not only mediates interaction with SUMO-PCNA to promote the anti-recombination function but it also plays a PCNA-independent pro-recombination role, probably by stimulating the formation of recombination complexes. The fact that deletion of PIM suppresses the phenotypes of Srs2 lacking SIM suggests that proper balance between the anti-recombination PCNA-bound and pro-recombination pools of Srs2 is crucial. Notably, sumoylation of Srs2 itself specifically stimulates recombination at the rDNA locus.

  8. Business System Planning Project System Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, R.E.

    2000-09-08

    The purpose of the Business Systems Planning Project System Requirements Specification (SRS) is to provide the outline and contents of the requirements for the CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) integrated business and technical information systems. The SRS will translate proposed objectives into the statement of the functions that are to be performed and data and information flows that they require. The requirements gathering methodology will use (1) facilitated group requirement sessions; (2) individual interviews; (3) surveys; and (4) document reviews. The requirements will be verified and validated through coordination of the technical requirement team and CHG Managers. The SRS document used the content and format specified in Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. Organization Standard Software Practices in conjunction with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 8340-1984 for Systems Requirements Documents.

  9. Requirement for the SRS2 DNA helicase gene in non-homologous end joining in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vijay; Klein, Hannah

    2000-01-01

    Mitotic cells experience double-strand breaks (DSBs) from both exogenous and endogenous sources. Since unrepaired DSBs can result in genome rearrangements or cell death, cells mobilize multiple pathways to repair the DNA damage. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mitotic cells preferentially use a homologous recombination repair pathway. However, when no significant homology to the DSB ends is available, cells utilize a repair process called non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which can join ends with no homology through resection to uncover microhomologies of a few nucleotides. Although components of the homologous recombination repair system are also involved in NHEJ, the rejoining does not involve all of the homologous recombination repair genes. The SRS2 DNA helicase has been shown to be required for DSB repair when the homologous single-stranded regions are short. Here it is shown that SRS2 is also required for NHEJ, regardless of the cell mating type. Efficient NHEJ of sticky ends requires the Ku70 and Ku80 proteins and the silencing genes SIR2, SIR3 and SIR4. However, NHEJ of blunt ends, while very inefficient, is not further reduced by mutations in YKU70, SIR2, SIR3, SIR4 or SRS2, suggesting that this rejoining process occurs by a different mechanism. PMID:10908335

  10. Investigating the clinical usefulness of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) in a tertiary level, autism spectrum disorder specific assessment clinic.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Fiona J; Gibbs, Vicki M; Schmidhofer, Katherine; Williams, Megan

    2012-02-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS; Constantino and Gruber in Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, 2005) is a commonly used screening tool for identifying children with possible autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study investigated the relationship between SRS scores and eventual diagnostic outcome for children referred to a tertiary level, autism specific assessment service. Forty eight children (mean age = 8.10; 92% male) underwent a comprehensive ASD assessment. Parent and teacher SRS scores were subsequently compared with diagnostic outcome. Sensitivity was high (91% for parent report; 84% for teacher report), however specificity was much lower (8% for parent report; 41% for teacher report). Results demonstrate a need for caution when interpreting SRS results based on current cut-off scores, particularly in children with previously identified social developmental problems.

  11. Why SRS Matters - Introduction

    ScienceCinema

    Hunt, Paul

    2016-08-26

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode provides an introduction to the SRS mission and operations.

  12. Why SRS Matters - Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Paul

    2015-01-21

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode provides an introduction to the SRS mission and operations.

  13. Why SRS Matters- Tritium

    ScienceCinema

    Howell, Steve; Schifer, Lee

    2016-07-12

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site’s (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer.

  14. Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

  15. A New Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain with a Mutant Smt3-Deconjugating Ulp1 Protein Is Affected in DNA Replication and Requires Srs2 and Homologous Recombination for Its Viability

    PubMed Central

    Soustelle, Christine; Vernis, Laurence; Fréon, Karine; Reynaud-Angelin, Anne; Chanet, Roland; Fabre, Francis; Heude, Martine

    2004-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Srs2 protein is involved in DNA repair and recombination. In order to gain better insight into the roles of Srs2, we performed a screen to identify mutations that are synthetically lethal with an srs2 deletion. One of them is a mutated allele of the ULP1 gene that encodes a protease specifically cleaving Smt3-protein conjugates. This allele, ulp1-I615N, is responsible for an accumulation of Smt3-conjugated proteins. The mutant is unable to grow at 37°C. At permissive temperatures, it still shows severe growth defects together with a strong hyperrecombination phenotype and is impaired in meiosis. Genetic interactions between ulp1 and mutations that affect different repair pathways indicated that the RAD51-dependent homologous recombination mechanism, but not excision resynthesis, translesion synthesis, or nonhomologous end-joining processes, is required for the viability of the mutant. Thus, both Srs2, believed to negatively control homologous recombination, and the process of recombination per se are essential for the viability of the ulp1 mutant. Upon replication, mutant cells accumulate single-stranded DNA interruptions. These structures are believed to generate different recombination intermediates. Some of them are fixed by recombination, and others require Srs2 to be reversed and fixed by an alternate pathway. PMID:15169880

  16. Investigating the Clinical Usefulness of the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) in a Tertiary Level, Autism Spectrum Disorder Specific Assessment Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Fiona J.; Gibbs, Vicki M.; Schmidhofer, Katherine; Williams, Megan

    2012-01-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS; Constantino and Gruber in Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). Western Psychological Services, Los Angeles, 2005) is a commonly used screening tool for identifying children with possible autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study investigated the relationship between SRS scores and eventual diagnostic outcome…

  17. Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) Software Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect

    MAY, D.L.

    2000-03-22

    This document is the primary document establishing requirements for the Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) as it is converted to a client-server architecture. The purpose is to provide the customer and the performing organizations with the requirements for the SWITS in the new environment. This Software Requirement Specification (SRS) describes the system requirements for the SWITS Project, and follows the PHMC Engineering Requirements, HNF-PRO-1819, and Computer Software Qualify Assurance Requirements, HNF-PRO-309, policies. This SRS includes sections on general description, specific requirements, references, appendices, and index. The SWITS system defined in this document stores information about the solid waste inventory on the Hanford site. Waste is tracked as it is generated, analyzed, shipped, stored, and treated. In addition to inventory reports a number of reports for regulatory agencies are produced.

  18. TWRSview system requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.A.; Lee, A.K.

    1995-12-01

    This document provides the system requirements specification for the TWRSview software system. The TWRSview software system is being developed to integrate electronic data supporting the development of the TWRS technical baseline

  19. Growth in Coculture Stimulates Metabolism of the Phenylurea Herbicide Isoproturon by Sphingomonas sp. Strain SRS2

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Ronen, Zeev; Aamand, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Metabolism of the phenylurea herbicide isoproturon by Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 was significantly enhanced when the strain was grown in coculture with a soil bacterium (designated strain SRS1). Both members of this consortium were isolated from a highly enriched isoproturon-degrading culture derived from an agricultural soil previously treated regularly with the herbicide. Based on analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, strain SRS1 was assigned to the β-subdivision of the proteobacteria and probably represents a new genus. Strain SRS1 was unable to degrade either isoproturon or its known metabolites 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-1-methylurea, 3-(4-isopropylphenyl)-urea, or 4-isopropyl-aniline. Pure culture studies indicate that Sphingomonas sp. SRS2 is auxotrophic and requires components supplied by association with other soil bacteria. A specific mixture of amino acids appeared to meet these requirements, and it was shown that methionine was essential for Sphingomonas sp. SRS2. This suggests that strain SRS1 supplies amino acids to Sphingomonas sp. SRS2, thereby leading to rapid metabolism of 14C-labeled isoproturon to 14CO2 and corresponding growth of strain SRS2. Proliferation of strain SRS1 suggests that isoproturon metabolism by Sphingomonas sp. SRS2 provides unknown metabolites or cell debris that supports growth of strain SRS1. The role of strain SRS1 in the consortium was not ubiquitous among soil bacteria; however, the indigenous soil microflora and some strains from culture collections also stimulate isoproturon metabolism by Sphingomonas sp. strain SRS2 to a similar extent. PMID:12089031

  20. Master Software Requirements Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Chaumin

    2003-01-01

    A basic function of a computational grid such as the NASA Information Power Grid (IPG) is to allow users to execute applications on remote computer systems. The Globus Resource Allocation Manager (GRAM) provides this functionality in the IPG and many other grids at this time. While the functionality provided by GRAM clients is adequate, GRAM does not support useful features such as staging several sets of files, running more than one executable in a single job submission, and maintaining historical information about execution operations. This specification is intended to provide the environmental and software functional requirements for the IPG Job Manager V2.0 being developed by AMTI for NASA.

  1. RMACS software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Gneiting, B.C.

    1996-10-01

    This document defines the essential user (or functional) requirements of the Requirements Management and Assured Compliance System (RMACS), which is used by the Tank Waste Remediation System program (TWRS). RMACS provides a computer-based environment that TWRS management and systems engineers can use to identify, define, and document requirements. The intent of the system is to manage information supporting definition of the TWRS technical baseline using a structured systems engineering process. RMACS has the capability to effectively manage a complete set of complex requirements and relationships in a manner that satisfactorily assures compliance to the program requirements over the TWRS life-cycle.

  2. Specific features of SRS-CARS monitoring of low impurity concentrations of hydrogen in dense gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, Gennady M.; Mogileva, Tatyana N.; Popov, Aleksey Yu.

    2006-09-01

    The possibility of measuring the hydrogen impurity concentration in dense gas mixtures by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is studied. In this technique, biharmonic laser pumping based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in compressed hydrogen is used. Because of the interference between the coherent scattering components from buffer gas molecules and molecules of the impurity to be detected, the signal recorded may depend on the hydrogen concentration by a parabolic law, which has a minimum and makes the results uncertain. It is shown that this uncertainty can be removed if the frequency of the biharmonic laser pump, which is produced by the SRS oscillator, somewhat differs from the frequency of molecular oscillations of hydrogen in the test mixture. A sensitivity of 5 ppm is obtained as applied to the hydrogen-air mixture under normal pressure. The description of a set-up for the determination of the coefficient of the hydrogen diffusion in gas mixtures is given. The main assembly units are a diffusion chamber and an automated laser system for the selective hydrogen diagnostics in gas mixtures by the SRS-CARS method. The determination of the diffusion coefficient is based on the approximation of the experimental data describing the hydrogen concentration varying with time at a specified point in the diffusion chamber and the accurate solution of the diffusion equation for the selected one-dimensional geometry of the experiment.

  3. Wrapping SRS with CORBA: from textual data to distributed objects.

    PubMed

    Coupaye, T

    1999-04-01

    Biological data come in very different shapes. Databanks are maintained and used by distinct organizations. Text is the de facto Standard exchange format. The SRS system can integrate heterogeneous textual databanks but it was lacking a way to structure the extracted data. This paper presents a CORBA interface to the SRS system which manages databanks in a flat file format. SRS Object Servers are CORBA wrappers for SRS. They allow client applications (visualisation tools, data mining tools, etc.) to access and query SRS servers remotely through an Object Request Broker (ORB). They provide loader objects that contain the information extracted from the databanks by SRS. Loader objects are not hard-coded but generated in a flexible way by using loader specifications which allow SRS administrators to package data coming from distinct databanks. The prototype may be available for beta-testing. Please contact the SRS group (http://srs.ebi.ac.uk).

  4. Requirements management system browser software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the essential user requirements for the Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) application. This includes specifications for the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the supporting database structures. The RMSB application is needed to provide an easy to use PC-based interface to browse system engineering data stored and managed in a UNIX software application. The system engineering data include functions, requirements, and architectures that make up the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) technical baseline. This document also covers the requirements for a software application titled ``RMSB Data Loader (RMSB- DL)``, referred to as the ``Parser.`` The Parser is needed to read and parse a data file and load the data structure supporting the Browser.

  5. Why SRS Matters - K Area

    ScienceCinema

    Hunt, Paul; Lawson, Janice

    2016-07-12

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features K Area's mission and operations.

  6. Why SRS Matters - F Area

    ScienceCinema

    Howell, Steve; Tadlock, Bill; Beeler, Dewitt; Gardner, Curt

    2016-07-12

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features F Area's mission and operations.

  7. Why SRS Matters - E Area

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve; Mooneyhan, Verne; Tempel, Kevin; Bullington, Michele

    2015-03-09

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features E Area's mission and operations.

  8. Why SRS Matters - H Canyon

    ScienceCinema

    Hunt, Paul; Lewczyk, Mike; Swain, Mike

    2016-07-12

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features H Canyon's mission and operations.

  9. Why SRS Matters - E Area

    ScienceCinema

    Howell, Steve; Mooneyhan, Verne; Tempel, Kevin; Bullington, Michele

    2016-07-12

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features E Area's mission and operations.

  10. Why SRS Matters - L Area

    ScienceCinema

    Hunt, Paul

    2016-07-12

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features L Area's mission and operations.

  11. Why SRS Matters - L Area

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Paul

    2015-01-28

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features L Area's mission and operations.

  12. Why SRS Matters - F Area

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Steve; Tadlock, Bill; Beeler, Dewitt; Gardner, Curt

    2015-02-17

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features F Area's mission and operations.

  13. Why SRS Matters - H Canyon

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Paul; Lewczyk, Mike; Swain, Mike

    2015-02-17

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site's (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features H Canyon's mission and operations.

  14. Why SRS Matters - K Area

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Paul; Lawson, Janice

    2015-02-04

    A video series presenting an overview of the Savannah River Site (SRS) mission and operations. Each episode features a specific area/operation and how it contributes to help make the world safer. This episode features K Area's mission and operations.

  15. Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) OS&D SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, A.C.

    1994-08-30

    A Department of Energy (DOE) policy for the business processes related to the Over, Short, and Damaged Claims Module (OS&D) has been established. The impetus behind the development of the OS&D stems from a subtask created to expand the usefulness of the Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS). This subtask supports the development of individual modules covering three important areas: household goods movement, damage claims, and single rate. The OS&D will employ ATMS to perform two transportation management functions: to (a) enter and modify claims-related data related to over, short, or damaged shipments, and to (b) generate letters and reports. The purpose of this document is to define the system requirements necessary to implement and integrate computer support for these business processes into the ATMS. This software requirements specification (SRS) will serve as direct input to the detailed design. The acceptance criteria section in this document will serve as the driving force in the development of test plans. To fulfill these objectives, the SRS must contain complete and verifiable requirements. This SRS provides the ATMS software developers a concise definition of the system software requirements. By emphasizing functions to be performed, rather than system architecture, the SRS will not be restrictive and will allow maximum flexibility during system design. The general structure of this document is to progress from a description of the OS&D to the specific software requirements necessary to support its` functionality.

  16. Project X functional requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  17. Flight Guidance System Requirements Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven P.; Tribble, Alan C.; Carlson, Timothy M.; Danielson, Eric J.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes a requirements specification written in the RSML-e language for the mode logic of a Flight Guidance System of a typical regional jet aircraft. This model was created as one of the first steps in a five-year project sponsored by the NASA Langley Research Center, Rockwell Collins Inc., and the Critical Systems Research Group of the University of Minnesota to develop new methods and tools to improve the safety of avionics designs. This model will be used to demonstrate the application of a variety of methods and techniques, including safety analysis of system and subsystem requirements, verification of key properties using theorem provers and model checkers, identification of potential sources mode confusion in system designs, partitioning of applications based on the criticality of system hazards, and autogeneration of avionics quality code. While this model is representative of the mode logic of a typical regional jet aircraft, it does not describe an actual or planned product. Several aspects of a full Flight Guidance System, such as recovery from failed sensors, have been omitted, and no claims are made regarding the accuracy or completeness of this specification.

  18. Converting SRS-24, SRS-23, and SRS-22 to SRS-22r: establishing conversion equations using regression modeling.

    PubMed

    Lai, Sue-Min; Burton, Douglas C; Asher, Marc A; Carlson, Brandon B

    2011-11-01

    Cross-sectional mail questionnaire. Assess the feasibility of translating total and domain scores from Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-24, SRS-23, and SRS-22 to SRS-22r. Three successive editions of the original SRS-24 health-related quality-of-life questionnaire have resulted from efforts to improve its psychometric properties and validate its use in patients down to 10 years of age. This resulted in the need to establish, if possible, conversion equations to the last and most thoroughly validated version, SRS-22r. A consolidated questionnaire of 49 questions that incorporated the various questions in the four questionnaires was mailed to a consecutive series of 235 patients who had received primary posterior or anterior instrumentation and arthrodesis to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Regression modeling was used to establish conversion equations from the SRS-24, SRS-23, and SRS-22 to the SRS-22r. One hundred twenty-one of the 235 patients (51%), aged 23.3 ± 4.52 years (range 14.2-34.6 years), returned the questionnaire at 8.6 ± 4.00 years (range 2.3-15.9 years) following surgery. Estimation of SRS-22r questionnaire and nonmanagement domains total scores and mean scores from SRS-22 and SRS-23 scores is excellent (R2 scores of 0.97-0.99) and good for SRS-24 scores (R2 scores of 0.80-0.82, improving to 0.86 and 0.87 after minimal domain reconfiguration). Estimation of SRS-22r individual domain total scores and mean scores from SRS-22 and SRS-23 is good to excellent (R2 scores of 0.81-0.99). Minimal domain reconfiguration improves conversion from SRS-24 pain from R2 = 0.71 to 0.76, which are both fair; SRS-24 function from R2 = 0.69 and 0.74 to 0.83, from poor and fair to good; and SRS-24 satisfaction/dissatisfaction with management from R2 = 0.64 to 0.80, from poor to good. Conversion of SRS-24 self-image is poor (R2 = 0.60) despite the correlation being statistically significant. With one exception, SRS-24, SRS-23, and SRS-22 questionnaire

  19. SRS SWPF Construction Completion

    ScienceCinema

    Craig, Jack; Sheppard, Frank; Marks, Pam

    2016-08-17

    Now that construction is complete, DOE and construction contractor Parsons, are focusing on testing the Savannah River Site’s Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) systems and training the workforce to operate the plant in preparation for the start of operations. Once in operation, the SWPF will significantly increase processing rates at SRS tank farms in an effort to empty the site’s high-level radioactive waste tanks.

  20. SRS SWPF Construction Completion

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Jack; Sheppard, Frank; Marks, Pam

    2016-08-04

    Now that construction is complete, DOE and construction contractor Parsons, are focusing on testing the Savannah River Site’s Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) systems and training the workforce to operate the plant in preparation for the start of operations. Once in operation, the SWPF will significantly increase processing rates at SRS tank farms in an effort to empty the site’s high-level radioactive waste tanks.

  1. Testing of SRS and RFETS Nylon Bag Material

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    This report compares the effects of radiation and heating on nylon bagout materials used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Recently, to simplify the processing of sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C), FB-Line has replaced the low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags normally used to package cans of plutonium-bearing material with nylon bags. LDPE and PVC are not soluble in the nitric acid dissolver solution used in F-Canyon, so cans bagged using these materials had to be repackaged before they were added to the dissolver. Because nylon dissolves in nitric acid, cans bagged in nylon can be charged to the F-Canyon dissolvers without repackaging, thereby reducing handling requirements and personnel exposure. As part of a program to process RFETS SS and C at SRS, RFETS has also begun to use a nylon bagout material. The RFETS bag materials is made from a copolymer of nylon 6 and nylon 6.9, while the SRS material is made from a nylon 6 monomer. In addition, the SRS nylon has an anti-static agent added. The RFETS nylon is slightly softer than the SRS nylon, but does not appear to be as resistant to flex cracks initiated by contact with sharp corners of the inner can containing the SS and C.2 FB-Line Operations has asked for measurement of the effects of radiation and heating on these materials. Specifically, they have requested a comparison of the material properties of the plastics before and after irradiation, a measurement of the amount of outgassing when the plastics are heated, and a calculation of the amount of radiolytic gas generation. Testing was performed on samples taken from material that is currently used in FB-Line (color coded orange) and at RFETS. The requested tests are the same tests previously performed on the original and replacement nylon and LDPE bag materials.3,4,5. To evaluate the effect of irradiation on material properties, tensile stresses and elongations to break

  2. Enterprise.SRS = Business for Success at SRS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Goals and accomplishments of SRS. The debut of enterprise.srs, a strategic vision that will refocus site talents and efforts on developing future missions by broadening its impact in existing and new areas of national service. An expansion of people and facility in 3 areas: National Security, Clean Energy, and Environmental Stewardship.

  3. Enterprise.SRS = Business for Success at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Goals and accomplishments of SRS. The debut of enterprise.srs, a strategic vision that will refocus site talents and efforts on developing future missions by broadening its impact in existing and new areas of national service. An expansion of people and facility in 3 areas: National Security, Clean Energy, and Environmental Stewardship.

  4. Utilization of SRS pond ash in controlled low strength material. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1995-12-01

    Design mixes for Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) were developed which incorporate pond ashes (fly ashes) from the A-Area Ash Pile, the old F-Area Ash Basin and the D-Area Ash Basin. CLSM is a pumpable, flowable, excavatable backfill used in a variety of construction applications at SRS. Results indicate that CLSM which meets all of the SRS design specifications for backfill, can be made with the A-, D-, and F-Area pond ashes. Formulations for the design mixes are provided in this report. Use of the pond ashes may result in a cost savings for CLSM used at SRS and will utilize a by-product waste material, thereby decreasing the amount of material requiring disposal.

  5. Requirements Specification Language (RSL) and supporting tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frincke, Deborah; Wolber, Dave; Fisher, Gene; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes a general purpose Requirement Specification Language (RSL). RSL is a hybrid of features found in several popular requirement specification languages. The purpose of RSL is to describe precisely the external structure of a system comprised of hardware, software, and human processing elements. To overcome the deficiencies of informal specification languages, RSL includes facilities for mathematical specification. Two RSL interface tools are described. The Browser view contains a complete document with all details of the objects and operations. The Dataflow view is a specialized, operation-centered depiction of a specification that shows how specified operations relate in terms of inputs and outputs.

  6. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  7. Nej1 recruits the Srs2 helicase to DNA double-strand breaks and supports repair by a single-strand annealing-like mechanism.

    PubMed

    Carter, Sidney D; Vigasová, Dana; Chen, Jiang; Chovanec, Miroslav; Aström, Stefan U

    2009-07-21

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most severe DNA lesion a cell can suffer, as they pose the risk of inducing loss of genomic integrity and promote oncogenesis in mammals. Two pathways repair DSBs, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). With respect to mechanism and genetic requirements, characterization of these pathways has revealed a large degree of functional separation between the two. Nej1 is a cell-type specific regulator essential to NHEJ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Srs2 is a DNA helicase with multiple roles in HR. In this study, we show that Nej1 physically interacts with Srs2. Furthermore, mutational analysis of Nej1 suggests that the interaction was strengthened by Dun1-dependent phosphorylation of Nej1 serines 297/298. Srs2 was previously shown to be recruited to replication forks, where it promotes translesion DNA synthesis. We demonstrate that Srs2 was also efficiently recruited to DSBs generated by the HO endonuclease. Additionally, efficient Srs2 recruitment to this DSB was dependent on Nej1, but independent of mechanisms facilitating Srs2 recruitment to replication forks. Functionally, both Nej1 and Srs2 were required for efficient repair of DSBs with 15-bp overhangs, a repair event reminiscent of a specific type of HR called single-strand annealing (SSA). Moreover, absence of Rad51 suppressed the SSA-defect in srs2 and nej1 strains. We suggest a model in which Nej1 recruits Srs2 to DSBs to promote NHEJ/SSA-like repair by dismantling inappropriately formed Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments. This unexpected link between NHEJ and HR components may represent cross-talk between DSB repair pathways to ensure efficient repair.

  8. Nej1 recruits the Srs2 helicase to DNA double-strand breaks and supports repair by a single-strand annealing-like mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Sidney D.; Vigašová, Dana; Chen, Jiang; Chovanec, Miroslav; Åström, Stefan U.

    2009-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most severe DNA lesion a cell can suffer, as they pose the risk of inducing loss of genomic integrity and promote oncogenesis in mammals. Two pathways repair DSBs, nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). With respect to mechanism and genetic requirements, characterization of these pathways has revealed a large degree of functional separation between the two. Nej1 is a cell-type specific regulator essential to NHEJ in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Srs2 is a DNA helicase with multiple roles in HR. In this study, we show that Nej1 physically interacts with Srs2. Furthermore, mutational analysis of Nej1 suggests that the interaction was strengthened by Dun1-dependent phosphorylation of Nej1 serines 297/298. Srs2 was previously shown to be recruited to replication forks, where it promotes translesion DNA synthesis. We demonstrate that Srs2 was also efficiently recruited to DSBs generated by the HO endonuclease. Additionally, efficient Srs2 recruitment to this DSB was dependent on Nej1, but independent of mechanisms facilitating Srs2 recruitment to replication forks. Functionally, both Nej1 and Srs2 were required for efficient repair of DSBs with 15-bp overhangs, a repair event reminiscent of a specific type of HR called single-strand annealing (SSA). Moreover, absence of Rad51 suppressed the SSA-defect in srs2 and nej1 strains. We suggest a model in which Nej1 recruits Srs2 to DSBs to promote NHEJ/SSA-like repair by dismantling inappropriately formed Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments. This unexpected link between NHEJ and HR components may represent cross-talk between DSB repair pathways to ensure efficient repair. PMID:19571008

  9. Structured representation for requirements and specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Fisher, Gene; Frincke, Deborah; Wolber, Dave

    1991-01-01

    This document was generated in support of NASA contract NAS1-18586, Design and Validation of Digital Flight Control Systems suitable for Fly-By-Wire Applications, Task Assignment 2. Task 2 is associated with a formal representation of requirements and specifications. In particular, this document contains results associated with the development of a Wide-Spectrum Requirements Specification Language (WSRSL) that can be used to express system requirements and specifications in both stylized and formal forms. Included with this development are prototype tools to support the specification language. In addition a preliminary requirements specification methodology based on the WSRSL has been developed. Lastly, the methodology has been applied to an Advanced Subsonic Civil Transport Flight Control System.

  10. SRS: Site ranking system for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Brown, S.L.

    1988-05-01

    This report describes the rationale and presents instructions for a site ranking system (SRS). SRS ranks hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites by scoring important and readily available factors that influence risk to human health. Using SRS, sites can be ranked for purposes of detailed site investigations. SRS evaluates the relative risk as a combination of potentially exposed population, chemical toxicity, and potential exposure of release from a waste site; hence, SRS uses the same concepts found in a detailed assessment of health risk. Basing SRS on the concepts of risk assessment tends to reduce the distortion of results found in other ranking schemes. More importantly, a clear logic helps ensure the successful application of the ranking procedure and increases its versatility when modifications are necessary for unique situations. Although one can rank sites using a detailed risk assessment, it is potentially costly because of data and resources required. SRS is an efficient approach to provide an order-of-magnitude ranking, requiring only readily available data (often only descriptive) and hand calculations. Worksheets are included to make the system easier to understand and use. 88 refs., 19 figs., 58 tabs.

  11. Technical requirements specification for tank waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberd, D.L.

    1996-09-26

    This document provides the technical requirements specification for the retrieval of waste from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. All activities covered by this scope are conducted in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission.

  12. 30 CFR 20.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MINE LAMPS OTHER THAN STANDARD CAP LAMPS § 20.7 Specific requirements. Two general classes of electric lamps are recognized in these requirements, namely: Class 1, those...

  13. In Situ Vitrification software requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Grush, W.H.; Marwil, E.S.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes the Software Requirements Specification for the Electrical Resistance Heating and Thermal Energy Transport models of the In-Situ Vitrification (ISV) process. It contains the Data Flow Diagrams, Process Specifications, Data Structure Diagrams, and the Data Dictionary. 5 refs.

  14. Improvements to Technical Specifications surveillance requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Lobel, R.; Tjader, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    In August 1983 an NRC task group was formed to investigate problems with surveillance testing required by Technical Specifications, and to recommend approaches to effect improvements. NUREG-1024 ( Technical Specifications-Enhancing Safety Impact'') resulted, and it contained recommendations to review the basis for test frequencies; to ensure that the tests promote safety and do not degrade equipment; and to review surveillance tests so that they do not unnecessarily burden personnel. The Technical Specifications Improvement Program (TSIP) was established in December 1984 to provide the framework for rewriting and improving the Technical Specifications. As an element of the TSIP, all Technical Specifications surveillance requirements were comprehensively examined as recommended in NUREG-1024. The results of that effort are presented in this report. The study found that while some testing at power is essential to verify equipment and system operability, safety can be improved, equipment degradation decreased, and unnecessary personnel burden relaxed by reducing the amount of testing at power.

  15. Roadmap to the SRS computing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.

    1994-07-05

    This document outlines the major steps that must be taken by the Savannah River Site (SRS) to migrate the SRS information technology (IT) environment to the new architecture described in the Savannah River Site Computing Architecture. This document proposes an IT environment that is {open_quotes}...standards-based, data-driven, and workstation-oriented, with larger systems being utilized for the delivery of needed information to users in a client-server relationship.{close_quotes} Achieving this vision will require many substantial changes in the computing applications, systems, and supporting infrastructure at the site. This document consists of a set of roadmaps which provide explanations of the necessary changes for IT at the site and describes the milestones that must be completed to finish the migration.

  16. SRS Burial Ground Complex: Remediation in Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.; Crapse, B.; Cowan, S.

    1998-01-21

    Closure of the various areas in the Burial Ground Complex (BGC) represents a major step in the reduction of risk at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a significant investment of resources. The Burial Ground Complex occupies approximately 195 acres in the central section of the SRS. Approximately 160 acres of the BGC consists of hazardous and radioactive waste disposal sites that require remediation. Of these source acres, one-third have been remediated while two-thirds are undergoing interim or final action. These restoration activities have been carried out in a safe and cost effective manner while minimizing impact to operating facilities. Successful completion of these activities is in large part due to the teamwork demonstrated by the Department of Energy, contractor/subcontractor personnel, and the regulatory agencies. The experience and knowledge gained from the closure of these large disposal facilities can be used to expedite closure of similar facilities.

  17. Integrated Bioinformatic and Targeted Deletion Analyses of the SRS Gene Superfamily Identify SRS29C as a Negative Regulator of Toxoplasma Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wasmuth, James D.; Pszenny, Viviana; Haile, Simon; Jansen, Emily M.; Gast, Alexandra T.; Sher, Alan; Boyle, Jon P.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Parkinson, John; Grigg, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Toxoplasma gondii SRS gene superfamily is structurally related to SRS29B (formerly SAG1), a surface adhesin that binds host cells and stimulates host immunity. Comparative genomic analyses of three Toxoplasma strains identified 182 SRS genes distributed across 14 chromosomes at 57 genomic loci. Eight distinct SRS subfamilies were resolved. A core 69 functional gene orthologs were identified, and strain-specific expansions and pseudogenization were common. Gene expression profiling demonstrated differential expression of SRS genes in a developmental-stage- and strain-specific fashion and identified nine SRS genes as priority targets for gene deletion among the tissue-encysting coccidia. A Δsag1 ∆sag2A mutant was significantly attenuated in murine acute virulence and showed upregulated SRS29C (formerly SRS2) expression. Transgenic overexpression of SRS29C in the virulent RH parent was similarly attenuated. Together, these findings reveal SRS29C to be an important regulator of acute virulence in mice and demonstrate the power of integrated genomic analysis to guide experimental investigations. PMID:23149485

  18. 30 CFR 22.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS PORTABLE METHANE DETECTORS § 22.7 Specific requirements. (a) Design. In the... shall be of such design that it will not produce sparks that will ignite an explosive mixture of methane and air. (5) Detectors of the flame type. Methane detectors of the flame type shall be subject to...

  19. 30 CFR 22.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS PORTABLE METHANE DETECTORS § 22.7 Specific requirements. (a) Design. In the... shall be of such design that it will not produce sparks that will ignite an explosive mixture of methane and air. (5) Detectors of the flame type. Methane detectors of the flame type shall be subject to the...

  20. 30 CFR 22.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS PORTABLE METHANE DETECTORS § 22.7 Specific requirements. (a) Design. In the... shall be of such design that it will not produce sparks that will ignite an explosive mixture of methane and air. (5) Detectors of the flame type. Methane detectors of the flame type shall be subject to the...

  1. SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED

    SciTech Connect

    Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-25

    This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

  2. SRS Research Information System Thesaurus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Claire K., Ed.

    For information storage and retrieval, a thesaurus is used during indexing and searching processes to translate from natural language into a more restricted retrieval system language. The purpose of this thesaurus is to control the language used to index and retrieve documents of interest to Social and Rehabilitation Service (SRS) and the…

  3. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    SciTech Connect

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

  4. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this

  5. Testicular Functions and Clinical Characterization of Patients with Gender Dysphoria (GD) Undergoing Sex Reassignment Surgery (SRS).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Florian; Neuhaus, Nina; Wistuba, Joachim; Zitzmann, Michael; Heß, Jochen; Mahler, Dorothee; van Ahlen, Hermann; Schlatt, Stefan; Kliesch, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    Cross-sex hormone treatment of gender dysphoria (GD) patients changing from male to female a prerequisite for sex reassignment. For initial physical adaptation, a combined treatment of anti-androgens and estrogens is used. Provided that patients fulfill specific criteria, sex reassignment surgery (SRS) presents the final step toward physical adaptation. However, systematic studies analyzing effects of hormone treatment regimens are lacking. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of three different hormonal treatment strategies regarding endocrinological parameters and testicular histology. Testicular tissues were obtained in a multicenter study from 108 patients on the day of SRS from three clinics following different treatment strategies. Patients either discontinued treatment 6 weeks (clinic A) or 2 weeks (clinic B) prior to SRS or not at all (clinic C). Testicular tissues, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood and questionnaires were obtained on the day of SRS. Blood hormone and intratesticular testosterone (ITT) levels were measured. Testicular weight and histology were evaluated and the percentage of luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) positive cells was determined. According to the questionnaires, patients showed desired phenotypical changes including breast growth (75%) and smooth skin (32%). While patients from clinics A and B presented with rather virilized hormonal levels, patients from clinic C showed generally feminized blood serum levels. Histological evaluation revealed highly heterogeneous results with about 24% of patients presenting with qualitatively normal spermatogenesis. In accordance with serum endocrine profile, ITT levels were lowest in clinic C and correlated with testosterone and free testosterone, but not with the spermatogenic state. The percentage of LHCGR-positive cells and ITT levels did not correlate. Only patients that did not discontinue hormonal treatment showed feminized blood levels on the day of

  6. Integrated bioinformatic and targeted deletion analyses of the SRS gene superfamily identify SRS29C as a negative regulator of Toxoplasma virulence.

    PubMed

    Wasmuth, James D; Pszenny, Viviana; Haile, Simon; Jansen, Emily M; Gast, Alexandra T; Sher, Alan; Boyle, Jon P; Boulanger, Martin J; Parkinson, John; Grigg, Michael E

    2012-11-13

    The Toxoplasma gondii SRS gene superfamily is structurally related to SRS29B (formerly SAG1), a surface adhesin that binds host cells and stimulates host immunity. Comparative genomic analyses of three Toxoplasma strains identified 182 SRS genes distributed across 14 chromosomes at 57 genomic loci. Eight distinct SRS subfamilies were resolved. A core 69 functional gene orthologs were identified, and strain-specific expansions and pseudogenization were common. Gene expression profiling demonstrated differential expression of SRS genes in a developmental-stage- and strain-specific fashion and identified nine SRS genes as priority targets for gene deletion among the tissue-encysting coccidia. A Δsag1 sag2A mutant was significantly attenuated in murine acute virulence and showed upregulated SRS29C (formerly SRS2) expression. Transgenic overexpression of SRS29C in the virulent RH parent was similarly attenuated. Together, these findings reveal SRS29C to be an important regulator of acute virulence in mice and demonstrate the power of integrated genomic analysis to guide experimental investigations. Parasitic species employ large gene families to subvert host immunity to enable pathogen colonization and cause disease. Toxoplasma gondii contains a large surface coat gene superfamily that encodes adhesins and virulence factors that facilitate infection in susceptible hosts. We generated an integrated bioinformatic resource to predict which genes from within this 182-gene superfamily of adhesin-encoding genes play an essential role in the host-pathogen interaction. Targeted gene deletion experiments with predicted candidate surface antigens identified SRS29C as an important negative regulator of acute virulence in murine models of Toxoplasma infection. Our integrated computational and experimental approach provides a comprehensive framework, or road map, for the assembly and discovery of additional key pathogenesis genes contained within other large surface coat gene

  7. RADIOLYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION INSAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) HIGH LEVEL WASTETANKS COMPARISON OF SRS AND HANFORDMODELING PREDICTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N

    2009-04-15

    the waste. The difference in the two models has led to the questions of how different are the results predicted by the two models and which model predicts the more conservative (larger) G values. More conservative G values would predict higher H{sub 2} generation rates that would require higher ventilation rates in the SRS tanks. This report compares predictions based on the two models at various nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS HLW tanks for both beta/gamma and for alpha radiation. It also compares predicted G values with those determined by actually measuring the H{sub 2} production from four SRS HLW tanks (Tanks 32H, 35H, 39H, and 42H). Lastly, the H{sub 2} generation rates predicted by the two models are compared for the 47 active SRS high level waste tanks using the most recent tank nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the beta/gamma and alpha heat loads for each tank. The predictions of the models for total H{sub 2} generation rates from the 47 active SRS waste were, for the most part, similar. For example, the predictions for both models applied to 25 tanks agreed within {+-}10% of each other. For the remaining 22 tanks, the SRS prediction was more conservative for 9 tanks (maximum 29% higher) and the Hanford prediction was more conservative for 13 tanks (maximum 19% higher). When comparing G values predicted by the equations presuming only alpha radiation or only beta/gamma was present the results were somewhat different. The results of predictions for alpha radiation, at the 47 current nitrate and nitrite concentrations in the SRS tanks indicated that all the SRS predictions were higher (up to 30%) than the Hanford predictions and thus more conservative. For beta/gamma radiation the predictions for both models agreed to {+-}10% for 18 of the combinations, the Hanford model predicted higher values (11 up to 17%) for 25 of the concentrations considered, and the SRS model predicted higher G values for the remaining two combinations (12 and 17

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca L; Gaspar, Laurie E

    2014-07-12

    In many patients with brain metastases, the primary therapeutic aim is symptom palliation and maintenance of neurologic function, but in a subgroup, long-term survival is possible. Local control in the brain, and absent or controlled extracranial sites of disease are prerequisites for favorable survival. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a focal, highly precise treatment option with a long track record. Its clinical development and implementation by several pioneering institutions eventually rendered possible cooperative group randomized trials. A systematic review of those studies and other landmark studies was undertaken. Most clinicians are aware of the potential benefits of SRS such as a short treatment time, a high probability of treated-lesion control and, when adhering to typical dose/volume recommendations, a low normal tissue complication probability. However, SRS as sole first-line treatment carries a risk of failure in non-treated brain regions, which has resulted in controversy around when to add whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). SRS might also be prescribed as salvage treatment in patients relapsing despite previous SRS and/or WBRT. An optimal balance between intracranial control and side effects requires continued research efforts.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In many patients with brain metastases, the primary therapeutic aim is symptom palliation and maintenance of neurologic function, but in a subgroup, long-term survival is possible. Local control in the brain, and absent or controlled extracranial sites of disease are prerequisites for favorable survival. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a focal, highly precise treatment option with a long track record. Its clinical development and implementation by several pioneering institutions eventually rendered possible cooperative group randomized trials. A systematic review of those studies and other landmark studies was undertaken. Most clinicians are aware of the potential benefits of SRS such as a short treatment time, a high probability of treated-lesion control and, when adhering to typical dose/volume recommendations, a low normal tissue complication probability. However, SRS as sole first-line treatment carries a risk of failure in non-treated brain regions, which has resulted in controversy around when to add whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). SRS might also be prescribed as salvage treatment in patients relapsing despite previous SRS and/or WBRT. An optimal balance between intracranial control and side effects requires continued research efforts. PMID:25016309

  10. SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-08-01

    High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure.

  11. Technical Review of SRS Dose Reconstrruction Methods Used By CDC

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, Ali, A

    2005-07-20

    At the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a subcontractor Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International, Inc.(ATL) issued a draft report estimating offsite dose as a result of Savannah River Site operations for the period 1954-1992 in support of Phase III of the SRS Dose Reconstruction Project. The doses reported by ATL differed than those previously estimated by Savannah River Site SRS dose modelers for a variety of reasons, but primarily because (1) ATL used different source terms, (2) ATL considered trespasser/poacher scenarios and (3) ATL did not consistently use site-specific parameters or correct usage parameters. The receptors with the highest dose from atmospheric and liquid pathways were within about a factor of four greater than dose values previously reported by SRS. A complete set of technical comments have also been included.

  12. Methodology for Estimating Ingestion Dose for Emergency Response at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Simpkins, A.A.

    2003-07-21

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), emergency response computer models are used to estimate dose following releases of radioactive materials to the environment. Downwind air and ground concentrations and their associated doses from inhalation and ground shine pathways are estimated. The emergency response model (PUFF-PLUME) uses real-time data to track either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases. A site-specific ingestion dose model was developed for use with PUFF-PLUME that includes the following ingestion dose pathways pertinent to the surrounding SRS area: milk, beef, water, and fish. The model is simplistic and can be used with existing code output.

  13. A Guide to the Use of the SRS Research Information System; Instruction Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for the Crippled and Disabled, New York, NY. Research Utilization Lab.

    The Social and Rehabilitation Service (SRS) has developed the Research Information System (RIS), a central information base which evolved from research and demonstration (R&D) programs sponsored over the years by SRS. It was specifically designed for use by the practitioner rather than by the formal researcher in an area of special…

  14. General specifications covering requirements of aeronautic instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1917-01-01

    Report includes specifications for the use and production of instruments used in the navigation and operation of aircraft. Specifications are included for the following instruments: barometer or altimeter, compass, air speed meter, inclinometer, drift meter, tachometer, oil gauge, oil pressure gauge, gasoline gauge, gasoline flow indicator, distance indicator, barograph, angle of attack indicator, radiator temperature indicator, gasoline feed system pressure indicator, sextant, airplane director.

  15. 46 CFR 63.20-1 - Specific control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specific control system requirements. 63.20-1 Section 63... AUXILIARY BOILERS Additional Control System Requirements § 63.20-1 Specific control system requirements. In... following requirements apply for specific control systems: (a) Primary safety control system....

  16. 46 CFR 63.20-1 - Specific control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specific control system requirements. 63.20-1 Section 63... AUXILIARY BOILERS Additional Control System Requirements § 63.20-1 Specific control system requirements. In... following requirements apply for specific control systems: (a) Primary safety control system. Following...

  17. 46 CFR 63.20-1 - Specific control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specific control system requirements. 63.20-1 Section 63... AUXILIARY BOILERS Additional Control System Requirements § 63.20-1 Specific control system requirements. In... following requirements apply for specific control systems: (a) Primary safety control system. Following...

  18. 46 CFR 63.20-1 - Specific control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specific control system requirements. 63.20-1 Section 63... AUXILIARY BOILERS Additional Control System Requirements § 63.20-1 Specific control system requirements. In... following requirements apply for specific control systems: (a) Primary safety control system....

  19. 46 CFR 63.20-1 - Specific control system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specific control system requirements. 63.20-1 Section 63... AUXILIARY BOILERS Additional Control System Requirements § 63.20-1 Specific control system requirements. In... following requirements apply for specific control systems: (a) Primary safety control system....

  20. System requirements specification for SMART structures mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Specified here are the functional and informational requirements for software modules which address the geometric and data modeling needs of the aerospace structural engineer. The modules are to be included as part of the Solid Modeling Aerospace Research Tool (SMART) package developed for the Vehicle Analysis Branch (VAB) at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The purpose is to precisely state what the SMART Structures modules will do, without consideration of how it will be done. Each requirement is numbered for reference in development and testing.

  1. IMCS reflight certification requirements and design specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The requirements for reflight certification are established. Software requirements encompass the software programs that are resident in the PCC, DEP, PDSS, EC, or any related GSE. A design approach for the reflight software packages is recommended. These designs will be of sufficient detail to permit the implementation of reflight software. The PDSS/IMC Reflight Certification system provides the tools and mechanisms for the user to perform the reflight certification test procedures, test data capture, test data display, and test data analysis. The system as defined will be structured to permit maximum automation of reflight certification procedures and test data analysis.

  2. PDSS/IMC requirements and functional specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The system (software and hardware) requirements for the Payload Development Support System (PDSS)/Image Motion Compensator (IMC) are provided. The PDSS/IMC system provides the capability for performing Image Motion Compensator Electronics (IMCE) flight software test, checkout, and verification and provides the capability for monitoring the IMC flight computer system during qualification testing for fault detection and fault isolation.

  3. 30 CFR 22.7 - Specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... diameter and are of reasonably thick glass. (4) Battery. If the detector is equipped with a battery, it... battery-type detectors is due chiefly to possible burning of the user by electrolyte that has spilled from the battery. MSHA, therefore, requires that: (1) Spilling of electrolyte. The battery shall be...

  4. Hitchhiker: Customer Accommodations and Requirements Specifications (CARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    In 1984, NASA Headquarters established projects at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to develop quick-reaction carrier systems for low-cost 'flight of opportunity' or secondary payloads on the Space Transportation System (STS). One of these projects is the Hitchhiker (HH) Program. GSFC has developed a family of carrier equipment known as the Shuttle Payload of Opportunity Carrier (SPOC) system for mounting small payloads such as HH to the side of the Orbiter payload bay. The side-mounted HHs are referred to as Hitchhiker-G (HH-G). MSFC developed a cross-bay 'bridge-type' carrier structure called the Hitchhiker-M (HH-M). In 1987, responsibility for the HH-M carrier was transferred to and is now managed by the HH Project Office at the GSFC. The HH-M carrier now uses the same interchangeable SPOC avionics unit and the same electrical interfaces and services developed for HH-G. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has created this document to acquaint potential HH system customers with the facilities NASA provides and the requirements which customers must satisfy to use these facilities. This publication defines interface items required for integrating customer equipment with the HH carrier system. Those items such as mounting equipment and electrical inputs and outputs; configuration, environmental, command, telemetry, and operational constraints are described as well as weight, power, and communications. The purpose of this publication is to help the customer understand essential integration documentation requirements and to prepare a Customer Payload Requirements (CPR) document.

  5. Engineering Specifications derived from Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Arnold, William; Bevan, Ryan M.; Smith, W. Scott; Kirk, Charles S.; Postman, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) is a multi-year effort to systematically mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review. This technology must enable missions capable of both general astrophysics & ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. To accomplish our objective, we use a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system.

  6. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Mike; Herbert, James E.; Scheele, Patrick W.

    2015-01-12

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m3 to 4921 m3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and

  7. Srs2 promotes Mus81-Mms4-mediated resolution of recombination intermediates.

    PubMed

    Chavdarova, Melita; Marini, Victoria; Sisakova, Alexandra; Sedlackova, Hana; Vigasova, Dana; Brill, Steven J; Lisby, Michael; Krejci, Lumir

    2015-04-20

    A variety of DNA lesions, secondary DNA structures or topological stress within the DNA template may lead to stalling of the replication fork. Recovery of such forks is essential for the maintenance of genomic stability. The structure-specific endonuclease Mus81-Mms4 has been implicated in processing DNA intermediates that arise from collapsed forks and homologous recombination. According to previous genetic studies, the Srs2 helicase may play a role in the repair of double-strand breaks and ssDNA gaps together with Mus81-Mms4. In this study, we show that the Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 proteins physically interact in vitro and in vivo and we map the interaction domains within the Srs2 and Mus81 proteins. Further, we show that Srs2 plays a dual role in the stimulation of the Mus81-Mms4 nuclease activity on a variety of DNA substrates. First, Srs2 directly stimulates Mus81-Mms4 nuclease activity independent of its helicase activity. Second, Srs2 removes Rad51 from DNA to allow access of Mus81-Mms4 to cleave DNA. Concomitantly, Mus81-Mms4 inhibits the helicase activity of Srs2. Taken together, our data point to a coordinated role of Mus81-Mms4 and Srs2 in processing of recombination as well as replication intermediates.

  8. Specific energy requirement for compacting corn stover.

    PubMed

    Mani, Sudhagar; Tabil, Lope G; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2006-08-01

    Corn stover is a major crop residue for biomass conversion to produce chemicals and fuels. One of the problems associated with the supply of corn stover to conversion plants is the delivery of feedstock at a low cost. Corn stover has low bulk density and it is difficult to handle. In this study, chopped corn stover samples were compacted in a piston cylinder under three pressure levels (5, 10, 15 MPa) and at three moisture content levels (5%, 10%, 15% (wb)) to produce briquettes. The total energy requirement to compress and extrude briquette ranged from 12 to 30 MJ/t. The briquette density ranged from 650 to 950 kg/m3 increasing with pressure. Moisture content had also a significant effect on briquette density, durability and stability. Low moisture stover (5-10%) resulted in denser, more stable and more durable briquettes than high moisture stover (15%).

  9. 22 CFR 226.49 - USAID-Specific procurement requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false USAID-Specific procurement requirements 226.49... TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Procurement Standards § 226.49 USAID-Specific procurement requirements Procurement requirements which are applicable to USAID because of statute...

  10. 22 CFR 226.49 - USAID-Specific procurement requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false USAID-Specific procurement requirements 226.49... TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Procurement Standards § 226.49 USAID-Specific procurement requirements Procurement requirements which are applicable to USAID because of statute...

  11. 22 CFR 226.49 - USAID-Specific procurement requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false USAID-Specific procurement requirements 226.49... TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Procurement Standards § 226.49 USAID-Specific procurement requirements Procurement requirements which are applicable to USAID because of statute...

  12. 22 CFR 226.49 - USAID-Specific procurement requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false USAID-Specific procurement requirements 226.49... TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Procurement Standards § 226.49 USAID-Specific procurement requirements Procurement requirements which are applicable to USAID because of statute...

  13. ARIES: Acquisition of Requirements and Incremental Evolution of Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Nancy A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a requirements/specification environment specifically designed for large-scale software systems. This environment is called ARIES (Acquisition of Requirements and Incremental Evolution of Specifications). ARIES provides assistance to requirements analysts for developing operational specifications of systems. This development begins with the acquisition of informal system requirements. The requirements are then formalized and gradually elaborated (transformed) into formal and complete specifications. ARIES provides guidance to the user in validating formal requirements by translating them into natural language representations and graphical diagrams. ARIES also provides ways of analyzing the specification to ensure that it is correct, e.g., testing the specification against a running simulation of the system to be built. Another important ARIES feature, especially when developing large systems, is the sharing and reuse of requirements knowledge. This leads to much less duplication of effort. ARIES combines all of its features in a single environment that makes the process of capturing a formal specification quicker and easier.

  14. Structuring Formal Requirements Specifications for Reuse and Product Families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heimdahl, Mats P. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this project we have investigated how formal specifications should be structured to allow for requirements reuse, product family engineering, and ease of requirements change, The contributions of this work include (1) a requirements specification methodology specifically targeted for critical avionics applications, (2) guidelines for how to structure state-based specifications to facilitate ease of change and reuse, and (3) examples from the avionics domain demonstrating the proposed approach.

  15. Action Plan for updated Chapter 15 Accident Analysis in the SRS Production Reactor SAR

    SciTech Connect

    Hightower, N.T. III; Burnett, T.W.

    1989-11-15

    This report describes the Action Plan for the upgrade of the Chapter 15 Accident Analysis in the SRS Production Reactor SAR required for K-Restart. This Action Plan will be updated periodically to reflect task accomplishments and issue resolutions.

  16. Analysis of internal construct validity of the SRS-24 questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Neubauer, Georg; Klasen, Juergen; Min, Kan

    2012-08-01

    The SRS-24 questionnaire was originally validated using methods of classical test theory, but internal construct validity has never been shown. Internal construct validity, i.e. unidimensionality and linearity, is a fundamental arithmetic requirement and needs to be shown for a scale for summating any set of Likert-type items. Here, internal construct validity of the SRS-24 questionnaire in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients is analyzed. 232 SRS-24 questionnaires distributed to 116 patients with AIS pre-operatively and at postoperative follow-up were analyzed. 103 patients were females; the average age was 16.5 ± 7.1 years. The questionnaires were subjected to Rasch analysis using the RUMM2020 software package. All seven domains of the SRS-24 showed misfit to the Rasch model, and three of seven were unidimensional. Unidimensionality and linearity could only be achieved for an aggregate score by separating pre- and postoperative items and omitting items which caused model misfit. Reducing the questionnaire to six pre-operative items (p = 0.098; 2.25% t tests) and five postoperative items (p = 0.267; 3.70% t tests) yields model fit and unidimensionality for both summated scores. The person-separation indices (PSI) were 0.67 and 0.69, respectively, for the pre- and postoperative patients. The SRS-24 score is a non-linear and multidimensional construct. Adding the items into a single value is therefore not supported and invalid in principle. Making profound changes to the questionnaire yields a score which fulfills the properties of internal construct validity and supports its use a change score for outcome measurement.

  17. Software Requirements Specifications of a Proposed Plant Property Management System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    RD-li32 176 SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS SPECIFICATIONS OF R PROPOSED 1/2 PLANT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM(U) NAVAL POSTGRRDUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA E J...1983J THESIS SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS SPECIFICATIONS OF A PROPOSED PLANT PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SY’STEM by Edward J. Buselt June 1983 C)Thesis Advisor: R.W...Subtitle) s. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Software Requirements Specifications Master’s Thesis; of a (June 1983) * Proposed Plant Property Management

  18. 14 CFR 221.71 - Requirement of clarity and specificity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Amendment of Tariffs § 221.71 Requirement of clarity and specificity. Amendments to tariffs shall identify with specificity and clarity the material being amended and...

  19. Prerequisites to Deriving Formal Specifications from Natural Language Requirements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Special 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side Ii nocessary and Identify by block number) formal specifications, English specifications, modules, software... English specifications and formal specifications of modules are complementary and since formal specifications require so much effort to write, our...involved four areas of work. The firtt is,A\\ comparing English descriptions with formal specifications of the same software module. This work is now complete

  20. 49 CFR 179.401-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and... specification requirements for the inner tank and its appurtenances are as follows: DOT specification...

  1. 49 CFR 179.401-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and... specification requirements for the inner tank and its appurtenances are as follows: DOT specification...

  2. 49 CFR 179.401-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and... specification requirements for the inner tank and its appurtenances are as follows: DOT specification...

  3. 49 CFR 179.401-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and... specification requirements for the inner tank and its appurtenances are as follows: DOT specification...

  4. Continuous-wave stimulated Raman scattering (cwSRS) microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2013-08-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a powerful tool for chemically sensitive non-invasive optical imaging. However, ultrafast laser sources, which are currently employed, are still expensive and require substantial maintenance to provide temporal overlap and spectral tuning. SRS imaging, which utilizes continuous-wave laser sources, has a major advantage, as it eliminates the cell damage due to exposure to the high-intensity light radiation, while substantially reducing the cost and complexity of the setup. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate microscopic imaging of dimethyl sulfoxide using two independent, commonly used lasers, a diode-pumped, intracavity doubled 532-nm laser and a He-Ne laser operating at 632.8-nm.

  5. 49 CFR 173.62 - Specific packaging requirements for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specific packaging requirements for explosives... Class 1 § 173.62 Specific packaging requirements for explosives. (a) Except as provided in § 173.7 of this subchapter, when the § 172.101 Table specifies that an explosive must be packaged in...

  6. 49 CFR 173.62 - Specific packaging requirements for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specific packaging requirements for explosives... Class 1 § 173.62 Specific packaging requirements for explosives. (a) Except as provided in § 173.7 of this subchapter, when the § 172.101 Table specifies that an explosive must be packaged in...

  7. 49 CFR 173.62 - Specific packaging requirements for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specific packaging requirements for explosives... Class 1 § 173.62 Specific packaging requirements for explosives. (a) Except as provided in § 173.7 of this subchapter, when the § 172.101 Table specifies that an explosive must be packaged in...

  8. 49 CFR 173.62 - Specific packaging requirements for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specific packaging requirements for explosives... Class 1 § 173.62 Specific packaging requirements for explosives. (a) Except as provided in § 173.7 of this subchapter, when the § 172.101 Table specifies that an explosive must be packaged in...

  9. 49 CFR 173.62 - Specific packaging requirements for explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specific packaging requirements for explosives... Class 1 § 173.62 Specific packaging requirements for explosives. (a) Except as provided in § 173.7 of this subchapter, when the § 172.101 Table specifies that an explosive must be packaged in...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1506 - Equipment required and specifications; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment required and specifications; overview. 86.1506 Section 86.1506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Test Procedures § 86.1506 Equipment required and specifications; overview. (a) This subpart contains...

  11. From Goal-Oriented Requirements to Event-B Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aziz, Benjamin; Arenas, Alvaro E.; Bicarregui, Juan; Ponsard, Christophe; Massonet, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    In goal-oriented requirements engineering methodologies, goals are structured into refinement trees from high-level system-wide goals down to fine-grained requirements assigned to specific software/ hardware/human agents that can realise them. Functional goals assigned to software agents need to be operationalised into specification of services that the agent should provide to realise those requirements. In this paper, we propose an approach for operationalising requirements into specifications expressed in the Event-B formalism. Our approach has the benefit of aiding software designers by bridging the gap between declarative requirements and operational system specifications in a rigorous manner, enabling powerful correctness proofs and allowing further refinements down to the implementation level. Our solution is based on verifying that a consistent Event-B machine exhibits properties corresponding to requirements.

  12. Electrical Bonding: A Survey of Requirement, Methods, and Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1998-01-01

    This document provides information helpful to engineers imposing electrical bonding requirements, reviewing waiver requests, or modifying specifications on various space programs. Electrical bonding specifications and some of the processes used in the United States have been reviewed. This document discusses the specifications, the types of bonds, the intent of each, and the basic requirements where possible. Additional topics discussed are resistance versus impedance, bond straps, corrosion, finishes, and special applications.

  13. Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental overview

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rear, M.G. ); Steele, J.L.; Kitchen, B.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The environmental surveillance activities at and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) (formerly the Savannah River Plant (SRP)) comprise one of the most comprehensive and extensive environmental monitoring programs in the United States. This overview contains monitoring data from routine and nonroutine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities, summaries of environmental protection programs in progress, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities, and a listing of environmental permits (Appendix A) issued by regulatory agencies. This overview provides information about the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. The SRS occupies a large area of approximately 300 square miles along the Savannah River, principally in Aiken and Barnwell counties of South Carolina. SRS's primary function is the production of tritium, plutonium, and other special nuclear materials for national defense, for other governmental uses, and for some civilian purposes. From August 1950 to March 31, 1989, SRS was operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by E. I. du Pont de Nemours Co. On April 1, 1989 the Westinghouse Savannah River Company assumed responsibility as the prime contractor for the Savannah River Site.

  14. SRS Computer Animation and Drive Train System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthun, Daniel; Schachner, Christian

    2001-01-01

    The spinning rocket simulator (SRS) is an ongoing project at Oral Roberts University. The goal of the SRS is to gather crucial data concerning a spinning rocket under thrust for the purpose of analysis and correction of the coning motion experienced by this type of spacecraft maneuver. The computer animation simulates a virtual, scale model of the component of the SRS that represents the spacecraft itself. This component is known as the (VSM), or virtual spacecraft model. During actual physical simulation, this component of the SRS will experience a coning. The goal of the animation is to cone the VSM within that range to accurately represent the motion of the actual simulator. The drive system of the SRS is the apparatus that turns the actual simulator. It consists of a drive motor, motor mount and chain to power the simulator into motion. The motor mount is adjustable and rigid for high torque application. A digital stepper motor controller actuates the main drive motor for linear acceleration. The chain transfers power from the motor to the simulator via sprockets on both ends.

  15. A Comparative Analysis Among the SRS M&M, NIS, and KID Databases for the Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nathan J; Guzman, Javier Z; Kim, Jun; Skovrlj, Branko; Martin, Christopher T; Pugely, Andrew J; Gao, Yubo; Caridi, John M; Mendoza-Lattes, Sergio; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-11-01

    Retrospective cohort analysis. A growing number of publications have utilized the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) Morbidity and Mortality (M&M) database, but none have compared it to other large databases. The objective of this study was to compare SRS complications with those in administrative databases. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and Kid's Inpatient Database (KID) captured a greater number of overall complications while the SRS M&M data provided a greater incidence of spine-related complications following adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) surgery. Chi-square was used to obtain statistical significance, with p < .05 considered significant. The SRS 2004-2007 (9,904 patients), NIS 2004-2007 (20,441 patients) and KID 2003-2006 (10,184 patients) databases were analyzed for AIS patients who underwent fusion. Comparable variables were queried in all three databases, including patient demographics, surgical variables, and complications. Patients undergoing AIS in the SRS database were slightly older (SRS 14.4 years vs. NIS 13.8 years, p < .0001; KID 13.9 years, p < .0001) and less likely to be male (SRS 18.5% vs. NIS 26.3%, p < .0001; KID 24.8%, p < .0001). Revision surgery (SRS 3.3% vs. NIS 2.4%, p < .0001; KID 0.9%, p < .0001) and osteotomy (SRS 8% vs. NIS 2.3%, p < .0001; KID 2.4%, p < .0001) were more commonly reported in the SRS database. The SRS database reported fewer overall complications (SRS 3.9% vs. NIS 7.3%, p < .0001; KID 6.6%, p < .0001). However, when respiratory complications (SRS 0.5% vs. NIS 3.7%, p < .0001; KID 4.4%, p < .0001) were excluded, medical complication rates were similar across databases. In contrast, SRS reported higher spine-specific complication rates. Mortality rates were similar between SRS versus NIS (p = .280) and SRS versus KID (p = .08) databases. There are similarities and differences between the three databases. These discrepancies are likely due to the varying data-gathering methods each organization uses to

  16. [A study for time-history waveform synthesis of algorithm in shock response spectrum (SRS)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-ying; Ma, Ai-jun

    2002-12-01

    Objective. To present an effective on-line SRS time-history waveform synthesis method for simulating pyrotechnic shock environment with electrodynamic shakers. Method. A procedure was developed for synthesizing a SRS time-history waveform according to a general principle. The effect of three main parameters to waveform's shape, amplitude of acceleration and duration were investigated. A modification method of SRS's amplitude and an optimal algorithm of time-history waveform were presented. Result. The algorithm was used to generate a time-history waveform that could satisfy SRS's accuracy requirement and electrodynamic shaker's acceleration limitation. Conclusion. The numerical example indicates that the developed method is effective. The synthesized time-history waveform can be used to simulate pyrotechnic shock environment using electrodynamic shakers.

  17. Examining Reuse in LaSRS++-Based Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, Michael M.

    2001-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) developed the Langley Standard Real-Time Simulation in C++ (LaSRS++) to consolidate all software development for its simulation facilities under one common framework. A common framework promised a decrease in the total development effort for a new simulation by encouraging software reuse. To judge the success of LaSRS++ in this regard, reuse metrics were extracted from 11 aircraft models. Three methods that employ static analysis of the code were used to identify the reusable components. For the method that provides the best estimate, reuse levels fall between 66% and 95% indicating a high degree of reuse. Additional metrics provide insight into the extent of the foundation that LaSRS++ provides to new simulation projects. When creating variants of an aircraft, LaRC developers use object-oriented design to manage the aircraft as a reusable resource. Variants modify the aircraft for a research project or embody an alternate configuration of the aircraft. The variants inherit from the aircraft model. The variants use polymorphism to extend or redefine aircraft behaviors to meet the research requirements or to match the alternate configuration. Reuse level metrics were extracted from 10 variants. Reuse levels of aircraft by variants were 60% - 99%.

  18. Seismic Hazard Characterization at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS): Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Savy, J.B.

    1994-06-24

    The purpose of the Seismic Hazard Characterization project for the Savannah River Site (SRS-SHC) is to develop estimates of the seismic hazard for several locations within the SRS. Given the differences in the geology and geotechnical characteristics at each location, the estimates of the seismic hazard are to allow for the specific local conditions at each site. Characterization of seismic hazard is a critical factor for the design of new facilities as well as for the review and potential retrofit of existing facilities at SRS. The scope of the SRS seismic hazard characterization reported in this document is limited to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The goal of the project is to provide seismic hazard estimates based on a state-of-the-art method which is consistent with developments and findings of several ongoing studies which are deemed to bring improvements in the state of the seismic hazard analyses.

  19. Radiobiological basis of SBRT and SRS.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang W; Kim, Mi-Sook; Cho, L Chinsoo; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Sperduto, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) have been demonstrated to be highly effective for a variety of tumors. However, the radiobiological principles of SBRT and SRS have not yet been clearly defined. It is well known that newly formed tumor blood vessels are fragile and extremely sensitive to ionizing radiation. Various lines of evidence indicate that irradiation of tumors with high dose per fraction, i.e. >10 Gy per fraction, not only kills tumor cells but also causes significant damage in tumor vasculatures. Such vascular damage and ensuing deterioration of the intratumor environment then cause ischemic or indirect/secondary tumor cell death within a few days after radiation exposure, indicating that vascular damage plays an important role in the response of tumors to SBRT and SRS. Indications are that the extensive tumor cell death due to the direct effect of radiation on tumor cells and the secondary effect through vascular damage may lead to massive release of tumor-associated antigens and various pro-inflammatory cytokines, thereby triggering an anti-tumor immune response. However, the precise role of immune assault on tumor cells in SBRT and SRS has not yet been clearly defined. The "4 Rs" for conventional fractionated radiotherapy do not include indirect cell death and thus 4 Rs cannot account for the effective tumor control by SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model is for cell death caused by DNA breaks and thus the usefulness of this model for ablative high-dose SBRT and SRS is limited.

  20. UML activity diagrams in requirements specification of logic controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobelna, Iwona; Grobelny, Michał

    2015-12-01

    Logic controller specification can be prepared using various techniques. One of them is the wide understandable and user-friendly UML language and its activity diagrams. Using formal methods during the design phase increases the assurance that implemented system meets the project requirements. In the approach we use the model checking technique to formally verify a specification against user-defined behavioral requirements. The properties are usually defined as temporal logic formulas. In the paper we propose to use UML activity diagrams in requirements definition and then to formalize them as temporal logic formulas. As a result, UML activity diagrams can be used both for logic controller specification and for requirements definition, what simplifies the specification and verification process.

  1. 22 CFR 226.49 - USAID-Specific procurement requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false USAID-Specific procurement requirements 226.49 Section 226.49 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-award Requirements Procurement Standards § 226.49...

  2. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements § 76.75 Specific EEO... necessary. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to require a multichannel video programming...) In addition to using such recruitment sources, a multichannel video programming distributor...

  3. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements § 76.75 Specific EEO... necessary. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to require a multichannel video programming...) In addition to using such recruitment sources, a multichannel video programming distributor...

  4. 47 CFR 76.75 - Specific EEO program requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Equal Employment Opportunity Requirements § 76.75 Specific EEO... necessary. Nothing in this section shall be interpreted to require a multichannel video programming...) In addition to using such recruitment sources, a multichannel video programming distributor...

  5. 49 CFR 543.6 - Petition: Specific content requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Petition: Specific content requirements. 543.6 Section 543.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EXEMPTION FROM VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD § 543.6 Petition: Specific content...

  6. 14 CFR 142.5 - Certificate and training specifications required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS General § 142.5 Certificate and training specifications required. (a) No person may operate a certificated training center without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Certificate and training specifications...

  7. 14 CFR 142.5 - Certificate and training specifications required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS General § 142.5 Certificate and training specifications required. (a) No person may operate a certificated training center without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Certificate and training specifications...

  8. 14 CFR 142.5 - Certificate and training specifications required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS General § 142.5 Certificate and training specifications required. (a) No person may operate a certificated training center without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Certificate and training specifications...

  9. 14 CFR 142.5 - Certificate and training specifications required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS General § 142.5 Certificate and training specifications required. (a) No person may operate a certificated training center without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Certificate and training specifications...

  10. 14 CFR 142.5 - Certificate and training specifications required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS General § 142.5 Certificate and training specifications required. (a) No person may operate a certificated training center without... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certificate and training specifications...

  11. 40 CFR 86.1406 - Equipment required and specifications; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment required and specifications; overview. 86.1406 Section 86.1406 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... specifications; overview. (a) Exhaust emission tests. All vehicles subject to this subpart are tested for...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1406 - Equipment required and specifications; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment required and specifications; overview. 86.1406 Section 86.1406 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... specifications; overview. (a) Exhaust emission tests. All vehicles subject to this subpart are tested for exhaust...

  13. 49 CFR 179.101-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.101-1 Section 179.101-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  14. 49 CFR 179.201-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.201-1 Section 179.201-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  15. 49 CFR 179.101-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.101-1 Section 179.101-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  16. 49 CFR 179.201-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.201-1 Section 179.201-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  17. 49 CFR 179.201-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.201-1 Section 179.201-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  18. 49 CFR 179.101-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.101-1 Section 179.101-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  19. 49 CFR 179.101-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.101-1 Section 179.101-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR...

  20. 24 CFR 1003.302 - Project specific threshold requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Purpose Grant Application and Selection Process § 1003.302 Project specific threshold requirements. (a) Housing rehabilitation projects. All applicants for housing rehabilitation projects shall adopt... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Project specific threshold...

  1. Localization of recombination proteins and Srs2 reveals anti-recombinase function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Lisby, Michael; Altmannova, Veronika; Krejci, Lumir; Sung, Patrick; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-06-15

    Homologous recombination (HR), although an important DNA repair mechanism, is dangerous to the cell if improperly regulated. The Srs2 "anti-recombinase" restricts HR by disassembling the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament, an intermediate preceding the exchange of homologous DNA strands. Here, we cytologically characterize Srs2 function in vivo and describe a novel mechanism for regulating the initiation of HR. We find that Srs2 is recruited separately to replication and repair centers and identify the genetic requirements for recruitment. In the absence of Srs2 activity, Rad51 foci accumulate, and surprisingly, can form in the absence of Rad52 mediation. However, these Rad51 foci do not represent repair-proficient filaments, as determined by recombination assays. Antagonistic roles for Rad52 and Srs2 in Rad51 filament formation are also observed in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Srs2 removes Rad51 indiscriminately from DNA, while the Rad52 protein coordinates appropriate filament reformation. This constant breakdown and rebuilding of filaments may act as a stringent quality control mechanism during HR.

  2. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  3. Groundwater Treatment at SRS: An Innovative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jorque, M.A.; Golshir, G.H.; Davis, B.

    1998-03-01

    The SRS is located in southwestern South Carolina, occupying an almost circular area of approximately 800 km2 within Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties. The site lies approximately 36 km southeast of Augusta, Georgia, and is bounded by the Savannah River along its southwestern border. Prior to the establishment of the SRS in 1952, the area was largely a rural agricultural community. As part of the defense complex, the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the national defense.From 1955 until 1988, unlined earthen basins were used to dispose of wastewater from the SRS separations facilities located in the F and H areas. Approximately 300 million liters of wastewater was transported annually from the process area through underground piping to the basins. The wastewater was allowed to evaporate and to seep into the underlying formations. There were three basins in the F-Area covering a total of about 3 hectares; while the H-Area was served by four basins covering about 6 hectares. The seepage basins closure was started in 1989 and SCDHEC certified the closures as completed in 1991.Groundwater monitoring conducted in accordance with the provisions of the RCRA Permits determined that the underlying hydrogeologic units were contaminated by tritium, radioactive metals (primarily Cesium 137, Strontium 90, and Uranium 235), nitrate and heavy metals, some of which are defined as hazardous by RCRA. Under the terms and conditions of the RCRA Post- Closure Permits, it was necessary to remediate the contaminated groundwater plumes.

  4. Groundwater Treatment at SRS: An Innovative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jorque, M.A.; Golshir, G.H.; Davis, B.

    1998-03-01

    The SRS is located in southwestern South Carolina, occupying an almost circular area of approximately 800 km{sub 2} within Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties. The site lies approximately 36 km southeast of Augusta, Georgia, and is bounded by the Savannah River along its southwestern border. Prior to the establishment of the SRS in 1952, the area was largely a rural agricultural community. As part of the defense complex, the SRS produced special nuclear materials for the national defense. From 1955 until 1988, unlined earthen basins were used to dispose of wastewater from the SRS separations facilities located in the F and H areas. Approximately 300 million liters of wastewater was transported annually from the process area through underground piping to the basins. The wastewater was allowed to evaporate and to seep into the underlying formations. There were three basins in the F-Area covering a total of about 3 hectares; while the H-Area was served by four basins covering about 6 hectares. The seepage basins closure was started in 1989 and SCDHEC certified the closures as completed in 1991. Groundwater monitoring conducted in accordance with the provisions of the RCRA Permits determined that the underlying hydrogeologic units were contaminated by tritium, radioactive metals (primarily Cesium{sup 137}, Strontium{sup 90}, and Uranium{sup 235}), nitrate and heavy metals, some of which are defined as hazardous by RCRA. Under the terms and conditions of the RCRA Post-Closure Permits, it was necessary to remediate the contaminated groundwater plumes.

  5. Mixing in SRS Closure Business Unit Applications

    SciTech Connect

    POIRIER, MICHAELR.

    2004-06-23

    The following equipment is commonly used to mix fluids: mechanical agitators, jets (pumps), shrouded axial impeller mixers (Flygt mixers), spargers, pulsed jet mixers, boiling, static mixers, falling films, liquid sprays, and thermal convection. This discussion will focus on mechanical agitators, jets, shrouded axial impeller mixers, spargers, and pulsed jet mixers, as these devices are most likely to be employed in Savannah River Site (SRS) Closure Business applications. In addressing mixing problems in the SRS Tank Farm, one must distinguish between different mixing objectives. These objectives include sludge mixing (e.g., Extended Sludge Processing), sludge retrieval (e.g., sludge transfers between tanks), heel retrieval (e.g., Tanks 18F and 19F), chemical reactions (e.g., oxalic acid neutralization) and salt dissolution. For example, one should not apply sludge mixing guidelines to heel removal applications. Mixing effectiveness is a function of both the mixing device (e.g., slurry pump, agitator, air sparger) and the properties of the material to be mixed (e.g., yield stress, viscosity, density, and particle size). The objective of this document is to provide background mixing knowledge for the SRS Closure Business Unit personnel and to provide general recommendations for mixing in SRS applications.

  6. How to Write and Use the Ontology Requirements Specification Document

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Figueroa, Mari Carmen; Gómez-Pérez, Asunción; Villazón-Terrazas, Boris

    The goal of the ontology requirements specification activity is to state why the ontology is being built, what its intended uses are, who the end-users are, and which requirements the ontology should fulfill. The novelty of this paper lies in the systematization of the ontology requirements specification activity since the paper proposes detailed methodological guidelines for specifying ontology requirements efficiently. These guidelines will help ontology engineers to capture ontology requirements and produce the ontology requirements specification document (ORSD). The ORSD will play a key role during the ontology development process because it facilitates, among other activities, (1) the search and reuse of existing knowledge-aware resources with the aim of re-engineering them into ontologies, (2) the search and reuse of existing ontological resources (ontologies, ontology modules, ontology statements as well as ontology design patterns), and (3) the verification of the ontology along the ontology development. In parallel to the guidelines, we present the ORSD that resulted from the ontology requirements specification activity within the SEEMP project, and how this document facilitated not only the reuse of existing knowledge-aware resources but also the verification of the SEEMP ontologies. Moreover, we present some use cases in which the methodological guidelines proposed here were applied.

  7. A Framework for RFID Survivability Requirement Analysis and Specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yanjun; Pimple, Malvika; Lande, Suhas

    Many industries are becoming dependent on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology for inventory management and asset tracking. The data collected about tagged objects though RFID is used in various high level business operations. The RFID system should hence be highly available, reliable, and dependable and secure. In addition, this system should be able to resist attacks and perform recovery in case of security incidents. Together these requirements give rise to the notion of a survivable RFID system. The main goal of this paper is to analyze and specify the requirements for an RFID system to become survivable. These requirements, if utilized, can assist the system in resisting against devastating attacks and recovering quickly from damages. This paper proposes the techniques and approaches for RFID survivability requirements analysis and specification. From the perspective of system acquisition and engineering, survivability requirement is the important first step in survivability specification, compliance formulation, and proof verification.

  8. Brief Report: the Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults (SRS-A): initial results in a German cohort.

    PubMed

    Bölte, Sven

    2012-09-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a tool for quantitative autism assessment in children and adolescents. The SRS-A addresses social responsiveness in adulthood. Reliability and validity using the German adaptation of the SRS-A was examined in 20 adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), 62 with other mental disorders (CLIN) and 163 typically developing (TD) participants. Cronbach's alpha ranged from .71 (TD) to .89 (ASD). A SRS-A total score of 67 had a sensitivity of .85, and a specificity of .83 for ASD versus CLIN/TD. Correlations with established autism scales (ADOS, AQ, SCQ) were moderate to high (r = .25-.83). Results provide adequate preliminary support for the application of the SRS-A.

  9. Treatability Variance Petition for SRS Raschig Ring Packing Material

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrom, T.

    1999-08-31

    The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) is a vital component in the nation's nuclear weapons complex. When in full operation, SRS produced nuclear material by manufacturing fuel and target components that were then irradiated in nuclear reactors.

  10. NSD1 duplication in Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS): molecular karyotyping in patients with SRS features.

    PubMed

    Sachwitz, J; Meyer, R; Fekete, G; Spranger, S; Matulevičienė, A; Kučinskas, V; Bach, A; Luczay, A; Brüchle, N O; Eggermann, K; Zerres, K; Elbracht, M; Eggermann, T

    2017-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a growth retardation syndrome characterized by intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, relative macrocephaly and protruding forehead, body asymmetry and feeding difficulties. Nearly 50% of cases show a hypomethylation in 11p15.5, in 10% maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 is present. A significant number of patients with SRS features also exhibit chromosomal aberrations. We analyzed 43 individuals referred for SRS genetic testing by molecular karyotyping. Pathogenic variants could be detected in five of them, including a NSD1 duplication in 5q35 and a 14q32 microdeletion. NSD1 deletions are detectable in overgrowth disorders (Sotos syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome), whereas NSD1 duplications are associated with growth retardation. The 14q32 deletion is typically associated with Temple syndrome (TS14), but the identification of a patient in our cohort reflects the clinical overlap between TS14 and SRS. As determination of molecular subtypes is the basis for a directed counseling and therapy, the identification of pathogenic variants in >10% of the total cohort of patients referred for SRS testing and in >16% of characteristic individuals with the characteristic SRS phenotype confirms the need to apply molecular karyotyping in this cohort. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. ENHANCED UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SRS COMPOSITE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.; Phifer, M.

    2011-06-30

    sand and clay), (b) Dose Parameters (34 parameters), (c) Material Properties (20 parameters), (d) Surface Water Flows (6 parameters), and (e) Vadose and Aquifer Flow (4 parameters). Results provided an assessment of which group of parameters is most significant in the dose uncertainty. It was found that K{sub d} and the vadose/aquifer flow parameters, both of which impact transport timing, had the greatest impact on dose uncertainty. Dose parameters had an intermediate level of impact while material properties and surface water flows had little impact on dose uncertainty. Results of the importance analysis are discussed further in Section 7 of this report. The objectives of this work were to address comments received during the CA review on the uncertainty analysis and to demonstrate an improved methodology for CA uncertainty calculations as part of CA maintenance. This report partially addresses the LFRG Review Team issue of producing an enhanced CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. This is described in Table 1-1 which provides specific responses to pertinent CA maintenance items extracted from Section 11 of the SRS CA (2009). As noted above, the original uncertainty analysis looked at each POA separately and only included the effects from at most five sources giving the highest peak doses at each POA. Only 17 of the 152 CA sources were used in the original uncertainty analysis and the simulation time was reduced from 10,000 to 2,000 years. A major constraint on the original uncertainty analysis was the limitation of only being able to use at most four distributed processes. This work expanded the analysis to 10,000 years using 39 of the CA sources, included cumulative dose effects at downstream POAs, with more realizations (1,000) and finer time steps. This was accomplished by using the GoldSim DP-Plus module and the 36 processors available on a new windows cluster. The last part of the work looked at the contribution to overall uncertainty from the main

  12. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SRS WASTE TANK OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-03-27

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on waste temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the Type-I Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing long-shaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The model will also be used to provide input to the operation planning. This planning will be used as input to pump run duration in order to maintain temperature requirements within the tank during SMP operation. The analysis model took a parametric approach. A series of the modeling analyses was performed to examine how submersible mixer pumps affect tank temperature during waste removal operation in the Type-I tank. The model domain included radioactive decay heat load, two SMP's, and one Submersible Transfer Pump (STP) as heat source terms. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%. Transient modeling calculations for two potential scenarios of sludge mixing and removal operations have been made to estimate transient waste temperatures within a Type-I waste tank. When two 200-HP submersible mixers and 12 active cooling coils are continuously operated in 100-in tank level and 40 C initial temperature for 40 days since the initiation of mixing operation, waste temperature rises about 9 C in 48 hours at a maximum. Sensitivity studies for the key operating variables were performed. The sensitivity results showed that the chromate cooling coil system provided the primary cooling mechanism to remove process

  13. Independent verification and validation of large software requirement specification databases

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1992-04-01

    To enhance quality, an independent verification and validation (IV V) review is conducted as software requirements are defined. Requirements are inspected for consistency and completeness. IV V strives to detect defects early in the software development life cycle and to prevent problems before they occur. The IV V review process of a massive software requirements specification, the Reserve Component Automation System (RCAS) Functional Description (FD) is explored. Analysis of the RCAS FD error history determined that there are no predictors of errors. The size of the FD mandates electronic analysis of the databases. Software which successfully performs automated consistency and completeness checks is discussed. The process of verifying the quality of analysis software is described. The use of intuitive ad hoc techniques, in addition to the automatic analysis of the databases, is required because of the varying content of the requirements databases. The ad hoc investigation process is discussed. Case studies are provided to illustrate how the process works. This thesis demonstrates that it is possible to perform an IV V review on a massive software requirements specification. Automatic analysis enables inspecting for completeness and consistency. The work with the RCAS FD clearly indicates that the IV V review process is not static; it must continually grow, adapt, and change as conditions warrant. The ad hoc investigation process provides this required flexibility This process also analyzes errors discovered by manual review and automatic processing. The analysis results in the development of new algorithms and the addition of new programs to the automatic inspection software.

  14. Transforming Multidisciplinary Customer Requirements to Product Design Specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiao-Jie; Ding, Guo-Fu; Qin, Sheng-Feng; Li, Rong; Yan, Kai-Yin; Xiao, Shou-Ne; Yang, Guang-Wu

    2017-09-01

    With the increasing of complexity of complex mechatronic products, it is necessary to involve multidisciplinary design teams, thus, the traditional customer requirements modeling for a single discipline team becomes difficult to be applied in a multidisciplinary team and project since team members with various disciplinary backgrounds may have different interpretations of the customers' requirements. A new synthesized multidisciplinary customer requirements modeling method is provided for obtaining and describing the common understanding of customer requirements (CRs) and more importantly transferring them into a detailed and accurate product design specifications (PDS) to interact with different team members effectively. A case study of designing a high speed train verifies the rationality and feasibility of the proposed multidisciplinary requirement modeling method for complex mechatronic product development. This proposed research offersthe instruction to realize the customer-driven personalized customization of complex mechatronic product.

  15. 18 CFR 12.35 - Specific inspection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Specific inspection requirements. 12.35 Section 12.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS...

  16. 18 CFR 12.35 - Specific inspection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Specific inspection requirements. 12.35 Section 12.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS...

  17. 18 CFR 12.35 - Specific inspection requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Specific inspection requirements. 12.35 Section 12.35 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT SAFETY OF WATER POWER PROJECTS...

  18. 14 CFR 145.5 - Certificate and operations specifications requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certificate and operations specifications requirements. 145.5 Section 145.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS General § 145.5...

  19. 19 CFR 134.42 - Specific method may be required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Specific method may be required. 134.42 Section 134.42 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN MARKING Method and Location of Marking Imported Articles §...

  20. 19 CFR 134.42 - Specific method may be required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Specific method may be required. 134.42 Section 134.42 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN MARKING Method and Location of Marking Imported Articles §...

  1. 49 CFR 178.35 - General requirements for specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Inspections and analyses. Chemical analyses and tests required by this subchapter must be made within the...) Obtaining samples for all tests and check chemical analyses (Note: Recommended locations for test specimens... specific construction design.); (v) Witnessing all tests; (vi) Verify threads by gauge; (vii)...

  2. 40 CFR 35.3135 - Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements. 35.3135 Section 35.3135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35...

  3. 40 CFR 35.3135 - Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements. 35.3135 Section 35.3135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35...

  4. 40 CFR 35.3135 - Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements. 35.3135 Section 35.3135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35...

  5. 40 CFR 35.3135 - Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements. 35.3135 Section 35.3135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35...

  6. 40 CFR 35.3135 - Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specific capitalization grant agreement requirements. 35.3135 Section 35.3135 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE State Water Pollution Control Revolving Funds § 35...

  7. Information Requirements Specification II: Brainstorming Collective Decision-Making Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telem, Moshe

    1988-01-01

    Information requirements specification (IRS) constitutes an Achilles heel in the system life cycle of management information systems. This article establishes a systematic overall IRS technique applicable to organizations of all types and sizes. The technique's integration of brainstorming and theory Z principles creates an effective, stimulating,…

  8. 30 CFR 23.7 - Specific requirements for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Specific requirements for approval. 23.7 Section 23.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... outside of the compartment, of not less than 1 inch if the unoccupied volume (air space) in the...

  9. 7 CFR 1753.6 - Standards, specifications, and general requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... prior to purchase or commencement of construction. (c) Only new materials and equipment may be financed... General § 1753.6 Standards, specifications, and general requirements. (a) Materials, equipment, and.... Materials and equipment meeting these standards are included on the List of Material Acceptable for Use on...

  10. 24 CFR 1003.302 - Project specific threshold requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Project specific threshold requirements. 1003.302 Section 1003.302 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  11. 49 CFR 179.201-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual specification requirements. 179.201-1 Section 179.201-1 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  12. Groundwater Monitoring Optimization of Post Closure Waste Sites at SRS - 13184

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Jeff; O'Quinn, Sadika; Adams, Karen; Prater, Phil

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater monitoring at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is required at dozens of waste sites and includes sampling at over 1,000 monitoring wells. The expected longevity of groundwater contamination and associated groundwater monitoring and reporting constitutes a significant long-term cost that represents an increasing proportion of the environmental management budget as surface waste units are closed. Therefore, a comprehensive evaluation of the monitoring program for eighteen regulated waste units was conducted to identify areas where monitoring could be optimized. The units evaluated varied considerably in the scope of monitoring; ranging from two wells to hundreds of wells. In order to systematically evaluate such disparate monitoring networks, SRS developed a decision-logic analysis using flow sheets to address potential areas of optimization. Five areas were identified for evaluation, including: (1) Comparison of current monitoring to regulatory requirements, (2) Spatial distribution, (3) Temporal sampling, (4) Analyte requirements, and (5) Reporting frequency and content. Optimization recommendations were made for fifteen of the eighteen groundwater units. The spatial evaluation resulted in recommendations to suspend sampling in 79 wells and add sampling at 16 wells. The temporal evaluation resulted in recommendations to reduce the number of well visits per year by 504. Analyte reductions were recommended at three groundwater units, with increases at three other units. Reporting frequency reductions were recommended for five units. Approximately $700,000 (direct dollars) of potential annualized cost savings were identified for these groundwater units, provided all recommendations are approved. The largest area of savings was associated with reducing the reporting frequency. The optimization approach has been presented to the EPA and South Carolina Department of Environmental Control (SCHDEC), with unit-specific recommendations approved for all five units

  13. Teaching with Student Response Systems (SRS): Teacher-Centric Aspects that Can Negatively Affect Students' Experience of Using SRS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Kjetil L.; Hansen, Gabrielle; Stav, John B.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe and discuss the most significant teacher-centric aspects of student response systems (SRS) that we have found to negatively affect students' experience of using SRS in lecture settings. By doing so, we hope to increase teachers' awareness of how they use SRS and how seemingly trivial choices or aspects when using SRS…

  14. Draft Geologic Disposal Requirements Basis for STAD Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Bryan, Charles R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-03-25

    This document provides the basis for requirements in the current version of Performance Specification for Standardized Transportation, Aging, and Disposal Canister Systems, (FCRD-NFST-2014-0000579) that are driven by storage and geologic disposal considerations. Performance requirements for the Standardized Transportation, Aging, and Disposal (STAD) canister are given in Section 3.1 of that report. Here, the requirements are reviewed and the rationale for each provided. Note that, while FCRD-NFST-2014-0000579 provides performance specifications for other components of the STAD storage system (e.g. storage overpack, transfer and transportation casks, and others), these have no impact on the canister performance during disposal, and are not discussed here.

  15. Repackaging SRS Black Box TRU Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Swale, D. J.; Stone, K.A.; Milner, T. N.

    2006-01-09

    Historically, large items of TRU Waste, which were too large to be packaged in drums for disposal have been packaged in various sizes of custom made plywood boxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS), for many years. These boxes were subsequently packaged into large steel ''Black Boxes'' for storage at SRS, pending availability of Characterization and Certification capability, to facilitate disposal of larger items of TRU Waste. There are approximately 107 Black Boxes in inventory at SRS, each measuring some 18' x 12' x 7', and weighing up to 45,000 lbs. These Black Boxes have been stored since the early 1980s. The project to repackage this waste into Standard Large Boxes (SLBs), Standard Waste Boxes (SWB) and Ten Drum Overpacks (TDOP), for subsequent characterization and WIPP disposal, commenced in FY04. To date, 10 Black Boxes have been repackaged, resulting in 40 SLB-2's, and 37 B25 overpack boxes, these B25's will be overpacked in SLB-2's prior to shipping to WIPP. This paper will describe experience to date from this project.

  16. SRS environmental air surveillance program 1954-2015: General trends

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, K.; Jannik, T.

    2016-06-02

    The radiological monitoring program at SRS was established under the DuPont Company in June 1951 and was used as a measurement of the effectiveness of plant controls and as an authoritative record of environmental conditions surrounding the plant. It also served as a method of demonstrating compliance with applicable federal regulations and guidance. This document serves as a general summary of changes made specifically to the environmental air monitoring program since its inception, and a discussion of the general trends seen in the air monitoring program at SRS from 1954 to 2015. Initially, the environmental air surveillance program focused not only on releases from SRS but also on fallout from various weapons testing performed through the end of 1978. Flypaper was used to measure the amount of fallout in the atmosphere during this period, and was present at each of the 10 monitoring stations. By 1959, all site stacks were included in the air monitoring program to determine their contribution to the airborne radioactivity onsite, and the number of air surveillance samplers rose to 18. This trend of an increased number of sampling locations continued to a peak of 35 sampling locations before shifting to a downward trend in the mid-1990s. In 1962, 4 outer-range samplers were placed in Savannah and Macon, GA, and in Greenville and Columbia, SC. Until 1976, air samplers were simply placed around the perimeter of the various operation locations (after 1959, this included stacks to determine their contribution to the airborne radioactivity), with the intent of creating as representative a distribution as possible of the air surrounding operations.

  17. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopic OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Zhou, Kevin C.; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables non-invasive, high-resolution, tomographic imaging of biological tissues by leveraging principles of low coherence interferometry; however, OCT lacks molecular specificity. Spectroscopic OCT (SOCT) overcomes this limitation by providing depth-resolved spectroscopic signatures of chromophores, but SOCT has been limited to a couple of endogenous molecules, namely hemoglobin and melanin. Stimulated Raman scattering, on the other hand, can provide highly specific molecular information of many endogenous species, but lacks the spatial and spectral multiplexing capabilities of SOCT. In this work we integrate the two methods, SRS and SOCT, to enable simultaneously multiplexed spatial and spectral imaging with sensitivity to many endogenous biochemical species that play an important role in biology and medicine. The method, termed SRS-SOCT, has the potential to achieve fast, volumetric, and highly sensitive label-free molecular imaging, which would be valuable for many applications. We demonstrate the approach by imaging excised human adipose tissue and detecting the lipids' Raman signatures in the high-wavenumber region. Details of this method along with validations and results will be presented.

  18. Liver-specific activities of FGF19 require Klotho beta.

    PubMed

    Lin, Benjamin C; Wang, Manping; Blackmore, Craig; Desnoyers, Luc R

    2007-09-14

    Hepatocyte function is regulated by members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of proteins, but little is known about the specific molecular mechanisms of this endocrine pathway. FGF19 regulates bile acid homeostasis and gall bladder filling; FGF19 binds only to FGF receptor 4 (FGFR4), but its liver-specific activity cannot be explained solely by the distribution of this receptor. Although it has been suggested that Klotho beta (KLB) may have a role in mediating FGF19 activity, we have provided for the first time definitive evidence that KLB is required for FGF19 binding to FGFR4, intracellular signaling, and downstream modulation of gene expression. We have shown that FGFR4 is widely distributed in mouse, whereas KLB distribution is more restricted. Liver was the only organ in which both genes were abundantly expressed. We show that in mice, FGF19 injection triggers liver-specific induction of c-Fos and repression of CYP7A1. The tissue-specific activity of FGF19 supports the unique intersection of KLB and FGFR4 distribution in liver. These studies define KLB as a novel FGFR4 coreceptor required for FGF19 liver specific functions.

  19. Rationale for windshield glass system specification requirements for shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashida, K.; King, G. L.; Tesinsiky, J.; Wittenburg, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary procurement specification for the space shuttle orbiter windshield pane, and some of the design considerations and rationale leading to its development are presented. The windshield designer is given the necessary methods and procedures for assuring glass pane structural integrity by proof test. These methods and procedures are fully developed for annealed and thermally tempered aluminosilicate, borosilicate, and soda lime glass and for annealed fused silica. Application of the method to chemically tempered glass is considered. Other considerations are vision requirements, protection against bird impact, hail, frost, rain, and meteoroids. The functional requirements of the windshield system during landing, ferrying, boost, space flight, and entry are included.

  20. An iterative requirements specification procedure for decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Brookes, C H

    1987-08-01

    Requirements specification is a key element in a DSS development project because it not only determines what is to be done, it also drives the evolution process. A procedure for requirements elicitation is described that is based on the decomposition of the DSS design task into a number of functions, subfunctions, and operators. It is postulated that the procedure facilitates the building of a DSS that is complete and integrates MIS, modelling and expert system components. Some examples given are drawn from the health administration field.

  1. Software requirements: Guidance and control software development specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward; Rich, Don C.; Lowman, Douglas S.; Buckland, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The software requirements for an implementation of Guidance and Control Software (GCS) are specified. The purpose of the GCS is to provide guidance and engine control to a planetary landing vehicle during its terminal descent onto a planetary surface and to communicate sensory information about that vehicle and its descent to some receiving device. The specification was developed using the structured analysis for real time system specification methodology by Hatley and Pirbhai and was based on a simulation program used to study the probability of success of the 1976 Viking Lander missions to Mars. Three versions of GCS are being generated for use in software error studies.

  2. Independent verification and validation of large software requirement specification databases

    SciTech Connect

    Twitchell, Kevin E.

    1992-04-01

    To enhance quality, an independent verification and validation (IV&V) review is conducted as software requirements are defined. Requirements are inspected for consistency and completeness. IV&V strives to detect defects early in the software development life cycle and to prevent problems before they occur. The IV&V review process of a massive software requirements specification, the Reserve Component Automation System (RCAS) Functional Description (FD) is explored. Analysis of the RCAS FD error history determined that there are no predictors of errors. The size of the FD mandates electronic analysis of the databases. Software which successfully performs automated consistency and completeness checks is discussed. The process of verifying the quality of analysis software is described. The use of intuitive ad hoc techniques, in addition to the automatic analysis of the databases, is required because of the varying content of the requirements databases. The ad hoc investigation process is discussed. Case studies are provided to illustrate how the process works. This thesis demonstrates that it is possible to perform an IV&V review on a massive software requirements specification. Automatic analysis enables inspecting for completeness and consistency. The work with the RCAS FD clearly indicates that the IV&V review process is not static; it must continually grow, adapt, and change as conditions warrant. The ad hoc investigation process provides this required flexibility This process also analyzes errors discovered by manual review and automatic processing. The analysis results in the development of new algorithms and the addition of new programs to the automatic inspection software.

  3. Military Specification: Mobility, Towed Aerospace Ground Equipment General Requirements for.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-02-01

    Seven Conductor Electrical Connector for Truck Trailer Jumper Cable J585 Tail Lamps (Rear Position Light) J586 Stop Lamps J588 Turn Signal Lamps J592...Wiring: NOTE: Normally not required for Groups A, B, and C items; equipment specification. Lighting Complete Complete Turn signals Yes Yes Voltage 12V...J585 Turn signals SAE J588, class A. 3.11.2 Vehicles less than 80 inches wide. Items less than 80 inches wide shall contain the lighting devices, and

  4. Risk impact of BWR technical specifications requirements during shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Staple, B.D.; Kirk, H.K.; Yakle, J.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents an application of probabilistic models and risk based criteria for determining the risk impact of the Limiting Conditions of Operations (LCOs) in the Technical Specifications (TSs) of a boiling water reactor during shutdown. This analysis studied the risk impact of the current requirements of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) and Surveillance Test Intervals (STIs) in eight Plant Operational States (POSs) which encompass power operations, shutdown, and refueling. This report also discusses insights concerning TS action statements.

  5. Analyzing Tabular and State-Transition Requirements Specifications in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owre, Sam; Rushby, John; Shankar, Natarajan

    1997-01-01

    We describe PVS's capabilities for representing tabular specifications of the kind advocated by Parnas and others, and show how PVS's Type Correctness Conditions (TCCs) are used to ensure certain well-formedness properties. We then show how these and other capabilities of PVS can be used to represent the AND/OR tables of Leveson and the Decision Tables of Sherry, and we demonstrate how PVS's TCCs can expose and help isolate errors in the latter. We extend this approach to represent the mode transition tables of the Software Cost Reduction (SCR) method in an attractive manner. We show how PVS can check these tables for well-formedness, and how PVS's model checking capabilities can be used to verify invariants and reachability properties of SCR requirements specifications, and inclusion relations between the behaviors of different specifications. These examples demonstrate how several capabilities of the PVS language and verification system can be used in combination to provide customized support for specific methodologies for documenting and analyzing requirements. Because they use only the standard capabilities of PVS, users can adapt and extend these customizations to suit their own needs. Those developing dedicated tools for individual methodologies may find these constructions in PVS helpful for prototyping purposes, or as a useful adjunct to a dedicated tool when the capabilities of a full theorem prover are required. The examples also illustrate the power and utility of an integrated general-purpose system such as PVS. For example, there was no need to adapt or extend the PVS model checker to make it work with SCR specifications described using the PVS TABLE construct: the model checker is applicable to any transition relation, independently of the PVS language constructs used in its definition.

  6. The method to divide a sentence of requirement into individual requirements and the development of requirement specification editor which can describe individual requirements.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kuniya; Ooba, Masahiro; Takagi, Tomohiko; Furukawa, Zengo; Komiya, Seiichi; Yaegashi, Rihito

    2013-12-01

    Agile software development gains requirements from the direct discussion with customers and the development staff each time, and the customers evaluate the appropriateness of the requirement. If the customers divide the complicated requirement into individual requirements, the engineer who is in charge of software development can understand it easily. This is called division of requirement. However, the customers do not understand how much and how to divide the requirements. This paper proposes the method to divide a complicated requirement into individual requirements. Also, it shows the development of requirement specification editor which can describe individual requirements. The engineer who is in charge of software development can understand requirements easily.

  7. Review of seismicity and ground motion studies related to development of seismic design at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, D.E.; Acree, J.R.

    1992-08-01

    The NRC response spectra developed in Reg. Guide 1.60 is being used in the studies related to restarting of the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors. Because it envelopes all the other site specific spectra which have been developed for SRS, it provides significant conservatism in the design and analysis of the reactor systems for ground motions of this value or with these probability levels. This spectral shape is also the shape used for the design of the recently licensed Vogtle Nuclear Station, located south of the Savannah River from the SRS. This report provides a summary of the data base used to develop the design basis earthquake. This includes the seismicity, rates of occurrence, magnitudes, and attenuation relationships. A summary is provided for the studies performed and methodologies used to establish the design basis earthquake for SRS. The ground motion response spectra developed from the various studies are also summarized. The seismic hazard and PGA`s developed for other critical facilities in the region are discussed, and the SRS seismic instrumentation is presented. The programs for resolving outstanding issues are discussed and conclusions are presented.

  8. Summary of the SRS Severe Accident Analysis Program, 1987--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.A.; Hyder, M.L.; Britt, T.E.; Allison, D.K.; Chow, S.; Graves, R.D.; DeWald, A.B. Jr.; Monson, P.R. Jr.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-11-01

    The Severe Accident Analysis Program (SAAP) is a program of experimental and analytical studies aimed at characterizing severe accidents that might occur in the Savannah River Site Production Reactors. The goals of the Severe Accident Analysis Program are: To develop an understanding of severe accidents in SRS reactors that is adequate to support safety documentation for these reactors, including the Safety Analysis Report (SAR), the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and other studies evaluating the safety of reactor operation; To provide tools and bases for the evaluation of existing or proposed safety related equipment in the SRS reactors; To provide bases for the development of accident management procedures for the SRS reactors; To develop and maintain on the site a sufficient body of knowledge, including documents, computer codes, and cognizant engineers and scientists, that can be used to authoritatively resolve questions or issues related to reactor accidents. The Severe Accident Analysis Program was instituted in 1987 and has already produced a substantial amount of information, and specialized calculational tools. Products of the Severe Accident Analysis Program (listed in Section 9 of this report) have been used in the development of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and the Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), and in the development of technical specifications for the SRS reactors. A staff of about seven people is currently involved directly in the program and in providing input on severe accidents to other SRS activities.

  9. JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-07-05

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline

  10. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L.

    1993-03-01

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and {sup 137}Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

  11. Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Savannah River Site (SRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.; Morris, S.C.; Pardi, R.; Sun, C. ); Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.; McKone, T.E.; Straume, T.; Anspaugh, L. )

    1993-03-01

    An assessment of the health risks was made for releases of tritium and [sup 137]Cs from the Savannah River Site (SRS) at water-receptor locations downriver. Although reactor operations were shut down at the SRS in 1989, liquid wastes continue to be released to the Savannah River either by direct discharges into onsite surface waters or by groundwater transport into surface waters from waste facilities. Existing state mandates will cause the liquid waste streams from future operations to go directly into surface waters. Two drinking water processing plants take water from the river approximately 129 km downriver from the SRS. Potential incremental risks of cancer fatality to individuals and each population were analyzed for either no further reactor operations or resumption of operation of one specific reactor.

  12. Thermodynamic Modeling of the SRS Evaporators: Part II. The 3H System

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2001-10-02

    Accumulations of two solid phases have formed scale deposits in the Savannah River Site 2H Evaporator system since late 1996. The aluminosilicate scale deposits caused the evaporator pot to become inoperable in October 1999. Accumulations of the diuranate phase have caused criticality concerns in the SRS 2H Evaporator. In order to ensure that similar deposits are not and will not form in the SRS 3H Evaporator, thermodynamically derived activity diagrams specific to the feeds processed from Tanks 30 and 32 are evaluated in this report.

  13. Requirements specification for nickel cadmium battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The requirements for performance, design, test, and qualification of a computer program identified as NICBES, Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System, is established. The specific spacecraft power system configuration selected was the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Electrical Power System (EPS) Testbed. Power for the HST comes from a system of 13 Solar Panel Arrays (SPAs) linked to 6 Nickel Cadmium Batteries which are connected to 3 Busses. An expert system, NICBES, will be developed at Martin Marietta Aerospace to recognize a testbed anomaly, identify the malfunctioning component and recommend a course of action. Besides fault diagnosis, NICBES will be able to evaluate battery status, give advice on battery status and provide decision support for the operator. These requirements are detailed.

  14. Reengineering DOD-STD-2167A Requirements Specifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    DTIC1111111111111111101111" ELECT E ’•S SEP 1 6 1994 FINAL REPORT REENGINEERING DOD- STD -2167A REQUIREMENTS SPECIFICATIONS CONTRACT N00014-92.C.0242 OFFICE OF...Dist Special Canwacg Number N00014-92-C0242 Fna Report Reuglomeegtug DOD- STD -2167A Requirhmais SpecOmladom 1. INTRODUCTION This is the Final Report...under contract N00014-92-C-0242. This contract covered work in two steps: 1. Design of the automatic system for generating DoD- STD -2167A Software

  15. Incubator Display Software Cost Reduction Toolset Software Requirements Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Susanne; Jeffords, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    The Incubator Display Software Requirements Specification was initially developed by Intrinsyx Technologies Corporation (Intrinsyx) under subcontract to Lockheed Martin, Contract Number NAS2-02090, for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center (ARC) Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP). The Incubator Display is a User Payload Application (UPA) used to control an Incubator subrack payload for the SSBRP. The Incubator Display functions on-orbit as part of the subrack payload laptop, on the ground as part of the Communication and Data System (CDS) ground control system, and also as part of the crew training environment.

  16. Energy storage specification requirements for hybrid-electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, A.F.

    1993-09-01

    A study has been made of energy storage unit requirements for hybrid-electric vehicles. The drivelines for these vehicles included both primary energy storage units and/or pulse power units. The primary energy storage units were sized to provide ``primary energy`` ranges up to 60 km. The total power capability of the drivelines were such that the vehicles had 0 to 100 km/h acceleration times of 10 to 12 s. The power density requirements for primary energy storage devices to be used in hybrid vehicles are much higher than that for devices to be used in electric vehicles. The energy density and power density requirements for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles, are not much different than those in an electric vehicle. The cycle life requirements for primary energy-storage units for hybrid vehicles are about double that for electric vehicles, because of the reduced size of the storage units in the hybrid vehicles. The cycle life for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles is about the same as for electric vehicles having battery load leveling. Because of the need for additional components in the hybrid driveline, the cost of the energy storage units in hybrid vehicles should be much less (at least a factor of two) than those in electric vehicles. There are no presently available energy storage units that meet all the specifications for hybrid vehicle applications, but ultracapacitors and bipolar lead-acid batteries are under development that have the potential for meeting them. If flywheel systems having a mechanical system energy density of 40 to 50 W{center_dot}h/kg and an electrical system power density of 2 to 3 kw/kg can be developed, they would have the potential of meeting specifications for primary storage and pulse power units.

  17. Energy storage specification requirements for hybrid-electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. F.

    1993-09-01

    A study has been made of energy storage unit requirements for hybrid-electric vehicles. The drivelines for these vehicles included both primary energy storage units and/or pulse power units. The primary energy storage units were sized to provide 'primary energy' ranges up to 60 km. The total power capability of the drivelines were such that the vehicles had 0 to 100 km/h acceleration times of 10 to 12 s. The power density requirements for primary energy storage devices to be used in hybrid vehicles are much higher than that for devices to be used in electric vehicles. The energy density and power density requirements for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles, are not much different than those in an electric vehicle. The cycle life requirements for primary energy-storage units for hybrid vehicles are about double that for electric vehicles, because of the reduced size of the storage units in the hybrid vehicles. The cycle life for pulse-power devices for hybrid vehicles is about the same as for electric vehicles having battery load leveling. Because of the need for additional components in the hybrid driveline, the cost of the energy storage units in hybrid vehicles should be much less (at least a factor of two) than those in electric vehicles. There are no presently available energy storage units that meet all the specifications for hybrid vehicle applications, but ultracapacitors and bipolar lead-acid batteries are under development that have the potential for meeting them. If flywheel systems having a mechanical system energy density of 40 to 50 W(center dot)h/kg and an electrical system power density of 2 to 3 kw/kg can be developed, they would have the potential of meeting specifications for primary storage and pulse power units.

  18. Development of SRS.php, a Simple Object Access Protocol-based library for data acquisition from integrated biological databases.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Silva, A; Pafilis, E; Ortega, J M; Schneider, R

    2007-12-11

    Data integration has become an important task for biological database providers. The current model for data exchange among different sources simplifies the manner that distinct information is accessed by users. The evolution of data representation from HTML to XML enabled programs, instead of humans, to interact with biological databases. We present here SRS.php, a PHP library that can interact with the data integration Sequence Retrieval System (SRS). The library has been written using SOAP definitions, and permits the programmatic communication through webservices with the SRS. The interactions are possible by invoking the methods described in WSDL by exchanging XML messages. The current functions available in the library have been built to access specific data stored in any of the 90 different databases (such as UNIPROT, KEGG and GO) using the same query syntax format. The inclusion of the described functions in the source of scripts written in PHP enables them as webservice clients to the SRS server. The functions permit one to query the whole content of any SRS database, to list specific records in these databases, to get specific fields from the records, and to link any record among any pair of linked databases. The case study presented exemplifies the library usage to retrieve information regarding registries of a Plant Defense Mechanisms database. The Plant Defense Mechanisms database is currently being developed, and the proposal of SRS.php library usage is to enable the data acquisition for the further warehousing tasks related to its setup and maintenance.

  19. Radiological effects of SRS operations, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, L.R.

    1989-10-25

    A discussion of the offsite effective dose equivalents reported for 1988 SRS releases serves as the basis for this report. Detailed analyses of atmospheric and liquid release trends and their consequences in terms of relative importance among facilities, radionuclides, and exposure pathways have also been included. Releases of radioactivity to the atmosphere were generally lower in 1988 than in 1987. No major unplanned tritium releases were recorded during the year. However, there were three inadvertent releases of Pu-238 from F Area in January, March and October of 160, 32 and 83 uCi, respectively. Radioactive releases to onsite streams from direct discharges and seepage basin migration decreased in 1988. However, as a result of a decrease in the flow rate of the Savannah River in 1988, higher offsite doses were reported. The maximum individual dose, conversely, was down from 1987. This decrease reflected the fact that the maximum individual dose is most significantly affected by the cesium concentration in fish. In terms of largest contributors to dose, the releases were dominated by tritium, Cs-137 and to a much lesser extent Sr-90. With respect to the offsite population, doses from atmospheric releases are generally higher than those from liquid releases, and this trend continued in 1988. Analyses of 1988 data and the data for the preceding decade suggest that radioactive releases from the SRS during this period have not significantly impacted the offsite population.

  20. SRS baseline hydrogeologic investigation: Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Bledsoe, H.W.; Aadland, R.K.; Sargent, K.A.

    1990-11-01

    Work on the Savannah River Site (SRS) Baseline Hydrogeologic Investigation began in 1983 when it was determined that the knowledge of the plant hydrogeologic systems needed to be expanded and improved in response to changing stratigraphic and hydrostratigraphic terminology and increased involvement by regulatory agencies (Bledsoe, 1984). Additionally, site-wide data were needed to determine flow paths, gradients, and velocities associated with the different aquifers underlying the plant site. The program was divided into three phases in order to allow the results of one phase to be evaluated and necessary changes and improvements incorporated into the following phases. This report summarizes the results of all three phases and includes modified graphic logs, lithologic descriptions of the different geologic formations, profiles of each cluster site, hydrostratigraphic cross sections, hydrographs of selected wells within each cluster for the first full year of uninterrupted water level measurements, potentiometric maps developed from data collected from all clusters, completion diagrams for each well, and a summary of laboratory tests. Additionally, the proposed new classification of hydrostratigraphic units at SRS (Aadland and Bledsoe, 1990) has been incorporated.

  1. SRS stainless steel beneficial reuse program

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.L.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) has thousands of tons of stainless steel radioactive scrap metal (RSNI). Much of the metal is volumetrically contaminated. There is no {open_quotes}de minimis{close_quotes} free release level for volumetric material, and therefore no way to recycle the metal into the normal commercial market. If declared waste, the metal would qualify as low level radioactive waste (LLW) and ultimately be dispositioned through shallow land buried at a cost of millions of dollars. The metal however could be recycled in a {open_quotes}controlled release{close_quote} manner, in the form of containers to hold other types of radioactive waste. This form of recycle is generally referred to as {open_quotes}Beneficial Reuse{close_quotes}. Beneficial reuse reduces the amount of disposal space needed and reduces the need for virgin containers which would themselves become contaminated. Stainless steel is particularly suited for long term storage because of its resistance to corrosion. To assess the practicality of stainless steel RSM recycle the SRS Benficial Reuse Program began a demonstration in 1994, funded by the DOE Office of Science and Technology. This paper discusses the experiences gained in this program.

  2. Software Requirements Specification for Lunar IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser-Garbrick, Michael R.

    Lunar IceCube is a 6U satellite that will orbit the moon to measure water volatiles as a function of position, altitude, and time, and measure in its various phases. Lunar IceCube, is a collaboration between Morehead State University, Vermont Technical University, Busek, and NASA. The Software Requirements Specification will serve as contract between the overall team and the developers of the flight software. It will provide a system's overview of the software that will be developed for Lunar IceCube, in that it will detail all of the interconnects and protocols for each subsystem's that Lunar IceCube will utilize. The flight software will be written in SPARK to the fullest extent, due to SPARK's unique ability to make software free of any errors. The LIC flight software does make use of a general purpose, reusable application framework called CubedOS. This framework imposes some structuring requirements on the architecture and design of the flight software, but it does not impose any high level requirements. It will also detail the tools that we will be using for Lunar IceCube, such as why we will be utilizing VxWorks.

  3. Specific Nucleoporin Requirement for Smad Nuclear Translocation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaochu; Xu, Lan

    2010-01-01

    Cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of Smad is a fundamental step in transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signal transduction. Here we identify a subset of nucleoporins that, in conjunction with Msk (Drosophila Imp7/8), specifically mediate activation-induced nuclear translocation of MAD (Drosophila Smad1) but not the constitutive import of proteins harboring a classic nuclear localization signal (cNLS) or the spontaneous nuclear import of Medea (Drosophila Smad4). Surprisingly, many of these nucleoporins, including Sec13, Nup75, Nup93, and Nup205, are scaffold nucleoporins considered important for the overall integrity of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) but not known to have cargo-specific functions. We demonstrate that the roles of these nucleoporins in supporting Smad nuclear import are separate from their previously assigned functions in NPC assembly. Furthermore, we uncovered novel pathway-specific functions of Sec13 and Nup93; both Sec13 and Nup93 are able to preferentially interact with the phosphorylated/activated form of MAD, and Nup93 acts to recruit the importin Msk to the nuclear periphery. These findings, together with the observation that Sec13 and Nup93 could interact directly with Msk, suggest their direct involvement in the nuclear import of MAD. Thus, we have delineated the nucleoporin requirement of MAD nuclear import, reflecting a unique trans-NPC mechanism. PMID:20547758

  4. Alloy 800 specifications in compliance with component requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, H.; Bodmann, E.

    1990-04-01

    In view of the importance of the material Alloy 800 in high-temperature reactor plants (HTR), a material data bank was established which is used for statistical evaluation of mechanical and physical material behaviour. Based on investigations on the interconnection between the mechanical properties at high temperatures and the metallurgical parameters, different types of Alloy 800 were specified in compliance with the component requirements. In addition, aspects of corrosion and toughness behaviour were taken into consideration. The specifications and strength characteristics for the different variants of Alloy 800 were incorporated into draft DIN standards after discussion and approval in expert committees. Further important characteristics of the mechanical and physical material behaviour were summarized in HTR material data sheets so as to furnish an improved basis for the design and stress analyses of Alloy 800 components.

  5. CRISPR Immunological Memory Requires a Host Factor for Specificity.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, James K; Bai, Lawrence; Harrington, Lucas B; Hinder, Tracey L; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-06-16

    Bacteria and archaea employ adaptive immunity against foreign genetic elements using CRISPR-Cas systems. To generate immunological memory, the Cas1-Cas2 protein complex captures 30-40 base pair segments of foreign DNA and catalyzes their integration into the host genome as unique spacer sequences. Although spacers are inserted strictly at the A-T-rich leader end of CRISPR loci in vivo, the molecular mechanism of leader-specific spacer integration remains poorly understood. Here we show that the E. coli integration host factor (IHF) protein is required for spacer acquisition in vivo and for integration into linear DNA in vitro. IHF binds to the leader sequence and induces a sharp DNA bend, allowing the Cas1-Cas2 integrase to catalyze the first integration reaction at the leader-repeat border. Together, these results reveal that Cas1-Cas2-mediated spacer integration requires IHF-induced target DNA bending and explain the elusive role of CRISPR leader sequences during spacer acquisition.

  6. Assessment of SRS ambient air monitoring network

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, K.; Jannik, T.

    2016-08-03

    Three methodologies have been used to assess the effectiveness of the existing ambient air monitoring system in place at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Effectiveness was measured using two metrics that have been utilized in previous quantification of air-monitoring network performance; frequency of detection (a measurement of how frequently a minimum number of samplers within the network detect an event), and network intensity (a measurement of how consistent each sampler within the network is at detecting events). In addition to determining the effectiveness of the current system, the objective of performing this assessment was to determine what, if any, changes could make the system more effective. Methodologies included 1) the Waite method of determining sampler distribution, 2) the CAP88- PC annual dose model, and 3) a puff/plume transport model used to predict air concentrations at sampler locations. Data collected from air samplers at SRS in 2015 compared with predicted data resulting from the methodologies determined that the frequency of detection for the current system is 79.2% with sampler efficiencies ranging from 5% to 45%, and a mean network intensity of 21.5%. One of the air monitoring stations had an efficiency of less than 10%, and detected releases during just one sampling period of the entire year, adding little to the overall network intensity. By moving or removing this sampler, the mean network intensity increased to about 23%. Further work in increasing the network intensity and simulating accident scenarios to further test the ambient air system at SRS is planned

  7. Significance of Soft Zone Sediments at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Aadland, R.K.

    2000-02-03

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on the origin, extent and stability of ''soft zones'' in the carbonate bearing strata at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As part of this study, a comprehensive historical compendium of how soft zones have been addressed during the past 47 years at SRS is reviewed.

  8. SRS generation and amplification of femtosecond pulses in compressed gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, Victor G.; Efimov, Yuri N.; Staselko, Dmitry I.; Krylov, Vitaly N.; Ollikainen, Olavi; Wild, Urs P.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2000-02-01

    We present the review of femtosecond SRS generation and amplification in compressed gases. the aim of our work is to study SRS spectral and temporal structures in compressed gases with femtosecond light pulses and to optimize conditions of excitation in order to obtain pulses with the desired spectral, temporal, and energy properties. In what follows, we present the result of our studies of SRS amplification in compressed hydrogen pumped by femtosecond pluses of the second harmonic of radiation of a titanium- doped sapphire laser. Our aim was to estimate the feasibility of increasing efficiency of SRS conversion and the potentialities of using transient SRS for spectral-time selection and amplification of weak signals.

  9. Requirements for species-specific papovavirus DNA replication.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, E R; Naujokas, M; Hassell, J A

    1989-01-01

    Replication of papovavirus DNA requires a functional replication origin, a virus-encoded protein, large T antigen, and species-specific permissive factors. How these components interact to initiate and sustain viral DNA replication is not known. Toward that end, we have attempted to identify the viral target(s) of permissive factors. The functionally defined replication origins of polyomavirus and simian virus 40, two papovaviruses that replicate in different species (mice and monkeys, respectively), are composed of two functionally distinct domains: a core domain and an auxiliary domain. The origin cores of the two viruses are remarkably similar in primary structure and have common binding sites for large T antigen. By contrast, their auxiliary domains share few sequences and serve as binding sites for cellular proteins. It seemed plausible, therefore, that if cellular permissive factors interacted with the replication origin, their targets were likely to be in the auxiliary domain. To test this hypothesis we constructed hybrid origins for DNA replication that were composed of the auxiliary domain of one virus and the origin core of the other and assessed their capacity to replicate in a number of mouse and monkey cell lines, which express the large T antigen of one or the other virus. The results of this analysis showed that the auxiliary domains of the viral replication origins could substitute for one another in DNA replication, provided that the viral origin core and its cognate large T antigen were present in a permissive cellular milieu. Surprisingly, the large T antigens of the viruses could not substitute for one another, regardless of the species of origin of the host cell, even though the two large T antigens bind to the same sequence motif in vitro. These results suggest that species-specific permissive factors do not interact with the origin-auxiliary domains but, rather, with either the origin core or the large T antigen or with both components to

  10. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS).

    PubMed

    Seung, Steven K; Larson, David A; Galvin, James M; Mehta, Minesh P; Potters, Louis; Schultz, Christopher J; Yajnik, Santosh V; Hartford, Alan C; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2013-06-01

    American College of Radiology and American Society for Radiation Oncology Practice Guideline for the Performance of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS). SRS is a safe and efficacious treatment option of a variety of benign and malignant disorders involving intracranial structures and selected extracranial lesions. SRS involves a high dose of ionizing radiation with a high degree of precision and spatial accuracy. A quality SRS program requires a multidisciplinary team involved in the patient management. Organization, appropriate staffing, and careful adherence to detail and to established SRS standards is important to ensure operational efficiency and to improve the likelihood of procedural success. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for SRS. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, and qualified medical physicist. Quality assurance is essential for safe and accurate delivery of treatment with SRS. Quality assurance issues for the treatment unit, stereotactic accessories, medical imaging, and treatment-planning system are presented and discussed. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and patient safety in a successful SRS program.

  11. The Brazilian version of the SRS-22r questionnaire for idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Camarini, Paula M F; Rosanova, Giselle C L; Gabriel, Bruna S; Gianini, Priscila E S; Oliveira, Anamaria S

    2013-01-01

    The SRS-22r questionnaire is a well-accepted instrument used to measure health-related quality of life in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. No validated tool exists in Brazil for idiopathic scoliosis, and the use of the SRS-22r in non-English Laguage contries requires its transcultural adaptation. The objective of this study was to culturally adapt the translated Brazilian version of the SRS-22r questionnaire and to determine its reliability using statistical tests for internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The transcultural adaptation process was carried out according to the recommendations of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. The pre-final version was administered to 44 patients with idiopathic scoliosis. The mean age of the participants was 18.93 years and the mean curve magnitude was 54.6°. A subgroup of 30 volunteers completed the questionnaire a second time one week later to determine the scale's reproducibility. Internal consistency was determined using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, and the test-retest reliability was determined using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC). No floor effects were observed using the Brazilian version of the SRS-22r. Ceiling effects were observed in the Pain and Satisfaction with Management domains. The internal consistency values were very good for 3 domains and good for 2 domains. The ICC values were excellent for all domains. The high values of internal consistency and ICC reproducibility suggest that this version of the questionnaire can be used in Brazilian patients with idiopathic scoliosis.

  12. Modulation of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Srs2 and Rad51

    PubMed Central

    Milne, G. T.; Ho, T.; Weaver, D. T.

    1995-01-01

    RAD52 function is required for virtually all DNA double-strand break repair and recombination events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To gain greater insight into the mechanism of RAD52-mediated repair, we screened for genes that suppress partially active alleles of RAD52 when mutant or overexpressed. Described here is the isolation of a phenotypic null allele of SRS2 that suppressed multiple alleles of RAD52 (rad52B, rad52D, rad52-1 and KlRAD52) and RAD51 (KlRAD51) but failed to suppress either a rad52δ or a rad51δ. These results indicate that SRS2 antagonizes RAD51 and RAD52 function in recombinational repair. The mechanism of suppression of RAD52 alleles by srs2 is distinct from that which has been previously described for RAD51 overexpression, as both conditions were shown to act additively with respect to the rad52B allele. Furthermore, overexpression of either RAD52 or RAD51 enhanced the recombination-dependent sensitivity of an srs2δ RAD52 strain, suggesting that RAD52 and RAD51 positively influence recombinational repair mechanisms. Thus, RAD52-dependent recombinational repair is controlled both negatively and positively. PMID:7768432

  13. Long-Term Results of GH Treatment in Silver-Russell Syndrome (SRS): Do They Benefit the Same as Non-SRS Short-SGA?

    PubMed

    Smeets, C C J; Zandwijken, G R J; Renes, J S; Hokken-Koelega, A C S

    2016-05-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome characterized by low birth weight, severe short stature, and variable dysmorphic features. GH treatment is a registered growth-promoting therapy for short children born small for gestational age, including SRS, but there are limited data on the GH response in SRS children and on differences in response among the (epi)genetic SRS subtypes (11p15 aberrations, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 [mUPD7], and idiopathic SRS). To compare growth and adult height between GH-treated small for gestational age children with and without SRS (non-SRS), and to analyze the difference in GH response among SRS genotypes. A longitudinal study. Sixty-two SRS and 227 non-SRS subjects. All subjects received GH treatment (1 mg/m(2)/d). Adult height and total height gain. The SRS group consisted of 31 children with 11p15 aberrations, 11 children with mUPD7, and 20 children with idiopathic SRS. At the start of GH treatment, mean (SD) height standard deviation score [SDS] was significantly lower in SRS (-3.67 [1.0]) than in non-SRS (-2.92 [0.6]; P < .001). Adult height SDS was lower in SRS (-2.17 [0.8]) than in non-SRS (-1.65 [0.8]; P = .002), but the total height gain SDS was similar. There was a trend toward a greater height gain in mUPD7 than in 11p15 (P = .12). Children with SRS have a similar height gain during GH treatment as non-SRS subjects. All (epi)genetic SRS subtypes benefit from GH treatment, with a trend toward mUPD7 and idiopathic SRS having the greatest height gain.

  14. Reliability and Validity Study of the Finnish Adaptation of Scoliosis Research Society Questionnaire Version SRS-30.

    PubMed

    Kyrölä, Kati; Järvenpää, Salme; Ylinen, Jari; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Repo, Jussi Petteri; Häkkinen, Arja

    2017-06-15

    A prospective clinical study to test and adapt a Finnish version of the Scoliosis Research Society 30 (SRS-30) questionnaire. The aim of this study was to perform cross-cultural adaptation and evaluate the validity of the adapted Finnish version of the SRS-30 questionnaire. The SRS-30 questionnaire has proved to be a valid instrument in evaluating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adolescent and adult population with spine deformities in the United States. Multinational availability requires cross-cultural and linguistic adaptation and validation of the instrument. The SRS-30 was translated into Finnish using accepted methods for translation of quality-of-life questionnaires. A total of 274 adult patients with degenerative radiographic sagittal spinal disorder answered the questionnaire with sociodemographic data, RAND 36-item health survey questionnaire (RAND Corp. Health, Santa Monica, CA, US), Oswestry disability index, DEPS depression scale, and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) back and leg pain scales within 2 weeks' interval. The cohort included patients with and without previous spine surgery. Internal consistency and validity were tested with Cronbach α, intraclass correlation (ICC), standard error of measurement, and Spearman correlation coefficient with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The internal consistency of SRS-30 was good in both surgery and nonsurgery groups, with Cronbach α 0.853 (95% CI, 0.670 to 0.960) and 0.885 (95% CI, 0.854 to 0.911), respectively. The test-retest reproducibility ICC of the SRS-30 total and subscore domains of patients with stable symptoms was 0.905 (95% CI, 0.870-0.930) and 0.904 (95% CI, 0.871-0.929), respectively. The questionnaire had discriminative validity in the pain, self-image, and satisfaction with management domains compared with other questionnaires. The SRS-30 questionnaire proved to be valid and applicable in evaluating HRQoL in Finnish adult spinal deformity patients. It has two domains related to deformity

  15. A flexible and rapid frequency selective scheme for SRS microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingting; Yue, Yuankai; Shih, Wei-Chuan

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a label-free imaging technique suitable for studying biological systems. Due to stimulated nature by ultrafast laser pulses, SRS microscopy has the advantage of significantly higher sensitivity but often reduced spectroscopic information. In this paper, we present a newly constructed femtosecond SRS microscope with a high-speed dynamic micromirror device based pulse shaper to achieve flexible and rapid frequency selection within the C-H stretch region near 2800 to 3100 cm-1 with spectral width of 30 cm-1. This technique is applicable to lipid profiling such as cell activity mapping, lipid distribution mapping and distinction among subclasses.

  16. TRANSFORMING THE SRS ENVIRONMENTAL BUSINESS: COMMUNICATION AND APPLIED PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Saldivar, E.

    2010-01-20

    A process for communicating information relating to core business functions that also encourages improving internal communications has been established at SRS. This process continues to grow and strengthen as the multiple Contractors, Regulators and DOE-SR relationships mature. A number of management communication tools have been initiated, retooled, rebooted or continued with enhancements to ensure appropriate information is communicated to all levels with environmental responsibility at SRS. The types of information that are the focus of this improved process are feedback from the customer and from informational exchange forums (i.e., Challenge Opportunity and Resolution (COR), SRS Regulatory Integration Team (SRIT), Environmental Quality Management Division (EQMD), Senior Environmental Managers Council (SEMC), etc.). These forums, SRS environmental functions centralization, and the creation of a Regulatory Integration process allows for cross-functional decision making, problem solving and information sharing that involves the field organizations, Environmental Compliance Authorities (ECA), Subject Matter Experts (SME), DOE and the Regulators. Numerous examples of effective decision-making and problem solving will be shared. Lessons Learned involving inadequate communications and the resulting impacts on the environment, customer satisfaction, and relationships will also be discussed. Additionally, the focus on improved communications also includes maintaining awareness of business activities. The tools being utilized to facilitate the continuing improvement of internal communications include weekly staff meetings for all individuals within the organization, quarterly ECA and SME meeting, quarterly Regulatory Integration & Environmental Services (RI&ES) All-Hands meetings hosted by the Director, bi-weekly EQMD and EQMD Lite meetings with the customer, bi-annual SRIT meetings, and COR meetings on an as need basis. In addition, an existing Required Reading Program

  17. Congenital scoliosis SRS-22 outcomes in children treated with observation, surgery, and VEPTR.

    PubMed

    Farley, Frances A; Li, Ying; Jong, Nahbee; Powell, Corey C; Speers, Michele S; Childers, David M; Caird, Michelle S

    2014-10-15

    Prospective, nonrandomized study of children with congenital scoliosis. To determine the outcomes of children with congenital scoliosis using SRS-22. Outcome measures in children with congenital scoliosis are unreported. Novel treatments such as VEPTR (vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib) must show positive patient-reported outcomes during treatment because improvement in pulmonary function has not been demonstrated. Patients with congenital scoliosis were prospectively enrolled and divided into 3 groups: children under observation (OBSERVATION), children who had surgery (SURGICAL), and children treated with VEPTR (VEPTR). The SRS-22 questionnaire reports 6 domains: Total, Function, Mental Health, Image, Satisfaction, and Pain. SRS-22 questionnaires were prospectively collected from 184 OBSERVATION patients, 27 SURGICAL patients, and 22 VEPTR patients. Because of repeated measurement on each patient, the observations cannot be assumed to be independent. To account for this dependence, linear mixed models were used. OBSERVATION scores were near normal in all domains. Initial postoperative scores for Function and Pain decreased for the SURGICAL group and subsequently Total, Function, Image, and Satisfaction scores increased. Initial postoperative VEPTR scores in Mental Health and Pain decreased and Total, Function, and Image scores increased during subsequent visits. Children with congenital scoliosis had SRS-22 scores that compare favorably with scores reported in the literature for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. For SURGICAL and VEPTR patients with congenital scoliosis, SRS-22 Total, Function, and Image scores increased over time. Function, Image, and Pain require focus in children with congenital scoliosis. This is the first study that documents improvement in outcomes of VEPTR patients while in treatment. 2.

  18. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by closure

  19. 49 CFR 179.401-1 - Individual specification requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS... specification 113A60W 113C120W Design service temperature, °F −423 −260. Material § 179.400-5 § 179.400-5. Impact test (weld and plate material) § 179.400-5(c) § 179.400-5(c). Impact test values §...

  20. Actin isoform specificity is required for the maintenance of lactation

    PubMed Central

    Weymouth, Nate; Shi, Zengdun; Rockey, Don C.

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle α-actin (Acta2) is one of six highly conserved mammalian actin isoforms that appear to exhibit functional redundancy. Nonetheless, we have postulated a specific functional role for the smooth muscle specific isoform. Here, we show that Acta2 deficient mice have a remarkable mammary phenotype such that dams lacking Acta2 are unable to nurse their offspring effectively. The phenotype was rescued in cross fostering experiments with wild type mice, excluding a developmental defect in Acta2 null pups. The mechanism for the underlying phenotype is due to myoepithelial dysfunction postpartum resulting in precocious involution. Further, we demonstrate a specific defect in myoepithelial cell contractility in Acta2 null mammary glands, despite normal expression of cytoplasmic actins. We conclude that Acta2 specifically mediates myoepithelial cell contraction during lactation and that this actin isoform therefore exhibits functional specificity. PMID:22123032

  1. A Genetic Screen for High Copy Number Suppressors of the Synthetic Lethality Between elg1Δ and srs2Δ in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gazy, Inbal; Liefshitz, Batia; Bronstein, Alex; Parnas, Oren; Atias, Nir; Sharan, Roded; Kupiec, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Elg1 and Srs2 are two proteins involved in maintaining genome stability in yeast. After DNA damage, the homotrimeric clamp PCNA, which provides stability and processivity to DNA polymerases and serves as a docking platform for DNA repair enzymes, undergoes modification by the ubiquitin-like molecule SUMO. PCNA SUMOylation helps recruit Srs2 and Elg1 to the replication fork. In the absence of Elg1, both SUMOylated PCNA and Srs2 accumulate at the chromatin fraction, indicating that Elg1 is required for removing SUMOylated PCNA and Srs2 from DNA. Despite this interaction, which suggests that the two proteins work together, double mutants elg1Δ srs2Δ have severely impaired growth as haploids and exhibit synergistic sensitivity to DNA damage and a synergistic increase in gene conversion. In addition, diploid elg1Δ srs2Δ double mutants are dead, which implies that an essential function in the cell requires at least one of the two gene products for survival. To gain information about this essential function, we have carried out a high copy number suppressor screen to search for genes that, when overexpressed, suppress the synthetic lethality between elg1Δ and srs2Δ. We report the identification of 36 such genes, which are enriched for functions related to DNA- and chromatin-binding, chromatin packaging and modification, and mRNA export from the nucleus. PMID:23704284

  2. SRS history and experience with palladium diffusers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.; Dauchess, D.A.; Heung, L.K.; Rabun, R.L.; Motyka, T.

    1995-08-11

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has processed tritium in support of national defense programs since 1955. Palladium diffusers have been used extensively for separating hydrogen isotopes from inert gases (such as argon, helium, and nitrogen). In almost forty years of service, the design of the diffuser has been steadily improving. Several diffuser designs from different manufacturers have been evaluated at SRS. The operating experience gained from these designs together with failure analyses performed on failed units have led to several recommendations for improved diffuser designs and operating methods. This experience gained at SRS and the following recommendations form the basis of this report. Even though palladium diffuser technology has proven to be reliable, SRS has examined several alternative technologies over the past several years. This report will also review some of these promising alternatives.

  3. The SRS-Schwab adult spinal deformity classification: assessment and clinical correlations based on a prospective operative and nonoperative cohort.

    PubMed

    Terran, Jamie; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Smith, Justin S; Devos, Pierre; Ames, Christopher P; Fu, Kai-Ming G; Burton, Douglas; Hostin, Richard; Klineberg, Eric; Gupta, Munish; Deviren, Vedat; Mundis, Gregory; Hart, Robert; Bess, Shay; Lafage, Virginie

    2013-10-01

    The SRS-Schwab classification of adult spinal deformity (ASD) is a validated system that provides a common language for the complex pathology of ASD. Classification reliability has been reported; however, correlation with treatment has not been assessed. To assess the clinical relevance of the SRS-Schwab classification based on correlations with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measures and the decision to pursue operative vs nonoperative treatment. Prospective analysis of consecutive ASD patients (18 years of age and older) collected through a multicenter group. The SRS-Schwab classification includes a curve type descriptor and 3 sagittal spinopelvic modifiers (sagittal vertical axis, pelvic tilt, pelvic incidence/lumbar lordosis mismatch). Differences in demographics, HRQOL (Oswestry Disability Index, SRS-22, Short Form-36), and classification between operative and nonoperative patients were evaluated. A total of 527 patients (mean age, 52.9 years; range, 18.4-85.1 years) met inclusion criteria. Significant differences in HRQOL were identified based on SRS-Schwab curve type, with thoracolumbar and primary sagittal deformities associated with greater disability and poorer health status than thoracic or double curve deformities. Operative patients had significantly poorer grades for each of the sagittal spinopelvic modifiers, and progressively higher grades were associated with significantly poorer HRQOL (P < .05). Patients with worse sagittal spinopelvic modifier grades were significantly more likely to require major osteotomies, iliac fixation, and decompression (P ≤ .009). The SRS-Schwab classification provides a validated language to describe and categorize ASD. This study demonstrates that the SRS-Schwab classification reflects severity of disease state based on multiple measures of HRQOL and significantly correlates with the important decision of whether to pursue operative or nonoperative treatment.

  4. 29 CFR 1926.452 - Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Additional requirements applicable to specific types of... Scaffolds § 1926.452 Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds. In addition to the applicable requirements of § 1926.451, the following requirements apply to the specific types of...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.452 - Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Additional requirements applicable to specific types of... Scaffolds § 1926.452 Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds. In addition to the applicable requirements of § 1926.451, the following requirements apply to the specific types of...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.452 - Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Additional requirements applicable to specific types of... Scaffolds § 1926.452 Additional requirements applicable to specific types of scaffolds. In addition to the applicable requirements of § 1926.451, the following requirements apply to the specific types of...

  7. Analyzing Tabular Requirements Specifications Using Infinite State Model Checking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    two-state properties that hold in every reachable transition. Property Checking with Salsa . The SCR property checker Salsa [5] may be used to check...SCR specifications for Dis- jointness and Coverage and for satisfaction of state and tran- sition invariants. Salsa can check the validity of formulas...TAME and Salsa . 3. Action Language Verifier Action Language is a specification language for reactive software systems. The Action Language Verifier

  8. A fast shutdown system for SRS (Savannah River Site) reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, N.P.

    1990-01-01

    Power has been sharply reduced at Savannah River Site (SRS) reactors in large part to ensure that no bulk boiling occurs during hypothesized loss of coolant accidents. A fast shutdown system is essential to regain much of this lost power. Computations and experiments indicate that a He-3 injection system will serve this function. Instrumented tests of a full system are planned for early 1991 for one of the SRS reactors. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Potential for erosion corrosion of SRS high level waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    SRS high-level radioactive waste tanks will not experience erosion corrosion to any significant degree during slurry pump operations. Erosion corrosion in carbon steel structures at reported pump discharge velocities is dominated by electrochemical (corrosion) processes. Interruption of those processes, as by the addition of corrosion inhibitors, sharply reduces the rate of metal loss from erosion corrosion. The well-inhibited SRS waste tanks have a near-zero general corrosion rate, and therefore will be essentially immune to erosion corrosion. The experimental data on carbon steel erosion corrosion most relevant to SRS operations was obtained at the Hanford Site on simulated Purex waste. A metal loss rate of 2.4 mils per year was measured at a temperature of 102 C and a slurry velocity comparable to calculated SRS slurry velocities on ground specimens of the same carbon steel used in SRS waste tanks. Based on these data and the much lower expected temperatures, the metal loss rate of SRS tanks under waste removal and processing conditions should be insignificant, i.e. less than 1 mil per year.

  10. Requirements for Minimum Sample Size for Sensitivity and Specificity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Tassha Hilda

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity analysis is commonly used for screening and diagnostic tests. The main issue researchers face is to determine the sufficient sample sizes that are related with screening and diagnostic studies. Although the formula for sample size calculation is available but concerning majority of the researchers are not mathematicians or statisticians, hence, sample size calculation might not be easy for them. This review paper provides sample size tables with regards to sensitivity and specificity analysis. These tables were derived from formulation of sensitivity and specificity test using Power Analysis and Sample Size (PASS) software based on desired type I error, power and effect size. The approaches on how to use the tables were also discussed. PMID:27891446

  11. An Operational Approach to Requirements Specification for Embedded Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    language can have is to be unable to express what the requirements analyst wants to say. This is the problem that makes analysts revert to English ...APPENDIX: A GRAMMAR FOR PAISLEY This gramar is LALR, and is written in BNF with nonterminals underlined. Comments are transparent, and can therefore

  12. 29 CFR 1926.651 - Specific excavation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... excavation. (g) Hazardous atmospheres—(1) Testing and controls. In addition to the requirements set forth in... apply: (i) Where oxygen deficiency (atmospheres containing less than 19.5 percent oxygen) or a hazardous atmosphere exists or could reasonably be expected to exist, such as in excavations in landfill areas or...

  13. 30 CFR 23.7 - Specific requirements for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 23.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... outside of the compartment, of not less than 1 inch if the unoccupied volume (air space) in the... effective safety devices, such as are required for permissible electric mine lamps, 1 or enclosed in...

  14. 30 CFR 23.7 - Specific requirements for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 23.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... outside of the compartment, of not less than 1 inch if the unoccupied volume (air space) in the... effective safety devices, such as are required for permissible electric mine lamps, 1 or enclosed in...

  15. 30 CFR 23.7 - Specific requirements for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 23.7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING... outside of the compartment, of not less than 1 inch if the unoccupied volume (air space) in the... effective safety devices, such as are required for permissible electric mine lamps, 1 or enclosed in...

  16. 30 CFR 23.7 - Specific requirements for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reserves the right to require the attachment of wiring diagrams to the cases of telephones and signal..., the electrical design and construction of telephones and signal devices shall be such that neither... external terminals and circuits will result in electrical sparks capable of igniting explosive...

  17. System requirements specification for waste information and control system

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.R.

    1994-09-01

    This document defines the requirements for the Waste Information and Control System (WICS). The document defines the functions, constraints, and objectives that pertain to WICS. This shall serve as the baseline document to ensure the needs of the Hazardous Material Control group (HMC) at 222-S Laboratory are met with regard to assurance of accuracy and quality of data taken with WICS.

  18. Cementitious Grout for Closing SRS High Level Waste Tanks - 12315

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.; Stefanko, D.B.; Burns, H.H.; Waymer, J.; Mhyre, W.B.; Herbert, J.E.; Jolly, J.C. Jr.

    2012-07-01

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. Ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks will also be filled to the extent practical. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and to be chemically reducing with a reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400. Grouts with this chemistry stabilize potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  19. 49 CFR 178.35 - General requirements for specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specification by— (i) Making a chemical analysis of each heat of material; (ii) Obtaining a certified chemical analysis from the material manufacturer for each heat of material (a ladle analysis is acceptable); or (iii) If an analysis is not provided for each heat of material by the material manufacturer, by making a...

  20. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS.

    PubMed

    Shultz, David B; Modlin, Leslie A; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C; Choi, Clara Y H; Chang, Steven D; Harsh, Griffith R; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R; Hancock, Steven L; Soltys, Scott G

    2015-08-01

    To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R.; Hancock, Steven L.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  2. Treatment of SRS Tank 48H Simulants Using Fenton's Reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, PA

    2003-11-18

    High-level-waste Tank 48H at the Savannah River Site (SRS) contains about 50,000 lb of tetraphenylborate (TPB), which must be destroyed to return the tank to active service. Laboratory-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the use of Fenton's Reagent (hydrogen peroxide and a metal catalyst) to treat simulants of the Tank 48H waste. Samples of the treated slurry and the off-gas were analyzed to determine the reaction products. Process parameters developed earlier by AEA Technology were used for these tests; namely (for 500 mL of waste simulant), reduce pH to 7.5 with nitric acid, heat to boiling, add hydrogen peroxide at 1 mL/min for 1 h, reduce pH to 3.5, and add the remaining peroxide at 2 mL/min. These parameters were developed to minimize the formation of tarry materials during the early part of the reaction and to minimize the concentration of total organic carbon in the final treated slurry. The treated samples contained low concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and no detectable TPB. Tests using a mixture of iron and copper salts as the Fenton's catalyst had a lower TOC concentration in the final treated slurry than did tests that used a copper-only catalyst. TPB is known to hydrolyze to benzene, particularly at high temperature and low pH, and copper is known to increase the rate of hydrolysis. Significant amounts of benzene were present in the off-gas from the tests, especially during the early portion of the treatment, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction was occurring in parallel with the oxidation of the TPB by Fenton's reagent. For the reaction conditions used in these tests, approximately equal fractions of the TPB were converted to benzene and carbon dioxide. Minimizing the formation of benzene is important to SRS personnel; however, this consideration was not addressed in the AEA-recommended parameters, since they did not analyze for benzene in the off-gas. Smaller amounts of carbon monoxide and other organics were also produced. One test

  3. ALTERNATE APPROACH TO HAZARD CATEGORIZATION FOR SALTSTONE FACILITY AT SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, B.

    2009-04-28

    The Saltstone Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) was originally segmented into two segments: the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Based on the inventory of radionuclides available for release the SPF and SDF were categorized as Nonreactor Hazard Category (HC)-3. The hazard categorization recognized the SDF will contain contributions of radionuclides which would exceed the HC-2 Threshold Quantity (TQ) in the form of grout. However it was determined not to impact the facility hazard categorization based on the grout being in a solid, monolithic form which was not easily dispersible. But, the impact of a quantity of unset grout expected to be present at the vault following operation of the process was not addressed. A Potential Inadequacy in Safety Analysis (PISA) was later issued based on the hazard categorization determination for the facility not addressing unset grout. This initiated a re-evaluation of the accident scenarios within the hazards analysis. During this re-evaluation, the segmentation of the facility was challenged based on the potential interaction between facility segments; specifically, the leachate return line and the grout transfer line, which were considered separate segments, are located in close proximity at one point. such that for certain events (NPH as well as External Vehicle Impact) both could be damaged simultaneously and spill contents on the ground that could commingle. This would violate the guideline for segmentation. Therefore, the Hazard Categorization (HC) was reevaluated based on the facility being a single segment and including the additional unset grout as part of total inventory. This total inventory far exceeded the limit for HC-2 TQ and made the facility's initial categorization as HC-2. However, alternative analysis methodology based on credible release fractions allowed in DOE-STD-1027-92 (Ref.1) showed that the Saltstone facility could still be categorized as Hazard Category

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NPDES STORM WATER COMPLIANCE ALTERNATIVES AT THE SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Shedrow, C

    2006-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed and alternative actions to achieve water quality permit compliance at 38 storm water outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). Effluent monitoring data indicates that some of these outfalls may not presently comply with new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water General Permit effluent standards that became effective July 1, 2005 (SCR000000). The NPDES permit requires that best management practices (BMPs) be implemented and maintained, as necessary, to ensure that storm water discharges at SRS do not cause or contribute to the contravention of applicable state water quality standards (WQS).

  5. End User Acceptance - Requirements or Specifications, Certification, Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2013-01-01

    NASA follows top level safety requirement of two-failure tolerance (t hree levels of controls or design for minimum risk) to all catastroph ic hazards in the design of safe li-ion batteries for space use. ? R igorous development testing at appropriate levels to credible offnominal conditions and review of test data. ? Implement robust design con trols based on test results and test again to confirm safety at the a ppropriate levels. ? Stringent testing of all (100%) flight batteries (from button cells to large batteries).

  6. Software requirements specification document for the AREST code development

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, D.W.; McGrail, B.P.; Whitney, P.D.; Gray, W.J.; Williford, R.E.; White, M.D.; Eslinger, P.W.; Altenhofen, M.K.

    1993-11-01

    The Analysis of the Repository Source Term (AREST) computer code was selected in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Energy. The AREST code will be used to analyze the performance of an underground high level nuclear waste repository. The AREST code is being modified by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in order to evaluate the engineered barrier and waste package designs, model regulatory compliance, analyze sensitivities, and support total systems performance assessment modeling. The current version of the AREST code was developed to be a very useful tool for analyzing model uncertainties and sensitivities to input parameters. The code has also been used successfully in supplying source-terms that were used in a total systems performance assessment. The current version, however, has been found to be inadequate for the comparison and selection of a design for the waste package. This is due to the assumptions and simplifications made in the selection of the process and system models. Thus, the new version of the AREST code will be designed to focus on the details of the individual processes and implementation of more realistic models. This document describes the requirements of the new models that will be implemented. Included in this document is a section describing the near-field environmental conditions for this waste package modeling, description of the new process models that will be implemented, and a description of the computer requirements for the new version of the AREST code.

  7. SRS supplemental safety system injection (gas pressurizer) test

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, W.L.; Dimenna, R.A.

    1992-12-31

    An evaluation and validation of an existing version of the RELAP5 thermal hydraulics computer code was undertaken for the purpose of certification for use in the new production reactor - heavy water reactor (NPR-HWR) program. This version of the code was RELAP5/MOD3 Version 5q, designated for the purposes of the NPR-HWR program as RELAP5/NPR Version 0. As part of the evaluation and assessment, test data from theSRS Supplemental Safety System Injection (Gas Pressurizer) was used to verify and assess the ability of RELAP5/NPR Version 0 to perform thermal-hydraulic model analysis using the test data. Specifically, the assessment determines RELAP5/NPR Version 0 capability in modeling sudden depressurization phenomena. Two RELAP5/NPR Version 0 components (pipe and accumulator) were used to compare calculated pressure and temperature against test data. The code deficiencies are a temperature clamp in the accumulator component prevents the gas temperature from going below {minus}9{degrees}F, and RELAP5 accumulator and pipe components wall-to-fluid heat transfer correlation and interfacial vapor heat transfer correlation need substantial improvement. Only the code pipe component calculated pressures and temperatures within the specified 10 percent accuracy.

  8. SRS supplemental safety system injection (gas pressurizer) test

    SciTech Connect

    Howarth, W.L.; Dimenna, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation and validation of an existing version of the RELAP5 thermal hydraulics computer code was undertaken for the purpose of certification for use in the new production reactor - heavy water reactor (NPR-HWR) program. This version of the code was RELAP5/MOD3 Version 5q, designated for the purposes of the NPR-HWR program as RELAP5/NPR Version 0. As part of the evaluation and assessment, test data from theSRS Supplemental Safety System Injection (Gas Pressurizer) was used to verify and assess the ability of RELAP5/NPR Version 0 to perform thermal-hydraulic model analysis using the test data. Specifically, the assessment determines RELAP5/NPR Version 0 capability in modeling sudden depressurization phenomena. Two RELAP5/NPR Version 0 components (pipe and accumulator) were used to compare calculated pressure and temperature against test data. The code deficiencies are a temperature clamp in the accumulator component prevents the gas temperature from going below [minus]9[degrees]F, and RELAP5 accumulator and pipe components wall-to-fluid heat transfer correlation and interfacial vapor heat transfer correlation need substantial improvement. Only the code pipe component calculated pressures and temperatures within the specified 10 percent accuracy.

  9. Reliability and Validity Testing of a Danish Translated Version of the Scoliosis Research Society Instrument-22 Revised (SRS-22R).

    PubMed

    Simony, Ane; Carreon, Leah Y; Andersen, Mikkel O

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional Objectives: To present a reliable and valid Danish translation of the Scoliosis Research Society-22R (SRS-22R). The SRS22R was designed as a disease-specific measure of quality of life in surgically treated adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. It has been translated and adapted into several languages. A reliable and valid Danish version is not available. A Danish version of the SRS-22R was developed using previously published and widely accepted guidelines. The final Danish SRS-22R and the Danish Short Form-36 were administered to 169 AIS patients and 45 healthy controls. Cronbach's α was computed as a measure of internal consistency. Concordant validity was determined by computing correlations of the SRS-22R Domains with the corresponding SF-36 domains and factor analysis. Discriminant validity was determined by comparing Domain scores between AIS patients treated surgically, AIS patients treated with a brace, and the healthy controls. One hundred sixty-five (97.6%) AIS patients and 42 (93.3%) healthy controls returned their questionnaires. Moderate ceiling effects were observed in the AIS cohort for the Function and Satisfaction Domains. Cronbach's α for each Domain and the Total score were good to excellent. Pearson correlation coefficients were found to be high for the SRS-22R Domains that had similar latent variables as the SF-36 Domains. Factor analysis revealed an underlying factorial structure of the questionnaire accounting for 60% of the explained variance. The SRS-22R Domain scores were statistically significantly different between the AIS cohort that had surgery, the AIS cohort that was treated with a brace, and the healthy controls. The Danish version of the SRS-22R is reliable, with content, concordant, and discriminant validity. The scores, the score distribution, and the ceiling and floor effects were similar to those of the original SRS-22R in English as well as other previous translations. Copyright © 2016 Scoliosis

  10. 14 CFR 417.17 - Launch reporting requirements and launch specific updates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... specific updates. 417.17 Section 417.17 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL... Conditions § 417.17 Launch reporting requirements and launch specific updates. (a) General. A launch operator must satisfy the launch reporting requirements and launch specific updates required by this section...

  11. Benefits of a Unified LaSRS++ Simulation for NAS-Wide and High-Fidelity Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Patricia; Madden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The LaSRS++ high-fidelity vehicle simulation was extended in 2012 to support a NAS-wide simulation mode. Since the initial proof-of-concept, the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulation is maturing into a research-ready tool. A primary benefit of this new capability is the consolidation of the two modeling paradigms under a single framework to save cost, facilitate iterative concept testing between the two tools, and to promote communication and model sharing between user communities at Langley. Specific benefits of each type of modeling are discussed along with the expected benefits of the unified framework. Current capability details of the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulations are provided, including the visualization tool, live data interface, trajectory generators, terminal routing for arrivals and departures, maneuvering, re-routing, navigation, winds, and turbulence. The plan for future development is also described.

  12. SRS BEDROCK PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS (PSHA) DESIGN BASIS JUSTIFICATION (U)

    SciTech Connect

    , R

    2005-12-14

    This represents an assessment of the available Savannah River Site (SRS) hard-rock probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs), including PSHAs recently completed, for incorporation in the SRS seismic hazard update. The prior assessment of the SRS seismic design basis (WSRC, 1997) incorporated the results from two PSHAs that were published in 1988 and 1993. Because of the vintage of these studies, an assessment is necessary to establish the value of these PSHAs considering more recently collected data affecting seismic hazards and the availability of more recent PSHAs. This task is consistent with the Department of Energy (DOE) order, DOE O 420.1B and DOE guidance document DOE G 420.1-2. Following DOE guidance, the National Map Hazard was reviewed and incorporated in this assessment. In addition to the National Map hazard, alternative ground motion attenuation models (GMAMs) are used with the National Map source model to produce alternate hazard assessments for the SRS. These hazard assessments are the basis for the updated hard-rock hazard recommendation made in this report. The development and comparison of hazard based on the National Map models and PSHAs completed using alternate GMAMs provides increased confidence in this hazard recommendation. The alternate GMAMs are the EPRI (2004), USGS (2002) and a regional specific model (Silva et al., 2004). Weights of 0.6, 0.3 and 0.1 are recommended for EPRI (2004), USGS (2002) and Silva et al. (2004) respectively. This weighting gives cluster weights of .39, .29, .15, .17 for the 1-corner, 2-corner, hybrid, and Greens-function models, respectively. This assessment is judged to be conservative as compared to WSRC (1997) and incorporates the range of prevailing expert opinion pertinent to the development of seismic hazard at the SRS. The corresponding SRS hard-rock uniform hazard spectra are greater than the design spectra developed in WSRC (1997) that were based on the LLNL (1993) and EPRI (1988) PSHAs. The

  13. PILOT SCALE TESTING OF MONOSODIUM TITANATE MIXING FOR THE SRS SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS - 11224

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Restivo, M.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.; Steeper, T.

    2011-01-25

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for suspending monosodium titanate (MST), crystalline silicotitanate (CST), and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the requirements for the pumps to suspend the MST particles so that they can contact the strontium and actinides in the liquid and be removed from the tank. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of SRS Tank 41H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 41H. The pump locations correspond to the proposed locations in Tank 41H by the SCIX program (Risers B5 and B2 for two pump configurations and Risers B5, B3, and B1 for three pump configurations). The conclusions from this work follow: (i) Neither two standard slurry pumps nor two quad volute slurry pumps will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. (ii) Two Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. However, the testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is close to the maximum discharge velocity of the pump (within 12%). (iii) Three SMPs will provide sufficient power to initially suspend MST in an SRS waste tank. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 66% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. (iv) Three SMPs are needed to resuspend MST that has settled in a waste tank at nominal 45 C for four weeks. The testing shows the required pump discharge velocity is 77% of the maximum discharge velocity of the pump. Two SMPs are not sufficient to resuspend MST that settled under these

  14. HSCT4.0 Application: Software Requirements Specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, A. O.; Walsh, J. L.; Mason, B. H.; Weston, R. P.; Townsend, J. C.; Samareh, J. A.; Green, L. L.

    2001-01-01

    The software requirements for the High Performance Computing and Communication Program High Speed Civil Transport application project, referred to as HSCT4.0, are described. The objective of the HSCT4.0 application project is to demonstrate the application of high-performance computing techniques to the problem of multidisciplinary design optimization of a supersonic transport configuration, using high-fidelity analysis simulations. Descriptions of the various functions (and the relationships among them) that make up the multidisciplinary application as well as the constraints on the software design arc provided. This document serves to establish an agreement between the suppliers and the customer as to what the HSCT4.0 application should do and provides to the software developers the information necessary to design and implement the system.

  15. Are patient specific meshes required for EIT head imaging?

    PubMed

    Jehl, Markus; Aristovich, Kirill; Faulkner, Mayo; Holder, David

    2016-06-01

    Head imaging with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is usually done with time-differential measurements, to reduce time-invariant modelling errors. Previous research suggested that more accurate head models improved image quality, but no thorough analysis has been done on the required accuracy. We propose a novel pipeline for creation of precise head meshes from magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans, which was applied to four different heads. Voltages were simulated on all four heads for perturbations of different magnitude, haemorrhage and ischaemia, in five different positions and for three levels of instrumentation noise. Statistical analysis showed that reconstructions on the correct mesh were on average 25% better than on the other meshes. However, the stroke detection rates were not improved. We conclude that a generic head mesh is sufficient for monitoring patients for secondary strokes following head trauma.

  16. Specification of advanced safety modeling requirements (Rev. 0).

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Tautges, T. J.

    2008-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership has lead to renewed interest in liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors for the purpose of closing the nuclear fuel cycle and making more efficient use of future repository capacity. However, the U.S. has not designed or constructed a fast reactor in nearly 30 years. Accurate, high-fidelity, whole-plant dynamics safety simulations will play a crucial role by providing confidence that component and system designs will satisfy established design limits and safety margins under a wide variety of operational, design basis, and beyond design basis transient conditions. Current modeling capabilities for fast reactor safety analyses have resulted from several hundred person-years of code development effort supported by experimental validation. The broad spectrum of mechanistic and phenomenological models that have been developed represent an enormous amount of institutional knowledge that needs to be maintained. Complicating this, the existing code architectures for safety modeling evolved from programming practices of the 1970s. This has lead to monolithic applications with interdependent data models which require significant knowledge of the complexities of the entire code in order for each component to be maintained. In order to develop an advanced fast reactor safety modeling capability, the limitations of the existing code architecture must be overcome while preserving the capabilities that already exist. To accomplish this, a set of advanced safety modeling requirements is defined, based on modern programming practices, that focuses on modular development within a flexible coupling framework. An approach for integrating the existing capabilities of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 fast reactor safety analysis code into the SHARP framework is provided in order to preserve existing capabilities while providing a smooth transition to advanced modeling capabilities. In doing this, the advanced fast reactor safety models will

  17. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; Mastroianni, Giulia; Spence, Edward M.; Yu, Jianfeng; Nixon, Peter J.; Appel, Jens; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Bryan, Samantha J.

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to the dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.

  18. Solar powered biohydrogen production requires specific localization of the hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Burroughs, Nigel J.; Boehm, Marko; Eckert, Carrie; ...

    2014-09-04

    Cyanobacteria contain a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase which transiently produces hydrogen upon exposure of anoxic cells to light, potentially acting as a “valve” releasing excess electrons from the electron transport chain. However, its interaction with the photosynthetic electron transport chain remains unclear. By GFP-tagging the HoxF diaphorase subunit we show that the hydrogenase is thylakoid associated, comprising a population dispersed uniformly through the thylakoids and a subpopulation localized to discrete puncta in the distal thylakoid. Thylakoid localisation of both the HoxH and HoxY hydrogenase subunits is confirmed by immunogold electron microscopy. The diaphorase HoxE subunit is essential for recruitment to themore » dispersed thylakoid population, potentially anchoring the hydrogenase to the membrane, but aggregation to puncta occurs through a distinct HoxE-independent mechanism. Membrane association does not require NDH-1. Localization is dynamic on a scale of minutes, with anoxia and high light inducing a significant redistribution between these populations in favour of puncta. Lastly, since HoxE is essential for access to its electron donor, electron supply to the hydrogenase depends on a physiologically controlled localization, potentially offering a new avenue to enhance photosynthetic hydrogen production by exploiting localization/aggregation signals.« less

  19. Search Hanford accessible reports electronically system requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Willers, K.J.

    1994-02-28

    The Emergency, Safety, & Quality (ESQ) Services organization of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is experiencing changes related to new programs. The programs include Corrective Actions Management Systems, Self-Assessment, Trend Analysis, and Lessons Learned analysis. The programs are pushing up organizational costs while funding and manpower levels are projected to be dropping. A large cost involved in implementing the new programs is the cost for people to locate unstructured information required to make decisions or write documentation. But, most resources for retrieving information are found in structured database systems. This means that unstructured information that must be located has to be found by one of these methods: (1) searching manually through documents, (2) searching individual documents one at a time with word processing programs, (3) searching through text fields with query systems primarily designed for structured database information, or (4) develop a text search and retrieval system designed for unstructured information. One example of this is using Occurrence Reporting Processing System (ORPS) and Quality, Environmental, and Safety Tracking (QUEST) documents. An explanation of this is in the following textual box.

  20. Robust Entrainment of Circadian Oscillators Requires Specific Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Thommen, Quentin; Lefranc, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clocks keeping time in many living organisms rely on self-sustained biochemical oscillations entrained by external cues, such as light, to the 24-h cycle induced by Earth's rotation. However, environmental cues are unreliable due to the variability of habitats, weather conditions, or cue-sensing mechanisms among individuals. A tempting hypothesis is that circadian clocks have evolved so as to be robust to fluctuations in the signal that entrains them. To support this hypothesis, we analyze the synchronization behavior of weakly and periodically forced oscillators in terms of their phase response curve (PRC), which measures phase changes induced by a perturbation applied at different times of the cycle. We establish a general relationship between the robustness of key entrainment properties, such as stability and oscillator phase, on the one hand, and the shape of the PRC as characterized by a specific curvature or the existence of a dead zone, on the other hand. The criteria obtained are applied to computational models of circadian clocks and account for the disparate robustness properties of various forcing schemes. Finally, the analysis of PRCs measured experimentally in several organisms strongly suggests a case of convergent evolution toward an optimal strategy for maintaining a clock that is accurate and robust to environmental fluctuations. PMID:21641300

  1. Specific requirement for CD3ɛ in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    DeJarnette, Jan B.; Sommers, Connie L.; Huang, Kun; Woodside, Kenneth J.; Emmons, Rebecca; Katz, Kenneth; Shores, Elizabeth W.; Love, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pre-TCR complexes are composed of clonotypic heterodimers in association with dimers of signal transducing invariant subunits (CD3γ, -δ, -ɛ, and ζ). The role of individual invariant subunits in T cell development has been investigated by generating gene-specific mutations in mice. Mutation of CD3γ, -δ, or ζ results in an incomplete block in development, characterized by reduced numbers of mature T cells that express low levels of TCR. In contrast, mature T cells are absent from CD3ɛ−/− mice, and thymocyte development is arrested at the early CD4−CD8− stage. Although these results suggest that CD3ɛ is essential for pre-TCR and TCR expression/function, their interpretation is complicated by the fact that expression of the CD3γ and CD3δ genes also is reduced in CD3ɛ−/− mice. Thus, it is unclear whether the phenotype of CD3ɛ−/− mice reflects the collective effects of CD3γ, -δ, and -ɛ deficiency. By removing the selectable marker (PGK-NEO) from the targeted CD3ɛ gene via Cre/loxP-mediated recombination, we generated mice that lack CD3ɛ yet retain normal expression of the closely linked CD3γ and CD3δ genes. These (CD3ɛΔ/Δ) mice exhibited an early arrest in T cell development, similar to that of CD3ɛ−/− mice. Moreover, the developmental defect could be rescued by expression of a CD3ɛ transgene. These results identify an essential role for CD3ɛ in T cell development not shared by the CD3γ, CD3δ, or ζ-family proteins and provide further evidence that PGK-NEO can influence the expression of genes in its proximity. PMID:9843989

  2. Shedding new light on lipid functions with CARS and SRS microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong; Ramachandran, Prasanna V.; Wang, Meng C.

    2014-01-01

    Modern optical microscopy has granted biomedical scientists unprecedented access to the inner workings of a cell, and revolutionized our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying physiological and disease states. In spite of these advances, however, visualization of certain classes of molecules (e.g. lipids) at the sub-cellular level has remained elusive. Recently developed chemical imaging modalities – Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy – have helped bridge this gap. By selectively imaging the vibration of a specific chemical group, these non-invasive techniques allow high-resolution imaging of individual molecules in vivo, and circumvent the need for potentially perturbative extrinsic labels. These tools have already been applied to the study of fat metabolism, helping uncover novel regulators of lipid storage. Here we review the underlying principle of CARS and SRS microscopy, and discuss the advantages and caveats of each technique. We also review recent applications of these tools in the study of lipids as well as other biomolecules, and conclude with a brief guide for interested researchers to build and use CARS/SRS systems for their own research. PMID:24576891

  3. Shedding new light on lipid functions with CARS and SRS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Ramachandran, Prasanna V; Wang, Meng C

    2014-08-01

    Modern optical microscopy has granted biomedical scientists unprecedented access to the inner workings of a cell, and revolutionized our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying physiological and disease states. In spite of these advances, however, visualization of certain classes of molecules (e.g. lipids) at the sub-cellular level has remained elusive. Recently developed chemical imaging modalities - Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy - have helped bridge this gap. By selectively imaging the vibration of a specific chemical group, these non-invasive techniques allow high-resolution imaging of individual molecules in vivo, and circumvent the need for potentially perturbative extrinsic labels. These tools have already been applied to the study of fat metabolism, helping uncover novel regulators of lipid storage. Here we review the underlying principle of CARS and SRS microscopy, and discuss the advantages and caveats of each technique. We also review recent applications of these tools in the study of lipids as well as other biomolecules, and conclude with a brief guide for interested researchers to build and use CARS/SRS systems for their own research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions.

  4. Single-Isocenter Multiple-Target SRS: Risk of Compromised Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Justin; Chanyavanich, Vorakarn; Betzel, Gregory; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the dosimetric effects of rotational errors on target coverage using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for multi-target stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials This retrospective study includes 50 SRS cases, each with 2 intracranial planning target volumes (PTVs). Both PTVs were planned for simultaneous treatment to 21 Gy using a single-isocenter, non-coplanar VMAT SRS technique. Rotational errors of 0.5°, 1.0°, and 2.0° were simulated about all axes. The dose to 95% of the PTV (D95) and the volume covered by 95% of the prescribed dose (V95) were evaluated using multivariate analysis to determine how PTV coverage is related to PTV volume, PTV separation, and rotational error. Results At 0.5° rotational error, D95 values and V95 coverage rates were ≥ 95% in all cases. For rotational errors of 1.0°, 7% of targets had D95 and V95 values below 95%. Coverage worsened substantially when the rotational error increased to 2.0°: D95 and V95 values were > 95% for only 63% of the targets. Multivariate analysis showed that PTV volume and distance to isocenter were strong predictors of target coverage. Conclusions The effects of rotational errors on target coverage were studied across a broad range of SRS cases. In general, the risk of compromised coverage increases with decreasing target volume, increasing rotational error and increasing distance between targets. Multivariate regression models from this study may be used to quantify the dosimetric effects of rotational errors on target coverage given patient-specific input parameters of PTV volume and distance to isocenter. PMID:26460996

  5. Effects of refractive index mismatch on SRS and CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Kolk, Jarno; Lesina, Antonino Calà; Ramunno, Lora

    2016-10-31

    An inhomogeneous linear refractive index profile, such as that occurring in biological tissues, is shown to significantly alter stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images. Our finite-difference time-domain simulations show that near-field enhancement and microlensing can lead to an increase of an object's perceived molecular density by a factor of nine and changes in its perceived position by 0.4 μm up to 1.0 μm. Thus the assumption that SRS scales linearly and CARS quadratically with density does not always hold. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous linear index can cause false CARS and AM-SRS signals, even for a homogeneous nonlinear susceptibility.

  6. Assessment of SRS radiological liquid and airborne contaminants and pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    This report compiles and documents the radiological critical-contaminant/critical-pathway analysis performed for SRS. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface water, which are the principal media that carry contaminants off site. During routine operations at SRS, limited amounts of radionuclides are released to the environment through atmospheric and/or liquid pathways. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. Though the groundwater beneath an estimated 5 to 10 percent of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, there is no evidence that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated offsite (Arnett, 1996). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people.

  7. NONLINEAR-OPTICS PHENOMENA Interference suppression of SRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanov, V. P.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1)π (n=0, ±1, ±2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations.

  8. Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) Alone Versus Surgical Resection and SRS for Large Brain Metastases: A Multi-institutional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Roshan S; Press, Robert H; Patel, Kirtesh R; Boselli, Danielle M; Symanowski, James T; Lankford, Scott P; McCammon, Robert J; Moeller, Benjamin J; Heinzerling, John H; Fasola, Carolina E; Asher, Anthony L; Sumrall, Ashley L; Buchwald, Zachary S; Curran, Walter J; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Crocker, Ian; Burri, Stuart H

    2017-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) dose is limited by brain metastasis (BM) size. The study goal was to retrospectively determine whether there is a benefit for intracranial outcomes and overall survival (OS) for gross total resection with single-fraction SRS versus SRS alone for patients with large BMs. A large BM was defined as ≥4 cm(3) (2 cm in diameter) prior to the study. We reviewed the records of consecutive patients treated with single-fraction SRS alone or surgery with preoperative or postoperative SRS between 2005 and 2013 from 2 institutions. Overall, 213 patients with 223 treated large BMs were included; 66 BMs (30%) were treated with SRS alone and 157 (70%) with surgery and SRS (63 preoperatively and 94 postoperatively). The groups (SRS vs surgery and SRS) were well balanced except regarding lesion volume (median, 5.9 cm(3) vs 9.6 cm(3); P<.001), median number of BMs (1.5 vs 1, P=.002), median SRS dose (18 Gy vs 15 Gy, P<.001), and prior whole-brain radiation therapy (33% vs 5%, P<.001). The local recurrence (LR) rate was significantly lower with surgery and SRS (1-year LR rate, 36.7% vs 20.5%; P=.007). There was no difference in radiation necrosis (RN) by resection status, but there was a significantly increased RN rate with postoperative SRS versus with preoperative SRS and with SRS alone (1-year RN rate, 22.6% vs 5% and 12.3%, respectively; P<.001). OS was significantly higher with surgery and SRS (2-year OS rate, 38.9% vs 19.8%; P=.01). Both multivariate adjusted analyses and propensity score-matched analyses demonstrated similar results. In this retrospective study, gross total resection with SRS was associated with significantly reduced LR compared with SRS alone for patients with large BMs. Postoperative SRS was associated with the highest rate of RN. Surgical resection with SRS may improve outcomes in patients with a limited number of large BMs compared with SRS alone. Further studies are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  9. 46 CFR 71.65-5 - Plans and specifications required for new construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plans and specifications required for new construction... VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 71.65-5 Plans and specifications required for new construction. (a) General. (1) Specifications. (2) General Arrangement Plan of decks, holds, inner bottoms, etc...

  10. Reference manual for a Requirements Specification Language (RSL), version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Gene L.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1993-01-01

    This report is a Reference Manual for a general-purpose Requirements Specification Language, RSL. The purpose of RSL is to specify precisely the external structure of a mechanized system and to define requirements that the system must meet. A system can be comprised of a mixture of hardware, software, and human processing elements. RSL is a hybrid of features found in several popular requirements specification languages and includes constructs for formal mathematical specification.

  11. Functions and Requirements and Specifications for Replacement of the Computer Automated Surveillance System (CASS)

    SciTech Connect

    SCAIEF, C.C.

    1999-12-16

    This functions, requirements and specifications document defines the baseline requirements and criteria for the design, purchase, fabrication, construction, installation, and operation of the system to replace the Computer Automated Surveillance System (CASS) alarm monitoring.

  12. 24 CFR 200.936 - Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building products certification program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements under HUD building products certification program for solid fuel type room heaters and fireplace... Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building products certification program for solid fuel... fireplace stoves certified under the HUD Building Products Certification Program shall be...

  13. Risk-Dominant Scenarios from Several SRS Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-03-15

    This report and associated spreadsheets describe the SRS safety analysis provided for four selected transuranic storage and stabilization facilities. For each of the four sets of analysis, the bounding events in each frequency category are identified, key inputs and assumptions are stated, and final doses tabulated.

  14. Wastewaters at SRS where heavy metals are a potential problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.

    1994-11-01

    The principal objective of this report is to identify and prioritize heavy metal-containing wastewaters at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in terms of their suitability for testing of and clean-up by a novel bioremediation process being developed by SRTC. This process involves the use of algal biomass for sequestering heavy metal and radionuclides from wastewaters. Two categories of SRS wastewaters were considered for this investigation: (1) waste sites (primarily non-contained wastes managed by Environmental Restoration), and (2) waste streams (primarily contained wastes managed by Waste Management). An attempt was made to evaluate all sources of both categories of waste throughout the site so that rational decisions could be made with regard to selecting the most appropriate wastewaters for present study and potential future treatment. The investigation included a review of information on surface and/or groundwater associated with all known SRS waste sites, as well as waters associated with all known SRS waste streams. Following the initial review, wastewaters known or suspected to contain potentially problematic concentrations of one or more of the toxic metals were given further consideration.

  15. Brain-specific-homeobox is required for the specification of neuronal types in the Drosophila optic lobe.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Eri; Kaido, Masako; Takayama, Rie; Sato, Makoto

    2013-05-01

    The Drosophila optic lobe comprises a wide variety of neurons forming laminar and columnar structures similar to the mammalian brain. The Drosophila optic lobe may provide an excellent model to investigate various processes of brain development. However, it is poorly understood how neuronal specification is regulated in the optic lobe to form a complicated structure. Here we show that the Brain-specific-homeobox (Bsh) protein, which is expressed in the lamina and medulla ganglia, is involved in specifying neuronal identity. Bsh is expressed in L4 and L5 lamina neurons and in Mi1 medulla neurons. Analyses of loss-of-function and gain-of-function clones suggest that Bsh is required and largely sufficient for Mi1 specification in the medulla and L4 specification in the lamina. Additionally, Bsh is at least required for L5 specification. In the absence of Bsh, L5 is transformed into glial cells.

  16. The Role of SHI/STY/SRS Genes in Organ Growth and Carpel Development Is Conserved in the Distant Eudicot Species Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Gomariz-Fernández, Africa; Sánchez-Gerschon, Verónica; Fourquin, Chloé; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Carpels are a distinctive feature of angiosperms, the ovule-bearing female reproductive organs that endow them with multiple selective advantages likely linked to the evolutionary success of flowering plants. Gene regulatory networks directing the development of carpel specialized tissues and patterning have been proposed based on genetic and molecular studies carried out in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on the conservation/diversification of the elements and the topology of this network are still scarce. In this work, we have studied the functional conservation of transcription factors belonging to the SHI/STY/SRS family in two distant species within the eudicots, Eschscholzia californica and Nicotiana benthamiana. We have found that the expression patterns of EcSRS-L and NbSRS-L genes during flower development are similar to each other and to those reported for Arabidopsis SHI/STY/SRS genes. We have also characterized the phenotypic effects of NbSRS-L gene inactivation and overexpression in Nicotiana. Our results support the widely conserved role of SHI/STY/SRS genes at the top of the regulatory network directing style and stigma development, specialized tissues specific to the angiosperm carpels, at least within core eudicots, providing new insights on the possible evolutionary origin of the carpels.

  17. The Role of SHI/STY/SRS Genes in Organ Growth and Carpel Development Is Conserved in the Distant Eudicot Species Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Gomariz-Fernández, Africa; Sánchez-Gerschon, Verónica; Fourquin, Chloé; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Carpels are a distinctive feature of angiosperms, the ovule-bearing female reproductive organs that endow them with multiple selective advantages likely linked to the evolutionary success of flowering plants. Gene regulatory networks directing the development of carpel specialized tissues and patterning have been proposed based on genetic and molecular studies carried out in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on the conservation/diversification of the elements and the topology of this network are still scarce. In this work, we have studied the functional conservation of transcription factors belonging to the SHI/STY/SRS family in two distant species within the eudicots, Eschscholzia californica and Nicotiana benthamiana. We have found that the expression patterns of EcSRS-L and NbSRS-L genes during flower development are similar to each other and to those reported for Arabidopsis SHI/STY/SRS genes. We have also characterized the phenotypic effects of NbSRS-L gene inactivation and overexpression in Nicotiana. Our results support the widely conserved role of SHI/STY/SRS genes at the top of the regulatory network directing style and stigma development, specialized tissues specific to the angiosperm carpels, at least within core eudicots, providing new insights on the possible evolutionary origin of the carpels. PMID:28588595

  18. Computer-Aided Discovery of Formal Specification Behavioral Requirements and Requirement to Implementation Mappings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    PRELIMINARIES 2.1 FORMAL SPECIFICATIONS USING STATECHART ASSERTIONS In section 3 we will be using the following Traffic Light Controller ( TLC ) example...The TLC controls lights at a junction of two streets, El Camino Real and B Street, in Silicon Valley. Sensors are positioned under both streets. The El...Camino Real sensor dispatches a newCar or newTruck event to the TLC , when a new car or a new truck is detected. The system should contain a camera

  19. Proximal junctional kyphosis results in inferior SRS pain subscores in adult deformity patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Jo; Bridwell, Keith H; Lenke, Lawrence G; Park, Moon Soo; Ahmad, Azeem; Song, Kwang-Sup; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Hershman, Stuart; Fogelson, Jeremy; Mesfin, Addisu

    2013-05-15

    Retrospective comparative study. We aimed to examine the difference in clinical outcomes in proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK). To date, PJK has been primarily a radiographical finding. Inferior outcomes associated with PJK have not been reported. We performed an analysis of PJK in adult deformity patients to identify risk factors and to evaluate clinical outcomes. A total of 364 patients at a single institution from 2002 to 2007 with adult scoliosis, with an average 3.5 years' follow-up were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were age more than 18 years and fusion greater than 5 levels from any thoracic upper instrumented vertebrae to any lower instrumented vertebrae. Cobb measurements in the coronal and sagittal plane in addition to measurements of the PJK angle at postoperative time points were performed. Clinical assessment was performed using Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) scores and the Oswestry Disability Index. The prevalence of PJK was 39.5% (144/364). The average age in the non-PJK group (n-PJK) was 48.9 versus 53.3 in the PJK group (PJK), and, specifically, age more than 60 years posed a higher prevalence. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 9.8% versus 20.4% in the n-PJK versus PJK groups, respectively. Sex, body mass index, revision surgery, and smoking status were not different between groups. Pain was prevalent in 0.9% versus 29.4% in n-PJK versus PJK, which resulted in lower composite SRS Pain scores (mean change +1.2 vs. +0.8), despite no differences seen in other SRS domains, total SRS score, or Oswestry Disability Index. On multivariate analysis, the presence of pain of the upper back was highly predictive of PJK (odds ratio, 12.5, 95% confidence interval, 2.5-63.2). Radiographically, no differences were seen between groups. However, increasing distance of the upper instrumented vertebrae to C7 plumb line had a higher prevalence of PJK. Instrumentation type, surgical approach, and crosslink use were not different between groups. PJK results in worse

  20. STATS SRS v11.0

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M A; Nazario, O L

    2007-06-20

    The objective of this project is the delivery of an application that will provide a unified, web-based system for collecting, verifying and analyzing the achievements for Laboratory employees. The application will enable individual Directorates to manage and report achievement record data for their employees using an LLNL standard web browser. In addition, cross directorate data reporting and analysis will be available for such organizations as LSTO and programmatic directorates. This system is intended to store reference data and metadata for employee achievements. Abstracts and entire publications will not be stored in this system.Directorates are expected to use this system at all levels of management in preparing for Annual Self-Assessments, peer reviews, LDRD reviews, work force reviews, performance appraisals, and requests from sponsors. This document represents the primary deliverable for the Requirements Definition stage of system development. As part of a successful Requirements Definition, this document provides the development staff, the project sponsor, and the user community with a clear understanding of the product's operational, data, and other requirements. With this understanding, the development staff will take the opportunity to refine estimates regarding the cost, schedule, and deliverables reflected in it.

  1. 49 CFR 171.23 - Requirements for specific materials and packagings transported under the ICAO Technical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for specific materials and packagings... International Transport Standards and Regulations § 171.23 Requirements for specific materials and packagings... self-closing release device (see § 171.8). In addition, an aerosol must be in a metal packaging...

  2. 10 CFR 810.12 - Information required in an application for specific authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information required in an application for specific authorization. 810.12 Section 810.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.12 Information required in an application for specific authorization. Each application...

  3. 10 CFR 810.12 - Information required in an application for specific authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Information required in an application for specific authorization. 810.12 Section 810.12 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN ATOMIC ENERGY ACTIVITIES § 810.12 Information required in an application for specific authorization. Each application...

  4. 78 FR 47015 - Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... COMMISSION Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software Used in Safety Systems of... 1 of RG 1.172, ``Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software used in Safety... well as the software elements of those systems. This RG is one of six RG revisions addressing computer...

  5. 49 CFR 173.457 - Transportation of fissile material packages-specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-specific requirements. 173.457 Section 173.457 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation....457 Transportation of fissile material packages—specific requirements. (a) Packages containing fissile... area must be so limited that the total sum of the CSI's in any group of packages, overpacks or freight...

  6. Tools reference manual for a Requirements Specification Language (RSL), version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Gene L.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a general-purpose Requirements Specification Language, RSL. The purpose of RSL is to specify precisely the external structure of a mechanized system and to define requirements that the system must meet. A system can be comprised of a mixture of hardware, software, and human processing elements. RSL is a hybrid of features found in several popular requirements specification languages, such as SADT (Structured Analysis and Design Technique), PSL (Problem Statement Language), and RMF (Requirements Modeling Framework). While languages such as these have useful features for structuring a specification, they generally lack formality. To overcome the deficiencies of informal requirements languages, RSL has constructs for formal mathematical specification. These constructs are similar to those found in formal specification languages such as EHDM (Enhanced Hierarchical Development Methodology), Larch, and OBJ3.

  7. 75 FR 17765 - Termination of Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Special Resource Study (SRS) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... (SRS) for Castle Nugent Farms, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands in favor of an Environmental Assessment..., St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. A Notice of Intent to prepare an EIS for the SRS was published in the... located on the island of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The SRS will determine whether study area...

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the modern management of patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Hany; Das, Sunit; Larson, David A; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-03-15

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established non-invasive ablative therapy for brain metastases. Early clinical trials with SRS proved that tumor control rates are superior to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. As a result, WBRT plus SRS was widely adopted for patients with a limited number of brain metastases ("limited number" customarily means 1-4). Subsequent trials focused on answering whether WBRT upfront was necessary at all. Based on current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses comparing SRS alone to SRS plus WBRT, adjuvant WBRT results in better intracranial control; however, at the expense of neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. These adverse effects of WBRT may also negatively impact on survival in younger patients. Based on the results of these studies, treatment has shifted to SRS alone in patients with a limited number of metastases. Additionally, RCTs are evaluating the role of SRS alone in patients with >4 brain metastases. New developments in SRS include fractionated SRS for large tumors and the integration of SRS with targeted systemic therapies that cross the blood brain barrier and/or stimulate an immune response. We present in this review the current high level evidence and rationale supporting SRS as the standard of care for patients with limited brain metastases, and emerging applications of SRS.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the modern management of patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany; Das, Sunit; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established non-invasive ablative therapy for brain metastases. Early clinical trials with SRS proved that tumor control rates are superior to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. As a result, WBRT plus SRS was widely adopted for patients with a limited number of brain metastases (“limited number” customarily means 1-4). Subsequent trials focused on answering whether WBRT upfront was necessary at all. Based on current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses comparing SRS alone to SRS plus WBRT, adjuvant WBRT results in better intracranial control; however, at the expense of neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. These adverse effects of WBRT may also negatively impact on survival in younger patients. Based on the results of these studies, treatment has shifted to SRS alone in patients with a limited number of metastases. Additionally, RCTs are evaluating the role of SRS alone in patients with >4 brain metastases. New developments in SRS include fractionated SRS for large tumors and the integration of SRS with targeted systemic therapies that cross the blood brain barrier and/or stimulate an immune response. We present in this review the current high level evidence and rationale supporting SRS as the standard of care for patients with limited brain metastases, and emerging applications of SRS. PMID:26848525

  10. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for inspection and test of... Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars. (a) General. Each tank car owner must ensure that a tank car facility: (1) Inspects and tests each item according to the requirements specified...

  11. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for inspection and test of... Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars. (a) General. Each tank car owner must ensure that a tank car facility: (1) Inspects and tests each item according to the requirements specified...

  12. 49 CFR 180.509 - Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for inspection and test of... Requirements for inspection and test of specification tank cars. (a) General. Each tank car owner must ensure that a tank car facility: (1) Inspects and tests each item according to the requirements specified...

  13. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In addition...

  14. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201 Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks....

  15. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  16. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201 Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks....

  17. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In addition...

  18. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  19. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  20. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In addition...

  1. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.101 Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank...

  2. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201 Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks....

  3. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a)...

  4. Effects of Using Requirements Catalogs on Effectiveness and Productivity of Requirements Specification in a Software Project Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; Meca, Joaquín Vidal; Ros, Joaquín Nicolás; Toval, Ambrosio; Idri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two educational experiments carried out to determine whether the process of specifying requirements (catalog-based reuse as opposed to conventional specification) has an impact on effectiveness and productivity in co-located and distributed software development environments. The participants in the experiments…

  5. An evaluation of epidemiological and reporting characteristics of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) systematic reviews (SRs).

    PubMed

    Turner, Lucy; Galipeau, James; Garritty, Chantelle; Manheimer, Eric; Wieland, L Susan; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Moher, David

    2013-01-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) are abundant. The optimal reporting of SRs is critical to enable clinicians to use their findings to make informed treatment decisions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are widely used therefore it is critical that conduct and reporting of systematic research in this field be of high quality. Here, methodological and reporting characteristics of a sample of CAM-related SRs and a sample of control SRs are evaluated and compared. MEDLINE(®) was searched to identify non-Cochrane SRs indexed from January 2010 to May 2011. Control SRs were retrieved and a search filter was used to identify CAM SRs. Citations were screened and publications that met a pre-specified definition of a SR were included. Pre-designed, standardized data extraction forms were developed to capture reporting and methodological characteristics of the included reviews. Where appropriate, samples were compared descriptively. A total of 349 SRs were identified, of which 174 were CAM-related SRs and 175 were conventional SRs. We compared 131 CAM-related non-Cochrane SRs to the 175 conventional non-Cochrane reviews. Fifty-seven percent (75/131) of CAM SRs specified a primary outcome compared to 21% (37/175) of conventional sample reviews. Reporting of publication bias occurred in less than 5% (6/131) of the CAM sample versus 46% (80/175) of the conventional sample of SRs. Source of funding was frequently and consistently under-reported. Less than 5% (11/306) of all SRs reported public availability of a review protocol. The two samples of reviews exhibited different strengths and weaknesses. In some cases there were consistencies across items which indicate the need for continued improvements in reporting for all SR reports. We advise authors to utilise the PRISMA Statement or other SR guidance when reporting SRs.

  6. An Evaluation of Epidemiological and Reporting Characteristics of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Systematic Reviews (SRs)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lucy; Galipeau, James; Garritty, Chantelle; Manheimer, Eric; Wieland, L. Susan; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Moher, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews (SRs) are abundant. The optimal reporting of SRs is critical to enable clinicians to use their findings to make informed treatment decisions. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are widely used therefore it is critical that conduct and reporting of systematic research in this field be of high quality. Here, methodological and reporting characteristics of a sample of CAM-related SRs and a sample of control SRs are evaluated and compared. Methods MEDLINE® was searched to identify non-Cochrane SRs indexed from January 2010 to May 2011. Control SRs were retrieved and a search filter was used to identify CAM SRs. Citations were screened and publications that met a pre-specified definition of a SR were included. Pre-designed, standardized data extraction forms were developed to capture reporting and methodological characteristics of the included reviews. Where appropriate, samples were compared descriptively. Results A total of 349 SRs were identified, of which 174 were CAM-related SRs and 175 were conventional SRs. We compared 131 CAM-related non-Cochrane SRs to the 175 conventional non-Cochrane reviews. Fifty-seven percent (75/131) of CAM SRs specified a primary outcome compared to 21% (37/175) of conventional sample reviews. Reporting of publication bias occurred in less than 5% (6/131) of the CAM sample versus 46% (80/175) of the conventional sample of SRs. Source of funding was frequently and consistently under-reported. Less than 5% (11/306) of all SRs reported public availability of a review protocol. Conclusion The two samples of reviews exhibited different strengths and weaknesses. In some cases there were consistencies across items which indicate the need for continued improvements in reporting for all SR reports. We advise authors to utilise the PRISMA Statement or other SR guidance when reporting SRs. PMID:23341949

  7. Evaluation of Background Mercury Concentrations in the SRS Groundwater System

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.

    1999-03-03

    Mercury analyses associated with the A-01 Outfall have highlighted the importance of developing an understanding of mercury in the Savannah River Site groundwater system and associated surface water streams. This activity is critical based upon the fact that the EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) for this constituent is 0.012mg/L, a level that is well below conventional detection limits of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/L. A first step in this process is obtained by utilizing the existing investment in groundwater mercury concentrations (20,242 records) maintained in the SRS geographical information management system (GIMS) database. Careful use of these data provides a technically defensible initial estimate for total recoverable mercury in background and contaminated SRS wells.

  8. Hybrid Microwave Treatment of SRS TRU and Mixed Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wicks, G.G.

    1999-11-18

    A new process, using hybrid microwave energy, has been developed as part of the Strategic Research and Development program and successfully applied to treatment of a wide variety of non-radioactive materials, representative of SRS transuranic (TRU) and mixed wastes. Over 35 simulated (non-radioactive) TRU and mixed waste materials were processed individually, as well as in mixed batches, using hybrid microwave energy, a new technology now being patented by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC).

  9. Health effects of SRS non-radiological air emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.

    1997-06-16

    This report examines the potential health effects of non radiological emissions to the air resulting from operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this study was limited to the 55 air contaminants for which the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has quantified risk by determining unit risk factors (excess cancer risks) and/or reference concentrations (deleterious non cancer risks). Potential health impacts have been assessed in relation to the maximally exposed individual. This is a hypothetical person who resides for a lifetime at the SRS boundary. The most recent (1994) quality assured SRS emissions data available were used. Estimated maximum site boundary concentrations of the air contaminants were calculated using air dispersion modeling and 24-hour and annual averaging times. For the emissions studied, the excess cancer risk was found to be less than the generally accepted risk level of 1 in 100,000 and, in most cases, was less than 1 in 1,000,000. Deleterious non cancer effects were also found to be very unlikely.

  10. THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2011-03-08

    The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

  11. Engineering Specification for Large-aperture UVO Space Telescopes Derived from Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Arnold, William; Bevan, Ryan M.; Smith, W. Scott.; Kirk, Charles S.; Postman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    An advanced large aperture UV/optical UVO space telescope is required for the next generation of astrophysics and exoplanet science. The science requirements of proposed exoplanet and astrophysics missions were used to determine the encircled energy, point spread function stability and thermal environment requirements. These requirements then determine the optical wavefront specification for potential telescope assemblies which can fit inside current and planned launch vehicles. The optical wavefront specification becomes the top level of the error budget that is split into various sources that control the structural, thermal and optical design.

  12. The SRS-Viewer: A Software Tool for Displaying and Evaluation of Pyroshock Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberl, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    For the evaluation of the success of a pyroshock, the time domain and the corresponding Shock-Response- Spectra (SRS) have to be considered. The SRS-Viewer is an IABG developed software tool [1] to read data in Universal File format (*.unv) and either display or plot for each accelerometer the time domain, corresponding SRS and the specified Reference-SRS with tolerances in the background.The software calculates the "Average (AVG)", "Maximum (MAX)" and "Minimum (MIN)" SRS of any selection of accelerometers. A statistical analysis calculates the percentages of measured SRS above the specified Reference-SRS level and the percentage within the tolerance bands for comparison with the specified success criteria.Overlay plots of single accelerometers of different test runs enable to monitor the repeatability of the shock input and the integrity of the specimen. Furthermore the difference between the shock on a mass-dummy and the real test unit can be examined.

  13. The Mitochondrial Lon Protease Is Required for Age-Specific and Sex-Specific Adaptation to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Pomatto, Laura C D; Carney, Caroline; Shen, Brenda; Wong, Sarah; Halaszynski, Kelly; Salomon, Matthew P; Davies, Kelvin J A; Tower, John

    2017-01-09

    Multiple human diseases involving chronic oxidative stress show a significant sex bias, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, immune dysfunction, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. However, a possible molecular mechanism for the sex bias in physiological adaptation to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster females but not males adapt to hydrogen peroxide stress, whereas males but not females adapt to paraquat (superoxide) stress. Stress adaptation in each sex requires the conserved mitochondrial Lon protease and is associated with sex-specific expression of Lon protein isoforms and proteolytic activity. Adaptation to oxidative stress is lost with age in both sexes. Transgenic expression of transformer gene during development transforms chromosomal males into pseudo-females and confers the female-specific pattern of Lon isoform expression, Lon proteolytic activity induction, and H2O2 stress adaptation; these effects were also observed using adult-specific transformation. Conversely, knockdown of transformer in chromosomal females eliminates the female-specific Lon isoform expression, Lon proteolytic activity induction, and H2O2 stress adaptation and produces the male-specific paraquat (superoxide) stress adaptation. Sex-specific expression of alternative Lon isoforms was also observed in mouse tissues. The results develop Drosophila melanogaster as a model for sex-specific stress adaptation regulated by the Lon protease, with potential implications for understanding sexual dimorphism in human disease.

  14. 49 CFR 180.205 - General requirements for requalification of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for steel and nickel cylinders (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter); C-6.1 for seamless aluminum... requirements prescribed in this paragraph (f), each specification cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy...

  15. 49 CFR 180.205 - General requirements for requalification of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for steel and nickel cylinders (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter); C-6.1 for seamless aluminum... requirements prescribed in this paragraph (f), each specification cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy...

  16. 49 CFR 180.205 - General requirements for requalification of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for steel and nickel cylinders (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter); C-6.1 for seamless aluminum... requirements prescribed in this paragraph (f), each specification cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy...

  17. 49 CFR 180.205 - General requirements for requalification of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for steel and nickel cylinders (IBR, see § 171.7 of this subchapter); C-6.1 for seamless aluminum... requirements prescribed in this paragraph (f), each specification cylinder manufactured of aluminum alloy...

  18. Production of refolded Toxoplasma gondii recombinant SAG1-related sequence 3 (SRS3) and its use for serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Mirzadeh, Abolfazl; Saadatnia, Geita; Golkar, Majid; Babaie, Jalal; Noordin, Rahmah

    2017-03-02

    SAG1-related sequence 3 (SRS3) is one of the major Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite surface antigens and has been shown to be potentially useful for the detection of toxoplasmosis. This protein is highly conformational due to the presence of six disulfide bonds. To achieve solubility and antigenicity, SRS3 depends on proper disulfide bond formation. The aim of this study was to over-express the SRS3 protein with correct folding for use in serodiagnosis of the disease. To achieve this, a truncated SRS3 fusion protein (rtSRS3) was produced, containing six histidyl residues at both terminals and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The refolding process was performed through three methods, namely dialysis in the presence of chemical additives along with reduced/oxidized glutathione and drop-wise dilution methods with reduced/oxidized glutathione or reduced DTT/oxidized glutathione. Ellman's assay and ELISA showed that the protein folding obtained by the dialysis method was the most favorable, probably due to the correct folding. Subsequently, serum samples from individuals with chronic infection (n = 76), probable acute infection (n = 14), and healthy controls (n = 81) were used to determine the usefulness of the refolded rtSRS3 for Toxoplasma serodiagnosis. The results of the developed IgG-ELISA showed a diagnostic specificity of 91% and a sensitivity of 82.89% and 100% for chronic and acute serum samples, respectively. In conclusion, correctly folded rtSRS3 has the potential to be used as a soluble antigen for the detection of human toxoplasmosis.

  19. Screening for Autism with the SRS and SCQ: Variations across Demographic, Developmental and Behavioral Factors in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Moody, Eric J; Reyes, Nuri; Ledbetter, Caroline; Wiggins, Lisa; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Alexander, Amira; Jackson, Shardel; Lee, Li-Ching; Levy, Susan E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2017-08-30

    The Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ) and the Social Responsiveness Scales (SRS) are commonly used screeners for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Data from the Study to Explore Early Development were used to examine variations in the performance of these instruments by child characteristics and family demographics. For both instruments, specificity decreased as maternal education and family income decreased. Specificity was decreased with lower developmental functioning and higher behavior problems. This suggests that the false positive rates of the SRS and the SCQ are associated with child characteristics and family demographic factors. There is a need for ASD screeners that perform well across socioeconomic and child characteristics. Clinicians should be mindful of differential performance of these instruments in various groups of children.

  20. AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    AMTD is using a Science Driven Systems Engineering approach to develop Engineering Specifications based on Science Measurement Requirements and Implementation Constraints. Science requirements meet the needs of both Exoplanet and General Astrophysics science. Engineering Specifications are guiding our effort to mature to TRL-6 the critical technologies needed to produce 4-m or larger flight-qualified UVOIR mirrors by 2018 so that a viable mission can be considered by the 2020 Decadal Review.

  1. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  2. 40 CFR 270.21 - Specific part B information requirements for landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for landfills. 270.21 Section 270.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Permit Application § 270.21 Specific part B information requirements for landfills. Except as otherwise provided in § 264.1, owners and operators of facilities that dispose of hazardous waste in landfills must...

  3. 46 CFR 189.55-5 - Plans and specifications required for new construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Plan Approval § 189.55-5 Plans and specifications... bottom plating and framing. 1 The asterisk (*) indicates items which may require approval by the American..., carbon dioxide, foam and sprinkling systems. (e) Marine engineering. For plans required for...

  4. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR...

  5. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR...

  6. 10 CFR 72.236 - Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specific requirements for spent fuel storage cask approval and fabrication. 72.236 Section 72.236 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR...

  7. 10 CFR 40.32 - General requirements for issuance of specific licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... weighing the environmental, economic, technical and other benefits against environmental costs and... satisfies any applicable special requirements contained in § 40.34. (g) If the proposed activity involves... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements for issuance of specific licenses....

  8. 10 CFR 30.33 - General requirements for issuance of specific licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... part 51 of this chapter, has concluded, after weighing the environmental, economic, technical, and... protection of environmental values. (b) Upon a determination that an application meets the requirements of... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements for issuance of specific licenses....

  9. 40 CFR 270.21 - Specific part B information requirements for landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for landfills. 270.21 Section 270.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Permit Application § 270.21 Specific part B information requirements for landfills. Except as otherwise provided in § 264.1, owners and operators of facilities that dispose of hazardous waste in landfills...

  10. 40 CFR 270.21 - Specific part B information requirements for landfills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for landfills. 270.21 Section 270.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Permit Application § 270.21 Specific part B information requirements for landfills. Except as otherwise provided in § 264.1, owners and operators of facilities that dispose of hazardous waste in landfills...

  11. 7 CFR 1724.54 - Requirements for RUS approval of plans and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... DESIGN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Electric System Design § 1724.54 Requirements for RUS approval of plans... specifications for transmission construction projects which are not based on RUS approved line design data or do... section, plans and specifications for transmission construction which use previously approved design...

  12. 46 CFR 91.55-5 - Plans and specifications required for new construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plans and specifications required for new construction... new construction. (a) General. (1) Specifications. (2) General Arrangement Plan of decks, holds, inner... facilities for all crewmembers. (i) Navigation bridge visibility. For vessels of 100 meters (328 feet) or...

  13. 49 CFR 180.209 - Requirements for requalification of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Requirements for requalification of specification cylinders. (a) Periodic qualification of cylinders. Each specification cylinder that becomes due for periodic requalification, as specified in the following table, must... records must be maintained in accordance with § 180.215. Table 1 follows: Table 1—Requalification of...

  14. 46 CFR 62.35-50 - Tabulated monitoring and safety control requirements for specific systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... auxiliary, system, power supply Status Auto transfer 1 See the ABS Steel Vessel Rules (incorporated by... specific systems. 62.35-50 Section 62.35-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION Requirements for Specific Types of Automated Vital...

  15. 46 CFR 62.35-50 - Tabulated monitoring and safety control requirements for specific systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... auxiliary, system, power supply Status Auto transfer 1 See the ABS Steel Vessel Rules (incorporated by... specific systems. 62.35-50 Section 62.35-50 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION Requirements for Specific Types of Automated Vital...

  16. 40 CFR 270.24 - Specific part B information requirements for process vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Permit Application § 270.24 Specific part B information requirements for process vents. Except as... with the process vent standards in § 264.1032, including: (1) Information and data identifying all... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specific part B information...

  17. 40 CFR 270.24 - Specific part B information requirements for process vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Permit Application § 270.24 Specific part B information requirements for process vents. Except as... with the process vent standards in § 264.1032, including: (1) Information and data identifying all... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Specific part B information...

  18. 40 CFR 270.24 - Specific part B information requirements for process vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Permit Application § 270.24 Specific part B information requirements for process vents. Except as... with the process vent standards in § 264.1032, including: (1) Information and data identifying all... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific part B information...

  19. 40 CFR 270.24 - Specific part B information requirements for process vents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Permit Application § 270.24 Specific part B information requirements for process vents. Except as... with the process vent standards in § 264.1032, including: (1) Information and data identifying all... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specific part B information...

  20. Airborne Systems Software Acquisition Engineering Guidebook for Requirements Analysis and Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    documented in the pre- liminary system specification. This guidebook does not, however, describe how to produce a complete Computer Program Part I... Part I Development Specification. Software testing is discussed in the SAE Guidebook for Software Quality Assurance and in the SAE Guidebook for...Verification, Validation, and Certification. This guidebook does address -1- all the requirements that would appear in Section 3 of a Part I specification

  1. Performance Modeling Applied to the Treatment and Disposal of a Mixed Waste at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, J.B.; Jantzen, C.M.; Cook, J.R.; Whited, A.R.; Field, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    Performance modeling for Low Level Mixed Waste disposal was conducted using the measured leach rates from a number of vitrified waste formulations. The objective of the study was to determine if the improved durability of a vitrified mixed waste would allow trench disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Leaching data were compiled from twenty-nine diverse reference glasses, encompassing a wide range of exposed glass surface area to leachant volume ratios (SA/V), and various leachant solutions; all of which had been leached at 90 degrees Celsius, using the MCC-1 or PCT procedures (ASTM Procedures C1220-92 and C1285-94, respectively). The normalized leach rates were scaled to the ambient disposal temperature of 25 degrees Celsius, and compared to the allowable leach rate of uranium - which would meet the performance assessment requirements. The results indicated that a glass of above average durability (vs. the reference glasses) would meet the uranium leaching concentration for direct SRS trench disposal.

  2. Epigenetic mutations of the imprinted IGF2-H19 domain in Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS): results from a large cohort of patients with SRS and SRS-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Bartholdi, D; Krajewska-Walasek, M; Ounap, K; Gaspar, H; Chrzanowska, K H; Ilyana, H; Kayserili, H; Lurie, I W; Schinzel, A; Baumer, A

    2009-03-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterised by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation. Loss of DNA methylation at the telomeric imprinting control region 1 (ICR1) on 11p15 is an important cause of SRS. We studied the methylation pattern at the H19-IGF2 locus in 201 patients with suspected SRS. In an attempt to categorise the patients into different subgroups, we developed a simple clinical scoring system with respect to readily and unambiguously assessable clinical features. In a second step, the relationship between clinical score and epigenetic status was analysed. The scoring system emerged as a powerful tool for identifying those patients with both a definite SRS phenotype and carrying an epimutation at 11p15. 53% of the 201 patients initially enrolled fulfilled the criteria for SRS and about 40% of them exhibited an epimutation at the H19-IGF2 locus. Methylation defects were restricted to patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SRS. Patients carrying epimutations had a more severe phenotype than either the SRS patients with mUPD7 or the idiopathic SRS patients. The majority of patients with methylation abnormalities showed hypomethylation at both the H19 and IGF2 genes. However, we also identified SRS patients where hypomethylation was restricted to either the H19 or the IGF2 gene. Interestingly, we detected epimutations in siblings of normal parents, most likely reflecting germ cell mosaicism in the fathers. In one family, we identified an epimutation in an affected father and his likewise affected daughter.

  3. SU-E-T-72: Commissioning of a Standardized SRS Cone Set: Determination of the Bolus Gap Factors in a Passively Scattered Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R; Gordon, I; Ghebremedhin, A; Wroe, A; Schulte, R; Bush, D; Slater, J; Patyal, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the proton output factors for an SRS cone set using standardized apertures and varied range compensators (bolus blanks); specifically, to determine the best method for modeling the bolus gap factor (BGF) and eliminate the need for patient specific calibrations. Methods: A Standard Imaging A-16 chamber was placed in a Plastic Water phantom to measure the change in dose/MU with different treatment combinations for a proton SRS cone, using standardized apertures and range compensators. Measurements were made with all apertures in the SRS cone set, with four different range compensator thicknesses and five different air gaps between the end of the SRS cone and the surface of the phantom. The chamber was located at iso-center and maintained at a constant depth at the center of modulation for all measurements. Each aperture was placed in the cone to measure the change in MU needed to maintain constant dose at the chamber, as the air gap was increased with different thicknesses of bolus. Results: The dose/MU varied significantly with decreasing aperture size, increasing bolus thickness, or increasing air gap. The measured data was fitted with the lowest order polynomials that accurately described the data, to create a model for determining the change in output for any potential combination of devices used to treat a patient. For a given standardized aperture, the BGF could be described by its constituent factors: the bolus thickness factor (BTF) and the nozzle extension factor (NEF). Conclusion: The methods used to model the dose at the calibration point could be used to accurately predict the change in output for SRS proton beams due to the BGF, eliminating the need for patient specific calibrations. This method for modeling SRS treatments could also be applied to model other treatments using passively scattered proton beams.

  4. Phenotype classification of single cells using SRS microscopy, RNA sequencing, and microfluidics (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streets, Aaron M.; Cao, Chen; Zhang, Xiannian; Huang, Yanyi

    2016-03-01

    Phenotype classification of single cells reveals biological variation that is masked in ensemble measurement. This heterogeneity is found in gene and protein expression as well as in cell morphology. Many techniques are available to probe phenotypic heterogeneity at the single cell level, for example quantitative imaging and single-cell RNA sequencing, but it is difficult to perform multiple assays on the same single cell. In order to directly track correlation between morphology and gene expression at the single cell level, we developed a microfluidic platform for quantitative coherent Raman imaging and immediate RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of single cells. With this device we actively sort and trap cells for analysis with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (SRS). The cells are then processed in parallel pipelines for lysis, and preparation of cDNA for high-throughput transcriptome sequencing. SRS microscopy offers three-dimensional imaging with chemical specificity for quantitative analysis of protein and lipid distribution in single cells. Meanwhile, the microfluidic platform facilitates single-cell manipulation, minimizes contamination, and furthermore, provides improved RNA-Seq detection sensitivity and measurement precision, which is necessary for differentiating biological variability from technical noise. By combining coherent Raman microscopy with RNA sequencing, we can better understand the relationship between cellular morphology and gene expression at the single-cell level.

  5. An introduction to requirements capture using PVS: Specification of a simple autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to capturing software requirements in the PVS formal language. The object of study is a simplified digital autopilot that was motivated in part by the mode control panel of NASA Langley's Boeing 737 research aircraft. The paper first presents the requirements for this autopilot in English and then steps the reader through a translation of these requirements into formal mathematics. Along the way deficiencies in the English specification are noted and repaired. Once completed, the formal PVS requirement is analyzed using the PVS theorem prover and shown to maintain an invariant over its state space.

  6. SRS facility impacts on Crackerneck Wildlife Management Area

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-01-11

    Savannah River site (SRS) facilities that contain hazardous materials have completed the Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) process in accordance with Emergency Management Program Procedure (EMPP) 6Q-001. The EPHA determines the consequences of releases from these facilities and identifies events that exceed Protective Action Criteria (PAC) at defined receptor locations for areas of interest. One such area of interest is the Crackerneck wildlife Management Area (WMA). As such, facilities with releases that have the potential to exceed PAC at the Crackerneck WMA have been identified.

  7. PC-Based Applications Programming on the SRS Control System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martlew, Brian; Owen, Hywel; Pugh, Martin; Rawlinson, Bill; Smith, Susan

    1997-05-01

    The CERN PC-based ISOLDE control system has been installed at the SRS electron storage ring at Daresbury Laboratory. The use of Windows NT for the control consoles together with PC and VME front-end computers running under several operating systems has resulted in a flexible and reliable system for accelerator control. The implementation and philosophy of control application programs, based around a suite of Microsoft Visual Basic and Excel programs, is described. In particular, the use of Excel to provide adaptable programs online allows rapid generation of new control functions; orbit correction and servoing at the application level are described as examples of this.

  8. Vitrification of actinide solutions in SRS separations facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Minichan, R.L.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1995-09-01

    The actinide vitrification system being developed at SRS provides the capability to convert specialized or unique forms of nuclear material into a stable solid glass product that can be safely shipped, stored or reprocessed according to the DOE complex mission. This project is an application of technology developed through funds from the Office of Technology Development (OTD). This technology is ideally suited for vitrifying relatively small quantities of fissile or special nuclear material since it is designed to be critically safe. Successful demonstration of this system to safely vitrify radioactive material could open up numerous opportunities for transferring this technology to applications throughout the DOE complex.

  9. Lead pyrovanadate single crystal as a new SRS material

    SciTech Connect

    Basiev, Tasoltan T; Voronko, Yu K; Maslov, Vladislav A; Sobol, A A; Shukshin, V E

    2011-02-28

    Lead pyrovanadate Pb{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 7} single crystals of optical quality suitable for laser experiments are obtained. Vibrational modes are identified based on the analysis of the polarised Raman spectra of the single crystals. The main parameters (width at half maximum, peak and integral intensities) of the spectral lines most promising for SRS conversion in this material are estimated. These parameters are compared with the corresponding parameters of the most frequently used lines of known Raman materials: yttrium and gadolinium vanadates, potassium and lead tungstates, and lead molybdate. (active media)

  10. Label-free imaging of lipid dynamics using Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Folick, Andrew; Min, Wei; Wang, Meng C.

    2011-01-01

    The recently developed Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy have provided new methods to visualize the localization and regulation of biological molecules without the use of invasive and potentially perturbative labels. They allow rapid imaging of specific molecules with high resolution and sensitivity. These tools have been effectively applied to the study of lipid metabolism using Caenorhabditis elegans as a genetic model, unraveling new lipid storage phenotypes and their regulatory mechanisms. Here we review the underlying principle of CARS and SRS microscopy, as well as their recent applications in lipid biology research in C. elegans. PMID:21945002

  11. A Methodology for Writing High Quality Requirements Specification and Evaluating Existing Ones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda; Hammer, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    Requirements development and management have always been critical in the implementation of software systems; engineers are unable to build what analysts can't define. It is generally accepted that the earlier in the life cycle potential risks are identified the easier it is to eliminate or manage the conditions that introduce that risk. Problems that are not found until testing are approximately 14 times more costly to fix than if the problem was found in the requirement phase. The requirements specification, as the first tangible representation of the capability to be produced, establishes the basis for all of the project's engineering management and assurance functions. If the quality of the requirements specification is poor it can give rise to risks in all areas of the project. Recently, automated tools have become available to support requirements management. The use of these tools not only provides support in the definition and tracing of requirements, but it also opens the door to effective use of metrics in characterizing and assessing the quality of the requirement specifications.

  12. A Methodology for Writing High Quality Requirement Specifications and for Evaluating Existing Ones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda; Hammer, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    Requirements development and management have always been critical in the implementation of software systems-engineers are unable to build what analysts can not define. It is generally accepted that the earlier in the life cycle potential risks are identified the easier it is to eliminate or manage the conditions that introduce that risk. Problems that are not found until testing are approximately 14 times more costly to fix than if the problem was found in the requirement phase. The requirements specification, as the first tangible representation of the capability to be produced, establishes the basis for all of the project's engineering management and assurance functions. If the quality of the requirements specification is poor it can give rise to risks in all areas of the project. Recently, automated tools have become available to support requirements management. The use of these tools not only provides support in the definition and tracing of requirements, but it also opens the door to effective use of metrics in characterizing and assessing the quality of the requirement specifications.

  13. A Methodology for Writing High Quality Requirements Specification and Evaluating Existing Ones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda; Hammer, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    Requirements development and management have always been critical in the implementation of software systems; engineers are unable to build what analysts can't define. It is generally accepted that the earlier in the life cycle potential risks are identified the easier it is to eliminate or manage the conditions that introduce that risk. Problems that are not found until testing are approximately 14 times more costly to fix than if the problem was found in the requirement phase. The requirements specification, as the first tangible representation of the capability to be produced, establishes the basis for all of the project's engineering management and assurance functions. If the quality of the requirements specification is poor it can give rise to risks in all areas of the project. Recently, automated tools have become available to support requirements management. The use of these tools not only provides support in the definition and tracing of requirements, but it also opens the door to effective use of metrics in characterizing and assessing the quality of the requirement specifications.

  14. A Methodology for Writing High Quality Requirement Specifications and for Evaluating Existing Ones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Linda; Hammer, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    Requirements development and management have always been critical in the implementation of software systems-engineers are unable to build what analysts can not define. It is generally accepted that the earlier in the life cycle potential risks are identified the easier it is to eliminate or manage the conditions that introduce that risk. Problems that are not found until testing are approximately 14 times more costly to fix than if the problem was found in the requirement phase. The requirements specification, as the first tangible representation of the capability to be produced, establishes the basis for all of the project's engineering management and assurance functions. If the quality of the requirements specification is poor it can give rise to risks in all areas of the project. Recently, automated tools have become available to support requirements management. The use of these tools not only provides support in the definition and tracing of requirements, but it also opens the door to effective use of metrics in characterizing and assessing the quality of the requirement specifications.

  15. Towards the formal specification of the requirements and design of a processor interface unit: HOL listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fura, David A.; Windley, Phillip J.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1993-01-01

    This technical report contains the HOL listings of the specification of the design and major portions of the requirements for a commercially developed processor interface unit (or PIU). The PIU is an interface chip performing memory interface, bus interface, and additional support services for a commercial microprocessor within a fault-tolerant computer system. This system, the Fault-Tolerant Embedded Processor (FTEP), is targeted towards applications in avionics and space requiring extremely high levels of mission reliability, extended maintenance-free operation, or both. This report contains the actual HOL listings of the PIU specification as it currently exists. Section two of this report contains general-purpose HOL theories that support the PIU specification. These theories include definitions for the hardware components used in the PIU, our implementation of bit words, and our implementation of temporal logic. Section three contains the HOL listings for the PIU design specification. Aside from the PIU internal bus (I-Bus), this specification is complete. Section four contains the HOL listings for a major portion of the PIU requirements specification. Specifically, it contains most of the definition for the PIU behavior associated with memory accesses initiated by the local processor.

  16. Enterprise SRS: leveraging ongoing operations to advance nuclear fuel cycles research and development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, A.M.; Marra, J.E.; Wilmarth, W.R.; McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B.

    2013-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is re-purposing its vast array of assets (including H Canyon - a nuclear chemical separation plant) to solve issues regarding advanced nuclear fuel cycle technologies, nuclear materials processing, packaging, storage and disposition. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, radical view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into SRS facilities but also in other facilities in conjunction with on-going missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, a center for applied nuclear materials processing and engineering research has been established in SRS.

  17. New synchronous compensators for the Nelson River HVDC system; Planning requirements and specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Thio, C.V.; Davies, J.B. )

    1991-04-01

    The first units of Limestone Generating Station, the third plant on the Lower Nelson River in northern Manitoba, will come into service in the fall of 1990. Additional var compensation equipment is required at the inverter end of the Nelson River HVdc system to accommodate power from Limestone. This paper describes the system requirements of and the overall specification for the synchronous compensators selected to supply the reactive power and voltage support.

  18. A Strategy for Efficiently Verifying Requirements Specifications Using Composition and Invariants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-05

    described in [21, 22]. The verification tools used in our experiments include a theorem prover called Salsa [8], which applies a decision procedure... Salsa has been customized to prove properties of SCR requirements specifications. To use SMV (and SPIN), SCR specifications were translated into the SMV...describes the results of using Salsa , SMV, and SPIN to apply the proof rules to the ver- ificiation of a practical Navy system. Finally, Section 6

  19. SRS MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site(SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. SRS has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 2 or 3 facility with storage of bulk PuO{sub 2} and assembly, storage, and shipping of fuel bundles in an S and S Category 1 facility. The total Category 1 approach, which is the recommended option, would be done in the 221-H Canyon Building. A facility that was never in service will be removed from one area, and a hardened wall will be constructed in another area to accommodate execution of the LA fuel fabrication. The non-Category 1 approach would require removal of process equipment in the FB-Line metal production and packaging glove boxes, which requires work in a contamination area. The Immobilization Hot Demonstration Program

  20. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus a stereotactic boost (WBRT+SRS) for one to three brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Rades, Dirk; Kueter, Jan-Dirk; Hornung, Dagmar; Veninga, Theo; Hanssens, Patrick; Schild, Steven E; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-12-01

    The best available treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases is still unclear. This study compared the results of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus SRS (WBRT+SRS). Survival (OS), intracerebral control (IC), and local control of treated metastases (LC) were retrospectively analyzed in 144 patients receiving SRS alone (n=93) or WBRT+SRS (n=51). Eight additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score (ECOG-PS), tumor type, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation. Subgroup analyses were performed for RPA class I and II patients. 1-year-OS was 53% after SRS and 56% after WBRT+SRS (p=0.24). 1-year-IC rates were 51% and 66% (p=0.015), respectively. 1-year-LC rates were 66% and 87% (p=0.003), respectively. On multivariate analyses, OS was associated with age (p=0.004), ECOG-PS (p=0.005), extracerebral metastases (p<0.001), RPA class (p<0.001), and interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation (p<0.001). IC was associated with interval from tumor diagnosis to irradiation (p=0.004) and almost with treatment (p=0.09), and LC with treatment (p=0.026) and almost with interval (p=0.08). The results of the subgroup analyses were similar to those of the entire cohort. The increase in IC was stronger in RPA class I patients. WBRT+SRS resulted in better IC and LC but not better OS than SRS alone. Because also IC and LC are important end-points, additional WBRT appears justified in patients with one to three brain metastases, in particular in RPA class I patients.

  1. Alternative Ultrafiltration Membrane Testing for the SRS Baseline Process

    SciTech Connect

    N. R. Mann; R. S. Herbst; T. G. Garn; M. R. Poirier; S. D. Fink

    2004-06-01

    The ability to more rapidly process high-level waste sludge and supernate, without sacrificing cost savings, continues to be a crucial challenge facing the Savannah River Site (SRS). There has, to date, not been any extensive investigation of alternative filter technologies for the SRS baseline process. To address this problem, a focused investigation into alternative, state-of-the art filtration technologies to facilitate the strontium and actinide removal process, which can be cost effectively implemented in existing facilities and current equipment designs, was completed. Filter technologies manufactured by Mott (0.1 µm and 0.5 µm) Graver (0.07 µm), Pall (0.1 µm and 0.8 µm) and GKN (0.1 µm) were evaluated. Membranes had a nominal inside diameter of 3/8 inches and an active membrane length of 2 feet. The investigation was performed in two phases. The first phase of testing evaluated the consistency or variability in flux through the different membranes using water and a standard 5.0 wt% strontium carbonate slurry. The second phase of testing evaluated the achievable permeate flux and clarity through the various membranes using the SRS average salt supernate simulant at solids loadings of 0.06, 0.29 and 4.5 wt%. Membrane variation data indicate that membranes having an asymmetric ceramic coating (Pall 0.1 µm and Graver 0.07 µm), typically displayed the lowest variability with water. Membranes without a ceramic asymmetric coating (Mott 0.5 µm and GKN 0.1 µm) displayed the highest variability. This is most likely associated with the experimental uncertainties in measuring large volumes of permeate in a short amount of time and to the impact of impurities in the water. In general, variability ranging from 4-56% was observed when using water for all membranes. In the case of variation testing using strontium carbonate, variability decreased to 3-12%. In addition, membrane structure or composition had little effect on the variability. Data obtained from SRS

  2. General analysis of SRS-limited high-power fiber lasers and design strategy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Pengfei; Lv, Haibin; Xu, Jiangmin; Zhou, Pu; Jiang, Zongfu

    2016-11-14

    In this paper, a spectral model by incorporating SRS effect is proposed and established, which is feasible for analyzing the SRS effect both in high-power fiber oscillator and master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system. The theoretical results show that the SRS effect is tightly related to the bandwidths of the fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and it can be efficiently suppressed by optimizing the bandwidth of the FBGs. Besides, the established theoretical model is also feasible for analyzing the influence of seed power on the SRS effect. The theoretical predictions agree well with the previous experimental results.

  3. Long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (Srs) in patients with acoustic neuromas

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. . E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Thilmann, Christoph; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and long-term outcome of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for acoustic neuromas (AN). Patients and Methods: Between 1990 and 2001, we treated 26 patients with 27 AN with SRS. Two patients suffered from neurofibromatosis type 2. Before SRS, a subtotal or total resection had been performed in 3 and in 5 patients, respectively. For SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy/80% isodose was applied. Results: The overall actuarial 5-year and 10-year tumor control probability in all patients was 91%. Two patients developed tumor progression after SRS at 36 and 48 months. Nineteen patients (73%) were at risk of treatment-related facial nerve toxicity; of these, 1 patient developed a complete facial nerve palsy after SRS (5%). A total of 93% of the lesions treated were at risk of radiation-induced trigeminal neuralgia. Two patients (8%) developed mild dysesthesia of the trigeminal nerve after SRS. The hearing preservation rate in patients with useful hearing before SRS was 55% at 9 years. Conclusion:: Stereotactic radiosurgery results in good local control rates of AN and the risk of cranial nerve toxicities is acceptable. As toxicity is lower with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  4. Formal specification of requirements for analytical redundancy-based fault-tolerant flight control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gobbo, Diego

    2000-10-01

    Flight control systems are undergoing a rapid process of automation. The use of Fly-By-Wire digital flight control systems in commercial aviation (Airbus 320 and Boeing FBW-B777) is a clear sign of this trend. The increased automation goes in parallel with an increased complexity of flight control systems with obvious consequences on reliability and safety. Flight control systems must meet strict fault-tolerance requirements. The standard solution to achieving fault tolerance capability relies on multi-string architectures. On the other hand, multi-string architectures further increase the complexity of the system inducing a reduction of overall reliability. In the past two decades a variety of techniques based on analytical redundancy have been suggested for fault diagnosis purposes. While research on analytical redundancy has obtained desirable results, a design methodology involving requirements specification and feasibility analysis of analytical redundancy based fault tolerant flight control systems is missing. The main objective of this research work is to describe within a formal framework the implications of adopting analytical redundancy as a basis to achieve fault tolerance. The research activity involves analysis of the analytical redundancy approach, analysis of flight control system informal requirements, and re-engineering (modeling and specification) of the fault tolerance requirements. The USAF military specification MIL-F-9490D and supporting documents are adopted as source for the flight control informal requirements. The De Havilland DHC-2 general aviation aircraft equipped with standard autopilot control functions is adopted as pilot application. Relational algebra is adopted as formal framework for the specification of the requirements. The detailed analysis and formalization of the requirements resulted in a better definition of the fault tolerance problem in the framework of analytical redundancy. Fault tolerance requirements and related

  5. Label-free chemical imaging of live Euglena gracilis by high-speed SRS spectral microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakisaka, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Yuta; Tokunaga, Kyoya; Hirose, Misa; Domon, Ryota; Akaho, Rina; Kuroshima, Mai; Tsumura, Norimichi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Iwata, Osamu; Suzuki, Kengo; Nakashima, Ayaka; Goda, Keisuke; Ozeki, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Microbes, especially microalgae, have recently been of great interest for developing novel biofuels, drugs, and biomaterials. Imaging-based screening of live cells can provide high selectivity and is attractive for efficient bio-production from microalgae. Although conventional cellular screening techniques use cell labeling, labeling of microbes is still under development and can interfere with their cellular functions. Furthermore, since live microbes move and change their shapes rapidly, a high-speed imaging technique is required to suppress motion artifacts. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy allows for label-free and high-speed spectral imaging, which helps us visualize chemical components inside biological cells and tissues. Here we demonstrate high-speed SRS imaging, with temporal resolution of 0.14 seconds, of intracellular distributions of lipid, polysaccharide, and chlorophyll concentrations in rapidly moving Euglena gracilis, a unicellular phytoflagellate. Furthermore, we show that our method allows us to analyze the amount of chemical components inside each living cell. Our results indicate that SRS imaging may be applied to label-free screening of living microbes based on chemical information.

  6. International Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) Project Technical Requirements Specification, Revision F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Docking System (NDS) is NASA's implementation for the emerging International Docking System Standard (IDSS) using low impact docking technology. The NASA Docking System Project (NDSP) is the International Space Station (ISS) Program's project to produce the NDS, Common Docking Adapter (CDA) and Docking Hub. The NDS design evolved from the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). The acronym international Low Impact Docking System (iLIDS) is also used to describe this system as well as the Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) project designing the NDS for the NDSP. NDS and iLIDS may be used interchangeability. This document will use the acronym iLIDS. Some of the heritage documentation and implementations (e.g., software command names, requirement identification (ID), figures, etc.) used on NDS will continue to use the LIDS acronym. This specification defines the technical requirements for the iLIDS GFE delivered to the NDSP by the iLIDS project. This document contains requirements for two iLIDS configurations, SEZ29101800-301 and SEZ29101800-302. Requirements with the statement, iLIDS shall, are for all configurations. Examples of requirements that are unique to a single configuration may be identified as iLIDS (-301) shall or iLIDS (-302) shall. Furthermore, to allow a requirement to encompass all configurations with an exception, the requirement may be designated as iLIDS (excluding -302) shall. Verification requirements for the iLIDS project are identified in the Verification Matrix (VM) provided in the iLIDS Verification and Validation Document, JSC-63966. The following definitions differentiate between requirements and other statements: Shall: This is the only verb used for the binding requirements. Should/May: These verbs are used for stating non-mandatory goals. Will: This verb is used for stating facts or declaration of purpose. A Definition of Terms table is provided in Appendix B to define those terms with specific tailored uses in this document.

  7. 33 CFR 149.615 - What construction drawings and specifications are required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Design and Equipment General § 149.615 What construction drawings and specifications are required? (a) To... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What construction drawings...

  8. 10 CFR 72.75 - Reporting requirements for specific events and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting requirements for specific events and conditions... events and conditions. (a) Emergency notifications: Each licensee shall notify the NRC Headquarters... possible but not later than four hours after the discovery of any of the following events or...

  9. 10 CFR 72.75 - Reporting requirements for specific events and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reporting requirements for specific events and conditions... events and conditions. (a) Emergency notifications: Each licensee shall notify the NRC Headquarters... possible but not later than four hours after the discovery of any of the following events or...

  10. 10 CFR 72.75 - Reporting requirements for specific events and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reporting requirements for specific events and conditions... events and conditions. (a) Emergency notifications: Each licensee shall notify the NRC Headquarters... possible but not later than four hours after the discovery of any of the following events or...

  11. 10 CFR 40.32 - General requirements for issuance of specific licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General requirements for issuance of specific licenses. 40.32 Section 40.32 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL License... applicant is qualified by reason of training and experience to use the source material for the...

  12. 24 CFR 200.952 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Supplementary specific requirements... treads. 200.952 Section 200.952 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Minimum Property Standards §...

  13. 24 CFR 200.955 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standard and certification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Supplementary specific requirements... doors). 200.955 Section 200.955 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Minimum Property Standards §...

  14. 40 CFR 761.372 - Specific requirements for relatively clean surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... clean surfaces. 761.372 Section 761.372 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 761.372 Specific requirements for relatively clean surfaces. For surfaces that do not appear dusty or... with clean rinse solvent such that the entire surfaces is very wet for 1 minute. Drain and contain...

  15. 40 CFR 761.372 - Specific requirements for relatively clean surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... clean surfaces. 761.372 Section 761.372 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 761.372 Specific requirements for relatively clean surfaces. For surfaces that do not appear dusty or... with clean rinse solvent such that the entire surfaces is very wet for 1 minute. Drain and contain...

  16. 40 CFR 60.3019 - What site-specific documentation is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What site-specific documentation is required? 60.3019 Section 60.3019 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... operators that addresses the nine topics described in paragraphs (a)(1) through (9) of this section....

  17. 40 CFR 60.2910 - What site-specific documentation is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What site-specific documentation is required? 60.2910 Section 60.2910 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... facility and readily accessible for all OSWI unit operators that addresses the nine topics described...

  18. 40 CFR 60.2095 - What site-specific documentation is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What site-specific documentation is required? 60.2095 Section 60.2095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... ten topics described in paragraphs (a)(1) through (10) of this section. You must maintain...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2660 - What site-specific documentation is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What site-specific documentation is required? 60.2660 Section 60.2660 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... accessible for all CISWI unit operators that addresses the ten topics described in paragraphs (a)(1)...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2095 - What site-specific documentation is required?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What site-specific documentation is required? 60.2095 Section 60.2095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... readily accessible for all CISWI unit operators that addresses the ten topics described in paragraphs...

  1. 41 CFR 301-2.5 - What travel arrangements require specific authorization or prior approval?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What travel arrangements require specific authorization or prior approval? 301-2.5 Section 301-2.5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES INTRODUCTION 2-GENERAL...

  2. 24 CFR 200.943 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the grademarking of lumber. 200... Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the... that the lumber was green or dry at the time of dressing; (7) Indication that the lumber was...

  3. 24 CFR 200.943 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the grademarking of lumber. 200... Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the... that the lumber was green or dry at the time of dressing; (7) Indication that the lumber was...

  4. 24 CFR 200.943 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the grademarking of lumber. 200... Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the... that the lumber was green or dry at the time of dressing; (7) Indication that the lumber was...

  5. 24 CFR 200.943 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the grademarking of lumber. 200... Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the... that the lumber was green or dry at the time of dressing; (7) Indication that the lumber was...

  6. 24 CFR 200.943 - Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the grademarking of lumber. 200... Supplementary specific requirements under the HUD building product standards and certification program for the... that the lumber was green or dry at the time of dressing; (7) Indication that the lumber was...

  7. 46 CFR 62.35-50 - Tabulated monitoring and safety control requirements for specific systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Gas turbine (8) (8) (8) (8) (5) Engines and turbines Jacking/turning gear Engaged (8) Fuel oil (9) (9... instrumentation, alarms, and safety controls required for specific types of systems are listed in Table 62.35-50...) System Service Instrumentation Alarm Safety control Notes Main (Propulsion) boiler (1) (1) (1) (2)...

  8. 14 CFR 380.32 - Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts. 380.32 Section 380.32 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... or, when the charter is sold to the participant by a retail travel agent, checks and money orders may...

  9. 14 CFR 380.32 - Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts. 380.32 Section 380.32 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... or, when the charter is sold to the participant by a retail travel agent, checks and money orders may...

  10. 14 CFR 380.32 - Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts. 380.32 Section 380.32 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... or, when the charter is sold to the participant by a retail travel agent, checks and money orders may...

  11. 14 CFR 380.32 - Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specific requirements for operator-participant contracts. 380.32 Section 380.32 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF... or, when the charter is sold to the participant by a retail travel agent, checks and money orders may...

  12. 49 CFR 180.205 - General requirements for requalification of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Periodic requalification of cylinders. Each cylinder bearing a DOT specification marking must be requalified and marked as specified in the Requalification Table in this subpart. Each cylinder bearing a DOT... inspection of cylinders. Without regard to any other periodic requalification requirements, a cylinder must...

  13. 40 CFR 53.51 - Demonstration of compliance with design specifications and manufacturing and test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 § 53.51 Demonstration of... manufacturing quality control and testing. (2) In addition, specific tests are required by paragraph (d) of this...

  14. 40 CFR 53.51 - Demonstration of compliance with design specifications and manufacturing and test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EQUIVALENT METHODS Procedures for Testing Physical (Design) and Performance Characteristics of Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM 2.5 or PM 10-2.5 § 53.51 Demonstration of... manufacturing quality control and testing. (2) In addition, specific tests are required by paragraph (d) of this...

  15. 7 CFR 1724.54 - Requirements for RUS approval of plans and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and standard structures do not require RUS approval. Plans and specifications for related work, such... not use RUS standard structures must receive RUS approval prior to requesting bids on contracts or... application must show floor area and estimated cost breakdown between office building space and space...

  16. 7 CFR 1724.54 - Requirements for RUS approval of plans and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and standard structures do not require RUS approval. Plans and specifications for related work, such... not use RUS standard structures must receive RUS approval prior to requesting bids on contracts or... application must show floor area and estimated cost breakdown between office building space and space...

  17. 7 CFR 1724.54 - Requirements for RUS approval of plans and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and standard structures do not require RUS approval. Plans and specifications for related work, such... not use RUS standard structures must receive RUS approval prior to requesting bids on contracts or... application must show floor area and estimated cost breakdown between office building space and space...

  18. 7 CFR 1724.54 - Requirements for RUS approval of plans and specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and standard structures do not require RUS approval. Plans and specifications for related work, such... not use RUS standard structures must receive RUS approval prior to requesting bids on contracts or... application must show floor area and estimated cost breakdown between office building space and space...

  19. 24 CFR 200.937 - Supplementary specific procedural requirements under HUD building product standards and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... following standards, which are incorporated by reference: ANSI Z124.1—(1980)Plastic Bathtub Units ANSI Z124... requirements under HUD building product standards and certification program for plastic bathtub units, plastic... DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Minimum Property Standards § 200.937 Supplementary specific...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1306-07 - Equipment required and specifications; overview.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... simultaneous tests. This comparison shall be performed over the “hot-start” portion of the FTP test cycle. If... (CONTINUED) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1306-07 Equipment required and specifications; overview. Section...

  1. 40 CFR 761.372 - Specific requirements for relatively clean surfaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... clean surfaces. 761.372 Section 761.372 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY..., DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE, AND USE PROHIBITIONS Double Wash/Rinse Method for Decontaminating Non-Porous Surfaces § 761.372 Specific requirements for relatively clean surfaces. For surfaces that do not appear dusty or...

  2. A Methodology for Systems Requirements Specification and Traceability for Large Real Time Complex Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    The ECS block is divided into four projects : Systems Design Synthesis Technology, Systems Evaluation and Assessment Technology, Systems Reengineering...Technology, and Engineering Application Prototype. These projects work closely together to incorporate new technology across the entire system...development life cycle. The Requirements Specification and Traceability Task is within the Systems Design Synthesis Technology Project . The project looks at

  3. 77 FR 50726 - Software Requirement Specifications for Digital Computer Software and Complex Electronics Used in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... National Standards Institute and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (ANSI/IEEE) Standard 830-1998, ``IEEE Recommended Practice for Software Requirements Specifications.'' DATES: Submit comments by... Systems Of Nuclear Power Plants,'' dated September 1997. This RG endorses IEEE Standard 830-1998 with...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.904 - Specific requirements for designing the transportation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the transportation system. 3280.904 Section 3280.904 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... SAFETY STANDARDS Transportation § 3280.904 Specific requirements for designing the transportation system. (a) General. The entire system (frame, drawbar and coupling mechanism, running gear assembly,...

  5. ONR BAA 06-007 System Requirements Specification. Version 1.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-10

    ONR BAA 06-007 System Requirements Specification Version 1.1 Mercury Data Systems 10 April 2007 Abstract This... Mercury Data Systems 4214 Beechwood Drive Suite 105 Greensboro, NC 27410 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...the Confidentiality Statement of this document. Document Control This is a controlled document produced by Mercury Data Systems Inc. ( Mercury ). The

  6. Towards the formal specification of the requirements and design of a processor interface unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fura, David A.; Windley, Phillip J.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1993-01-01

    Work to formally specify the requirements and design of a Processor Interface Unit (PIU), a single-chip subsystem providing memory interface, bus interface, and additional support services for a commercial microprocessor within a fault-tolerant computer system, is described. This system, the Fault-Tolerant Embedded Processor (FTEP), is targeted towards applications in avionics and space requiring extremely high levels of mission reliability, extended maintenance free operation, or both. The approaches that were developed for modeling the PIU requirements and for composition of the PIU subcomponents at high levels of abstraction are described. These approaches were used to specify and verify a nontrivial subset of the PIU behavior. The PIU specification in Higher Order Logic (HOL) is documented in a companion NASA contractor report entitled 'Towards the Formal Specification of the Requirements and Design of a Processor Interfacs Unit - HOL Listings.' The subsequent verification approach and HOL listings are documented in NASA contractor report entitled 'Towards the Formal Verification of the Requirements and Design of a Processor Interface Unit' and NASA contractor report entitled 'Towards the Formal Verification of the Requirements and Design of a Processor Interface Unit - HOL Listings.'

  7. TESTING OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS ACTUAL WASTE TANK 5F AND TANK 12H SLUDGES

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.

    2011-08-22

    Forty three of the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have internal structures that hinder removal of the last approximately five thousand gallons of waste sludge solely by mechanical means. Chemical cleaning can be utilized to dissolve the sludge heel with oxalic acid (OA) and pump the material to a separate waste tank in preparation for final disposition. This dissolved sludge material is pH adjusted downstream of the dissolution process, precipitating the sludge components along with sodium oxalate solids. The large quantities of sodium oxalate and other metal oxalates formed impact downstream processes by requiring additional washing during sludge batch preparation and increase the amount of material that must be processed in the tank farm evaporator systems and the Saltstone Processing Facility. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) was identified as a potential method for greatly reducing the impact of oxalate additions to the SRS Tank Farms without adding additional components to the waste that would extend processing or increase waste form volumes. In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate an alternative to the baseline 8 wt. % OA chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. The baseline OA technology results in the addition of significant volumes of oxalate salts to the SRS tank farm and there is insufficient space to accommodate the neutralized streams resulting from the treatment of the multiple remaining waste tanks requiring closure. ECC is a promising alternative to bulk OA cleaning, which utilizes a more dilute OA (nominally 2 wt. % at a pH of around 2) and an oxalate destruction technology. The technology is being adapted by AREVA from their decontamination technology for Nuclear Power Plant secondary side scale removal. This report contains results from the SRNL small scale testing of the ECC process

  8. A discussion of higher order software concepts as they apply to functional requirements and specifications. [space shuttles and guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, M.

    1973-01-01

    The entry guidance software functional requirements (requirements design phase), its architectural requirements (specifications design phase), and the entry guidance software verified code are discussed. It was found that the proper integration of designs at both the requirements and specifications levels are of high priority consideration.

  9. NASA specification for manufacturing and performance requirements of NASA standard aerospace nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    On November 25, 1985, the NASA Chief Engineer established a NASA-wide policy to maintain and to require the use of the NASA standard for aerospace nickel-cadmium cells and batteries. The Associate Administrator for Safety, Reliability, Maintainability, and Quality Assurance stated on December 29, 1986, the intent to retain the NASA standard cell usage policy established by the Office of the Chief Engineer. The current NASA policy is also to incorporate technological advances as they are tested and proven for spaceflight applications. This policy will be implemented by modifying the existing standard cells or by developing new NASA standards and their specifications in accordance with the NASA's Aerospace Battery Systems Program Plan. This NASA Specification for Manufacturing and Performance Requirements of NASA Standard Aerospace Nickel-Cadmium Cells is prepared to provide requirements for the NASA standard nickel-cadmium cell. It is an interim specification pending resolution of the separator material availability. This specification has evolved from over 15 years of nickel-cadmium cell experience by NASA. Consequently, considerable experience has been collected and cell performance has been well characterized from many years of ground testing and from in-flight operations in both geosynchronous (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) applications. NASA has developed and successfully used two standard flight qualified cell designs.

  10. The RNA Export Factor, Nxt1, Is Required for Tissue Specific Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianqiao; White-Cooper, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The highly conserved, Nxf/Nxt (TAP/p15) RNA nuclear export pathway is important for export of most mRNAs from the nucleus, by interacting with mRNAs and promoting their passage through nuclear pores. Nxt1 is essential for viability; using a partial loss of function allele, we reveal a role for this gene in tissue specific transcription. We show that many Drosophila melanogaster testis-specific mRNAs require Nxt1 for their accumulation. The transcripts that require Nxt1 also depend on a testis-specific transcription complex, tMAC. We show that loss of Nxt1 leads to reduced transcription of tMAC targets. A reporter transcript from a tMAC-dependent promoter is under-expressed in Nxt1 mutants, however the same transcript accumulates in mutants if driven by a tMAC-independent promoter. Thus, in Drosophila primary spermatocytes, the transcription factor used to activate expression of a transcript, rather than the RNA sequence itself or the core transcription machinery, determines whether this expression requires Nxt1. We additionally find that transcripts from intron-less genes are more sensitive to loss of Nxt1 function than those from intron-containing genes and propose a mechanism in which transcript processing feeds back to increase activity of a tissue specific transcription complex. PMID:23754955

  11. Thirty-year solid waste generation forecast for facilities at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The information supplied by this 30-year solid waste forecast has been compiled as a source document to the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (WMEIS). The WMEIS will help to select a sitewide strategic approach to managing present and future Savannah River Site (SRS) waste generated from ongoing operations, environmental restoration (ER) activities, transition from nuclear production to other missions, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) programs. The EIS will support project-level decisions on the operation of specific treatment, storage, and disposal facilities within the near term (10 years or less). In addition, the EIS will provide a baseline for analysis of future waste management activities and a basis for the evaluation of the specific waste management alternatives. This 30-year solid waste forecast will be used as the initial basis for the EIS decision-making process. The Site generates and manages many types and categories of waste. With a few exceptions, waste types are divided into two broad groups-high-level waste and solid waste. High-level waste consists primarily of liquid radioactive waste, which is addressed in a separate forecast and is not discussed further in this document. The waste types discussed in this solid waste forecast are sanitary waste, hazardous waste, low-level mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste, and transuranic waste. As activities at SRS change from primarily production to primarily decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration, the volume of each waste s being managed will change significantly. This report acknowledges the changes in Site Missions when developing the 30-year solid waste forecast.

  12. Constitutive expression and characterization of a surface SRS (NcSRS67) protein of Neospora caninum with no orthologue in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Marcos Alexandre; Pereira, Luiz Miguel; Bononi, Aline; Biella, Carla Agostino; Baroni, Luciana; Pollo-Oliveira, Leticia; Yatsuda, Ana Patrícia

    2017-04-01

    Neospora caninum is a parasite of the Apicomplexa phylum responsible for abortion and losses of fertility in cattle. As part of its intracellular cycle, the first interaction of the parasite with the target cell is performed with the surface proteins known as the SRS superfamily (Surface Antigen Glycoprotein - Related Sequences). SAG related or SRS proteins have been a target of intense research due to its immunodominant pattern, exhibiting potential as diagnostic and/or vaccine candidates. The aim of this study was the cloning, expression and characterization of the gene NcSRS67 of N. caninum using a novel designed plasmid. The coding sequence of NcSRS67 (without the signal peptide and the GPI anchor) was cloned and expressed constitutively instead of the ccdB system of pCR-Blunt II-TOPO. The protein was purified in a nickel sepharose column and identified by mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The constitutive expression did not affect the final bacterial growth, with a similar OD 600nm compared to the non-transformed strains. The recombinant NcSRS67 was over expressed and the native form was detected by the anti-rNcSRS67 serum on 1D western blot as a single band of approximately 38kDa as predicted. On an in vitro assay, the inhibitory effect of the polyclonal antiserum anti-rNcSRS67 was nearly 20% on adhesion/invasion of host cells. The NcSRS67 native protein was localised on part of the surface of N. caninum tachyzoite when compared to the nucleus by confocal immunofluorescence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clemson final report: High temperature formulations for SRS soils

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1997-03-11

    This study was undertaken to demonstrate the application of a DC arc melter to in-situ vitrification of SRS soils. The melter that was available at the DOE/Industrial Vitrification Laboratory at Clemson University was equipped with opposing solid electrodes. To simulate field conditions, two hollow electrode configurations were evaluated which allowed fluxes to be injected into the melter while the soils were being vitrified. the first 4 runs utilized pre-blended flux (two runs) and attempted flux injection (two runs). These runs were terminated prematurely due to offgas sampling problems and melt freezing. The remaining four runs utilized a different electrode geometry, and the runs were not interrupted to change out the offgas sampling apparatus. These runs were conducted successfully.

  14. Vaccines for piscirickettsiosis (salmonid rickettsial septicaemia, SRS): the Chile perspective.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Montero, Ruth; Christodoulides, Myron

    2017-03-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis (P. salmonis) is the aetiological bacterium of the contagious disease piscirickettsiosis or salmonid rickettsial septicaemia (SRS) and causes significant economic losses to aquaculture production in Chile. Current strategies to control infection are i) indiscriminate antibiotic use and ii) vaccination with predominantly P. salmonis bacterin vaccines that do not provide acceptable levels of protection against piscirickettsiosis. Areas covered: This review covers the basic biology of P. salmonis, clinical piscirickettsiosis and disease control, the development of current P. salmonis vaccines, innate and adaptive immunity and a 5-year plan to develop new piscirickettsiosis vaccines. Expert commentary: Fundamental knowledge is lacking on the complexities of P. salmonis-host interactions, relating to bacterial virulence and host innate and adaptive immune responses, which needs to be addressed. The development of new P. salmonis vaccines needs the application of comprehensive 'omics' technologies to identify candidate vaccine antigens capable of stimulating long-lasting protective immune responses.

  15. APPLICATION OF NONSPHERICAL FISSILE CONFIGURATION IN WASTE CONTAINERS AT SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Eghbali, D; Michelle Abney, M

    2007-01-03

    Transuranic (TRU) solid waste that has been generated as a result of the production of nuclear material for the United States defense program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been stored in more than 30,000 55-gallon drums and carbon steel boxes since 1953. Nearly two thirds of those containers have been processed and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Among the containers assayed so far, the results indicate several drums with fissile inventories significantly higher (600-1000 fissile grams equivalent (FGE) {sup 239}Pu) than their original assigned values. While part of this discrepancy can be attributed to the past limited assay capabilities, human errors are believed to be the primary contributor. This paper summarizes the application of nonspherical fissile material configuration in waste containers, resulting in less restrictive mass and spacing limits, increased storage capacity, and several administrative controls for handling and storage of waste containers being modified without compromising safety.

  16. Period Analysis of Three SRS: Stars in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Red, Wesley; Jones, Gabrielle; Cash, Jennifer; Walter, Donald K.

    2017-01-01

    As a portion of a larger project to observe SemiRegular Variable Stars in the original Kepler field, our research group is analyzing the light curve of three objects currently classified as SRS: stars in the GCVS, meaning that they possible members of the newer classification of Semi Regular variables of Short periods. We will present our analysis of the Kepler data to date. In particular these targets presented some interesting challenges to the standard analysis pipeline and we will present the steps taken to work around these challenges.This work was support by the South Carolina Space Grant Consortium. This work was also supported in part by NSF PAARE award AST-1358913 to SCSU and Kepler GO award NNX13AC24G to SCSU.

  17. Host specific differences alter the requirement for certain Salmonella genes during swine colonization.

    PubMed

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D

    2011-06-02

    The pathogenic potential of Salmonella is determined during the complex interaction between pathogen and host, requiring optimal regulation of multiple bacterial genetic systems within variable in vivo environments. The mouse model of systemic disease has been an extremely productive model to investigate the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). Although the mouse model is a widely used paradigm for studying the pathogenesis of systemic disease caused by Salmonella, investigations concerning food safety interventions should employ natural hosts to examine gastrointestinal colonization by Salmonella. Recent research has demonstrated specific differences in the attenuation of certain S. Typhimurium mutants in mice compared to swine. This variation in pathogenesis between the mouse model and pigs for the S. Typhimurium mutants is presumably dependent upon either the requirements for specific gene products during systemic disease (mouse) versus gastrointestinal colonization (pig) or host specific differences. In addition, host specific diversity in Salmonella colonization of swine has also been described in comparison to other food-producing animals, including cattle and chickens. Differences in Salmonella colonization and pathogenesis across diverse animal species highlight the importance of species-specific studies of gastrointestinal colonization for the development of Salmonella interventions to enhance pork safety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Colloid and ionic tracer migration within SRS sediments: Final summary

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, R.N.; Seaman, J.C.; Bertsch, P.M.; Miller, W.P.

    1996-04-09

    The generation of a stable colloidal suspension in geologic materials has a number of environmental implications. Mobile colloids may act as vectors for the transport of adsorbed contaminants through soils and within aquifers and can cause serious problems related to well monitoring and formation permeability in an injections well system. Colloid-facilitated transport has been implicated in the migration of contaminants from seepage basins on the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) at a rate greater than was predicted in two- phase transport models. From 1955 to 1988, seepage basins overlying the water-table aquifer received acidic wastes containing high levels of Na+ and nitric acid, as well as trace radionuclides and metals from the nuclear materials processing facilities. Numerical simulations predicted that metal contaminants would not reach the water table, but measurable quantities of these contaminants have been detected in monitoring wells down gradient from the basins. Lack of agreement between predicted and observed contaminant migration in this and other studies has been attributed to both local non equilibrium situation, preferential flow paths within the geologic material, and to transport of the contaminant in association with a mobile solid phase, i.e. dispersed colloids. Additionally, the association of contaminants with a mobile colloidal phase has important ramifications for groundwater sampling on SRS intended to evaluate the potential environmental hazards of a given contaminant. As part of the F- and H-Area reclamation project, the Department of Energy has proposed the capture and treatment of the contaminant plume followed by reinjection of the treated water into the water table and upper confined aquifers. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. Experimental Determination and Thermodynamic Modeling of Electrical Conductivity of SRS Waste Tank Supernate

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, J.; Reboul, S.

    2015-06-01

    SRS High Level Waste Tank Farm personnel rely on conductivity probes for detection of incipient overflow conditions in waste tanks. Minimal information is available concerning the sensitivity that must be achieved such that that liquid detection is assured. Overly sensitive electronics results in numerous nuisance alarms for these safety-related instruments. In order to determine the minimum sensitivity required of the probe, Tank Farm Engineering personnel need adequate conductivity data to improve the existing designs. Little or no measurements of liquid waste conductivity exist; however, the liquid phase of the waste consists of inorganic electrolytes for which the conductivity may be calculated. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Tank Farm Facility Engineering requested SRNL to determine the conductivity of the supernate resident in SRS waste Tank 40 experimentally as well as computationally. In addition, SRNL was requested to develop a correlation, if possible, that would be generally applicable to liquid waste resident in SRS waste tanks. A waste sample from Tank 40 was analyzed for composition and electrical conductivity as shown in Table 4-6, Table 4-7, and Table 4-9. The conductivity for undiluted Tank 40 sample was 0.087 S/cm. The accuracy of OLI Analyzer™ was determined using available literature data. Overall, 95% of computed estimates of electrical conductivity are within ±15% of literature values for component concentrations from 0 to 15 M and temperatures from 0 to 125 °C. Though the computational results are generally in good agreement with the measured data, a small portion of literature data deviates as much as ±76%. A simplified model was created that can be used readily to estimate electrical conductivity of waste solution in computer spreadsheets. The variability of this simplified approach deviates up to 140% from measured values. Generally, this model can be applied to estimate the conductivity within a factor of two. The comparison of the

  20. Performance requirements of real-time continuous media computing: specification techniques and hardware/software implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkatesh; Subrahmanyam, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Today's typical multimedia computer consists of a fast CPU and multimedia peripherals such as attached sound and video support hardware. In such a machine, the low-level audio and video handling may be performed by these peripherals while any significant processing on these media requires the intimate involvement of the CPU, main memory system and the operating system. Given that these components are not typically designed to meet the real-time requirements of continuous media, there are a number of constraints on the nature of multimedia applications that can be executed. To get around these constraints, demanding multimedia applications may typically be offloaded to attached peripheral compute engines which are customized to execute the applications. This approach requires dedicating resources to specific applications and suffers from the problem that such applications are not flexible integrated with the main system. We posit that new software and hardware technologies are needed to truly integrate real-time multimedia processing capabilities within a multimedia computer. The design of these technologies must be based on a thorough understanding of the timing and real-time computing requirements of various types of continuous media. Formal mechanisms are needed to express and analyze these requirements in order for multimedia operating systems to efficiently and correctly schedule the use of computing and communication resources. Indeed such mechanisms may be used to guide the specification and design of hardware and software processing component. In this paper, we present a framework for specifying the timing properties and computational requirements of continuous media. We discuss the usefulness of this framework in the context of some common audio and video data formats. We also discuss the impact of this framework on the design of resource scheduling mechanisms. Finally we offer some insights on designing audio/video processing engines based on real

  1. Justification for Continued Operation of the SRS Saltstone Facility (Z-Area)

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, W.A.

    1999-01-20

    Saltstone Production and Disposal Facilities (Z-Area) are a part of the Defense Waste Processing Facilities (DWPF). Z-Area facilities are just one segment of an integrated waste management and disposal system located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The bases for the Justification of Continuing Operations (JCO) of the Saltstone Production and Disposal Facilities (Z-Area) at SRS are provided.

  2. Testing Requirements to Manage Data Exchange Specifications in Enterprise Integration - A Schema Design Quality Focus.

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Ivezic, Nenad; Buhwan, Jeong

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the requirements to test W3C XML Schema usage when defining message schemas for data exchange in any large and evolving enterprise integration project. We then decompose the XML Schema testing into four (4) aspects including the message schema conformance to the XML Schema specification grammar, the message schema conformance to the XML Schema specification semantics, the message schema conformance to design quality testing, and canonical semantics testing of the message schema. We describe these four testing aspects in some detail and point to other related efforts. We further focus to provide some technical details for the message schema design quality testing. As a future work, we describe the requirements for canonical semantics testing and potential solution approaches. Finally, we describe an implementation architecture for the message schema design quality testing.

  3. Benchmark specifications and data requirements for initial modeling of the China experimental fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, T. H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-06-04

    A specification is proposed for an initial transient benchmark analysis of the China Experimental Fast Reactor design based on the analysis capabilities of the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code. For the initial benchmark, a single-channel protected transient overpower accident is defined. Reactivity feedback coefficients will not be required and simplified material properties are recommended. This report also describes the data required for developing the modeling input. This data includes assembly geometry, reactor power distributions, kinetics and decay heat data, and material properties. Comparisons of benchmark results will take place at a future SAS4A/SASSYS-1 training meeting planned to occur at Argonne National Laboratory. Future benchmark specifications will be planned to expand upon this initial model to include more complex reactivity feedback models, material properties, additional assembly geometry, and primary and intermediate coolant systems.

  4. Requirement for specific gravity and creatinine adjustments for urinary steroids and luteinizing hormone concentrations in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmeet K S; Balzer, Ben W R; Desai, Reena; Jimenez, Mark; Steinbeck, Katharine S; Handelsman, David J

    2015-11-01

    Urinary hormone concentrations are often adjusted to correct for hydration status. We aimed to determine whether first morning void urine hormones in growing adolescents require adjustments and, if so, whether urinary creatinine or specific gravity are better adjustments. The study population was adolescents aged 10.1 to 14.3 years initially who provided fasting morning blood samples at 0 and 12 months (n = 343) and first morning urine every three months (n = 644). Unadjusted, creatinine and specific gravity-adjusted hormonal concentrations were compared by Deming regression and Bland-Altman analysis and grouped according to self-rated Tanner stage or chronological age. F-ratios for self-rated Tanner stages and age groups were used to compare unadjusted and adjusted hormonal changes in growing young adolescents. Correlations of paired serum and urinary hormonal concentration of unadjusted and creatinine and specific gravity-adjusted were also compared. Fasting first morning void hormone concentrations correlated well and were unbiased between unadjusted or adjusted by either creatinine or specific gravity. Urine creatinine concentration increases with Tanner stages, age and male gender whereas urine specific gravity was not influenced by Tanner stage, age or gender. Adjustment by creatinine or specific gravity of urinary luteinizing hormone, estradiol, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone concentrations did not improve correlation with paired serum concentrations. Urine steroid and luteinizing hormone concentrations in first morning void samples of adolescents are not significantly influenced by hydration status and may not require adjustments; however, if desired, both creatinine and specific gravity adjustments are equally suitable. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) dynamics simulator requirements and mathematical specifications, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, R.; Blejer, D.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements and mathematical specifications for the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) Dynamics Simulator are presented. The complete simulator system, which consists of the profie subsystem, simulation control and input/output subsystem, truth model subsystem, onboard computer model subsystem, and postprocessor, is described. The simulator will be used to evaluate and test the attitude determination and control models to be used on board GRO under conditions that simulate the expected in-flight environment.

  6. Entry of Bluetongue Virus Capsid Requires the Late Endosome-specific Lipid Lysobisphosphatidic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Avnish; Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Roy, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The entry of viruses into host cells is one of the key processes of infection. The mechanisms of cellular entry for enveloped virus have been well studied. The fusion proteins as well as the facilitating cellular lipid factors involved in the viral fusion entry process have been well characterized. The process of non-enveloped virus cell entry, in comparison, remains poorly defined, particularly for large complex capsid viruses of the family Reoviridae, which comprises a range of mammalian pathogens. These viruses enter cells without the aid of a limiting membrane and thus cannot fuse with host cell membranes to enter cells. Instead, these viruses are believed to penetrate membranes of the host cell during endocytosis. However, the molecular mechanism of this process is largely undefined. Here we show, utilizing an in vitro liposome penetration assay and cell biology, that bluetongue virus (BTV), an archetypal member of the Reoviridae, utilizes the late endosome-specific lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid for productive membrane penetration and viral entry. Further, we provide preliminary evidence that lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid facilitates pore expansion during membrane penetration, suggesting a mechanism for lipid factor requirement of BTV. This finding indicates that despite the lack of a membrane envelope, the entry process of BTV is similar in specific lipid requirements to enveloped viruses that enter cells through the late endosome. These results are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that a large non-enveloped virus of the Reoviridae has specific lipid requirements for membrane penetration and host cell entry. PMID:27036941

  7. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Charli D.; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N.; Gohil, Vishal M.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non–bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non–bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER–mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non–bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. PMID:27226479

  8. Appraisal of work ability in relation to job-specific health requirements in ambulance workers.

    PubMed

    van Schaaijk, A; Boschman, J S; Frings-Dresen, M H W; Sluiter, J K

    2017-01-01

    To gain insight into which job-specific health requirements relate to work ability, the following two research questions were formulated: Which job-specific health requirements are associated with the appraisal of work ability in ambulance drivers and paramedics? How are appraisals of physical and mental work ability associated with the appraisal of overall work ability in ambulance drivers and paramedics? Workers Health Surveillance cross-sectional data of 506 ambulance workers (236 drivers and 270 paramedics) were used. The tests for specific job requirements were divided into six categories. Work ability was appraised as overall, physical and mental/emotional. Multiple linear stepwise regression analyses were used to model the associations. Outcomes in 'raised alertness and judgment ability' (R (2) = 0.09), 'job-specific physical abilities' (R (2) = 0.10) and 'emotional peak load' (R (2) = 0.07) significantly explained appraised overall, physical and mental/emotional work ability. Physical and mental/emotional work ability together explained 48.3% of the variance of overall work ability. The explained variance by physical and mental/emotional work ability was almost 4% higher in drivers than in paramedics. Overall work ability was significantly explained by outcomes in 'raised alertness and judgment ability' and 'emotional peak load.' Physical work ability was significantly explained by 'job-specific physical abilities' and 'raised alertness and judgment ability' outcomes, while 'emotional peak load' and 'raised alertness and judgment ability' outcomes significantly explained mental/emotional work ability. Physical and mental/emotional work ability explains the same proportion of variance in overall work ability.

  9. Results of a questionnaire regarding practice patterns for the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial radiation necrosis after SRS.

    PubMed

    Stockham, Abigail L; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Reddy, Chandana A; Suh, John H; Kumar, Aryavarta; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Barnett, Gene H; Murphy, Erin S; Chao, Samuel T

    2013-12-01

    -refractory patients, most recommend surgical intervention (63 %). Most physicians who responded to this questionnaire believe that post-SRS RN is uncommon (≤10 % of cases). The approach to establish the diagnosis of RN is variable. Steroids are the most commonly utilized first-line treatment for suspected RN. Considerable variation exists in the management of steroid-refractory RN. Additional studies are required to establish guidelines for evaluation and treatment of RN.

  10. SRS2 and SGS1 prevent chromosomal breaks and stabilize triplet repeats by restraining recombination.

    PubMed

    Kerrest, Alix; Anand, Ranjith P; Sundararajan, Rangapriya; Bermejo, Rodrigo; Liberi, Giordano; Dujon, Bernard; Freudenreich, Catherine H; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2009-02-01

    Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed to explain trinucleotide repeat expansions. Here we show that in yeast srs2Delta cells, CTG repeats undergo both expansions and contractions, and they show increased chromosomal fragility. Deletion of RAD52 or RAD51 suppresses these phenotypes, suggesting that recombination triggers trinucleotide repeat instability in srs2Delta cells. In sgs1Delta cells, CTG repeats undergo contractions and increased fragility by a mechanism partially dependent on RAD52 and RAD51. Analysis of replication intermediates revealed abundant joint molecules at the CTG repeats during S phase. These molecules migrate similarly to reversed replication forks, and their presence is dependent on SRS2 and SGS1 but not RAD51. Our results suggest that Srs2 promotes fork reversal in repetitive sequences, preventing repeat instability and fragility. In the absence of Srs2 or Sgs1, DNA damage accumulates and is processed by homologous recombination, triggering repeat rearrangements.

  11. AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope

  12. AMTD: update of engineering specifications derived from science requirements for future UVOIR space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-08-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope.

  13. Maintenance of spermatogenesis requires TAF4b, a gonad-specific subunit of TFIID

    PubMed Central

    Falender, Allison E.; Freiman, Richard N.; Geles, Kenneth G.; Lo, Kirk C.; Hwang, KeumSil; Lamb, Dolores J.; Morris, Patricia L.; Tjian, Robert; Richards, JoAnne S.

    2005-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of spermatogenesis in mammals requires specialized networks of gene expression programs in the testis. The gonad-specific TAF4b component of TFIID (formerly TAFII105) is a transcriptional regulator enriched in the mouse testis. Herein we show that TAF4b is required for maintenance of spermatogenesis in the mouse. While young Taf4b-null males are initially fertile, Taf4b-null males become infertile by 3 mo of age and eventually exhibit seminiferous tubules devoid of germ cells. At birth, testes of Taf4b-null males appear histologically normal; however, at post-natal day 3 gonocyte proliferation is impaired and expression of spermatogonial stem cell markers c-Ret, Plzf, and Stra8 is reduced. Together, these data indicate that TAF4b is required for the precise expression of gene products essential for germ cell proliferation and suggest that TAF4b may be required for the regulation of spermatogonial stem cell specification and proliferation that is obligatory for normal spermatogenic maintenance in the adult. PMID:15774719

  14. Maintenance of spermatogenesis requires TAF4b, a gonad-specific subunit of TFIID.

    PubMed

    Falender, Allison E; Freiman, Richard N; Geles, Kenneth G; Lo, Kirk C; Hwang, KeumSil; Lamb, Dolores J; Morris, Patricia L; Tjian, Robert; Richards, JoAnne S

    2005-04-01

    The establishment and maintenance of spermatogenesis in mammals requires specialized networks of gene expression programs in the testis. The gonad-specific TAF4b component of TFIID (formerly TAF(II)105) is a transcriptional regulator enriched in the mouse testis. Herein we show that TAF4b is required for maintenance of spermatogenesis in the mouse. While young Taf4b-null males are initially fertile, Taf4b-null males become infertile by 3 mo of age and eventually exhibit seminiferous tubules devoid of germ cells. At birth, testes of Taf4b-null males appear histologically normal; however, at post-natal day 3 gonocyte proliferation is impaired and expression of spermatogonial stem cell markers c-Ret, Plzf, and Stra8 is reduced. Together, these data indicate that TAF4b is required for the precise expression of gene products essential for germ cell proliferation and suggest that TAF4b may be required for the regulation of spermatogonial stem cell specification and proliferation that is obligatory for normal spermatogenic maintenance in the adult.

  15. Glia-derived neurons are required for sex-specific learning in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sammut, Michele; Cook, Steven J.; Nguyen, Ken C.Q.; Felton, Terry; Hall, David H.; Emmons, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in behaviour extend to cognitive-like processes such as learning but the underlying dimorphisms in neural circuit development and organization that generate these behavioural differences are largely unknown. Here we define at the single-cell level, from development, through neural circuit connectivity, to function, the neural basis of a sex-specific learning in the nematode C. elegans. We show that sexual conditioning, a form of associative learning, requires a pair of male-specific interneurons whose progenitors are fully differentiated glia. These neurons are born during sexual maturation and incorporated into pre-exisiting sex-shared circuits to couple chemotactic responses to reproductive priorities. Our findings reveal a general role for glia as neural progenitors across metazoan taxa and demonstrate that the addition of sex-specific neuron types to brain circuits during sexual maturation is an important mechanism for the generation of sexually dimorphic plasticity in learning. PMID:26469050

  16. Glia-derived neurons are required for sex-specific learning in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Sammut, Michele; Cook, Steven J; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Felton, Terry; Hall, David H; Emmons, Scott W; Poole, Richard J; Barrios, Arantza

    2015-10-15

    Sex differences in behaviour extend to cognitive-like processes such as learning, but the underlying dimorphisms in neural circuit development and organization that generate these behavioural differences are largely unknown. Here we define at the single-cell level-from development, through neural circuit connectivity, to function-the neural basis of a sex-specific learning in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that sexual conditioning, a form of associative learning, requires a pair of male-specific interneurons whose progenitors are fully differentiated glia. These neurons are generated during sexual maturation and incorporated into pre-exisiting sex-shared circuits to couple chemotactic responses to reproductive priorities. Our findings reveal a general role for glia as neural progenitors across metazoan taxa and demonstrate that the addition of sex-specific neuron types to brain circuits during sexual maturation is an important mechanism for the generation of sexually dimorphic plasticity in learning.

  17. Identifying context-specific competencies required by community Australian Football sports trainers.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Alex; Finch, Caroline F

    2012-08-01

    First-aid is a recommended injury prevention and risk management strategy in community sport; however, little is known about the sport-specific competencies required by first-aid providers. To achieve expert consensus on the competencies required by community Australian Football (community-AF) sports trainers. A three-round online Delphi process. Community-AF. 16 Australian sports first-aid and community-AF experts. Rating of competencies as either 'essential', 'expected', 'ideal' or 'not required'. Results After Round 3, 47 of the 77 (61%) competencies were endorsed as 'essential' or 'expected' for a sports trainer to effectively perform the activities required to the standards expected at a community-AF club by ≥75% of experts. These competencies covered: the role of the sports trainer; the responsibilities of the sports trainer; emergency management; injury and illness assessment and immediate management; taping; and injury prevention and risk management. Four competencies (5%) were endorsed as 'ideal' or 'not required' by ≥85% of experts and were excluded from further consideration. The 26 competencies where consensus was not reached were retained as second-tier, optional competencies. Sports trainers are important members of on-field first-aid teams, providing support to both injured players and other sports medicine professionals. The competencies identified in this study provide the basis of a proposed two-tiered community-AF-specific sports trainer education structure that can be implemented by the peak sports body. This includes six mandatory modules, relating to the 'required' competencies, and a further six optional modules covering competencies on which consensus was not reached.

  18. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-07-10

    In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

  19. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  20. Submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in idiopathic Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS): the SRS phenotype overlaps with the 12q14 microdeletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spengler, S; Schönherr, N; Binder, G; Wollmann, H A; Fricke-Otto, S; Mühlenberg, R; Denecke, B; Baudis, M; Eggermann, T

    2010-05-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is a heterogeneous disorder associated with intrauterine and postnatal growth restriction, body asymmetry, a relative macrocephaly, a characteristic triangular face and further dysmorphisms. In about 50% of patients, genetic/epigenetic alterations can be detected: >38% of patients show a hypomethylation of the IGF2/H19 imprinting region in 11p15, whereas the additional 10% carry a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7. In single cases, cytogenetic aberrations can be detected. Nevertheless, there still remain 50% of SRS patients without known genetic/epigenetic alterations. To find out whether submicroscopic imbalances contribute to the aetiology of SRS, 20 idiopathic SRS patients were screened with the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500 K array set. Apart from known apathogenic copy number variations, we identified one patient with a 12q14 microdeletion. The 12q14 microdeletion syndrome is characterised by dwarfism but it additionally includes mental retardation and osteopoikilosis. The deletion in our patient is smaller than those in the 12q14 microdeletion carriers but it also affects the LEMD3 and the HMGA2 genes. LEMD3 haploinsufficiency and point mutations have been previously associated with osteopoikilosis but radiographs of our patient at the age of 16 years did not reveal any hint for osteopoikilosis lesions. Haploinsufficiency of HMGA2 is probably responsible for aberrant growth in 12q14 microdeletion syndrome. However, in this study, a general role of HMGA2 mutations for SRS was excluded by sequencing of 20 idiopathic patients. In conclusion, our results exclude a common cryptic chromosomal imbalance in idiopathic SRS patients but show that chromosomal aberrations are relevant in this disease. Thus, molecular karyotyping is indicated in SRS and should be included in the diagnostic algorithm.

  1. 49 CFR 178.345 - General design and construction requirements applicable to Specification DOT 406 (§ 178.346), DOT...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General design and construction requirements... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345 General design and construction requirements applicable to Specification DOT 406 (§ 178.346),...

  2. Nuclear mRNA export requires specific FG nucleoporins for translocation through the nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Terry, Laura J; Wente, Susan R

    2007-09-24

    Trafficking of nucleic acids and large proteins through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) requires interactions with NPC proteins that harbor FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat domains. Specialized transport receptors that recognize cargo and bind FG domains facilitate these interactions. Whether different transport receptors utilize preferential FG domains in intact NPCs is not fully resolved. In this study, we use a large-scale deletion strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate a new set of more minimal pore (mmp) mutants that lack specific FG domains. A comparison of messenger RNA (mRNA) export versus protein import reveals unique subsets of mmp mutants with functional defects in specific transport receptors. Thus, multiple functionally independent NPC translocation routes exist for different transport receptors. Our global analysis of the FG domain requirements in mRNA export also finds a requirement for two NPC substructures-one on the nuclear NPC face and one in the NPC central core. These results pinpoint distinct steps in the mRNA export mechanism that regulate NPC translocation efficiency.

  3. Specific immune responses are required to control parasitemia in Babesia equi infection.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D P; Kappmeyer, L S; Perryman, L E

    1994-01-01

    Horses possessing a normal immune system and spleen often control infection caused by Babesia equi. However, splenectomized horses are unable to control B. equi infection and usually succumb to the infection. To investigate the role of the spleen in the control of B. equi infection in the absence of specific immune responses, two 1-month-old foals with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and two age-matched normal foals were inoculated with B. equi. The SCID foals became febrile seven days postinoculation and developed terminal parasitemias of 41 and 29%. The SCID foals had greater than 50% decreases in indices of total erythrocytes, packed-cell volumes, and hemoglobin concentrations. Both SCID foals were euthanized in extremis at 10 days postinoculation. As expected, the serum of the SCID foals lacked detectable antibodies to B. equi antigens. In contrast, the normal foals inoculated with B. equi produced detectable anti-erythrocyte-stage parasite antibodies by 7 days and controlled clinical disease by 12 days postinoculation. Although SCID foals lack functional T and B lymphocytes, they do possess complement, macrophages, granulocytes, and natural killer cells, as well as a spleen. Therefore, the data indicate that specific immune responses are required to control B. equi parasitemia but are not required for erythrocyte lysis in infected horses. Furthermore, the spleen is not able to control B. equi parasitemia in the absence of specific immune responses to parasite antigens. Images PMID:8168957

  4. Extraembryonic but not embryonic SUMO-specific protease 2 is required for heart development

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Eri O.; Lin, Heng; Chiu, Shang-Yi; Yu, H.-M. Ivy; Porter, George A.; Hsu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    SUMO-specific protease 2 (SENP2) activities to remove SUMO from its substrates is essential for development of trophoblast stem cells, niches and lineages. Global deletion of SENP2 leads to midgestation lethality, and causes severe defects in the placenta which is accompanied by embryonic brain and heart abnormalities. Because of the placental deficiencies, the role of SENP2 in development of the embryonic tissues has not been properly determined. The brain and heart abnormalities may be secondary to placental insufficiency. Here we have created a new mouse strain permitting conditional inactivation of SENP2. Mice homozygous for germline deletion of the conditional allele exhibit trophoblast defects and embryonic abnormalities resembling the global SENP2 knockout. However, tissue-specific disruptions of SENP2 demonstrate its dispensable role in embryogenesis. Placental expression of SENP2 is necessary and sufficient for embryonic heart and brain development. Using a protease deficient model, we further demonstrate the requirement of SENP2-dependent SUMO modification in development of all major trophoblast lineages. SENP2 regulates sumoylation of Mdm2 which controls p53 activities critical for G-S transition of mitotic division and endoreduplication in trophoblast proliferation and differentiation, respectively. The differentiation of trophoblasts is also dependent on SENP2-mediated activation of p57Kip2, a CDK-specific inhibitor required for endoreduplication. PMID:26883797

  5. Maternofetal and neonatal copper requirements revealed by enterocyte-specific deletion of the Menkes disease protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanfang; Zhu, Sha; Hodgkinson, Victoria; Prohaska, Joseph R.; Weisman, Gary A.; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    The essential requirement for copper in early development is dramatically illustrated by Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of early childhood caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the copper transporting ATPase ATP7A. In this study, we generated mice with enterocyte-specific knockout of the murine ATP7A gene (Atp7a) to test its importance in dietary copper acquisition. Although mice lacking Atp7a protein within intestinal enterocytes appeared normal at birth, they exhibited profound growth impairment and neurological deterioration as a consequence of copper deficiency, resulting in excessive mortality prior to weaning. Copper supplementation of lactating females or parenteral copper injection of the affected offspring markedly attenuated this rapid demise. Enterocyte-specific deletion of Atp7a in rescued pregnant females did not restrict embryogenesis; however, copper accumulation in the late-term fetus was severely reduced, resulting in early postnatal mortality. Taken together, these data demonstrate unique and specific requirements for enterocyte Atp7a in neonatal and maternofetal copper acquisition that are dependent on dietary copper availability, thus providing new insights into the mechanisms of gene-nutrient interaction essential for early human development. PMID:23064757

  6. Mapping the SRS-22r questionnaire onto the EQ-5D-5L utility score in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carlos King Ho; Cheung, Prudence Wing Hang; Samartzis, Dino; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin

    2017-01-01

    This is a prospective study to establish prediction models that map the refined Scoliosis Research Society 22-item (SRS-22r) onto EuroQoL-5 dimension 5-level (EQ-5D-5L) utility scores in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. Comparison of treatment outcomes in AIS can be determined by cost-utility analysis. However, the mainstay spine-specific health-related quality of life outcome measure, the SRS-22r questionnaire does not provide utility assessment. In this study, AIS patients were prospectively recruited to complete both the EQ-5D-5L and SRS-22r questionnaires by trained interviewers. Ordinary least squares regression was undertaken to develop mapping models, which the validity and robustness were assessed by using the 10-fold cross-validation procedure. EQ-5D-5L utility scores were regressed on demographics, Cobb angle, curve types, treatment modalities, and five domains of the SRS-22r questionnaire. Three models were developed using stepwise selection method. EQ-5D-5L scores were regressed on 1) main effects of SRS-22r subscale scores, 2) as per 1 plus squared and interaction terms, and 3) as per 2 plus demographic and clinical characteristics. Model goodness-of-fit was assessed using R-square, adjusted R-square, and information criteria; whereas the predictive performance was evaluated using root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), and the proportion of absolute error within the threshold of 0.05 and 0.10. A total of 227 AIS patients with mean age of 15.6 years were recruited. The EQ-5D-5L scores were predicted by four domains of SRS-22r (main effects of 'Function', 'Pain', 'Appearance' and 'Mental Health', and squared term of 'Function' and 'Pain'), and Cobb angle in Model 3 with the best goodness-of-fit (R-square/adjusted R-square: 62.1%/60.9%). Three models demonstrated an acceptance predictive performance in error analysis applying 10-fold cross-validation to three models where RMSE and MAE were between 0.063-0.065 and between

  7. MIXING MODELING ANALYSIS FOR SRS SALT WASTE DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-01-18

    Nuclear waste at Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks consists of three different types of waste forms. They are the lighter salt solutions referred to as supernate, the precipitated salts as salt cake, and heavier fine solids as sludge. The sludge is settled on the tank floor. About half of the residual waste radioactivity is contained in the sludge, which is only about 8 percentage of the total waste volume. Mixing study to be evaluated here for the Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) project focuses on supernate preparations in waste tanks prior to transfer to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The methods to mix and blend the contents of the SRS blend tanks were evalutaed to ensure that the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 50H to the SWPF feed tank. The work consists of two principal objectives to investigate two different pumps. One objective is to identify a suitable pumping arrangement that will adequately blend/mix two miscible liquids to obtain a uniform composition in the tank with a minimum level of sludge solid particulate in suspension. The other is to estimate the elevation in the tank at which the transfer pump inlet should be located where the solid concentration of the entrained fluid remains below the acceptance criterion (0.09 wt% or 1200 mg/liter) during transfer operation to the SWPF. Tank 50H is a Waste Tank that will be used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The modeling results will provide quantitative design and operation information during the mixing/blending process and the transfer operation of the blended

  8. Feasibility of using the Vero SBRT system for intracranial SRS.

    PubMed

    Burghelea, Manuela; Verellen, Dirk; Gevaert, Thierry; Depuydt, Tom; Poels, Kenneth; Simon, Viorica; De Ridder, Mark

    2014-01-06

    The Vero SBRT system was benchmarked in a planning study against the Novalis SRS system for quality of delivered dose distributions to intracranial lesions and assessing the Vero system's capacity for SRS. A total of 27 patients with one brain lesion treated on the Novalis system, with 3 mm leaf width MLC and C-arm gantry, were replanned for Vero, with a 5 mm leaf width MLC mounted on an O-ring gantry allowing rotations around both the horizontal and vertical axis. The Novalis dynamic conformal arc (DCA) planning included vertex arcs, using 90° couch rotation. These vertex arcs cannot be reproduced with Vero due to the mechanical limitations of the O-ring gantry. Alternative class solutions were investigated for the Vero. Additionally, to distinguish between the effect of MLC leaf width and different beam arrangements on dose distributions, the Vero class solutions were also applied for Novalis. In addition, the added value of noncoplanar IMRT was investigated in this study. Quality of the achieved dose distributions was expressed in the conformity index (CI) and gradient index (GI), and compared using a paired Student's t-test with statistical significance for p-values ≤ 0.05. For lesions larger than 5 cm3, no statistical significant difference in conformity was observed between Vero and Novalis, but for smaller lesions, the dose distributions showed a significantly better conformity for the Novalis (ΔCI = 13.74%, p = 0.0002) mainly due to the smaller MLC leaf width. Using IMRT on Vero reduces this conformity difference to nonsignificant levels. The cutoff for achieving a GI around 3, characterizing a sharp dose falloff outside the target volume was 4 cm3 for Novalis and 7 cm3 for Vero using DCA technique. Using noncoplanar IMRT, this threshold was reduced to 3 cm3 for the Vero system. The smaller MLC and the presence of the vertex fields allow the Novalis system to better conform the dose around the lesion and to obtain steeper dose falloff outside the lesion

  9. Definition of human factor requirements in the invitation to tender and system specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Remond, C.; Pirus, D.

    2006-07-01

    For more than 20 years, EDF has led Human Factors (HF) studies in order to improve its plants, the interfaces used by operating crews in nuclear power plants, the prescriptive operating documents, the organization and the control of the NPPs... The experience feedback of these projects highlights the need for defining, as soon as possible in the projects, the HF requirements to take into account and to list them in the HSI Specifications addressed to the designer or to the supplier. Experience feedback shows that if these requirements (in terms of integration of the HF process in the project and the HF criteria for the design) are not clearly and precisely defined to the designer, the persons in charge of projects can encounter real difficulties for: 1) Defining the resources required to carry out the tests (usability tests during the design; verification and validation tests during or at the end of the design), 2) Plan the HF interventions and studies in the design schedule, 3) Refer to HF standards and requirements during the design phase, 4) Carry out modifications on the products designed before they are commissioned on site in case of differences between these products' design features and the HF requirements. This paper presents the solutions recommended by EDF to cope with these problems, in particular with respect to the Human Factors Engineering (HFE) methodology. This paper insists on the functional needs to take into account by the designer during the design of the product and the need for writing a document as 'functional requirements' which presents the experience feedback of the existing products, the HF studies carried out on site to have in-depth knowledge of the tasks and activities done by the operating crews related to the considered interface modifications, the requirements applicable during the design, etc. This paper insists on the need for being also prescriptive in the specifications on: 1) the iterative character of the design process, 2

  10. Specific requirements of nonbilayer phospholipids in mitochondrial respiratory chain function and formation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Charli D; Basu Ball, Writoban; Pryce, Erin N; Gohil, Vishal M

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial membrane phospholipid composition affects mitochondrial function by influencing the assembly of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes into supercomplexes. For example, the loss of cardiolipin (CL), a signature non-bilayer-forming phospholipid of mitochondria, results in disruption of MRC supercomplexes. However, the functions of the most abundant mitochondrial phospholipids, bilayer-forming phosphatidylcholine (PC) and non-bilayer-forming phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), are not clearly defined. Using yeast mutants of PE and PC biosynthetic pathways, we show a specific requirement for mitochondrial PE in MRC complex III and IV activities but not for their formation, whereas loss of PC does not affect MRC function or formation. Unlike CL, mitochondrial PE or PC is not required for MRC supercomplex formation, emphasizing the specific requirement of CL in supercomplex assembly. Of interest, PE biosynthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) can functionally substitute for the lack of mitochondrial PE biosynthesis, suggesting the existence of PE transport pathway from ER to mitochondria. To understand the mechanism of PE transport, we disrupted ER-mitochondrial contact sites formed by the ERMES complex and found that, although not essential for PE transport, ERMES facilitates the efficient rescue of mitochondrial PE deficiency. Our work highlights specific roles of non-bilayer-forming phospholipids in MRC function and formation. © 2016 Baker et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Brief Report: The Social Responsiveness Scale for Adults (SRS-A)-- Initial Results in a German Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a tool for quantitative autism assessment in children and adolescents. The SRS-A addresses social responsiveness in adulthood. Reliability and validity using the German adaptation of the SRS-A was examined in 20 adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), 62 with other mental disorders (CLIN) and 163…

  12. Specifications of the octupole magnets required for the ATF2 ultra-low ß* lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Modena, M.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Tomas, R.; White, G.R.; /SLAC

    2014-05-28

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) aims to test the novel chromaticity correction for higher chromaticity lattices as the one of CLIC. To this end the ATF2 ultra-low ß* lattice is designed to vertically focus the beam at the focal point or usually referred to as interaction point (IP), down to 23 nm. However when the measured multipole components of the ATF2 magnets are considered in the simulations, the evaluated spot sizes at the IP are well above the design value. The designed spot size is effectively recovered by inserting a pair of octupole magnets. In this note we address the technical specifications required for these octupole magnets.

  13. DNA sequence-specific recognition by a transcriptional regulator requires indirect readout of A-tracts

    PubMed Central

    Mendieta, Jesús; Pérez-Lago, Laura; Salas, Margarita; Camacho, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The bacteriophage Ø29 transcriptional regulator p4 binds to promoters of different intrinsic activities. The p4–DNA complex contains two identical protomers that make similar interactions with the target sequence 5′-AACTTTTT-15 bp-AAAATGTT-3′. To define how the various elements in the target sequence contribute to p4's affinity, we studied p4 binding to a series of mutated binding sites. The binding specificity depends critically on base pairs of the target sequence through both direct as well as indirect readout. There is only one specific contact between a base and an amino acid residue; other contacts take place with the phosphate backbone. Alteration of direct amino acid–base contacts, or mutation of non-contacted A·T base pairs at A-tracts abolished binding. We generated three 5 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the basis for the p4–DNA complex specificity. Recognition is controlled by the protein and depends on DNA dynamic properties. MD results on protein–DNA contacts and the divergence of p4 affinity to modified binding sites reveal an inherent asymmetry, which is required for p4-specific binding and may be crucial for transcription regulation. PMID:17452358

  14. Arx is required for specification of the zona incerta and reticular nucleus of the thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Sunnen, C. Nicole; Simonet, Jacqueline C.; Marsh, Eric D.; Golden, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the aristaless-related homeobox (ARX) gene result in a spectrum of structural and functional nervous system disorders including lissencephaly, movement disorders, intellectual disabilities, and epilepsy. Some patients also have symptoms indicative of hypothalamic dysfunction, however, little is known about the role of ARX in diencephalic development. To begin evaluating diencephalic defects we examined the expression of a panel of known genes and gene products that label specific diencephalic nuclei in two different Arx mutant mouse lines. Male mice engineered to have a polyalanine expansion mutation (Arx(GCG)7/Y) revealed no expression differences in any diencephalic nucleus when compared to wildtype littermates. In contrast, mice null for Arx (Arx−/Y) lost expression of specific markers of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and zona incerta (ZI), while retaining expression in other thalamic nuclei and in the hypothalamus. Tyrosine hydroxylase, a marker of the ZI’s dopaminergic A13 sub-nucleus, was among those lost, suggesting a requirement for Arx in normal TRN and ZI development, and for A13 dopaminergic fate, specifically. Since the ZI and A13 regions make connections to several hypothalamic nuclei, such mis-specification may contribute to the “hypothalamic dysfunction” observed in some patients. PMID:24487799

  15. Tead4 is required for specification of trophectoderm in pre-implantation mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Shinji; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroko; Sawada, Atsushi; Ota, Mitsunori; Nakao, Kazuki; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    During pre-implantation mouse development, embryos form blastocysts with establishment of the first two cell lineages: the trophectoderm (TE) which gives rise to the placenta, and the inner cell mass (ICM) which will form the embryo proper. Differentiation of TE is regulated by the transcription factor Caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2), but the mechanisms which act upstream of Cdx2 expression remain unknown. Here we show that the TEA domain family transcription factor, Tead4, is required for TE development. Tead1, Tead2 and Tead4 were expressed in pre-implantation embryos, and at least Tead1 and Tead4 were expressed widely in both TE and ICM lineages. Tead4-/- embryos died at pre-implantation stages without forming the blastocoel. The mutant embryos continued cell proliferation, and adherens junction and cell polarity were not significantly affected. In Tead4-/- embryos, Cdx2 was weakly expressed at the morula stage but was not expressed in later stages. None of the TE specific genes, including Eomes and a Cdx2 independent gene, Fgfr2, was detected in Tead4-/- embryos. Instead, the ICM specific transcription factors, Oct3/4 and Nanog, were expressed in all the blastomeres. Tead4-/- embryos also failed to differentiate trophoblast giant cells when they were cultured in vitro. ES cells with normal in vitro differentiation abilities were established from Tead4-/- embryos. These results suggest that Tead4 has a distinct role from Tead1 and Tead2 in trophectoderm specification of pre-implantation embryos, and that Tead4 is an early transcription factor required for specification and development of the trophectoderm lineage, which includes expression of Cdx2.

  16. Maternal Dead-End1 is required for vegetal cortical microtubule assembly during Xenopus axis specification

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Wenyan; Jin, Zhigang; Lai, Fangfang; Schwend, Tyler; Houston, Douglas W.; King, Mary Lou; Yang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate axis specification is an evolutionarily conserved developmental process that relies on asymmetric activation of Wnt signaling and subsequent organizer formation on the future dorsal side of the embryo. Although roles of Wnt signaling during organizer formation have been studied extensively, it is unclear how the Wnt pathway is asymmetrically activated. In Xenopus and zebrafish, the Wnt pathway is triggered by dorsal determinants, which are translocated from the vegetal pole to the future dorsal side of the embryo shortly after fertilization. The transport of dorsal determinants requires a unique microtubule network formed in the vegetal cortex shortly after fertilization. However, molecular mechanisms governing the formation of vegetal cortical microtubule arrays are not fully understood. Here we report that Dead-End 1 (Dnd1), an RNA-binding protein required for primordial germ cell development during later stages of embryogenesis, is essential for Xenopus axis specification. We show that knockdown of maternal Dnd1 specifically interferes with the formation of vegetal cortical microtubules. This, in turn, impairs translocation of dorsal determinants, the initiation of Wnt signaling, organizer formation, and ultimately results in ventralized embryos. Furthermore, we found that Dnd1 binds to a uridine-rich sequence in the 3′-UTR of trim36, a vegetally localized maternal RNA essential for vegetal cortical microtubule assembly. Dnd1 anchors trim36 to the vegetal cortex in the egg, promoting high concentrations of Trim36 protein there. Our work thus demonstrates a novel and surprising function for Dnd1 during early development and provides an important link between Dnd1, mRNA localization, the microtubule cytoskeleton and axis specification. PMID:23615278

  17. Improving the measurement of health-related quality of life in adolescent with idiopathic scoliosis: the SRS-7, a Rasch-developed short form of the SRS-22 questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Caronni, Antonio; Zaina, Fabio; Negrini, Stefano

    2014-04-01

    Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) questionnaire was developed to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. Rasch analysis (RA) is a statistical procedure which turns questionnaire ordinal scores into interval measures. Measures from Rasch-compatible questionnaires can be used, similar to body temperature or blood pressure, to quantify disease severity progression and treatment efficacy. Purpose of the current work is to present Rasch analysis (RA) of the SRS-22 questionnaire and to develop an SRS-22 Rasch-approved short form. 300 SRS-22 were randomly collected from 2447 consecutive IS adolescents at their first evaluation (229 females; 13.9 ± 1.9 years; 26.9 ± 14.7 Cobb°) in a scoliosis outpatient clinic. RA showed both disordered thresholds and overall misfit of the SRS-22. Sixteen items were re-scored and two misfitting items (6 and 14) removed to obtain a Rasch-compatible questionnaire. Participants HRQL measured too high with the rearranged questionnaire, indicating a severe SRS-22 ceiling effect. RA also highlighted SRS-22 multidimensionality, with pain/function not merging with self-image/mental health items. Item 3 showed differential item functioning (DIF) for both curve and hump amplitude. A 7-item questionnaire (SRS-7) was prepared by selecting single items from the original SRS-22. SRS-7 showed fit to the model, unidimensionality and no DIF. Compared with the SRS-22, the short form scale shows better targeting of the participants' population. RA shows that SRS-22 has poor clinimetric properties; moreover, when used with AIS at first evaluation, SRS-22 is affected by a severe ceiling effect. SRS-7, an SRS-22 7-item short form questionnaire, provides an HRQL interval measure better tailored to these participants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity, Reliability, and Responsiveness of SRS-7 as an Outcomes Assessment Instrument for Operatively Treated Patients With Adult Spinal Deformity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Lafage, Virginie; Kelly, Michael P; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Neuman, Brian J; Sciubba, Daniel M; Bess, Shay; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P; Scheer, Justin K; Burton, Douglas; Gupta, Munish C; Hart, Robert; Hostin, Richard A; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2016-09-15

    A retrospective analysis. The aim of our study was to compare the normality, concurrent validity, internal consistency, responsiveness, and dimensionality of an item response theory-derived seven-question instrument (SRS-7), against the Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS-22r) questionnaire in operatively treated patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). Compared with SRS-22r, SRS-7 (which has been validated in operatively treated patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis) has advantages of being short, unidimensional, and linear. A prospective database of ASD patients was queried for patients 18 years or older who were operatively treated, and who answered pre- and postoperative (at 2-year follow-up) SRS-22r questions (n = 276). Corresponding SRS-7 scores were calculated using answers to SRS-22r items 1, 4, 6, 10, 18, 19, and 20. Significance was set at a P value less than 0.01. SRS-7 and SRS-22r were normally distributed preoperatively but not postoperatively. SRS-7 and SRS-22r scores had high correlation both preoperatively (r = 0.76, P < 0.01) and postoperatively (r = 0.83, P < 0.01). The internal consistency reliability Cronbach α values were 0.61 (SRS-7) and 0.83 (SRS-22r) preoperatively and 0.91 (SRS-7) and 0.95 (SRS-22r) postoperatively. SRS-7 was found to be more responsive than SRS-22r with measures of effect size: Cohen d = 1.21 versus 1.13, Hedge g = 1.21 versus 1.13, and effect size correlation r = 0.52 versus 0.49. Iterative principal factor analysis of pre- and postoperative scores showed the presence of one dominant latent factor in SRS-7 (unidimensionality) and four latent factors in SRS-22r (multidimensionality). SRS-7 is a valid, reliable, responsive, and unidimensional instrument, which can be used as a short-form alternative to the SRS-22r for assessing global changes in patient-reported outcomes over time in patients with ASD. 3.

  19. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in high-grade glioma: judicious selection of small target volumes improves results.

    PubMed

    Bokstein, Felix; Blumenthal, Deborah T; Corn, Benjamin W; Gez, Eliahu; Matceyevsky, Diana; Shtraus, Natan; Ram, Zvi; Kanner, Andrew A

    2016-02-01

    We present a retrospective review of 55 Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) procedures performed in 47 consecutive patients with high-grade glioma (HGG). Thirty-three (70.2%) patients were diagnosed with glioblastoma and 14 (29.8%) with grade III glioma. The indications for SRS were small (up to 30 mm in diameter) locally progressing lesions in 32/47 (68%) or new distant lesions in 15/47 (32%) patients. The median target volume was 2.2 cc (0.2-9.5 cc) and the median prescription dose was 18 Gy (14-24 Gy). Three patients (5.5% incidence in 55 treatments) developed radiation necrosis. In eight cases (17%) patients received a second salvage SRS treatment to nine new lesions detected during follow-up. In 22/55 SRS treatments (40.0%) patients received concurrent chemo- or biological therapy, including temozolamide (TMZ) (15 patients), bevacizumab (BVZ) (6 patients) and carboplatin in one patient. Median time to progression after SRS was 5.0 months (1.0-96.4). Median survival time after SRS was 15.9 months (2.3-109.3) overall median survival (since diagnosis) was 37.4 months (9.6-193.6 months). Long-lasting responses (>12 months) after SRS were observed in 25/46 (54.3%) patients. We compared a matched (histology, age, KPS) cohort of patients with recurrent HGG treated with BVZ alone with the current study group. Median survival was significantly longer for SRS treated patients compared to the BVZ only cohort (12.6 vs. 7.3 months, p = 0.0102). SRS may be considered an effective salvage procedure for selected patients with small volume, recurrent high-grade gliomas. Long-term radiological control was observed in more than 50% of the patients.

  20. Control of collective FSBS and backscatter SRS through plasma composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Harvey; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2005-10-01

    Nominal NIF parameters are near the collective forward SBS (FSBS) threshold (P. M. Lushnikov and H. A. Rose, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255003 (2004), ``L&R''). It will be shown that being on this instability edge can be used as a control lever: a small amount of high Z dopant may lead to qualitative change in FSBS regime at fixed laser intensity, possibly reducing backscatter instability losses (Such results have already been observed, but absent SSD, a key aspect of our theory: R. M. Stevenson et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2709 (2004); L. J. Suter et al., 2738, ib.). Ponderomotive FSBS regimes are determined by the parameter I=F^2( vosc / vosc ve . - ve )^2( ne / ne nc . - nc ) / ( ne / ne nc . - nc ) ν . - ν, with ν the dimensionless ion acoustic damping coefficient and F the optic f/#. Analytical results will be presented which show a decrease of I1pt's threshold value through the addition of high Z dopant to low Z plasma, owing to increased thermal contribution to FSBS. Alternatively, one may raise the threshold by managing the value of νby, e.g., adding He to SiO2. For nominal NIF parameters, a range of He fraction in SiO2 plasma is predicted to suppress backscatter SRS while maintaining control of forward SBS.

  1. Recommendations for the treatment of aging in standard technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Orton, R.D.; Allen, R.P.

    1995-09-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated the standard technical specifications for nuclear power plants to determine whether the current surveillance requirements (SRs) were effective in detecting age-related degradation. Nuclear Plant Aging Research findings for selected systems and components were reviewed to identify the stressors and operative aging mechanisms and to evaluate the methods available to detect, differentiate, and trend the resulting aging degradation. Current surveillance and testing requirements for these systems and components were reviewed for their effectiveness in detecting degraded conditions and for potential contributions to premature degradation. When the current surveillance and testing requirements appeared ineffective in detecting aging degradation or potentially could contribute to premature degradation, a possible deficiency in the SRs was identified that could result in undetected degradation. Based on this evaluation, PNL developed recommendations for inspection, surveillance, trending, and condition monitoring methods to be incorporated in the SRs to better detect age- related degradation of these selected systems and components.

  2. NPH Risk Assessment and Mitigation of a SRS Facility for the Safe Storage of Tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, J.R.; Griffin, M.J.; Bjorkman, G.S.

    1995-10-18

    Because of the reduction in the nation`s stockpile of weapon systems a large amount of tritium is being returned to the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Due to the increased quantity of tritium returning to SRS, the SRS Tritium Facility was tasked to determine the most cost effective means to safely store the tritium gas in a short period of time. This paper presents results of the risk assessment developed to evaluate the safe storage of tritium at SRS, and highlights the structural design of the HIVES used as the cost-effective short term NPH mitigation solution.

  3. Analyses of SRS waste glass buried in granite in Sweden and salt in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.P.; Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Lodding, A.R.

    1991-12-31

    Simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste glass forms have been buried in the granite geology of the Stirpa mine in Sweden for two years. Analyses of glass surfaces provided a measure of the performance of the waste glasses as a function of time. Similar SRS waste glass compositions have also been buried in salt at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, New Mexico for a similar time period. Analyses of the SRS waste glasses buried in-situ in granite will be presented and compared to the performance of these same compositions buried in salt at WIPP.

  4. DECOMMISSIONING THE PHYSICS LABORATORY, BUILDING 777-10A, AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Musall, J; Cathy Sizemore, C

    2007-01-17

    SRS recently completed a four-year mission to decommission {approx}250 excess facilities. As part of that effort, SRS decommissioned a 48,000 ft{sup 2} laboratory that housed four low-power test reactors, formerly used by SRS to determine reactor physics. This paper describes and reviews the decommissioning, with a focus on component segmentation and handling (i.e. hazardous material removal, demolition, and waste handling). The paper is intended to be a resource for engineers, planners, and project managers who face similar decommissioning challenges.

  5. Analyses of SRS waste glass buried in granite in Sweden and salt in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.P. ); Wicks, G.G. ); Clark, D.E. ); Lodding, A.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste glass forms have been buried in the granite geology of the Stirpa mine in Sweden for two years. Analyses of glass surfaces provided a measure of the performance of the waste glasses as a function of time. Similar SRS waste glass compositions have also been buried in salt at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, New Mexico for a similar time period. Analyses of the SRS waste glasses buried in-situ in granite will be presented and compared to the performance of these same compositions buried in salt at WIPP.

  6. Neural crest specification and migration independently require NSD3-related lysine methyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Fricke, Bridget T.; Gammill, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest precursors express genes that cause them to become migratory, multipotent cells, distinguishing them from adjacent stationary neural progenitors in the neurepithelium. Histone methylation spatiotemporally regulates neural crest gene expression; however, the protein methyltransferases active in neural crest precursors are unknown. Moreover, the regulation of methylation during the dynamic process of neural crest migration is unclear. Here we show that the lysine methyltransferase NSD3 is abundantly and specifically expressed in premigratory and migratory neural crest cells. NSD3 expression commences before up-regulation of neural crest genes, and NSD3 is necessary for expression of the neural plate border gene Msx1, as well as the key neural crest transcription factors Sox10, Snail2, Sox9, and FoxD3, but not gene expression generally. Nevertheless, only Sox10 histone H3 lysine 36 dimethylation requires NSD3, revealing unexpected complexity in NSD3-dependent neural crest gene regulation. In addition, by temporally limiting expression of a dominant negative to migratory stages, we identify a novel, direct requirement for NSD3-related methyltransferase activity in neural crest migration. These results identify NSD3 as the first protein methyltransferase essential for neural crest gene expression during specification and show that NSD3-related methyltransferase activity independently regulates migration. PMID:25318671

  7. Neurotransmitter Transporter-Like: A Male Germline-specific SLC6 Transporter Required for Drosophila Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nabanita; Rollins, Janet; Mahowald, Anthony P.; Bazinet, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The SLC6 class of membrane transporters, known primarily as neurotransmitter transporters, is increasingly appreciated for its roles in nutritional uptake of amino acids and other developmentally specific functions. A Drosophila SLC6 gene, Neurotransmitter transporter-like (Ntl), is expressed only in the male germline. Mobilization of a transposon inserted near the 3′ end of the Ntl coding region yields male-sterile mutants defining a single complementation group. Germline transformation with Ntl cDNAs under control of male germline-specific control elements restores Ntl/Ntl homozygotes to normal fertility, indicating that Ntl is required only in the germ cells. In mutant males, sperm morphogenesis appears normal, with elongated, individualized and coiled spermiogenic cysts accumulating at the base of the testes. However, no sperm are transferred to the seminal vesicle. The level of polyglycylation of Ntl mutant sperm tubulin appears to be significantly lower than that of wild type controls. Glycine transporters are the most closely related SLC6 transporters to Ntl, suggesting that Ntl functions as a glycine transporter in developing sperm, where augmentation of the cytosolic pool of glycine may be required for the polyglycylation of the massive amounts of tubulin in the fly's giant sperm. The male-sterile phenotype of Ntl mutants may provide a powerful genetic system for studying the function of an SLC6 transporter family in a model organism. PMID:21298005

  8. eor-1 and eor-2 are required for cell-specific apoptotic death in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Daniel J; Spector, Mona S; Ratliff, Thomas M; Kinchen, Jason M; Granat, Susan; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Bhusri, Satjit S; Conradt, Barbara; Herman, Michael A; Hengartner, Michael O

    2004-10-01

    Programmed cell death occurs in every multicellular organism and in diverse cell types yet the genetic controls that define which cells will live and which will die remain poorly understood. During development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the coordinated activity of four gene products, EGL-1, CED-9, CED-4 and CED-3, results in the death of essentially all cells fated to die. To identify novel upstream components of the cell death pathway, we performed a genetic screen for mutations that abolish the death of the hermaphrodite-specific neurons (HSNs), a homologous pair of cells required for egg-laying in the hermaphrodite. We identified and cloned the genes, eor-1 and eor-2, which are required to specify the fate of cell death in male HSNs. In addition to defects in HSN death, mutation of either gene leads to defects in coordinated movement, neuronal migration, male tail development, and viability; all consistent with abnormal neuronal differentiation. eor-1 encodes a putative transcription factor related to the human oncogene PLZF. eor-2 encodes a novel but conserved protein. We propose that eor-1 and eor-2 function together throughout the nervous system to promote terminal differentiation of neurons and function specifically in male HSNs to promote apoptotic death of the HSNs.

  9. The efficacy of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide-specific antibodies to serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae requires macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Kevin; Manix, Catherine; Tian, Haijun; van Rooijen, Nico; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2010-11-03

    The efficacy of antibody immunity against Streptococcus pneumoniae stems from the ability of opsonic, serotype (ST)-specific antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS) to facilitate killing of the homologous ST by host phagocytes. However, PPS-specific antibodies have been identified that are protective in mice, but do not promote opsonic killing in vitro, raising the question of how they mediate protection in vivo. To probe this question, we investigated the dependence of antibody efficacy against lethal systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 (ST3) on macrophages and neutrophils for the following PPS3-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in survival experiments in mice using a non-opsonic human IgM (A7), a non-opsonic mouse IgG1 (1E2) and an opsonic mouse IgG1 (5F6). The survival of A7- and PPS3-specific and isotype control MAb-treated neutrophil-depleted and neutrophil-sufficient and macrophage-depleted and macrophage-sufficient mice were determined after i.p. challenge with ST3 strains 6303 and WU2. Neutrophils were dispensable for A7 and the mouse MAbs to mediate protection in this model, but macrophages were required for the efficacy of A7 and optimal mouse MAb-mediated protection. For A7-treated mice, macrophage-depleted mice had higher blood CFU, cytokines and peripheral neutrophil levels than macrophage-sufficient mice, and macrophage-sufficient mice had lower tissue bacterial burdens than control MAb-treated mice. These findings demonstrate that macrophages contribute to opsonic and non-opsonic PPS3-specific MAb-mediated protection against ST3 infection by enhancing bacterial clearance and suggest that neutrophils do not compensate for the absence of macrophages in the model used in this study.

  10. Stage specific requirement of Gfrα1 in the ureteric epithelium during kidney development.

    PubMed

    Keefe Davis, T; Hoshi, Masato; Jain, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) binds a coreceptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and forms a signaling complex with the receptor tyrosine kinase RET. GDNF-GFRα1-RET signaling activates cellular pathways that are required for normal induction of the ureteric bud (UB) from the Wolffian duct (WD). Failure of UB formation results in bilateral renal agenesis and perinatal lethality. Gfrα1 is expressed in both the epithelial and mesenchymal compartments of the developing kidney while Ret expression is specific to the epithelium. The biological importance of Gfrα1's wider tissue expression and its role in later kidney development are unclear. We discovered that conditional loss of Gfrα1 in the WD epithelium prior to UB branching is sufficient to cause renal agenesis. This finding indicates that Gfrα1 expressed in the nonepithelial structures cannot compensate for this loss. To determine Gfrα1's role in branching morphogenesis after UB induction we used an inducible Gfrα1-specific Cre-deletor strain and deleted Gfrα1 from the majority of UB tip cells post UB induction in vivo and in explant kidney cultures. We report that Gfrα1 excision from the epithelia compartment after UB induction caused a modest reduction in branching morphogenesis. The loss of Gfrα1 from UB-tip cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation and decreased activated ERK (pERK). Further, cells without Gfrα1 expression are able to populate the branching UB tips. These findings delineate previously unclear biological roles of Gfrα1 in the urinary tract and demonstrate its cell-type and stage-specific requirements in kidney development.

  11. An Automated Method for Identifying Inconsistencies within Diagrammatic Software Requirements Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Zhong

    1997-01-01

    The development of large-scale, composite software in a geographically distributed environment is an evolutionary process. Often, in such evolving systems, striving for consistency is complicated by many factors, because development participants have various locations, skills, responsibilities, roles, opinions, languages, terminology and different degrees of abstraction they employ. This naturally leads to many partial specifications or viewpoints. These multiple views on the system being developed usually overlap. From another aspect, these multiple views give rise to the potential for inconsistency. Existing CASE tools do not efficiently manage inconsistencies in distributed development environment for a large-scale project. Based on the ViewPoints framework the WHERE (Web-Based Hypertext Environment for requirements Evolution) toolkit aims to tackle inconsistency management issues within geographically distributed software development projects. Consequently, WHERE project helps make more robust software and support software assurance process. The long term goal of WHERE tools aims to the inconsistency analysis and management in requirements specifications. A framework based on Graph Grammar theory and TCMJAVA toolkit is proposed to detect inconsistencies among viewpoints. This systematic approach uses three basic operations (UNION, DIFFERENCE, INTERSECTION) to study the static behaviors of graphic and tabular notations. From these operations, subgraphs Query, Selection, Merge, Replacement operations can be derived. This approach uses graph PRODUCTIONS (rewriting rules) to study the dynamic transformations of graphs. We discuss the feasibility of implementation these operations. Also, We present the process of porting original TCM (Toolkit for Conceptual Modeling) project from C++ to Java programming language in this thesis. A scenario based on NASA International Space Station Specification is discussed to show the applicability of our approach. Finally

  12. Bacteriophage SPP1 pac Cleavage: A Precise Cut without Sequence Specificity Requirement.

    PubMed

    Djacem, Karima; Tavares, Paulo; Oliveira, Leonor

    2017-01-09

    In many tailed bacteriophages, DNA packaging is initiated by recognition and cleavage of a specific sequence pac by the small (TerS) and large (TerL) terminase subunits. It was previously shown that the SPP1 pac region has two sequences where TerS binds (pacR and pacL), flanking the segment where TerL cleaves the SPP1 DNA (pacC). However, the pac-specific sequences required to achieve this endonucleolytic cut were not established. Their characterization is essential to understand the underlying mechanism. We show that the pacR sequence localized within 35bp downstream of the pac cut can be extensively degenerated, including its c1 and c2 repeats, and that only a disruption of a 5-bp polyadenine tract impairs the pac cleavage. This result together with deletion analysis of pacL shows that the specific DNA sequences required for targeting the terminase for pac cleavage are considerably shorter than the large region bound by TerS. Furthermore, extensive degeneration of the 6-bp target sequence within pacC where pac cleavage occurs reveals that TerL maintains, remarkably, its precise position of cleavage. Studies with SPP1-related phages show the conservation of the cut position, irrespective of the sequence variation in pacC and in pacR or the changes in pacL-pacC distance. Mechanistically, our data are compatible with a model in which TerS interactions with part of the pacL sequence and a poly-A tract in pacR are sufficient to orient very accurately the TerL nuclease to a defined pacC position. They also demonstrate that the resulting precise cut at pacC is independent of the targeted DNA sequence.

  13. Resistance-training exercises with different stability requirements: time course of task specificity.

    PubMed

    Saeterbakken, Atle Hole; Andersen, Vidar; Behm, David G; Krohn-Hansen, Espen Krogseth; Smaamo, Mats; Fimland, Marius Steiro

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the task-specificity (greater improvements in trained compared to non-trained tasks), transferability and time-course adaptations of resistance-training programs with varying instability requirements. Thirty-six resistance-trained men were randomized to train chest press 2 days week(-1) for 10 week (6 repetitions × 4 series) using a Swiss ball, Smith machine or dumbbells. A six-repetition maximum-strength test with the aforementioned exercises and traditional barbell chest press were performed by all participants at the first, 7th, 14th and final training session in addition to electromyographic activities of the prime movers measured during isometric bench press. The groups training with the unstable Swiss-ball and dumbbells, but not the stable Smith-machine, demonstrated task-specificity, which became apparent in the early phase and remained throughout the study. The improvements in the trained exercise tended to increase more with instability (dumbbells vs. Smith machine, p = 0.061). The group training with Smith machine had similar improvements in the non-trained exercises. Greater improvements were observed in the early phase of the strength-training program (first-7th session) for all groups in all three exercises, but most notably for the unstable exercises. No differences were observed between the groups or testing times for EMG activity. These findings suggest that among resistance-trained individuals, the concept of task-specificity could be most relevant in resistance training with greater stability requirements, particularly due to rapid strength improvements for unstable resistance exercises.

  14. Australin: a chromosomal passenger protein required specifically for Drosophila melanogaster male meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Buttrick, Graham J.; Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Auton, Adam; Gatti, Maurizio; Wakefield, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), which is composed of conserved proteins aurora B, inner centromere protein (INCENP), survivin, and Borealin/DASRA, localizes to chromatin, kinetochores, microtubules, and the cell cortex in a cell cycle–dependent manner. The CPC is required for multiple aspects of cell division. Here we find that Drosophila melanogaster encodes two Borealin paralogues, Borealin-related (Borr) and Australin (Aust). Although Borr is a passenger in all mitotic tissues studied, it is specifically replaced by Aust for the two male meiotic divisions. We analyzed aust mutant spermatocytes to assess the effects of fully inactivating the Aust-dependent functions of the CPC. Our results indicate that Aust is required for sister chromatid cohesion, recruitment of the CPC to kinetochores, and chromosome alignment and segregation but not for meiotic histone phosphorylation or spindle formation. Furthermore, we show that the CPC is required earlier in cytokinesis than previously thought; cells lacking Aust do not initiate central spindle formation, accumulate anillin or actin at the cell equator, or undergo equatorial constriction. PMID:18268101

  15. Sensitivity requirements of assisted BDS and GPS in specification 3GPP TS 36.171

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiaoxi; Chen, Xin; Ying, Rendong; Yang, Genke

    2016-01-01

    With the needs of growing location-based service, a more high-performance satellite positioning technology - assisted global navigation satellite system (A-GNSS assisted-GNSS) becomes a new hotspot in area of navigation and positioning. Now, 3GPP has already provided supports for GPS, Galileo, GLONASS and QZSS, SBAS, so standardization work of introduction BDS into 3GPP organization is very imperative. In this paper, we first analysis the performance of GPS L1 C/A with assistant information, then by taking into account the difference between BDS and GPS, including the unique nature of GEO/NGEO satellites' navigation message data length and format, we design the sensitivity requirements of BDS B1 following A-GPS. The results between A-GPS and A-BDS of typical sensitivity test cases are shown in this paper, which show that the suggested sensitivity requirements satisfy the minimum performance requirements under technical specification of 3GPP TS 36.171.

  16. Point design targets, specifications, and requirements for the 2010 ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, S. W.; Lindl, J. D.; Callahan, D. A.; Clark, D. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Hammel, B. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Cook, R. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Glenzer, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Hatchett, S. P.; Herrmann, M. C.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ho, D. D.; Huang, H.; Jones, O. S.; Kline, J.; Kyrala, G.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Milovich, J. L.; Moreno, K. A.; Moses, E. I.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Peterson, K.; Pollaine, S. M.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P.; Vesey, R.; Weber, S. V.; Wilkens, H. L.; Wilson, D. C.

    2011-05-01

    Point design targets have been specified for the initial ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 443, 2841 (2004)]. The targets contain D-T fusion fuel in an ablator of either CH with Ge doping, or Be with Cu. These shells are imploded in a U or Au hohlraum with a peak radiation temperature set between 270 and 300 eV. Considerations determining the point design include laser-plasma interactions, hydrodynamic instabilities, laser operations, and target fabrication. Simulations were used to evaluate choices, and to define requirements and specifications. Simulation techniques and their experimental validation are summarized. Simulations were used to estimate the sensitivity of target performance to uncertainties and variations in experimental conditions. A formalism is described that evaluates margin for ignition, summarized in a parameter the Ignition Threshold Factor (ITF). Uncertainty and shot-to-shot variability in ITF are evaluated, and sensitivity of the margin to characteristics of the experiment. The formalism is used to estimate probability of ignition. The ignition experiment will be preceded with an experimental campaign that determines features of the design that cannot be defined with simulations alone. The requirements for this campaign are summarized. Requirements are summarized for the laser and target fabrication.

  17. Spinopelvic Changes Based on the Simplified SRS-Schwab Adult Spinal Deformity Classification: Relationships with Disability and Health-related Quality of Life in Adult Patients with Prolonged Degenerative Spinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kyrölä, Kati; Repo, Jussi; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Ylinen, Jari; Kautiainen, Hannu; Häkkinen, Arja

    2017-08-01

    Cross-sectional, observational study. To study the occurrence of sagittal malalignment, the adaptability of a simplified sagittal modifiers grading of the Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-Schwab adult spinal deformity classification (ASD), and the deformity-specific SRS questionnaire version 30 (SRS-30) in an unselected adult cohort with symptomatic degenerative spinal disorders. The sagittal modifiers of the SRS-Schwab ASD classification correlate with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures in patients with ASD. The deformities and disabilities caused by sagittal malalignment in patients with common degenerative spinal disorders of multiple etiologies are rarely studied. A simplified and categorizing version of the SRS-Schwab ASD classification in relation to the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the SRS-30 outcomes has not yet been developed. We recruited 874 consecutive patients with degenerative spinal disorders between March 2013 and February 2014. Full spine radiographs were taken and the patients divided into sagittal deformity severity groups: mild or none, moderate, and marked deformity. Participants completed the ODI, SRS-30, and a general health questionnaire. We included 637 patients in the analysis. The severity of sagittal deformity was mild or none in 407 (63.9%) patients, moderate in 159 (25.0%), and marked in 71 (11.1%). Linearity across the modifier grades and deformity classes was found for ODI total score (p = 0.033), and the function/activity (p = 0.004) and self-image/appearance (p = 0.030) domains of the SRS-30. Age, body mass index, duration of symptoms, and the use of painkillers increased while physical activity, working, and educational status decreased significantly with deformity severity. Sagittal spinopelvic malalignment is significantly related to deterioration of the ODI and the SRS-30 in symptomatic adults with degenerative spinal disorders. The SRS-Schwab classification sagittal modifiers categorized into 3

  18. Mitochondria are required for antigen-specific T cell activation through reactive oxygen species signaling.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Li, Sha; Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali; Ezponda, Teresa; Hildeman, David A; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Schumacker, Paul T; Licht, Jonathan D; Perlman, Harris; Bryce, Paul J; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2013-02-21

    It is widely appreciated that T cells increase glycolytic flux during activation, but the role of mitochondrial flux is unclear. Here, we have shown that mitochondrial metabolism in the absence of glucose metabolism is sufficient to support interleukin-2 (IL-2) induction. Furthermore, we used mice with reduced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in T cells (T-Uqcrfs(-/-) mice) to show that mitochondria are required for T cell activation to produce mROS for activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and subsequent IL-2 induction. These mice could not induce antigen-specific expansion of T cells in vivo, but Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells retained the ability to proliferate in vivo under lymphopenic conditions. This suggests that Uqcrfs1(-/-) T cells were not lacking bioenergetically but rather lacked specific ROS-dependent signaling events needed for antigen-specific expansion. Thus, mitochondrial metabolism is a critical component of T cell activation through the production of complex III ROS.

  19. Specific immunoadsorption of pathogenic autoantibodies in pemphigus requires the entire ectodomains of desmogleins.

    PubMed

    Langenhan, Jana; Dworschak, Jenny; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Komorowski, Lars; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Stöcker, Winfried; Westermann, Jürgen; Recke, Andreas; Zillikens, Detlef; Schmidt, Enno; Probst, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV) are life-threatening autoimmune blistering skin diseases. They are characterized by circulating autoantibodies which bind to the ectodomains of desmoglein (Dsg) 1 and Dsg3. These antibodies induce acantholysis in skin and mucous membranes. In severe cases of pemphigus, immunoadsorption is applied to remove total IgG from patient plasma using protein A or other ligands. To develop a specific adsorber for anti-Dsg antibodies, epitope mapping studies of Dsg1 and Dsg3 ectodomains were conducted. Dsg variants were expressed on the surface of HEK-293 cells and analysed for reactivity with pemphigus and control sera by indirect immunofluorescence technique. For Dsg1, a construct consisting of domain 1 directly fused to domain 5, seemed to be suitable for specific immunoadsorption of anti-Dsg1 antibodies. The recognized epitopes were mainly conformation-dependent. However, adsorption of pemphigus foliaceus IgG using this protein coupled to a Sepharose matrix did not completely remove pathogenicity from the sera, as proven by a keratinocyte dissociation assay. In contrast, full-length Dsg1 and Dsg3 ectodomains were able to specifically adsorb anti-Dsg antibodies and to efficiently eliminate pathogenicity. Therefore, the complete and correctly folded ectodomains of both desmogleins are required for therapeutic immunoadsorption.

  20. Metamorphic T3-response genes have specific co-regulator requirements

    PubMed Central

    Havis, Emmanuelle; Sachs, Laurent M.; Demeneix, Barbara A.

    2003-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) have several regulatory functions in vertebrates. In the absence of thyroid hormone (T3; triiodothyronine), apo-TRs associate with co-repressors to repress transcription, whereas in the presence of T3, holo-TRs engage transcriptional coactivators. Although many studies have addressed the molecular mechanisms of T3 action, it is not known how specific physiological responses arise. We used T3-dependent amphibian metamorphosis to analyse how TRs interact with particular co-regulators to differentially regulate gene expression during development. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation to study tissue from pre-metamorphic tad-poles, we found that TRs are physically associated with T3-responsive promoters, whether or not T3 is present. Addition of T3 results in histone H4 acetylation specifically on T3-response genes. Most importantly, we show that individual T3-response genes have distinct co-regulator requirements, the T3-dependent co-repressor-to-coactivator switch being gene-specific for both co-regulator categories. PMID:12947412

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa twitching motility-mediated chemotaxis towards phospholipids and fatty acids: specificity and metabolic requirements.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rhea M; Tomaras, Andrew P; Barker, Adam P; Voelker, Dennis R; Chan, Edward D; Vasil, Adriana I; Vasil, Michael L

    2008-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa demonstrates type IV pilus-mediated directional twitching motility up a gradient of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Only one of four extracellular phospholipases C of P. aeruginosa (i.e., PlcB), while not required for twitching motility per se, is required for twitching-mediated migration up a gradient of PE or phosphatidylcholine. Whether other lipid metabolism genes are associated with this behavior was assessed by analysis of transcription during twitching up a PE gradient in comparison to transcription during twitching in the absence of any externally applied phospholipid. Data support the hypothesis that PE is further degraded and that the long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) moieties of PE are completely metabolized via beta-oxidation and the glyoxylate shunt. It was discovered that P. aeruginosa exhibits twitching-mediated chemotaxis toward unsaturated LCFAs (e.g., oleic acid), but not saturated LCFAs (e.g., stearic acid) of corresponding lengths. Analysis of mutants that are deficient in glyoxylate shunt enzymes, specifically isocitrate lyase (DeltaaceA) and malate synthase (DeltaaceB), suggested that the complete metabolism of LCFAs through this pathway was required for the migration of P. aeruginosa up a gradient of PE or unsaturated LCFAs. At this point, our data suggested that this process should be classified as energy taxis. However, further evaluation of the ability of the DeltaaceA and DeltaaceB mutants to migrate up a gradient of PE or unsaturated LCFAs in the presence of an alternative energy source clearly indicated that metabolism of LCFAs for energy is not required for chemotaxis toward these compounds.

  2. Evolution of New cis-Regulatory Motifs Required for Cell-Specific Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis

    PubMed Central

    Félix, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Patterning of C. elegans vulval cell fates relies on inductive signaling. In this induction event, a single cell, the gonadal anchor cell, secretes LIN-3/EGF and induces three out of six competent precursor cells to acquire a vulval fate. We previously showed that this developmental system is robust to a four-fold variation in lin-3/EGF genetic dose. Here using single-molecule FISH, we find that the mean level of expression of lin-3 in the anchor cell is remarkably conserved. No change in lin-3 expression level could be detected among C. elegans wild isolates and only a low level of change—less than 30%—in the Caenorhabditis genus and in Oscheius tipulae. In C. elegans, lin-3 expression in the anchor cell is known to require three transcription factor binding sites, specifically two E-boxes and a nuclear-hormone-receptor (NHR) binding site. Mutation of any of these three elements in C. elegans results in a dramatic decrease in lin-3 expression. Yet only a single E-box is found in the Drosophilae supergroup of Caenorhabditis species, including C. angaria, while the NHR-binding site likely only evolved at the base of the Elegans group. We find that a transgene from C. angaria bearing a single E-box is sufficient for normal expression in C. elegans. Even a short 58 bp cis-regulatory fragment from C. angaria with this single E-box is able to replace the three transcription factor binding sites at the endogenous C. elegans lin-3 locus, resulting in the wild-type expression level. Thus, regulatory evolution occurring in cis within a 58 bp lin-3 fragment, results in a strict requirement for the NHR binding site and a second E-box in C. elegans. This single-cell, single-molecule, quantitative and functional evo-devo study demonstrates that conserved expression levels can hide extensive change in cis-regulatory site requirements and highlights the evolution of new cis-regulatory elements required for cell-specific gene expression. PMID:27588814

  3. SU-E-T-48: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification for Conventional, SRS and SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, R; Kamima, T; Tachibana, H; Baba, H; Itano, M; Yamazaki, T; Ishibashi, S; Higuchi, Y; Shimizu, H; Yamamoto, T; Yamashita, M; Sugawara, Y; Sato, A; Nishiyama, S; Kawai, D; Miyaoka, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show the results of a multi-institutional study of the independent dose verification for conventional, Stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiotherapy (SRS and SBRT) plans based on the action level of AAPM TG-114. Methods: This study was performed at 12 institutions in Japan. To eliminate the bias of independent dose verification program (Indp), all of the institutions used the same CT-based independent dose verification software (Simple MU Analysis, Triangle Products, JP) with the Clarkson-based algorithm. Eclipse (AAA, PBC), Pinnacle{sup 3} (Adaptive Convolve) and Xio (Superposition) were used as treatment planning system (TPS). The confidence limits (CL, Mean±2SD) for 18 sites (head, breast, lung, pelvis, etc.) were evaluated in comparison in dose between the TPS and the Indp. Results: A retrospective analysis of 6352 treatment fields was conducted. The CLs for conventional, SRS and SBRT were 1.0±3.7 %, 2.0±2.5 % and 6.2±4.4 %, respectively. In conventional plans, most of the sites showed within 5 % of TG-114 action level. However, there were the systematic difference (4.0±4.0 % and 2.5±5.8 % for breast and lung, respectively). In SRS plans, our results showed good agreement compared to the action level. In SBRT plans, the discrepancy between the Indp was variable depending on dose calculation algorithms of TPS. Conclusion: The impact of dose calculation algorithms for the TPS and the Indp affects the action level. It is effective to set the site-specific tolerances, especially for the site where inhomogeneous correction can affect dose distribution strongly.

  4. 50 CFR Appendix F to Part 622 - Specifications for Sea Turtle Mitigation Gear and Sea Turtle Handling and Release Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specifications for Sea Turtle Mitigation Gear and Sea Turtle Handling and Release Requirements F Appendix F to Part 622 Wildlife and Fisheries... 622—Specifications for Sea Turtle Mitigation Gear and Sea Turtle Handling and Release Requirements...

  5. Optical Properties of Rare Earth Doped SrS Phosphor: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Ayush; Mishra, Shubhra; Kshatri, D. S.; Tiwari, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped SrS phosphor has attracted a lot of attention on a wide range of photo-, cathodo-, thermo-, and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with different RE elements (e.g., Ce, Pr, Eu, Yb), the luminescence from SrS can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the strontium sulfide host. The main applications include flat panel displays and SrS-based powder electroluminescence (EL) for back lights. Sulfide materials known for providing Eu2+ based red emission band and preferred as a color conversion material in white light emitting diodes are discussed. Especially, the applications of RE doped SrS are described in light of their utility as conversion and storage phosphors. The effect of energy level splitting, EL efficiency, post-annealing, milling time, and impurity on luminescence properties for SrS are also discussed.

  6. Autonomous Sampling Platform Development: Radiological Contamination Mapping at SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Moya, Nicholas; Whiteside, Tad

    2016-07-01

    From 1961 to 1964, radioactive elements were released from the Savannah River Site into local bodies of water via cooling water charges from the reactors on site. In 1983, the extent of the radioactive contamination was first studied, and elements such as 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu, 241Am, 244Cm, and tritium were found to have seeped from local bodies of water into sediment and the surrounding flora and fauna. The current method of tracking and monitoring radioactive contamination at the SRS is to gather samples and conduct measurements in a laboratory. A cheaper, and safer, method to conduct such measurements would be to automate the process by using an autonomous boat that can travel to locations, conduct measurements, and return home all without human intervention. To introduce this idea, the construction of an autonomous boat prototype was completed to demonstrate the practicality and feasibility of such an idea. The prototype travels to a set of waypoints, stops at each waypoint, and returns when all waypoints have been reached. It does this by employing a simple battery-powered boat with an Arduino controller that steers the boat using a steering algorithm incorporated into a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) function. A total of three tests were conducted at two different bodies of water; and after working out some hardware problems, the boat drone was able to successfully steer and reach all programmed waypoints. With the prototype complete, the next steps to realizing the final product of the boat drone will include adopting a processing unit with higher-bit architecture, using a bigger boat with a more powerful trolling motor, and incorporating a solar panel for continuous power and round-the-clock performance.

  7. SU-E-T-630: Commissioning for SRS Planning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pella, S; Smith, C; Leventouri, T; Bacala, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This study will try to find optimal procedures to collect small fields beam data for commissioning in treatment planning systems (TPS), and to provide a protocol to collect output factors for very small field sizes: 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 4.0 cm × 4.0 cm.This will help in determining the correct beam configuration methods in TPS planning intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and stereotactic radiosurgery SRS using mini multileaf collimation (mMLC). Methods: Data has been collected for a mMLC linear accelerator (linac) Novalis from 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm (its maximum field size). The TPS chosen is BrainLab, Eclipse and Cyberknife. The beam data collected was modeled and imported in the TPS. Verification plans were generated in solid water to confirm the goodness of the data. 3D and IMRT plans on regular CT scans were generated and verified using Mapcheck. All 3D plans with field sizes above 4 cm × 4 cm verified excellent using a distance to agreement of 2 mm and a 2% tolerance. IMRT plans gave an error of -8%. New scans with new detectors have been taken, new field sizes were introduced, and focus has been applied on determining the dosimetric leaf gap. Results: Although this is still a work in progress, this study brings several issues to light: the importance of the correct technique in beam data collection from the correct watertank to the correct detectors. Readings for rectangular fields have to be taken especially for fields which one side is under 4 cm. Conclusion: The use of equivalent square fields will not provide correct readings for the fields with large differences between the length and the width.

  8. The self-rating score (SRS) versus the examiner rating score (ERS) in measuring helplessness in healthy individuals and in patients with benign breast disease and breast cancer: a prospective case-control study in Finland.

    PubMed

    Eskelinen, Matti; Korhonen, Riika; Selander, Tuomas; Ollonen, Paula

    2014-10-01

    The self-rating score (SRS) versus examiner rating score (ERS) in measuring helplessness in healthy study subjects (HSS) and in patients with benign breast disease (BBD) and breast cancer (BC) has not been yet compared in a prospective study. We, therefore, investigated SRS versus ERS in 115 patients. In an extension of the Kuopio Breast Cancer Study 115 women with breast symptoms were evaluated for hopelessness versus helplessness before any diagnostic procedures were carried-out. The SRS and the ERS for hopelessness were highly significantly positively correlated in the HSS, BBD and BC groups. The weighted kappa values for hopelessness between the SRS and the ERS in the HSS, BBD and BC groups were also statistically significant. There was also a significant positive correlation between the SRS and the ERS for helplessness in the HSS, BBD and BC groups. The weighted and unweighted kappa-values for hopelessness versus helplessness for the SRS in the HSS, BBD and BC groups were statistically significant. The Spearman correlation coefficients and both weighted and unweighted kappa values for hopelessness versus helplessness in the ERS in the HSS, BBD and BC groups were statistically significant. The results of this study support a specific link between hopelessness and helplessness attitude characteristics by SRS and ERS. This finding is of clinical importance, since in the BC and BBD groups, hopelessness/helplessness might be associated with a delay in BC diagnosis and have a negative impact on the adjustment and well-being of patients. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  9. The RED domain of Paired is specifically required for Drosophila accessory gland maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Li, Ping; Xue, Lei

    2015-02-01

    The evolutionarily conserved paired domain consists of the N-terminal PAI and the C-terminal RED domains, each containing a helix-turn-helix motif capable of binding DNA. Despite its conserved sequence, the physiological functions of the RED domain remain elusive. Here, we constructed a prd transgene expressing a truncated Paired (Prd) protein without the RED domain, and examined its rescue ability in prd mutants. We found that the RED domain is specifically required for the expression of Acp26Aa and sex peptide in male accessory glands, and the induction of female post-mating response. Our data thus identified an important physiological function for the evolutionarily conserved RED domain.

  10. Rapid amyloid fibril formation by a winter flounder antifreeze protein requires specific interaction with ice.

    PubMed

    Dubé, André; Leggiadro, Cindy; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya

    2016-05-01

    A typically α-helical antifreeze protein (wflAFP-6) from winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, forms amyloid fibrils during freezing. In this study, the effects of distinct components of the freezing process were examined. Freezing of wflAFP-6 in the presence of template ice was shown to be necessary for rapid conversion to an amyloid conformation. Neither subfreezing temperature nor phase change was sufficient. Thus, specific interaction with the ice surface was essential. The ice-induced formation of amyloid appeared to be unique to this helical antifreeze, it required high concentrations of protein and it occurred over a range of pH values. These results define a method for rapid formation of amyloid by wflAFP-6 on demand under physiological conditions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Specific mRNA destabilization in Dictyostelium discoideum requires RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Amara, J F; Lodish, H F

    1987-01-01

    We tested the effects of inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis on the disaggregation-mediated destabilization of prespore mRNAs in Dictyostelium discoideum. Incubating disaggregated cells with daunomycin to inhibit RNA synthesis prevented the loss of prespore mRNAs, whereas the inhibitor decreased or did not affect levels of the common mRNAs CZ22 and actin. Protein synthesis inhibitors varied in their effects. Cycloheximide, which inhibited protein synthesis almost completely, prevented the loss of the prespore mRNAs, but puromycin, which inhibited protein synthesis less well, did not. These results indicate that the process of specific mRNA destabilization requires the synthesis of RNA and possibly of protein. Images PMID:3437899

  12. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Operations System: Version 4.0 - system requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Kashporenko, D.

    1996-07-01

    This document is intended to provide an operations standard for the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory OPerations System (EMSL OPS). It is directed toward three primary audiences: (1) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) facility and operations personnel; (2) laboratory line managers and staff; and (3) researchers, equipment operators, and laboratory users. It is also a statement of system requirements for software developers of EMSL OPS. The need for a finely tuned, superior research environment as provided by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory has never been greater. The abrupt end of the Cold War and the realignment of national priorities caused major US and competing overseas laboratories to reposition themselves in a highly competitive research marketplace. For a new laboratory such as the EMSL, this means coming into existence in a rapidly changing external environment. For any major laboratory, these changes create funding uncertainties and increasing global competition along with concomitant demands for higher standards of research product quality and innovation. While more laboratories are chasing fewer funding dollars, research ideas and proposals, especially for molecular-level research in the materials and biological sciences, are burgeoning. In such an economically constrained atmosphere, reduced costs, improved productivity, and strategic research project portfolio building become essential to establish and maintain any distinct competitive advantage. For EMSL, this environment and these demands require clear operational objectives, specific goals, and a well-crafted strategy. Specific goals will evolve and change with the evolution of the nature and definition of DOE`s environmental research needs. Hence, EMSL OPS is designed to facilitate migration of these changes with ease into every pertinent job function, creating a facile {open_quotes}learning organization.{close_quotes}

  13. Specific regions within the embryonic midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling during development

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; Echevarria, Diego; Ahn, Christina Petersen; Sudarov, Anamaria; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mason, Ivor J.; Martinez, Salvador; Martin, Gail R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of the prospective midbrain and cerebellum are coordinated by FGF ligands produced by the isthmic organizer. Previous studies have suggested that the midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling for their development. However, little is known about the extent to which specific regions within these two parts of the brain differ in their requirement for FGF signaling during embryogenesis. In this study, we have explored the effects of inhibiting FGF signaling within the embryonic midbrain (mesencephalon) and cerebellum (rhombomere 1) by misexpressing Sprouty2 (Spry2) specifically in the mouse mesencephalon and rhombomere 1 from an early stage. We show that such Spry2 misexpression moderately reduces FGF signaling, and that this reduction causes the death of cells in the anterior mesencephalon, the region furthest from the source of FGF ligands. Interestingly, the remaining cells in the posterior mesencephalon develop into anterior midbrain, indicating that a low level of FGF signaling is sufficient to promote only anterior midbrain development. Spry2 misexpression also affects development of the vermis, the medial part of the cerebellum that spans the midline. We found that whereas misexpression of Spry2 alone caused loss of the anterior vermis, reducing FGF signaling further, by decreasing Fgf8 gene dosage, resulted in loss of the entire vermis. We provide evidence that cell death is not responsible for this tissue loss. Instead, our data suggest that the vermis fails to develop because reducing FGF signaling perturbs the balance between vermis and roof plate development in rhombomere 1. We suggest a molecular explanation for this phenomenon by providing evidence that FGF signaling functions to inhibit the BMP signaling that promotes roof plate development. PMID:18216176

  14. Ground motion following selection of SRS design basis earthquake and associated deterministic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of a deterministic assessment of earthquake ground motions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The purpose of this study is to assist the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Laboratory in reevaluating the design basis earthquake (DBE) ground motion at SRS during approaches defined in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 100. This work is in support of the Seismic Engineering Section's Seismic Qualification Program for reactor restart.

  15. PCNASUMO and Srs2: a model SUMO substrate-effector pair.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, H D

    2007-12-01

    Attachment of the SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) to the replication factor PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) in the budding yeast has been shown to recruit a helicase, Srs2, to active replication forks, which in turn prevents unscheduled recombination events. In the present review, I will discuss how the interaction between SUMOylated PCNA and Srs2 serves as an example for a mechanism by which SUMO modulates the properties of its targets and mediates the activation of downstream effector proteins.

  16. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms. Volume 1, State-of-the-art and potential applications at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Benemann, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  17. Engineering Specification for Large-aperture UVO Space Telescopes Derived from Science Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Smith, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is a three year effort initiated in FY12 to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 to 8 meter UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND result in a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To provide the science community with options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. We have assembled an outstanding team from academia, industry, and government with extensive expertise in astrophysics and exoplanet characterization, and in the design/manufacture of monolithic and segmented space telescopes. A key accomplishment is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints.

  18. Testis determination requires a specific FGFR2 isoform to repress FOXL2.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Bird, Anthony D; Zhao, Liang; Ryan, Janelle M; Yong, Meiyun; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Koopman, Peter; Eswarakumar, Jacob V; Harley, Vincent R

    2017-09-11

    Male sex determination in mammals relies on SRY-mediated up-regulation of SOX9 expression in XY gonads, whereas WNT/RSPO signalling and FOXL2 drive female sex determination in XX gonads. FGF9-signalling ensures sustained SOX9 expression through repression of one of the ovarian pathways (WNT signalling), while the significance of FGF-mediated repression of the FOXL2 pathway has not been studied. Previously, we demonstrated that FGFR2 is the receptor for FGF9 in the XY gonad. Whether a specific isoform (FGFR2b or FGFR2c) is required was puzzling. Here, we show that FGFR2c is required for male sex determination. Initially, in developing mouse embryos at 12.5-13.5 days post coitum (dpc), XY Fgfr2c-/- gonads appear ovotestes, with SOX9 and FOXL2 expression predominantly localised to the posterior and anterior gonadal poles, respectively. However by 15.5dpc, XY Fgfr2c-/- gonads show complete male-to-female sex reversal, evident by the lack of SOX9 and ectopic expression of FOXL2 throughout the gonads. Furthermore, ablation of the Foxl2 gene leads to partial or complete rescue of gonadal sex reversal in XY Fgfr2c-/- mice. Together with previous findings, our data suggest that testis determination involves FGFR2c-mediated repression of both the WNT4- and FOXL2-driven ovarian determining pathways. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  19. Specific requirement for ATP at an early step of in vitro transcription of human mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, N.; Attardi, G.

    1987-06-01

    The ATP concentrations allowing transcription of heavy- and light-strand of human mtDNA in a HeLa cell mitochrondrial lysate were found to cover a broad range, with a maximum around 2.5 mM, and with reproducible differences in the ATP response curves for the two transcription events. Direct measurements showed that nonspecific ATP degradation during the assay did not account for the high ATP requirement. 5'-Adenylyl imidodiphosphate (p(NH)ppA), an ATP analog with a nonhydrolyzable ..beta..-..gamma.. bond, was unable to substitute for ATP in supporting mtDNA transcription but greatly stimulated this transcription in the presence of a low concentration of exogenous APT, measured with (/sup 32/P)-labeled nucleotides. Evidence was obtained indicating that p(NH)ppA did not support an early event in mtDNA transcription (formation of preinitiation complex or initiation), whereas this analog could substitute effectively for ATP in the subsequent elongation steps. These results pointed to a specific requirement for ATP at an early step of the transcription process.

  20. Differential requirements for Gli2 and Gli3 in the regional specification of the mouse hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Tóvolli, Roberta; Paul, Fabian A.; Zhang, Yuanfeng; Zhou, Xunlei; Theil, Thomas; Puelles, Luis; Blaess, Sandra; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein Sonic hedgehog (Shh) ventralizes the neural tube by modulating the crucial balance between activating and repressing functions (GliA, GliR) of transcription factors Gli2 and Gli3. This balance—the Shh-Gli code—is species- and context-dependent and has been elucidated for the mouse spinal cord. The hypothalamus, a forebrain region regulating vital functions like homeostasis and hormone secretion, shows dynamic and intricate Shh expression as well as complex regional differentiation. Here we asked if particular combinations of Gli2 and Gli3 and of GliA and GliR functions contribute to the variety of hypothalamic regions, i.e., we wanted to approach the question of a possible hypothalamic version of the Shh-Gli code. Based on mouse mutant analysis, we show that: (1) hypothalamic regional heterogeneity is based in part on differentially stringent requirements for Gli2 or Gli3; (2) another source of diversity are differential requirements for Shh of neural vs. non-neural origin; (3) the medial progenitor domain known to depend on Gli2 for its development generates several essential hypothalamic nuclei plus the pituitary and median eminence; (4) the suppression of Gli3R by neural and non-neural Shh is essential for hypothalamic specification. Finally, we have mapped our results on a recent model which considers the hypothalamus as a transverse region with alar and basal portions. Our data confirm the model and are explained by it. PMID:25859185