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Sample records for requires ketamine anesthesia

  1. Exposure to Ketamine Anesthesia Affects Rat Impulsive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Melo, António; Leite-Almeida, Hugo; Ferreira, Clara; Sousa, Nuno; Pêgo, José M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ketamine is a general anesthetic (GA) that activates several neurotransmitter pathways in various part of the brain. The acute effects as GA are the most well-known and sought-after: to induce loss of responsiveness and to produce immobility during invasive procedures. However, there is a concern that repeated exposure might induce behavioral changes that could outlast their acute effect. Most research in this field describes how GA affects cognition and memory. Our work is to access if general anesthesia with ketamine can disrupt the motivational behavior trait, more specifically measuring impulsive behavior. Methods: Aiming to evaluate the effects of exposure to repeat anesthetic procedures with ketamine in motivational behavior, we tested animals in a paradigm of impulsive behavior, the variable delay-to-signal (VDS). In addition, accumbal and striatal medium spiny neurons morphology was assessed. Results: Our results demonstrated that previous exposure to ketamine deep-anesthesia affects inhibitory control (impulsive behavior). Specifically, ketamine exposed animals maintain a subnormal impulsive rate in the initial periods of the delays. However, in longer delays while control animals progressively refrain their premature unrewarded actions, ketamine-exposed animals show a different profile of response with higher premature unrewarded actions in the last seconds. Animals exposed to multiple ketamine anesthesia also failed to show an increase in premature unrewarded actions between the initial and final periods of 3 s delays. These behavioral alterations are paralleled by an increase in dendritic length of medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Conclusions: This demonstrates that ketamine anesthesia acutely affects impulsive behavior. Interestingly, it also opens up the prospect of using ketamine as an agent with the ability to modulate impulsivity trait.

  2. Exposure to Ketamine Anesthesia Affects Rat Impulsive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Melo, António; Leite-Almeida, Hugo; Ferreira, Clara; Sousa, Nuno; Pêgo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ketamine is a general anesthetic (GA) that activates several neurotransmitter pathways in various part of the brain. The acute effects as GA are the most well-known and sought-after: to induce loss of responsiveness and to produce immobility during invasive procedures. However, there is a concern that repeated exposure might induce behavioral changes that could outlast their acute effect. Most research in this field describes how GA affects cognition and memory. Our work is to access if general anesthesia with ketamine can disrupt the motivational behavior trait, more specifically measuring impulsive behavior. Methods: Aiming to evaluate the effects of exposure to repeat anesthetic procedures with ketamine in motivational behavior, we tested animals in a paradigm of impulsive behavior, the variable delay-to-signal (VDS). In addition, accumbal and striatal medium spiny neurons morphology was assessed. Results: Our results demonstrated that previous exposure to ketamine deep-anesthesia affects inhibitory control (impulsive behavior). Specifically, ketamine exposed animals maintain a subnormal impulsive rate in the initial periods of the delays. However, in longer delays while control animals progressively refrain their premature unrewarded actions, ketamine-exposed animals show a different profile of response with higher premature unrewarded actions in the last seconds. Animals exposed to multiple ketamine anesthesia also failed to show an increase in premature unrewarded actions between the initial and final periods of 3 s delays. These behavioral alterations are paralleled by an increase in dendritic length of medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Conclusions: This demonstrates that ketamine anesthesia acutely affects impulsive behavior. Interestingly, it also opens up the prospect of using ketamine as an agent with the ability to modulate impulsivity trait. PMID:27932959

  3. Ketamine: Current applications in anesthesia, pain, and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi, Madhuri S.; Theerth, Kaushic A.; Deva, Radhika S.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine was introduced commercially in 1970 with the manufacturer's description as a “rapidly acting, nonbarbiturate general anesthetic” and a suggestion that it would be useful for short procedures. With the help of its old unique pharmacological properties and newly found beneficial clinical properties, ketamine has survived the strong winds of time, and it currently has a wide variety of clinical applications. It's newly found neuroprotective, antiinflammatory and antitumor effects, and the finding of the usefulness of low dose ketamine regimens have helped to widen the clinical application profile of ketamine. The present article attempts to review the current useful applications of ketamine in anesthesia, pain and critical care. It is based on scientific evidence gathered from textbooks, journals, and electronic databases. PMID:25886322

  4. Ketamine and midazolam anesthesia in Pacific martens (Martes caurina).

    PubMed

    Mortenson, Jack A; Moriarty, Katie M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The use of midazolam as a tranquilizer for anesthesia in mustelids in conjunction with the cyclohexamine ketamine is not well documented. Because midazolam is fast acting, inexpensive, and quickly metabolized, it may serve as a good alternative to other more commonly used tranquilizers. We trapped and anesthetized 27 Pacific martens (Martes caurina) in Lassen National Forest (northern California, US) August 2010-April 2013. We assessed anesthesia with ketamine at 18 and 25 mg/kg combined with 0.2 mg/kg of midazolam by comparing mean times of induction, return to consciousness, and recovery, plus physiologic parameters. No reversal was used for the midazolam portion of the anesthetic. Mean (±SD) induction for both ketamine dosages was 1.7±0.5 and 1.8±1.0 min, respectively. Return to consciousness mean times were 8.0 min longer (P<0.001) for martens receiving a 25 mg/kg ketamine dosage. Mean recoveries were 15.1 min longer (P<0.003) for the 25 mg/kg ketamine dosage. Physiologic parameter means were similar for both ketamine dosages with no statistically significant differences. Body temperatures and heart and respiratory rates were generally stable, but percentage of oxygen saturation and end tidal carbon dioxide values were below those seen in previous mustelid studies. The combination of ketamine, at both dosages, and midazolam provided reliable field anesthesia for Pacific martens, and supplemental oxygen is recommended as needed.

  5. Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia causes hyperopic refractive shift in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tkatchenko, Tatiana V.; Tkatchenko, Andrei V.

    2010-01-01

    Mice have increasingly been used as a model for studies of myopia. The key to successful use of mice for myopia research is the ability to obtain accurate measurements of refractive status of their eyes. In order to obtain accurate measurements of refractive errors in mice, the refraction needs to be performed along the optical axis of the eye. This represents a particular challenge, because mice are very difficult to immobilize. Recently, ketamine-xylazine anesthesia has been used to immobilize mice before measuring refractive errors, in combination with tropicamide ophthalmic solution to induce mydriasis. Although these drugs have increasingly been used while refracting mice, their effects on the refractive state of the mouse eye have not yet been investigated. Therefore, we have analyzed the effects of tropicamide eye drops and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on refraction in P40 C57BL/6J mice. We have also explored two alternative methods to immobilize mice, i.e. the use of a restraining platform and pentobarbital anesthesia. We found that tropicamide caused a very small, but statistically significant, hyperopic shift in refraction. Pentobarbital did not have any substantial effect on refractive status, whereas ketamine-xylazine caused a large and highly significant hyperopic shift in refraction. We also found that the use of a restraining platform represents good alternative for immobilization of mice prior to refraction. Thus, our data suggest that ketamine-xylazine anesthesia should be avoided in studies of refractive development in mice and underscore the importance of providing appropriate experimental conditions when measuring refractive errors in mice. PMID:20813132

  6. Intraperitoneal co-administration of low dose urethane with xylazine and ketamine for extended duration of surgical anesthesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Clover, Anthony J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Procedures involving complex surgical techniques in rats, such as placement of abdominal aortic graft require extended duration of surgical anesthesia, which often can be achieved by repeated administrations of xylazine-ketamine combination. However such repeated anesthetic administration, in addition to being technically challenging, may be associated with potential adverse events due to cumulative effects of anesthesia. We report here the feasibility of using urethane at low dose (~1/10 the recommended anesthetic dose) in combination with a xylazine-ketamine mix to achieve an extended duration of surgical anesthesia in rats. The anesthesia induction phase was quick and smooth with an optimal phase of surgical anesthesia achieved for up to 90 minutes, which was significantly higher compared to that achieved with use of only xylazine-ketamine combination. The rectal temperature, heart rate and respiratory rate were within the physiological range with an uneventful recovery phase. Post surgery the rats were followed up to 3 months without any evidence of tumor or any other adverse effects related to the use of the urethane anesthetic combination. We conclude that low dose urethane can be effectively used in combination with xylazine and ketamine to achieve extended duration of surgical anesthesia up to 90 minutes in rats. PMID:26755920

  7. Evaluation of the effects of ketamine on spinal anesthesia with levobupivacaine or ropivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hong; Yi, Wen-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Spinal anesthesia or regional anesthesia is a potent anesthetic procedure. Additional modalities have been sought to increase the duration of block in spinal anesthesia. Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker that has an anesthetic effect when injected intrathecally and has a synergic effect with bupivacaine. Ketamine also has potent analgesic properties. The present study investigated the effect of intrathecally administered ketamine on spinal anesthesia with levobupivacaine or ropivacaine. Sprague-Dawley rats at post-natal day 21 were exposed to spinal anesthesia with 0.5% levobupivacaine or 0.5% ropivacaine. Separate groups of rats were treated with intrathecal ketamine at a 5 or 10 mg/kg bodyweight dose along with ropivacaine or levobupivacaine. The thermal and mechanical withdrawal latencies of the animals were determined using hot plate and von Frey filaments, respectively. A rotarod apparatus was employed to assess the capacity of the rats to rotate the spindle at 24 h following anesthesia. The gait of the rat pups was also assessed. Intrathecal administration of ketamine resulted in dense blocks and extended the duration of spinal blocks as evidenced by thermal latencies and responses to von Frey filaments. The latency to fall was shorter in rats exposed to ketamine along with ropivacaine or levobupivacaine spinal anesthesia. The gait parameters were also more disturbed upon ketamine administration. In conclusion, ketamine administration with ropivacaine or levobupivacaine increased the intensity and duration of spinal blockade, thereby increasing the anesthetic effects. PMID:27698726

  8. Combining Sevoflurane Anesthesia with Fentanyl–Midazolam or S-Ketamine in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cesarovic, Nikola; Jirkof, Paulin; Rettich, Andreas; Nicholls, Flora; Arras, Margarete

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory mice typically are anesthetized by either inhalation of volatile anesthetics or injection of drugs. Here we compared the acute and postanesthetic effects of combining both methods with standard inhalant monoanesthesia using sevoflurane in mice. After injection of fentanyl–midazolam or S-ketamine as premedication, a standard 50-min anesthesia was conducted by using sevoflurane. Addition of fentanyl–midazolam (0.04 mg/kg–4 mg/kg) induced sedation, attenuation of aversive behaviors at induction, shortening of the induction phase, and reduced the sevoflurane concentration required by one third (3.3% compared with 5%), compared with S-ketamine (30 mg/kg) premedication or sevoflurane alone. During anesthesia, heart rate and core body temperature were depressed significantly by both premedications but in general remained within normal ranges. In contrast, with or without premedication, substantial respiratory depression was evident, with a marked decline in respiratory rate accompanied by hypoxia, hypercapnia, and acidosis. Arrhythmia, apnea, and occasionally death occurred under S-ketamine–sevoflurane. Postanesthetic telemetric measurements showed unchanged locomotor activity but elevated heart rate and core body temperature at 12 h; these changes were most prominent during sevoflurane monoanesthesia and least pronounced or absent during fentanyl–midazolam–sevoflurane. In conclusion, combining injectable and inhalant anesthetics in mice can be advantageous compared with inhalation monoanesthesia at induction and postanesthetically. However, adverse physiologic side effects during anesthesia can be exacerbated by premedications, requiring careful selection of drugs and dosages. PMID:22776121

  9. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine–Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera)

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey BC; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine–ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine–ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine–ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas. PMID:27177565

  10. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine-Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey Bc; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine-ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine-ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine-ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas.

  11. The emerging use of ketamine for anesthesia and sedation in traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lee C; Raty, Sally R; Ortiz, Jaime; Bailard, Neil S; Mathew, Sanjay J

    2013-06-01

    Traditionally, the use of ketamine for patients with traumatic brain injuries is contraindicated due to the concern of increasing intracranial pressure (ICP). These concerns, however, originated from early studies and case reports that were inadequately controlled and designed. Recently, the concern of using ketamine in these patients has been challenged by a number of published studies demonstrating that the use of ketamine was safe in these patients. This article reviews the current literature in regards to using ketamine in patients with traumatic brain injuries in different clinical settings associated with anesthesia, as well as reviews the potential mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of ketamine. Studies examining the use of ketamine for induction, maintenance, and sedation in patients with TBI have had promising results. The use of ketamine in a controlled ventilation setting and in combination with other sedative agents has demonstrated no increase in ICP. The role of ketamine as a neuroprotective agent in humans remains inconclusive and adequately powered; randomized controlled trials performed in patients undergoing surgery for traumatic brain injury are necessary.

  12. Evaluation of medetomidine-ketamine and medetomidine-ketamine-butorphanol for the field anesthesia of free-ranging dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Wayne S J; Lethbridge, Mark R; Hampton, Jordan O; Smith, Ian; Woolnough, Andrew P; McEwen, Margaret-Mary; Miller, Graham W J; Caraguel, Charles G B

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We report the clinical course and physiologic and anesthetic data for a case series of 76 free-ranging dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) chemically restrained, by remote injection from a helicopter, in the rangelands of Western Australia and South Australia, 2008-11, to attach satellite-tracking collars. Fifty-five camels were successfully anesthetized using medetomidine-ketamine (MK, n=27) and medetomidine-ketamine-butorphanol (MKB, n=28); the induction of anesthesia in 21 animals was considered unsuccessful. To produce reliable anesthesia for MK, medetomidine was administered at 0.22 mg/kg (± SD=0.05) and ketamine at 2.54 mg/kg (± 0.56), and for MKB, medetomidine was administered at 0.12 mg/kg (± 0.05), ketamine at 2.3 mg/kg (± 0.39), and butorphanol at 0.05 mg/kg (± 0.02). Median time-to-recumbency for MKB (8.5 min) was 2.5 min shorter than for MK (11 min) (P=0.13). For MK, the reversal atipamezole was administered at 0.24 mg/kg (± 0.10), and for MKB, atipamezole was administered at 0.23 mg/kg (± 0.13) and naltrexone at 0.17 mg/kg (± 0.16). Median time-to-recovery was 1 min shorter for MK (5 min) than MKB (6 min; P=0.02). Physiologic parameters during recumbency were not clinically different between the two regimes. Both regimes were suitable to safely anesthetize free-ranging camels; however, further investigation is required to find the safest, most consistent, and logistically practical combination.

  13. More effective induction of anesthesia using midazolam-butorphanol-ketamine-sevoflurane compared with ketamine-sevoflurane in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-01

    The common marmoset has been increasingly used for research in the biomedical field; however, there is little information available regarding effective methods of anesthesia in this species. This study retrospectively analyzed 2 regimens of anesthesia induction: intramuscular injection of ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane, and intramuscular injection of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane. Anesthetic depth did not reach the surgical anesthesia stage in 7 out of 99 animals receiving the former regimen, whereas there were only 2 such animals out of 273 receiving the latter regimen. The latter regimen, when followed by maintenance anesthesia with 3% sevoflurane inhalation, was successfully used in various nociceptive procedures. These results indicate that the injection of a combination of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of a high concentration of sevoflurane is effective for anesthesia induction in marmosets.

  14. Middle latency auditory evoked potentials during total intravenous anesthesia with droperidol, ketamine and fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, A; Matsuki, A

    1999-04-01

    We investigated whether total intravenous anesthesia with ketamine, fentanyl and droperidol would affect middle latency auditory evoked potentials and explicit memory, and whether dreams during the anesthesia are related to plasma concentrations of fentanyl and the infusion technique. A total number of 40 patients were the subjects for this study. Twenty patients (group A) were maintained with intravenous ketamine 2 mg kg-1 hr-1 and fentanyl 5 micrograms kg-1 hr-1 for the first 60 min and 3 micrograms kg-1 hr-1 for the next 90 min, and droperidol 0.1 mg kg-1. The remaining 20 patients (group B) were maintained with intravenous ketamine 2 mg kg-1 hr-1, droperidol 0.1 mg kg-1 and fentanyl 50-100 micrograms in a bolus intermittently as needed by vital signs such as increases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. Middle latency auditory evoked potentials, plasma fentanyl and ketamine levels were measured; explicit memory and dreams were also estimated. There were no patients who recollected explicit memories of intraoperative events in both groups. The middle latency auditory evoked potentials were not significantly changed during the anesthesia in both groups. We could find no significant differences in latencies and amplitudes of the middle latency auditory evoked potentials between the both groups. Plasma fentanyl levels of group B patients were significantly lower than those of group A patients and the incidence of the dreams was significantly higher in group B patients. We conclude that the anesthesia with ketamine, fentanyl and droperidol is not associated with the explicit memories, though the middle latency auditory evoked potentials were not significantly changed as compared with those in the waking state. In addition, dreams during the anesthesia may correlate with plasma fentanyl concentrations or the infusion technique.

  15. Significant treatment effect of add-on ketamine anesthesia in electroconvulsive therapy in depressive patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dian-Jeng; Wang, Fu-Chiang; Chu, Che-Sheng; Chen, Tien-Yu; Tang, Chia-Hung; Yang, Wei-Cheng; Chow, Philip Chik-Keung; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Tseng, Ping-Tao; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Add-on ketamine anesthesia in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been studied in depressive patients in several clinical trials with inconclusive findings. Two most recent meta-analyses reported insignificant findings with regards to the treatment effect of add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients. The aim of this study is to update the current evidence and investigate the role of add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients via a systematic review and meta-analysis. We performed a thorough literature search of the PubMed and ScienceDirect databases, and extracted all relevant clinical variables to compare the antidepressive outcomes between add-on ketamine anesthesia and other anesthetics in ECT. Total 16 articles with 346 patients receiving add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT and 329 controls were recruited. We found that the antidepressive treatment effect of add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients was significantly higher than that of other anesthetics (p<0.001). This significance persisted in both short-term (1-2 weeks) and moderate-term (3-4 weeks) treatment courses (all p<0.05). However, the side effect profiles and recovery time profiles were significantly worse in add-on ketamine anesthesia group than in control group. Our meta-analysis highlights the significantly higher antidepressive treatment effect of add-on ketamine in depressive patients receiving ECT compared to other anesthetics. However, clinicians need to take undesirable side effects into consideration when using add-on ketamine anesthesia in ECT in depressive patients.

  16. Sympathoadrenal responses to cold and ketamine anesthesia in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolka, M. A.; Elizondo, R. S.; Weinberg, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of cold exposure on the sympathoadrenal system is investigated in eight adult rhesus monekys with and without ketamine anesthesia. It is found that a 3 hr cold exposure (12 c) was associated with a 175 percent increase above control levels of norepinephrine (NE) and a 100 percent increase in epinephrine (E). Also observed were decreases in the core temperature, mean skin temperature, and mean body temperature. No change in the plasma levels of NE and E from the control values was found during continuous infusion of ketamine; while the core temperature, mean skin temperature, and mean body temperature all showed greater declines with the addition of ketamine infusion to the cold exposure. Water exposure (28 C) under ketamine anesthesia resulted in a reduction of the core temperature to 33 C within 1 hr. Plasma levels of NE and E were found to be unchanged from control values at core temperatures of 35 and 33 C. It is concluded that the administration of ketamine abolishes both the thermoregulatory response and the catecholamine response to acute cold exposure.

  17. Capture and medetomidine-ketamine anesthesia of free-ranging wolverines (Gulo gulo).

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Asa; Arnemo, Jon M; Persson, Jens; Segerström, Peter; Nyman, Görel

    2008-01-01

    Capture and anesthesia with medetomidine-ketamine were evaluated in free-ranging wolverines (Gulo gulo) immobilized for marking with radiocollars or intraperitoneal radiotransmitters in Norrbotten, Sweden, during early June 2004 and 2005. Twelve juvenile wolverines were captured by hand and injected with 0.14 +/- 0.03 mg/kg (mean +/- SD) medetomidine and 7.5 +/- 2.0 mg/kg ketamine. Twelve adult wolverines were darted from a helicopter or the ground, or captured by hand. Adults received 0.37 +/- 0.06 mg/kg medetomidine and 9.4 +/- 1.4 mg/kg ketamine. Arterial blood samples were collected between 15 min and 30 min and between 45 min and 60 min after drug administration and immediately analyzed for selected hematologic and plasma variables. Hyperthermia was recorded initially in one juvenile wolverine and 11 adults. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and lactate decreased significantly during anesthesia, whereas hemoglobin oxygen saturation, pH, partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide, and base excess increased. Adult wolverines darted from a helicopter had a significantly higher rectal temperature, higher glucose and hematocrit values, and a lower heart rate than juveniles captured by hand. Impaired arterial oxygenation was evident in all wolverines. This study provides baseline data on physiologic variables in adult and juvenile wolverines captured with different methods and anesthetized with medetomidine-ketamine.

  18. Physiological and pharmacokinetic effects of multilevel caging on Sprague Dawley rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Dodelet-Devillers, Aurore; Zullian, Chiara; Beaudry, Francis; Gourdon, Jim; Chevrette, Julie; Hélie, Pierre; Vachon, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    While the cage refinement is a necessary step towards improving the welfare of research rats, increasing the complexity and surface area of the living space of an animal may have physiological impacts that need to be taken into consideration. In this study, ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (10 mg/kg) caused a short duration anesthesia that was significantly decreased in Sprague-Dawley rats housed in multilevel cages (MLC), compared to rats housed in standard cages (SDC). The withdrawal reflex, the palpebral reflexes and the time-to-sternal all occurred earlier in MLC housed rats, suggesting an effect of housing on the physiology of the rats. In addition, during anesthesia, cardiac frequencies were increased in animals housed in the smaller SDC. Respiratory frequencies, the blood oxygen saturation and rectal temperatures during anesthesia did not vary between conditions during the anesthesia. While xylazine pharmacokinetics were unchanged with caging conditions, the clearance and half-lives of ketamine and its metabolite, norketamine, were altered in the rats housed in MLC. Finally, while no difference was ultimately seen in rat body weights, isolated liver and adrenal gland weights were significantly lighter in rats housed in the MLC. Increasing cage sizes, while having a positive impact on wellbeing in rats, can alter anesthetic drug metabolism and thus modify anesthesia parameters and associated physiological processes. PMID:27263962

  19. Efficacy of Ketamine as an Adjunct to Local Anesthesia in the Surgical Removal of Impacted Mandibular Third Molars – A Split Mouth Prospective Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anand; Halli, Rajshekhar; Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Khurana, Jyotsana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The removal of impacted teeth is one of the most common procedures performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Reduction of discomfort post-operatively and efficient local anesthesia are imperative for success in surgical practice. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a noticeable analgesic action, which can be used to supplement local anesthesia with minimal side effects. Aim To assess the efficacy of low-dose ketamine as an adjunct to local anesthesia in the management of pain, swelling and trismus after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars. Materials and Methods Twenty five patients with bilaterally symmetrical impacted mandibular third molars requiring surgical removal under local anesthesia were selected for the controlled clinical study. The third molar sites of all patients enrolled in the trial were randomly assigned into 2 groups: Local Anesthesia (Lignocaine) Alone [LAA] and Local Anesthesia plus ketamine [LAK]. 5ml of local anesthetic (Lignocaine Hydrochloride 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000) was injected in the ‘LAA’ group while the ‘LAK’ group received 5ml of local anesthetic plus 0.2mg/kg ketamine. Patients were blinded to the solution used and the operator recorded the group (LAA or LAK) and the respective site (Right or Left) for analysis. Bilaterally symmetrical impacted mandibular molars were removed at an interval of 15 days. Results Facial swelling on post-operative days was significantly lower in the LAK group than in the LAA group (p<0.05). The pain scores on the VAS were significantly higher in the LAA group than in the LAK group (p<0.05). Conclusion The role of ketamine in low doses as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory is evident in our study. The combination of a local anesthetic and sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine injected for surgical removal of impacted third molars provides good local anesthesia while alleviating post-operative sequelae for the patient by providing a degree of post

  20. Regional cerebral energy metabolism during intravenous anesthesia with etomidate, ketamine or thiopental

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Regional brain glucose utilization (rCMRglc) was measured in rats during steady-state levels of intravenous anesthesia to determine if alterations in brain function due to anesthesia could provide information on the mechanisms of anesthesia. Intravenous anesthetics from three different chemical classes were studied: etomidate, ketamine and thiopental. All rCMRglc experiments were conducted in freely moving rats in isolation chambers, with the use of (6-/sup 14/C) glucose and guantitative autoradiography. Etomidate caused a rostral-to-caudal gradient of depression of rCMRglc. The four doses of etomidate did not differ in their effects on energy metabolism. Sub-anesthetic (5 mg kg/sup -1/) and anesthetic (30 mg kg /sup -1/) doses of ketamine produced markedly different patterns of behavior. Brain energy metabolism during the sub-anesthetic dose was stimulated in most regions, while the anesthetic dose selectively stimulated the hippocampus, leaving most brain regions unaffected. Thiopental produced a dose-dependent reduction of rCMRglc in all gray matter regions. No brain region was selectively affected. Comparison of the drug-specific alterations of cerebral energy metabolism suggests these anesthetics do not act through a common mechanism. The hypothesis that each acts by binding to specific cell membrane receptors is consistent with these observations.

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy with S-ketamine anesthesia for catatonia in coexisting depression and dementia.

    PubMed

    Litvan, Zsuzsa; Bauer, Martin; Kasper, Siegfried; Frey, Richard

    2017-02-22

    Information on efficacy and safety of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with dementia is sparse. The current case report describes a patient suffering from severe depression and dementia who received electroconvulsive therapy with S-ketamine anesthesia at our psychiatric intensive care unit for the treatment of her therapy-resistant catatonic stupor. The patient's condition improved remarkably through the treatment. By the end of 16 electroconvulsive therapy sessions, her catatonic symptoms remitted entirely, her affect was brighter and she performed markedly better at the cognitive testing.

  2. Anesthetic and cardiovascular effects of balanced anesthesia using constant rate infusion of midazolam-ketamine-medetomidine with inhalation of oxygen-sevoflurane (MKM-OS anesthesia) in horses.

    PubMed

    Kushiro, Tokiko; Yamashita, Kazuto; Umar, Mohammed Ahmed; Maehara, Seiya; Wakaiki, Shinsuke; Abe, Reona; Seno, Takahiro; Tsuzuki, Keiko; Izumisawa, Yasuharu; Muir, William W

    2005-04-01

    The anesthetic sparring and cardiovascular effects produced by midazolam 0.8 mg/ml-ketamine 40 mg/ml-medetomidine 0.05 mg/ml (0.025 ml/kg/hr) drug infusion during sevoflurane in oxygen (MKM-OS) anesthesia was determined in healthy horses. The anesthetic sparring effects of MKM-OS were assessed in 6 healthy thoroughbred horses in which the right carotid artery was surgically relocated to a subcutaneous position. All horses were intubated and ventilated with oxygen using intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). The end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane (ET(SEV)) required to maintain surgical anesthesia was approximately 1.7%. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure averaged 23-41 beats/min and 70-112 mmHg, respectively. All horses stood between 23-44 min after the cessation of all anesthetic drugs. The cardiovascular effects of MKM-OS anesthesia were evaluated in 5 healthy thoroughbred horses ventilated using IPPV. Anesthesia was maintained for 4 hr at an ET(SEV) of 1.7%. Each horse was studied during left lateral (LR) and dorsal recumbency (DR) with a minimum interval between evaluations of 1 month. Cardiac output and cardiac index were maintained between 70-80% of baseline values during LR and 65-70% of baseline values during DR. Stroke volume was maintained between 75-85% of baseline values during LR and 60-70% of baseline values during DR. Systemic vascular resistance was not different from baseline values regardless of position. MKM-OS anesthesia may be useful for prolonged equine surgery because of its minimal cardiovascular depression in both of lateral and dorsal recumbency.

  3. Ketamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious disturbance in a person's mental state amnesia (memory loss or forgetting) lack of coordination and body ... period of time can lead to problems with memory and attention. Ketamine also can have negative effects ...

  4. ETORPHINE-KETAMINE-MEDETOMIDINE TOTAL INTRAVENOUS ANESTHESIA IN WILD IMPALA (AEPYCEROS MELAMPUS) OF 120-MINUTE DURATION.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Gareth E; Stegmann, George F; Fosgate, Geoffrey; Buck, Roxanne K; Kästner, Sabine B R; Kummrow, Maya; Gerlach, Christina; Meyer, Leith C R

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing necessity to perform long-term anesthesia in wildlife, especially antelope. The costs and logistics of transporting wildlife to veterinary practices make surgical intervention a high-stakes operation. Thus there is a need for a field-ready total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) infusion to maintain anesthesia in antelope. This study explored the feasibility of an etorphine-ketamine-medetomidine TIVA for field anesthesia. Ten wild-caught, adult impala ( Aepyceros melampus ) were enrolled in the study. Impala were immobilized with a standardized combination of etorphine (2 mg) and medetomidine (2.2 mg), which equated to a median (interquartile range [IQR]) etorphine and medetomidine dose of 50.1 (46.2-50.3) and 55.1 (50.8-55.4) μg/kg, respectively. Recumbency was attained in a median (IQR) time of 13.9 (12.0-16.5) min. Respiratory gas tensions, spirometry, and arterial blood gas were analyzed over a 120-min infusion. Once instrumented, the TIVA was infused as follows: etorphine at a variable rate initiated at 40 μg/kg per hour (adjusted according to intermittent deep-pain testing); ketamine and medetomidine at a fixed rate of 1.5 mg/kg per hour and 5 μg/kg per hour, respectively. The etorphine had an erratic titration to clinical effect in four impala. Arterial blood pressure and respiratory and heart rates were all within normal physiological ranges. However, arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and acidosis. Oxygenation and ventilation indices were calculated and highlighted possible co-etiologies to the suspected etorphine-induced respiratory depression as the cause of the blood gas derangements. Impala recovered in the boma post atipamezole (13 mg) and naltrexone (42 mg) antagonism of medetomidine and etorphine, respectively. The etorphine-ketamine-medetomidine TIVA protocol for impala may be sufficient for field procedures of up to 120-min duration. However, hypoxemia and hypercapnia are of paramount concern and

  5. Ketamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... open to suggestion and more vulnerable to sexual assault. Also, since ketamine can mess with someone's memory, ... take you to a site outside of KidsHealth's control. About TeensHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  6. COMPARISON OF ETORPHINE-ACEPROMAZINE AND MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE ANESTHESIA IN CAPTIVE IMPALA (AEPYCEROS MELAMPUS).

    PubMed

    Perrin, Kathryn L; Denwood, Matthew J; Grøndahl, Carsten; Nissen, Peter; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2015-12-01

    Impala (Aepyceros melampus) are a notoriously difficult species to manage in captivity, and anesthesia is associated with a high risk of complications including mortality. The aim of this study was to compare an opioid-based protocol with an α-2 agonist-based protocol. Nine female impala were studied in a random cross-over design. Subjects received either an etorphine-acepromazine (EA) protocol: 15 μg/kg etorphine and 0.15 mg/kg acepromazine, or a medetomidine-ketamine (MK) protocol: 109 μg/kg medetomidine and 4.4 mg/kg ketamine on day 1. Anaesthesia was repeated 3 days later with the alternative protocol. Subjective assessments of the quality of induction, muscle relaxation, and recovery were made by a blinded observer. Objective monitoring included blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, regional tissue oxygenation, and blood gas analysis. EA provided a significantly quicker (mean EA, 7.17 mins; MK, 17.6 mins) and more-reliable (score range EA, 3-5; MK, 1-5) induction. Respiratory rates were lower for EA with higher end-tidal CO2, but no apnoea was observed. As expected, blood pressures with EA were lower, with higher heart rates; however, arterial oxygenation and tissue oxygenation were equal or higher than with the MK protocol. In conclusion, at these doses, EA provided superior induction and equivalent muscle relaxation and recovery with apparent improved oxygen tissue delivery when compared to MK.

  7. [Clinical study on total intravenous anesthesia with droperidol, fentanyl and ketamine--12. Effects on plasma complement and immunoglobulin concentrations].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, H; Araki, I; Sato, T; Takagi, Y; Hashimoto, Y; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A

    1991-12-01

    Complements and immunoglobulins in the plasma are the important humoral factors to maintain immunity. As there is no study on immune response to total intravenous anesthesia with droperidol, fentanyl and ketamine (DFK), twelve patients who underwent abdominal, neck dissection, or plastic surgery were studied to determine plasma concentrations of complements and immunoglobulins. In five patients of isoflurane group, anesthesia was induced with intravenous thiopental 5 mg.kg-1 and succinylcholine 0.8-1 mg.kg-1 and maintained with 1-2% isoflurane in nitrous oxide (50%) and oxygen (50%). The remaining seven patients of the DFK group received intravenous droperidol 0.25 mg.kg-1, fentanyl 1-2 micrograms.kg-1, ketamine 1-1.5 mg.kg-1 and succinylcholine 0.8-1 mg.kg-1 for the induction of anesthesia, and then they were given a total dose of fentanyl 5-15 micrograms.kg-1, ketamine 2 mg.kg-1.hr-1 and oxygen (30%) for the maintenance of anesthesia. Vecuronium was given intravenously as needed. Lactated Ringer's solution was used for intraoperative fluid replacement. A total of 40 ml of arterial blood was drawn on four occasions, just before the induction of anesthesia, at the recovery from anesthesia, on the third and tenth post-operative days. Plasma concentrations of complements (C3.C4) and immunoglobulins (IgG.IgA.IgM.IgD) were measured by immuno-turbidimetry. C3 concentrations in the plasma decreased significantly when the patients recovered from anesthesia, but they increased significantly on the third and tenth post-operative days in the isoflurane group. In the DFK group, they increased significantly on the tenth post-operative day only. No significant difference in the C3 concentrations was detected between two groups at any time of measurement.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Xylazine-midazolam-ketamine versus medetomidine-midazolam-ketamine anesthesia in captive Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Curro, Thomas G; Okeson, Danelle; Zimmerman, Dawn; Armstrong, Douglas L; Simmons, Lee G

    2004-09-01

    Two alpha2-adrenoceptor agents, xylazine and medetomidine, in combination with midazolam and ketamine safely and effectively immobilized Siberian tigers (Panthera tigris altaica). The medetomidine protocol used smaller drug volumes, and induction and recovery times were shorter. Although cardiopulmonary abnormalities were noted, none were likely to be life threatening.

  9. Anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of total intravenous anesthesia using a midazolam, ketamine and medetomidine drug combination in horses.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kazuto; Wijayathilaka, Tikiri P; Kushiro, Tokiko; Umar, Mohammed A; Taguchi, Kiyoshi; Muir, William W

    2007-01-01

    The anesthetic and cardiopulmonary effects of midazolam, ketamine and medetomidine for total intravenous anesthesia (MKM-TIVA) were evaluated in 14 horses. Horses were administered medetomidine 5 microg/kg intravenously as pre-anesthetic medication and anesthetized with an intravenous injection of ketamine 2.5 mg/kg and midazolam 0.04 mg/kg followed by the infusion of MKM-drug combination (midazolam 0.8 mg/ml-ketamine 40 mg/ml-medetomidine 0.1 mg/ml). Nine stallions (3 thoroughbred and 6 draft horses) were castrated during infusion of MKM-drug combination. The average duration of anesthesia was 38 +/- 8 min and infusion rate of MKM-drug combination was 0.091 +/- 0.021 ml/kg/hr. Time to standing after discontinuing MKM-TIVA was 33 +/- 13 min. The quality of recovery from anesthesia was satisfactory in 3 horses and good in 6 horses. An additional 5 healthy thoroughbred horses were anesthetized with MKM- TIVA in order to assess cardiopulmonary effects. These 5 horses were anesthetized for 60 min and administered MKM-drug combination at 0.1 ml/kg/hr. Cardiac output and cardiac index decreased to 70-80%, stroke volume increased to 110% and systemic vascular resistance increased to 130% of baseline value. The partial pressure of arterial blood carbon dioxide was maintained at approximately 50 mmHg while the arterial partial pressure of oxygen pressure decreased to 50-60 mmHg. MKM-TIVA provides clinically acceptable general anesthesia with mild cardiopulmonary depression in horses. Inspired air should be supplemented with oxygen to prevent hypoxemia during MKM-TIVA.

  10. Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol (KMP-TIVA) in horses undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    UMAR, Mohammed Ahmed; FUKUI, Sho; KAWASE, Kodai; ITAMI, Takaharu; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol drug combination (KMP-TIVA) were determined in 5 Thoroughbred horses undergoing surgery. The horses were anesthetized with intravenous administration (IV) of ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.04 mg/kg) following premedication with medetomidne (5 µg/kg, IV) and artificially ventilated. Surgical anesthesia was maintained by controlling propofol infusion rate (initially 0.20 mg/kg/min following an IV loading dose of 0.5 mg/kg) and constant rate infusions of ketamine (1 mg/kg/hr) and medetomidine (1.25 µg/kg/hr). The horses were anesthetized for 175 ± 14 min (range from 160 to 197 min). Propofol infusion rates ranged from 0.13 to 0.17 mg/kg/min, and plasma concentration (Cpl) of propofol ranged from 11.4 to 13.3 µg/ml during surgery. Cardiovascular measurements during surgery remained within clinically acceptable ranges in the horses (heart rate: 33 to 37 beats/min, mean arterial blood pressure: 111 to 119 mmHg, cardiac index: 48 to 53 ml/kg/min, stroke volume: 650 to 800 ml/beat and systemic vascular resistance: 311 to 398 dynes/sec/cm5). The propofol Cpl declined rapidly after the cessation of propofol infusion and was significantly lower at 10 min (4.5 ± 1.5 µg/ml), extubation (4.0 ± 1.2 µg/ml) and standing (2.4 ± 0.9 µg/ml) compared with the Cpl at the end of propofol administration (11.4 ± 2.7 µg/ml). All the horses recovered uneventfully and stood at 74 ± 28 min after the cessation of anesthesia. KMP-TIVA provided satisfactory quality and control of anesthesia with minimum cardiovascular depression in horses undergoing surgery. PMID:25409552

  11. Influence of cadmium on ketamine-induced anesthesia and brain microsomal Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.; Sangiah, S. )

    1994-10-01

    Cadmium is a rare metallic element, present in almost all types of food. Shellfish, wheat and rice accumulate very high amounts. Occupational and environmental pollutants are the main sources of cadmium exposure. Cadmium has a very long biologic half-life. Exposure to Cadmium causes anemia, hypertension, hepatic, renal, pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders as well as being a possible mutagen, teratogen and carcinogen. Acute cadmium treatment increased the hexobarbital sleeping time and inhibited hepatic microsomal drug metabolism due to a decrease in cytochrome P[sub 450] content. Cadmium potentiated ethanol-induced sleep in a dose-dependent manner. Cadmium has been shown to inhibit brain microsomal Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase activity in vitro and in vivo. Cadmium and ethanol additively inhibited brain Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase. This might be a direct interaction between cadmium and ethanol in the central nervous system. Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. It acts on central nervous system and produces [open quotes]dissociative anaesthesia.[close quotes] Ketamine provides adequate surgical anesthesia and is used alone in humans and/or combination with xylazine, an [alpha][sub 2]-adrenergic agonist in animals. It produces CNS depression, analgesia, amnesia, immobility and a feeling of dissociation from the environment. Ketamine is a non-competitive antagonist of the NMDA subset of the glutamate receptor. This perhaps results in an increase in neuronal activity leading to disorganization of normal neurotransmission and produces dissociative anesthetic state. Because it is different from most other anesthetics, ketamine may be expected to have a unique effect on brain biochemical parameters and enzymes. The purpose of this study was to examine the interactions between cadmium and ketamine on the central nervous system and ATPase, in an attempt to further understand the mechanism of action. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Effects of avertin versus xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on cardiac function in normal mice.

    PubMed

    Hart, C Y; Burnett, J C; Redfield, M M

    2001-11-01

    Anesthetic regimens commonly administered during studies that assess cardiac structure and function in mice are xylazine-ketamine (XK) and avertin (AV). While it is known that XK anesthesia produces more bradycardia in the mouse, the effects of XK and AV on cardiac function have not been compared. We anesthetized normal adult male Swiss Webster mice with XK or AV. Transthoracic echocardiography and closed-chest cardiac catheterization were performed to assess heart rate (HR), left ventricular (LV) dimensions at end diastole and end systole (LVDd and LVDs, respectively), fractional shortening (FS), LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau), and the first derivatives of LV pressure rise and fall (dP/dt(max) and dP/dt(min), respectively). During echocardiography, HR was lower in XK than AV mice (250 +/- 14 beats/min in XK vs. 453 +/- 24 beats/min in AV, P < 0.05). Preload was increased in XK mice (LVDd: 4.1 +/- 0.08 mm in XK vs. 3.8 +/- 0.09 mm in AV, P < 0.05). FS, a load-dependent index of systolic function, was increased in XK mice (45 +/- 1.2% in XK vs. 40 +/- 0.8% in AV, P < 0.05). At LV catheterization, the difference in HR with AV (453 +/- 24 beats/min) and XK (342 +/- 30 beats/min, P < 0.05) anesthesia was more variable, and no significant differences in systolic or diastolic function were seen in the group as a whole. However, in XK mice with HR <300 beats/min, LVEDP was increased (28 +/- 5 vs. 6.2 +/- 2 mmHg in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05), whereas systolic (LV dP/dt(max): 4,402 +/- 798 vs. 8,250 +/- 415 mmHg/s in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05) and diastolic (tau: 23 +/- 2 vs. 14 +/- 1 ms in mice with HR >300 beats/min, P < 0.05) function were impaired. Compared with AV, XK produces profound bradycardia with effects on loading conditions and ventricular function. The disparate findings at echocardiography and LV catheterization underscore the importance of comprehensive assessment of LV function in

  13. Comparison of the effects of intravenous premedication: Midazolam, Ketamine, and combination of both on reducing anxiety in pediatric patients before general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi, Parvin; Habibi, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In some medical circumstances, pediatric patients may need premedication for transferring to the operating room. In these situations, using intravenous premedication is preferred. We assessed the efficacy and safety of intravenous midazolam, intravenous ketamine, and combination of both to reduce the anxiety and improve behavior in children undergoing general anesthesia. Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, 90 pediatric patients aged 6 months to 6 years with American Society of Anesthesiologist grade I or II were enrolled. Before anesthesia, children were randomly divided into three groups to receive intravenous midazolam 0.1 mg/kg, or intravenous ketamine 1 mg/kg, or combination of half doses of both. Behavior types and sedation scores were recorded before premedication, after premedication, before anesthesia, and after anesthesia in the postanesthesia care unit. Anesthesia time, recovery duration, blood pressure, and heart rate were also recorded. For comparing distribution of behavior types and sedation scores among three groups, we used Kruskal–Wallis test, and for comparing mean and standard deviation of blood pressure and heart rates, we used analysis of variance. Findings: After premedication, children's behavior was significantly better in the combination group (P < 0.001). After anesthesia, behavior type was same among three groups (P = 0.421). Sedation scores among three groups were also different after premedication and the combination group was significantly more sedated than the other two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Combination of 0.05 mg/kg of intravenous midazolam and 0.5 mg/kg of intravenous ketamine as premedication produced more deep sedation and more desirable behavior in children compared with each midazolam 0.1 mg/kg or ketamine 1 mg/kg. PMID:26645024

  14. Comparison between the effects of pentobarbital or ketamine/nitrous oxide anesthesia on metabolic and endothelial components of coronary reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Rastaldo, R; Penna, C; Pagliaro, P

    2001-06-29

    Barbiturates induce reduction of myocardial contractility and metabolism, whereas ketamine exerts a sympathomimetic effect that can mask its direct depressant effect on contractility. However, it is unclear whether barbiturates, which interfere with the cytochrome P-450 pathway, or ketamine, which inhibits nitric oxide synthesis, also alter the responsiveness of the coronary vessels to vasodilator stimuli. We hypothesized that the parameters of coronary reactive hyperemia (CRH), which reflect both the degree of myocardial metabolism and vascular reactivity, could be modified by the type of anesthesia used. In two groups of goats, anesthesia was induced either using ketamine plus nitrous oxide or pentobarbital alone. To record coronary flow an electromagnetic flow-probe was placed around the left circumflex coronary artery. In the ketamine group (n = 14) and in the pentobarbital group (n = 16) CRH was studied using the indices of myocardial metabolism and vascular dilator responsiveness. In the pentobarbital group all of the indices of myocardial metabolism were lower than in the ketamine group (i.e. the excess to debt flow ratio was 2.3+/-0.8 vs. 4.6+/-2.4; p< 0.001). Yet, some indices of vascular responsiveness (time derivative of coronary flow and the peak to basal flow ratio) were not different in the two groups. Moreover, the duration of the reactive hyperemia was shorter in the ketamine than in the pentobarbital group (118+/-47 vs. 153+/-45 s, p<0.05). It is suggested that pentobarbital decreases the indices of CRH related to metabolic activity, whereas ketamine reduces the duration of the hyperemic response, which suggests an impairment of endothelial function.

  15. Cardiovascular effects of halothane anesthesia after diazepam and ketamine administration in beavers (Castor canadensis) during spontaneous or controlled ventilation.

    PubMed

    Greene, S A; Keegan, R D; Gallagher, L V; Alexander, J E; Harari, J

    1991-05-01

    Fourteen adult beavers (Castor canadensis) weighing 16.5 +/- 4.14 kg (mean +/- SD) were anesthetized for surgical implantation of radio telemetry devices. Beavers were anesthetized with diazepam (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (25 mg/kg) administered IM, which provided smooth anesthetic induction and facilitated tracheal intubation. Anesthesia was maintained with halothane in oxygen via a semiclosed circle anesthetic circuit. Values for heart rate, respiratory rate, esophageal temperature, direct arterial blood pressure, end-tidal halothane concentration, and end-tidal CO2 tension were recorded every 15 minutes during the surgical procedure. Arterial blood samples were collected every 30 minutes to determine pH, PaO2, and PaCO2. Values for plasma bicarbonate, total CO2, and base excess were calculated. Ventilation was spontaneous in 7 beavers and controlled to maintain normocapnia (PaCO2 approx 40 mm of Hg) in 7 others. Vaporizer settings were adjusted to maintain a light surgical plane of anesthesia. Throughout the surgical procedure, all beavers had mean arterial pressure less than 60 mm of Hg and esophageal temperature less than 35 C. Mean values for arterial pH, end-tidal CO2, PaO2, and PaCO2 were significantly (P less than 0.05) different in spontaneously ventilating beavers, compared with those in which ventilation was controlled. Respiratory acidosis during halothane anesthesia was observed in spontaneously ventilating beavers, but not in beavers maintained with controlled ventilation. All beavers recovered unremarkably from anesthesia.

  16. Tiletamine-zolazepam, ketamine, and xylazine anesthesia of captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Albert H; Bonar, Christopher J; Evans, Sara E

    2002-12-01

    Thirty-two anesthetic episodes used a combination of tiletamine-zolezepam (50 mg/ml each), ketamine (80 mg/ml), and xylazine (20 mg/ml) at various dosages for routine diagnostic and minor surgical procedures in 13 captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). The mean dosage (0.023 +/- 0.003 ml/kg) provided rapid induction with a single i.m. injection along with safe predictable working time, good muscle relaxation, and analgesia. Yohimbine administration subsequently accelerated smooth and rapid recovery.

  17. Acute hyperglycemia induced by ketamine/xylazine anesthesia in rats: mechanisms and implications for preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Saha, Joy K; Xia, Jinqi; Grondin, Janet M; Engle, Steven K; Jakubowski, Joseph A

    2005-11-01

    The effects of anesthetic agents, commonly used in animal models, on blood glucose levels in fed and fasted rats were investigated. In fed Sprague-Dawley rats, ketamine (100 mg/kg)/xylazine (10 mg/kg) (KX) produced acute hyperglycemia (blood glucose 178.4 +/- 8.0 mg/dl) within 20 min. The baseline blood glucose levels (104.8 +/- 5.7 mg/dl) reached maximum levels (291.7 +/- 23.8 mg/dl) at 120 min. Ketamine alone did not elevate glucose levels in fed rats. Isoflurane also produced acute hyperglycemia similar to KX. Administration of pentobarbital sodium did not produce hyperglycemia in fed rats. In contrast, none of these anesthetic agents produced hyperglycemia in fasted rats. The acute hyperglycemic effect of KX in fed rats was associated with decreased plasma levels of insulin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and corticosterone and increased levels of glucagon and growth hormone (GH). The acute hyperglycemic response to KX was dose-dependently inhibited by the specific alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine (1-4 mg/kg). KX-induced changes of glucoregulatory hormone levels such as insulin, GH, ACTH, and corticosterone were significantly altered by yohimbine, whereas the glucagon levels remained unaffected. In conclusion, the present study indicates that both KX and isoflurane produce acute hyperglycemia in fed rats. The effect of KX is mediated by modulation of the glucoregulatory hormones through stimulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptors. Pentobarbital sodium did not produce hyperglycemia in either fed or fasted rats. Based on these findings, it is suggested that caution needs to be taken when selecting anesthetic agents, and fed or fasted state of animals in studies of diabetic disease or other models where glucose and/or glucoregulatory hormone levels may influence outcome and thus interpretation. However, fed animals are of value when exploring the hyperglycemic response to anesthetic agents.

  18. Investigating Power Density and the Degree of Nonlinearity in Intrinsic Components of Anesthesia EEG by the Hilbert-Huang Transform: An Example Using Ketamine and Alfentanil

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Feng-Fang; Fan, Shou-Zen; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Huang, Norden E.; Yeh, Jia-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) is an adaptive filter bank for processing nonlinear and non-stationary signals, such as electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. EMD works well to decompose a time series into a set of intrinsic mode functions with specific frequency bands. An IMF therefore represents an intrinsic component on its correspondingly intrinsic frequency band. The word of ‘intrinsic’ means the frequency is totally adaptive to the nature of a signal. In this study, power density and nonlinearity are two critical parameters for characterizing the amplitude and frequency modulations in IMFs. In this study, a nonlinearity level is quantified using degree of waveform distortion (DWD), which represents the characteristic of waveform distortion as an assessment of the intra-wave modulation of an IMF. In the application of anesthesia EEG analysis, the assessments of power density and DWD for a set of IMFs represent dynamic responses in EEG caused by two different anesthesia agents, Ketamine and Alfentanil, on different frequency bands. Ketamine causes the increase of power density and the decrease of nonlinearity on γ-band neuronal oscillation, which cannot be found EEG responses of group B using Alfentanil. Both agents cause an increase of power density and a decrease of nonlinearity on β-band neuronal oscillation accompany with a loss of consciousness. Moreover, anesthesia agents cause the decreases of power density and nonlinearity (i.e. DWD) for the low-frequency IMFs. PMID:27973590

  19. Hemodynamic Responses to Two Different Anesthesia Regimens in Compromised Left Ventricular Function Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: Etomidate-Midazolam Versus Propofol-Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Aghdaii, Nahid; Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Faritus, Seyedeh Zahra; Azarfarin, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various methods have been suggested to prevent hemodynamic instability caused by propofol and adverse effects caused by etomidate induction. The current study evaluated hemodynamic effects of propofol-ketamine mixture in comparison to etomidate-midazolam mixture during anesthesia induction. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic effects of etomidate-midazolam by comparing it with propofol-ketamine for the induction of anesthesia in patients with left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Patients and Methods: One-hundred patients aged between 40 and 65 with coronary artery disease and low ejection fraction scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass surgery participated in this study. The patients were randomly allotted to one of the two groups to receive either propofol-ketamine or etomidate-midazolam combination. Two groups were compared for pain on injection and myoclonus, Heart Rate (HR), Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP), Diastolic Blood Pressure (DBP), Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP), Cardiac Index (CI) and Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR), before and one minute after induction of anesthesia, and one, three and five minutes after intubation. Results: Incidence of pain on injection (2 - 4%) and myoclonus (10%) was less in both groups. The hemodynamic response was similar in the two groups for all variables over the time interval, except for CI at one and three minutes after intubation (P = 0.024 and P = 0.048, respectively), and SVR in five minutes after intubation (P = 0.009), with differences being statistically significant. Conclusions: Both anesthetic regimens were acceptable for induction in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:26161330

  20. Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm or leg. A common type is epidural anesthesia, which is often used during childbirth. General - makes ... afterwards. Sedation can be used with or without anesthesia. The type of anesthesia or sedation you get ...

  1. Total intravenous anesthesia with midazolam, ketamine, and xylazine or detomidine following induction with tiletamine, zolazepam, and xylazine in red deer (Cervus elaphus hippelaphus) undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Auer, Ulrike; Wenger, Sandra; Beigelböck, Christoph; Zenker, Wolfgang; Mosing, Martina

    2010-10-01

    Sixteen captive female red deer were successfully anesthetized to surgically implant a telemetry system. The deer were immobilized with (mean±SD) 1.79±0.29 mg/kg xylazine and 1.79±0.29 mg/kg tiletamine/zolazepam given intramuscularly with a dart gun. Anesthesia was maintained for 69±2 min using a total intravenous protocol with a catheter placed in the jugular vein. Group X received xylazine (0.5±0.055 mg/kg/hr) and group D, detomidine (2±0.22 μg/kg/hr), both in combination with ketamine (2±0.02 mg/kg/hr) and midazolam (0.03±0.0033 mg/kg/hr), as a constant rate infusion. Anesthesia was reversed with 0.09±0.01 mg/kg atipamezole and 8.7±1.21 μg/kg sarmazenil given intravenously in both groups. These drug combinations provided smooth induction, stable anesthesia for surgery, and rapid recovery. Respiratory depression and mild hypoxemia were seen, and we, therefore, recommend using supplemental intranasal oxygen.

  2. Prophylactic use of intravenous ondansetron versus ketamine - midazolam combination for prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Mohammadsadeqie, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy intravenous (IV) ondansetron with ketamine plus midazolam for the prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia (SA). Materials and Methods: Ninety patients, aged 18–65 years, undergoing lower extremity orthopedic surgery were included in the present study. SA was performed in all patients with hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg. The patients were randomly allocated to receive normal saline (Group C), ondansetron 8 mg IV (Group O) or ketamine 0.25 mg/kg IV plus midazolam 37.5 μg/kg IV (Group KM) immediately after SA. During surgery, shivering scores were recorded at 5 min intervals. The operating room temperature was maintained at 24°C. Results: The incidences of shivering were 18 (60%) in Group C, 6 (20%) in Group KM and 8 (26.6%) in Group O. The difference between Groups O and Group KM with Group C was statistically significant (P < 0.05). No significant difference was noted between Groups KM with Group O in this regard (P > 0.05). Peripheral and core temperature changes throughout surgery were not significantly different among three groups (P > 0.05). Incidence (%) of hallucination was not significantly different between the three groups (0, 3.3, 0 in Group O, Group KM, Group C respectively, P > 0.05). Conclusion: Prophylactic use of ondansetron 8 mg IV was comparable to ketamine 0.25 mg/kg IV plus midazolam 37.5 μg/kg IV in preventing shivering during SA. PMID:26605236

  3. Comparison of medetomidine, thiopental and ketamine/midazolam anesthesia in chick embryos for in ovo Magnetic Resonance Imaging free of motion artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Waschkies, Conny; Nicholls, Flora; Buschmann, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive assessment of the perfusion capacity of tissue engineered constructs grown on the chorioallantoic membrane by MRI is often hampered by motion artifacts. Therefore, we examined the suitability of three anesthetic regimes for sufficient sedation of the chick embryo. Medetomidine at a dosage of 0.3 mg/kg, was compared to thiopental at 100 mg/kg and ketamine/midazolam at 50 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg, respectively. These soluble anesthetics were applied by dropping a total volume of 0.3 mL onto the surface of the CAM. Motion was videotaped through the window of the eggshell and scored semi-quantitatively. Medetomidine performed best in terms of reduced motion; onset of anesthesia occurred within 10 minutes and for the following 30 minutes, allowing proper in vivo MRI measurements. The other regimen were not sedating deep enough (ketamine/midazolam) and not long enough (thiopental). In sum, medetomidine allows proper sedation for MRI assessment of the perfusion capacity in a tissue engineered construct placed on the CAM. PMID:26493765

  4. Laparoscopic appendectomy under spinal anesthesia with dexmedetomidine infusion

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Go-Woon; Kim, Min-Su; Yang, Hun-Ju; Park, Dong-Ho; Cho, Choon-Kyu; Kwon, Hee-Uk; Kang, Po-Soon; Moon, Ju-Ik

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is rarely performed under regional anesthesia because of pneumoperitoneum-related problems. We expected that dexmedetomidine would compensate for the problems arising from spinal anesthesia alone. Thus, we performed a feasibility study of spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion. Methods Twenty-six patients undergoing LA received spinal anesthesia with intravenous dexmedetomidine infusion. During surgery, the patient's pain or discomfort was controlled by supplemental fentanyl or ketamine injection, and all adverse effects were evaluated. Results No patient required conversion to general anesthesia, and all operations were completed laparoscopically without conversion to open surgery. Seventeen (65.4%) patients required supplemental injection of fentanyl or ketamine. Bradycardia occurred in seven (26.9%) patients. Conclusions Spinal anesthesia with dexmedetomidine infusion may be feasible for LA. However, additional analgesia, sedation, and careful attention to the potential development of bradycardia are needed for a successful anesthetic outcome. PMID:25368782

  5. [From the racemate to the eutomer: (S)-ketamine. Renaissance of a substance?].

    PubMed

    Adams, H A; Werner, C

    1997-12-01

    load, along with more rapid recovery. The clinical use of (S)-ketamine: The clinical use of (S)-ketamine depends on its analgesic and sympathomimetic properties, whereas the anaesthetic potency remains in the background. In clinical anesthesiology, (S)-ketamine, especially in combination with midazolam and/or propofol, can be used for short procedures with preserved spontaneous ventilation, for induction of anesthesia in patients with shock or asthmatic disorders, and for induction and maintenance of anesthesia in caesarean sections. Additional indications are repeated anesthesia, for example, in burn patients, analgesia during delivery and diagnostic procedures and intramuscular administration in uncooperative patients. The value of (S)-ketamine as an analgesic component for total intravenous anesthesia has not been defined yet. In comparison with opioides, the advantages are related to improved hemodynamic stability and reduced postoperative respiratory depression. When (S)-ketamine, especially in combination with midazolam, is used for analgosedation in intensive care medicine, a reduction of exogenous catecholamine demand can be expected. Moreover, the effects on intestinal motility are superior to opioids. In combination with midazolam and propofol, excellent control of analgosedation was found, making both combinations suitable for situations in which repeated neurological assessment of patients is necessary. In emergency and disaster medicine, (S)-ketamine is of outstanding importance because of its minimal logistic requirements, the chance for intramuscular administration and the broad range of use for analgesia, anaesthesia and analgosedation as well. Further perspectives of (S)-ketamine may be the treatment of chronic pain and the assumed neuroprotective action of the substance.

  6. Potential anesthesia protocols for space exploration missions.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, Matthieu; Watkins, Sharmila D; Lebuffe, Gilles; Clark, Jonathan B

    2013-03-01

    In spaceflight beyond low Earth's orbit, medical conditions requiring surgery are of a high level of concern because of their potential impact on crew health and mission success. Whereas surgical techniques have been thoroughly studied in spaceflight analogues, the research focusing on anesthesia is limited. To provide safe anesthesia during an exploration mission will be a highly challenging task. The research objective is thus to describe specific anesthesia procedures enabling treatment of pre-identified surgical conditions. Among the medical conditions considered by the NASA Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability element, those potentially necessitating anesthesia techniques have been identified. The most appropriate procedure for each condition is thoroughly discussed. The substantial cost of training time necessary to implement regional anesthesia is pointed out. Within general anesthetics, ketamine combines the unique advantages of preservation of cardiovascular stability, the protective airway reflexes, and spontaneous ventilation. Ketamine side effects have for decades tempered enthusiasm for its use, but recent developments in mitigation means broadened its indications. The extensive experience gathered in remote environments, with minimal equipment and occasionally by insufficiently trained care providers, confirms its high degree of safety. Two ketamine-based anesthesia protocols are described with their corresponding indications. They have been designed taking into account the physiological changes occurring in microgravity and the specific constraints of exploration missions. This investigation could not only improve surgical care during long-duration spaceflights, but may find a number of terrestrial applications in isolated or austere environments.

  7. The role of ketamine in the treatment of chronic cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    ZGAIA, ARMEANA OLIMPIA; IRIMIE, ALEXANDRU; SANDESC, DOREL; VLAD, CATALIN; LISENCU, COSMIN; ROGOBETE, ALEXANDRU; ACHIMAS-CADARIU, PATRICIU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Ketamine is a drug used for the induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, for the treatment of postoperative and posttraumatic acute pain, and more recently, for the reduction of postoperative opioid requirements. The main mechanism of action of ketamine is the antagonization of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that are associated with central sensitization. In the pathogenesis of chronic pain and particularly in neuropathic pain, an important role is played by the activation of NMDA receptors. Although ketamine is indicated and used for the treatment of chronic cancer pain as an adjuvant to opioids, there are few clinical studies that clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of ketamine in this type of pain. The aim of this study is to analyze evidence-based clinical data on the effectiveness and safety of ketamine administration in the treatment of chronic neoplastic pain, and to summarize the evidence-based recommendations for the use of ketamine in the treatment of chronic cancer pain. Method We reviewed the literature from the electronic databases of MEDLINE, COCHRANE, PUBMED, MEDSCAPE (1998–2014), as well as chapters of specialized books (palliative care, pain management, anesthesia). Results A number of studies support the effectiveness of ketamine in the treatment of chronic cancer pain, one study does not evidence clear clinical benefits for the use of ketamine, and some studies included too few patients to be conclusive. Conclusions Ketamine represents an option for neoplasic pain that no longer responds to conventional opioid treatment, but this drug should be used with caution, and the development of potential side effects should be carefully monitored. PMID:26733743

  8. Analysis of print news media framing of ketamine treatment in the United States and Canada from 2000 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives There are multifaceted views on the use of ketamine, a potentially addictive substance, to treat mental health problems. The past 15 years have seen growing media coverage of ketamine for medical and other purposes. This study examined the print news media coverage of medical and other uses of ketamine in North America to determine orientations and trends over time. Methods Print newspaper coverage of ketamine from 2000 to 2015 was reviewed, resulting in 43 print news articles from 28 North American newspapers. A 55-item structured coding instrument was applied to assess news reports of ketamine. Items captured negative and positive aspects, therapeutic use of ketamine, and adverse side effects. Chi-squares tested for changes in trends over time. Results In the 15-year reviewed period, the three most frequent themes related to ketamine were: abuse (68.2%), legal status (34.1%), and clinical use in anesthesia (31.8%). There was significant change in trends during two periods (2000–2007 and 2008–2015). In 2008–2015, print news media articles were significantly more likely to encourage clinical use of ketamine to treat depression (p = 0.002), to treat treatment resistant depression (p = 0.043), and to claim that ketamine is more effective than conventional antidepressants (p = 0.043). Conclusions Our review found consistent positive changes in the portrayals of ketamine by the print news media as a therapeutic antidepressant that mirror the recent scientific publications. These changes in news media reporting might influence the popularity of ketamine use to treat clinical depression. Guidance is required for journalists on objective reporting of medical research findings, including limitations of current research evidence and potential risks of ketamine. PMID:28257514

  9. [Anesthesia and zootechnical interference in goats].

    PubMed

    Ganter, M

    1992-04-01

    Some particularities in anesthesia and surgical procedures are discussed. The combination of xylazine with ketamine is recommended for general anesthesia. Particular aspects of the castration of billy goats, deodorization and dehorning are also discussed.

  10. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  11. Evaluation of medetomidine, ketamine and buprenorphine for neutering feral cats.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kelly A; Robertson, Sheilah A; Levy, Julie K; Isaza, Natalie M

    2011-12-01

    A combination of medetomidine (M, 100 μg/kg), ketamine (K, 10 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (B, 10 μg/kg), administered by intramuscular injection, was evaluated for spaying and castration (neutering) of feral cats (n = 101). Eleven animals (11%) required supplemental anesthesia (isoflurane by mask) to maintain an adequate plane of surgical anesthesia. Atipamezole (A, 125 μg/kg) was administered subcutaneously at the completion of surgery. All cats recovered from surgery and were released the following day. A hemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)) value of < 95% was recorded at least once during anesthesia in all cats. This MKB combination can be used in a feral cat sterilization clinic, but isoflurane supplementation may be necessary. Further research is indicated to determine the clinical significance of the low SpO(2) values associated with this anesthetic regimen.

  12. [Technical requirements for buying a heat and humidity exchanger for ventilation during anesthesia. French Society of Anesthesia and Intensive Care].

    PubMed

    Hajjar, J; Loctin, H; Goullet, D

    2000-08-01

    To prevent cross infection and to improve the management of anaesthetic circuits, the French society of anesthesia and intensive care recommended the use of heat and moisture exchange filter (HMEF). Buying a HMEF needs a procedure with different steps and a product request form must delineate precise needed requirements of the device. In the absence of standardized methods to assess filtration performance, required specifications are established from both manufacturer data and scientific published studies. Proposed purchasing method and criteria help the health care workers at the time of final decision for objective comparison between the different devices on the market.

  13. Requirement of AMPA receptor stimulation for the sustained antidepressant activity of ketamine and LY341495 during the forced swim test in rats.

    PubMed

    Koike, Hiroyuki; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists produce antidepressant effects in animal models of depression, which last for at least 24h, through the transient increase in glutamate release, leading to activation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic (AMPA) receptor. Both ketamine and an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist reportedly increase the expression of GluR1, an AMPA receptor subunit, within 24h, which may account for the sustained enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission following ketamine administration. However, whether the sustained increase in AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission is associated with the antidepressant effects of ketamine and mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists has not yet been investigated. In the present study, to address this question, we tested whether AMPA receptor stimulation at 24h after a single injection of ketamine or an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, (2S)-2-amino-2-[(1S,2S)-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495) was necessary for the antidepressant effect of these compounds using a forced swim test in rats. A single injection of ketamine or LY341495 at 24h before the test significantly decreased the immobility time. An AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), administered 30min prior to the test significantly and dose-dependently reversed the antidepressant effects of ketamine and LY341495, while NBQX itself had no effect on the immobility time. Our findings suggest that AMPA receptor stimulation at 24h after a single injection of ketamine or LY341495 is required to produce the anti-immobility effects of these compounds. Moreover, the present results provide additional evidence that an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist may share some of neural mechanisms with ketamine to exert antidepressant effects.

  14. [Rectal anaesthesia with diazepam added to ketamine for preschool child (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Postel, J P; Brille, P; Starobinsky, E; Buffet, J P; Milhaud, A

    1981-01-01

    The authors relate their experience of 61 rectal anesthesias with ketamine (10 mg/kg) and diazepam (0.25-0.5 mg/kg). Rectal anesthesia is well accepted by children who are afraid of percutaneous injection. When ketamine is used alone, they obtained only 76 p. cent good result. When diazepam is associated, good results arise to 95 p. cent. Diazepam added to ketamine allows surface surgery during 10 to 15 minutes.

  15. Effects of lidocaine constant rate infusion on sevoflurane requirement, autonomic responses, and postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariectomy under opioid-based balanced anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Columbano, Nicolò; Secci, Fabio; Careddu, Giovanni M; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Rossi, Gabriele; Driessen, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    The effects of constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine on sevoflurane (SEVO) requirements, autonomic responses to noxious stimulation, and postoperative pain relief were evaluated in dogs undergoing opioid-based balanced anesthesia. Twenty-four dogs scheduled for elective ovariectomy were randomly assigned to one of four groups: BC, receiving buprenorphine without lidocaine; FC, receiving fentanyl without lidocaine; BL, receiving buprenorphine and lidocaine; FL, receiving fentanyl and lidocaine. Dogs were anesthetized with intravenous (IV) diazepam and ketamine and anesthesia maintained with SEVO in oxygen/air. Lidocaine (2mg/kg plus 50 μg/kg/min) or saline were infused in groups BL/FL and BC/FC, respectively. After initiation of lidocaine or saline CRI IV buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) or fentanyl (4 μg/kg plus 8 μg/kg/h CRI) were administered IV in BC/BL and FC/FL, respectively. Respiratory and hemodynamic variables, drug plasma concentrations, and end-tidal SEVO concentrations (E'SEVO) were measured. Behaviors and pain scores were subjectively assessed 1 and 2h post-extubation. Lidocaine CRI produced median drug plasma concentrations <0.4 μg/mL during peak surgical stimulation. Lidocaine produced a 14% decrease in E'SEVO in the BL (P<0.01) but none in the FL group and no change in cardio-pulmonary responses to surgery or postoperative behaviors and pain scores in any group. Thus, depending on the opioid used, supplementing opioid-based balanced anesthesia with lidocaine (50 μg/kg/min) may not have any or only a minor impact on anesthetic outcome in terms of total anesthetic dose, autonomic responses to visceral nociception, and postoperative analgesia.

  16. Ketamine: 50 Years of Modulating the Mind

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linda; Vlisides, Phillip E.

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine was introduced into clinical practice in the 1960s and continues to be both clinically useful and scientifically fascinating. With considerably diverse molecular targets and neurophysiological properties, ketamine’s effects on the central nervous system remain incompletely understood. Investigators have leveraged the unique characteristics of ketamine to explore the invariant, fundamental mechanisms of anesthetic action. Emerging evidence indicates that ketamine-mediated anesthesia may occur via disruption of corticocortical information transfer in a frontal-to-parietal (“top down”) distribution. This proposed mechanism of general anesthesia has since been demonstrated with anesthetics in other pharmacological classes as well. Ketamine remains invaluable to the fields of anesthesiology and critical care medicine, in large part due to its ability to maintain cardiorespiratory stability while providing effective sedation and analgesia. Furthermore, there may be an emerging role for ketamine in treatment of refractory depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. In this article, we review the history of ketamine, its pharmacology, putative mechanisms of action and current clinical applications. PMID:27965560

  17. Effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on management of postoperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sarvjeet; Saroa, Richa; Aggarwal, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of opioids for perioperative analgesia is associated with sedation, respiratory depression and postoperative nausea and vomiting. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist such as ketamine has both analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties. We studied the effect of intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine on postoperative analgesia and its management with opioids. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 patients scheduled for open cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into two equal groups in a randomized double-blinded way. The general anesthetic technique was standardized in both groups. Group K patients (n = 40) received bolus of ketamine 0.2 mg/kg intravenously followed by an infusion of 0.1 mg/kg/h before skin incision, which was continued up to the end of surgery. Similar volume of saline was infused in Group C (n = 40). The pain score at different intervals and cumulative morphine consumption over 24 h was observed. Secondary outcomes such as hemodynamic parameters, patient satisfaction score and incidences of side effects were also recorded. Results: Intraoperative infusion of low-dose ketamine resulted in effective analgesia in first 6 h of the postoperative period, which was evident from reduced pain scores and reduced opioid requirements (P = 0.001). The incidence of side effects and patient satisfaction were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Intraoperative low-dose ketamine infusion provides good postoperative analgesia while reducing need of opioid analgesics, which must be considered for better management of postoperative analgesia. PMID:26283834

  18. Influence of the Mode of Ventilation on Ketamine/Xylazine Requirements in Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    controlled parameters were considered as ‘acceptable norms’ for the present study: heart rate ¼ 200–300 beats minute)1, SpO2 >90% (on FiO2 ¼ 0.5), PE¢CO2...between the two studies. From the PaO2 values reported by Wyatt et al. (1989), it would appear that their animals breathed room air, whereas the FiO2 ...17), was anesthetized, intu- bated, but not ventilated mechanically. FiO2 in all groups was 0.5. Anesthesia was maintained at a surgical plane by IV

  19. Prospective, randomized, and controlled trial on ketamine infusion during bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy: Effects on postoperative pain and recovery profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, June Young; Kim, Byoung-Gook; Hwang, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Joo; Oh, Ah-Young; Jeon, Young-Tae; Ryu, Jung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy using bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) is frequently performed for excellent cosmesis. However, postoperative pain is remained as concerns due to the extent tissue dissection and tension during the operation. Ketamine is a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that reduces acute postoperative pain. We evaluated the effects of intraoperative ketamine infusion on postoperative pain control and recovery profiles following BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy. Methods: Fifty-eight adult patients scheduled for BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy were randomized into a control group (n = 29) and ketamine group (n = 29). Following induction of anesthesia, patients in each group were infused with the same volume of saline or ketamine solution (1 mg/kg bolus, 60 μg/kg/h continuous infusion). Total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil was used to induce and maintain anesthesia. Pain scores (101-point numerical rating scale, 0 = no pain, 100 = the worst imaginable pain), the consumption of rescue analgesics, and other postoperative adverse effects were assessed at 1, 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. Results: Patients in the ketamine group reported lower pain scores than those in the control group at 6 hours (30 [30] vs 50 [30]; P = 0.017), 24 hours (20 [10] vs 30 [20]; P < 0.001), and 48 hours (10 [10] vs 20 [15]; P < 0.001) in neck area. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups in terms of the requirements for rescue analgesics or the occurrence of adverse events. Conclusion: Intravenous ketamine infusion during anesthesia resulted in lower postoperative pain scores following BABA robotic or endoscopic thyroidectomy, with no increase in adverse events. PMID:27930531

  20. Nurse anesthesia program requirements for esophageal/precordial stethoscope earpieces: a survey.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer; Wakim, Judith H; Hill, Linda

    2009-06-01

    Student nurse anesthetists are often required to purchase an auscultatory earpiece device for use in the clinical setting. Although the device is required, students have observed that many anesthesia providers in the clinical setting no longer use this piece of equipment. The purpose of this project was to determine the number of anesthesia programs that required mandatory purchase of the auscultatory earpiece by student nurse anesthetists. A brief survey was developed to collect data from the directors of all 105 accredited nurse anesthesia programs in the United States. The survey was completed by 63 (60%) of the program directors, and 62 completed surveys were used in the analysis. Results revealed that 95% of the responding nurse anesthesia programs (59 of 62) require esophageal/ precordial stethoscope earpieces for their students, but 46% (27) of those programs provide the earpieces. Most (76%) of the programs required the use of the earpieces in the clinical setting, but only 45% thought that they should be used for monitoring every anesthetic delivered.

  1. Clinical and practical requirements of online software for anesthesia documentation an experience report.

    PubMed

    Benson, M; Junger, A; Quinzio, L; Fuchs, C; Sciuk, G; Michel, A; Marquardt, K; Hempelmann, G

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this paper is the presentation of a new version of the anesthesia documentation software, NarkoData, that has been used in routine clinical work in our department as part of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) since 1995. The performance of this software is presented along with requirements for future development of such a system. The originally used version, NarkoData 3.0, is an online anesthesia documentation software established by the software company ProLogic GmbH. It was primarily developed as a disk-based system for the MacOS operating system (Apple Computer Inc.). Based on our routine experience with the system, a catalogue of requirements was developed that concentrated on improvement in the sequence of work, administration and data management. In 1996, the concepts developed in our department, in close co-operation with medical personnel and the software company, led to a considerable enlargement of the program functions and the subsequent release of a new version of NarkoData. Since 1997, more than 20 000 anesthesia procedures have been recorded annually with this new version at 115 decentralized work stations at our university hospital.

  2. Ketamine-A Narrative Review of Its Uses in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Brian M; Puri, Shawn; Sifonios, Anthony N; Eloy, Jean D; Le, Vanny

    One of the most fascinating drugs in the anesthesiologist's armament is ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist with a myriad of uses. The drug is a dissociative anesthetic and has been used more often as an analgesic in numerous hospital units, outpatient pain clinics, and in the prehospital realm. It has been used to treat postoperative pain, chronic pain, complex regional pain syndrome, phantom limb pain, and other neuropathic conditions requiring analgesia. Research has also demonstrated its efficacy as an adjunct in psychotherapy, as a treatment for both depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, as a procedural sedative, and as a treatment for respiratory and neurologic conditions. Ketamine is not without its adverse effects, some of which can be mitigated with certain efforts. Such effects make it necessary for the clinician to use the drug only in situations where it will provide the greatest benefit with the fewest adverse effects. To the best of our knowledge, none of the reviews regarding ketamine have taken a comprehensive look at the drug's uses in all territories of medicine. This review will serve to touch on its chemical data, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, medical uses, and adverse effects while focusing specifically on the drugs usage in anesthesia and analgesia.

  3. The effect of spinal versus general anesthesia on postoperative pain and analgesic requirements in patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Nesek-Adam, Visnja; Rasić, Zarko; Schwarz, Dragan; Grizelj-Stojcić, Elvira; Rasić, Domagoj; Krstonijević, Zoran; Markić, Ana; Kovacević, Marko

    2012-12-01

    The optimal anesthetic technique for peripheral vascular surgery remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of spinal versus general anesthesia on postoperative pain, analgesic requirements and postoperative comfort in patients undergoing peripheral vascular surgery. A total of 40 patients scheduled for peripheral vascular surgery were randomly assigned to two groups of 20 patients each to receive general anesthesia (GA) or spinal anesthesia (SA). In GA group, anesthesia was induced using thiopental and fentanyl. Vecuronium was used for muscle relaxation. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane and nitrous oxide. In the SA group, hyperbaric 0.5% bupivacaine was injected into the subarachnoid space. Postoperative pain was assessed for 24 hours by a visual analog scale during three assessment periods: 0-4, 4-12 and 12-24 h as well as analgesic requirements. Patients were also asked to assess their postoperative state as satisfactory or unsatisfactory with regard to the pain, side effects and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score was significantly lower in the group SA compared with group GA. This effect was mainly due to the lower pain score during the first study period. The patients received general anesthesia also reported a significantly higher rate of unsatisfactory postoperative comfort than those receiving spinal anesthesia. We conclude that spinal anesthesia is superior to general anesthesia when considering patients' satisfaction, side effects and early postoperative analgesic management.

  4. Exploring the simulation requirements for virtual regional anesthesia training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charissis, V.; Zimmer, C. R.; Sakellariou, S.; Chan, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation towards the simulation requirements for virtual regional anaesthesia training. To this end we have developed a prototype human-computer interface designed to facilitate Virtual Reality (VR) augmenting educational tactics for regional anaesthesia training. The proposed interface system, aims to compliment nerve blocking techniques methods. The system is designed to operate in real-time 3D environment presenting anatomical information and enabling the user to explore the spatial relation of different human parts without any physical constrains. Furthermore the proposed system aims to assist the trainee anaesthetists so as to build a mental, three-dimensional map of the anatomical elements and their depictive relationship to the Ultra-Sound imaging which is used for navigation of the anaesthetic needle. Opting for a sophisticated approach of interaction, the interface elements are based on simplified visual representation of real objects, and can be operated through haptic devices and surround auditory cues. This paper discusses the challenges involved in the HCI design, introduces the visual components of the interface and presents a tentative plan of future work which involves the development of realistic haptic feedback and various regional anaesthesia training scenarios.

  5. [Anesthesia for cesarean section].

    PubMed

    Eldor, J; Guedj, P; Lavie, A

    1992-11-15

    Of 684 parturients who underwent cesarean section between July 1985-August 1990, 371 (54.2%) were given epidural anesthesia; 50 (7.3%) required general anesthesia after a failed attempt at epidural anesthesia; and 5 (0.7%) underwent inadvertent spinal anesthesia because of dural penetration by the epidural needle. In 258 (37.7%) general anesthesia was decided on before operation. The intentional avoidance of spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in this university hospital is criticized.

  6. Efficacy of Opioid-free Anesthesia in Reducing Postoperative Respiratory Depression in Children Undergoing Tonsillectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Anesthesia; General Anesthesia; Analgesics, Opioid; Postoperative Complications; Pathologic Processes; Physiologic Effects of Drugs; Narcotics; Analgesics; Sleep Disordered Breathing; Obstructive Sleep Apnea of Child; Tonsillectomy; Respiratory Depression; Dexmedetomidine; Ketamine; Lidocaine; Gabapentin; Pulse Oximetry

  7. Regional intravenous anesthesia in knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Mahmut; Cantürk, Mehmet; Örnek, Dilşen; Gamlı, Mehmet; Pala, Yaşar; Dikmen, Bayazit; Basaran, Melekşah

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the study was to investigate the regıonal ıntravenous anesthesıa procedure in knee arthroscopy and to evaluate the effects of adding ketamine over the anesthesia block charactery and tourniquet pain. MATERIAL/METHOD: Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) II patients who received knee arthroscopy were enrolled. After monitoring, a peripheral IV line was inserted.The venous blood in the lower extremity was evacuated with a bandage, and the proximal cuff of the double-cuff tourniquet was inflated. The patients were randomly split into two groups. While Group P received 80 ml 0.5% prilocaine, Group PK received 0.15 mg/kg ketamine (80 ml in total) via the dorsum of the foot. We recorded onset time of the sensory block, end time of the sensory block, presence of the motor block, the time when the patient verbally reported tourniquet pain and surgical pain, duration of tourniquet tolerance, fentanyl consumption during the operation, time to first analgesic requirement, methemoglobin values at 60 minutes, operative conditions, 24-hour analgesic consumption, discharge time, and hemodynamic parameters. RESULTS: The body mass index (BMI) of the patients who required general anesthesia was significantly higher than the BMI of other patients. The onset time of the sensory block was shorter for those in Group PK, but the time to first analgesic requirement was longer. CONCLUSION: Regıonal ıntravenous anesthesıa using the doses and volumes commonly used in knee arthroscopy may be an inadequate block among patients with high BMI values. Moreover, the addition of ketamine to the local anesthetic solution may produce a partial solution by shortening the onset of sensory block and prolonging the time until the first analgesic is required. PMID:21049208

  8. Echocardiographic effects of dexmedetomidine-ketamine in chinchillas ( Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Doss, Grayson A; Mans, Christoph; Stepien, Rebecca L

    2017-02-01

    Alpha2-agonist anesthetic combinations are often used in rodent anesthesia but no information about their effects on cardiac function in chinchillas exists. The purpose of this study was to utilize echocardiography to evaluate the cardiovascular effects of dexmedetomidine-ketamine anesthesia in chinchillas. Echocardiographic examinations were performed in eight adult chinchillas under manual restraint and following dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg) and ketamine (4 mg/kg) administration. Dexmedetomidine-ketamine anesthesia resulted in a significantly decreased heart rate, fractional shortening, cardiac output, and flow velocity across the aortic and pulmonic valves, and significantly increased left ventricular internal diameter in systole. The observed changes in echocardiographic parameters are similar to those previously reported in chinchillas anesthetized with isoflurane.

  9. Efficacy of oral ketamine compared to midazolam for sedation of children undergoing laceration repair

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Orit; Barkan, Shiri; Breitbart, Rachelle; Berkovitch, Sofia; Toledano, Michal; Weiser, Giora; Karadi, Natali; Nassi, Anat; Kozer, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the efficacy of oral ketamine versus oral midazolam for sedation during laceration repair at a pediatric emergency department. Methods: Children between 1 and 10 years requiring laceration repair were randomly assigned to 2 groups, treated either with oral midazolam (0.7 mg/kg) or with oral ketamine (5 mg/kg). Main outcomes measured were level of pain during local anesthesia, as assessed by the parent on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and the number of children who required intravenous sedation. Secondary outcomes included VAS by physician, pain assessment by child, maximal sedation depth assessed by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale, time until University of Michigan Sedation Scale 2 or more, general satisfaction of a parent and treating physician, length of procedure, total sedation time, and the incidence of any adverse events. Results: Sixty-eight children were recruited of which 33 were girls. Average age was 5.08 ± 2.14 years. Thirty-seven children were treated with ketamine and 31 with midazolam. Parent-assessed VAS in ketamine treated patients was 5.07 ± 0.75 compared with 3.68 ± 0.7 in midazolam treated patients [mean difference = 1.39 95% confidence interval (CI) –0.47 to 3.26]. Twelve (32%) of the children treated with ketamine required the addition of IV sedation compared to only 2 children (6%) of the children treated with midazolam [odds ratio (adjusted for age and gender) 6.1, 95% CI: 1.2 to 30.5]. The rest of the measured variables were similar between the groups, with no statistical significance. Discussion: No difference in the level of pain was found between ketamine and midazolam treated patients. Compared with oral midazolam (0.7 mg/kg), oral ketamine (5 mg/kg) was associated with higher rates of sedation failure, and thus is not recommended as a single agent for oral sedation in children requiring laceration repair. PMID:27368000

  10. Consciousness and Complexity during Unresponsiveness Induced by Propofol, Xenon, and Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Sarasso, Simone; Boly, Melanie; Napolitani, Martino; Gosseries, Olivia; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Casarotto, Silvia; Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer Girardi; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Boveroux, Pierre; Rex, Steffen; Tononi, Giulio; Laureys, Steven; Massimini, Marcello

    2015-12-07

    A common endpoint of general anesthetics is behavioral unresponsiveness, which is commonly associated with loss of consciousness. However, subjects can become disconnected from the environment while still having conscious experiences, as demonstrated by sleep states associated with dreaming. Among anesthetics, ketamine is remarkable in that it induces profound unresponsiveness, but subjects often report "ketamine dreams" upon emergence from anesthesia. Here, we aimed at assessing consciousness during anesthesia with propofol, xenon, and ketamine, independent of behavioral responsiveness. To do so, in 18 healthy volunteers, we measured the complexity of the cortical response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)--an approach that has proven helpful in assessing objectively the level of consciousness irrespective of sensory processing and motor responses. In addition, upon emergence from anesthesia, we collected reports about conscious experiences during unresponsiveness. Both frontal and parietal TMS elicited a low-amplitude electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave corresponding to a local pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during propofol anesthesia, a high-amplitude EEG slow wave corresponding to a global, stereotypical pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during xenon anesthesia, and a wakefulness-like, complex spatiotemporal activation pattern during ketamine anesthesia. Crucially, participants reported no conscious experience after emergence from propofol and xenon anesthesia, whereas after ketamine they reported long, vivid dreams unrelated to the external environment. These results are relevant because they suggest that brain complexity may be sensitive to the presence of disconnected consciousness in subjects who are considered unconscious based on behavioral responses.

  11. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M; Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Cameron, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis.

  12. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  13. Ketamine Affects the Neurogenesis of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus in 7-Day-Old Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Liu, Cun-Ming; Sun, Jie; Hao, Ting; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has been reported to cause neonatal neurotoxicity via a neuronal apoptosis mechanism; however, no in vivo research has reported whether ketamine could affect postnatal neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). A growing number of experiments suggest that postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis is the foundation of maintaining normal hippocampus function into adulthood. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of ketamine on hippocampal neurogenesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: the control group (equal volume of normal saline), and the ketamine-anesthesia group (40 mg/kg ketamine in four injections at 1 h intervals). The S-phase marker 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered after ketamine exposure to postnatal day 7 (PND-7) rats, and the neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG was assessed using single- or double-immunofluorescence staining. The expression of GFAP in the hippocampal DG was measured by western blot analysis. Spatial reference memory was tested by Morris water maze at 2 months after PND-7 rats exposed to ketamine treatment. The present results showed that neonatal ketamine exposure significantly inhibited neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, decreased astrocytic differentiation, and markedly enhanced neuronal differentiation. The disruptive effect of ketamine on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs lasted at least 1 week and disappeared by 2 weeks after ketamine exposure. Moreover, the migration of newborn neurons in the granule cell layer and the growth of astrocytes in the hippocampal DG were inhibited by ketamine on PND-37 and PND-44. Finally, ketamine caused a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory tasks at 2 months old. Our results suggested that ketamine may interfere with hippocampal neurogenesis and long-term neurocognitive function in PND-7 rats. These findings may provide a new perspective to explain the adult neurocognitive dysfunction induced by neonatal

  14. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  15. Acute pulmonary edema after diazepam-ketamine in a dog.

    PubMed

    Boutureira, Joseph; Trim, Cynthia M; Cornell, Karen K

    2007-09-01

    An 8-year-old mixed-breed dog was anesthetized for colonoscopy. Moderate sedation was produced by premedication with glycopyrrolate, acepromazine, and hydromorphone, and anesthesia was induced by IV injection of diazepam and ketamine. Frothy, reddish-colored fluid flowed from the endotracheal tube immediately after endotracheal intubation but ceased after several minutes. Furosemide was injected IV. Anesthesia was maintained by sevoflurane in oxygen. Ventilation and arterial blood pressure were satisfactory, however, after oxygen was administered to maintain normal hemoglobin saturation. Radiography revealed changes consistent with a diagnosis of pulmonary edema. The following day, ventricular premature contractions developed and atrial dissociation, valvular regurgitation, and pulmonary hypertension were diagnosed on echocardiography. The proposed etiology is either profound transient hypotension and/or pulmonary hypertension induced by ketamine. The cardiac abnormalities that were present the following day suggest that myocardial dysfunction after induction of anesthesia was more severe than was apparent as assessed by routine physical examination and monitoring methods.

  16. Addressing ketamine bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    The rise in ketamine misuse means more health professionals will need to diagnose, refer and treat ketamine bladder syndrome. Prevention and raising awareness of the problem among multidisciplinary teams will help limit damage to the bladder as well as making treatment and management more effective.

  17. REM sleep disorder following general anesthesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Katarina; Petrovic, Jelena; Ciric, Jelena; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative sleep disorders, particularly the REM sleep disorder, may have a significant deleterious impact on postoperative outcomes and may contribute to the genesis of certain delayed postoperative complications. We have followed the effect of distinct anesthesia regimens (ketamine/diazepam vs. pentobarbital) over 6days following the induction of a stable anesthetized state in adult male Wistar rats, chronically instrumented for sleep recording. In order to compare the effect of both anesthetics in the physiological controls vs. the rats with impaired pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic innervation, during the operative procedure for the implantation of EEG and EMG electrodes, the bilateral PPT lesion was conducted using ibotenic acid (IBO). We have followed in particular post-anesthesia REM sleep. Our results show the distinct EEG microstructure of the motor cortex during the different stable anesthetized states, and their distinct impact on post-anesthesia REM sleep. In contrast to pentobarbital anesthesia, the ketamine/diazepam anesthesia potentiated the long-lasting post-anesthesia REM statewith higher muscle tone (REM1) vs. REM state with atonia (REM2). Whereas both anesthesias prolonged the post-anesthesia REM sleep duration, the long-term prolongation of the REM1 state was demonstrated only after the ketamine/diazepam anesthesia, first due to the increased number of REM1 episodes, and then due to the prolonged REM1 episodes duration. On the other hand, whereas both anesthetic regimens abolished the prolonged post-anesthesia REM/REM1 sleep and the EEG microstructure disorder during REM sleep, only the pentobarbital abolished the increased NREM/REM/NREM transitions, caused by the PPT lesion. In addition, in the PPT lesioned rats, the ketamine/diazepam anesthesia decreased the Wake/NREM/Wake transitions while the pentobarbital anesthesia decreased the Wake/REM/Wake transitions. Our present study suggests pentobarbital anesthesia as being

  18. Effects of ketamine infusion on halothane minimal alveolar concentration in horses.

    PubMed

    Muir, W W; Sams, R

    1992-10-01

    Eight adult horses were used in a study to determine ketamine's ability to reduce halothane requirement. To obtain steady-state plasma concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 micrograms/ml, loading doses and constant infusions for ketamine were calculated for each horse on the basis of data from other studies in which the pharmacokinetic properties of ketamine were investigated. Blood samples for determination of plasma ketamine concentrations were collected periodically during each experiment. Plasma ketamine concentrations were determined by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry under electron-impact ionization conditions, using lidocaine as the internal standard. Halothane minimal alveolar concentration (MAC; concentration at which half the horses moved in response to an electrical stimulus) and plasma ketamine concentration were determined after steady-state concentrations of each ketamine infusion had been reached. Plasma ketamine concentrations > 1.0 microgram/ml decreased halothane MAC. The degree of MAC reduction was correlated directly with the square root of the plasma ketamine concentration, reaching a maximum of 37% reduction at a plasma ketamine concentration of 10.8 +/- 2.7 micrograms/ml. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, and the rate of increase of right ventricular pressure did not change with increasing plasma ketamine concentration and halothane MAC reduction. Cardiac output increased significantly during ketamine infusions and halothane MAC reduction. Our findings suggest that plasma ketamine concentrations > 1.0 micron/ml reduce halothane MAC and produce beneficial hemodynamic effects.

  19. Anesthesia Awareness

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Anesthesia Awareness Very rarely – in only one or two out ... become aware or conscious. The condition – called anesthesia awareness – means the patient can recall the surroundings or ...

  20. Anesthesia in a Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

    PubMed

    Trim, C M; Lamberski, N; Kissel, D I; Quandt, J E

    1998-06-01

    A Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii) was satisfactorily immobilized on two occasions with i.m. detomidine (0.065-0.13 mg/kg) and butorphanol (0.13-0.2 mg/kg). On the second occasion, anesthesia was induced by i.v. administration of ketamine (2.2 mg/kg). Twenty minutes later, endotracheal intubation was performed after an additional i.v. injection of ketamine (1.5 mg/kg). Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane, which provided excellent conditions for radiology and surgery. Anesthesia was associated with hypoxemia when the tapir was allowed to breathe air and with hypoventilation. Mean arterial pressure remained satisfactory. No antagonist drugs were administered, and recovery from anesthesia was rapid and smooth.

  1. [Anesthesia and Angelman syndrome].

    PubMed

    Witte, W; Nobel, C; Hilpert, J

    2011-07-01

    patients. For the preoperative consultation and anesthetization, communication with the patients requires the aid of parents or other relatives. Water and reflecting surfaces may be used to gain contact with AS patients. Patients with AS feel pain like any other person although they are frequently smiling and laughing and this has to be considered especially in major surgery (e.g. scoliosis surgery). The most important life-threatening complication is bradycardia due to vagal hypertonia which can lead to asystole with delayed response to atropine. None of the Berlin patients had severe bradycardia but the complication has to be taken into consideration. The use of drugs to ensure complete reversal of neuromuscular relaxation should be avoided because anticholinergic agents could cause bradycardia. The use of sugammadex in cases of AS has not been tested. To avoid elevation of the vagal tone, the indications for laparascopy have to be considered very carefully. There is no evidence that any drug or hypnotic may be more appropriate or advantageous. Balanced anesthesia and total intravenous anesthesia are possible but the duration of drug effect has to be taken into account. If ketamine is used the side-effects of the drug (psychomimetic reactions, muscular rigidity) should be prevented by the consistent administration of propofol, midazolam or thiopental. Usually AS patients are agitated so that regional anesthesia techniques are difficult to administer. If regional anesthesia does have considerable advantages over general anesthesia in a particular case, peripheral regional anesthesia should be preferred, especially because scoliosis is often present. There is no evidence that AS patients cause more intubation problems but because of facial dysmorphia accurate evaluation is needed in advance. This is even more important for older AS patients because the dysmorphia tends to accelerate during the course of life. Although epilepsy is the primary feature of AS, not every EEG

  2. Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Anesthesia Share this Page Preparing For Surgery Effects of Anesthesia Children and Anesthesia Pregnancy, Childbirth and Anesthesia Seniors and Anesthesia Surgery Risks Anesthesia Awareness Obesity and Anesthesia Sleep Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery ...

  3. Molecular recognition of ketamine by a subset of olfactory G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Saven, Jeffery G.; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine elicits various neuropharmacological effects, including sedation, analgesia, general anesthesia, and antidepressant activity. Through an in vitro screen, we identified four mouse olfactory receptors (ORs) that responded to ketamine. In addition to their presence in the olfactory epithelium, these G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are distributed throughout the central nervous system. To better understand the molecular basis of the interactions between ketamine and ORs, we used sequence comparison and molecular modeling to design mutations that (i) increased, reduced, or abolished ketamine responsiveness in responding receptors, and (ii) rendered non-responding receptors responsive to ketamine. We showed that olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that expressed distinct ORs responded to ketamine in vivo, suggesting that ORs may serve as functional targets for ketamine. The ability to both abolish and introduce responsiveness to ketamine in GPCRs enabled us to identify and confirm distinct interaction loci in the binding site, which suggested a signature ketamine-binding pocket that may guide exploration of additional receptors for this general anesthetic drug. PMID:25829447

  4. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima E

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913.

  5. Total Intravenous Anesthesia for Major Burn Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-30

    anesthesia, analgesia, and amnesia achievable. On the other hand, use of ketamine without a concomitant benzodiazepine has been associated with... benzodiazepine or propofol effectively prevents these phenomena, and they have not been a problem in our experience [4, 33]. Also, the S(+) enantiomer has a

  6. Ketamine use in the treatment of refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Synowiec, Andrea S; Singh, Deepinder S; Yenugadhati, Vamsi; Valeriano, James P; Schramke, Carol J; Kelly, Kevin M

    2013-07-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) occurs when status epilepticus (SE) fails to respond to appropriate therapy with typical antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Animal studies have shown ketamine to be a highly efficacious agent in this setting, but very few case reports describe use of ketamine in human SE or RSE. We report a retrospective review of 11 patients who were treated for RSE with ketamine infusion in addition to other standard AEDs over a nine-year period. Data collection included age, gender, history of epilepsy, etiology of RSE, daily dose of ketamine, co-therapeutic agents, duration of seizures, treatment response, and disposition. RSE was successfully terminated in all 11 patients treated with ketamine. Dosing ranged from 0.45 mg/kg/h to 2.1 mg/kg/h based upon the preference of the treating clinician and response to therapy, with maximal daily doses ranging from 1392 mg to 4200 mg. Ketamine was the last AED used prior to resolution of RSE in 7/11 (64%) cases. In the remaining four cases, one other AED was added after ketamine infusion had begun. Time from ketamine initiation to seizure cessation ranged from 4 to 28 days (mean=9.8, SD=8.9). In 7/11 patients, RSE was resolved within one week of starting therapy. Administration of ketamine was uniformly associated with improvement in hemodynamic stability. Six of the seven patients (85%) who required vasopressors during early treatment for RSE were able to be weaned from vasopressors during ketamine infusion. No acute adverse effects were noted. These findings suggest that ketamine may be a safe and efficacious adjunctive agent in the treatment of RSE.

  7. Evaluation of parenteral drugs for anesthesia in the blue crab (Callinectes sapidus).

    PubMed

    Quesada, Rolando J; Smith, Christopher D; Heard, Darryl J

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of several parenteral anesthetics in blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus). Thirty-one animals were administered one or more of the following drugs by injection into the hemolymph (i.v.) through an arthrodial membrane: etomidate, ketamine, lidocaine, pentobarbital, propofol, tiletamine-zolazepam, xylazine, and ketamine-xylazine. A subset of crabs received intracardiac ketamine. Etomidate had no effect. Lidocaine effects were ultrashort (<3 min). Pentobarbital had prolonged inductions (2 min) and often caused violent excitement and poor anesthesia. Propofol induced light anesthesia accompanied by distress and limb autotomy. Inductions with ketamine, xylazine, tiletamine-zolazepam, and ketamine-xylazine were usually fast (<60 sec). Their anesthetic effects were generally very short (5-10 min) but predictable, smooth, and with good muscle relaxation. The latter two protocols induced a deep plane of anesthesia more consistently but also more significant bradycardia. Intracardiac ketamine injection was fatal in four of five crabs. In conclusion, the anesthetic protocols were considered unsuitable for prolonged anesthesia. However, if very short-term anesthesia is desired, then tiletamine-zolazepam or ketamine-xylazine is recommended. Further studies are indicated to identify a safe anesthetic protocol of longer duration in C. sapidus as well as in other crab species.

  8. Effects of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anesthesia Seniors and Anesthesia Surgery Risks Anesthesia Awareness Obesity and Anesthesia Sleep Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Effects of Anesthesia Side effects of anesthesia can occur ...

  9. General Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    General anesthesia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Under general anesthesia, you are completely unconscious and unable to feel pain during medical procedures. General anesthesia usually uses a combination of intravenous drugs and ...

  10. Ketamine-Induced Toxicity in Neurons Differentiated from Neural Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Slikker, William; Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Patterson, Tucker A; Sadovova, Natalya; Hanig, Joseph P; Paule, Merle G; Wang, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    . The discussion focuses on: (1) the doses and time-course over which ketamine is associated with damage of neural cells; (2) how ketamine directs or signals neural stem cells/neural cells to undergo apoptosis or necrosis; (3) how functional neuronal transmitter receptors affect neurotoxicity induced by ketamine; and (4) advantages of using neural stem cell models to study critical issues related to ketamine anesthesia.

  11. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  12. Influence of ketamine on regional brain glucose use

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.; Mans, A.M.; Biebuyck, J.F.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of ketamine on cerebral function at the level of individual brain structures as reflected by glucose use. Rats received either 5 or 30 mg/kg ketamine intravenously as a loading dose, followed by an infusion to maintain a steady-state level of the drug. An additional group received 30 mg/kg as a single injection only, and was studied 20 min later, by which time they were recovering consciousness (withdrawal group). Regional brain energy metabolism was evaluated with (6-/sup 14/C)glucose and quantitative autoradiography during a 5-min experimental period. A subhypnotic, steady-state dose (5 mg/kg) of ketamine caused a stimulation of glucose use in most brain areas, with an average increase of 20%. At the larger steady-state dose (30 mg/kg, which is sufficient to cause anesthesia), there was no significant effect on most brain regions; some sensory nuclei were depressed (inferior colliculus, -29%; cerebellar dentate nucleus, -18%; vestibular nucleus, -16%), but glucose use in the ventral posterior hippocampus was increased by 33%. In contrast, during withdrawal from a 30-mg/kg bolus, there was a stimulation of glucose use throughout the brain (21-78%), at a time when plasma ketamine levels were similar to the levels in the 5 mg/kg group. At each steady-state dose, as well as during withdrawal, ketamine caused a notable stimulation of glucose use by the hippocampus.

  13. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Powers, A.R.; Gancsos, M.G.; Finn, E.S.; Morgan, P.T.; Corlett, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At sub-anesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation, and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Methods Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of three participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Results Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. Discussion We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced AVHs in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the magnetic resonance scanner, and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis: the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs and it does so more in situations of reduced perceptual input. The reduced perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine; such circumstances induce aberrant percepts including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of AVHs and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. PMID:26361209

  14. Effect of Etomidate Versus Combination of Propofol-Ketamine and Thiopental-Ketamine on Hemodynamic Response to Laryngoscopy and Intubation: A Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Emadi, Seyed Abdollah; Davanlou, Ali; Motamed, Nima; Yousefi Abdolmaleki, Ensieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and intubation frequently used for airway management during general anesthesia, is frequently associated with undesirable hemodynamic disturbances. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of etomidate, combination of propofol-ketamine and thiopental-ketamine as induction agents on hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Patients and Methods: In a double blind, randomized clinical trial a total of 120 adult patients of both sexes, aged 18 - 45 years, scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned into three equally sized groups. Patients in group A received etomidate (0.3 mg/kg) plus normal saline as placebo. Patients in group B and C received propofol (1.5 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) and thiopental sodium (3 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), respectively for anesthesia induction. Before laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, immediately after, and also one and three minutes after the procedures, hemodynamic values (SBP, DBP, MAP and HR) were measured. Results: A repeated measurement ANOVA showed significant changes in mean SBP and DBP between the time points (P < 0.05). In addition, the main effect of MAP and HR were statistically significant during the course of study (P < 0.05). Furthermore, after induction of anesthesia, the three study groups had significantly different SBP, DBP and MAP changes overtime (P < 0.05). However, HR changes over time were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Combination of propofol-ketamine had superior hemodynamic stability compared to other induction agents. Conclusions: Combination of propofol-ketamine may be recommended as an effective and safe induction agent for attenuating hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation with better hemodynamic stability. Although, further well-designed randomized clinical trials to confirm the safety and efficacy of this combination, especially in critically ill patients or patients with

  15. Antinociceptive effects, metabolism and disposition of ketamine in ponies under target-controlled drug infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Knobloch, M.; Portier, C.J.; Levionnois, O.L.; Theurillat, R.; Thormann, W.; Spadavecchia, C.; Mevissen, M. . E-mail: meike.mevissen@vpi.unibe.ch

    2006-11-01

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in a variety of drug combinations in human and veterinary medicine. Recently, it gained new interest for use in long-term pain therapy administered in sub-anesthetic doses in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPk) model for ketamine in ponies and to investigate the effect of low-dose ketamine infusion on the amplitude and the duration of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR). A target-controlled infusion (TCI) of ketamine with a target plasma level of 1 {mu}g/ml S-ketamine over 120 min under isoflurane anesthesia was performed in Shetland ponies. A quantitative electromyographic assessment of the NWR was done before, during and after the TCI. Plasma levels of R-/S-ketamine and R-/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. These data and two additional data sets from bolus studies were used to build a PBPk model for ketamine in ponies. The peak-to-peak amplitude and the duration of the NWR decreased significantly during TCI and returned slowly toward baseline values after the end of TCI. The PBPk model provides reliable prediction of plasma and tissue levels of R- and S-ketamine and R- and S-norketamine. Furthermore, biotransformation of ketamine takes place in the liver and in the lung via first-pass metabolism. Plasma concentrations of S-norketamine were higher compared to R-norketamine during TCI at all time points. Analysis of the data suggested identical biotransformation rates from the parent compounds to the principle metabolites (R- and S-norketamine) but different downstream metabolism to further metabolites. The PBPk model can provide predictions of R- and S-ketamine and norketamine concentrations in other clinical settings (e.g. horses)

  16. Antinociceptive effects, metabolism and disposition of ketamine in ponies under target-controlled drug infusion

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, M.; Portier, C.J.; Levionnois, O.L.; Theurillat, R.; Thormann, W.; Spadavecchia, C.; Mevissen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in a variety of drug combinations in human and veterinary medicine. Recently, it gained new interest for use in long-term pain therapy administered in sub-anesthetic doses in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPk) model for ketamine in ponies and to investigate the effect of low-dose ketamine infusion on the amplitude and the duration of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR). A target-controlled infusion (TCI) of ketamine with a target plasma level of 1 μg/ml S-ketamine over 120 min under isoflurane anesthesia was performed in Shetland ponies. A quantitative electromyographic assessment of the NWR was done before, during and after the TCI. Plasma levels of R-/S-ketamine and R-/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. These data and two additional data sets from bolus studies were used to build a PBPk model for ketamine in ponies. The peak-to-peak amplitude and the duration of the NWR decreased significantly during TCI and returned slowly toward baseline values after the end of TCI. The PBPk model provides reliable prediction of plasma and tissue levels of R- and S-ketamine and R- and S-norketamine. Furthermore, biotransformation of ketamine takes place in the liver and in the lung via first-pass metabolism. Plasma concentrations of S-norketamine were higher compared to R-norketamine during TCI at all time points. Analysis of the data suggested identical biotransformation rates from the parent compounds to the principle metabolites (R- and S-norketamine) but different downstream metabolism to further metabolites. The PBPk model can provide predictions of R- and S-ketamine and norketamine concentrations in other clinical settings (e.g. horses). PMID:16919695

  17. Ketamine does not inhibit interleukin-6 synthesis in hepatic resections requiring a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre): a controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Bonofiglio, Francisco Carlos; Molmenti, Ernesto P; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels correlated with mortality in critically ill patients. Goal To determine the effect of ketamine on IL-6 levels in liver resections patients with a temporary porto-arterial occlusion (Pringle manoeuvre). Materials and methods Controlled, prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. One group (n = 21) received ketamine whereas the other group (n = 17) received placebo. IL-6 levels were obtained at baseline, 4, 12, 24 h, 3 and 5 days. Results There were no significant differences in IL-6 levels between the groups (basal P = 089, 4 h P = 0.83, 12 h P = 0.39, 24 h, P = 0.55, 3 days P = 0.80 and 5 days P = 0.45). Both groups had elevated IL-6 levels that became almost undetectable by day 5. There was no major morbidity and no mortality in either group. Conclusions Ketamine does not seem to have an effect on plasma levels of IL-6. This could be interpreted as a potential finding associated with outcome as we did not encounter any deaths or major complications. Further studies will likely be needed to determine the range of IL-6 levels associated with survival and mortality, and whether it could be a predictor of survival. PMID:21929671

  18. Intraperitoneal Continuous-Rate Infusion for the Maintenance of Anesthesia in Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Rebecca L; Terzi, Matthew C; Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal injectable anesthetics are often used to achieve surgical anesthesia in laboratory mice. Because bolus redosing of injectable anesthetics can cause unacceptably high mortality, we evaluated intraperitoneal continuous-rate infusion (CRI) of ketamine with or without xylazine for maintaining surgical anesthesia for an extended period of time. Anesthesia was induced in male C57BL/6J mice by using ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (8 mg/kg) without or with acepromazine at 0.1 mg/kg or 0.5 mg/kg. At 10 min after induction, CRI for 90 min was initiated and comprised 25%, 50%, or 100% of the initial ketamine dose per hour or 50% of the initial doses of both ketamine and xylazine. Anesthetic regimens were compared on the basis of animal immobility, continuous surgical depth of anesthesia as determined by the absence of a pedal withdrawal reflex, and mortality. Consistent with previous studies, the response to anesthetics was highly variable. Regimens that provided the longest continuous surgical plane of anesthesia with minimal mortality were ketamine–xylazine–acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg) with CRI of 100% of the initial ketamine dose and ketamine–xylazine–acepromazine (0.5 mg/kg) with CRI of 50% of the initial ketamine and xylazine doses. In addition, heart rate and respiratory rate did not increase consistently in response to a noxious stimulus during CRI anesthesia, even when mice exhibited a positive pedal withdrawal reflex, suggesting that these parameters are unreliable indicators of anesthetic depth during ketamine–xylazine anesthesia in mice. We conclude that intraperitoneal CRI anesthesia in mice prolongs injectable anesthesia more consistently and with lower mortality than does bolus redosing. PMID:27657709

  19. General anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007410.htm General anesthesia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. General anesthesia is treatment with certain medicines that puts you ...

  20. Anesthesia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... as an injection or through inhaled gases or vapors, different types of anesthesia affect the nervous system ... in the arm) or by inhaling gases or vapors. Regional anesthesia. An anesthetic drug is injected near ...

  1. Anesthetic Activity of Alfaxalone Compared with Ketamine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Siriarchavatana, Parkpoom; Ayers, Jessica D; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    Alfaxalone encased in hydroxypropyl-β -cyclodextrin is a neuroactive steroid compound that has recently been approved in the United States for use as an anesthetic in dogs and cats. We evaluated the use of alfaxalone compared with ketamine, both alone and in combination with xylazine, for anesthesia of C57BL/6 mice. We assessed time to onset of anesthesia, duration of action, reflex responses, respiratory rate, and clinical signs. Alfaxalone (80 mg/kg IP) induced a light surgical plane of anesthesia in all mice, with a time to onset of 2.2 ± 0.2 min and duration of 57.1 ± 3.8 min, whereas ketamine (80 mg/kg IP) provided only sedative effects (time to onset, 5.4 ± 0.4 min; duration, 6.9 ± 0.8 min). Clinically, alfaxalone caused a spectrum of activities, including popcorn-like jumping movements after injection, intense scratching of the face, hyperresponsiveness to noise or touch, and marked limb jerking during recovery. Adding xylazine to the single-agent protocols achieved deep surgical anesthesia (duration: alfaxalone + xylazine, 80.3 ± 17.8 min; ketamine + xylazine, 37.4 ± 8.2 min) and ameliorated the adverse clinical signs. Our preliminary analysis suggests that, because of its side effects, alfaxalone alone is not a viable anesthetic option for mice. Although alfaxalone combined with xylazine appeared to be a more viable option, some mice still experienced mild adverse reactions, and the long duration of action might be problematic regarding the maintenance of body temperature and monitoring of recovery. Further studies evaluating different routes of administration and drug combinations are warranted.

  2. Effect of a single dose of lidocaine and ketamine on intraoperative opioids requirements in patients undergoing elective gynecological laparotomies under general anesthesia. A randomized, placebo controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    García-Navia, Jusset Teresa; Tornero López, Javier; Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Vilches Arenas, Angel; Vázquez Gutiérrez, Tiburcio

    2016-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos del estudio: existe evidencia de que la administracion perioperatoria de ketamina y lidocaina intravenosa reduce el dolor y el consumo de opioides postoperatorio, acorta la estancia hospitalaria y acelera la recuperacion de la funcion intestinal. Sin embargo, no se han estudiado los efectos beneficiosos en el periodo intraoperatorio. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de una unica dosis de lidocaina y ketamina sobre el consumo intraoperatorio de opioides en pacientes sometidas a cirugia ginecologica electiva bajo anestesia general. Material y métodos: estudio prospectivo, aleatorizado, doble ciego, controlado con placebo en un solo centro. Se incluyeron 33 pacientes (11 en el grupo ketamina, 11 en el grupo lidocaina y 11 en el grupo placebo). Para la analgesia postoperatoria se utilizo una bomba PCA (Analgesia Controlada por el Paciente ) de morfina. Los pacientes fueron asignados al azar a uno de los tres grupos de estudio: 1,5 mg/kg de lidocaina al 2%, 0,5 mg/kg de ketamina al 5% o solucion salina 0.9%. La variable principal del estudio fue el consumo de opioides durante la cirugia. Las variables secundarias fueron: tiempo de educcion de la anestesia, intensidad del dolor, consumo de opioides en las 24 horas posteriores a la cirugia y efectos adversos. Resultados: se observo una disminucion del consumo intraoperatorio de opioides en los grupos ketamina (402,3 } 106,3) y lidocaina (397,7 } 107,5) frente al grupo placebo (561,4 } 97,1); p = 0,001. Se encontro una correlacion positiva entre el consumo intraoperatorio de opioides y el tiempo de despertar (r = 0,864, p.

  3. Anesthesia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anesthesia Basics KidsHealth > For Teens > Anesthesia Basics Print A ... español Conceptos básicos sobre la anestesia What Is Anesthesia? No doubt about it, getting an operation can ...

  4. Total Intravenous Anesthesia on the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    anesthesia, which provides amnesia and excellent analgesia. The ketamine-induced rise in blood pressure and heart rate seen in the normotensive patient...capnography, blood pressure monitors) to provide an anesthetic. However, space, superfluous equipment, and electri- city can become issues. Furthermore...the anesthetic. New vaporizers, airway equipment, and blood transfusions for treatment of shock were other battlefield advances made during WWII.1

  5. Role of ketamine for analgesia in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Schermer, Erika; Kodumudi, Vijay; Belani, Kumar; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocking agent and a dissociative anesthetic with neurostimulatory side effects. In recent years, multiple research trials as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggest the usefulness of ketamine as a strong analgesic used in subanesthetic intravenous doses, and also as a sedative. In addition, ketamine was noted to possess properties of anti-tolerance, anti-hyperalgesia and anti-allodynia most likely secondary to inhibition of the NMDA receptors. Tolerance, hyperalgesia and allodynia phenomena are the main components of opioid resistance, and pathological pain is often seen in the clinical conditions involving neuropathic pain, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and central sensitization with allodynia or hyperalgesia. All these conditions are challenging to treat. In low doses, ketamine does not have major adverse dysphoric effects and also has the favorable effects of reduced incidence of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting. Therefore, ketamine can be a useful adjunct for pain control after surgery. Additional studies are required to determine the role of ketamine in the immediate postoperative period after surgical interventions known to produce severe pain and in the prevention and treatment of chronic pain. PMID:27625475

  6. Comparison of effects of intraoperative nefopam and ketamine infusion on managing postoperative pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy administered remifentanil

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Kwan; Choi, Jung Il; Kim, Woong Mo; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Keun Seok; Song, Ji A

    2016-01-01

    Background Although intraoperative opioids provide more comfortable anesthesia and reduce the use of postoperative analgesics, it may cause opioid induced hyperalgesia (OIH). OIH is an increased pain response to opioids and it may be associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. This study aimed to determine whether intraoperative nefopam or ketamine, known being related on NMDA receptor, affects postoperative pain and OIH after continuous infusion of intraoperative remifentanil. Methods Fifty-four patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into three groups. In the nefopam group (N group), patients received nefopam 0.3 mg/kg at the induction of anesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 0.065 mg/kg/h. In the ketamine group (K group), patients received ketamine 0.3 mg/kg at the induction of anesthesia followed by a continuous infusion of 3 µg/kg/min. The control group did not received any other agents except for the standard anesthetic regimen. Postoperative pain score, first time and number of demanding rescue analgesia, OIH and degrees of drowsiness/sedation scale were examined. Results Co-administrated nefopam or ketamine significantly reduced the total amount of intraoperative remifentanil and postoperative supplemental morphine. Nefopam group showed superior property over control and ketamine group in the postoperative VAS score and recovery index (alertness and respiratory drive), respectively. Nefopam group showed lower morphine consumption than ketamine group, but not significant. Conclusions Both nefopam and ketamine infusion may be useful in managing in postoperative pain control under concomitant infusion of remifentanil. However, nefopam may be preferred to ketamine in terms of sedation. PMID:27703629

  7. Post-anesthesia AMPA receptor potentiation prevents anesthesia-induced learning and synaptic deficits

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lianyan; Cichon, Joseph; Ninan, Ipe; Yang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that repeated exposure to general anesthesia during critical stages of brain development results in long-lasting behavioral deficits later in life. To date, there has been no effective treatment to mitigate the neurotoxic effects of anesthesia on brain development. By performing calcium imaging in the mouse motor cortex, we show that ketamine anesthesia causes a marked and prolonged reduction in neuronal activity during the period of post-anesthesia recovery. Administration of the AMPAkine drug CX546 [1-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-ylcarbonyl)piperidine] to potentiate AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor activity during emergence from anesthesia in mice enhances neuronal activity and prevents long-term motor learning deficits induced by repeated neonatal anesthesia. In addition, we show that CX546 administration also ameliorates various synaptic deficits induced by anesthesia, including reductions in synaptic expression of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) and AMPA receptor subunits, motor training-evoked neuronal activity, and dendritic spine remodeling associated with motor learning. Together, our results indicate that pharmacologically enhancing neuronal activity during the post-anesthesia recovery period could effectively reduce the adverse effects of early-life anesthesia. PMID:27334260

  8. Immobilization of swift foxes with ketamine hydrochloride-xylazine hydrochloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Telesco, R.L.; Sovada, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop field immobilization techniques that allow researchers to handle safely swift foxes (Vulpes velox) with minimal risk of stress or injury. We immobilized captive swift foxes to determine the safety and effectiveness of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride at different dosages. We attempted to determine appropriate dosages to immobilize swift foxes for an adequate field-handling period based on three anesthesia intervals (induction period, immobilization period, and recovery period) and physiologic responses (rectal temperature, respiration rate, and heart rate). Between October 1998-July 1999, we conducted four trials, evaluating three different dosage ratios of ketamine and xylazine (2.27:1.2, 5.68:1.2, and 11.4:1.2 mg/kg ketamine:mg/kg xylazine, respectively), followed by a fourth trial with a higher dosage at the median ratio (11.4 mg/kg ketamine:2.4 mg/kg xylazine). We found little difference in induction and recovery periods among trials 1-3, but immobilization time increased with increasing dosage (P<0.08). Both the immobilization period and recovery period increased in trial 4 compared with trials 1-3 (P???0.03). There was a high variation in responses of individual foxes across trials, making it difficult to identify an appropriate dosage for field handling. Heart rate and respiration rates were depressed but all physiologic measures remained within normal parameters established for domestic canids. We recommend a dosage ratio of 10 mg/kg ketamine to 1 mg/kg xylazine to immobilize swift foxes for field handling.

  9. Efficacy and Acceptability of Different Auxiliary Drugs in Pediatric Sevoflurane Anesthesia: A Network Meta-analysis of Mixed Treatment Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuchao; Huang, Panchuan; Gao, Weiwei; Cao, Fangli; Yi, Mingling; Chen, Liyong; Guo, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Emergence agitation preventive medicine should be combined with pediatric anesthesia because of the high frequency of emergence agitation. However, it is challenging to determine the most appropriate medication that can be introduced into pediatric anesthesia for the sake of emergence agitation prevention. We reviewed and retrieved the data from PubMed and Embase. Various medications were assessed based on several endpoints including Emergence agitation outcomes (EA), postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), the number of patients who required analgesic (RA), pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium (PAED), the extubation time, the emergency time and the duration of post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) stay. Both traditional and network meta-analysis were carried in this study. A total of 45 articles were complied with the selection criteria and the corresponding articles were reviewed. Fentanyl demonstrated the highest cumulative ranking probability which was followed by those of ketamine and dexmedetomidine with respect to EA and PAED. When PONV and RA were concerned together, clonidine exhibited the highest cumulative ranking probability compared to other medications. Our study suggested that dexmedetomidine perhaps is the most appropriate prophylactic treatment which can be introduced into anesthesia for preventing emergence agitation. PMID:27830713

  10. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J; da Cunha, Anderson F; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery.

  11. Ketamine in outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery: Effects on postoperative pain, hemodynamic stability and process times

    PubMed Central

    Schotola, Hanna; Kirsch, Karl-Christian; Höcker, Jan; Egan, Michael; Büttner, Benedikt; Wiese, Christoph; Mansur, Ashham; Hinz, José Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery is often severe, and establishing a pain treatment regimen that does not delay discharge can be challenging. The reported ability of ketamine to prevent opioid-induced hyperalgesia has not been investigated in this particular setting. Methods 300 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy under general anesthesia were recruited for this observational clinical trial and were allotted to either receive 1mg/kg IV bolus of ketamine before surgery (ketamine group, KG) or to a control group (CG) without ketamine. NRS pain scores were obtained on the operative day and on postoperative days 1 and 2 and compared between groups. Secondary variables were blood pressure, heart rate, process times, satisfaction with the anesthetic and unwanted effects. Results Pain severity did not differ significantly between the groups at any time. Propofol injection rate and cumulative dose were higher in the KG. Heart rates and blood pressures were similar. Time to emergence and time in PACU were longer and vomiting was more frequent in patients given ketamine. Conclusion Preoperative low-dose ketamine added to a general anesthetic does not reduce perioperative pain after outpatient shoulder arthroscopy. It increases procedural times and the incidence of PONV.

  12. Estimation of the contribution of norketamine to ketamine-induced acute pain relief and neurocognitive impairment in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Olofsen, Erik; Noppers, Ingeborg; Niesters, Marieke; Kharasch, Evan; Aarts, Leon; Sarton, Elise; Dahan, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-D-receptor antagonist ketamine is metabolized in the liver into its active metabolite norketamine. No human data are available on the relative contribution of norketamine to ketamine-induced analgesia and side effects. One approach to assess the ketamine and norketamine contributions is by measuring ketamine-effect at varying ketamine and norketamine plasma concentrations using the CYP450 inducer rifampicin. Methods In 12 healthy male volunteers the effect of rifampicin versus placebo pretreatment on S-ketamine (a 2-h infusion of 20 mg/h)-induced analgesia and cognition was quantified. The relative ketamine and norketamine contribution to effect was estimated using a linear additive population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model. Results S-ketamine produced significant analgesia, psychotropic effects (drug high), and cognitive impairment (including memory impairment, reduced psychomotor speed, reduced reaction time, reduced cognitive flexibility). Modeling revealed a negative contribution of S-norketamine to S-ketamine-induced analgesia and absence of contribution to cognitive impairment. At ketamine and norketamine effect concentrations of 100 ng/ml and 50 ng/ml, respectievly, the ketamine contribution to analgesia is −3.8 cm (visual analogue pain score) versus a contribution of norketamine of +1.5 cm, causing an overall effect −2.3 cm. The blood-effect-site equilibration half-life ranged from 0 (cognitive flexibility) to 11.8 (pain intensity) min, and averaged across all end-points was 6.1 min. Conclusions This first observation that norketamine produces effects in the opposite direction of ketamine requires further proof. It can explain the observation of ketamine-related excitatory phenomena (such as hyperalgesia and allodynia) upon the termination of ketamine infusions. PMID:22692377

  13. [S-(+)-Ketamine and circulation].

    PubMed

    Zielmann, S; Kazmaier, S; Schnüll, S; Weyland, A

    1997-03-01

    The S-(+) isomer of ketamine has about twice the analgesic potency of the clinically used racemic mixture. Therefore, the known side effects may be reduced when one-half of the usual dose is administered. Several prospective, randomised, and double-blinded studies have been performed to assess whether the S-(+) isomer of ketamine is superior to the racemic mixture with respect to circulatory side effects. Studies in young, healthy volunteers showed that heart rate (HR) and arterial blood pressure (ABP) rise significantly after injection of 2 mg/kg ketamine racemate and 1 mg/kg S-(+) isomer without any significant difference between groups. In the study of Doenicke et al. plasma levels of adrenaline (A) were higher in the racemate group, whereas no difference was found in elevated plasma levels of noradrenaline (NA). Premedication with midazolam blunted major haemodynamic changes. The investigation of Adams et al. confirmed that HR and ABP rise significantly after injection of 2 mg/kg ketamine racemate and 1 mg/kg S-(+) isomer without any significant difference between groups. In this study, no differences were found between groups concerning elevated plasma levels of A and NA. A further study in healthy volunteers also showed comparable haemodynamic changes following i.m.injection of 1.0 mg/kg ketamine racemate or 0.5 mg/kg S-(+) isomer without any significant difference between groups. In a previous clinical study including 40 elderly patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery, total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) was performed with S-(+)-ketamine or ketamine racemate as an analgesic compound. For induction of TIVA, patients received 0.1 mg/kg midazolam and 1 mg/kg S-(+)-ketamine or 2 mg/kg racemic ketamine, respectively. Throughout surgery, a continuous infusion of 2 mg/kg per hour S-(+)-ketamine or 4 mg/kg racemic ketamine was administered. Three patients in the racemate group showed severe arterial hypertension after induction of anaesthesia and were

  14. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats

    PubMed Central

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat, to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, while under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were largely uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas, but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS as compared to ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. PMID:22016533

  15. Short-Term Effects of Ketamine and Isoflurane on Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction in an Experimental Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wessler, Benjamin; Madias, Christopher; Pandian, Natesa; Link, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. General anesthesia is an essential element of experimental medical procedures. Ketamine and isoflurane are agents commonly used to induce and maintain anesthesia in animals. The cardiovascular effects of these anesthetic agents are diverse, and the response of global myocardial function is unknown. Methods. In a series of 15 swine, echocardiography measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were obtained before the animals received anesthesia (baseline), after an intramuscular injection of ketamine (postketamine) and after inhaled isoflurane (postisoflurane). Results. The mean LVEF of an unanesthetized swine was 47 ± 3%. There was a significant decrease in the mean LVEF after administration of ketamine to 41 + 6.5% (P = 0.003). The addition of inhaled isoflurane did not result in further decrease in mean LVEF (mean LVEF 38 ± 7.2%, P = 0.22). Eight of the swine had an increase in their LVEF with sympathetic stimulation. Conclusions. In our experimental model the administration of ketamine was associated with decreased LV function. The decrease may be largely secondary to a blunting of sympathetic tone. The addition of isoflurane to ketamine did not significantly change LV function. A significant number of animals had returned to preanesthesia LV function with sympathetic stimulation. PMID:22347646

  16. Anesthesia for outpatient female sterilization.

    PubMed

    Fishburne, J I

    1983-04-01

    This issue of the Bulletin deals with the principles of anesthesia for outpatient female sterilization with emphasis on techniques for laparoscopy and minilaparotomy. General anesthesia techniques provide analgesia, amnesia, and muscle relaxation and are particularly useful for managing the anxious patient. Disadvantages include increased expense, need for specialized equipment, and highly trained personnel, and delayed recovery. Complications, though relatively rare, can be life-threatening and include aspiration of stomach contents, hypoxia, hypercarbia, hypotension, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiorespiratory arrest, and death. There is no single preferred technique of general anesthesia, athough most anesthetists employ methods that allow rapid recovery of faculties, enabling the patient to be discharged soon after surgery. To accomplish this end, light anesthesia with sodium thiopental induction and nitrous oxide maintenance is often used. Short duration muscle relaxation with an agent such as succinylcholine supplements this technique. Other techniques include light anesthesia with inhalational anesthetic agents and the use of intravenous ketamine. Local anesthesia augmented by systemic and/or inhalational analgesia is supplanting general anesthesia techniques for laparoscopy in many locales. This approach is also particularly well-suited for minilaparotomy in developing countries, where it has achieved its greatest popularity. The local technique carries with it reduced morbidity and mortality but may not entirely relieve discomfort. The primary danger of local anesthesia is respiratory depression due to excessive narcosis and sedation. The operator must be alert to the action of the drugs and should always use the minimal effective dose. Although toxicity due to overdosage with local anesthetic drugs is occasionally experienced, allergic reactions to the amide-linkage drugs such as lidocaine or bupivacaine are exceedingly rare. For outpatient

  17. KETAMINE ABREACTION : A NEW APPROACH TO NARCOANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Golechha, G.R.; Sethi, I.C.; Misra, S.L.; Jayaprakash, N.P.

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY Ketamine is a parenterally administered non barbiturate anaesthetic agent, in use for more than a decade. It is a safer than Na Pentothal. Administered intramuscularly, in dose of 6 to 15 mgm/Kg body wt. it produces dissociative anaesthesia. But, in smaller sub anaesthetic doses it may act as an abreactant. We report in this study the abreaction effect of Ketamine in dose of .5 to 1.5 mgm/kg body wt. given intramuscularly in 30 selected psychiatric cases requiring narcoanalysis for diagnostic or therapeutic purpose. The results are compared with another ten cases subjected to pentothal interview and five cases subjected to narcoanalysis with intravenous Na Amytal and methidrine. Our findings suggest that Ketamine has property of an efficacious abreactant in doses of 1 to 1.5 mgm/kg body wt. administered intramuscularly and can successfully be used for narcoanalysis in properly selected cases as a good substitute for intravenous pentothal or sodium amytal with methidrine. The relative cardio respiratory safety and ease of administration are its two added advantages. PMID:21927193

  18. Comparison of nasal Midazolam with Ketamine versus nasal Midazolam as a premedication in children

    PubMed Central

    Khatavkar, Sonal S.; Bakhshi, Rochana G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was done to compare effects of intranasal midazolam and intranasal midazolam with ketamine for premedication of children aged 1-12 yrs undergoing intermediate and major surgeries. Aims: Midazolam and Ketamine have already been used as premedicants in children. Our aim was to find out advantage of combination of midazolam with ketamine over midazolam by nasal route. Methods: Sixty children of age group 1-12 yrs of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade 1 and 2 were selected. Group A- midazolam (0.2 mg/kg), Group B- midazolam (0.15 mg/kg + ketamine 1 mg/kg). Both groups received drug intranasally 30 min before surgery in recovery room with monitored anesthesia care. Onset of sedation, sedation score, emotional reaction, intravenous cannula acceptance, and mask acceptance were studied. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired t test and chi square test. Results: Sedation score, anxiolysis, attitude, reaction to intravenous cannulation, face mask acceptance, and emotional reaction were significantly better in midazolam with ketamine group. Intra operatively, in both groups, pulse rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate had no significant difference; also, post operatively, no significant difference was observed in above parameters, post operative analgesia was significantly better in midazolam with ketamine group. Conclusions: Intra nasal premedication allows rapid and predictable sedation in children. Midazolam as well as combination of Midazolam with ketamine gives good level of sedation and comfort. But quality of sedation, analgesia, and comfort is significantly better in midazolam with ketamine group. No significant side effects were observed in both groups. PMID:24665234

  19. A Pilot Study of Ketamine versus Midazolam/Fentanyl Sedation in Children Undergoing GI Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lightdale, Jenifer R.; Mitchell, Paul D.; Fredette, Meghan E.; Mahoney, Lisa B.; Zgleszewski, Steven E.; Scharff, Lisa; Fox, Victor L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Ketamine sedation has been found superior by physician report to traditional sedation regimens for pediatric endoscopy. Goal. To objectively compare sedation with ketamine versus midazolam/fentanyl for children undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy. Study. Patients received one of two regimens and were independently monitored using a standardized rating scale. Results. There were 2 episodes of laryngospasm during ketamine sedation. Univariate analyses showed patients sedated with ketamine (n = 17) moved more (median 25% of procedure time versus 8%, P = .03) and required similar low levels of restraint (0.83% versus 0.25%, P = .4) as patients sedated with midazolam/fentanyl (n = 20). Age-adjusted analyses suggested that patients sedated with ketamine were comparably more quiet (P = .002). Conclusions. A pilot trial of ketamine at our institution was associated with episodes of laryngospasm. In addition, children sedated with ketamine moved and required restraint similarly to patients sedated with midazolam/fentanyl. Physician perceptions may be affected by the fact that children who received ketamine were less likely to vocalize distress. PMID:21760813

  20. Effects of a midazolam-ketamine admixture in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Kanri, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    As the ideal sedative does not exist for all situations, we examined the effect of a midazolam-ketamine sedoanalgesic admixture in human volunteers. Ten ASA physical status I volunteers were administered loading doses of 0.07 mg/kg of midazolam followed by 0.7 mg/kg of ketamine. The same amount of midazolam and ketamine was then infused constantly over 1 hour via a 60 drops (gtts)/mL i.v. infusion set. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma catecholamine levels. Respiration rate and oxygen saturation did not alter significantly from baseline levels. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure remained stable with an increase of 15% in heart rate and 6% in systolic blood pressure only at 10 minutes following the bolus loading. Diastolic blood pressure did not alter significantly from baseline levels (P < .05). Plasma catecholamines levels remained stable except for an increase in epinephrine (38%) and norepinephrine (19%) 10 minutes following the bolus injections. Plasma dopamine levels remained unchanged. There were no cases of unpleasant dreaming, dysphoria, or emergence-type reactions. This combined nonnarcotic sedoanalgesic technique maintains spontaneous ventilation and stable cardiorespiratory parameters and may be considered as an alternative to traditional conscious sedation or general anesthesia.

  1. Effects of a midazolam-ketamine admixture in human volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Kanri, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    As the ideal sedative does not exist for all situations, we examined the effect of a midazolam-ketamine sedoanalgesic admixture in human volunteers. Ten ASA physical status I volunteers were administered loading doses of 0.07 mg/kg of midazolam followed by 0.7 mg/kg of ketamine. The same amount of midazolam and ketamine was then infused constantly over 1 hour via a 60 drops (gtts)/mL i.v. infusion set. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma catecholamine levels. Respiration rate and oxygen saturation did not alter significantly from baseline levels. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure remained stable with an increase of 15% in heart rate and 6% in systolic blood pressure only at 10 minutes following the bolus loading. Diastolic blood pressure did not alter significantly from baseline levels (P < .05). Plasma catecholamines levels remained stable except for an increase in epinephrine (38%) and norepinephrine (19%) 10 minutes following the bolus injections. Plasma dopamine levels remained unchanged. There were no cases of unpleasant dreaming, dysphoria, or emergence-type reactions. This combined nonnarcotic sedoanalgesic technique maintains spontaneous ventilation and stable cardiorespiratory parameters and may be considered as an alternative to traditional conscious sedation or general anesthesia. PMID:15497296

  2. Sedation and anesthesia of hatchling leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) for auditory evoked potential measurement in air and in water.

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; Piniak, Wendy E D; Eckert, Scott A; Stringer, Elizabeth M

    2014-03-01

    Sedation or anesthesia of hatchling leatherback sea turtles was employed to acquire auditory evoked potential (AEP) measurements in air and in water to assess their hearing sensitivity in relation to potential consequences from anthropogenic noise. To reduce artifacts in AEP collection caused by muscle movement, hatchlings were sedated with midazolam 2 or 3 mg/kg i.v. for in-air (n = 7) or in-water (n = 11) AEP measurements; hatchlings (n = 5) were anesthetized with ketamine 6 mg/kg and dexmedetomidine 30 microg/kg i.v. reversed with atipamezole 300 microg/kg, half i.m. and half i.v. for in-air AEP measurements. Midazolam-sedated turtles were also physically restrained with a light elastic wrap. For in-water AEP measurements, sedated turtles were brought to the surface every 45-60 sec, or whenever they showed intention signs for breathing, and not submerged again until they took a breath. Postprocedure temperature-corrected venous blood pH, pCO2, pO2, and HCO3- did not differ among groups, although for the midazolam-sedated in-water group, pCO2 trended lower, and in the ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthetized group there was one turtle considered clinically acidotic (temperature-corrected pH = 7.117). Venous blood lactate was greater for hatchlings recently emerged from the nest than for turtles sedated with midazolam in air, with the other two groups falling intermediate between, but not differing significantly from the high and low lactate groups. Disruptive movements were less frequent with anesthesia than with sedation in the in-air group. Both sedation with midazolam and anesthesia with ketamine-dexmedetomidine were successful for allowing AEP measurements in hatchling leatherback sea turtles. Sedation allowed the turtle to protect its airway voluntarily while limiting flipper movement. Midazolam or ketamine-dexmedetomidine (and reversal with atipamezole) would be useful for other procedures requiring minor or major restraint in leatherback sea turtle hatchlings

  3. Anesthetic and pathological changes following high doses of ketamine and xylazine in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Marie-Chantal; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Vachon, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of ketamine and xylazine in aging rats when coadministered intraperitoneally at high anesthetic doses. Three groups (n=6 rats/group) consisting of rats at 3, 6 and 12 months of age were used. During anesthesia, animals were monitored for heart rate, respiratory frequency, blood oxygen saturation, and rectal temperature. The corneal and paw withdrawal reflex were also examined during anesthesia. During anesthesia, withdrawal and corneal reflexes were absent for progressively longer durations with increasing age. Significant decreases in cardiac and respiratory frequency and, blood oxygen saturation occurred for the 6- and 12-month-old animals. Respiratory frequency and blood oxygen saturation returned to normal at the end of the anesthesia; however, the significant decrease in cardiac frequency persisted in the 6- and 12-month-old animals. Rectal temperature was decreased significantly only in the 3-month-old animals. Pulmonary edema and effusion occurred in 50% of the 12-month-old animals. In conclusion, if ketamine-xylazine are used for anesthesia, the doses should be optimized for the age of the subjects prior to initiation of the research project.

  4. Types of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Types of Anesthesia KidsHealth > For Teens > Types of Anesthesia A A ... I Get? en español Tipos de anestesia About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: ...

  5. Types of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Types of Anesthesia KidsHealth > For Teens > Types of Anesthesia Print A ... I Get? en español Tipos de anestesia About Anesthesia Anesthesia is broken down into three main categories: ...

  6. Antidepressant Potential of (R)-Ketamine in Rodent Models: Comparison with (S)-Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Kenichi; Toki, Hidetoh; Iijima, Michihiko; Hashihayata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi; Hashimoto, Kenji; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2017-04-01

    The rapid-acting and long-lasting antidepressant effects of (R,S)-ketamine have recently gained much attention. Although (S)-ketamine has been studied as an active isomer, recent evidence suggests that (R)-ketamine exhibits longer-lasting antidepressant effects than (S)-ketamine in rodents. However, the antidepressant potential of (R)-ketamine has not been fully addressed. In the present study, we compared the antidepressant effects of (R)-ketamine with those of (S)-ketamine in animal models of depression, including a model that is refractory to current medications. Both (R)-ketamine and (S)-ketamine exhibited antidepressant effects at 30 minutes as well as at 24 hours after administration in forced-swimming and tail-suspension tests in mice. At 48 hours after administration, however, (R)-ketamine still exerted a significant antidepressant effect in the tail-suspension test, whereas the effect of (S)-ketamine was no longer observed. Moreover, (R)-ketamine, but not (S)-ketamine, significantly reversed the depressive-like behavior induced by repeated treatments with corticosterone in rats at 24 hours after a single administration. This effect was attenuated by an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, suggesting the involvement of AMPA receptor stimulation in the effects. Both (R)-ketamine and (S)-ketamine exhibited practically the same exposure levels in plasma, brain, and cerebrospinal fluid in mice and rats, and both compounds were rapidly eliminated from plasma (<4-8 hours). The present results confirmed the previous findings that (R)-ketamine exerted longer-lasting antidepressant effects than (S)-ketamine in animal models of depression. Moreover, our study is the first to demonstrate that (R)-ketamine exerted a sustained antidepressant effect even in a model that is refractory to currently prescribed antidepressants.

  7. Rapid-acting glutamatergic antidepressants: the path to ketamine and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, John H.; Sanacora, Gerard; Duman, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional antidepressants require many weeks to reveal their therapeutic effects. However, the widely replicated observation that a single subanesthetic dose of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist, ketamine, produced meaningful clinical improvement within hours suggested that rapidly acting antidepressants might be possible. The ketamine studies stimulated a new generation of basic antidepressant research that identified new neural signaling mechanisms in antidepressant response and provided a conceptual framework linking a group of novel antidepressant mechanisms. This article presents the path that led to the testing of ketamine, considers its promise as an antidepressant, and reviews novel treatment mechanisms that are emerging from this line of research. PMID:23726151

  8. A comparison of ketamine versus etomidate for procedural sedation for the reduction of large joint dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Salen, Philip; Grossman, Michelle; Grossman, Michael; Milazzo, Anthony; Stoltzfus, Jill

    2016-01-01

    were myoclonus (1/46, 2.2%, 15/33, 45.5%; P – 0.0001), assisted ventilation with airway manipulation (3/45, 6.7%; 9/33, 27.3%; P – 0.01), and pulsoximetry desaturation < 90% (0/46; 7/34, 20.6%; P – 0.002). There was no significant difference in recovery time from PS between the ketamine and etomidate cohorts (11 min vs. 10 min; P – 0.69). Conclusion: Ketamine produces PS conditions for successful large joint dislocation reduction that are adequate and comparable to etomidate. The increased likelihood of myoclonus, of the requirement for airway assistance, and of hypoxia observed with etomidate suggest potential benefits with the utilization of ketamine for PS for dislocated large joint reduction. PMID:27308256

  9. Obstetric analgesia and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fields, S A; Wall, E M

    1993-09-01

    A number of analgesic and anesthetic options are available for patients during the intrapartum period. Appropriate attention in the prenatal period to patient education regarding these options is imperative. If pharmacologic anesthesia is required, risks and benefits both to the mother and neonate must be considered. If cesarean section is necessary, consideration of regional or general anesthesia is appropriate. Women and their support people should be involved in the discussion of anesthesia and analgesic options. This discussion should begin during the prenatal period to ensure that the woman has an opportunity to make an informed choice. When the woman presents in labor, the anesthetic plan may again need to be revised. Continued patient-doctor communication throughout labor is essential with the woman's preferences, tempered by sound medical judgment, guiding optimal pain control.

  10. [Anesthesia awareness].

    PubMed

    Luengo J, Víctor; Zapata P, Carola; Delfino, Alejandro; Calderón, Jorge; González Tugas, Matías

    2010-03-01

    Anesthesia awareness, or "unintended intra-operative awareness" occurs during general anesthesia, on the operating table, when a patient has not had enough general anesthetic or analgesic to prevent consciousness or waking up during surgery. According to international studies its global incidence ranges from 0.1 to 0.2%. Its impact on people can be as severe as other traumatic experiences such as natural disasters, violent fights or sexual abuse. The prevalence of symptoms compatible with post traumatic stress disorder can be as high as 50%, after experiencing the awareness phenomenon. This paper reviews the main issues of the awareness phenomenon.

  11. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J.; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J.; Singh, Nagendra S.; Dossou, Katina S.S.; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L.; Wainer, Irving W.; Albuquerque, Edson X.; Thompson, Scott M.; Thomas, Craig J.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Gould, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts ~16 percent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite a number of available monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require many weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine), exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects following a single dose in depressed patients. Here we show that the metabolism of ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant actions in vivo. Notably, we demonstrate that these antidepressant actions are NMDAR inhibition-independent but they involve early and sustained α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor activation. We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side-effects. Our results indicate a novel mechanism underlying ketamine’s unique antidepressant properties, which involves the required activity of a distinct metabolite and is independent of NMDAR inhibition. These findings have relevance for the development of next generation, rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:27144355

  12. The interactive effects of ketamine and magnesium upon depressive-like pathology

    PubMed Central

    Razmjou, Sara; Litteljohn, Darcy; Rudyk, Chris; Syed, Shuaib; Clarke, Melanie; Pentz, Rowan; Dwyer, Zach; Hayley, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with major depressive disorders (MDDs) are resistant to current treatment methods, and the majority of cases relapse at some point during therapy. This has resulted in novel treatments being adopted, including subanesthetic doses of ketamine, which affects aberrant neuroplastic circuits, glutamatergic signaling, and the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Ketamine rapidly relieves depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant major depressive disorder patients with effects that last for up to 2 weeks even after a single administration. However, it is also a drug with an abusive potential and can have marked side effects. Hence, this study aimed at enhancing the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine (allowing for lower dosing regimens) by coadministering magnesium hydroaspartate (Mg2+ normally affects the same receptors as ketamine) and also assessed whether an Mg2+-deficient diet would modify the impact of ketamine. It was found that a single 15 mg/kg dose of ketamine did indeed induce rapid antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test but did not affect brain levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Contrary to our hypothesis, magnesium administration or deficiency did not influence the impact of ketamine on these outcomes. Thus, these data do not support the use of magnesium as an adjunct agent and instead suggest that further research involving other antidepressant and animal models is required to confirm the present findings. PMID:27660449

  13. Pretreatment with minocycline restores neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and subgranular zone of the hippocampus after ketamine exposure in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Giri, P K; Lei, Shan; Zheng, Juan; Li, Weisong; Wang, Ning; Chen, Xinlin; Lu, Haixia; Zuo, Zhiyi; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Pengbo

    2017-04-05

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia in pediatric patients. Recent studies indicated that ketamine exposure in the developing brain can induce neuroapoptosis and disturb normal neurogenesis, which will result in long-lasting cognitive impairment. Minocycline exerts neuroprotection against a wide range of toxic insults in neurodegenerative diseases models. In the present study, we investigated whether the disturbed neurogenesis and behavioural deficits after ketamine neonatal exposure could be alleviated by minocycline. Postnatal day(PND)7 Sprague-Dawley rat pups randomly received either normal saline, ketamine, or minocycline 30min prior to ketamine administration, respectively. The rats were decapitated at PND14 for the detection of neurogenesis in the subventricularzone(SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus by immunostaining. The protein expression of p-Akt, p-GSK-3β in the SVZ and SGZ at 12h after anesthesia, PND10 and PND14 were assessed by western blotting analysis. At PND 42-47, spatial learning and memory abilities were measured by the Morris water maze in all groups. Our data showed that ketamine exposure in neonatal rats resulted in neurogenetic damage and persistent cognitive deficits, and that pretreatment with minocycline eliminated the brain development damage and improved the behavioral function in adult rats. Moreover, the protection of minocycline is associated with the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  14. Effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation of postoperative patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Shuncui; Chen, Zhenyi; Lin, Shaoli

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation (EA) in postoperative gastric cancer patients. Materials and methods A total of 150 patients with gastric cancer were included and divided into group B (1 mg butorphanol before anesthesia induction, n=50), group K (1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50), and group C (1 mg butorphanol combined with 1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) at the end of operation, just before extubation (T0) and at 0 minute (T1), 5 minutes (T2), and 30 minutes (T3) after extubation were compared. Statistical analysis of recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and EA incidence and adverse reactions were performed. Results There were no differences among groups with respect to MAP and HR at T0 and T1 (P>0.05). Compared with patients in group C, significant reduction of MAP and HR were observed in groups K and B at T2 and T3 (P<0.05), while no differences were found between group K and group B (P>0.05). Recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and incidence of EA in group C were significantly less than those in groups K and B (P<0.05), but no differences were observed between group K and group B (P>0.05). Total incidence of adverse reactions were significantly increased in group K compared to those in groups C and B (P<0.05). Conclusion Injection of ketamine combined with butorphanol before anesthesia induction was more effective than injection of ketamine or butorphanol separately in the prevention of EA. PMID:27217761

  15. Upregulation of miR-137 protects anesthesia-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Changshun; Zhang, Xingcai; Zheng, Jungang; Chen, Chunru; Chen, Yijun; Yi, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ketamine is commonly used in pediatric anesthesia but may cause neurodegeneration in young brains. The aim of the study is to use an animal model to characterize the role of microRNA 137 (miR-137) in ketamine-induced neurodegeneration in neonatal hippocampus. Methods: Young Sprague-Dawley Rats (1 month old) was systemically administrated with ketamine (75 mg/kg) for 3 days. TUNEL assay was used to assess the ketamine-induced neurodegeneration of hippocampal CA1 neurons, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to assess the expression of miR-137 and Morris water maze test (MWM) to assess the damaged memory function. Alternatively, lentivirus over-expressing miR-137 was injected into hippocampus before ketamine administration, and the subsequent effects of miR-137 upregulation on ketamine-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration and memory dysfunction were investigated. Furthermore, the direct downstream target of miR-137, CDC42, was down-regulated by siRNA injection into hippocampus. The effects of CDC42 inhibition on hippocampal apoptosis and memory function were also investigated. Results: Excessive ketamine treatment resulted in severe apoptosis in hippocampal CA1 neurons, downregulation of miR-137 in hippocampus and significant long-term memory dysfunction. Conversely, pre-treatment of overexpressing miR-137 protected hippocampal neurodegeneration and memory loss. The molecular target of miR-137, CDC42 was down-regulated by ketamine in hippocampus. Knocking down hippocampal CDC42 exerted an apoptotic effect on hippocampal neurons and memory loss, similar to the effect of ketamine treatment. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that miR-137 played an important role in regulating ketamine induced hippocampal neurodegeneration, possibly through CDC42. PMID:25197371

  16. Cortico-Cardio-Respiratory Network Interactions during Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shiogai, Yuri; Dhamala, Mukesh; Oshima, Kumiko; Hasler, Martin

    2012-01-01

    General anesthetics are used during medical and surgical procedures to reversibly induce a state of total unconsciousness in patients. Here, we investigate, from a dynamic network perspective, how the cortical and cardiovascular systems behave during anesthesia by applying nonparametric spectral techniques to cortical electroencephalography, electrocardiogram and respiratory signals recorded from anesthetized rats under two drugs, ketamine-xylazine (KX) and pentobarbital (PB). We find that the patterns of low-frequency cortico-cardio-respiratory network interactions may undergo significant changes in network activity strengths and in number of network links at different depths of anesthesia dependent upon anesthetics used. PMID:23028572

  17. Assessing the impact of state "opt-out" policy on access to and costs of surgeries and other procedures requiring anesthesia services.

    PubMed

    Schneider, John E; Ohsfeldt, Robert; Li, Pengxiang; Miller, Thomas R; Scheibling, Cara

    2017-12-01

    In 2001, the U.S. government released a rule that allowed states to "opt-out" of the federal requirement that a physician supervise the administration of anesthesia by a nurse anesthetist. To date, 17 states have opted out. The majority of the opt-out states cited increased access to anesthesia care as the primary rationale for their decision. In this study, we assess the impact of state opt-out policy on access to and costs of surgeries and other procedures requiring anesthesia services. Our null hypothesis is that opt-out rule adoption had little or no effect on surgery access or costs. We estimate an inpatient model of surgeries and costs and an outpatient model of surgeries. Each model uses data from multiple years of U.S. inpatient hospital discharges and outpatient surgeries. For inpatient cost models, the coefficient of the opt-out variable was consistently positive and also statistically significant in most model specifications. In terms of access to inpatient surgical care, the opt-out rules did not increase or decrease access in opt-out states. The results for the outpatient access models are less consistent, with some model specifications indicating a reduction in access associated with opt-out status, while other model specifications suggesting no discernable change in access. Given the sensitivity of model findings to changes in model specification, the results do not provide support for the belief that opt-out policy improves access to outpatient surgical care, and may even reduce access to outpatient surgical care (among freestanding facilities).

  18. GLYX-13 (rapastinel) ameliorates subchronic phencyclidine- and ketamine-induced declarative memory deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Burgdorf, Jeffrey S; Moskal, Joseph R; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2016-02-15

    GLYX-13 (rapastinel), a tetrapeptide (Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr-amide), has been reported to have fast acting antidepressant properties in man based upon its N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glycine site functional partial agonism. Ketamine, a non-competitive NMDAR antagonist, also reported to have fast acting antidepressant properties, produces cognitive impairment in rodents and man, whereas rapastinel has been reported to have cognitive enhancing properties in rodents, without impairing cognition in man, albeit clinical testing has been limited. The goal of this study was to compare the cognitive impairing effects of rapastinel and ketamine in novel object recognition (NOR), a measure of declarative memory, in male C57BL/6J mice treated with phencyclidine (PCP), another NMDAR noncompetitive antagonist known to severely impair cognition, in both rodents and man. C57BL/6J mice given a single dose or subchronic ketamine (30 mg/kg.i.p.) showed acute or persistent deficits in NOR, respectively. Acute i.v. rapastinel (1.0 mg/kg), did not induce NOR deficit. Pre-treatment with rapastinel significantly prevented acute ketamine-induced NOR deficit. Rapastinel (1.0 mg/kg, but not 0.3 mg/kg, iv) significantly reversed both subchronic ketamine- and subchronic PCP-induced NOR deficits. Rapastinel also potentiated the atypical antipsychotic drug with antidepressant properties, lurasidone, to restore NOR in subchronic ketamine-treated mice. These findings indicate that rapastinel, unlike ketamine, does not induce a declarative memory deficit in mice, and can prevent or reverse the ketamine-induced NOR deficit. Further study is required to determine if these differences translate during clinical use of ketamine and rapastinel as fast acting antidepressant drugs and if rapastinel could have non-ionotropic effects as an add-on therapy with antipsychotic/antidepressant medications.

  19. GLYX-13 (rapastinel) ameliorates subchronic phencyclidine- and ketamine-induced declarative memory deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Burgdorf, Jeffrey S.; Moskal, Joseph R.; Meltzer, Herbert Y.

    2016-01-01

    GLYX-13 (rapastinel), a tetrapeptide (Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr-amide), has been reported to have fast acting antidepressant properties in man based upon its N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glycine site functional partial agonism. Ketamine, a non-competitive NMDAR antagonist, also reported to have fast acting antidepressant properties, produces cognitive impairment in rodents and man, whereas rapastinel has been reported to have cognitive enhancing properties in rodents, without impairing cognition in man, albeit clinical testing has been limited. The goal of this study was to compare the cognitive impairing effects of rapastinel and ketamine in novel object recognition (NOR), a measure of declarative memory, in male C57BL/6J mice treated with phencyclidine (PCP), another NMDAR noncompetitive antagonist known to severely impair cognition, in both rodents and man. C57BL/6J mice given a single dose or subchronic ketamine (30 mg/kg. i.p.) showed acute or persistent deficits in NOR, respectively. Acute i.v. rapastinel (1.0 mg/kg), did not induce NOR deficit. Pre-treatment with rapastinel significantly prevented acute ketamine-induced NOR deficit. Rapastinel (1.0 mg/kg, but not 0.3 mg/kg, iv) significantly reversed both subchronic ketamine- and subchronic PCP-induced NOR deficits. Rapastinel also potentiated the atypical antipsychotic drug with antidepressant properties, lurasidone, to restore NOR in subchronic ketamine-treated mice. These findings indicate that rapastinel, unlike ketamine, does not induce a declarative memory deficit in mice, and can prevent or reverse the ketamine-induced NOR deficit. Further study is required to determine if these differences translate during clinical use of ketamine and rapastinel as fast acting antidepressant drugs and if rapastinel could have non-ionotropic effects as an add-on therapy with antipsychotic/antidepressant medications. PMID:26632337

  20. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J; Singh, Nagendra S; Dossou, Katina S S; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L; Wainer, Irving W; Albuquerque, Edson X; Thompson, Scott M; Thomas, Craig J; Zarate, Carlos A; Gould, Todd D

    2016-05-26

    Major depressive disorder affects around 16 per cent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite the availability of numerous monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require several weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive, glutamatergic NMDAR (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor) antagonist (R,S)-ketamine exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects after a single dose in patients with depression, but its use is associated with undesirable side effects. Here we show that the metabolism of (R,S)-ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant-related actions in mice. These antidepressant actions are independent of NMDAR inhibition but involve early and sustained activation of AMPARs (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors). We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side effects. Our data implicate a novel mechanism underlying the antidepressant properties of (R,S)-ketamine and have relevance for the development of next-generation, rapid-acting antidepressants.

  1. Anesthesia methods used by anesthetic specialists for circumcision cases

    PubMed Central

    Altaş, Cafer; Küçükosman, Gamze; Yurtlu, Bülent S.; Okyay, Rahşan D.; Aydın, Bengü G.; Pişkin, Özcan; Çimencan, Murat; Ayoğlu, Hilal; Hancı, Volkan; Özkoçak-Turan, Işıl

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the anesthesiologist’s choice for anesthesia techniques and drugs in circumcision and determine the preoperative examination, intraoperative monitoring techniques, postoperative analgesia methods, and common complications among anesthesiologists working in Turkey. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Bulent Ecevit University Hospital, Zonguldak, Turkey, between May and July 2012. Survey data were obtained via survey forms through electronic data over the web. The questionnaire consists of 20 questions. These questions included demographic data, methods of anesthesia for circumcision, postoperative analgesia methods, and monitoring methods. Results: The data were obtained from 206 anesthesiologists who agreed to participate in the survey. Circumcision was performed most frequently in the age group of 3-6 years old. It was found that 47% of routine preoperative laboratory tests were coagulation parameters and complete blood count tests. The most common method of anesthesia was laryngeal mask. The frequency of administration of regional anesthesia was 37.4%, and caudal block was more preferable. Bupivacaine as a local anesthetic in regional anesthesia and midazolam and ketamine were the most preferred agents in sedoanalgesia. During regional anesthesia, ultrasound was most often used by anesthesiologists (31.6%). Conclusion: Ambulatory anesthesia protocols, which are also needed in circumcision, can be improved with international recommendation, and these protocols could be conformed as sociocultural structure in societies. This study should be regarded as a preliminary study to attract attention on anesthesia techniques in circumcision. PMID:28042634

  2. Ketamine: stimulating antidepressant treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Byrow, Yulisha; Cassidy, Frederick; Cipriani, Andrea; Demyttenaere, Koen; Frye, Mark A.; Gitlin, Michael; Kennedy, Sidney H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Lam, Raymond W.; McShane, Rupert; Mitchell, Alex J.; Ostacher, Michael J.; Rizvi, Sakina J.; Thase, Michael E.; Tohen, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Summary The appeal of ketamine – in promptly ameliorating depressive symptoms even in those with non-response – has led to a dramatic increase in its off-label use. Initial promising results await robust corroboration and key questions remain, particularly concerning its long-term administration. It is, therefore, timely to review the opinions of mood disorder experts worldwide pertaining to ketamine’s potential as an option for treating depression and provide a synthesis of perspectives – derived from evidence and clinical experience – and to consider strategies for future investigations. Declaration of interests G.S.M. Grant/research support: National Health Medical Research Council, NSW Health, Ramsay Health, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly & Co, Organon, Pfizer, Servier, and Wyeth; has been a speaker for Abbott, AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly & Co, Janssen Cilag, Lundbeck, Pfizer, Ranbaxy, Servier, and Wyeth; consultant: AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly & Co, Janssen Cilag, Lundbeck, and Servier. M.A.F. Grant support: AssureRx, Janssen Research & Development, Mayo Foundation, Myriad, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Pfizer. Consultant (Mayo): Janssen Research & Development, LLC, Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Myriad Genetics, Neuralstem Inc., Sunovion, Supernus Pharmaceuticals, Teva Pharmaceuticals. CME/travel support: American Physician Institute, CME Outfitters. Financial interest/Mayo Clinic 2016: AssureRx. S.H.K. Grant/research support: Brain Canada, Bristol Meyer Squibb, CIHR, Janssen, Johnson & Johnson, Lundbeck, Ontario Brain Institute, Pfizer, Servier, St. Jude Medical, Sunovion. T.A.K. Grant/research support (through Stanford University): Sunovion Pharmaceuticals and Merck & Co., Inc.; consultant/advisory board bember: Allergan, Inc., Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc., and Sunovion Pharmaceuticals; lecture honoraria (not

  3. The Antidepressant Effects of an mGlu2/3 Receptor Antagonist and Ketamine Require AMPA Receptor Stimulation in the mPFC and Subsequent Activation of the 5-HT Neurons in the DRN

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Kenichi; Iijima, Michihiko; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    We have reported the antidepressant effects of both metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists and ketamine in several animal models, and proposed that serotonergic (5-HTergic) transmission is involved in these actions. Given that the projections from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), where the majority of serotonin (5-HT) neurons exist, are reportedly involved in the antidepressant effects, in this study, we investigated using the forced swimming test (FST) of C57BL/6J male mice, the role of 5-HT neurons in the DRN regulated by the mPFC–DRN projections in the antidepressant effects of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495, and ketamine. Following systemic administration/microinjection into the mPFC, both LY341495 and ketamine were found to exert antidepressant effects in the FST, and the effects were attenuated by depletion of 5-HT by treatment with an inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, PCPA. The antidepressant effects of LY341495 and ketamine were also blocked by systemic administration/microinjection into the mPFC of an AMPA receptor antagonist, NBQX. Moreover, systemic administration/microinjection into the mPFC of LY341495 and ketamine significantly increased the c-Fos expression in the 5-HT neurons in the DRN, and the effect of systemic administration of these drugs on the neuronal c-Fos expression was attenuated by microinjection of NBQX into the mPFC. Our findings suggest that activation of 5-HT neurons in the DRN regulated by stimulation of the AMPA receptor in the mPFC may be involved in the antidepressant effects of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist and ketamine. PMID:26245499

  4. Ketamine enantiomers in the rapid and sustained antidepressant effects

    PubMed Central

    Muller, John; Pentyala, Sahana; Dilger, James; Pentyala, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine shows significant therapeutic effects in major depression and bipolar disorder. This effect is especially important in treatment-resistant depression and depression with suicidal ideation. In this review we explain the mechanism of action, drug efficacy, and the side effects of ketamine; the antidepressive effects of ketamine; the individual effects of ketamine isomers, R(–) ketamine and S(+) ketamine; the effects of the combination of ketamine with electroconvulsive therapy; and the possible use of ketamine in treating depression. PMID:27354907

  5. Sufentanil infusion before extubation suppresses coughing on emergence without delaying extubation time and reduces postoperative analgesic requirement without increasing nausea and vomiting after desflurane anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jea Yeun; Lim, Byung Gun; Park, Hye Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Background Coughing, hypertension, tachycardia, and even laryngospasm can occur due to airway irritation during emergence from anesthesia. We investigated the effect of maintaining a sufentanil infusion during emergence from anesthesia by evaluating the incidence of cough and recovery profiles at extubation. Methods In total, eighty-four patients undergoing an elective laparoscopic hysterectomy were randomly divided into two sufentanil groups and a control group. During emergence, sufentanil was administered in the sufentanil groups at a rate of 0.2 µg/kg/hr (Group S1) or 0.3 µg/kg/hr (Group S2), and saline was administered to the control group. Cough score, hemodynamic changes, and recovery profiles, such as duration from skin closure to a bispectral index of 80, to eye opening at verbal command, to tracheal extubation and the total duration of study solution infusion, were recorded. The pain score, the total volume of administered patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), and the postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) score were evaluated 1, 6, and 24 hours after surgery. Results Groups S1 and S2 showed significantly lower cough scores and smaller hemodynamic changes on extubation compared to Group C. Recovery profiles showed no significant differences among the three groups. Pain score, PONV at 1 hour postoperatively, and the total volume of PCA administered at all evaluation times were significantly lower in Groups S1 and S2 than in the control group. However, pain score, and PONV at 6 hours and 24 hours postoperatively showed no significant differences. Conclusions A sufentanil infusion (0.2-0.3 µg/kg/hr) during emergence from desflurane anesthesia may suppress coughing on extubation in patients with body mass indexes (BMI) of 21-26 without delaying extubation time. It may also reduce the postoperative analgesic requirement without increasing PONV. PMID:22778885

  6. Anesthesia and critical-care delivery in weightlessness: A challenge for research in parabolic flight analogue space surgery studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Chad G.; Keaney, Marilyn A.; Chun, Rosaleen; Groleau, Michelle; Tyssen, Michelle; Keyte, Jennifer; Broderick, Timothy J.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.

    2010-03-01

    BackgroundMultiple nations are actively pursuing manned exploration of space beyond low-earth orbit. The responsibility to improve surgical care for spaceflight is substantial. Although the use of parabolic flight as a terrestrial analogue to study surgery in weightlessness (0 g) is well described, minimal data is available to guide the appropriate delivery of anesthesia. After studying anesthetized pigs in a 0 g parabolic flight environment, our group developed a comprehensive protocol describing prolonged anesthesia in a parabolic flight analogue space surgery study (PFASSS). Novel challenges included a physically remote vivarium, prolonged (>10 h) anesthetic requirements, and the provision of veterinary operating room/intensive care unit (ICU) equivalency on-board an aircraft with physical dimensions of <1.5 m 2 (Falcon 20). Identification of an effective anesthetic regime is particularly important because inhalant anesthesia cannot be used in-flight. MethodsAfter ethical approval, multiple ground laboratory sessions were conducted with combinations of anesthetic, pre-medication, and induction protocols on Yorkshire-cross specific pathogen-free (SPF) pigs. Several constant rate infusion (CRI) intravenous anesthetic combinations were tested. In each regimen, opioids were administered to ensure analgesia. Ventilation was supported mechanically with blended gradients of oxygen. The best performing terrestrial 1 g regime was flight tested in parabolic flight for its effectiveness in sustaining optimal and prolonged anesthesia, analgesia, and maintaining hemodynamic stability. Each flight day, a fully anesthetized, ventilated, and surgically instrumented pig was transported to the Flight Research Laboratory (FRL) in a temperature-controlled animal ambulance. A modular on-board surgical/ICU suite with appropriate anesthesia/ICU and surgical support capabilities was employed. ResultsThe mean duration of anesthesia (per flight day) was 10.28 h over four consecutive days

  7. A study to compare the overall effectiveness between midazolam and dexmedetomidine during monitored anesthesia care: A randomized prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Mohd. Asim; Punera, Dinesh Chandra; Bano, Mehar; Palaria, Urmila; Tyagi, Abhilasha; Sharma, Shatrunjay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Monitored anesthesia care (MAC) combines intravenous sedation along with local anesthetic infiltration or nerve block. Several drugs have been used for MAC, but all are associated with complications. Dexmedetomidine is a selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist with both sedative and analgesic properties and is devoid of respiratory depressant effects. Its short elimination half-life makes it an attractive agent for sedation during MAC. Aim: Comparative evaluation of dexmedetomidine and midazolam for MAC. Methods: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 50 American Society of Anesthesiologist I and II patients undergoing a surgical or diagnostic procedure of <1 h requiring MAC were enrolled. Dexmedetomidine-ketamine (Group “KD”) patients (n = 25) received intravenous (I.V.) dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/kg over 10 min followed by 0.5 mg/kg of I.V. ketamine. Midazolam-ketamine patients (n = 25) received I.V. midazolam 0.05 mg/kg over 10 min followed by 0.5 mg/kg of I.V. ketamine to get a targeted level of sedation (≤4 using Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale score). Inadequate sedation (e.g., 15% increase in mean arterial blood pressure or heart rate, decrease in degree of calmness, increase in respiratory rate, physical movement) was treated by a ketamine bolus of 0.5 mg/kg as a rescue analgesia. Statistical Analysis: The statistical tests used in the study are unpaired Student's t-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Mann–Whitney test was used to assess the patient and surgeon satisfaction. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Value of P < 0.05 is considered significant and P < 0.0001 as highly significant. Results: Clinically desired sedation and analgesia was achieved earlier and better with dexmedetomidine. Patients and surgeons satisfaction were significantly higher with dexmedetomidine. The requirement of additional sedation and analgesia was less in dexmedetomidine (KD

  8. Comparing the effect of ketamine and benzydamine gargling with placebo on post-operative sore throat: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Poornajafian, Alireza; Nikzad, Naghme

    2014-01-01

    Background: Air way intubation for general anesthesia usually leads to sore throat after surgery. Ketamine plays an important role to block a number of receptors related to pain. Benzydamine hydrochloride is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been used to improve oropharyngeal disorders. In this study, it was intended to compare the effect of gargling different solutions before the surgery on post-operative sore throat (POST) in patients who underwent general anesthesia for hysterectomy. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 patients who underwent the elective hysterectomy were entered to the randomized controlled trial regarding to the eligibility criteria. Patients were simply randomly allocated to three groups and received one code. Every code was representative for a specific drug: 20 cc normal saline (control group) or 1.5 mg benzydamine in 20 cc solution or 20 mg ketamine in 20 cc solutions. All the research teams were blinded to the received solutions. POST was evaluated with numerical rating scale. The data were entered to SPSS software and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test, were performed. Results: The mean ages of ketamine, benzydamine, and normal saline recipients were not significantly different. The trend of the severity of sore throat during the first 24 h after the operation in ketamine recipients was significantly lower than the other two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The pain scale after surgery was reduced by using both ketamine and benzydamine, but the ketamine effect was more noticeable. PMID:25371873

  9. Effect of Lidocaine–Ketamine Infusions Combined with Morphine or Fentanyl in Sevoflurane-Anesthetized Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Re, Michela; Canfrán, Susana; Largo, Carlota; de Segura, Ignacio A Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Providing lidocaine, ketamine, and an opioid greatly decreases the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of volatile anesthetics in dogs. However, the efficacy of this combination shows marked interspecies variation, and opioids are likely to be less effective in pigs than in other species. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of constant-rate infusion of lidocaine and ketamine combined with either morphine or fentanyl on the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. In a prospective, randomized, crossover design, 8 healthy crossbred pigs were premedicated with ketamine and midazolam, and anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane. Pigs then received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) combined with either morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0045 mg/kg/h; FLK) after a loading dose; the control group received Ringers lactate solution. The anesthetic-sparing action of the 2 infusion protocols was calculated according to the MAC, by using dewclaw clamping as the standard noxious stimulus. The sevoflurane MAC (mean ± 1 SD) was 2.0% ± 0.2%, 1.9% ± 0.4%, and 1.8% ± 0.2% in the control, MLK, and FLK groups, respectively. No differences among groups or treatments were found. In conclusion, the administration of MLK or FLK at the studied doses did not reduce the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. PMID:27177566

  10. Comparison of oral ketamine and oral midazolam as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Damle, S G; Gandhi, M; Laheri, V

    2008-09-01

    The safe and effective treatment of uncooperative or combative preschool children with extensive dental needs is one of pediatric dentist's ongoing challenges. The traditional methods of behavior management are no longer acceptable to parents as they are not ready to spare more time for dental treatment of their children. Keeping this in mind, the present study was designed and carried out to evaluate the sedative effects of oral ketamine and oral midazolam prior to general anesthesia. Twenty uncooperative children in the age-group of 2-6 years were selected after thorough medical examination and investigations. Informed consent was obtained from the parent. This was a randomized double-blind study. An anesthesiologist administered either 0.5 mg/kg midazolam or 5 mg/kg ketamine orally. The heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were recorded at regular intervals. The sedation and anxiolysis scores were also recorded. The parents were asked to answer a questionnaire at the follow-up session the next day on the surgical experience of the parent and the child and side effects experienced, if any. When the data was subjected to statistical analysis, it was observed that both drugs resulted in adequate sedation at the end of 30 min, with oral midazolam providing significantly better anxiolysis. The heart rate and respiratory rate were marginally higher with oral ketamine. The questionnaire revealed a better response with oral midazolam; side effects were more prominent with oral ketamine.

  11. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2017 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  12. Obesity and Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Obesity and Anesthesia More than one-third of Americans ... Sleep Apnea, a chronic medical problem common with obesity, can present with serious breathing problems before, during, ...

  13. Comparison of the Effect of Thiopental Sodium with Midazolam-ketamine on Post-tonsillectomy Agitation in Children.

    PubMed

    Toliyat, Maryam; Zangoee, Maliheh; Ahrari, Shahnaz; Zangoee, Reza

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of thiopental sodium with that of midazolam-ketamine on relieving agitation after tonsillectomy in children. In a clinical trial, 50 children aged 5-10 years, candidates for tonsillectomy, were randomly divided into two 25-member groups. In the first group, thiopental sodium 5mg/kg/IV, and in the second group combination of midazolam 0.01 mg/kg/IV and ketamine 1 mg/kg/IV were used to induce anesthesia. The level of sedation was assessed after surgery with the Ramsay scale. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of heart rate, arterial oxygen pressure (PO2), and duration of anesthesia. The Ramsay sedation score was significantly higher in the thiopental sodium group than in the midazolam-ketamine group (P=0.01). Thiopental sodium can be more effective than the combination of midazolam-ketamine for controlling agitation after tonsillectomy in children.

  14. Visualization of murine intranasal dosing efficiency using luminescent Francisella tularensis: effect of instillation volume and form of anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark A; Stabenow, Jennifer M; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Wodowski, Andrew J; Fabrizio, Thomas P; Bina, Xiaowen R; Zalduondo, Lillian; Bina, James E

    2012-01-01

    Intranasal instillation is a widely used procedure for pneumonic delivery of drugs, vaccine candidates, or infectious agents into the respiratory tract of research mice. However, there is a paucity of published literature describing the efficiency of this delivery technique. In this report we have used the murine model of tularemia, with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (FTLVS) infection, to evaluate the efficiency of pneumonic delivery via intranasal dosing performed either with differing instillation volumes or different types of anesthesia. FTLVS was rendered luminescent via transformation with a reporter plasmid that constitutively expressed the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon from a Francisella promoter. We then used an IVIS Spectrum whole animal imaging system to visualize FT dissemination at various time points following intranasal instillation. We found that instillation of FT in a dose volume of 10 µl routinely resulted in infection of the upper airways but failed to initiate infection of the pulmonary compartment. Efficient delivery of FT into the lungs via intranasal instillation required a dose volume of 50 µl or more. These studies also demonstrated that intranasal instillation was significantly more efficient for pneumonic delivery of FTLVS in mice that had been anesthetized with inhaled (isoflurane) vs. parenteral (ketamine/xylazine) anesthesia. The collective results underscore the need for researchers to consider both the dose volume and the anesthesia type when either performing pneumonic delivery via intranasal instillation, or when comparing studies that employed this technique.

  15. Visualization of Murine Intranasal Dosing Efficiency Using Luminescent Francisella tularensis: Effect of Instillation Volume and Form of Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark A.; Stabenow, Jennifer M.; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Wodowski, Andrew J.; Fabrizio, Thomas P.; Bina, Xiaowen R.; Zalduondo, Lillian; Bina, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Intranasal instillation is a widely used procedure for pneumonic delivery of drugs, vaccine candidates, or infectious agents into the respiratory tract of research mice. However, there is a paucity of published literature describing the efficiency of this delivery technique. In this report we have used the murine model of tularemia, with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (FTLVS) infection, to evaluate the efficiency of pneumonic delivery via intranasal dosing performed either with differing instillation volumes or different types of anesthesia. FTLVS was rendered luminescent via transformation with a reporter plasmid that constitutively expressed the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon from a Francisella promoter. We then used an IVIS Spectrum whole animal imaging system to visualize FT dissemination at various time points following intranasal instillation. We found that instillation of FT in a dose volume of 10 µl routinely resulted in infection of the upper airways but failed to initiate infection of the pulmonary compartment. Efficient delivery of FT into the lungs via intranasal instillation required a dose volume of 50 µl or more. These studies also demonstrated that intranasal instillation was significantly more efficient for pneumonic delivery of FTLVS in mice that had been anesthetized with inhaled (isoflurane) vs. parenteral (ketamine/xylazine) anesthesia. The collective results underscore the need for researchers to consider both the dose volume and the anesthesia type when either performing pneumonic delivery via intranasal instillation, or when comparing studies that employed this technique. PMID:22384012

  16. General anesthesia mediated by effects on ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been more than 165 years since the first introduction of modern anesthesia to the clinic, there is surprisingly little understanding about the exact mechanisms by which general anesthetics induce unconsciousness. As a result, we do not know how general anesthetics produce anesthesia at different levels. The main handicap to understanding the mechanisms of general anesthesia is the diversity of chemically unrelated compounds including diethyl ether and halogenated hydrocarbons, gases nitrous oxide, ketamine, propofol, benzodiazepines and etomidate, as well as alcohols and barbiturates. Does this imply that general anesthesia is caused by many different mechanisms Until now, many receptors, molecular targets and neuronal transmission pathways have been shown to contribute to mechanisms of general anesthesia. Among these molecular targets, ion channels are the most likely candidates for general anesthesia, in particular γ-aminobutyric acid type A, potassium and sodium channels, as well as ion channels mediated by various neuronal transmitters like acetylcholine, amino acids amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolpropionic acid or N-methyl-D-aspartate. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated the involvement in general anesthesia of other ion channels with distinct gating properties such as hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic- nucleotide-gated channels. The main aim of the present review is to summarize some aspects of current knowledge of the effects of general anesthetics on various ion channels. PMID:24701405

  17. A Comparative Study of Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam in Reducing Delirium Caused by Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajeev; Tripathi, Aditya Kumar; Mehta, Ranbeer Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ketamine is a well known agent for sedation for short surgical procedures due to its very good analgesic action. But it has cardio stimulatory response and recovery from anaesthesia after Ketamine use is complicated by delirium and hallucination. In studies it is proved that these side effects can be reduced by premedication with benzodiazepines. The α2 adrenoceptor agonists are becoming popular for their properties like haemodynamic stability and reducing anaesthetic requirement. Aim This study was planned to see the effects of Dexmedetomidine on emergent reaction of Ketamine, when used as premedication agent with Ketamine for conducting short surgeries in adult patients. Materials and Methods Study was conducted in 90 ASA class I and II male and female patients of age between 18–40 undergoing short procedures like laparoscopic ligation, skin grafting, dilatation and curettage, endoscopic procedures, excision of small swelling, etc. Patients were randomly divided into three groups of 30 each as follows: Group K: after premedication with inj. glycopyrrolate 0.01mg/kg, inj. Ketamine 2mg/kg, Group M: after premedication with inj. glycopyrrolate 0.01mg/kg and inj midazolam 0.05mg/kg, inj. Ketamine 2mg/kg, Group D: after premedication with inj glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg and inj. Dexmedetomidine 0.5μg/kg, Ketamine 2mg/kg was given. Observations were made for cardiovascular response to invasive procedure, post anaesthetic anxiety and delirium with help of Memorial Delirium Assessment scale (MDAS). Results Midazolam reduced delirium to a greater level, but in comparison to control group and midazolam group, dexmedetomidine reduced delirium to a much greater level (p-value<0.001). Postoperative pain was less in Dexmedetomidine group (p-value< 0.001). Conclusion Dexmedetomidine reduced delirium caused by Ketamine when used as a premedication agent. It produced more haemodynamic stable patients. Postoperative analgesia was also better. PMID:27656531

  18. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine....

  19. S-ketamine influences strategic allocation of attention but not exogenous capture of attention.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Isabella; Ansorge, Ulrich; Huber-Huber, Christoph; Höflich, Anna; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-09-01

    We investigated whether s-ketamine differentially affects strategic allocation of attention. In Experiment 1, (1) a less visible cue was weakly masked by the onsets of competing placeholders or (2) a better visible cue was not masked because it was presented in isolation. Both types of cue appeared more often opposite of the target (75%) than at target position (25%). With this setup, we tested for strategic attention shifts to the opposite side of the cues and for exogenous attentional capture toward the cue's side in a short cue-target interval, as well as for (reverse) cueing effects in a long cue-target interval after s-ketamine and after placebo treatment in a double-blind within-participant design. We found reduced strategic attention shifts after cues presented without placeholders for the s-ketamine compared to the placebo treatment in the short interval, indicating an early effect on the strategic allocation of attention. No differences between the two treatments were found for exogenous attentional capture by less visible cues, suggesting that s-ketamine does not affect exogenous attentional capture in the presence of competing distractors. Experiment 2 confirmed that the competing onsets of the placeholders prevented the strategic cueing effect. Taken together, the results indicate that s-ketamine affects strategic attentional capture, but not exogenous attentional capture. The findings point to a more prominent role of s-ketamine during top-down controlled forms of attention that require suppression of automatic capture than during automatic capture itself.

  20. Ketamine Exhibits Different Neuroanatomical Profile After Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition in the Prefrontal Cortex: the Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Danielski, Lucineia G; Petronilho, Fabricia; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2016-09-02

    Studies indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been identified as a novel MDD therapy; however, the antidepressant mechanism is not fully understood. In addition, the effects of ketamine after mTOR inhibition have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we examined the behavioral and biochemical effects of ketamine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens after inhibition of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol) or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). Immobility was assessed in forced swimming tests, and then oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory markers were evaluated in the brain and periphery. mTOR activation in the PFC was essential to ketamine's antidepressant-like effects. Ketamine increased lipid damage in the PFC, hippocampus, and amygdala. Protein carbonyl was elevated in the PFC, amygdala, and NAc after ketamine administration. Ketamine also increased nitrite/nitrate in the PFC, hippocampus, amygdala, and NAc. Myeloperoxidase activity increased in the hippocampus and NAc after ketamine administration. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced after ketamine administration in all brain areas studied. Inhibition of mTOR signaling pathways by rapamycin in the PFC was required to protect against oxidative stress by reducing damage and increasing antioxidant enzymes. Finally, the TNF-α level was increased in serum by ketamine; however, the rapamycin plus treatment group was not able to block this increase. Activation of mTOR in the PFC is involved in the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine; however, the inhibition of this pathway was able to protect certain brain areas against

  1. Analgesic Effects of Preincision Ketamine on Postspinal Caesarean Delivery in Uganda's Tertiary Hospital: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mwase, Richard; Kasumba, John Mark; Wanzira, Humphrey; Kintu, Andrew; Tindimwebwa, Joesph V. B.; Obua, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background. Good postoperative analgesic management improves maternal satisfaction and care of the neonate. Postoperative pain management is a challenge in Mulago Hospital, yet ketamine is accessible and has proven benefit. We determined ketamine's postoperative analgesic effects. Materials and Methods. We did an RCT among consenting parturients that were randomized to receive either intravenous ketamine (0.25 mg/kg) or placebo after spinal anesthetic. Pain was assessed every 30 mins up to 24 hours postoperatively using the numerical rating scale. The first complaint of pain requiring treatment was noted as “time to first breakthrough pain.” Results. We screened 100 patients and recruited 88 that were randomized into two arms of 44 patients that received either ketamine or placebo. Ketamine group had 30-minute longer time to first breakthrough pain and lower 24-hour pain scores. Postoperative diclofenac consumption was lesser in the ketamine group compared to placebo and Kaplan-Meier graphs showed a higher probability of experiencing breakthrough pain earlier in the placebo group. Conclusion. Preincision intravenous ketamine (0.25 mg/kg) offered 30-minute prolongation to postoperative analgesia requirement with reduced 24-hour pain scores. We recommend larger studies to explore this benefit. This trial is registered with Pan African Clinical Trial Registry number PACTR201404000807178. PMID:28321251

  2. Intramuscular ketamine in acute depression: A report on two cases

    PubMed Central

    Harihar, Chilukuri; Dasari, Padmavathy; Srinivas, Jakka Sriramulu

    2013-01-01

    It takes about 2 weeks for the onset of antidepressant action of drugs while electroconvulsive therapy though faster, is a cumbersome procedure requiring an anaesthetist and at least a minor operation theatre. Recent studies have shown that Ketamine, when given to severely depressed patients in the dose of 0.5 mg/kg as a slow intravenous infusion over 40 minutes, brought about acute relief from depression and amelioration of suicidal risk within a few hours. The improvement, however, was transient and lasted for up to a week but could be sustained by further weekly or biweekly injections. As the dose of ketamine administered was found to be safe, it was now tried in the intramuscular route in two severely depressed patients with similar rapid improvement. The cases are reported here which pave way for an easier mode of treating acute depression. PMID:23825857

  3. Topical anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects.

  4. Topical anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  5. Effect of the α2 -receptor agonists medetomidine, detomidine, xylazine and romifidine on the ketamine metabolism in equines assessed with enantioselective capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sandbaumhüter, Friederike A; Theurillat, Regula; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2017-03-02

    The combination of ketamine and an α2 -receptor agonist is often used in veterinary medicine. Four different α2 -receptor agonists, medetomidine, detomidine, xylazine and romifidine, which differ in their chemical structure and thus in selectivity for the α2 -receptor and in the sedative and analgesic potency, are typically employed during surgery of equines. Recovery following anesthesia with ketamine and an α2 -receptor agonist is dependent on the α2 -receptor agonist. This prompted us to investigate i) the inhibition characteristics for the N-demethylation of ketamine to norketamine and ii) the formation of the ketamine metabolites norketamine, 6-hydroxynorketamine (6HNK) and 5,6-dehydronorketamine (DHNK) in presence of the four α2 -receptor agonists and equine liver microsomes. Samples were analyzed with enantioselective capillary electrophoresis using highly sulfated γ-cyclodextrin as chiral selector. All four α2 -receptor agonists have an impact on the ketamine metabolism. Medetomidine was found to be the strongest inhibitor, followed by detomidine, whereas xylazine and romifidine showed almost no effect on the ketamine N-demethylation in the inhibition studies with a short incubation period of the reaction mixture. After prolonged incubation, inhibition with xylazine and romifidine was also observed. The formation of 6HNK and DHNK is affected by all selected α2 -receptor agonists. With medetomidine, levels of these metabolites are reduced compared to the case without an α2 -receptor agonist. For detomidine, xylazine and romifidine, the opposite was found. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. [Ketamine versus propofol during one-lung ventilation in thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Vyzhigina, O A; Kurilova, O A; Riabova, O S; Titov, V A; Zhukova, S G; Parshin, V D

    2012-01-01

    A comparative analysis of gas, the metabolic rate, pressor, resistive and volumetric characteristics of pulmonary blood flow, central and intracardiac hemodynamics in patients undergoing thoracic surgery was conducted. 2 methods of anesthesia maintenance: on the basis of ketamine - fentanyl - pipecuronium and propofol - fentanyl - pipecuronim were compared. Invasive monitoring system PiCCOplus for the behaviour of the transpulmonary thermodilution (TT) in combination with VoLEF for the pulmonary thermodilution (PT) the change of ventilation mode ALV - OLV - ALV was used. OLV lasted for more than 1.5 hours.

  7. Renal infarction secondary to ketamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Li; Chen, Jin-Li; Cha, Tai-Lung; Wu, Sheng-Tang; Tang, Shou-Hung; Tsao, Chih-Wei; Meng, En

    2013-07-01

    Renal infarction is an uncommon condition that resulted from inadequate perfusion of the kidney and is easily missed diagnosed due to its nonspecific clinical presentations. Major risk factors for renal infarction are atrial fibrillation, previous embolism, and ischemic and valvular heart disease. Progressive decrease in renal function or even death can occur if renal infarction is not diagnosed accurately and promptly. Ketamine abuse may cause variable urinary tract injury. However, renal infarction caused by ketamine abuse has never been reported. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of renal infarction following nasal insufflation of ketamine.

  8. Effective and safe anesthesia for Yorkshire and Yucatan swine with and without cardiovascular injury and intervention.

    PubMed

    Linkenhoker, Jan R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Linton, Cg Garry; Walden, April; Abusakran-Monday, Kim A; Rosero, Ana P; Foltz, Charmaine J

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this study was to identify an injectable anesthetic protocol that provides sedation sufficient for peripheral vascular catheterization, intubation, and transport while minimizing cardiovascular changes in Yorkshire and Yucatan pigs with and without cardiovascular injury and intervention (CI). Phase 1 examined the safety and efficacy of acepromazine-ketamine, diazepam-ketamine, midazolam-ketamine, and medetomidine-ketamine in 5 healthy Yorkshire pigs. For each drug combination, we obtained multiple measurements of heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, sedation score, ability to catheterize and intubate, and recovery score. Phase 2 evaluated and refined the dose of the most effective Phase 1 anesthetic combination (midazolam-ketamine) in healthy and CI Yorkshire pigs (n = 53 trials). Phase 3 mirrored Phase 2 but tested midazolam-ketamine in healthy and CI Yucatan pigs (n = 34 trials). Midazolam (0.5 mg/kg)-ketamine (25 to 27 mg/kg) was the most effective anesthetic combination in healthy Yorkshire pigs, but this dose was less effective in healthy Yucatan pigs and CI Yorkshire and Yucatan pigs. Midazolam-ketamine resulted in tachycardia and apnea more frequently in CI pigs than healthy pigs. This combination also caused vomiting in one CI Yucatan pig. Overall, midazolam-ketamine provided safe and effective sedation for catheterization and intubation of both healthy and CI pigs. This study suggests Yucatan pigs may require a higher dose midazolam-ketamine to achieve the same level of sedation as that in Yorkshire pigs. Although anesthetic complication rates were higher in CI pigs, our results indicate that midazolam-ketamine can be safely used for sedation of both pig breeds with and without CI.

  9. Ketamine use in current clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mei; Rejaei, Damoon; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    After nearly half a century on the market, ketamine still occupies a unique corner in the medical armamentarium of anesthesiologists or clinicians treating pain. Over the last two decades, much research has been conducted highlighting the drug's mechanisms of action, specifically those of its enantiomers. Nowadays, ketamine is also being utilized for pediatric pain control in emergency department, with its anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects being revealed in acute and chronic pain management. Recently, new insights have been gained on ketamine's potential anti-depressive and antisuicidal effects. This article provides an overview of the drug's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics while also discussing the potential benefits and risks of ketamine administration in various clinical settings. PMID:27018176

  10. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S. S.; Wainer, Irving W.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Frost, Douglas O.; Huang, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine’s antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine’s side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1–D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine’s enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID

  11. Mobile anesthesia: Ready, set, pack, and go

    PubMed Central

    Khayata, Issam; Bourque, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Although we get into the habit of thinking that anesthesia cannot be safely delivered without the availability of all equipments available in a state of the art Operating room, we find ourselves faced with situations where the availability and mobility of all this equipment is limited ; this results in the impetus to start a thought process of how we can perform mobile anesthesia with less technology. Disaster situations, such as earthquakes, floods, or armed conflicts, might happen in areas where access of a regular operating room might be hours away or not available at all. Golden Hour: Delivering mobile Anesthesia during the golden hour can be a totally different experience from customary anesthesia practices in a regular operating room.It requires setting up a field/forward surgical teams with its organization and structure. Total Intravenous anesthesia gained popularity in crisis and combat situations and has been documented as a safe method in crisis situations.Anesthesia configured medic bag: Is a modified medic bag that can be utilized to contain the most commonly used Anesthesia supply material in a portable way. Conclusion: In reviewing the knowledge of how to provide anesthesia in crisis and disaster situations we conclude that there is evidence that anesthesia can be safely and efficiently delivered in a remote areas with limited tools and technology. PMID:23210021

  12. Anesthetic and physiologic effects of tiletamine, zolazepam, ketamine, and xylazine combination (TKX) in feral cats undergoing surgical sterilization.

    PubMed

    Cistola, Alexis M; Golder, Francis J; Centonze, Lisa A; McKay, Lindsay W; Levy, Julie K

    2004-10-01

    Tiletamine (12.5 mg), zolazepam (12.5 mg), ketamine (20 mg), and xylazine (5 mg) (TKX; 0.25 ml, IM) combination was evaluated as an anesthetic in 22 male and 67 female adult feral cats undergoing sterilization at high-volume sterilization clinics. Cats were not intubated and breathed room air. Oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), respiration rate (RR), and core body temperature were recorded. Yohimbine (0.25 ml, 0.5 mg, IV) was administered at the completion of surgery. TKX produced rapid onset of lateral recumbency (4+/-1 min) and surgical anesthesia of sufficient duration to complete surgical procedures in 92% of cats. SpO(2) measured via a lingual pulse oximeter probe averaged 92+/-3% in male cats and 90+/-4% in females. SpO(2) fell below 90% at least once in most cats. MBP measured by oscillometry averaged 136+/-30 mm Hg in males and 113+/-29 mm Hg in females. MBP increased at the onset of surgical stimulation suggesting incomplete anti-nociceptive properties. HR averaged 156+/-19 bpm, and RR averaged 18+/-8 bpm. Neither parameter varied between males and females or over time. Body temperature decreased significantly over time, declining to 38.0+/-0.8 degrees C at the time of reversal in males and 36.6+/-0.8 degrees C at the time of reversal in females. Time from anesthetic reversal to sternal recumbency was prolonged (72+/-42 min). Seven cats (8%) required an additional dose of TKX to maintain an adequate plane of anesthesia at the onset of surgery, and this was associated with significantly longer recovery times (108+/-24 min).

  13. Decreased Thalamocortical Connectivity in Chronic Ketamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yanhui; Tang, Jinsong; Liu, Jianbin; Xie, An; Yang, Mei; Johnson, Maritza; Wang, Xuyi; Deng, Qijian; Chen, Hongxian; Xiang, Xiaojun; Liu, Tieqiao; Chen, Xiaogang; Song, Ming; Hao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Disintegration in thalamocortical integration suggests its role in the mechanistic ‘switch’ from recreational to dysregulated drug seeking/addiction. In this study, we aimed to address whether thalamic nuclear groups show altered functional connectivity within the cerebral cortex in chronic ketamine users. One hundred and thirty subjects (41 ketamine users and 89 control subjects) underwent rsfMRI (resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Based on partial correlation functional connectivity analysis we partitioned the thalamus into six nuclear groups that correspond well with human histology. Then, in the area of each nuclear group, the functional connectivity differences between the chronic ketamine user group and normal control group were investigated. We found that the ketamine user group showed significantly less connectivity between the thalamic nuclear groups and the cortical regions-of-interest, including the prefrontal cortex, the motor cortex /supplementary motor area, and the posterior parietal cortex. However, no increased thalamic connectivity was observed for these regions as compared with controls. This study provides the first evidence of abnormal thalamocortical connectivity of resting state brain activity in chronic ketamine users. Further understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms of the thalamus in addiction (ketamine addiction) may facilitate the evaluation of much-needed novel pharmacological agents for improved therapy of this complex disease. PMID:27977717

  14. [Emergency anesthesia, airway management and ventilation in major trauma. Background and key messages of the interdisciplinary S3 guidelines for major trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, M; Matthes, G; Kanz, K G; Waydhas, C; Fischbacher, M; Fischer, M; Böttiger, B W

    2011-11-01

    Patients with multiple trauma presenting with apnea or a gasping breathing pattern (respiratory rate <6/min) require prehospital endotracheal intubation (ETI) and ventilation. Additional indications are hypoxia (S(p)O(2)<90% despite oxygen insufflation and after exclusion of tension pneumothorax), severe traumatic brain injury [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS)<9], trauma-associated hemodynamic instability [systolic blood pressure (SBP)<90 mmHg] and severe chest trauma with respiratory insufficiency (respiratory rate >29/min). The induction of anesthesia after preoxygenation is conducted as rapid sequence induction (analgesic, hypnotic drug, neuromuscular blocking agent). With the availability of ketamine as a viable alternative, the use of etomidate is not encouraged due to its side effects on adrenal function. An electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure measurement and pulse oximetry are needed to monitor the emergency anesthesia and the secured airway. Capnography is absolutely mandatory to confirm correct placement of the endotracheal tube and to monitor tube dislocations as well as ventilation and oxygenation in the prehospital and hospital setting. Because airway management is often complicated in trauma patients, alternative devices and a fiber-optic endoscope need to be available within the hospital. Use of these alternative measures for airway management and ventilation should be considered at the latest after a maximum of three unsuccessful intubation attempts. Emergency medical service (EMS) physicians should to be trained in emergency anesthesia, ETI and alternative methods of airway management on a regular basis. Within hospitals ETI, emergency anesthesia and ventilation are to be conducted by trained and experienced anesthesiologists. When a difficult airway or induction of anesthesia is expected, endotracheal intubation should be supervised or conducted by an anesthesiologist. Normoventilation should be the goal of mechanical ventilation. After arrival in the

  15. Caudal additives in pediatrics: a comparison among midazolam, ketamine, and neostigmine coadministered with bupivacaine.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Rudra, A; Pan, A K; Acharya, A

    2005-07-01

    Single-shot "kiddie caudal" with bupivacaine alone is losing popularity because of its duration of 4-8 h. In a prospective randomized double-blind clinical study, we assessed and compared the efficacy of ketamine, midazolam, and neostigmine coadministered with bupivacaine in a caudal epidural to provide intraoperative and postoperative pain relief. Eighty children (ASA status I) aged 5-10 yr undergoing unilateral inguinal herniotomy were allocated randomly in equal numbers (n = 20) into 4 groups to receive a caudal injection of 0.25% bupivacaine (1 mL/kg) with or without ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), midazolam (50 microg/kg), and neostig-mine (2 microg/kg), after the induction of standardized general anesthesia without premedication. Monitoring for pain, sedation, postoperative nausea/vomiting, dizziness, and pruritus was performed by anesthesiologists blinded to the study allocation. The time to first analgesic administration (paracetamol syrup) was longer (P < 0.05) in the bupivacaine-neostigmine group and the bupivacaine-midazolam group than in the other groups. Undesirable effects, such as emesis, pruritus, and dizziness, were comparable in all groups. However, the incidence of hallucination was more frequent in the bupivacaine-ketamine group compared with the other groups. This study shows that single-shot caudal coadministration of bupivacaine-neostigmine and bupivacaine-midazolam was associated with an extended duration of postoperative pain relief.

  16. Ketamine Infusion Therapy as an Alternative Pain Control Strategy in Patients with Multi-Trauma including Rib Fracture; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Losing, Ashley K; Jones, Justin M; Keric, Adis; Briggs, Steven E; Leedahl, David D

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is a promising alternative agent for pain control that offers benefit to traditional strategies, particularly in the setting of rib fracture. Current pharmacologic therapies have clear adverse effects, and other options may be invasive, cost prohibitive, or marginally effective. We describe three consecutive patients with traumatic injuries including rib fracture for which a ketamine infusion was utilized as part of their pain control strategy.  For each patient, use of a ketamine infusion trended toward reduced opioid requirements with stable pain scores. One patient experienced a dissociative adverse effect prompting decrease and discontinuation of ketamine. No pulmonary complications in the form of emergent intubation or new diagnosis of pneumonia were observed. We believe the addition of ketamine infusion to be a valid alternative strategy for managing pain associated with rib fracture. PMID:27540552

  17. Intravenous dexamethasone versus ketamine gargle versus intravenous dexamethasone combined with ketamine gargle for evaluation of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Fariborzifar, Arghavan; Attari, Mohammadali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sore throat and hoarseness are the most frequent subjective complaints after tracheal intubation for general anesthesia. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle for reducing the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat (POST) and hoarseness. Materials and Methods: 140 patients (aged 16-65 year) scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into four groups of 35 subjects each: Group K, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline; Group D, were infused 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group KD, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline plus 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group P (placebo) that received saline (gargle and IV). POST was graded at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 h after operation on a four-point scale (0-3). Results: The incidence and severity of POST were significantly lower in Group KD, compared with the other groups at all times after tracheal extubation for up to 24 h (P < 0.05). Also the incidence and severity of hoarseness were significantly lower in each Groups of KD and K and D compared with group placebo (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The prophylactic use of 0.2 mg/kg of IV dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle significantly reduced the incidence and severity of POST compared with using each of these drugs alone or using placebo. PMID:25371869

  18. Propofol with ketamine following sedation with xylazine for routine induction of general anaesthesia in horses.

    PubMed

    Posner, L P; Kasten, J I; Kata, C

    2013-12-07

    To document the suitability of intravenous propofol and ketamine following sedation with xylazine for routine anaesthetic induction in horses. Retrospective. 100 client-owned horses. Anaesthetic records were evaluated to determine: signalment, anaesthetic drug and dosages, need for additional induction agents, notation of any adverse events, duration of anaesthesia and recovery characteristics (rough or smooth, and rapid or prolonged). Horses were sedated with xylazine 0.99±(0.2) mg/kg intravenous and 23 horses were also administered butorphanol 0.02±(0.001) mg/kg intravenous. Horses were anaesthetised with a combination of propofol 0.40±(0.1) mg/kg intravenous and ketamine 2.8±(0.3) mg/kg intravenous. Six horses required additional ketamine. None became apnoeic and no adverse events were noted. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in 66 horses and a combination of guaifenesin, ketamine and xylazine (GKX) in 34 horses. Total anaesthesia time was 125.4±(46) minutes. Fifty-one horses were administered romifidine 0.016 (±0.008) mg/kg intravenous at recovery. Time from orotracheal extubation to standing was 27.6±(25) minutes. Of the 58 records with recovery characteristics, the number per category was: rapid n=6, prolonged n=3, smooth n=46, rough n=6. Intravenous propofol and ketamine following xylazine provided satisfactory anaesthetic inductions and recoveries in a varied population of horses without any clinically relevant adverse events.

  19. Anesthesia Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... does anesthesia research contribute to other fields of science and medicine? Knowledge of how anesthetics affect pain ... supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Anesthesia from MedlinePlus Profile of anesthesiologist Daniel Sessler ...

  20. Ketamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... 23-31 Watch DEA National Red Ribbon Rally Video: Red Ribbon Week Red Ribbon Resolution Introduced In The House Of Representatives DEA Red Ribbon Week Patch Program National Heroin and Opioid Awareness Week is September 19-23, ... crimes. Street Names Special K, Cat Valium, Kit Kat, K, Super Acid, Super K, Purple, Special La Coke, Jet, ...

  1. Accelerated Recovery of Consciousness after General Anesthesia Is Associated with Increased Functional Brain Connectivity in the High-Gamma Bandwidth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duan; Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, Viviane S.; Mashour, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent data from our laboratory demonstrate that high-frequency gamma connectivity across the cortex is present during consciousness and depressed during unconsciousness. However, these data were derived from static and well-defined states of arousal rather than during transitions that would suggest functional relevance. We also recently found that subanesthetic ketamine administered during isoflurane anesthesia accelerates recovery upon discontinuation of the primary anesthetic and increases gamma power during emergence. In the current study we re-analyzed electroencephalogram (EEG) data to test the hypothesis that functional cortical connectivity between anterior and posterior cortical regions would be increased during accelerated recovery induced by ketamine when compared to saline-treated controls. Rodents were instrumented with intracranial EEG electrodes and general anesthesia was induced with isoflurane anesthesia. After 37.5 min of continuous isoflurane anesthesia, a subanesthetic dose of ketamine (25 mg/kg intraperitoneal) was administered, with evidence of a 44% reduction in emergence time. In this study, we analyzed gamma and theta coherence (measure of undirected functional connectivity) and normalized symbolic transfer entropy (measure of directed functional connectivity) between frontal and parietal cortices during various levels of consciousness, with a focus on emergence from isoflurane anesthesia. During accelerated emergence in the ketamine-treated group, there was increased frontal-parietal coherence {p = 0.005, 0.05–0.23 [95% confidence interval (CI)]} and normalized symbolic transfer entropy [frontal to parietal: p < 0.001, 0.010–0.026 (95% CI); parietal to frontal: p < 0.001, 0.009–0.025 (95% CI)] in high-frequency gamma bandwidth as compared with the saline-treated group. Surrogates of cortical information exchange in high-frequency gamma are increased in association with accelerated recovery from anesthesia. This finding adds evidence

  2. 'The Drug of War'--a historical review of the use of Ketamine in military conflicts.

    PubMed

    Mercer, S J

    2009-01-01

    Anaesthesia for surgery during armed conflict was traditionally based on simple and reliable techniques. These often required a minimum of equipment and drugs while ensuring rapid and safe patient recovery. Ketamine, which first became available in Britain in the 1970s, was thought to offer certain favorable characteristics for use as a military anaesthetic agent. This article discusses the use of ketamine in many of the major armed conflicts that have occurred since its introduction. It also catalogues the methods used by anaesthetists at the time and their opinions of the drug's success.

  3. Effects of Music Therapy on Anesthesia Requirements and Anxiety in Women Undergoing Ambulatory Breast Surgery for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bradley Palmer, Jaclyn; Lane, Deforia; Mayo, Diane; Schluchter, Mark; Leeming, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of live and recorded perioperative music therapy on anesthesia requirements, anxiety levels, recovery time, and patient satisfaction in women experiencing surgery for diagnosis or treatment of breast cancer. Patients and Methods Between 2012 and 2014, 207 female patients undergoing surgery for potential or known breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive either patient-selected live music (LM) preoperatively with therapist-selected recorded music intraoperatively (n = 69), patient-selected recorded music (RM) preoperatively with therapist-selected recorded music intraoperatively (n = 70), or usual care (UC) preoperatively with noise-blocking earmuffs intraoperatively (n = 68). Results The LM and the RM groups did not differ significantly from the UC group in the amount of propofol required to reach moderate sedation. Compared with the UC group, both the LM and the RM groups had greater reductions (P < .001) in anxiety scores preoperatively (mean changes [and standard deviation: −30.9 [36.3], −26.8 [29.3], and 0.0 [22.7]), respectively. The LM and RM groups did not differ from the UC group with respect to recovery time; however, the LM group had a shorter recovery time compared with the RM group (a difference of 12.4 minutes; 95% CI, 2.2 to 22.5; P = .018). Satisfaction scores for the LM and RM groups did not differ from those of the UC group. Conclusion Including music therapy as a complementary modality with cancer surgery may help manage preoperative anxiety in a way that is safe, effective, time-efficient, and enjoyable. PMID:26282640

  4. Dental anesthesia for patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chia; Lin, I-Hua; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Fan, Shou-Zen

    2012-09-01

    To offer individualized dental treatment to certain patients who cannot tolerate dental treatment, sedation or general anesthesia is required. The needs could be either medical, mental, or psychological. The most common indications for sedation or general anesthesia are lack of cooperation, multiple morbidities, and pediatric autism. In adults, cognitive impairment and multiple morbidities are most commonly encountered indications. Because of suboptimal home care, incomplete medical history, poor preoperative management, lack of cooperation, and developmental abnormalities, it is a challenge to prepare anesthesia for patients with special needs. The American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) has proposed guidelines for office-based anesthesia for ambulatory surgery. In patients with ASA physical status IV and V, sedation or general anesthesia for treatment in the dental office is not recommended. The distinction between sedation levels and general anesthesia is not clear. If intravenous general anesthesia without tracheal intubation is chosen for dental procedures, full cooperation between the dentist, dental assistant, and anesthesiologist is needed. Teamwork between the dentist and healthcare provider is key to achieve safe and successful dental treatment under sedation or general anesthesia in the patient with special needs.

  5. The Effectiveness of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine on Perioperative Hemodynamics, Analgesic Requirement, and Side Effects Profile in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Surgery Under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Panchgar, Vinayak; Shetti, Akshaya N.; Sunitha, H. B.; Dhulkhed, Vithal K.; Nadkarni, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is an upward surge in the use of laparoscopic surgeries due to various advantages when compared to open surgeries. Major advantages are, due to small incisions which are cosmetically acceptable and most of them are now daycare procedures. Problem of economic burden and hospital bed occupancy has been overcome with laparoscopic surgeries. All these advantages are not free from disadvantages, as hemodynamic changes such as hypertension; tachycardia and other surgical-related complications are commonly observed intraoperatively. Dexmedetomidine is one of the α2 agonist drugs which acts at both supraspinal and spinal level and modulate the transmission of nociceptive signals in the central nervous system. The basic effect of dexmedetomidine on the cardiovascular system is to decrease the heart rate and systemic vascular resistance with additional feature of opioid sparing effect. This drug has become an ideal adjuvant during general anesthesia, especially when stress is expected. Hence, the drug was studied in laparoscopic surgeries. Aims and Objectives: (a) To study the effect of dexmedetomidine on hemodynamic parameters during perioperative period in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. (b) To study the postoperative sedation score and analgesic requirement. (c) To study the side effect profile of dexmedetomidine. Settings and Design: Randomized double blind controlled trial. Subjects and Methods: After obtaining the Institutional Ethical Clearance, the study was conducted. Forty patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I and II were enrolled in this randomized study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups; group normal saline (NS) and group dexmedetomidine. Patient received either NS or dexmedetomidine in group NS and group dexmedetomidine, respectively, depending upon the allocation. The infusion rate was adjusted according to; loading dose (1 μg/kg) over 10 min and maintenance dose (0.5 μg/kg/h) and

  6. [Intravenous regional anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics. An update].

    PubMed

    Atanassoff, P G; Lobato, A; Aguilar, J L

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous regional anesthesia is a widely used technique for brief surgical interventions, primarily on the upper limbs and less frequently, on the lower limbs. It began being used at the beginning of the 20th century, when Bier injected procaine as a local anesthetic. The technique to accomplish anesthesia has not changed much since then, although different drugs, particularly long-acting local anesthetics, such as ropivacaine and levobupivacaine in low concentrations, were introduced. Additionally, drugs like opioids, muscle relaxants, paracetamol, neostigmine, magnesium, ketamine, clonidine, and ketorolac, have all been investigated as adjuncts to intravenous regional anesthesia, and were found to be fairly useful in terms of an increased onset of operative anesthesia and longer lasting perioperative analgesia. The present article provides an overview of current knowledge with emphasis on long-acting local anesthetic drugs.

  7. Determination of hair ketamine cut-off value from Hong Kong ketamine users by LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Leung, K Wing; Wong, Zack C F; Ho, Janet Y M; Yip, Ada W S; Ng, Jenny S C; Ip, Stanley P H; Ng, Winki Y Y; Ho, Karen K L; Duan, Ran; Zhu, Kevin Y; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-02-01

    Ketamine is one of the most frequent abused drugs in Hong Kong and South-East Asia, and the cases of ketamine abused have been reported worldwide. Hair has been commonly used as a specimen for the proof of chronic drug abused because of its non-invasiveness and long detection windows. The determinations of ketamine in hair with varieties of state-of-the-art instruments and detection methods have been developed in the past decade; however, the cut-off value for ketamine abuser has not been developed according to the international guidelines. The aim of this study is to propose a cut-off value for ketamine in hair by analyzing ketamine and its metabolite norketamine by LC-MS/MS method in a population of ketamine users in Hong Kong. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for ketamine and norketamine were 20pg/mg and 100pg/mg, respectively. From 977 ketamine abusers, the cut-off value for ketamine in hair was proposed to be 400pg/mg of hair. This proposed cut-off value is the concentration of hair ketamine when over 90% of samples are being detected with the presence of norketamine, which is a proof of ketamine abuse. This value could be applied as a screening or occupational cut-off for reference.

  8. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis.

  9. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis episode during halothane anesthesia in a horse.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J E; Pablo, L; Hubbell, J A

    1996-06-01

    A 7-month-old Quarter Horse filly was admitted for surgical repair of a right olecranon fracture. Anesthesia was achieved with xylazine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, ketamine hydrochloride, and halothane. Two and a half hours after induction of anesthesia, myotonia, muscle fasciculations, and sweating, concurrent with high serum potassium concentration and associated electrocardiographic changes consistent with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, were observed. Treatment included intermittent positive-pressure ventilation, changing intravenous administration of fluids from lactated Ringer's solution to 0.9% NaCl solution, and administration of calcium gluconate, glycopyrrolate, dopamine, and sodium bicarbonate. Clinical signs resolved with the return of serum potassium concentrations to the reference range. The horse was confirmed to be heterozygous for hyperkalemic periodic paralysis by DNA testing.

  10. Inhibition of morphine metabolism by ketamine.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoxin; Evans, Allan M; Wang, Jiping; Miners, John O; Upton, Richard N; Milne, Robert W

    2010-05-01

    Clinical observation of a synergistic effect of ketamine on morphine analgesia remains controversial. Although a pharmacodynamic basis for an interaction has been explored in animal and clinical studies, the possibility of a pharmacokinetic mechanism has not been investigated. Whereas both morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide are effective analgesics, morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) lacks activity. Thus, changes in the metabolism and disposition of morphine may result in an altered response. First, we investigated the interaction between morphine and ketamine in the isolated perfused rat liver preparation. The clearance of morphine was decreased from 16.8 +/- 4.6 ml/min in the control period to 7.7 +/- 2.8 ml/min in the ketamine-treatment period, with the formation clearance of M3G decreasing from 8.0 +/- 4.1 ml/min to 2.1 +/- 1.1 ml/min. Fractional conversion of morphine to M3G was significantly decreased from 0.46 +/- 0.17 in the control period to 0.28 +/- 0.14 upon the addition of ketamine. The possible mechanism of the interaction was further investigated in vitro with rat liver microsomes as the enzyme source. The formation of M3G followed single-enzyme Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a mean apparent K(m) of 2.18 +/- 0.45 mM and V(max) of 8.67 +/- 0.59 nmol/min/mg. Ketamine inhibited morphine 3-glucuronidation noncompetitively, with a mean K(i) value of 33.3 +/- 7.9 microM. The results demonstrate that ketamine inhibits the glucuronidation of morphine in a rat model.

  11. Stereoselective biotransformation of ketamine in equine liver and lung microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, A.; Portier, C. J.; Thormann, W.; Theurillat, R.; Mevissen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Stereoselectivity has to be considered for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic features of ketamine. Stereoselective biotransformation of ketamine was investigated in equine microsomes in vitro. Concentration curves were constructed over time, and enzyme activity was determined for different substrate concentrations using equine liver and lung microsomes. The concentrations of R/S-ketamine and R/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. A two-phase model based on Hill kinetics was used to analyze the biotransformation of R/S-ketamine into R/S-norketamine and, in a second step, into R/S-downstream metabolites. In liver and lung microsomes, levels of R-ketamine exceeded those of S-ketamine at all time points and S-norketamine exceeded R-norketamine at time points below the maximum concentration. In liver and lung microsomes, significant differences in the enzyme velocity (Vmax) were observed between Sand R-norketamine formation and between Vmax of S-norketamine formation when S-ketamine was compared to S-ketamine of the racemate. Our investigations in microsomal reactions in vitro suggest that stereoselective ketamine biotransformation in horses occurs in the liver and the lung with a slower elimination of S-ketamine in the presence of R-ketamine. Scaling of the in vitro parameters to liver and lung organ clearances provided an excellent fit with previously published in vivo data and confirmed a lung first-pass effect. PMID:19000264

  12. Effects of Ketamine on Neuronal Spontaneous Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents and Miniature Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents in the Somatosensory Cortex of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chengdong; Zhang, Yajun; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Song; Wang, Yuan; Fu, Bao; Yu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ketamine is a commonly used intravenous anesthetic which produces dissociation anesthesia, analgesia, and amnesia. The mechanism of ketamine-induced synaptic inhibition in high-level cortical areas is still unknown. We aimed to elucidate the effects of different concentrations of ketamine on the glutamatergic synaptic transmission of the neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex by using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats (11–19 postnatal days, n=36) were used to obtain brain slices (300 μM). Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (data from 40 neurons) were recorded at a command potential of -70 mV in the presence of bicuculline (a competitive antagonist of GABAA receptors, 30 μM) and strychnine (glycine receptor antagonist, 30 μM). Miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (data from 40 neurons) were also recorded when 1 μM of tetrodotoxin was added into the artificial cerebrospinal fluid. We used GraphPad Prism5for statistical analysis. Significant differences in the mean amplitude and frequency were tested using the Student paired 2-tailed t test. Values of P<0.05 were considered significant. Results: Different concentrations of ketamine inhibited the frequency and amplitude of the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents as well as the amplitude of the miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in a concentration-dependent manner, but they exerted no significant effect on the frequency of the miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: Ketamine inhibited the excitatory synaptic transmission of the neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex. The inhibition may have been mediated by a reduction in the sensitivity of the postsynaptic glutamatergic receptors. PMID:27365548

  13. Continuous Infusion of Ketamine for Out-of-hospital Isolated Orthopedic Injuries Secondary to Trauma: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wiel, Eric; Zitouni, Djamel; Assez, Nathalie; Sebilleau, Quentin; Lys, Sébastien; Duval, Audrey; Mauriaucourt, Patrick; Hubert, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Although ketamine has recently been demonstrated to provide a morphine-sparing effect, no previous study reports the effect of continuous infusion of ketamine for analgesia in out-of-hospital environments. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a continuous infusion of ketamine (IK group) vs. a continuous infusion of saline (IS group) on morphine requirements in out-of-hospital trauma patients suffering from severe acute pain. Methods. In this prospective, multicenter, randomized, single-blind clinical study, patients suffering from isolated orthopedic injuries secondary to trauma with severe acute pain received a low-dose intravenous (IV) bolus of ketamine (0.2 mg·kg(-1)) combined with an IV bolus of morphine (0.1 mg·kg(-1)) and were randomized either in the IK group (IV continuous infusion of ketamine 0.2 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1)), or in the IS group (IV continuous infusion of saline at the same volume). The primary endpoint was morphine requirements in terms of total dose of morphine (excluding the baseline bolus) injected at the end of prehospital emergency care at hospital admission (final time, Tf). The secondary endpoint was evaluation of pain with visual analogic scale (VAS). Results. Sixty-six patients were enrolled. Total morphine dose was not significantly reduced with continuous infusion of ketamine (0.048 [0.000; 0.150] vs. 0.107 [0.052; 0.150] in IK and IS groups), with similar mean duration of care (median 35.0 min). Analgesia was as efficient without any significant difference in VAS at Tf between groups (3.1 ± 2.3 (IK group) vs. 3.7 ± 2.7 (IS group), p = 0.5). Conclusions. Continuous ketamine infusion did not reduce morphine requirements in severe acute pain trauma patients in the out-of-hospital emergency settings.

  14. Changes in hippocampal AMPA receptors and cognitive impairments in chronic ketamine addiction models: another understanding of ketamine CNS toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Runtao; Li, Yanning; Du, Ao; Yu, Hao; He, Bolin; Shen, Ruipeng; Zhou, Jichuan; Li, Lu; Cui, Wen; Zhang, Guohua; Lu, Yan; Wu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine has been reported to impair human cognitive function as a recreational drug of abuse. However, chronic effects of ketamine on central nervous system need to be further explored. We set out to establish chronic ketamine addiction models by giving mice a three or six month course of daily intraperitoneal injections of ketamine, then examined whether long-term ketamine administration induced cognition deficits and changed hippocampal post-synaptic protein expression in adult mice. Behavior tests results showed that mice exhibited dose- and time-dependent learning and memory deficits after long-term ketamine administration. Western blot results showed levels of GluA1, p-S845 and p-S831 proteins demonstrated significant decline with ketamine 60 mg/kg until six months administration paradigm. But levels of p-S845 and p-S831 proteins exhibited obvious increase with ketamine 60 mg/kg three months administration paradigm. NR1 protein levels significantly decrease with ketamine 60 mg/kg three and six months administration paradigm. Our results indicate that reduced expression levels and decreased phosphorylation levels of hippocampal post-synaptic membrane GluA1- containing AMPA receptors maybe involved in cognition impairment after long-term ketamine administration. These findings provide further evidence for the cognitive damage of chronic ketamine addiction as a recreational drug. PMID:27934938

  15. Ketamine versus magnesium sulfate with caudal bupivacaine block in pediatric inguinoscrotal surgery: A prospective randomized observer-blinded study

    PubMed Central

    Farrag, Waleed S. H.; Ibrahim, Abdelrady S.; Mostafa, Mostafa Galal; Kurkar, Adel; Elderwy, Ahmad A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Possible approaches for postoperative analgesia after pediatric inguinoscrotal surgery are caudal block by bupivacaine/ketamine (BK) and bupivacaine/magnesium sulfate (BM). Aim: The purpose of the following study is to compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of ketamine and magnesium sulfate in combination with bupivacaine for caudal blockade in pediatric patients after inguinoscrotal operations. Materials and Methods: Patients randomly received one of the two solutions for caudal epidural injection after induction of general anesthesia. Group-BK: Were given a mixture of 0.25% bupivacaine and 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine. Group-BM: Were given a mixture of 0.25% bupivacaine and 50 mg magnesium sulfate. Postoperatively, a blinded post-anesthesia care unit nurse assessed the quality of analgesia with a visual pain analog scale (VPAS). Significant pain is defined as one that has a VAPS of ≥3. Results: Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II children (20 in each group) completed the study. The two groups were comparable regards age, sex, body mass index, anesthesia and surgery durations, recovery time and sevoflurane concentration. The mean duration of caudal analgesia ± standard deviation was 462 ± 17.2 min versus 398.05 ± 12.9 min for BK and BM groups, receptively (P < 0.001). Supplemental rectal paracetamol within 12 h postoperatively were 15% for BK group versus 25% for BM (P = 0.05). Four patients in BK group only experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting (P = 0.053). Conclusion: Caudal administration of BK is efficient and safe for pediatric inguinoscrotal operations with longer postoperative analgesia than BM sulfate. PMID:26229319

  16. Effects of ketamine administration on mTOR and reticulum stress signaling pathways in the brain after the infusion of rapamycin into prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Michels, Monique; Abatti, Mariane; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal Pizzol, Felipe; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies show that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway is required for the rapid antidepressant actions of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists. A relationship between mTOR kinase and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, also known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been shown. We evaluate the effects of ketamine administration on the mTOR signaling pathway and proteins of UPR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens, after the inhibiton of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol), or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). The immunocontent of mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) homologous protein (CHOP), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) - alpha were determined in the brain. The mTOR levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with saline and ketamine in the PFC; p4EBP1 levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine in the PFC and nucleus accumbens; the levels of peEF2K were increased in the PFC in the vehicle group treated with ketamine and reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. The PERK and IRE1-alpha levels were decreased in the PFC in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling inhibition by rapamycin could be involved, at least in part, with the mechanism of action of ketamine; and the ketamine antidepressant on ER stress pathway could be also mediated by mTOR signaling pathway in certain brain structures.

  17. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  18. [General anesthesia in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Carmen; Cernea, Daniela; Enache, Monalisa; Deca, Andreea Gabriela

    2012-01-01

    General anesthesia is less utilized in ophthalmology. There are some criteria that lead to general anesthesia: patients with auditive debility, aged and senile patients, allergic patients, children and young patients, and subjects who totally refuse loco-regional procedures. General anesthesia utilizes as basic products: narcotic substances, analgesic substances, or neuroleptic substances utilized separately or associated, with posology adaptated to several factors: patients' pulse, physical statement, age, duration. The type of anesthetic substance depends also of specialist anesthetist experience.

  19. Monitoring equine anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Riebold, T W

    1990-12-01

    In conclusion, monitoring the depth of anesthesia plays an integral role in the anesthetic regimen. Although the use of sophisticated monitoring equipment has replaced some of the art of anesthesia and made assessment of depth of anesthesia more precise, a vigilant clinician still needs to serve as the animal's advocate. He or she must gather the data that are generated by machines, acquire data that monitoring equipment cannot obtain, assimilate all the facts, and make appropriate changes in anesthetic management.

  20. The value proposition of anesthesia information management systems.

    PubMed

    Egger Halbeis, Christoph B; Epstein, Richard H

    2008-12-01

    Anesthesia information management systems add value to the anesthesiologist and the hospital above that which is provided by manual anesthesia records. The more complete documentation and less biased recording of vital signs in this system, relative to manual records, provide data needed for quality initiatives and operating room management and for clinical research. The system can improve the ability to increase anesthesia charge capture, meet the requirements of pay-for-performance programs, and assist in the defense of malpractice allegations. Realization of value from the anesthesia information management systems requires additional expenditures of resources to adapt the systems to meet specific institutional requirements.

  1. Ketamine in war/tropical surgery (a final tribute to the racemic mixture).

    PubMed

    Bonanno, F G

    2002-05-01

    A technique of continuous intravenous anaesthesia with ketamine was used successfully during the Somalia civil war in 1994 and in north Uganda in 1999 for 64 operations in 62 patients, aged from 6 weeks to 70 years, undergoing limb and abdominal surgery including caesarian sections and interventions in neonates. Operations lasting up to 2h could be performed in the absence of sophisticated equipment such as pulse oximeters or ventilators in patients on spontaneous ventilation breathing air/oxygen only. After premedication with diazepam, glycopyrrolate and local anaesthesia, and induction with standard doses of ketamine, a maintenance dose of 10-20 microg/kg/min of ketamine proved safe and effective. Emphasis was placed on bedside clinical monitoring, relying heavily on the heart rate. Diazepam, unless contraindicated or risky, remains the only necessary complementary drug to ketamine as it buffers its cardiovascular response and decreases the duration and intensity of operative and postoperative hallucinations. Local anaesthetic blocks were useful in decreasing the requirement for postoperative analgesia. An antisialogue was usually unnecessary in operations lasting up to 2 h, glycopyrrolate being the best choice for its lowest psychotropic and chronotropic effects, especially in a hot climate. Experience in war/tropical settings suggests this technique could be useful in civilian contexts such as outdoor life-saving emergency surgery or in mass casualties where, e.g. amputation and rapid extrication were required.

  2. Upper Extremity Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Joseph M.; Gerancher, J.C.; Hebl, James R.; Ilfeld, Brian M.; McCartney, Colin J.L.; Franco, Carlo D.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2009-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is the cornerstone of the peripheral nerve regional anesthesia practice of most anesthesiologists. As part of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s commitment to providing intensive evidence-based education related to regional anesthesia and analgesia, this article is a complete update of our 2002 comprehensive review of upper extremity anesthesia. The text of the review focuses on (1) pertinent anatomy, (2) approaches to the brachial plexus and techniques that optimize block quality, (4) local anesthetic and adjuvant pharmacology, (5) complications, (6) perioperative issues, and (6) challenges for future research. PMID:19282714

  3. Anesthesia and analgesia in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Galatos, Apostolos D

    2011-03-01

    Physical or chemical restraint, with or without local anesthesia, has been extensively used to perform diagnostic or minor surgical procedures in small ruminants. However, anesthetic and analgesic techniques are required when specific diagnostic procedures and painful surgery are to be performed. Apart from improving animal welfare standards, anesthesia and analgesia are essential to make the procedures easier and improve both animal and personnel safety. This article provides an overview of the anesthetic and analgesic agents and techniques commonly used in sheep and goats.

  4. Ketamine and other potential glutamate antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arpan; McKie, Shane; Deakin, J F William

    2015-01-30

    The need for rapid acting antidepressants is widely recognised. There has been much interest in glutamate mechanisms in major depressive disorder (MDD) as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. A single intravenous infusion of ketamine, a N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist anaesthetic agent, can alleviate depressive symptoms in patients within hours of administration. The mechanism of action appears to be in part through glutamate release onto non-NMDA receptors including α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and metabotropic receptors. However these are also reported effects on 5-HT, dopamine and intracellular effects on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The effects of SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor) antidepressants may also involve alterations in NMDA function. The article reviews the effect of current antidepressants on NMDA and examines the efficacy and mechanism of ketamine. Response to ketamine is also discussed and comparison with other glutamate drugs including lamotrigine, amantadine, riluzole, memantine, traxoprodil, GLYX-13, MK-0657, RO4917523, AZD2066 and Coluracetam. Future studies need to link the rapid antidepressant effects seen with ketamine to inflammatory theories in MDD.

  5. 21 CFR 522.1222a - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222a Section 522.1222a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222a...

  6. 21 CFR 522.1222a - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222a Section 522.1222a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222a...

  7. 21 CFR 522.1222a - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222a Section 522.1222a Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222a...

  8. Ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia for a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system undergoing cesarean delivery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, LinLi; Ni, Juan; Wu, Lan; Luo, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with preexisting diseases is challenging and individualized approaches need to be determined based on patients’ complications. We report here a case of ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia in combination with low-dose ketamine during cesarean delivery on a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system and airway problems. The ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia was performed in the L1–L2 space, followed by an intravenous administration of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) for sedation and analgesia. Satisfactory anesthesia was provided to the patient and spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the surgery. The mother and the baby were discharged 5 days after surgery, no complications were reported for either of them. Our work demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia combined with low-dose ketamine can be used to successfully maintain spontaneous ventilation and provide effective analgesia during surgery and reduce the risk of postoperative anesthesia-related pulmonary infection. PMID:25999759

  9. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Caused by Ultrasound Bursts Combined with Microbubbles Depends on Anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2011-09-01

    Prior works on BBB disruption via inter-arterial infusions of osmotic agents have shown a strong dependence on anesthesia. Here, we investigated whether different anesthesia agents can affect ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. A piston transducer fired through a rubber aperture (frequency: 532 kHz, diameter: 4 cm, aperture diameter: 16 mm) was used to generate the ultrasound fields, and sonications combined with an ultrasound contrast agent were performed at 5 power levels. BBB disruption was quantified by measuring the MRI contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI, and erythrocyte extravasation characterized in light microscopy. For each exposure level tested, experiments performed with ketamine/xylazine resulted in significantly greater (P<0.05) enhancement than with isoflurane/oxygen. The onset of severe red blood cell extravasation occurred at lower power levels with ketamine/xylazine. These results suggest ultrasound-induced BBB disruption can depend on anesthesia agent, possibly due effects on the vasculature. These results suggest that care is needed in comparing experiments with different anesthesia agents and physiological factors need to be considered with ultrasound-induced BBB disruption.

  10. Detecting ketamine in beverage residues: Application in date rape detection.

    PubMed

    Albright, Jessica A; Stevens, Sarah A; Beussman, Douglas J

    2012-05-01

    Ketamine can be used to facilitate date-rape when unknowingly spiked into a victim's beverage. If a biological sample is not available from the victim, the beverage container might be the only remaining source of forensic evidence. We present a rapid, simple analysis method for the detection of ketamine in wet or dry beverage residues based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Wet residues consist of the final few drops (<1 ml) in a container while dry residues are the remains once all liquid has evaporated. By using LC-MS, which readily handles aqueous samples, often no derivatization or sample extraction is needed, thus reducing analysis time and lab technician involvement. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides an enhancement in both selectivity and sensitivity. We have studied a range of beverages and determined limits of detection between 1.2 × 10-3 and 1.3 × 10-4 mg/ml, compared to 0.21-0.85 mg/ml used in most date-rape scenarios. This paper represents the first published report of using LC-MS/MS for the analysis of beverage residues for the presence of a date-rape drug. This method could replace the current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and provide a faster, more selective method for the analysis of date-rape drugs, requiring virtually no sample preparation.

  11. In vivo ketamine-induced changes in [11C]ABP688 binding to metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; DellaGioia, Nicole; Bloch, Michael; Sanacora, Gerard; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Abdallah, Chadi; Yang, Jie; Wen, Ruofeng; Mann, J. John; Krystal, John H.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Carson, Richard E.; Esterlis, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background At subanesthetic doses, ketamine, an N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist, increases glutamate release. Here, we imaged the acute effect of ketamine on brain metabotropic glutamatergic receptors subtype 5 (mGluR5) with a high affinity PET ligand [11C]ABP688 ((E)-3-((6-methylpyridin-2-yl)ethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-O-11C-methyl-oxime), a negative allosteric modulator of mGluR5. Methods Ten healthy nonsmoking human volunteers (34±13 years old) received two [11C]ABP688 PET scans on the same day – before (scan 1) and during i.v. ketamine administration (0.23mg/kg over 1min, then 0.58mg/kg over 1h; scan 2). PET data were acquired for 90 min immediately following [11C]ABP688 bolus injection. Input functions were obtained through arterial blood sampling with metabolite analysis. Results A significant reduction in [11C]ABP688 volume of distribution (VT) was observed in scan 2 relative to scan 1 of 21.3 ± 21.4%, on average, in the anterior cingulate, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, ventral striatum, parietal lobe, dorsal putamen, dorsal caudate, amygdala, and hippocampus. There was a significant increase in measurements of dissociative state after ketamine initiation (p<0.05) that resolved after completion of the scan. Discussion This study provides first evidence that ketamine administration decreases [11C]ABP688 binding in vivo in human subjects. Results suggest that [11C]ABP688 binding is sensitive to ketamine-induced effects, although the high individual variation in ketamine response requires further examination. PMID:25156701

  12. [The choice of a pediatric anesthesia ventilator].

    PubMed

    Kern, D; Larcher, C; Cottron, N; Ait Aissa, D; Fesseau, R; Alacoque, X; Delort, F; Masquère, P; Agnès, E; Visnadi, G; Fourcade, O

    2013-12-01

    The technology of anesthesia ventilators has substantially progressed during last years. The choice of a pediatric anesthesia ventilator needs to be led by multiple parameters: requirement, technical (pneumatic performance, velocity of halogenated or oxygen delivery), cost (purchase, in operation, preventive and curative maintenance), reliability, ergonomy, upgradability, and compatibility. The demonstration of the interest of pressure support mode during maintenance of spontaneous ventilation anesthesia makes this mode essential in pediatrics. In contrast, the financial impact of target controlled inhalation of halogenated has not be studied in pediatrics. Paradoxically, complex and various available technologies had not been much prospectively studied. Anesthesia ventilators performances in pediatrics need to be clarified in further clinical and bench test studies.

  13. Use of xylazine hydrochloride-ketamine hydrochloride for immobilization of wild leopards (Panthera pardus fusca) in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Belsare, Aniruddha V; Athreya, Vidya R

    2010-06-01

    In India, leopards (Panthera pardus fusca) inhabit human-dominated landscapes, resulting in encounters that require interventions to prevent harm to people, as well as the leopards. Immobilization is a prerequisite for any such intervention. Such emergency field immobilizations have to be carried out with limited tools, often amidst large uncontrollable crowds. An effective and practicable approach is discussed, based on 55 wild leopard immobilizations undertaken between January 2003 and April 2008. A xylazine hydrochloride (1.4 +/- 0.3 mg/kg)--ketamine hydrochloride (5 +/- 2 mg/kg) mixture was used for immobilization of leopards, based on estimated body weight. When weight could not be estimated, a standard initial dose of 50 mg of xylazine--150 mg of ketamine was used. Supplemental doses (50-75 mg) of only ketamine were used as required. No life-threatening adverse effects of immobilization were documented for at least 1 mo postimmobilization.

  14. [Gastroschisis repair under caudal anesthesia: a series of three cases].

    PubMed

    Kasat, Neha; Dave, Nandini; Shah, Harick; Mahajan, Swapnil

    2017-03-29

    Gastroschisis is a congenital anomaly characterized by a defect in the anterior abdominal wall with protrusion of abdominal viscera. Perioperative mortality is very high in these patients. Traditionally gastroschisis repair has been performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation, requiring postoperative intensive care admission and mechanical ventilation. Caudal block is an attractive alternative to general anesthesia. We present a series of three neonates with gastroschisis, repaired solely under caudal anesthesia.

  15. Preclinical imaging anesthesia in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vesce, Giancarlo; Micieli, Fabiana; Chiavaccini, Ludovica

    2017-03-01

    Despite the outstanding progress achieved by preclinical imaging science, laboratory animal anesthesia remains quite stationary. Ninety percent of preclinical imaging studies are carried on small rodents (mice and rats) anesthetized by outdated injectable and/or inhalation agents. A need for imaging awake (conscious) animals is questionably registered mainly for brain research, for phMRI and for accomplishing pain and analgesia studies. A need for improving current rodent anesthesia protocols and for enforcing the 3Rs paradigm is sought. Patient monitoring throughout the procedure and recovery phases, as well as vital parameter's data must be recorded in basic consciousness states and during imaging sessions. A multidrug approach is suggested to overcome the limits of monoanesthesia and well-timed physiological data are required to ground findings and to interpret imaging data.

  16. Comparison of oral Midazolam-Ketamine and Midazolam-Promethazine as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Golpayegani, Mojtaba Vahid; Dehghan, Fereshteh; Ansari, Ghassem; Shayeghi, Shahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Investigation was designed to evaluate the behavioral changes in children receiving dental treatment while they have been administered combination of Midazolam/Ketamine or Midazolam/Promethazine. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized double blind clinical trial with cases being selected from those uncooperative children aged 2 to 6 years from those referred for treatment under general anesthesia. Anxiety score of all cases were recorded before any attempt using Frankel's anxiety scoring system with those in negative category being included. Cases with at least a pair of similar size cavities on similar teeth were selected with each tooth being randomly allocated for one sedative regimen group. To avoid sequence effect, half of the patients received one regimen at the first visit while the other half received the other regimen as the first. Each case served as control for him or herself to reduce influencing factors. Child's reaction was recorded before, during, and at the end of dental procedure. SO2 as well as Pulse rate were recorded as the most critical vital signs. Collected data were then analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and paired t-test. Results: Patients’ mean age was 3.5 years with 43% being male. Only 10% of the Ketamine/Midazolam group showed considerable amount of change in their behavior with a statistical significant difference being presented (P=0.029). Conclusion: Under the current circumstances, Ketamine/Midazolam combination provided sufficient sedative effect in lower doses. However, Midazolam/Promethazine combination did not produce similar results. PMID:22363361

  17. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized using the following commonly used regimens: (1) hypnorm/midazolam repetitive or single injection; (2) ketamine/xylazine; (3) isoflurane; (4) pentobarbital; and (5) A saline injected, nonanesthetized group. Oral glucose was administered at time 0 min and blood glucose measured in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine/xylazine lowered insulin responses and resulted in severe hyperglycemia throughout the experiment; (3) isoflurane did not only alter the insulin secretion but also resulted in severe hyperglycemia; (4) pentobarbital resulted in both increased insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. All four anesthetic regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice.

  18. Effects of ketamine-xylazine intravenous bolus injection on cardiovascular function in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Christine; Bollerhey, Melanie; Ebner, Johanna; Laacke-Singer, Lién; Schuster, Tibor; Erhardt, Wolf

    2010-01-01

    The direct effects of ketamine-xylazine (KET-XYL) on vascular function have not been investigated in rabbits. The short-term cardiovascular effects of intravenous (IV) KET-XYL bolus injection, therefore, should be investigated using vascular ultrasonography. In this prospective experimental study, KET-XYL anesthesia was induced IV in 9 female New Zealand White rabbits before 3 defined test bolus injections of KET-XYL were given IV. Before and for 10 min after each KET-XYL injection vascular and hemodynamic variables were recorded at the left common carotid artery (ACC) after the 1st injection, and at the abdominal aorta (AA) after the 2nd injection. Echocardiography was performed after the 3rd injection to investigate changes in cardiac parameters. Ketamine-xylazine IV caused a significant increase in vessel diameter at the ACC and AA. Average volumetric flow significantly decreased at the ACC and pulsatility index significantly decreased at the AA. Fractional shortening (FS) and heart rate significantly decreased, while mean arterial blood pressure initially increased. Bolus injections of KET-XYL IV produced a transient vasodilatation at the ACC and AA. Despite central vasodilatation, bradycardia, and decrease of FS and average volumetric flow (VFave), mean arterial blood pressure did not significantly decrease indicating well-preserved cardiovascular compensatory mechanism after the ratio and doses of KET-XYL IV bolus injections used in this study. PMID:20885844

  19. Cellular Registration Without Behavioral Recall Of Olfactory Sensory Input Under General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsson, Andrew R.; Brandon, Nicole R.; Tang, Pei; Xu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest that sensory information is “received” but not “perceived” under general anesthesia. Whether and to what extent the brain continues to process sensory inputs in a drug-induced unconscious state remain unclear. Methods 107 rats were randomly assigned to 12 different anesthesia and odor exposure paradigms. The immunoreactivities of the immediate early gene products c-Fos and Egr1 as neural activity markers were combined with behavioral tests to assess the integrity and relationship of cellular and behavioral responsiveness to olfactory stimuli under a surgical plane of ketamine-xylazine general anesthesia. Results The olfactory sensory processing centers can distinguish the presence or absence of experimental odorants even when animals were fully anesthetized. In the anesthetized state, the c-Fos immunoreactivity in the higher olfactory cortices revealed a difference between novel and familiar odorants similar to that seen in the awake state, suggesting that the anesthetized brain functions beyond simply receiving external stimulation. Re-exposing animals to odorants previously experienced only under anesthesia resulted in c-Fos immunoreactivity similar to that elicited by familiar odorants, indicating that previous registration had occurred in the anesthetized brain. Despite the “cellular memory,” however, odor discrimination and forced-choice odor-recognition tests showed absence of behavioral recall of the registered sensations, except for a longer latency in odor recognition tests. Conclusions Histologically distinguishable registration of sensory process continues to occur at cellular level under ketamine-xylazine general anesthesia despite the absence of behavioral recognition, consistent with the notion that general anesthesia causes disintegration of information processing without completely blocking cellular communications. PMID:24694846

  20. Caffeine accelerates recovery from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Fong, Robert; Mason, Peggy; Fox, Aaron P; Xie, Zheng

    2014-03-01

    General anesthetics inhibit neurotransmitter release from both neurons and secretory cells. If inhibition of neurotransmitter release is part of an anesthetic mechanism of action, then drugs that facilitate neurotransmitter release may aid in reversing general anesthesia. Drugs that elevate intracellular cAMP levels are known to facilitate neurotransmitter release. Three cAMP elevating drugs (forskolin, theophylline, and caffeine) were tested; all three drugs reversed the inhibition of neurotransmitter release produced by isoflurane in PC12 cells in vitro. The drugs were tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were injected with either saline or saline containing drug. All three drugs dramatically accelerated recovery from isoflurane anesthesia, but caffeine was most effective. None of the drugs, at the concentrations tested, had significant effects on breathing rates, O2 saturation, heart rate, or blood pressure in anesthetized animals. Caffeine alone was tested on propofol-anesthetized rats where it dramatically accelerated recovery from anesthesia. The ability of caffeine to accelerate recovery from anesthesia for different chemical classes of anesthetics, isoflurane and propofol, opens the possibility that it will do so for all commonly used general anesthetics, although additional studies will be required to determine whether this is in fact the case. Because anesthesia in rodents is thought to be similar to that in humans, these results suggest that caffeine might allow for rapid and uniform emergence from general anesthesia in human patients.

  1. Rectal Thiopental versus Intramuscular Ketamine in Pediatric Procedural Sedation and Analgesia; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Azizkhani, Reza; Esmailian, Mehrdad; shojaei, Azadeh; Golshani, Keihan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Physicians frequently deal with procedures which require sedation of pediatric patients. Laceration repair is one of them. No study has been performed regarding the comparison between induction of sedation with sodium thiopental and ketamine in laceration repair. Therefore, the present study was aimed to comparison of induced sedation by rectal sodium thiopental and muscular injection of hydrochloride ketamine in pediatric patients need laceration repair. Methods: The presented study is a single-blinded clinical trial performed through 2013 to 2014 in Ayatollah Kashani and Alzahra Hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. Patients from 3 months to 14 years, needed sedation for laceration repair, were entered. Patients were sequentially evaluated and randomly categorized in two groups of hydrochloride ketamine with dose of 2-4 milligram per kilogram and sodium thiopental with dose of 25 milligram per kilogram. Demographic data and vital signs before drug administration and after induction of sedation, Ramsey score, time to onset of action, and sedation recovery time were evaluated. Chi-squared, Mann-Whitney, and Non-parametric analysis of covariance tests were used. P<0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: In this study 60 pediatric patients were entered. 30 patients with mean age of 42.8±18.82 months were received sodium thiopental and the rest with mean age of 30.08±16.88 months given ketamine. Mann-Whitney test was showed that time to onset of action in sodium thiopental group (28.23±5.18 minutes) was significantly higher than ketamine (7.77±4.13 minutes), (p<0.001). The sedation recovery time in ketamine group (29.83±7.70) was higher than sodium thiopental. Depth of sedation had no significant difference between two groups based on Ramsey score (p=0.87). No significant difference was seen between two groups in the respiratory rate (df=1, 58; F=0.002; P=0.96) and heart rate (df=1, 58; F=0.98; P=0.33). However, arterial oxygen saturation level (df

  2. [History of anesthesia : "From narcosis to perioperative homeostasis"].

    PubMed

    Petermann, H; Goerig, M

    2016-10-01

    In the western World 16 October 1846 is often called "Ether Day", marking the beginning of anesthesia. Before that date, for physicians there was only a struggle against pain. In the following 170 years all fields of general anesthesia as well as regional and local anesthesia were continuously developed. Pharmacological developments and technical innovations made this evolution possible. The complexity of this field of medicine requires a specialist: the anesthesiologist, whose selection of the most suitable form of anesthesia for the patient makes the surgical intervention painless. In addition, the history of anesthesia was characterized by personalities who were responsible for the progress of this medical field. Anesthesia is one part of the discipline of anesthesiology, which also includes resuscitation, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy.

  3. Ketamine Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ayman E.; Baroudy, Nevine R. El; Refay, Amira S. El

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moderate sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has traditionally been provided by the endoscopist. Controversy has ensued over safe and efficient sedation practice as endoscopy has increased in numbers and complexity. AIM: To evaluate the safety of ketamine sedation given by non-anesthesiologist during gastrointestinal endoscopy in children. METHODS: A prospective study of 100 paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms who were a candidate for upper or lower gastrointestinal endoscopy in paediatric endoscopy unit at Abo El-Reesh Paediatric Hospital, Cairo University. All children were > 2 years old and weighed > 6 kg. The analysis was performed in terms of sedation-related complications. RESULTS: A total 100 paediatric patients including 53 males and 47 females with mean age of 5.04 years were involved in the study. All children were medicated with ketamine with a mean dose of 3.77mg/kg. No complications occurred in 87% of cases. Desaturation occurred in 13% of the cases and was reversible by supplemental nasal oxygen. Desaturation was more frequent during Upper GI Endoscopy and with the intramuscular route (p value=0.049). No apnea, bradycardia, arrest or emergence reactions were recorded. CONCLUSION: Ketamine sedation found to be safe for paediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy in Egyptian children without co-morbidities. Transient Hypoxia (13%) may occur but easily reversed by nasal oxygen therapy. PMID:27703561

  4. Ketamine regulates the presynaptic release machinery in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wegener, Gregers; Liebenberg, Nico; Zarate, Carlos A; Popoli, Maurizio; Elfving, Betina

    2013-07-01

    In the search for new drug targets, that may help point the way to develop fast-acting treatments for mood disorders, we have explored molecular pathways regulated by ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, which has consistently shown antidepressant response within a few hours of administration. Using Sprague-Dawley rats we investigated the effects of ketamine on the presynaptic release machinery responsible for neurotransmitter release at 1, 2 and 4 h as well as 7 days after administration of a single subanesthetic dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg). A large reduction in the accumulation of SNARE complexes was observed in hippocampal synaptic membranes after 1, 2 and 4 h of ketamine administration. In parallel, we found a selective reduction in the expression of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin I and an increase in the levels of synapsin I in hippocampal synaptosomes suggesting a mechanism by which ketamine reduces SNARE complex formation, in part, by regulating the number of synaptic vesicles in the nerve terminals. Moreover, ketamine reduced Thr(286)-phosphorylated αCaMKII and its interaction with syntaxin 1A, which identifies CaMKII as a potential target for second messenger-mediated actions of ketamine. In addition, despite previous reports of ketamine-induced inhibition of GSK-3, we were unable to detect regulation of its activity after ketamine administration. Our findings demonstrate that ketamine rapidly induces changes in the hippocampal presynaptic machinery similar to those that are obtained only with chronic treatments with traditional antidepressants. This suggests that reduction of neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus has possible relevance for the rapid antidepressant effect of ketamine.

  5. Ketamine regulates the presynaptic release machinery in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wegener, Gregers; Liebenberg, Nico; Zarate, Carlos A.; Popoli, Maurizio; Elfving, Betina

    2013-01-01

    In the search for new drug targets, that may help point the way to develop fast-acting treatments for mood disorders, we have explored molecular pathways regulated by ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, which has consistently shown antidepressant response within a few hours of administration. Using Sprague-Dawley rats we investigated the effects of ketamine on the presynaptic release machinery responsible for neurotransmitter release at 1, 2 and 4 h as well as 7 days after administration of a single subanesthetic dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg). A large reduction in the accumulation of SNARE complexes was observed in hippocampal synaptic membranes after 1, 2 and 4 h of ketamine administration. In parallel, we found a selective reduction in the expression of the synaptic vesicle protein synaptotagmin I and an increase in the levels of synapsin I in hippocampal synaptosomes suggesting a mechanism by which ketamine reduces SNARE complex formation, in part, by regulating the number of synaptic vesicles in the nerve terminals. Moreover, ketamine reduced Thr286-phosphorylated αCaMKII and its interaction with syntaxin 1A, which identifies CaMKII as a potential target for second messenger-mediated actions of ketamine. In addition, despite previous reports of ketamine-induced inhibition of GSK-3, we were unable to detect regulation of its activity after ketamine administration. Our findings demonstrate that ketamine rapidly induces changes in the hippocampal presynaptic machinery similar to those that are obtained only with chronic treatments with traditional antidepressants. This suggests that reduction of neurotransmitter release in the hippocampus has possible relevance for the rapid antidepressant effect of ketamine. PMID:23548331

  6. Spinal and epidural anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines you are taking, and what anesthesia or sedation you have had before. If your procedure is ... Prough DS. Anesthesiology principles, pain management, and conscious sedation. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox ...

  7. [Meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mouchrif, Issam; Berdaii, Adnane; Labib, Ismail; Harrandou, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is a rare but serious complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Bacterial meningitis is mainly caused by Gram-positive cocci, implying an exogenous contamination which suggests a lack of asepsis. The evolution is usually favorable after treatment, but at the expense of increased health care costs and, sometimes, of significant neurological sequelae. We report a case of bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section.

  8. Are Anesthesia Providers Ready for Hypnosis? Anesthesia Providers' Attitudes Toward Hypnotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stone, Alexander B; Sheinberg, Rosanne; Bertram, Amanda; Seymour, Anastasia Rowland

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to measure current attitudes toward hypnosis among anesthesia providers using an in-person survey distributed at a single grand rounds at a single academic teaching hospital. One hundred twenty-six anesthesia providers (anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists) were included in this study. A 10-question Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved questionnaire was developed. One hundred twenty-six (73% of providers at the meeting) anesthesia providers completed the survey. Of the respondents, 54 (43%) were anesthesiologists, 42 (33%) were trainees (interns/residents/fellows) in anesthesia, and 30 (24%) were nurse anesthetists. Over 70% of providers, at each level of training, rated their knowledge of hypnosis as either below average or having no knowledge. Fifty-two (42%) providers agreed or strongly agreed that hypnotherapy has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia, while 103 (83%) believed that positive suggestion has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia (p < .0001). Common reasons cited against using hypnosis were that it is too time consuming (41%) and requires special training (34%). Only three respondents (2%) believed that there were no reasons for using hypnosis in their practice. These data suggest that there is a self-reported lack of knowledge about hypnosis among anesthesia providers, although many anesthesia providers are open to the use of hypnosis in their clinical practice. Anesthesia providers are more likely to support the use of positive suggestion in their practice than hypnosis. Practical concerns should be addressed if hypnosis and therapeutic verbal techniques are to gain more widespread use.

  9. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  10. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  11. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  12. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  13. Analgesic effects of ketamine infusion therapy in korean patients with neuropathic pain: A 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Gu; Lee, Chul Joong; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Sim, Woo Seok; Shin, Byung Seop; Lee, Sang Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Lee, Pyung Bok; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Background: The overexcitation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex appears to play a critical role in the development of neuropathic pain, and ketamine acts as an antagonist to that receptor. Some publications have reported on the prominent relief of neuropathic pain with intravenous or subcutaneous ketamine infusions or a single-dose intravenous ketamine injection despite adverse effects. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine the analgesic effect of intravenous ketamine infusion therapy for neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatments. Secondary objectives included identifying the variables related to the analgesic effect and the pain descriptors susceptible to ketamine infusion. Methods: This 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study was conducted in Korean patients with neuropathic pain recruited from the Samsung Seoul Hospital (Seoul, Republic of Korea) outpatient pain management unit. Patients were required to have a pain severity score >5 (visual analog scale [VAS], where 0 = no pain and 10 = worst pain imaginable) over a period of ≥1 month while on standard treatment. The patients were required to have shown no benefit from standard treatment and no pain relief lasting over 1 month. The ketamine infusion therapy was composed of 3 sessions performed consecutively every other day. Midazolam was administered concomitantly to reduce the occurrence of central nervous system-related adverse events (AEs) secondary to ketamine. Each session was as follows: ketamine 0.2 mg/kg and midazolam 0.1 mg/kg were administered intravenously for 5 minutes as a loading dose, followed by a continuous infusion of ketamine 0.5 mg/kg/h and midazolam 0.025 mg/kg/h for 2 hours. AEs were assessed in the following ways: close monitoring of ECG, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and evaluating the need for treatment of AEs during infu- sion and until discharge by an attending anesthesiologist; an open question about discomfort at the end of

  14. Pharmacokinetics of intramuscular ketamine in young ostriches premedicated with romifidine.

    PubMed

    De Lucas, J J; Rodríguez, C; Marín, M; González, F; Ballesteros, C; San Andrés, M I

    2007-02-01

    Ketamine is a short-acting dissociative anaesthetic for chemical restraint and surgical anaesthesia in domestic and non-domestic animals. The present study was designed to determine the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of ketamine (10 mg/kg) after intramuscular (i.m.) administration to young ostriches premedicated with romifidine. Ketamine was rapidly absorbed after i.m. administration. Maximal ketamine concentration (C(max)) of 2.93 +/- 0.61 microg/ml was reached at 12.5 +/- 2.50 min and thereafter ketamine concentrations decreased rapidly. The elimination half-life (t(1/2 z)) obtained was 62.37 +/- 17.37 min and mean residence time (MRT) was 77.33 +/- 19.12 min. The area under the curve (AUC) was 114.19 +/- 15.76 microg x min/ml.

  15. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Andrew W; Rosenfeld, David M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less) and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine's metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain.

  16. Impact of Anesthesia Protocols on In Vivo Bioluminescent Bacteria Imaging Results.

    PubMed

    Chuzel, Thomas; Sanchez, Violette; Vandamme, Marc; Martin, Stéphane; Flety, Odile; Pager, Aurélie; Chabanel, Christophe; Magnier, Luc; Foskolos, Marie; Petit, Océane; Rokbi, Bachra; Chereul, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Infectious murine models greatly benefit from optical imaging using bioluminescent bacteria to non-invasively and repeatedly follow in vivo bacterial infection. In this context, one of the most critical parameters is the bioluminescence sensitivity to reliably detect the smallest number of bacteria. Another critical point is the anesthetic approaches that have been demonstrated to impact the bioluminescence flux emission in studies with luciferase-transfected tumor cells. However, this impact has never been assessed on bacteria bioluminescent models. To this end, we investigated the effects of four anesthesia protocols on the bioluminescence flux in a central venous catheter murine model (SKH1-hr(hr) mice) infected by a bioluminescent S. aureus Xen36 strain. Bioluminescence imaging was performed on mice anesthetized by either ketamine/xylazine (with or without oxygen supplementation), or isoflurane carried with air or oxygen. Total flux emission was determined in vivo daily for 3 days and ex vivo at the end of the study together with a CFU counting of the biofilm in the catheter. Bioluminescence flux differences appear between the different anesthetic protocols. Using a ketamine/xylazine anesthesia (with air), bacteria detection was impossible since the bioluminescence signal remains in the background signal. Mice anesthetized with isoflurane and oxygen led to a signal significantly higher to the background all along the kinetics. The use of isoflurane in air presents a bioluminescence signal similar to the use of ketamine/xylazine with oxygen. These data highlight the importance of oxygen to improve bioluminescence flux by bacteria with isoflurane as well as with ketamine/xylazine anesthetics. As a conclusion, we recommend the use of isoflurane anesthetic with oxygen to increase the bioluminescence sensitivity in this kind of study.

  17. Comparison of intranasal dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine for premedication in pediatrics patients: A randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ravi; Santhosh, M.C.B.; Annigeri, Venkatesh M.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Goal of premedication in pediatric anesthesia are relieving pre and postoperative anxiety, good parental separation, and smooth induction of anesthesia. Anxiety can produce aggressive reactions, increased distress, increased postoperative pain and postoperative agitation. The benzodiazepine, midazolam, is the most frequently used premedication in pediatric anesthesia. Midazolam has a number of beneficial effects when used as premedication in children: Sedation, fast onset, and limited duration of action. Though midazolam has a number of beneficial effects, it is far from an ideal premedicant having untoward side effects such as paradoxical reaction, respiratory depression, cognitive impairment, amnesia, and restlessness. Dexmedetomidine is a newer α-2-agonist, which can be used as premedicant. Aims: To compare the level of sedation, parental separation, mask acceptance, postoperative recovery of intranasal premedication with dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine combination in pediatric patients. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized double-blind study. Subjects and Methods: After written informed consent from the patient's parents or legal guardian, 54 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged between 1 and 6 years, scheduled to undergo elective minor surgery were enrolled. In group D patient received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine intranasally and in group DK received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine intranasally. Patients were assessed every 10 min for the level of sedation, parenteral separation, heart rate, and oxygen saturation by an independent observer. Mask acceptance and postoperative agitation were noted using an appropriate scale. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson Chi-square analysis to determine differences between two groups with respect to separation anxiety and acceptance of the anesthesia mask. Percentages used to represent frequencies. The level of significance was set at P< 0

  18. A comparison study between ketamine and ketamine-promethazine combination for oral sedation in pediatric dental patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tina; Redden, Ronald J.; Murphy, Scott

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the incidence of vomiting and the sedative effectiveness of ketamine to a ketamine-prornethazine combination in pediatric dental patients. Twenty-two patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists' classification I physical status who were between the ages of 21 and 43 months were randomly divided into 2 groups. The control group received 10 mg/kg of ketamine orally, whereas the experimental group received 10 mg/kg of ketamine and 1.1 mg/kg of promethazine orally. Nitrous oxide in oxygen was supplemented between 35 and 50%. Each patient received 1 or 2 quadrants of restoration by one operator. Heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were monitored and recorded during the treatment. Crying, alertness, movement, and overall general behavior were rated using the scale by Houpt et al. A dentist-anesthesiologist conducted the vital sign monitoring and behavioral assessment. Ketamine combined with promethazine eliminated the incidence of vomiting. A 2 x 2 chi-square contingency table showed a statistical difference between the 2 groups at P < .05 (control group, 27%; experimental group, 0%). Ketamine alone yielded better sedations than the combined agents as shown by the Mann-Whitney U statistical analysis (P < .05). Ketamine and a ketamine-promethazine combination are effective in the sedation of pediatric dental patients. PMID:12779109

  19. Role of kappa-opioid receptors in the effects of salvinorin A and ketamine on attention in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Christina L.; Paine, Tracie A.; Rittiner, Joseph E.; Béguin, Cécile; Carroll, F. Ivy; Roth, Bryan L.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Disruptions in perception and cognition are characteristic of psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia. Studies of pharmacological agents that alter perception and cognition in humans might provide a better understanding of the brain substrates of these complex processes. One way to study these states in rodents is with tests that require attention and visual perception for correct performance. Methods We examined the effects of two drugs that cause disruptions in perception and cognition in humans—the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist salvinorin A (salvA; 0.125–4.0 mg/kg) and the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (0.63–20 mg/kg)—on behavior in rats using the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5CSRTT), a food-motivated test that quantifies attention. We also compared the binding profiles of salvA and ketamine at KORs and NMDA receptors. Results SalvA and ketamine produced the same pattern of disruptive effects in the 5CSRTT, characterized by increases in signs often associated with reduced motivation (omission errors) and deficits in processing (elevated latencies to respond correctly). Sessions in which rats were fed before testing suggest that reduced motivation produces a subtly different pattern of behavior. Pretreatment with the KOR antagonist JDTic (10 mg/kg) blocked all salvA effects and some ketamine effects. Binding and function studies revealed that ketamine is a full agonist at KORs, although not as potent or selective as salvA. Conclusions SalvA and ketamine have previously underappreciated similarities in their behavioral effects and pharmacological profiles. By implication, KORs might be involved in some of the cognitive abnormalities observed in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:20358363

  20. Neonatal anesthesia with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2014-01-01

    Neonates are the most vulnerable age group in terms of anesthetic risk and perioperative mortality, especially in the developing world. Prematurity, malnutrition, delays in presentation, and sepsis contribute to this risk. Lack of healthcare workers, poorly maintained equipment, limited drug supplies, absence of postoperative intensive care, unreliable water supplies, or electricity are further contributory factors. Trained anesthesiologists with the skills required for pediatric and neonatal anesthesia as well as basic monitoring equipment such as pulse oximetry will go a long way to improve the unacceptably high anesthetic mortality.

  1. Immobilization of free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed and brown-throated three-toed sloths using ketamine and medetomidine: a comparison of physiologic parameters.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher S; Siudak-Campfield, Joanna; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; Vaughan, Christopher; Ramirez, Oscar; Keuler, Nicholas S; Sladky, Kurt K

    2008-10-01

    Free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed sloths (Choloepus hoffmanni; n=26) and brown-throated three-toed sloths (Bradypus variegatus; n=15) were manually captured and immobilized with 2.5 mg/kg ketamine + 0.02 mg/kg medetomidine administered intramuscularly. Physical examinations were conducted on each sloth 10 min after initial injection, and blood, fecal, and ectoparasite samples were collected. Heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, indirect systolic blood pressure, and indirect peripheral oxygen saturation were monitored every 5 min for the duration of anesthesia. After 45 min, atipamazole (0.1 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, as an antagonist to medetomidine, in order to facilitate recovery. All recoveries were smooth, rapid, and uneventful. Physiologic parameters were compared across time, gender, and species. All sloths, regardless of species and gender, demonstrated a time-dependent decrease in heart rate and blood pressure, and an increase in respiratory rate, during the course of anesthesia. Peripheral oxygen saturation was similar for all sloths over time. There were significant species differences for heart rate (Choloepus > Bradypus), respiratory rate (Choloepus > Bradypus), and systolic blood pressure (Bradypus > Choloepus), while there were significant gender differences for body temperature (males > females) and blood pressure (males > females). Results of this study suggest that the ketamine-medetomidine mixture, as described above, is a safe and effective anesthetic combination in free-ranging two- and three-toed sloths, although peripheral blood pressure should be monitored during anesthesia.

  2. Robotic Anesthesia – A Vision for the Future of Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerling, Thomas M; Taddei, Riccardo; Wehbe, Mohamad; Morse, Joshua; Cyr, Shantale; Zaouter, Cedrick

    2011-01-01

    Summary This narrative review describes a rationale for robotic anesthesia. It offers a first classification of robotic anesthesia by separating it into pharmacological robots and robots for aiding or replacing manual gestures. Developments in closed loop anesthesia are outlined. First attempts to perform manual tasks using robots are described. A critical analysis of the delayed development and introduction of robots in anesthesia is delivered. PMID:23905028

  3. Ketamine in the field: the use of ketamine for induction of anaesthesia before intubation in injured patients in the field.

    PubMed

    Gofrit, O N; Leibovici, D; Shemer, J; Henig, A; Shapira, S C

    1997-01-01

    Intubating the subconscious, struggling patient in a pre-hospital setting can be a difficult task even in experienced hands. We performed a clinical prospective study to evaluate the applicability of ketamine for induction of anaesthesia before intubation in the field. Ketamine was distributed to all air medical rescue teams--trained reserve army volunteers from various medical specialties. Lectures and literature concerning the use of ketamine for anaesthesia induction before intubation were given. The physicians were instructed to administer ketamine, in a dose of 2 mg/kg intravenously, if a single intubation attempt failed. Following the administration of ketamine, a questionnaire was filled in by the physician. Analysis of the data was performed after 24 months. During the study period, intubation was indicated in 161 injured patients evacuated by air in Israel. In 29 patients (18 per cent) the first intubation attempt had failed and they were given ketamine. The reasons for failure of the first intubation attempt were restlessness or trismus in 23 patients and traumatic distortion of the upper airway anatomical landmarks in six. Following ketamine administration, intubation was successful in 19 patients (65.5 per cent) in all of whom the indication for ketamine administration was restlessness or trismus. All patients with upper airway anatomy distortion were given a cricothyroidotomy. There were no complications attributed to ketamine. All patients reached hospital alive. This preliminary study suggests that the use of ketamine in this pre-hospital setting is safe. The drug is effective in cases where the primary reason for failure to intubate is restlessness or trismus. The drug is not effective in cases of anatomical damage to the upper airway. In these cases, cricothyroidotomy should probably be performed as early as possible.

  4. [Ketamine--anticonvulsive and proconvulsive actions].

    PubMed

    Kugler, J; Doenicke, A

    1994-11-01

    Animal experimentation has revealed that ketamine has anticonvulsive properties. Changes in the EEG have also been reported in animals; these have been designated non-convulsive generalized electrographic seizures because of their similarities to epileptiform potentials, even though there are no recognizable signs of seizures. The cataleptic condition of the cats in which these changes were observed led to the conclusion that ketamine could cause petit mal seizures, which took the course of petit mal status. Ketamine was therefore also seen as a dangerous anaesthetic agent predisposing to convulsions, the use of which could lead to status epilepticus and irreversible brain damage. These conflicts of opinion should be resolved, as they are based on various misconceptions. (1) The terminology used for epilepsy by specialized clinicians is not always correctly applied in the context of animal experimentation. (2) The activation of epileptiform potentials in the EEG of animals cannot be interpreted as a reliable sign of epileptogenic efficiency in humans. (3) Too little regard is paid to the different actions of anaesthetic agents in various sites of the brain, at different doses and with different routes of administration. (4) The statistical significance and biological relevance of the study results are inadequate because the numbers of observations are too small. Epileptologists regret the insufficiency of animal models as paradigma for the study of efficiency of antiepileptic drugs in humans. The degree by which extensor spasms in the front paw of Gerbils of rats induced by pentylentetrazol or electric current are reduced after application of an anticonvulsive drug is no reliable measure of its anticonvulsive effect in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Alterations in splenic lymphocyte subpopulations and increased mortality from sepsis following anesthesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Hansbrough, J F; Zapata-Sirvent, R L; Bartle, E J; Anderson, J K; Elliott, L; Mansour, M A; Carter, W H

    1985-09-01

    The authors evaluated the potential of a variety of anesthetics in mice to produce subsequent alterations in host defenses. Specific monoclonal antibodies and immunofluorescent microscopy were used to enumerate splenic helper/inducer: suppressor/cytotoxic lymphocyte ratios (HSR), and resistance to bacterial challenge was evaluated by a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. Two hours of anesthesia with the intravenous agents ketamine and pentobarbital and with the inhalational agents isoflurane, enflurane, halothane, and halothane-nitrous oxide, were utilized. All anesthetics produced marked depression in the HSR, measured 24 h postanesthesia (P less than 0.05); with all agents, helper T-cell populations were decreased and suppressor populations increased. The HSR remained depressed 72 h postanesthetic, following both ketamine and halothane anesthesia (P less than 0.05). A dose-response curve was determined with enflurane; increasing the anesthetic time from 1 to 6 h resulted in progressively greater depression of the HSR 24 h later. Changes in lymphocyte subtypes of similar magnitude were found in mice after burn injury or hind limb crush injury and amputation, whereas simple laparotomy did not produce such changes. Serum corticosterone levels were not elevated 24 h post-anesthetic with enflurane, suggesting that the alterations were not nonspecific stress reactions. Resistance to sepsis was determined by measuring survival for 96 h after CLP. With CLP performed 24 h following 2 h anesthesia, mortality was increased from normal: control mortality 36.3%; ketamine 65.0% (P less than 0.023); isoflurane 69.5% (P less than 0.006); enflurane 84.2% (P less than 0.0002).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. The PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway activates recovery from general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun-Hui; Zhang, Jin; Song, Jian-Nan; Xu, Xue; Cai, Jin-Song; Zhou, Yang; Gao, Jin-Gui

    2016-01-01

    We investigated roles of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway in recovery from general anesthesia. Sprague-Dawley rats divided into five groups: saline+artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF; Group A), ketamine+ACSF (Group B), ketamine+IGF-1 (Group C), ketamine+PI3K inhibitor (Group D), and PI3K/Akt agonists (Group E). Proportion of δ waves on ECoGs was recorded. Rats were tested for duration of loss of righting reflex (LORR), ataxic period and behavior in Morris water maze. mRNA and protein expression of members of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway were measured by RT-qPCR and Western blots. Histopathologic changes in hippocampal tissues observed by HE staining. We found that the proportion of δ waves decreased in Group C, while increased in Group D compared with Group B; the durations of LORR and ataxic period were shorter in Group C, but longer in Group D. In Morris water maze, escape latency (EL) and duration and frequency of staying on platform was shorter in Group C and longer in Group D than in Group B. Group A exhibited low expression of proteins in PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, while p-AKT, p-mTOR and p-P70S6K expression increased in cerebral cortex, brain stem, and thalamus in Group C. By contrast, expression of those proteins was lower in Group D than Group B. Those proteins expressions were higher in Group E than in Group A. HE staining showed that anesthesia may induce cell apoptosis in rat hippocampal CA1 areas, and PI3K/Akt agonists could inhibit apoptosis. Our results suggest that activation of PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway may promote recovery from general anesthesia and enhance spatial learning and memory. PMID:27340771

  7. The Relationship Between Creatine and Whey Protein Supplements Consumption and Anesthesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Kianoush; Gorji Mahlabani, Mohammad Amin; Tashayoie, Mohammad; Nasiri Nejad, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because the trend of pharmacotherapy is toward controlling diet rather than administration of drugs, in our study we examined the probable relationship between Creatine (Cr) or Whey (Wh) consumption and anesthesia (analgesia effect of ketamine). Creatine and Wh are among the most favorable supplements in the market. Whey is a protein, which is extracted from milk and is a rich source of amino acids. Creatine is an amino acid derivative that can change to ATP in the body. Both of these supplements result in Nitric Oxide (NO) retention, which is believed to be effective in N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor analgesia. Objectives: The main question of this study was whether Wh and Cr are effective on analgesic and anesthetic characteristics of ketamine and whether this is related to NO retention or amino acids’ features Materials and Methods: We divided 30 male Wistar rats to three (n = 10) groups; including Cr, Wh and sham (water only) groups. Each group was administered (by gavage) the supplements for an intermediate dosage during 25 days. After this period, they became anesthetized using a Ketamine-Xylazine (KX) and their time to anesthesia and analgesia, and total sleep time were recorded. Results: Data were analyzed twice using the SPSS 18 software with Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test; first time we expunged the rats that didn’t become anesthetized and the second time we included all of the samples. There was a significant P-value (P < 0.05) for total anesthesia time in the second analysis. Bonferroni multiple comparison indicated that the difference was between Cr and Sham groups (P < 0.021). Conclusions: The data only indicated that there might be a significant relationship between Cr consumption and total sleep time. Further studies, with rats of different gender and different dosage of supplement and anesthetics are suggested. PMID:27110533

  8. Regional anesthesia at home

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gloria S.; Choy, Lynna P.; Ilfeld, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the recently published peer-reviewed literature involving regional anesthesia and analgesia in patients at home. Recent findings The potential benefits and risks of regional anesthesia and analgesia at home are pertinent queries, and increased data regarding these topics are rapidly becoming available. Of particular interest is the use of continuous peripheral nerve blocks at home and their potential effect upon hospitalization duration and recovery profile. Summary Advantages of regional techniques include site-specific anesthesia and decreased postoperative opioid use. For shoulder surgeries, the interscalene block provides effective analgesia with minimal complications, whereas the impact and risks of intraarticular injections remain unclear. Perineural catheters are an analgesic option that offer improved pain relief among other benefits. They are now being used at home in both adult and pediatric populations. PMID:18660659

  9. Total Intravenous Anesthesia Including Ketamine versus Volatile Gas Anesthesia for Combat-related Operative Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    radicals, hyper- glycemia, hypoxemia, hypotension, hyperthermia, in- creased intracranial pressure (ICP), decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF), and decreased...greater than 10 g/dl, systolic blood pressure (SBP) greater than 90 mmHg, glucose less than 150 mmol/dl, partial pressure of arte- rial carbon...tension; polytrauma more than one injury; SBP systolic blood pressure ; SBP 90 mmHg number of patients presenting with systolic blood pressure

  10. Office-based anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Treasure, Trevor; Bennett, Jeffrey

    2007-02-01

    The practice of office-based oral and maxillofacial surgery is continuously expanding and involves the management of a diverse population in regards to the surgical procedures performed within the office and the age and medical health of the patients treated within the office. Comfort, cooperation, and hemodynamic stability are critical to satisfactorily accomplishing the surgical procedure. Various anesthetic techniques are used, including local anesthesia, anxiolysis, analgesia and sedation, and general anesthesia. The topic is vast and too extensive to be fully discussed in this article. The intent of this article is to provide a discussion of some fundamental concepts that can optimize anesthetic safety and care.

  11. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion during general anesthesia: a case report.

    PubMed

    White, William A; Montalvo, Helen; Monday, Joshua M

    2004-10-01

    Care of the patient with diabetes mellitus presents numerous challenges to the anesthesia practitioner. There is no perfect way to care for these patients nor are any 2 patients with diabetes exactly alike. With the advent of subcutaneous insulin pumps, the anesthesia practitioner has another tool to assist him or her in giving high quality care. This case study describes the anesthesia care provided to a patient with type 1 diabetes who wore his continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) pump during general anesthesia for surgical repair of a herniated lumbar disk. Importantly, the anesthesia plan involved a collaborative effort with the patient. Blood glucose levels were stable throughout the perioperative period. Little or no extra work was required of the CRNA. This case showed that the CSII could be used to minimize perioperative fluctuations in blood sugar. Postoperatively, the patient expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the anesthetic.

  12. Behavioral pharmacology of the odor span task: Effects of flunitrazepam, ketamine, methamphetamine and methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Galizio, Mark; April, Brooke; Deal, Melissa; Hawkey, Andrew; Panoz-Brown, Danielle; Prichard, Ashley; Bruce, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    The Odor Span Task is an incrementing non-matching-to-sample procedure that permits the study of behavior under the control of multiple stimuli. Rats are exposed to a series of odor stimuli and selection of new stimuli is reinforced. Successful performance thus requires remembering which stimuli have previously been presented during a given session. This procedure has been frequently used in neurobiological studies as a rodent model of working memory; however, only a few studies have examined the effects of drugs on performance in this task. The present experiments explored the behavioral pharmacology of a modified version of the Odor Span Task by determining the effects of stimulant drugs methylphenidate and methamphetamine, NMDA antagonist ketamine, and positive GABAA modulator flunitrazepam. All four drugs produced dose-dependent impairment of performances on the Odor Span Task, but for methylphenidate and methamphetamine, these occurred only at doses that had similar effects on performance of a simple odor discrimination. Generally, these disruptions were based on omission of responding at the effective doses. The effects of ketamine and flunitrazepam were more selective in some rats. That is, some rats tested under flunitrazepam and ketamine showed decreases in accuracy on the Odor Span Task at doses that did not affect simple discrimination performance. These selective effects indicate disruption of within-session stimulus control. Overall, these findings support the potential of the Odor Span Task as a baseline for the behavioral pharmacological analysis of remembering.

  13. Determination of ketamine and amphetamines in hair by LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, María Jesús; Felli, Maria Linda; Bermejo, Ana María; Chiarotti, Marcello

    2009-12-01

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of ketamine (with its metabolite norketamine) and some amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine). This method was developed to determine these compounds in hair and is able to simultaneously quantify all of them in human hair. Hair samples (20 mg) were washed and pulverized, and an extraction with formic acid (0.01%) and ultrasonication for 4 h was used. Deuterated analogs of the analytes were used as internal standards for quantification. Linearity from 0.5 to 25 ng/mg was obtained for both ketamine (and norketamine) and amphetamines with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification obtained were 0.1 and 0.5 ng/mg, respectively, for ketamine and amphetamines. A total of 25 hair samples from known drug abusers (relating to designer drug consumption or consumption of amphetamines) were examined by this validated method. The results show that the proposed method is suitable for testing these drugs in a single sample of hair. In addition, it is simpler and faster than analysis by conventional methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which usually require a more laborious extraction procedure and, in most of cases, an additional derivatization process.

  14. Local anesthesia: a review.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Sykes, P; Kubota, Y; Matsuura, H; Lipp, M

    1992-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most widely administered drugs in dentistry. Significant advances have been made in past decades that have greatly increased both the safety and the efficacy of these important drugs. This paper reviews the history of local anesthesia, pharmacokinetics and clinical implications, techniques, complications, and future directions in the quest for more effective pain control in dentistry.

  15. The Develoment of Anesthesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Audrey B.

    1982-01-01

    Until the eighteenth century, doctors were reluctant to use chemicals to alleviate pain because they accepted the religious/moral beliefs of their day, claiming that pain was beneficial for the body. Traces technical developments in the control of pain, discussing relationships of anesthesia to social, cultural, and scientific factors and…

  16. Awareness during general anesthesia: new technology for an old problem.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, J R

    1998-05-01

    The possibility of awareness during general anesthesia causes apprehension for the patient and the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The goals of general anesthesia are to prevent the sensation of pain and produce a state of sedation, hypnosis, and unconsciousness so the patient will not remember the surgical procedure. An inadequate level of anesthesia can result in patient awareness during surgery. The current practice of anesthesia relies on indirect hemodynamic measurements such as blood pressure and heart rate to monitor the sedative hypnotic state of the patient's brain during general anesthesia. Hemodynamic responses are not reliable for predicting awareness just as blood pressure and heart rate are not indicative of consciousness. Electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms are known to be affected by anesthetics. Characteristic EEG waveforms are a direct indication of the patient's level of consciousness. Unprocessed and computer-processed EEG recordings have been used in an attempt to monitor the patient's level of consciousness during general anesthesia. A raw or unprocessed EEG recording to monitor the level of consciousness during general anesthesia is problematic. The EEG signal is complex, affected by artifact, and it requires a dedicated interpreter. Conventional processed EEG monitoring systems are problematic because of the complexity of the equipment and technical difficulty of reading the EEG recording. The purpose of this article is to describe the history of awareness during anesthesia and introduce a new processed EEG monitor, the Bispectral Index (BIS) (Aspect Medical Systems, Inc., Natick, MA) with implications for future clinical use and research.

  17. Antidepressant-like cognitive and behavioral effects of acute ketamine administration associated with plasticity in the ventral hippocampus to medial prefrontal cortex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jett, Julianne D.; Boley, Angela M.; Girotti, Milena; Shah, Amiksha; Lodge, Daniel J.; Morilak, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Acute low-dose administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, produces rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects in humans and rodents. Recently, we found that the long-lasting effect of ketamine on the forced swim test requires ventral hippocampal (vHipp) activity at the time of drug administration. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a target of the vHipp dysregulated in depression, is important for cognitive flexibility and response strategy selection. Deficits in cognitive flexibility, the ability to modify thoughts and behaviors in response to changes in the environment, are associated with depression. We have shown that chronic stress impairs cognitive flexibility on the attentional set-shifting test (AST), and induces a shift from active to passive response strategies on the shock-probe defensive burying test (SPDB). Objective In this study, we tested the effects of ketamine on chronic stress-induced changes in cognitive flexibility and coping behavior on the AST and SPDB, respectively. Subsequently, we investigated vHipp-mPFC plasticity as a potential mechanism of ketamine’s therapeutic action. Results Ketamine reversed deficits in cognitive flexibility and restored active coping behavior in chronically stressed rats. Further, high frequency stimulation in the vHipp replicated ketamine’s antidepressant-like effects on the forced swim test and AST, but not on the SPDB. Conclusion These results show that ketamine restores cognitive flexibility and coping response strategy compromised by stress. Activity in the vHipp-mPFC pathway may represent a neural substrate for some of the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine, including cognitive flexibility, but other circuits may mediate the effects of ketamine on coping response strategy. PMID:25986748

  18. Alfentanil versus ketamine combined with propofol for sedation during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy in morbidly obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Kılıc, Ertugrul; Demiriz, Barıs; Isıkay, Nurgül; Yıldırım, Abdullah E.; Can, Selman; Basmacı, Cem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To observe the effects of both propofol/alfentanil and propofol/ketamine on sedation during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy in morbidly obese patients (UGSEMOP). Methods: In a prospective, double-blinded, randomized clinical study, 52 patients scheduled for UGSEMOP were assigned to either group A (n=26; 10 µg/kg intravenous [IV] alfentanil) or group K (n=26; 0.5 mg/kg IV ketamine). Each patient was administered 0.7 mg/kg propofol for induction. If it was needed, the patients were administered an additional dose of IV propofol. This study was performed in Sehitkamil State Hospital, Gaziantep, Turkey, between January 2014-2015. Total propofol consumption, time to achieve Modified Aldrete Scores (MAS) of 5 and 10 following the procedure, physician and patient satisfaction scores, and instances of side effects, such as bradycardia and hypotension were recorded. Results: Time to onset of sedation and duration of sedation were both significantly shorter in group A. Patients in group A also required less time to achieve an MAS of 5. Total propofol consumption was significantly lower in group A. Conclusion: Both propofol/alfentanil and propofol/ketamine combinations provided appropriate hypnosis and analgesia during UGSEMOP. However, propofol consumption was significantly higher using the propofol/ketamine combination. PMID:27761556

  19. Ketamine selectively suppresses synchronized afterdischarges in immature hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Brady, R J; Swann, J W

    1986-08-29

    The role of excitatory amino acid neurotransmission in epileptogenesis was investigated in the developing hippocampus. Bath application of ketamine blocked penicillin-induced, synchronized afterdischarges in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons. Ketamine also decreased the duration of the preceding intracellularly recorded depolarization shift but had no measurable effect on the resting membrane potential or input impedance of pyramidal cells. Concentrations of ketamine that blocked afterdischarge generation dramatically depressed intracellular depolarizations produced by iontophoretic application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) but not quisqualate. The effects of the NMDA antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid on epileptiform discharges were identical to those of ketamine. These results suggest that an endogenous excitatory amino acid acting on an NMDA receptor plays a key role in the pronounced capacity of immature hippocampus for seizures.

  20. Ketamine Inhibits Fetal ACTH Responses to Cerebral Hypoperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Melanie J.; Wood, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    The present study tested the effect of ketamine on the fetal reflex responses of late-gestation sheep to brachiocephalic occlusion (BCO), a stimulus that mimics the reduction in cerebral blood flow that results from severe fetal hypotension. Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic and known non-competitive antagonist of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, has previously been shown to impair chemoreceptor responsiveness. Studies from this laboratory suggest that fetal reflex ACTH responses to hypotension are largely mediated by chemoreceptors; therefore we hypothesized that ketamine would inhibit the reflex hormonal response to BCO. Chronically catheterized fetal sheep were subjected to acute cerebral hypoperfusion through occlusion of the brachiocephalic artery. Fetal blood pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded and fetal blood samples drawn during the experiment were analyzed with specific hormone assays. Our results demonstrate that ketamine attenuates hemodynamic responses to cerebral hypoperfusion and is a potent inhibitor of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) / pro-ACTH release. These data support the hypothesis that fetal reflex responses hypotension are chemoreceptor mediated. Given the potency with which ketamine inhibits ACTH response to fetal hypotension, we suggest that the use of ketamine, or other anesthetic or analgesic drugs that block or otherwise interact with the NMDA-glutamate pathways, in late pregnancy or in pre-term newborns be reconsidered. PMID:17158270

  1. All about ketamine premedication for children undergoing ophtalmic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Altiparmak, Başak; Akça, Başak; Yilbaş, Aysun Ankay; Çelebi, Nalan

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a non-barbiturate cyclohexamine derivative which produces a state of sedation, immobility, analgesia, amnesia, and dissociation from the environment. One of the most important advantages of ketamine premedication is production of balanced sedation with less respiratory depression and less changes in blood pressure or heart rate. As its effects on intracranial pressure, the possible effect of ketamine on intraocular pressure has been controversial overtime. In this study, we aimed to demostrate all the advantages and possible side effects of ketamine premedication in 100 children with retinablastoma undergoing ophthalmic surgery. All the children were premedicated with ketamine 5 mg kg-1 15 minutes before the examination orally and peroperative complications, reaction to intravenous catheter insertion, need for additive dose and intraocular pressures of children were recorded. We showed that ketamine administration orally is a safe and effective way of premedication for oncologic patients undergoing examination under general anaesthesia. The incidence of agitation, anxiety at parental separation and reaction to insertion of intravenous catheter was very low while adverse side effects were seen rarely. Intraocular pressure which is very important for most of the ophthalmic surgery patients remained in normal ranges. PMID:26885101

  2. Acute and chronic effects of ketamine on semantic priming: modeling schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Ana; Brandner, Brigitta; Klaassen, Elissa; Cregg, Roman; Nagaratnam, Mayavaty; Bromley, Lesley M; Das, Ravi K; Rossell, Susan L; Morgan, Celia J A; Curran, H Valerie

    2009-04-01

    Acute administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine induces schizophrenia-like symptoms in healthy volunteers; furthermore, a window on ketamine's chronic effects is provided by regular recreational users. The current study utilized both acute ketamine administration in healthy volunteers and chronic ketamine abusers to investigate semantic processing, one of the key cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Semantic processing was examined using a semantic priming paradigm. In experiment 1, acute effects of low (75 ng/mL) and high (150 ng/mL) ketamine doses were compared in a placebo-controlled double-blind independent group design with 48 participants. In experiment 2, 19 regular recreational ketamine users were compared with 19 ketamine-naive polydrug controls and 26 non-drug-using controls. In both experiments, semantic priming parameters were manipulated to distinguish between ketamine's effects on (1) automatic and strategic processing and (2) the facilitation and inhibition components of semantic priming for strongly (directly) related primes and targets. Acute effects of ketamine on semantic priming for weakly (indirectly) related primes and targets were also assessed in experiment 1. Acutely, ketamine impaired the employment of strategic mechanisms but not automatic processing within both the direct and indirect semantic priming tasks. Acute ketamine administration also induced clear schizophrenia-like symptoms. Schizotypy traits in the cognitive and perceptual domains tended to correlate with increased semantic priming in long-term ketamine users. In summary, acute and chronic ketamine-induced changes partially mirrored the findings on semantic priming in schizophrenia.

  3. Comparison Effect of Intravenous Ketamine with Pethidine for Analgesia and Sedation during Bone Marrow Procedures in Oncologic Children: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Abdolkarimi, Babak; Zareifar, Soheila; Golestani Eraghi, Majid; Saleh, Fazl

    2016-01-01

    Background : Children suffering from cancer always require pain relief and reduce anxiety when undergoing painful procedures. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of pethedine and ketamine administration in cancer-diagnosed children undergoing bone marrow aspiration and biopsy procedures. Subjects and Methods : A randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial was carried out on 57 children undergoing painful procedures (bone marrow aspiration/biopsy). Patients were randomly assigned in a double-blinded fashion to receive either intravenous pethedine (1 mg/kg/dose) or ketamine (1 mg/kg/dose), respectively. The effectiveness of the drug was measured utilizing three parameters; perception of procedural pain with Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale and Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), hemodynamic changes and respiration and the frequency of vomiting nausea score. Results : Additionally, hemodynamic stability and pain control were significantly better in the patients receiving ketamine (p<0.05, at 0, 15, 30 min). Nausea and vomiting were more frequent in Group K than in Group M but there were no significant differences. No serious complications were observed. Conclusion: This study showed that intravenous ketamine generated a superior clinical effect in decreased pain. Ketamine may also be recommended as a reasonable option before oncology procedures in children suffering from cancer. PMID:27928474

  4. A comparative study of paediatric oral premedication: midazolam, ketamine and low dose combination of midazolam and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Bhakti; Bose, Anjana; Pahari, Subrata; Dan, Amit Kumar

    2011-06-01

    In a prospective randomised double-blind trial, 90 patients aged 1-7 years (ASA I) undergoing elective surgery less than 90 minutes duration were allocated into three separate groups to compare the safety and effectiveness of oral midazolam, ketamine, and low dose combination of midazolam and ketamine for premedication in paediatric patients. Group M received midazolam 0.5 mg kg(-1), group K received ketamine 6mg kg(-1) and group C received combination of ketamine 2.5 mg kg(-1) and midazolam 0.25 mg kg(-1) orally in 0.2ml kg(-1) of sugar syrup to make it palatable. The sedation score and emotional state on a four -point scale, ease of parental separation, cooperation for venepuncture, ease of mask acceptance and peri-operative cardiorespiratory status were evaluated. Peri-operative incidence of vomiting, nystagmus, emergence phenomenon and postanesthetic recovery time were noted. In the present study it was found that C group was more effective in sedating the children within 10 minutes and 20 minutes, whereas, the combination and midazolam groups are comparable in sedating the children at 30 minutes. Side-effects and recovery time were more in ketamine group. The recovery time was significantly less in group C. In conclusion oral combination of low dose ketamine and midazolam produced quick onset of satisfactory conscious sedation and more rapid recovery without significant side-effects, so that more children could be separated easily from their parents and provides smooth induction than the individual drug.

  5. Physiologic and serum biochemistry values in free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed (Choloepus hoffmanni) and brown-throated three-toed (Bradypus variegatus) sloths immobilized using dexmedetomidine and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Cole, Gretchen A; Vaughan, Christopher; Sladky, Kurt K

    2013-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist and dextrorotary enantiomer of medetomidine, was combined with ketamine and used to immobilize 14 free-ranging Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloths) and 11 Bradypus variegatus (brown-throated three-toed sloths) in Upala, Costa Rica. Following intramuscular injection of ketamine (2.1 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (11 microg/kg), heart rate, respiratory rate, and indirect systolic blood pressure were measured every 5 min for a total of 25 min. An iStat (CG8+) was used to evaluate serum biochemical and hematologic values during anesthesia. After 30 min of anesthesia, atipamezole (0.13 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, which resulted in rapid and smooth recoveries. Mean heart rate and respiratory rate remained unchanged in both C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus over time. Progressive decreases in mean indirect systolic blood pressure were documented in both species. Results of this study suggest a combination of dexmedetomidne and ketamine is a safe and effective anesthetic protocol for use in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus. Similar to other alpha-2 adrenergic agonist-based immobilization protocols, close monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters are recommended. This study also provides serum biochemical and hematologic data in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus.

  6. Anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John E

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have long played an important role in biomedical research in such fields as genetics, physiology, and development. However, with few exceptions, scientists, veterinarians, and technicians have paid little attention to the anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia of these diverse creatures. Indeed, some standard research procedures are routinely performed without anesthesia. Yet various chemical agents are available for the immobilization or anesthesia of invertebrates, ranging from gases or volatile liquids that can be pumped into either an anesthetic chamber (for terrestrial species) or a container of water (aquatic species), to benzocaine and other substances for fish. Many invertebrates are not difficult to immobilize or anesthetize and the procedures recommended in this article appear to be safe; however, none should be considered totally risk-free. Analgesia of invertebrates is as yet a largely unexplored field; until scientific data are available, other measures can promote the well-being of these animals in the laboratory. For euthanasia, various methods (physical or chemical or a combination of both) have been recommended for different taxa of invertebrates, but most have not been properly studied under laboratory conditions and some can be problematic in the context of research procedures and tissue harvesting. Furthermore, relevant data are scattered, sometimes available only in languages other than English, and there is no international approach for seeking and collating such information. In this article I review various methods of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia for terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates, as well as areas requiring further research.

  7. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers.

  8. Newly graduated nurse anesthetists' experiences and views on anesthesia nursing--a phenomenographic study.

    PubMed

    Mauleon, Annika Larsson; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa

    2002-08-01

    This qualitative study identifies and describes different ways in which newly graduated nurse anesthetists (NAs) experience and perceive nurse anesthesia. It explains different approaches to nurse anesthesia care and, thus, to clinical nursing care (in an anesthesia and surgical context), provided by new NAs. One month after graduation, all NAs who had completed an anesthesia nursing program responded to 4 open-ended questions. A phenomenographic method was used to analyze their responses. The results were divided into 3 categories, which describe nurse anesthesia from the perspectives of (1) maintaining physical well-being; (2) being protectors and advocates; and (3) ability to perform good nurse anesthesia given all the demands placed on the NAs. The results indicate that, for the new NAs, the nurse anesthesia care situation was largely influenced by context and generated feelings of inadequacy because the NAs could not provide the emotional support that they believed their patients required.

  9. Periodic Lateralized Epileptiform Discharges can Survive Anesthesia and Result in Asymmetric Drug-induced Burst Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Edward C.; Cannizzaro, Louis A.; Williams, Frank J.; Lalan, Saurabh; Olejniczak, Piotr W.

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced burst suppression (DIBS) is bihemispheric and bisymmetric in adults and older children. However, asymmetric DIBS may occur if a pathological process is affecting one hemisphere only or both hemispheres disproportionately. The usual suspect is a destructive lesion; an irritative or epileptogenic lesion is usually not invoked to explain DIBS asymmetry. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with new-onset seizures who was found to have a hemorrhagic cavernoma and periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) in the right temporal region. After levetiracetam and before anesthetic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were administered, the electroencephalogram (EEG) showed continuous PLEDs over the right hemisphere with maximum voltage in the posterior temporal region. Focal electrographic seizures also occurred occasionally in the same location. Propofol resulted in bihemispheric, but not in bisymmetric, DIBS. Remnants or fragments of PLEDs that survived anesthesia increased the amplitude and complexity of the bursts in the right hemisphere leading to asymmetric DIBS. Phenytoin, lacosamide, ketamine, midazolam, and topiramate were administered at various times in the course of EEG monitoring, resulting in suppression of seizures but not of PLEDs. Ketamine and midazolam reduced the rate, amplitude, and complexity of PLEDs but only after producing substantial attenuation of all burst components. When all anesthetics were discontinued, the EEG reverted to the original preanesthesia pattern with continuous non-fragmented PLEDs. The fact that PLEDs can survive anesthesia and affect DIBS symmetry is a testament to the robustness of the neurodynamic processes underlying PLEDs. PMID:28286626

  10. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  11. R-ketamine: a rapid-onset and sustained antidepressant without psychotomimetic side effects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, C; Shirayama, Y; Zhang, J-c; Ren, Q; Yao, W; Ma, M; Dong, C; Hashimoto, K

    2015-01-01

    Although the efficacy of racemate ketamine, a rapid onset and sustained antidepressant, for patients with treatment-resistant depression was a serendipitous finding, clinical use of ketamine is limited, due to psychotomimetic side effects and abuse liability. Behavioral and side-effect evaluation tests were applied to compare the two stereoisomers of ketamine. To elucidate their potential therapeutic mechanisms, we examined the effects of these stereoisomers on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)–TrkB signaling, and synaptogenesis in selected brain regions. In the social defeat stress and learned helplessness models of depression, R-ketamine showed a greater potency and longer-lasting antidepressant effect than S-ketamine (esketamine). Furthermore, R-ketamine induced a more potent beneficial effect on decreased dendritic spine density, BDNF–TrkB signaling and synaptogenesis in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus from depressed mice compared with S-ketamine. However, neither stereoisomer affected these alterations in the nucleus accumbens of depressed mice. In behavioral tests for side effects, S-ketamine, but not R-ketamine, precipitated behavioral abnormalities, such as hyperlocomotion, prepulse inhibition deficits and rewarding effects. In addition, a single dose of S-ketamine, but not R-ketamine, caused a loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells in the prelimbic region of the medial PFC and DG. These findings suggest that, unlike S-ketamine, R-ketamine can elicit a sustained antidepressant effect, mediated by increased BDNF–TrkB signaling and synaptogenesis in the PFC, DG and CA3. R-ketamine appears to be a potent, long-lasting and safe antidepressant, relative to S-ketamine, as R-ketamine appears to be free of psychotomimetic side effects and abuse liability. PMID:26327690

  12. Facilitation of serotonin-induced contraction of rat mesenteric artery by ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Woong; Noh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Bokyung; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Yoon Soo; Woo, Nam Sik

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is an anesthetic with hypertensive effects, which make it useful for patients at risk of shock. However, previous ex vivo studies reported vasodilatory actions of ketamine in isolated arteries. In this study, we reexamined the effects of ketamine on arterial tones in the presence and absence of physiological concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) by measuring the isometric tension of endothelium-denuded rat mesenteric arterial rings. Ketamine little affected the resting tone of control mesenteric arterial rings, but, in the presence of 5-HT (100~200 nM), ketamine (10~100 µM) markedly contracted the arterial rings. Ketamine did not contract arterial rings in the presence of NE (10 nM), indicating that the vasoconstrictive action of ketamine is 5-HT-dependent. The concentration-response curves (CRCs) of 5-HT were clearly shifted to the left in the presence of ketamine (30 µM), whereas the CRCs of NE were little affected by ketamine. The left shift of the 5-HT CRCs caused by ketamine was reversed with ketanserin, a competitive 5-HT2A receptor inhibitor, indicating that ketamine facilitated the activation of 5-HT2A receptors. Anpirtoline and BW723C86, selective agonists of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors, respectively, did not contract arterial rings in the absence or presence of ketamine. These results indicate that ketamine specifically enhances 5-HT2A receptor-mediated vasoconstriction and that it is vasoconstrictive in a clinical setting. The facilitative action of ketamine on 5-HT2A receptors should be considered in ketamine-induced hypertension as well as in the pathogenesis of diseases such as schizophrenia, wherein experimental animal models are frequently generated using ketamine. PMID:27847437

  13. To use or not to use: an update on licit and illicit ketamine use

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jih-Heng; Vicknasingam, Balasingam; Cheung, Yuet-Wah; Zhou, Wang; Nurhidayat, Adhi Wibowo; Jarlais, Don C Des; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Ketamine, a derivative of phencyclidine that was developed in the 1960s, is an anesthetic and analgesic with hallucinogenic effects. In this paper, the pharmacological and toxicological effects of ketamine are briefly reviewed. Ketamine possesses a wide safety margin but such a therapeutic benefit is somewhat offset by its emergence phenomenon (mind-body dissociation and delirium) and hallucinogenic effects. The increasing abuse of ketamine, initially predominantly in recreational scenes to experience a “k-hole” and other hallucinatory effects but more recently also as a drug abused during the workday or at home, has further pushed governments to confine its usage in many countries. Recently, urinary tract dysfunction has been associated with long-term ketamine use. In some long-term ketamine users, such damage can be irreversible and could result in renal failure and dialysis. Although ketamine has not yet been scheduled in the United Nations Conventions, previous studies using different assessment parameters to score the overall harms of drugs indicated that ketamine may cause more harm than some of the United Nations scheduled drugs. Some countries in Southeast and East Asia have reported an escalating situation of ketamine abuse. Dependence, lower urinary tract dysfunction, and sexual impulse or violence were the most notable among the ketamine-associated symptoms in these countries. These results implied that the danger of ketamine may have been underestimated previously. Therefore, the severity levels of the ketamine-associated problems should be scrutinized more carefully and objectively. To prevent ketamine from being improperly used and evolving into an epidemic, a thorough survey on the prevalence and characteristics of illicit ketamine use is imperative so that suitable policy and measures can be taken. On the other hand, recent findings that ketamine could be useful for treating major depressive disorder has given this old drug a new impetus. If

  14. Comparison of the Effects of Ketamine and Morphine on the Performance of Representative Military Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    USAARL Report No. 2010-17 Comparison of the Effects of Ketamine and Morphine on the Performance of Representative Military Tasks By Steven J...Effects of Ketamine and Morphine on the Performance of Representative Military Tasks Steven J. Gaydos, Amanda M. Kelley, Catherine M. Webb, Jeremy R. Athy...IM) ketamine versus 10 mg of IM morphine on the performance of representative Warrior Skill Tasks in 48 healthy subjects. Ketamine demonstrated

  15. R-ketamine: a rapid-onset and sustained antidepressant without psychotomimetic side effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Shirayama, Y; Zhang, J-c; Ren, Q; Yao, W; Ma, M; Dong, C; Hashimoto, K

    2015-09-01

    Although the efficacy of racemate ketamine, a rapid onset and sustained antidepressant, for patients with treatment-resistant depression was a serendipitous finding, clinical use of ketamine is limited, due to psychotomimetic side effects and abuse liability. Behavioral and side-effect evaluation tests were applied to compare the two stereoisomers of ketamine. To elucidate their potential therapeutic mechanisms, we examined the effects of these stereoisomers on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-TrkB signaling, and synaptogenesis in selected brain regions. In the social defeat stress and learned helplessness models of depression, R-ketamine showed a greater potency and longer-lasting antidepressant effect than S-ketamine (esketamine). Furthermore, R-ketamine induced a more potent beneficial effect on decreased dendritic spine density, BDNF-TrkB signaling and synaptogenesis in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus from depressed mice compared with S-ketamine. However, neither stereoisomer affected these alterations in the nucleus accumbens of depressed mice. In behavioral tests for side effects, S-ketamine, but not R-ketamine, precipitated behavioral abnormalities, such as hyperlocomotion, prepulse inhibition deficits and rewarding effects. In addition, a single dose of S-ketamine, but not R-ketamine, caused a loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells in the prelimbic region of the medial PFC and DG. These findings suggest that, unlike S-ketamine, R-ketamine can elicit a sustained antidepressant effect, mediated by increased BDNF-TrkB signaling and synaptogenesis in the PFC, DG and CA3. R-ketamine appears to be a potent, long-lasting and safe antidepressant, relative to S-ketamine, as R-ketamine appears to be free of psychotomimetic side effects and abuse liability.

  16. The ketamine effect on ICP in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, F A; Teitelbaum, J; West, M; Gillman, L M

    2014-08-01

    Our goal was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the use of ketamine in traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its effects on intracranial pressure (ICP). All articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, HealthStar, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to November 2013), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. Two reviewers independently identified all manuscripts pertaining to the administration of ketamine in human TBI patients that recorded effects on ICP. Secondary outcomes of effect on cerebral perfusion pressure, mean arterial pressure, patient outcome, and adverse effects were recorded. Two reviewers independently extracted data including population characteristics and treatment characteristics. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and GRADE methodology. Our search strategy produced a total 371 citations. Seven articles, six manuscripts and one meeting proceeding, were considered for the review with all utilizing ketamine, while documenting ICP in severe TBI patients. All studies were prospective studies. Five and two studies pertained to adults and pediatrics, respectively. Across all studies, of the 101 adult and 55 pediatric patients described, ICP did not increase in any of the studies during ketamine administration. Three studies reported a significant decrease in ICP with ketamine bolus. Cerebral perfusion pressure and mean blood pressure increased in two studies, leading to a decrease in vasopressors in one. No significant adverse events related to ketamine were recorded in any of the studies. Outcome data were poorly documented. There currently exists Oxford level 2b, GRADE C evidence to support that ketamine does not increase ICP in severe TBI patients that are sedated and ventilated, and in fact may lower it in selected cases.

  17. Optimizing dosage of ketamine and xylazine in murine echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Ming, Ziqiu; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2007-01-01

    1. Ketamine and xylazine (KX) mixture is the most commonly used anaesthetic drug during echocardiography in mice to induce sedation and immobility. Nevertheless, the doses of KX reported in the literature vary substantially with associated significant difference in cardiac function. To explore the optimal KX dosage and observation time for murine echocardiography, we compared the effects of various KX combinations on echocardiographic measurement. 2. Mice were anaesthetized with ketamine (50 or 100 mg/kg) and xylazine (0-10 mg/kg). Echocardiography was performed 5, 10, 20 and 40 min after induction of anaesthesia. Also, cardiac function was assessed in mice with and without pressure-overload induced left ventricle (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction, either under anaesthesia with KX or whilst conscious. 3. Ketamine at 100 mg/kg alone or together with xylazine at 0.1 mg/kg was associated with a high and stable heart rate (HR), a high fractional shortening (FS) and produced the least effect on LV inner dimension at end of diastole (LVIDd). Ketamine and xylazine at 100 and 10 mg/kg, respectively, produced a lower and stable FS, but with a low and unstable HR. All other combinations resulted in depressed and unstable cardiac function during this period. 4. The dose-dependent suppression of FS by xylazine was counteracted partly by ketamine. 5. Although in the chronic pressure-overload model LV hypertrophy can be detected accurately in both the anaesthetized or conscious state, systolic dysfunction was masked partially by higher doses of xylazine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg) combined with ketamine at 100 mg/kg. 6. With KX anaesthesia, both the dose of xylazine and the anaesthetic duration are critical in achieving an ideal condition for murine echocardiography. Ketamine at 100 mg/kg alone produces acceptable anaesthesia, stable cardiac function with a minimal depressant effect and is therefore recommended if single-dose anaesthetic is to be used.

  18. General Anesthesia for a Patient With Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamekura, Nobuhito; Nitta, Yukie; Takuma, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful management of general anesthesia for a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is one of a group of progressive, degenerative disorders of the cerebral white matter. The typical clinical manifestations of PMD include psychomotor retardation, nystagmus, abnormal muscle tone, seizures, and cognitive impairment. General anesthesia for a patient with PMD may be difficult mainly because of seizures and airway complications related to poor pharyngeal muscle control. In addition, the possibility of exacerbation of spasticity should be considered. A 20-year-old man with PMD required removal of impacted wisdom teeth under general anesthesia. General anesthesia was induced with thiamylal, fentanyl, and desflurane. Anesthesia was maintained with desflurane and continuous intravenous remifentanil under bispectral index and train-of-4 monitoring. Anesthesia lasted 1 hour 20 minutes and was completed uneventfully. Airway complications, seizures, and exacerbation of spasticity did not occur postoperatively. Preoperatively, our patient had no history of epilepsy attacks or aspiration pneumonia, and no clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, exacerbation of spasticity was one of the most likely potential complications. Identification of these associated conditions and evaluation of risk factors during preoperative examination is important for performing safe anesthesia in these patients. PMID:27269667

  19. General Anesthesia for a Patient With Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamekura, Nobuhito; Nitta, Yukie; Takuma, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful management of general anesthesia for a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is one of a group of progressive, degenerative disorders of the cerebral white matter. The typical clinical manifestations of PMD include psychomotor retardation, nystagmus, abnormal muscle tone, seizures, and cognitive impairment. General anesthesia for a patient with PMD may be difficult mainly because of seizures and airway complications related to poor pharyngeal muscle control. In addition, the possibility of exacerbation of spasticity should be considered. A 20-year-old man with PMD required removal of impacted wisdom teeth under general anesthesia. General anesthesia was induced with thiamylal, fentanyl, and desflurane. Anesthesia was maintained with desflurane and continuous intravenous remifentanil under bispectral index and train-of-4 monitoring. Anesthesia lasted 1 hour 20 minutes and was completed uneventfully. Airway complications, seizures, and exacerbation of spasticity did not occur postoperatively. Preoperatively, our patient had no history of epilepsy attacks or aspiration pneumonia, and no clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, exacerbation of spasticity was one of the most likely potential complications. Identification of these associated conditions and evaluation of risk factors during preoperative examination is important for performing safe anesthesia in these patients.

  20. Addressing the mandate for hand-off education: a focused review and recommendations for anesthesia resident curriculum development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lane-Fall, Meghan B; Brooks, Amber K; Wilkins, Sara A; Davis, Joshua J; Riesenberg, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that residency programs teach residents about handoffs and ensure their competence in this communication skill. Development of hand-off curricula for anesthesia residency programs is hindered by the paucity of evidence regarding how to conduct, teach, and evaluate handoffs in the various settings where anesthesia practitioners work. This narrative review draws from literature in anesthesia and other disciplines to provide recommendations for anesthesia resident hand-off curriculum development and evaluation.

  1. Nail surgery: best way to obtain effective anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jellinek, Nathaniel J; Vélez, Nicole F

    2015-04-01

    Nail procedures require an effective and reliable approach to anesthesia of the distal digit. Several techniques have been described in the literature. Herein, the relevant anatomy of the nail unit, pain pathways, anesthetic options, and several injection approaches to achieve complete anesthesia are reviewed. Also considered are the potential pitfalls and complications and their management. Ultimately, the physician's approach must be individualized to the patient, procedure, and setting.

  2. How do You Select an Anesthesia Method Prior to Tympanostomy Tube Insertion for a Child?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The use of general (face-mask inhalation and intravenous) anesthesia has been the method of choice for tympanostomy tube insertion in children. However, there is no exact guideline for the choice of anesthesia method and there is no evidence to support the use of one anesthesia method over another. Clinically, the anesthesia method used to be decided by old customs and the surgeon's blind faith that children cannot bear tympanostomy tube insertion under local anesthesia. Clinicians should keep in mind that pediatric anesthesia has a potential risk. Despite infrequent serious complications, their seriousness necessitates that sedation or general anesthesia should be done by an anesthesiologist and thus children requiring tympanostomy tube insertion should be referred to secondary or tertiary hospitals, even if they have been followed by a primary care physician for a long time. Previous evidence showed that local anesthesia is appropriate for tympanostomy tube insertion in selected children, especially in children older than 5 years are older. Proper choice of anesthesia method is helpful for both patient and medical service provider. Local anesthesia can give psychological relief to children and their parent. It is easier for the medical service providers to schedule the operation and allocate the medical resources in their hospital. Local anesthesia can reduce individual, social, and national burdens for the health care services. PMID:27942597

  3. Experiences of military CRNAs with service personnel who are emerging from general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John Tyler; Pokorny, Marie E

    2012-08-01

    We conducted this qualitative study to understand the experiences of military Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) working with service personnel who have traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are emerging from general anesthesia. This study is important because there are no studies in the literature that describe the experiences of anesthetists working with patients with these specific problems. The leading questions were: "Out of all the anesthesia cases both abroad and stateside (post 9/11/2001), have you noticed service members wake from general anesthesia (not utilizing total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), in a state of delirium? If so, can you tell me your experiences and thought processes as to why it was occurring?" Five themes emerged: (1) Emergence delirium (ED) exists and to a much higher degree in the military than in the general population. (2) ED was much more prevalent in the younger military population. (3) TIVA was a superior anesthetic for patients thought to have TBI and/or PTSD. (4) Talking to all patients suspected of having TBI and/or PTSD before surgery and on emergence was vital for a smooth emergence. (5) There is something profound happening in regard to ketamine and PTSD and TBI.

  4. Comparison of peritonsillar infiltration effects of ketamine and tramadol on post tonsillectomy pain: a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Vida; Behdad, Shekoufeh; Hatami, Maryam; Moshtaghiun, Hossein; Baghianimoghadam, Behnam

    2012-01-01

    Aim To assess the effect of peritonsillar infiltration of ketamine and tramadol on post tonsillectomy pain and compare the side effects. Methods The double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed on 126 patients aged 5-12 years who had been scheduled for elective tonsillectomy. The patients were randomly divided into 3 groups to receive either ketamine, tramadol, or placebo. They had American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I and II. All patients underwent the same method of anesthesia and surgical procedure. The three groups did not differ according to their age, sex, and duration of anesthesia and surgery. Post operative pain was evaluated using CHEOPS score. Other parameters such as the time to the first request for analgesic, hemodynamic elements, sedation score, nausea, vomiting, and hallucination were also assessed during 12 hours after surgery. Results Tramadol group had significantly lower pain scores (P = 0.005), significantly longer time to the first request for analgesic (P = 0.001), significantly shorter time to the beginning of liquid regimen (P = 0.001), and lower hemodynamic parameters such as blood pressure (P = 0.001) and heart rate (P = 0.001) than other two groups. Ketamine group had significantly greater presence of hallucinations and negative behavior than tramadol and placebo groups. The groups did not differ significantly in the presence of nausea and vomiting. Conclusion Preoperative peritonsillar infiltration of tramadol can decrease post-tonsillectomy pain, analgesic consumption, and the time to recovery without significant side effects. Registration No: IRCT201103255764N2 PMID:22522994

  5. The memory stages of a spatial Y-maze task are not affected by a low dose of ketamine/midazolam.

    PubMed

    Valentim, Ana M; Ribeiro, Patrícia O; Olsson, I Anna S; Antunes, Luís M

    2013-07-15

    Anesthetics, such as the ketamine/midazolam combination, are used in research with animals and in human clinical practice; thus, it is essential to clarify the potential effects of these anesthetics on memory. This study aimed to evaluate how a low dose of the ketamine/midazolam combination affects the acquisition, consolidation, or recall of a spatial memory task. Thirty-three adult male C57BL/6 mice were divided into four treatment groups: unanesthetized control animals and three groups of animals treated with 40 mg/kg of ketamine and 10mg/kg of midazolam administered in a single intraperitoneal injection. The different treatment groups received the same anesthetic dose at different time points, to study the acquisition, consolidation, and recall of spatial memory in the Y-maze task. The percentage of correct choices was measured. Six mice were killed 4 days and 12 days after anesthesia for histopathological analyses. There were no differences between treatment and control groups regarding the acquisition of spatial memory, measured as the slope of the learning curve, or in the percentage of correct choices in the consolidation or recall periods of the task. Similarly, no differences were detected between groups regarding the number of cells per square millimeter in the visual and retrosplenial cortex, in the dentate gyrus, and in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Hence, a low dose of the ketamine/midazolam combination did not impair memory processes or brain integrity in adult mice, suggesting that this combination is unlikely to cause cognitive complications.

  6. The fibrosis of ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor antagonist dose-dependent change in a ketamine-induced cystitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Song, Miho; Yu, Hwan Yeul; Chun, Ji-Youn; Shin, Dong-Myung; Song, Soo Hyun; Choo, Myung-Soo; Song, Yun Seob

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine abusers have greatly increased in number worldwide during recent years. The consumption of ketamine has increased, as have the number of published accounts of devastating urological sequelae. However, the mechanism of ketamine-associated urinary tract dysfunction remains unclear. This study was to evaluate the ketamine dose-dependency of ketamine-induced cystitis (KC) in a rat model. A total of 42 Sprague-Dawley rats (female, 10-week-old) were used. Each of the 7 KC rat models were induced by 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg ketamine intravenous injection for two weeks. For the sham group (n = 7), a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) vehicle was used rather than ketamine hydrochloride. The cystometric parameters, histological examinations, staining for Masson's trichome, cytokeratin, toluidine blue and quantitative PCR were measured at two weeks following the intervention. The voiding interval gradually decreased depending upon the ketamine dose of 1, 5, 10, 25, or 50 mg/kg, respectively, and was decreased compared with Sham. Bladder capacity was decreased as ketamine dose increased. In particular, the increase of fibrosis and submucosal apoptosis were found according to the increase of the ketamine dose. The bladder apoptosis in the KC rat model makes the fibrotic bladder change, and led us to hypothesize that fibrosis could contribute to the lower urinary-tract symptoms. We suggest that according to the pathophysiology evidence, fibrosis induced by apoptosis plays a key role in KC.

  7. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  8. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up.

  9. Efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Shiwaku, Hironari; Ohmiya, Toshihiro; Shimaoka, Hideki; Okada, Hiroki; Nakashima, Ryo; Beppu, Richiko; Kato, Daisuke; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Nimura, Satoshi; Yamaura, Ken; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) under general anesthesia. METHODS: From January 2011 to July 2014, 206 consecutive patients had undergone ESD under general anesthesia for neoplasms of the stomach, esophagus, and colorectum were enrolled in this retrospective study. The efficacy and safety of ESD under general anesthesia were assessed. RESULTS: The en bloc resection rate of esophageal, gastric, and colorectal lesions was 100.0%, 98.3%, and 96.1%, respectively. The complication rate of perforation and bleeding were 0.0% and 0.0% in esophageal ESD, 1.7% and 1.7% in gastric ESD, and 3.9% and 2.0% in colorectal ESD, respectively. No cases of aspiration pneumonia were observed. All complications were managed by conservative treatment, with no surgical intervention required. CONCLUSION: With the cooperation of an anesthesiologist, ESD under general anesthesia appears to be a useful method, decreasing the risk of complications. PMID:27433293

  10. Ketamine and phencyclidine: the good, the bad and the unexpected

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, D; Mercier, M S

    2015-01-01

    The history of ketamine and phencyclidine from their development as potential clinical anaesthetics through drugs of abuse and animal models of schizophrenia to potential rapidly acting antidepressants is reviewed. The discovery in 1983 of the NMDA receptor antagonist property of ketamine and phencyclidine was a key step to understanding their pharmacology, including their psychotomimetic effects in man. This review describes the historical context and the course of that discovery and its expansion into other hallucinatory drugs. The relevance of these findings to modern hypotheses of schizophrenia and the implications for drug discovery are reviewed. The findings of the rapidly acting antidepressant effects of ketamine in man are discussed in relation to other glutamatergic mechanisms. PMID:26075331

  11. Immobilization of wild collared anteaters with ketamine- and xylazine-hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Fournier-Chambrillon, C; Fournier, P; Vié, J C

    1997-10-01

    Collared anteaters (Tamandua tetradactyla) were immobilized for clinical procedures as part of a wildlife rescue during the filling of a hydroelectric dam (Petit Saut, French Guiana) from March 1994 to March 1995. Two doses of ketamine hydrochloride (KH) (group I mean +/- SD = 11.2 +/- 1.4 mg/kg, group II = 19.7 +/- 1.3 mg/kg) in combination with xylazine hydrochloride (XH) (1.0 +/- 0.1 mg/kg) were evaluated in seven and 10 collared anteaters, respectively. Induction time did not differ between the two groups. Immobilization time was significantly longer in group II than in group I (48.3 +/- 15.8 min and 35.0 +/- 9.5 min, respectively), without lengthening the recovery process. Adverse effects were not observed. The degree of anesthesia and the muscle relaxation were better in group II than in group I. Rectal temperature decreased in both groups and was significantly higher in group II than in group I. Heart rate was significantly higher in group II than in group I at 5 min post-injection and decreased in group II. No effects on respiratory rate were observed. We recommend the 20 mg/kg KH -1 mg/kg XH combination, especially for manipulations longer than 30 to 40 min and for minor surgery procedures.

  12. Cardiovascular and behavioral responses of gray wolves to ketamine-xylazine immobilization and antagonism by yohimbine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreeger, T.J.; Faggella, A.M.; Seal, U.S.; Mech, L.D.; Callahan, M.; Hall, B.

    1987-01-01

    Adult wolves (Canis lupus) were immobilized with 6.6 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride (KET) and 2.2 mg/kg xylazine hydrochloride (XYL) administered intramuscularly. Induction time was 4.6 +/- 0.3 min (mean +/- SE). Immobilization resulted in significant bradycardia and hypertension (P less than 0.05). Twenty min after induction, the wolves were given 0.05-0.60 mg/kg yohimbine hydrochloride (YOH). Yohimbine given intravenously produced dose-related increases in heart rate (HR) with doses greater than 0.15 mg/kg resulting in extreme tachycardia (greater than 300 bpm). All doses of YOH caused a temporary decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) with some individual animals manifesting profound hypotension (less than 30 torr) at doses greater than 0.15 mg/kg. Increasing the dose of YOH above 0.15 mg/kg did not significantly decrease either arousal or ambulation times. Administering YOH at 40 or 60 min after induction resulted in decreased arousal and ambulation times. Stimulation by weighing and taking repeated blood samples during anesthesia did not shorten arousal times. We recommend that wolves immobilized with XYL-KET be antagonized with doses of YOH less than 0.15 mg/kg.

  13. Magnesium in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care.

    PubMed

    Kutlesic, Marija S; Kutlesic, Ranko M; Mostic-Ilic, Tatjana

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium, one of the essential elements in the human body, has numerous favorable effects that offer a variety of possibilities for its use in obstetric anesthesia and intensive care. Administered as a single intravenous bolus dose or a bolus followed by continuous infusion during surgery, magnesium attenuates stress response to endotracheal intubation, and reduces intraoperative anesthetic and postoperative analgesic requirements, while at the same time preserving favorable hemodynamics. Applied as part of an intrathecal or epidural anesthetic mixture, magnesium prolongs the duration of anesthesia and diminishes total postoperative analgesic consumption with no adverse maternal or neonatal effects. In obstetric intensive care, magnesium represents a first-choice medication in the treatment and prevention of eclamptic seizures. If used in recommended doses with close monitoring, magnesium is a safe and effective medication.

  14. Local and General Anesthesia in the Laparoscopic Preperitoneal Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ferzli, George

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The extraperitoneal laparoscopic approach (EXTRA) has been shown to be an effective and safe repair for primary (PIH), recurrent (RIH) and bilateral hernia (BIH). There is very little data examining the merits of laparoscopic repair for hernias under local anesthesia. In this paper, we compare EXTRA performed under both general and local anesthesia. Methods: This nonrandomized prospective study was performed selectively on a male population only. Patients with associated pulmonary disease and high risk for general surgery were selected. Patients with recurrence and previous abdominal operations were excluded to decrease confounding variables in the study. A Prolene mesh was used in all patients. Results: Between May 1997 and September 1998, 92 male patients underwent the repair of 107 groin hernias using the EXTRA technique. The procedure was explained to them, and different anesthesia options were given. Fourteen of these repairs were performed under local anesthesia and 93 under general anesthesia. Of the 10 patients who underwent a repair under local anesthesia, there were 8 indirect, 5 direct and 1 pantaloon. The mean age was 53 years. In the group of general anesthesia, the types of hernias repaired were 45 indirect, 30 direct and 11 pantaloon. The mean age was 45 years. The mean follow-up was 15 months. Each patient was sent home the same day. Two peritoneal tears were recorded in the first group. The operative time was longer in the local group (47 ± 11 vs 18 ± 3). None of the patients required conversion to an open technique or change of anesthesia. No recurrences were found in either group. The average time of return to work and regular activity was 3.5 ± 1 and 3 ± 1 days, respectively. Conclusion: There appears to be no significant difference in recurrence and complication rates when the EXTRA is performed under local anesthesia as compared to general. Blunt dissection of the preperitoneal space does not trigger pain and does not require

  15. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  16. Memantine Reverses Social Withdrawal Induced by Ketamine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Landaeta, José; Wix, Richard; Eblen, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of memantine on schizophrenia-like symptoms in a ketamine-induced social withdrawal model in rats. We examined therapeutic effects of memantine, an NMDA antagonist, and haloperidol, a classic antipsychotic drug, on this behavioral model. Administration of memantine (10 or 15 mg·kg-1) significantly reduced ketamine-induced social withdrawal, and this effect was more effective than that of haloperidol (0.25 mg·kg-1) by restoring the social interaction between rats with no modification in general motor activity. These results suggest that memantine could have a therapeutic potential for schizophrenia. PMID:23585718

  17. Glycopyrrolate compared with atropine in association with ketamine anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Toft, P; Rømer, U D

    1987-07-01

    Atropine and glycopyrrolate given intravenously before the induction of a ketamine anaesthesia to diminish salivary secretion were compared for their effect on psychotomimetic side-effects, awakening time and heart rate. Though atropine is a tertiary amine that crosses the blood-brain barrier, which glycopyrrolate as a quaternary ammonium compound does not, it did not increase the incidence of psychotomimetic side-effects nor did it significantly prolong the awakening time after ketamine anaesthesia. During intubation the increase in heart rate was significantly higher following atropine than following glycopyrrolate.

  18. Intravenous ketamine plus midazolam is superior to intranasal midazolam for emergency paediatric procedural sedation

    PubMed Central

    Acworth, J; Purdie, D; Clark, R

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—This study compared intranasal midazolam (INM) with a combination of intravenous ketamine and intravenous midazolam (IVKM) for sedation of children requiring minor procedures in the emergency department. Method—A single blinded randomised clinical trial was conducted in the emergency department of a major urban paediatric hospital. Subjects requiring sedation for minor procedures were randomised to receive either INM (0.4 mg/kg) or intravenous ketamine (1 mg/kg) plus intravenous midazolam (0.1 mg/kg). Physiological variables and two independent measures of sedation (Sedation Score and Visual Analogue Sedation Scale) were recorded before sedation and at regular intervals during the procedure and recovery period. Times to adequate level of sedation and to discharge were compared. Results—Fifty three patients were enrolled over a 10 month period. Sedation was sufficient to complete the procedures in all children receiving IVKM and in 24 of the 26 receiving INM. Onset of sedation was an average of 5.3 minutes quicker with IVKM than with INM (95%CI 3.2, 7.4 minutes, p<0.001). Children given INM were discharged an average of 19 minutes earlier than those given IVKM (95%CI 4, 33 minutes, p=0.02). Mean Sedation Scores and Visual Analogue Sedation Scale scores for the 30 minutes after drug administration were significantly better in children given IVKM compared with INM (2.4 and 1.8 versus 3.5 and 3.8, respectively). Both doctors and parents were more satisfied with sedation by intravenous ketamine and midazolam. Conclusions—Intravenous ketamine plus midazolam used in an appropriate setting by experienced personnel provides an excellent means of achieving sedation suitable for most non-painful minor procedures for children in the emergency department. This combination is superior to INM in terms of speed of onset and consistency of effect. INM delivered via aerosol spray has a more variable effect but may still be adequate for the completion of many of

  19. Dose Regimens, Variability, and Complications Associated with Using Repeat-Bolus Dosing to Extend a Surgical Plane of Anesthesia in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2014-01-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redosing protocols included 25% (0.25K), 50% (0.5K), or 100% (1.0K) of the initial ketamine dose or 25% (0.25KX) or 50% (0.5KX) of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose. In the ISP group, the surgical plane was extended by 13.8 ± 2.1 min (mean ± SEM) after redosing for the 0.25K redose with 50% returning to a surgical plane, 42.7 ± 4.5 min for the 0.5K redose with 88% returning to a surgical plane, and 44.3 ± 15.4 min for the 1.0K redose, 52.8 ± 7.2 min for the 0.25KX redose, and 45.9 ± 2.9 min for the 0.5KX redose, with 100% of mice returning to a surgical plane of anesthesia in these 3 groups. Mortality rates for ISP groups were 0%, 12%, 33%, 12%, and 18%, respectively. Mice in CSP groups had 50% mortality, independent of the repeat-dosing protocol. We recommend redosing mice with either 50% of the initial ketamine dose or 25% of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose immediately upon return of the pedal withdrawal reflex to extend the surgical plane of anesthesia in mice, optimize the extension of the surgical plane, and minimize mortality. PMID:25650976

  20. Subanesthetic, Subcutaneous Ketamine Infusion Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain.

    PubMed

    Zekry, Olfat; Gibson, Stephen B; Aggarwal, Arun

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to describe the efficacy and toxicity of subcutaneous ketamine infusions and sublingual ketamine lozenges for the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain. Data were collected prospectively on 70 subjects managed in an academic, tertiary care hospital between 2007 and 2012 who received between 3 and 7 days of subanesthetic, subcutaneous ketamine infusion. Data were analyzed for efficacy, adverse effects, and reduction in use of opioid medication. We also analyzed whether subsequent treatment with sublingual ketamine lozenges resulted in longer-term efficacy of the beneficial effects of the initial ketamine infusion. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity measured by numerical rating scale (NRS) from mean of 6.38 before ketamine to 4.60 after ketamine (P < .005) that was sustained for between 3 months and 6 years. In subjects on opioids, there was a significant reduction in opioid use at the end of the ketamine infusion from a mean morphine equivalent dose (MMED) of 216 mg/day before ketamine to 89 mg/day after ketamine (P < .005). The overall reduction in opioid use after ketamine infusion was 59%. No subjects increased their use of opioids during their hospitalization for the ketamine infusion. A small proportion of subjects who responded to the infusion were continued on ketamine lozenges. This group was followed for between 3 months and 2 years. The use of ketamine lozenges after the infusion resulted in 31% of these subjects being able to cease their use of opioids compared with only 6% who did not receive ketamine lozenges. Eleven percent of subjects who received lozenges subsequently increased their opioid usage. Adverse effects were fairly common, but only mild, with 46% of patients experiencing light-headedness and dizziness, 25% tiredness and sedation, 12% headaches, 12% hallucinations, and 8% vivid dreams. Adverse effects were easily managed by reducing the rate of the ketamine infusion. The administration of

  1. Consciousness and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Alkire, Michael T; Hudetz, Anthony G; Tononi, Giulio

    2008-11-07

    When we are anesthetized, we expect consciousness to vanish. But does it always? Although anesthesia undoubtedly induces unresponsiveness and amnesia, the extent to which it causes unconsciousness is harder to establish. For instance, certain anesthetics act on areas of the brain's cortex near the midline and abolish behavioral responsiveness, but not necessarily consciousness. Unconsciousness is likely to ensue when a complex of brain regions in the posterior parietal area is inactivated. Consciousness vanishes when anesthetics produce functional disconnection in this posterior complex, interrupting cortical communication and causing a loss of integration; or when they lead to bistable, stereotypic responses, causing a loss of information capacity. Thus, anesthetics seem to cause unconsciousness when they block the brain's ability to integrate information.

  2. Spinal Anesthesia in Elderly Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Noah L; Edwards, Charles C; Brown, Charles H; Ledford, Emily C; Dean, Clayton L; Lin, Charles; Edwards, Charles C

    2017-03-01

    Spinal anesthesia is increasingly viewed as a reasonable alternative to general anesthesia for lumbar spine surgery. However, the results of spinal anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spine decompression and combined decompression and fusion procedures are limited in the literature. The aim of this study was to report a single institution's experience using spinal anesthesia in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. A retrospective review was conducted using a prospectively collected database of consecutive lumbar spine surgeries performed under spinal anesthesia in patients 70 years or older at a single center between December 2013 and October 2015. A total of 56 patients were included in the study; 27 patients (48%) underwent lumbar decompression and 29 patients (52%) underwent combined decompression and fusion procedures. Mean operative time was 101 minutes (range, 30-210 minutes), and mean operative blood loss was 187 mL (range, 20-700 mL). Mean maximum inpatient postoperative visual analog scale score was 6.2 (range, 1-10). Nausea occurred in 21% (12 of 56) of the patients. Mean length of stay was 2.4 days (range, 1-6 days). No mortality, stroke, permanent loss of function, or pulmonary embolism occurred. None of the cases required conversion to general anesthesia. All of the patients were ambulatory on either the day of the surgery or the next morning. These results demonstrate that spinal anesthesia is a viable method of anesthesia for patients 70 years and older undergoing lumbar spine surgery. They also demonstrate the safety of this method for patients older than 84 years and for surgeries lasting up to 3½ hours. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e317-e322.].

  3. Fortuitous Diagnosis of Preexisting Neuropathy During Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anesthesia Performance: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Marty, Philippe; Basset, Bertrand; Marquis, Constance; Merouani, Medhi; Rontes, Olivier; Delbos, Alain

    2017-03-31

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia requires the anesthesia provider to interpret new information. This article reports on the case of a 38-year-old man scheduled for a fifth metacarpal fracture repair. Ultrasound nerve examination revealed abnormal pathology of the axillary brachial plexus consisting of an increased volume of the terminal nerves of the brachial plexus. Ultrasound scanning initiated the subsequent diagnosis of multifocal motor neuropathy. Regional anesthesia was abandoned in favor of general anesthesia. Ultrasonography training needs to be expanded in the coming years to include awareness of the abnormal pathology, as it might impact the choice of anesthetic procedure and patient outcome.

  4. Anesthesia 101: everything you need to know.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Successful patient outcomes from an operative procedure require vigilance, diligence, and teamwork among the various providers involved with the surgical procedure. An understanding of the responsibilities and appreciation for the complexities of each healthcare provider's role in the operative process is essential to a harmonious relationship among the perioperative team to improve the working environment and provide safe patient care. The information provided in this article is based on commonly observed practices in the anesthesia community with the caveat that the choices can vary considerably and are influenced by patient presentation and surgical requirements.

  5. [Regional anesthesia and cancer immunology].

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Toru; Mori, Katsuya; Inoue, Kei; Suzuki, Takeshi; Morisaki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Regional anesthesia has been widely applied as an excellent method for perioperative analgesia. Recent studies suggested that regional anesthesia is a promising approach to minimize the risk of surgical site infection and postoperative cancer recurrence, subsequently providing the benefits to the long-term outcome. In particular, it is of great interest that regional anesthesia might be able to reduce cancer recurrence. In cancer patients, innate immunity against cancer could be depressed, resulting in the predisposition to evoke metastasis. Besides, during the perioperative periods, tumor immunity is significantly depressed due to surgical pain, activation of sympathetic nervous system, inflammatory responses, and others. In this review article, we discuss the tumor immunity during the perioperative period, with focus on the alterations of tumor immunity and regional anesthesia.

  6. Gradual emergence of spontaneous correlated brain activity during fading of general anesthesia in rats: Evidences from fMRI and local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Bettinardi, Ruggero G.; Tort-Colet, Núria; Ruiz-Mejias, Marcel; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.; Deco, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic brain activity is characterized by the presence of highly structured networks of correlated fluctuations between different regions of the brain. Such networks encompass different functions, whose properties are known to be modulated by the ongoing global brain state and are altered in several neurobiological disorders. In the present study, we induced a deep state of anesthesia in rats by means of a ketamine/medetomidine peritoneal injection, and analyzed the time course of the correlation between the brain activity in different areas while anesthesia spontaneously decreased over time. We compared results separately obtained from fMRI and local field potentials (LFPs) under the same anesthesia protocol, finding that while most profound phases of anesthesia can be described by overall sparse connectivity, stereotypical activity and poor functional integration, during lighter states different frequency-specific functional networks emerge, endowing the gradual restoration of structured large-scale activity seen during rest. Noteworthy, our in vivo results show that those areas belonging to the same functional network (the default-mode) exhibited sustained correlated oscillations around 10 Hz throughout the protocol, suggesting the presence of a specific functional backbone that is preserved even during deeper phases of anesthesia. Finally, the overall pattern of results obtained from both imaging and in vivo-recordings suggests that the progressive emergence from deep anesthesia is reflected by a corresponding gradual increase of organized correlated oscillations across the cortex. PMID:25804643

  7. Longitudinal Effects of Ketamine on Dendritic Architecture In Vivo in the Mouse Medial Frontal Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Phoumthipphavong, Victoria; Barthas, Florent; Hassett, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, leads to fast-acting antidepressant effects. In rodent models, systemic ketamine is associated with higher dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, reflecting structural remodeling that may underlie the behavioral changes. However, turnover of dendritic spines is a dynamic process in vivo, and the longitudinal effects of ketamine on structural plasticity remain unclear. The purpose of the current study is to use subcellular resolution optical imaging to determine the time course of dendritic alterations in vivo following systemic ketamine administration in mice. We used two-photon microscopy to visualize repeatedly the same set of dendritic branches in the mouse medial frontal cortex (MFC) before and after a single injection of ketamine or saline. Compared to controls, ketamine-injected mice had higher dendritic spine density in MFC for up to 2 weeks. This prolonged increase in spine density was driven by an elevated spine formation rate, and not by changes in the spine elimination rate. A fraction of the new spines following ketamine injection was persistent, which is indicative of functional synapses. In a few cases, we also observed retraction of distal apical tuft branches on the day immediately after ketamine administration. These results indicate that following systemic ketamine administration, certain dendritic inputs in MFC are removed immediately, while others are added gradually. These dynamic structural modifications are consistent with a model of ketamine action in which the net effect is a rebalancing of synaptic inputs received by frontal cortical neurons. PMID:27066532

  8. Comparison of Oral and Intranasal Midazolam/Ketamine Sedation in 3-6-year-old Uncooperative Dental Patients.

    PubMed

    Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Ansari, Ghassem; Soleymani, Ali Asghar; Shayeghi, Shahnaz; Fotuhi Ardakani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. There are several known sedative drugs, with midazolam and ketamine being the most commonly used drugs in children. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intranasal and oral midazolam plus ketamine in children with high levels of dental anxiety. Materials and methods. A crossover double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 23 uncooperative children aged 3-6 (negative or definitely negative by Frankel scale), who required at least two similar dental treatment visits. Cases were randomly given ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) through oral or intranasal routes in each visit. The sedative efficacy of the agents was assessed by an overall success rate judged by two independent pediatric dentists based on Houpt's scale for sedation. Data analysis was carried out using Wilcoxon test and paired t-test. Results. Intranasal administration was more effective in reduction of crying and movement during dental procedures compared to oral sedation (P<0.05). Overall behavior control was scored higher in nasal compared to oral routes at the time of LA injection and after 15 minutes (P<0.05). The difference was found to be statistically significant at the start and during treatment. However, the difference was no longer significant after 30 minutes, with the vital signs remaining within physiological limits. Recovery time was longer in the intranasal group (P<0.001) with a more sleepy face (P=0.004). Conclusion. . Intranasal midazolam/ketamine combination was more satisfactory and effective than the oral route when sedating uncooperative children.

  9. Comparison of Oral and Intranasal Midazolam/Ketamine Sedation in 3-6-year-old Uncooperative Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Ansari, Ghassem; Soleymani, Ali Asghar; Shayeghi, Shahnaz; Fotuhi Ardakani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. There are several known sedative drugs, with midazolam and ketamine being the most commonly used drugs in children. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intranasal and oral midazolam plus ketamine in children with high levels of dental anxiety. Materials and methods.A crossover double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 23 uncooperative children aged 3-6 (negative or definitely negative by Frankel scale), who required at least two similar dental treatment visits. Cases were randomly given ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) through oral or intranasal routes in each visit. The sedative efficacy of the agents was assessed by an overall success rate judged by two independent pediatric dentists based on Houpt’s scale for sedation. Data analysis was carried out using Wilcoxon test and paired t-test. Results. Intranasal administration was more effective in reduction of crying and movement during dental procedures compared to oral sedation (P<0.05). Overall behavior control was scored higher in nasal compared to oral routes at the time of LA injection and after 15 minutes (P<0.05). The difference was found to be statistically significant at the start and during treatment. However, the difference was no longer significant after 30 minutes, with the vital signs remaining within physiological limits. Recovery time was longer in the intranasal group (P<0.001) with a more sleepy face (P=0.004). Conclusion.. Intranasal midazolam/ketamine combination was more satisfactory and effective than the oral route when sedating uncooperative children. PMID:26236429

  10. Opposing effects of ketamine and acetyl L-carnitine on the serotonergic system of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Bonnie L; Dumas, Melanie; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2015-10-21

    Ketamine, a pediatric anesthetic, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. Studies show that ketamine is neurotoxic in developing mammals and zebrafish. In both mammals and zebrafish, acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) has been shown to be protective against ketamine toxicity. Ketamine is known to modulate the serotonergic system in mammals. Here, we measured the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses, did not produce significant changes in the 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels in 3 dpf (day post-fertilization) embryos. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels comparable to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced 5-HT level, and 5-HIAA was not detectable indicating that 5-HT metabolism was abolished. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR by itself did not significantly alter 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels compared to the control. Ratios of metabolite/5-HT indicated that 2 mM ketamine inhibited 5-HT metabolism to 5-HIAA whereas lower doses (0.1-0.3 mM) of ketamine did not have any effect. ALCAR reversed the effects of 2 mM ketamine not only by restoring 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels but also 5-HT turnover rate to control levels. Whole mount immunohistochemical studies showed that 2 mM ketamine reduced the serotonergic area in the brain whereas ALCAR expanded it with increased axonal sprouting and branching. These results indicate that ketamine and ALCAR have opposing effects on the zebrafish serotonergic system.

  11. Opposing effects of ketamine and acetyl L-carnitine on the serotonergic system of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Bonnie L.; Dumas, Melanie; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a pediatric anesthetic, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. Studies show that ketamine is neurotoxic in developing mammals and zebrafish. In both mammals and zebrafish, acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) has been shown to be protective against ketamine toxicity. Ketamine is known to modulate the serotonergic system in mammals. Here, we measured the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses, did not produce significant changes in the 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels in 3 dpf (day post-fertilization) embryos. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels comparable to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced 5-HT level, and 5-HIAA was not detectable indicating that 5-HT metabolism was abolished. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR by itself did not significantly alter 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels compared to the control. Ratios of metabolite/5-HT indicated that 2 mM ketamine inhibited 5-HT metabolism to 5-HIAA whereas lower doses (0.1–0.3 mM) of ketamine did not have any effect. ALCAR reversed the effects of 2 mM ketamine not only by restoring 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels but also 5-HT turnover rate to control levels. Whole mount immunohistochemical studies showed that 2 mM ketamine reduced the serotonergic area in the brain whereas ALCAR expanded it with increased axonal sprouting and branching. These results indicate that ketamine and ALCAR have opposing effects on the zebrafish serotonergic system. PMID:26365406

  12. Anesthesia and sedation outside of the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ann Misun; Kim, Yoon-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid evolution and technological advancements, medical personnel now require special training outside of their safe zones. Anesthesiologists face challenges in practicing in locations beyond the operating room. New locations, inadequate monitoring devices, poor assisting staff, unfamiliarity of procedures, insufficient knowledge of basic standards, and lack of experience compromise the quality of patient care. Therefore, anesthesiologists must recognize possible risk factors during anesthesia in nonoperating rooms and familiarize themselves with standards to improve safe practice. This review article emphasizes the need for standardizing hospitals and facilities requiring nonoperating room anesthesia, and encourages anesthesiologists to take the lead in applying these practice guidelines to improve patient outcomes and reduce adverse events. PMID:26257843

  13. Changes in the thalamocortical connectivity during anesthesia-induced transitions in consciousness.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Hwang, Eunjin; Kang, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Seunghwan; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2012-03-28

    Thalamocortical networks play an important role in information integration during consciousness. However, little is known about how the information flows between the thalamus and the cortex are affected by a loss of consciousness. To investigate this issue, we analyzed effective connectivity between the cortex and the thalamus in animals during anesthesia-induced transitions. By recording the electroencephalogram from the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex and by recording local field potentials from the ventral lateral and the ventrobasal thalamic nuclei, we evaluated changes in the conditional Granger causality between cortical and thalamic electrical activity as mice gradually lost consciousness from the use of anesthesia (ketamine/xylazine). The point of loss of consciousness was indicated by a moment of loss of movement that was measured using a head-mounted motion sensor. The results showed that 65% of the thalamocortical information flows were changed by anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness. Specifically, the effective connectivity between the cortex and the ventral lateral thalamus was altered such that the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex Granger-caused the ventral lateral thalamus before loss of consciousness whereas the ventral lateral thalamus Granger-caused the primary motor cortex and the primary somatosensory cortex after loss of consciousness. In contrast, the primary somatosensory cortex consistently Granger-caused the ventrobasal thalamus, regardless of the loss of consciousness. These results suggest how information flows change across the thalamocortical network during transitions in consciousness.

  14. Effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on vascular conductance are unaffected by anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Bouder, T.G.; Huffman, L.J.; Hedge, G.A. )

    1988-12-01

    In rats anesthetized with ketamine and pentobarbital (KET/PB), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) increases vascular conductance (VC) in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, whereas no changes in VC are observed in a number of other organs. Because anesthesia may alter the responsiveness of physiological systems, we compared the effects of VIP on organ VC in conscious or anesthetized rats. Chronically catheterized rats were studied in the conscious state or 30 min after induction of anesthesia with KET/PB, isoflurane, or Inactin. Blood flows were measured by the reference sample version of the radioactive microsphere (MS) technique using two MS injections ({sup 141}Ce-MS/{sup 85}Sr-MS). Mean arterial blood pressure was monitored and used in the calculation of VC. Organ VCs were similar under basal conditions in conscious and anesthetized rats. VIP infusion caused systemic hypotension and increased VCs in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, and these responses were largely unaffected by anesthesia. These results indicate that the anesthetics used do not alter basal VC or the responsiveness of the vasculature to exogenous VIP.

  15. Endotracheal tubes versus laryngeal mask airways in rabbit inhalation anesthesia: ease of use and waste gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer C; Robertson, Linda D; Auhll, Ann; March, Tim J; Derring, Cheryl; Bolon, Brad

    2004-07-01

    In this study, we compared two endotracheal tubes (cuffed [Murphy Eye type] and uncuffed [Cole type]) and a pediatric laryngeal mask airway (LMA) with respect to their ease of use in rabbits and their capacities to limit waste isoflurane emissions. Animals (New Zealand White, 3.3 to 5.0 kg, n = 8) were sedated with intramuscular ketamine (50 mg/kg) and xylazine (10 mg/kg). After 5 min, the larynx was numbed with cetocaine, an intubation device was positioned, and anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane (2%) in oxygen (1 liter/min). Real-time atmospheric isoflurane emissions were assessed at the rabbit's oral commissure and in the operator's breathing zone (45 cm from the rabbit's nose) by using a portable infrared spectrophotometer. The LMA was placed more easily than was either endotracheal tube, especially by novices. The cuffed tube was positioned more readily than was the uncuffed variant. All three devices emitted isoflurane. The concentrations measured at the oral commissure for the LMA (mean +/- standard error, 8.4 +/- 0.6 ppm) were modestly higher than those acquired for the cuffed (6.7 +/- 0.5 ppm) and uncuffed (6.3 +/- 0.4 ppm) endotracheal tubes; the difference between the LMA and uncuffed tube was significant (P = 0.012). Isoflurane was not detected in the operator's breathing zone. These data show that the uncuffed endotracheal tube (usually used to anesthetize birds and reptiles) and the pediatric LMA can be used in rabbits as readily as a cuffed tube. In addition, our findings indicate that tradeoffs will be required in selecting a delivery system for this species, as the easiest apparatus (the LMA) also emits the most isoflurane waste.

  16. Multistage drug effects of ketamine in the treatment of major depression.

    PubMed

    Walter, Martin; Li, Shijia; Demenescu, Liliana Ramona

    2014-11-01

    A substantial number of patients diagnosed with major depression disorder show poor or no response to standard antidepressive drugs. Recent studies showed that ketamine promotes a rapid and sustained antidepressive effect in treatment-resistant depression. Importantly, after a single dose, such antidepressant action appears very fast, reaching maximum efficacy after 1-2 days before it slowly decays after 3-7 days. This temporal pattern is especially interesting since most effects are investigated following single, subanesthetic doses. This means that effects are observed at time points when the blood levels have long fallen below any active threshold. Mechanisms of action thus may be sought either in secondary or compensatory processes, which develop after acute systemic derangement or in molecular downstream mechanisms of action, which after initiation do not require the presence of active drug levels. We here review acute and delayed effects of subanesthetic ketamine infusion and discuss potential origins of antidepressant drug action. We will provide evidences that both acute effects on abnormal network configuration and delayed effects at the level of homeostatic synaptic plasticity may be necessary for antidepressant action. We further argue that such effects should be followed by a temporally well-defined exploitation of these transient changes by therapeutic processes, aiming at sustained changes of network configuration via psychotherapeutic or other methods.

  17. The Lancaster experience of 2.0 to 2.5 mg/kg intramuscular ketamine for paediatric sedation: 501 cases and analysis

    PubMed Central

    McGlone, R; Howes, M; Joshi, M

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To report the experience of using intramuscular ketamine 2.0 or 2.5 mg/kg for minor painful procedures in children in a medium sized district general hospital accident and emergency department. To demonstrate the safety and acceptability of ketamine and determine if the incidence of adverse effects is related to dose or other variables. Methods: Prospective data collection and analysis using Statsdirect and SPSS software. Results: 501 consecutive cases were collected from August 1996 to April 2002. A total of 310 children received 2.0 mg/kg and 191 received 2.5 mg/kg. Twenty six received a second dose. In seven cases oxygen saturation fell below 93%, three of these fell below 90%. There was one case of laryngospasm. Eight cases received airway suctioning, five of these were mouth or lip wounds. Seventeen per cent vomited in recovery or at home for which one child required admission. Muscle hypertonicity was observed in 6.8%, disturbed sleep or nightmares in 2%. The median time to discharge was 85 minutes. Ninety seven per cent of parents' experiences were "the same as" or "better than" expected. No children suffered any lasting or troublesome complications. Conclusions: 2.0 – 2.5 mg/kg intramuscular ketamine sedation is a safe and acceptable technique when used within a defined protocol. Lower dose ketamine (2 mg/kg) warrants further study in view of potentially less airway complications and quicker discharge times than previously reported. PMID:15107365

  18. Amyloidosis and Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zara; Harkawat, Dev Kumar; Sharma, Meenaxi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this article is to provide a view of amyloidosis and discuss implications for the anesthetic management of patients with this condition. Material and Method: Urine samples from patients with plasma cell dyscrasias were obtained from a urine bank that gathers urine samples from patients who gave research use consent for specimens that would otherwise be considered waste. Results: Patients with amyloidosis may present to the anesthesiologist for procedures relating to diagnosis, surgery relating to the underlying condition (e.g., bronchial laser and organ transplant), or for incidental surgery. The condition carries a significant risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Conclusion: The term amyloid was coined by Virchow in the mid 19th century, meaning “starch like.” Amyloidosis is a disease complex, in which there is an abnormal deposition of extracellular hyaline material with particular staining characteristics and which contains protein fibrils embedded in a relatively amorphous ground substance. There are numerous clinical manifestations, the onset is insidious, and the diagnosis may not be made in a patient undergoing anesthesia and surgery for an apparently straightforward problem. Unexpected complications such as heart or kidney failure may arise, either before operation or in the postoperative period. Bullous lesions of the skin or oral mucosa and extensive areas of purpura are but two of the ways, in which amyloidosis may first present. The disease spectrum may be inherited or acquired, localized or systemic, and life threatening or an incidental finding. PMID:28298791

  19. Alzheimer disease and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Inan, Gözde; Özköse Satirlar, Zerrin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases and the most prevalent form of dementia. Some factors in the development of AD, age being the best-known one, have been suggested; however, no causes have been found yet. The pathophysiology of the disease is highly complex, current therapies are palliative, and a cure is still lacking. Adverse effects of anesthetics in the elderly have been reported since the 1950s; however, awareness of this old problem has recently gained inportance again. Whether exposure to surgery and general anesthesia (GA) is associated with the development of AD has been questioned. As the population is aging, many elderly patients will need to be anesthetized, and maybe some were already anesthetized before they were diagnosed. Exposure to anesthetics has been demonstrated to promote pathogenesis of AD in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, to date, there have not been any clinical trials to address a link between exposure to GA and the development of AD in humans. Therefore, before making any conclusions we need further studies, but we should be aware of the potential risks and take cautions with vulnerable elderly patients.

  20. New narcotics in anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Borel, J D

    1983-01-01

    Recent research has led to the development of a new family of synthetic narcotic fentanyl derivatives. Two of these, sufentanil and alfentanil, are already in clinical use abroad and are presently under clinical investigation in the United States. Sufentanil is more potent than fentanyl and is claimed to have fewer side effects and less variability in patient cardiovascular responses under stress. It appears that its primary application will be for high-dose narcotic anesthesia in patients with cardiovascular disease. Alfentanil has a shorter duration of action and is claimed to have less postoperative ventilatory depression than fentanyl. It is being recommended for use via continuous intravenous infusion. It will probably become a popular anesthetic agent for outpatient and short surgical procedures. It should be remembered that at this time very little information concerning these agents is in print. Most of the research has been done by a handful of investigators and much has not been published in peer review publications. Based on the clinical impressions of our European colleagues, one can say that these agents should be as safe and as reliable as fentanyl, but any clinically significant advantages over their parent compound, especially in the case of sufentanil, will have to await more widespread use and controlled investigation.

  1. Effect of General Anesthesia in Infancy on Long-Term Recognition Memory in Humans and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Greg; Lee, Joshua; Sall, Jeffrey W; Lee, Bradley H; Alvi, Rehan S; Shih, Jennifer; Rowe, Allison M; Ramage, Tatiana M; Chang, Flora L; Alexander, Terri G; Lempert, David K; Lin, Nan; Siu, Kasey H; Elphick, Sophie A; Wong, Alice; Schnair, Caitlin I; Vu, Alexander F; Chan, John T; Zai, Huizhen; Wong, Michelle K; Anthony, Amanda M; Barbour, Kyle C; Ben-Tzur, Dana; Kazarian, Natalie E; Lee, Joyce YY; Shen, Jay R; Liu, Eric; Behniwal, Gurbir S; Lammers, Cathy R; Quinones, Zoel; Aggarwal, Anuj; Cedars, Elizabeth; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ghetti, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia in infancy impairs performance in recognition memory tasks in mammalian animals, but it is unknown if this occurs in humans. Successful recognition can be based on stimulus familiarity or recollection of event details. Several brain structures involved in recollection are affected by anesthesia-induced neurodegeneration in animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that anesthesia in infancy impairs recollection later in life in humans and rats. Twenty eight children ages 6–11 who had undergone a procedure requiring general anesthesia before age 1 were compared with 28 age- and gender-matched children who had not undergone anesthesia. Recollection and familiarity were assessed in an object recognition memory test using receiver operator characteristic analysis. In addition, IQ and Child Behavior Checklist scores were assessed. In parallel, thirty three 7-day-old rats were randomized to receive anesthesia or sham anesthesia. Over 10 months, recollection and familiarity were assessed using an odor recognition test. We found that anesthetized children had significantly lower recollection scores and were impaired at recollecting associative information compared with controls. Familiarity, IQ, and Child Behavior Checklist scores were not different between groups. In rats, anesthetized subjects had significantly lower recollection scores than controls while familiarity was unaffected. Rats that had undergone tissue injury during anesthesia had similar recollection indices as rats that had been anesthetized without tissue injury. These findings suggest that general anesthesia in infancy impairs recollection later in life in humans and rats. In rats, this effect is independent of underlying disease or tissue injury. PMID:24910347

  2. General anesthesia as a possible GABAergic modulator affects visual processing in children

    PubMed Central

    Van den Boomen, C.; de Graaff, J. C.; de Jong, T. P. V. M.; Kalkman, C. J.; Kemner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) inhibitory interneurons play an important role in visual processing, as is revealed by studies administering drugs in human and monkey adults. Investigating this process in children requires different methodologies, due to ethical considerations. The current study aimed to investigate whether a new method, being general anesthesia using Sevoflurane, can be used to trace the effects of GABAergic modulation on visual brain functioning in children. To this aim, visual processing was investigated in children aged 4–12 years who were scheduled for minor urologic procedures under general anesthesia in day-care treatment. In a visual segmentation task, the difference in Event-Related Potential (ERP) response to homogeneous and textured stimuli was investigated. In addition, psychophysical performance on visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were measured. Results were compared between before and shortly after anesthesia. In two additional studies, effects at 1 day after anesthesia and possible effects of task-repetition were investigated. ERP results showed longer latency and lower amplitude of the Texture Negativity (TN) component shortly after compared to before anesthesia. No effects of anesthesia on psychophysical measurements were found. No effects at 1 day after anesthesia or of repetition were revealed either. These results show that GABAergic modulation through general anesthesia affects ERP reflections of visual segmentation in a similar way in children as benzodiazepine does in adults, but that effects are not permanent. This demonstrates that ERP measurement after anesthesia is a successful method to study effects of GABAergic modulation in children. PMID:23630461

  3. Ketamine for Treatment of Suicidal Ideation and Reduction of Risk for Suicidal Behavior.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Faryal; McCullumsmith, Cheryl B

    2016-06-01

    Ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist with efficacy as a rapid anti-depressant, has early evidence for action to reduce suicidal ideation. This review will explore several important questions that arise from these studies. First, how do we measure reductions in suicidal ideation that occur over minutes to hours? Second, are the reductions in suicidal ideation after ketamine treatment solely a result of its rapid anti-depressant effect? Third, is ketamine only effective in reducing suicidal ideation in patients with mood disorders? Fourth, could ketamine's action lead us to a greater understanding of the neurobiology of suicidal processes? Last, do the reductions in depression and suicidal ideation after ketamine treatment translate into decreased risk for suicidal behavior? Our review concludes that ketamine treatment can be seen as a double-edged sword, clinically to help provide treatment for acutely suicidal patients and experimentally to explore the neurobiological nature of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior.

  4. Effects of Ketamine on Metabolomics of Serum and Urine in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xueying; Zeng, Xiancheng; Hong, Jiehua; Yuan, Congli; Cui, Li; Ma, Jing; Chang, Yan; Hua, Xiuguo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a metabolomics approach based on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and pertinent multivariate data analyses was used to evaluate the effect of ketamine on metabolic markers in cynomolgus macaques. Principal component analysis and orthogonal projection to latent structure with discriminant analysis showed that ketamine (10 mg/kg) induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, ketamine-treated macaques had lower serum levels of α-glucose, myoinositol, lactate and succinate and lower urine levels of pyruvate and lactate. In contrast, the levels of leucine in serum and arginine in urine were significantly higher in the ketamine group. Our results also demonstrated that a single injection of ketamine influenced the major energy and amino acid metabolic pathways in cynomolgus macaques. Our study suggests that these influences should be considered in the design of experiments and the interpretation related blood and urine data from ketamine-sedated cynomolgus macaques. PMID:27657710

  5. Adverse Drug Effects and Preoperative Medication Factors Related to Perioperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Goldberg, Stephen F; Patel, Ronak D; Zhou, Jon; Adams, Douglas R; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    High-dose opioid administration is associated with significant adverse events. Evidence suggests that low-dose ketamine infusions improve perioperative analgesia over conventional opioid management, but usage is highly variable. Ketamine's adverse drug effects (ADEs) are well known, but their prevalence during low-dose infusions in a clinical setting and how often they lead to infusion discontinuation are unknown. The purposes of this study were 3-fold: (1) to identify patient factors associated with initiation of ketamine infusions during spine surgery, (2) to identify specific spine procedures in which ketamine has been used most frequently, and (3) to identify ADEs associated with postoperative ketamine infusions and which ADEs most frequently led to discontinuation. Spine surgery was chosen because of its association with moderate to severe pain and a relatively high use of ketamine infusions in this population at our hospital.

  6. Ketamine Injection among High Risk Youth: Preliminary Findings from New York City

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Clatts, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ketamine, a synthetic drug commonly consumed by high risk youth, produces a range of experiences, including sedation, dissociation, and hallucinations. While ketamine is more typically sniffed, we describe a small sample of young ketamine injectors (n=25) in New York City and highlight risks associated with this emerging type of injection drug use. Our findings indicate that the injection practices, injection groups, and use norms surrounding ketamine often differ from other injection drug use: intramuscular injections were more common than intravenous injections; injection groups were often large; multiple injections within a single episode were common; bottles rather than cookers were shared; and the drug was often obtained for free. Our findings suggest that the drug injection practices exercised by ketamine injectors place them at risk for bloodborne pathogens, such as HIV, HBV, and HCV. We conclude that ketamine injectors represent an emerging, though often hidden, population of injection drug users, particularly among high risk, street-involved youth. PMID:17440604

  7. Local, Regional, and Spinal Anesthesia in Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Misty A

    2016-11-01

    Local, regional, and spinal anesthesias are safe, effective, often more desirable procedures for ruminants than general anesthesia. Many procedures can be performed safely and humanely in ruminants using a combination of physical restraint, mild sedation, and local, regional, or spinal anesthesia. This article focuses on the use of local anesthetics for providing anesthesia for dehorning, procedures of the nose and eye, laparotomy, reproductive procedures, teat repair, and procedures on the distal limb. Local, regional, and spinal anesthesia techniques are safe effective methods for providing anesthesia for common surgical procedures and analgesia for painful conditions in cattle and small ruminants.

  8. Distinct effects of ketamine and acetyl L-carnitine on the dopamine system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Bonnie L; Dumas, Melanie; Cuevas, Elvis; Gu, Qiang; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. We have previously shown that acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents ketamine toxicity in zebrafish embryos. In mammals, ketamine is known to modulate the dopaminergic system. NMDA receptor antagonists are considered as promising anti-depressants, but the exact mechanism of their function is unclear. Here, we measured the levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the zebrafish embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses (0.1-0.3 mM), did not produce significant changes in DA, DOPAC or HVA levels in 52 h post-fertilization embryos treated for 24 h. In these embryos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression remained unchanged. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels equivalent to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced DA level and TH mRNA indicating that DA synthesis was adversely affected. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR showed similar effects on DA level and TH mRNA, but increased DOPAC level compared to control. ALCAR reversed 2 mM ketamine-induced reduction in HVA levels. With ALCAR alone, the expression of genes encoding the DA metabolizing enzymes, MAO (monoamine oxidase) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), was not affected. However, ketamine altered MAO mRNA expression, except at the 0.1 mM dose. COMT transcripts were reduced in the 2 mM ketamine-treated group. These distinct effects of ketamine and ALCAR on the DA system may shed some light on the mechanism on how ketamine can work as an anti-depressant, especially at sub-anesthetic doses that do not affect DA metabolism and suppress MAO gene expression.

  9. Pregnancy With a Successful Vaginal Delivery Following Augmentation Enterocystoplasty for Ketamine Cystitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shang-Jen

    2016-01-01

    A 28-year-old female with a 1-year history of ketamine abuse developed ketamine-associated urinary symptoms that were refractory to conservative treatment after the complete cessation of ketamine use. Smooth voiding with increased bladder capacity and minimal postvoid residual urine volume were achieved by performing an augmentation enterocystoplasty. An uneventful pregnancy with the vaginal delivery of a healthy baby occurred postoperatively. PMID:28043107

  10. Distinct effects of ketamine and acetyl l-carnitine on the dopamine system in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Bonnie L.; Dumas, Melanie; Cuevas, Elvis; Gu, Qiang; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. We have previously shown that acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents ketamine toxicity in zebrafish embryos. In mammals, ketamine is known to modulate the dopaminergic system. NMDA receptor antagonists are considered as promising anti-depressants, but the exact mechanism of their function is unclear. Here, we measured the levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the zebrafish embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses (0.1–0.3 mM), did not produce significant changes in DA, DOPAC or HVA levels in 52 h post-fertilization embryos treated for 24 h. In these embryos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression remained unchanged. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels equivalent to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced DA level and TH mRNA indicating that DA synthesis was adversely affected. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR showed similar effects on DA level and TH mRNA, but increased DOPAC level compared to control. ALCAR reversed 2 mM ketamine-induced reduction in HVA levels. With ALCAR alone, the expression of genes encoding the DA metabolizing enzymes, MAO (monoamine oxidase) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), was not affected. However, ketamine altered MAO mRNA expression, except at the 0.1 mM dose. COMT transcripts were reduced in the 2 mM ketamine-treated group. These distinct effects of ketamine and ALCAR on the DA system may shed some light on the mechanism on how ketamine can work as an anti-depressant, especially at sub-anesthetic doses that do not affect DA metabolism and suppress MAO gene expression. PMID:26898327

  11. Extrapedicular Infiltration Anesthesia as an Improved Method of Local Anesthesia for Unipedicular Percutaneous Vertebroplasty or Percutaneous Kyphoplasty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aim. This report introduces extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia as an improved method of local anesthesia for unipedicular percutaneous vertebroplasty or percutaneous kyphoplasty. Method. From March 2015 to March 2016, 44 patients (11 males and 33 females) with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with a mean age of 71.4 ± 8.8 years (range: 60 to 89) received percutaneous vertebroplasty or percutaneous kyphoplasty. 24 patients were managed with conventional local infiltration anesthesia (CLIA) and 20 patients with both CLIA and extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia (EPIA). Patients evaluated intraoperative pain by means of the visual analogue score and were monitored during the procedure for additional sedative analgesia needs and for adverse nerve root effects. Results. VAS of CLIA + EPIA and CLIA group was 2.5 ± 0.7 and 4.3 ± 1.0, respectively, and there was significant difference (P = 0.001). In CLIA group, 1 patient required additional sedative analgesia, but in CLIA + EPIA group, no patients required that. In the two groups, no adverse nerve root effects were noted. Summary. Extrapedicular infiltration anesthesia provided good local anesthetic effects without significant complications. This method deserves further consideration for use in unipedicular percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty. PMID:27766261

  12. Anesthesia for the child with cancer.

    PubMed

    Latham, Gregory J

    2014-03-01

    Children with cancer undergo a host of surgeries and procedures that require anesthesia during the various phases of the disease. A safe anesthetic plan includes consideration of the direct effects of tumor, toxic effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy, the specifics of the surgical procedure, drug-drug interactions with chemotherapy agents, pain syndromes, and psychological status of the child. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the anesthetic management of the child with cancer, focuses on a systems-based approach to the impact from both tumor and its treatment in children, and presents a discussion of the relevant anesthetic considerations.

  13. Ketamine, propofol and low dose remifentanil versus propofol and remifentanil for ERCP outside the operating room: Is ketamine not only a “rescue drug”?

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Lea Paola; Nucera, Maria; Marsili, Massimo; Al Malyan, Mohamed; Becchi, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography ERCP is a painful and long procedure requiring transient deep analgesia and conscious sedation. An ideal anaesthetic that guarantees a rapid and smooth induction, good quality of maintenance, lack of adverse effects and rapid recovery is still lacking. This study aimed to compare safety and efficacy of a continuous infusion of low dose remifentanil plus ketamine combined with propofol in comparison to the standard regimen dose of remifentanil plus propofol continuous infusion during ERCP. Material/Methods 322 ASAI-III patients, 18–85 years old and scheduled for planned ERCP were randomized. Exclusion criteria were a predictable difficult airway, drug allergy, and ASA IV–V patients. We evaluated Propofol 1 mg/kg/h plus Remifentanil 0.25 μg/kg/min (GR) vs. Propofol 1 mg/kg/h plus Ketamine 5 μg/kg/min and Remifentanil 0.1 μg/kg/min (GK). Main outcome measures were respiratory depression, nausea/vomiting, quality of intraoperative conditions, and discharge time. P≤0.05 was statistically significant (95% CI). Results Respiratory depression was observed in 25 patients in the GR group compared to 9 patients in the GK group (p=0.0035). ERCP was interrupted in 9 cases of GR vs. no cases in GK; patients ventilated without any complication. Mean discharge time was 20±5 min in GK and 35±6 min in GR (p=0.0078) and transfer to the ward delayed because of nausea and vomiting in 30 patients in GR vs. 5 patients in GK (p=0.0024). Quality of intraoperative conditions was rated highly satisfactory in 92% of GK vs. 67% of GR (p=0.028). Conclusions The drug combination used in GK confers clinical advantages because it avoids deep sedation, maintains adequate analgesia with conscious sedation, and achieves lower incidence of postprocedural nausea and vomiting with shorter discharge times. PMID:22936194

  14. Long-Term Heavy Ketamine Use is Associated with Spatial Memory Impairment and Altered Hippocampal Activation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia J. A.; Dodds, Chris M.; Furby, Hannah; Pepper, Fiona; Fam, Johnson; Freeman, Tom P.; Hughes, Emer; Doeller, Christian; King, John; Howes, Oliver; Stone, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, is rising in popularity as a drug of abuse. Preliminary evidence suggests that chronic, heavy ketamine use may have profound effects on spatial memory but the mechanism of these deficits is as yet unclear. This study aimed to examine the neural mechanism by which heavy ketamine use impairs spatial memory processing. In a sample of 11 frequent ketamine users and 15 poly-drug controls, matched for IQ, age, years in education. We used fMRI utilizing an ROI approach to examine the neural activity of three regions known to support successful navigation; the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and the caudate nucleus during a virtual reality task of spatial memory. Frequent ketamine users displayed spatial memory deficits, accompanied by and related to, reduced activation in both the right hippocampus and left parahippocampal gyrus during navigation from memory, and in the left caudate during memory updating, compared to controls. Ketamine users also exhibited schizotypal and dissociative symptoms that were related to hippocampal activation. Impairments in spatial memory observed in ketamine users are related to changes in medial temporal lobe activation. Disrupted medial temporal lobe function may be a consequence of chronic ketamine abuse and may relate to schizophrenia-like symptomatology observed in ketamine users. PMID:25538631

  15. Mutual enhancement of central neurotoxicity induced by ketamine followed by methamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, J.-J.; Chen, H.-I.; Jen, C.J.; Kuo, Y.-M.; Cherng, C.G.; Tsai, Y.-P.N.; Ho, M.-C.; Tsai, C.-W.; Lung Yu

    2008-03-01

    We hereby report that repeated administration of ketamine (350 mg/kg in total) and methamphetamine (30 mg/kg in total) causes specific glutamatergic and dopaminergic neuron deficits, respectively, in adult mouse brain. Acute ketamine did not affect basal body temperature or the later methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. However, pretreatment with repeated doses of ketamine aggravated methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic terminal loss as evidenced by a drastic decrease in the levels of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and dopamine transporter density as well as poor gait balance performance. In contrast, methamphetamine-induced serotonergic depletion was not altered by ketamine pretreatment. Likewise, the subsequent treatment with methamphetamine exacerbated the ketamine-induced glutamatergic damage as indicated by reduced levels of the vesicular glutamate transporter in hippocampus and striatum and poor memory performance in the Morris water maze. Finally, since activation of the D1 and AMPA/kainate receptors has been known to be involved in the release of glutamate and dopamine, we examined the effects of co-administration of SCH23390, a D1 antagonist, and CNQX, an AMPA/kainate antagonist. Intraventricular CNQX infusion abolished ketamine's potentiation of methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity, while systemic SCH23390 mitigated methamphetamine's potentiation of ketamine-induced glutamatergic toxicity. We conclude that repeated doses of ketamine potentiate methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity via AMPA/kainate activation and that conjunctive use of methamphetamine aggravates ketamine-induced glutamatergic neurotoxicity possibly via D1 receptor activation.

  16. Allometric scaling of chemical restraint associated with inhalant anesthesia in giant anteaters.

    PubMed

    Carregaro, Adriano Bonfim; Gerardi, Patrícia Molina; Honsho, Daniel Kan

    2009-04-01

    This study describes the use of allometric scaling in five giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) submitted for osteosynthesis, gastrostomy, or treatment of burns. Chemical restraint was performed by allometric scaling using the dog as a reference; acepromazine (0.06 mg/kg), diazepam (0.3 mg/kg), ketamine (8.8 mg/kg), and buprenorphine (5.9 microg/kg) were combined, and the animals were maintained under isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, respiratory rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, temperature, and anesthetic depth were measured. Postoperative treatment consisted of ketoprofen, buprenorphine, and ceftiofur. Anesthetic induction was obtained in 10-15 min, achieving muscle relaxation and absence of excitement. Physiologic parameters were stable during the procedures, and postoperative treatment was effective. Allometric scaling was effective for chemical restraint and postoperative treatment.

  17. Cervical plexus anesthesia versus general anesthesia for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Lijun; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-01-01

    after GA, with highest degree at 8 hours postoperation; then the pain degree decreased, and the NRS was 1 at 24 hours postoperation. In group B, intraoperative pain was NRS 4, and pain degree decreased from 4 hours postoperation; the NRS was 2 at 24 hours postoperation. The incidence of severe PONV was higher in group A than that in group B. There was no significant difference in the spinal surgeon satisfaction and anesthetist satisfaction for the anesthetic techniques. There was significant difference in patient satisfaction between the 2 groups, with high satisfaction for GA. General anesthesia is superior to CPA in maintaining better intraoperative hemodynamic stability and providing high patient satisfaction with no intraoperative pain for patients receiving ACDF, but it entails longer surgery and anesthesia time, and requires more postoperative analgesic and anesthesia cost. PMID:28207536

  18. Regional versus general anesthesia for spine surgery. A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Mergeay, M; Verster, A; Van Aken, D; Vercauteren, M

    2015-01-01

    The use of regional anesthesia techniques for intra-operative anesthesia remains very controversial for patients scheduled to undergo spinal interventions. Spine surgery is still mostly performed under general anesthesia. This has to be explained by the patient's position required during surgery, the extent and duration of some procedures, the preference of the surgeon and/or anesthesiologist and a trend which becomes more and more prominent to abandon central nerve blocks in general. The presence of foreign material in the neighborhood of the surgical field may be a reason for surgeons to refuse such techniques. Nevertheless, during the last decade the available literature has increased progressively in support of regional anesthesia for these interventions. The present overview will focus on the feasibility of different regional techniques to be used intra-operatively. These techniques may also be of interest or even intended for prolonged postoperative analgesia and benefit even after a single bolus injection, continuous or intermittent administration. Although all techniques described offered favorable success rates, future research is mandatory to determine their superiority over general intra-operative anesthesia and conventional pain therapy.

  19. Remifentanil consumption in septoplasty surgery under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mustafa, Mahmoud M.; Al Oweidi, Abdelkarim S.; Al-Zaben, Khaled R.; Qudaisat, Ibraheem Y.; Abu-Halaweh, Sami A.; Al-Ghanem, Subhi M.; Massad, Islam M.; Samarah, Walid K.; Al-Shaer, Reem A.; Ismail, Said I.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the influence of the ORM1 variants in codon 118 on the intra-operative remifentanil consumption under general anesthesia. Methods: A prospective gene association study, performed at the Jordan University Jordan, Amman, Jordan from September 2013 to August 2014. It includes patients who underwent septoplasty surgery under general anesthesia. All patients received standard intravenous anesthesia. Anesthesia maintained with fixed dose of Sevoflurane and variable dose of Remifentanil to keep the systolic blood pressure between 90-100 mm Hg. The Remifentanil dose was calculated and correlated with ORM1 genotype variance. Results: Genotype and clinical data were available for 123 cases. The A118A genotype was seen in 96 patients (78%), the A118G genotype was seen in 25 patients (20.3%), and only 2 patients had genotype G118G (1.6%). The G118G variant was removed from the statistical analysis due to small sample size. There was a significant effect of ORM1 genotype variant and the amount of remifentanil consumed. The A118A genotype received 0.173 ± 0.063 µg kg-1 min-1 and the A118G genotype received 0.316 ± 0.100 µg kg-1 min-1 (p<0.0001). Conclusion: The ORM1 gene has a role in intra-operative remifentanil consumption in patients who underwent septoplasty surgery under general anesthesia. The A118G gene required higher dose of remifentanil compared with the A118A genotype. PMID:28133690

  20. Implementation of an Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    PubMed

    Douglas, James R; Ritter, Melody J

    2011-01-01

    During the administration of anesthesia, the anesthesia provider has historically created a paper record, charted manually, that included extensive patient care-related data (vital signs, other parameters, etc) and commentaries. DocuSys, a proprietary anesthesia information management system (AIMS), creates an electronic version of the anesthesia record and provides additional information. It electronically captures data from clinical monitors and other sources, including scheduling applications and laboratory computers. The AIMS facilitates chart entries such as drug doses and case narratives. Benefits of an AIMS include improved legibility of the anesthesia record and greater efficiency in documentation efforts. Use of the AIMS assists the practitioner with decision support logic, such as the timing of antibiotic administration and the inclusion of legally required documentation. Upon case completion, the AIMS data are immediately available to other information systems, such as billing and medical records. Data can be made available from a single case or, more important, from thousands of cases to analyze variables such as efficiency of services, adherence to best practices, patient outcomes, and clinical research. The AIMS was deployed at the main campus of the Ochsner Health System on March 26, 2009. In this article, we discuss the issues involved in the AIMS implementation process: the successes, surprises, and continued challenges.

  1. Implementation of an Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, James R.; Ritter, Melody J.

    2011-01-01

    During the administration of anesthesia, the anesthesia provider has historically created a paper record, charted manually, that included extensive patient care–related data (vital signs, other parameters, etc) and commentaries. DocuSys, a proprietary anesthesia information management system (AIMS), creates an electronic version of the anesthesia record and provides additional information. It electronically captures data from clinical monitors and other sources, including scheduling applications and laboratory computers. The AIMS facilitates chart entries such as drug doses and case narratives. Benefits of an AIMS include improved legibility of the anesthesia record and greater efficiency in documentation efforts. Use of the AIMS assists the practitioner with decision support logic, such as the timing of antibiotic administration and the inclusion of legally required documentation. Upon case completion, the AIMS data are immediately available to other information systems, such as billing and medical records. Data can be made available from a single case or, more important, from thousands of cases to analyze variables such as efficiency of services, adherence to best practices, patient outcomes, and clinical research. The AIMS was deployed at the main campus of the Ochsner Health System on March 26, 2009. In this article, we discuss the issues involved in the AIMS implementation process: the successes, surprises, and continued challenges. PMID:21734847

  2. Advances in Anesthesia Delivery in the Deployed Setting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John E; Barras, William P

    2016-01-01

    Lessons learned over the past decade and a half of combat casualty management has brought about numerous advances in trauma anesthesia practice. In the post-Vietnam era, deployable anesthesia equipment centered on the capability to provide a balanced anesthetic technique, utilizing a combination of volatile gas and intravenous anesthetic adjuncts. The evolution of the modern battlefield has forced anesthesia providers across the military to adapt to mission requirements that often dictate a surgical capability that is more rapidly mobile and less reliant on logistical support. Institutional medical equipment development has focused on fielding a lighter, more mobile volatile gas delivery method. Despite numerous advances in anesthetic gas delivery, many veteran anesthesia providers have come to recognize the value of alternative anesthetic techniques in the deployed setting. One of the most appealing advances in combat anesthesia practice is the emergence of total intravenous anesthetics (TIVA) for trauma management and resuscitation. Although there have been numerous developments in anesthetic equipment for use in the deployed setting, TIVA has many advantages over volatile gas administration. Future research, development, and education should focus on TIVA and the ability to provide this as an alternative safe anesthetic for patients in austere environments. It is imperative to retain the lessons we have learned in order to adapt more effectively in future conflicts. This accumulation of knowledge must inform future innovative solutions to the challenges of casualty management in a deployed setting.

  3. Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000184.htm Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... with your child's doctor about the type of anesthesia that will be best for your child. Below ...

  4. Marsupial, insectivore, and chiropteran anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pye, G W

    2001-01-01

    This article covers the manual restraint and anesthesia of marsupials, insectivores, and chiroptera. Marsupials commonly kept as pets in the U.S. [e.g., eastern gray kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus), and sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps)] are covered in detail. Marsupial species kept in zoological parks [e.g., Tasmanian devils, koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), and common wombats (Vombatus ursinus)] are covered in less detail. Of the insectivores, only the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) and the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) are commonly kept as pets and, consequently, the insectivore section concentrates on discussing these two species. The section on chiropteran anesthesia is divided into two broad categories: the megachiropterans (flying foxes and fruit bats) and the microchiropterans (insectivorous bats). Most of the information on the species covered in this article is anecdotal, and this should be kept in mind when using the anesthesia protocols described.

  5. Large exotropia after retrobulbar anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chung-Hwan; Kim, Ungsoo Samuel

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman complained of horizontal diplopia shortly following bilateral cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation performed under retrobulbar anesthesia. Retrobulbar anesthesia was administered at an inferotemporal injection site using 1 cc lidocaine hydrochloride 2% mixed with bupivacaine hydrochloride 0.5%. The initial ophthalmologic evaluation showed a 12-prism diopter (PD) exotropia, and ocular motility evaluation revealed marked limitation of adduction without vertical limitation. One year after cataract surgery, the exodeviation increased up to 60 PD. The patient underwent an 8.0-mm recession of the right lateral rectus and a 6.0-mm recession of the left lateral rectus. Both lateral rectus muscles were biopsied, and biopsy revealed dense fibrous connective tissue without viable muscular cells. The lateral rectus muscle might be injured by retrobulbar anesthesia, and it could induce large exotropia. PMID:26953032

  6. [Readaptation after total intravenous anesthesia in one-day surgery].

    PubMed

    Buravtsev, V A; Medvinskiĭ, I D

    1997-01-01

    The authors analyze the stages of readaptation and recovery of clear consciousness in the immediate postoperative period in 200 patients administered one of the four variants of intravenous anesthesia in a one-day surgical hospital. The purpose of this work was to optimize the anesthetic care and the readaptation period. The stages of readaptation were assessed by psychophysiological testing. This process coursed most smoothly after propofol-phentanyl and hypnomidate-phentanyl anesthesia. Readaptation after sombrevin-phentanyl coursed reliably slower. The longest recovery was observed after calipsol-diazepam anesthesia, despite drug stimulation. This type of narcosis is irrational for one-day surgery, for it requires prolonged postoperative monitoring and thus makes the hospital stay longer.

  7. Local anesthesia for middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Caner, Gül; Olgun, Levent; Gültekin, Gürol; Aydar, Levent

    2005-08-01

    The adequacy of anesthesia and comfort during surgery was assessed for 100 consecutive patients undergoing middle ear surgery using local anesthesia, both by the patients themselves and by the surgeon. The possibility of inducing an iatrogenic facial weakness was also evaluated. Both the surgeon and the majority of patients were pleased with the quality of anesthesia and little adverse effects occurred as a consequence of local anesthesia itself.

  8. The Nucleus Accumbens and Ketamine Treatment in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Chadi G; Jackowski, Andrea; Salas, Ramiro; Gupta, Swapnil; Sato, João R; Mao, Xiangling; Coplan, Jeremy D; Shungu, Dikoma C; Mathew, Sanjay J

    2017-03-29

    Animal models of depression repeatedly showed stress-induced nucleus accumbens (NAc) hypertrophy. Recently, ketamine was found to normalize this stress-induced NAc structural growth. Here, we investigated NAc structural abnormalities in major depressive disorder (MDD) in two cohorts. Cohort A included a cross-sectional sample of 34 MDD and 26 healthy control (HC) subjects, with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate NAc volumes. Proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) was used to divide MDD subjects into two subgroups: glutamate-based depression (GBD) and non-GBD. A separate longitudinal sample (cohort B) included 16 MDD patients who underwent MRI at baseline then 24 h following intravenous infusion of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg). In cohort A, we found larger left NAc volume in MDD compared to controls (Cohen's d=1.05), but no significant enlargement in the right NAc (d=0.44). Follow-up analyses revealed significant subgrouping effects on the left (d⩾1.48) and right NAc (d⩾0.95) with larger bilateral NAc in non-GBD compared to GBD and HC. NAc volumes were not different between GBD and HC. In cohort B, ketamine treatment reduced left NAc, but increased left hippocampal, volumes in patients achieving remission. The cross-sectional data provided the first evidence of enlarged NAc in patients with MDD. These NAc abnormalities were limited to patients with non-GBD. The pilot longitudinal data revealed a pattern of normalization of left NAc and hippocampal volumes particularly in patients who achieved remission following ketamine treatment, an intriguing preliminary finding that awaits replication.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 29 March 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.49.

  9. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  10. Ketamine Protects Gamma Oscillations by Inhibiting Hippocampal LTD

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lanting; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Ying; Sun, Eve Y.

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been widely reported to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity through effects on long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). LTP and LTD have been implicated in learning and memory processes. Besides synaptic plasticity, it is known that the phenomenon of gamma oscillations is critical in cognitive functions. Synaptic plasticity has been widely studied, however it is still not clear, to what degree synaptic plasticity regulates the oscillations of neuronal networks. Two NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine and memantine, have been shown to regulate LTP and LTD, to promote cognitive functions, and have even been reported to bring therapeutic effects in major depression and Alzheimer’s disease respectively. These compounds allow us to investigate the putative interrelationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity and to learn more about the mechanisms of their therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have identified that ketamine and memantine could inhibit LTD, without impairing LTP in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus, which may underlie the mechanism of these drugs’ therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that NMDA-induced LTD caused a marked loss in the gamma power, and pretreatment with 10 μM ketamine prevented the oscillatory loss via its inhibitory effect on LTD. Our study provides a new understanding of the role of NMDA receptors on hippocampal plasticity and oscillations. PMID:27467732

  11. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery En Español What kinds of anesthesia are available for adults having eye surgery? A “general”, “local”, or “topical” anesthesia is ...

  12. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public... Anesthesia services. (a) General rule. (1) For services furnished prior to January 1, 2010, an unreduced physician fee schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia...

  13. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  14. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public... Anesthesia services. (a) General rule. (1) For services furnished prior to January 1, 2010, an unreduced physician fee schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia...

  15. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  16. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public... Anesthesia services. (a) General rule. (1) For services furnished prior to January 1, 2010, an unreduced physician fee schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia...

  17. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  18. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  19. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public..., AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.178 Anesthesia... schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia procedure involving...

  20. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  1. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public..., AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.178 Anesthesia... schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia procedure involving...

  2. Evaluation of urinary bladder fibrogenesis in a mouse model of long-term ketamine injection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Shou-Chieh; Wang, Shou-Tsung; Lin, Shu-Mei; Wu, Jiann-Der; Lin, Chang-Te; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Long-term ketamine abuse has been shown to affect the lower urinary tract and result in interstitial cystitis-like syndrome. However, the causative mechanism of ketamine-induced dysfunction remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the physiological, histological and molecular changes on ketamine-associated cystitis (KC) in a mouse model. Both male and female Balb/c mice were separately distributed into the control group (normal saline) and ketamine group, which received ketamine hydrochloride (100 mg/kg/day) daily by intraperitoneal injection for a total period of 20 weeks. In each group, the urine was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure the concentration of ketamine and its metabolites. Urinary frequency and urine volume were examined to investigate the urinary voiding functions. Mice bladders were excised for cDNA microarray and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The ketamine and metabolites were detected only in ketamine-treated mice urine. The voiding interval was reduced in the male mice group after 20 week ketamine administration. Additionally, the result of cDNA array analysis revealed a number of gene expression levels involved in chronic wound healing response and collagen accumulation, which were closely associated with fibrosis progression in the connective tissue. In HE staining of the bladder tissue, the ketamine-injected mice exhibited prominently denser blood vessel distribution in the submucosal layer. Based on the evidence in the present study, a mechanism that delineates fibrosis formation of urinary bladder induced by the pathogenesis of ketamine abuse can be constructed. PMID:27431428

  3. St John's wort greatly decreases the plasma concentrations of oral S-ketamine.

    PubMed

    Peltoniemi, Marko A; Saari, Teijo I; Hagelberg, Nora M; Laine, Kari; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Olkkola, Klaus T

    2012-12-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anaesthetic and analgesic agent but it can also be used orally as an adjuvant in the treatment of chronic pain. This study investigated the effect of the herbal antidepressant St John's wort, an inducer of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral S-ketamine. In a randomized cross-over study with two phases, 12 healthy subjects were pretreated with oral St John's wort or placebo for 14 days. On day 14, they were given an oral dose of 0.3 mg/kg of S-ketamine. Plasma concentrations of ketamine and norketamine were measured for 24 h and pharmacodynamic variables for 12 h. St John's wort decreased the mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞)) of ketamine by 58% (P < 0.001) and decreased the peak plasma concentration (C(max)) of ketamine by 66% (P < 0.001) when compared with placebo. Mean C(max) of norketamine (the major metabolite of ketamine) was decreased by 23% (P = 0.002) and mean AUC(0-∞) of norketamine by 18% (P < 0.001) by St John's wort. There was a statistically significant linear correlation between the self-reported drug effect and C(max) of ketamine (r = 0.55; P < 0.01). St John's wort greatly decreased the exposure to oral S-ketamine in healthy volunteers. Although this decrease was not associated with significant changes in the analgesic or behavioural effects of ketamine in the present study, usual doses of S-ketamine may become ineffective if used concomitantly with St John's wort.

  4. Practical application of the neuroregenerative properties of ketamine: real world treatment experience

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Theodore A.

    2016-01-01

    While controversial, ketamine has emerged as an effective treatment for refractory depression. Serial infusions have been performed 3 times per week, but our practical experience has challenged this precept concerning infusion frequency. Depression is associated with neuron loss, reduced synapse numbers, and dearborization of dendrites. Ketamine appears to potently induce mechanisms which reverse these neurodegenerative processes. Ketamine not only blocks the glutamate receptor, it activates eukaroyotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). This, in turn, activates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein synthesis. This is thought to underlie ketamine's enduring benefits. In addition, ketamine alters glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) phosphorylation, probably responsible for its rapid antidepressant effect. Notably, inhibition of the BDNF receptor does not block the immediate benefits of ketamine, but does prevent the enduring effects. Neuro-Luminance Ketamine Infusion Centers have been treating patients with serial ketamine infusions for over three years. Our methods differ from what is often reported, as we perform infusions only once per week and generally do not perform more than five infusions. Data from 100 patients showed that 80% of the patients responded. The baseline Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report (QIDS-SR) score was 17.8 ± 2.8. Responders to ketamine showed a drop in QIDS-SR score of 10.8 ± 3.5, while non-responders showed a 0.8 ± 1.8 change. Moreover, they often had persistent benefits over several months. Recently, it was proposed that psychotomimetic effects are necessary during a ketamine infusion to yield effective antidepressant benefits. Yet, only one patient in our clinic has experienced hallucinations in three years. Nevertheless, 80% of our patients show clinical improvement. Further studies of clinical methods for ketamine infusion therapy are encouraged. PMID:27073354

  5. Medial septal lesion enhances general anesthesia response.

    PubMed

    Leung, L Stan; Ma, Jingyi; Shen, Bixia; Nachim, Ilan; Luo, Tao

    2013-09-01

    Electrolytic lesion of the medial septum, a basal forebrain nucleus that projects to the hippocampus, prolonged the emergence from general anesthesia in rats. Septal lesioned rats required a longer time to recover from a loss of righting reflex (LORR) and a loss of tail-pinch response after injectable (20 mg/kg i.p. pentobarbital, 5mg/kg i.v. propofol) or volatile (1.5% halothane, 2% isoflurane) anesthetic. When incremental doses of propofol were given i.p., septal lesioned rats as compared to control rats showed LORR at a lower dose of propofol. Similarly, when the rats were exposed to increasing concentrations of isoflurane, the percent of rats showing LORR was leftward shifted for lesioned rats as compared to control rats. Septal lesioned rats as compared to control rats showed decreased locomotor activity when exposed to 1.5% halothane. Lesion of the medial septum was confirmed by thionin-stained histological sections as well as loss of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) staining in the hippocampus, indicating a depletion of septohippocampal cholinergic afferents. Medial septal lesion resulted in a near complete loss of hippocampal theta rhythm during walking and a general decrease in power of the hippocampal EEG at all frequencies (0-100 Hz), during walking or immobility. It is concluded that lesion of medial septum, in part through a loss of septohippocampal cholinergic afferents, increased the anesthesia response to volatile and injectable general anesthetics, during both induction and emergence. It is suggested that the septohippocampal system participates in many components of general anesthesia including hypnosis, immobility, and analgesia.

  6. Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, S C; Lascola, K M; Schaeffer, D J

    2015-12-05

    Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine were evaluated. Thirty tigers received either dexmedetomidine (0.025 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DK) or dexmedetomidine (0.0125 mg/kg), midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DMK). Heart rate, SPO2 and blood pressure were measured at five-minute intervals. Arterial pH, PO2, PCO2, glucose, K+ and arterial and venous lactate were measured at 15 and 45 minutes after immobilisation. A generalised linear mixed model was used for statistical comparison. There was no difference within or between groups at any time point for any measured variable. Measured PO2 was 73.2±17.5 mm Hg and SPO2 was 88.9±10.8 per cent. Systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressures were 170.5±48.4, 138.9±41.8 and 121.8±37.2 mm Hg, respectively. Venous lactate was higher than arterial lactate within groups at each time point. Seizure-like behaviour was observed in 25 per cent of tigers in group DK but not in group DMK. The addition of midazolam into a protocol for immobilisation of tigers did not result in a difference in any of the measured variables but may have prevented the development of seizure-like behaviour.

  7. The effect of Pencan needle orientation on spinal anesthesia outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Kenneth; Kase, Shawn; Moore, Jennifer; Kelly, Joseph; Pellegrini, Joseph E

    2005-04-01

    Slow resolution of block and incidence of side effects deter many practitioners from choosing spinal anesthesia for out-patient surgical procedures. Some studies suggest that controlling bevel or side port orientation of a spinal needle during anesthetic injection can affect occurrence of side effects and time to block resolution. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of varying Pencan spinal needle (B-Braun, Bethlehem, Pa) side port orientations on duration of block and incidence of side effects in groups of patients receiving spinal anesthesia. We randomized 87 subjects scheduled for spinal anesthesia to receive a spinal anesthesia injection using a cephalad, lateral, or caudad side port orientation. Onset, duration, block height, incidence of side effects, and analgesic requirements were among the variables measured. No difference in onset, duration, or analgesic requirements was noted among groups. Differences were noted in time to discharge from the hospital (P = .027) and time to first voiding (P = .023) in the lateral compared with the cephalad and caudad orientation groups. Patients in whom the lateral needle side port orientation was used for injection were discharged earlier and had fewer side effects. This could translate into significant savings, financially and in terms of staff requirements.

  8. Speak Up: Anesthesia and Sedation

    MedlinePlus

    ... lightly sleeping. You may have little or no memory of the procedure. Your breathing slows and you may be given oxygen. You may sleep until the drugs wear off. Tell your doctor or anesthesia professional about • General health issues and any recent ...

  9. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  10. Implementing safe obstetric anesthesia in Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-08-01

    The position of woman in any civilization is an index of the advancement of that civilization; the position of woman is gauged best by the care given her at the birth of her child. Obstetric anesthesia, by definition, is a subspecialty of anesthesia devoted to peripartum, perioperative, pain and anesthetic management of women during pregnancy and the puerperium. Today, obstetric anesthesia has become a recognized subspecialty of anesthesiology and an integral part of practice of most anesthesiologists. Perhaps, no other subspecialty of anesthesiology provides more personal gratification than the practice of obstetric anesthesia. This article reviews the challenges associated with implementing safe obstetric anesthesia practice in Eastern Europe.

  11. Electronic dental anesthesia in a patient with suspected allergy to local anesthetics: report of case.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Quinn, C L

    1988-01-01

    A 56-year-old patient with alleged allergy to local anesthetics required restorative dental treatment. Electronic dental anesthesia was used successfully, in lieu of injectable local anesthetics, to manage intraoperative pain associated with the restoration of vital mandibular teeth.

  12. 21 CFR 522.1222b - Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recommended dose from 15 to 20 milligrams ketamine base per pound of body weight, depending on the effect... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.1222b Section 522.1222b Food and Drugs FOOD...

  13. 21 CFR 522.1222b - Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... recommended dose from 15 to 20 milligrams ketamine base per pound of body weight, depending on the effect... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.1222b Section 522.1222b Food and Drugs FOOD...

  14. 21 CFR 522.1222b - Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... recommended dose from 15 to 20 milligrams ketamine base per pound of body weight, depending on the effect... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.1222b Section 522.1222b Food and Drugs FOOD...

  15. Interactive effects of ghrelin and ketamine on forced swim performance: Implications for novel antidepressant strategies.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, Jeffrey; Shawaf, Farah; Dwyer, Zach; Abizaid, Alfonso; Hayley, Shawn

    2016-08-11

    The efficacy of ketamine to alleviate depressive symptoms has promoted a wealth of research exploring alternate therapeutic targets for depression. Given the caveats of ketamine treatment taken together with the increasingly greater emphasis on combinatorial therapeutic approaches to depression, we sought to asses whether the hypothalamic "hunger hormone", ghrelin, would augment the effects of ketamine. Indeed, ghrelin has recently been found to possess antidepressant potential and may be especially effective against the metabolic and feeding deficits observed with depression. Two studies were performed: 1. mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin (80μg/kg) or saline, followed by a saline or a low or high dose of ketamine (5 or 10mg/kg) and 2. mice received 10mg/kg of ketamine together with saline or the ghrelin receptor antagonist JMV2959 (3 or 6mg/kg) and Forced Swim Test (FST) performance was assessed. In both studies, ketamine alone reduced FST immobility. Similarly, ghrelin alone reduced swim immobility suggesting an antidepressant-like response. However, ghrelin did not augment the impact of ketamine when co-administered and in fact, it appeared to antagonize its actions at the lower dose. As well, JMV2959 did not significantly influence FST performance. These data confirm the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and further suggest that ghrelin might have similar properties. Yet, our results caution against combinatorial treatment with these agents, probably owing to unexpected allosteric or other antagonist actions.

  16. Orexinergic neurons and barbiturate anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kushikata, T; Hirota, K; Yoshida, H; Kudo, M; Lambert, D G; Smart, D; Jerman, J C; Matsuki, A

    2003-01-01

    Orexins (OXs) regulate sleep with possible interactions with brain noradrenergic neurons. In addition, noradrenergic activity affects barbiturate anesthesia. As we have also recently reported that OXs selectively evoke norepinephrine release from rat cerebrocortical slices we hypothesized that barbiturate anesthesia may result from of an interaction with central orexinergic systems. To test this hypothesis, we performed a series of in vivo and in vitro studies in rats. In vivo, the effects of i.c.v. OX A, B and SB-334867-A (OX1 receptor antagonist) on pentobarbital, thiopental or phenobarbital-induced anesthesia times (loss of righting reflex) was assessed. In vitro effects of barbiturates and SB-334867-A on OX-evoked norepinephrine release from cerebrocortical slice was examined. In Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human OX1/OX2 receptors OX A- and B-evoked increases in intracellular Ca2+ were measured with and without barbiturates. OX A and B significantly decreased pentobarbital, thiopental and phenobarbital anesthesia times by 15-40%. SB-334867-A increased thiopental-induced anesthesia time by approximately by 40%, and reversed the decrease produced by OX A. In vitro, all anesthetic barbiturates inhibited OX-evoked norepinephrine release with clinically relevant IC50 values. A GABAA antagonist, bicuculline, did not modify the inhibitory effects of thiopental and the GABAA agonist, muscimol, did not inhibit norepinephrine release. In addition there was no interaction of barbiturates with either OX1 or OX2 receptors. Collectively our data suggest that orexinergic neurons may be an important target for barbiturates, and GABAA, OX1 and OX2 receptors may not be involved in this interaction.

  17. Multimodal Analgesia With Ketamine or Tramadol in Combination With Intravenous Paracetamol After Renal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Sabouri, Seyed Mehdi; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Pourfakhr, Pejman; Najafi, Atabak; Etezadi, Farhad; Imani, Farsad

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids are generally the preferred analgesic agents during the early postoperative period. Objectives The present study was designed to assess and compare the multimodal analgesic effects of ketamine and tramadol in combination with intravenous acetaminophen after renal surgery. Patients and Methods This randomized, double-blinded, clinical trial was conducted on 80 consecutive patients undergoing various types of kidney surgeries in Sina hospital in Tehran in 2014 - 2016. After extubation, the patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenous paracetamol (1 gr) plus tramadol (0.7 mg/kg) (PT group) or paracetamol (1 gr) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) (PK group) within ten minutes. Pain severity was assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS), and the level of agitation was assessed by the Ramsey sedation scale (RSS). Morphine consumption was assessed within the first six hours after drug injection, and hemodynamic parameters were assessed at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after infusion, at the time of transfer from recovery to the ward, and also at one and six hours after transfer to the ward. Results Postoperative pain scores were significantly lower in the PK group than in the PT group during all study time points. The mean dose of morphine needed at recovery in the PK group was lower compared with the PT group (0.47 ± 0.94 mg versus 1.50 ± 1.35 mg/P = 0.001). The level of agitation based on the RSS score was significantly lower in the PK group than in the PT group at 10 and 20 minutes after drug administration. The total postoperative complication rate in the PK group was lower than in the PT group (20% versus 53.3%, P = 0.007). In this regard, catheter bladder discomfort was more frequent in the PT group than in the PK group (43.3% versus 3.3%, P < 0.001). Conclusions The combination of intravenous paracetamol 1 gr and ketamine 0.5 mg/kg resulted in an overall reduction in pain scores, decreased postoperative analgesic requirements, and lower agitation

  18. Enantioselective inhibition of D-serine transport by (S)-ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S; Bernier, Michel; Camandola, Simonetta; Khadeer, Mohammed A; Moaddel, Ruin; Mattson, Mark P; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with major depressive disorder receiving racemic ketamine, (R,S)-ketamine, experience transient increases in Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale scores and a coincident drop in plasma d-serine levels. The results suggest that (R,S)-ketamine produces an immediate, concentration-dependent pharmacological effect on d-serine plasma concentrations. One potential source of this effect is (R,S)-ketamine-induced inhibition of the transporter ASCT2, which regulates intracellular d-serine concentrations. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of (S)- and (R)-ketamine on ASCT2-mediated transport of d-serine in PC-12 and 1321N1 cells and primary neuronal cells in culture. Experimental Approach Intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels were determined using capillary electrophoresis–laser-induced fluorescence and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry respectively. Expression of ASCT2, Asc-1 and serine racemase was determined utilizing Western blotting. Key Results (S)-Ketamine produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular d-serine and reduced extracellular d-serine accumulation. In contrast, (R)-ketamine decreased both intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels. The ASCT2 inhibitor, benzyl-d-serine (BDS), and ASCT2 gene knockdown mimicked the action of (S)-ketamine on d-serine in PC-12 cells, while the Asc-1 agonist d-isoleucine reduced intracellular d-serine and increased extracellular d-serine accumulation. This response to d-isoleucine was not affected by BDS or (S)-ketamine. Primary cultures of rat neuronal cells expressed ASCT2 and were responsive to (S)-ketamine and BDS. (S)- and (R)-ketamine increased the expression of monomeric serine racemase in all the cells studied, with (S)-ketamine having the greatest effect. Conclusions and Implications (S)-Ketamine decreased cellular export of d-serine via selective inhibition of ASCT2, and this could represent a possible source

  19. Does pregnancy increase the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Arakawa, M

    2004-04-01

    Pregnancy has been reported to enhance the sensitivity of nerves to local anesthetics and to decrease anesthetic requirements during regional anesthesia. In this study, whether pregnancy increased the efficacy of lumbar epidural anesthesia was evaluated. Two populations (14 pregnant and 14 non-pregnant women) undergoing lumbar epidural anesthesia were studied and received 17 mL of 2% lidocaine-epinephrine (1: 200,000). The pain threshold response after repeated electrical stimulation was used to assess sensory blockade at the L2, S1 and S3 dermatomes. Motor blockade was evaluated using the Bromage score. Demographic data except for weight were comparable between the two groups. There was a significant difference in cephalad spread of anesthesia between the groups. No significant differences in pain threshold or onset of sensory blockade at the L2, S1 or S3 segments were found between the groups. The pain thresholds at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly lower than that at L2 within each group. The mean onset times at the S1 and S3 dermatomes were significantly longer than that at L2 within each group. No differences in Bromage score were found between the groups. In pregnant women, cephalad spread of epidural anesthesia was facilitated but latency of blockade, density and motor blockade were not. It takes over 25 min to achieve satisfactory blockade at sacral segments. Those who perform lumbar epidural anesthesia alone for cesarean section should consider the use of additives (e.g. fentanyl, bicarbonate) to enhance the block, or a greater volume of local anesthetic.

  20. Dose-response characteristics of ketamine effect on locomotion, cognitive function and central neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Imre, Gabor; Fokkema, Dirk S; Den Boer, Johan A; Ter Horst, Gert J

    2006-04-14

    The present dose-response study sought to determine the effects of subanesthetic dosages (4-16 mg/kg) of ketamine on locomotion, sensorimotor gating (PPI), working memory, as well as c-fos expression in various limbic regions implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In addition, we examined whether ketamine-induced locomotion was influenced by the dark/light cycle. We found that ketamine increased locomotor activity in a dose dependent manner, but found no influence of the dark-light cycle. Additionally, ketamine dose-dependently interrupted PPI, resulting in prepulse facilitation at doses of 8 and 12 mg/kg. The dose of 12 mg/kg also induced impairments in working memory assessed by the discrete-trial delayed-alternation task. C-fos expression indicated that the dose-dependent behavioral effects of ketamine might be related to changes in the activity of limbic regions, notably hippocampus and amygdala.

  1. In the United States, "Opt-Out" States Show No Increase in Access to Anesthesia Services for Medicare Beneficiaries Compared with Non-"Opt-Out" States.

    PubMed

    Sun, Eric C; Miller, Thomas R; Halzack, Nicholas M

    2016-05-01

    In the United States, anesthesia care can be provided by anesthesiologists or nurse anesthetists. Since 2001, 17 states have exercised their right to "opt-out" of the federal requirement that a physician supervise the administration of anesthesia by a nurse anesthetist, with the majority citing increased access to anesthesia care as the rationale for their decision. By using Medicare data, we found that most (4 of 5) cohorts of "opt-out" states likely experienced smaller growth in anesthesia utilization rates compared with non-"opt-out" states, suggesting that opt-out was not associated with an increase in access to anesthesia care.

  2. Anesthesia, antisepsis, microscope: the confluence of neurotology.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Lawrence R

    2007-06-01

    Neurotology and skull base surgery slowly emerged out of a confluence of interrelated disciplines and technologies over the past century to become the field that we know today. Its formation required the marriage of neurosurgery and otology, the introduction of the operating microscope, and advances in surgical technique, anesthesia, and radiology. Along the way, the field also began involving specialists within ophthalmology and craniofacial and plastic and reconstructive surgery. Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, the formation of neurotology and skull base surgery required pioneering surgeons who were willing to push the boundaries of their training, sometimes under the ridicule or scorn of the medical establishment. This historical overview focuses upon the origins of the specialty, from the birth of otology and neurosurgery up through the last quarter century.

  3. Left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses to ketamine and TEE in chronically instrumented monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, S. C.; Ludwig, D. A.; Reister, C.; Fanton, J. W.; Ewert, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of prescribed doses of ketamine five minutes after application and influences of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses were investigated to test the hypothesis that ketamine and/or TEE probe insertion alter cardiovascular function. Seven rhesus monkeys were tested under each of four randomly selected experimental conditions: (1) intravenous bolus dose of ketamine (0.5 ml), (2) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min), (3) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min) with TEE, and (4) control (no ketamine or TEE). Monkeys were chronically instrumented with a high fidelity, dual-sensor micromanometer to measure left ventricular and aortic pressure and a transit-time ultrasound probe to measure aortic flow. These measures were used to calculate left ventricular function. A 4-element Windkessel lumped-parameter model was used to estimate total peripheral resistance and systemic arterial compliance. Baroreflex response was calculated as the change in R-R interval divided by the change in mean aortic pressure measured during administration of graded concentrations of nitroprusside. The results indicated that five minutes after ketamine application heart rate and left ventricular diastolic compliance decreased while TEE increased aortic systolic and diastolic pressure. We conclude that ketamine may be administered as either a bolus or continuous infusion without affecting cardiovascular function 5 minutes after application while the insertion of a TEE probe will increase aortic pressure. The results for both ketamine and TEE illustrate the classic "Hawthorne Effect," where the observed values are partly a function of the measurement process. Measures of aortic pressure, heart rate, and left ventricular diastolic pressure should be viewed as relative, as opposed to absolute, when organisms are sedated with ketamine or instrumented with a TEE probe.

  4. Ketamine Inhalation Ameliorates Ovalbumin-Induced Murine Asthma by Suppressing the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Sen, Shi; Sun, Yuhong; Zhou, Jun; Mo, Liqun; He, Yanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma accounts for 0.4% of all deaths worldwide, a figure that increases annually. Ketamine induces bronchial smooth muscle relaxation, and increasing evidence suggests that its anti-inflammatory properties might protect against lung injury and ameliorate asthma. However, there is a lack of evidence of the usefulness and mechanism of ketamine in acute asthma exacerbation. This study aimed to analyze the therapeutic effects and mechanism of action of ketamine on acute ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma. Material/Methods In vivo, BALB/c mice with OVA-induced asthma were treated with or without ketamine (25 or 50 mg/mL). Serum, lung sections, and mononuclear cell suspensions from the lung were collected for histological, morphometric, immunofluorescence, microRNA, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, regulatory T cell identification, cytokine, and Western blotting analyses. In vitro, bronchial epithelial cells were cultured to analyze the effect and mechanism of ketamine on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. Results The inhalation of ketamine 25 or 50 mg/mL markedly suppressed OVA-induced airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation, significantly increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells, and significantly decreased OVA-induced up-regulation of TGF-β1 and the EMT. MiR-106a was present at higher amounts in OVA-induced lung samples and was suppressed by ketamine treatment. The in vitro results showed that TGF-β1-induced EMT was suppressed by ketamine via miR-106a level regulation. Conclusions Ketamine ameliorates lung fibrosis in OVA-induced asthmatic mice by suppressing EMT and regulating miR-106a level, while ketamine inhalation might be a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:27418244

  5. Protective effect of ketamine against hemorrhagic cystitis in rats receiving ifosfamide

    PubMed Central

    Ozguven, Ali A.; Yılmaz, Omer; Taneli, Fatma; Ulman, Cevval; Vatansever, Seda; Onag, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible protective effect of a single dose of ketamine and the synergistic effect between ketamine and 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (mesna) against ifosfamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and Methods: 35 adult female wistar rats were divided into five groups and pretreated with ketamine at 10 mg/kg and/or mesna 400 mg/kg 30 minutes before intraperitoneal injection of IFS (400 mg/kg) or with saline (control group). Hemorrhagic cystitis was evaluated 24 hours after IFS injection according to bladder wet weight (BWW), and microscopic changes, i.e. edema, hemorrhage, cellular infiltration, and urothelial desquamation. The markers of oxidative damage including nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the expressions of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (e-NOS) were also assayed in the bladder tissues. Results: Pretreatment with ketamine alone or ketamine in combination with mesna reduced the IFS-induced increase of BWW (58,47% and 63,33%, respectively, P < 0.05). IFS- induced microscopic alterations were also prevented by ketamine with or without mesna (P < 0.05). In addition, also statistically insignificant, the bladder tissue expressions of IL-1β were lower in ketamine and/or mesna-receiving groups (P > 0,05). The parameters of oxidative stress, the NO and the MDA contents of the bladder tissues of the study groups were not different. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that a single dose of ketamine pretreatment attenuates experimental IFS-induced bladder damage. It is therefore necessary to investigate ketamine locally and systematically with various dosing schedulesin order to reduce the bladder damage secondary to oxazaphosphorine-alkylating agents and these results may widen the spectrum of ketamine. PMID:24741183

  6. The toxic effect of ketamine on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line and human neuron.

    PubMed

    Mak, Ying T; Lam, Wai P; Lü, Lanhai; Wong, Yeuk W; Yew, David T

    2010-03-01

    Ketamine used as an injectable anesthetic in human and animal medicine is also a recreational drug used primarily by young adults often at all night dance parties in nightclubs. The percentage of ketamine users has grown very fast in the last 5 years worldwide. However, this leads to the serious question of the long-term adverse effects of ketamine on our nervous system, particularly the brain, because ketamine as an NMDA antagonist could cause neurons to commit apoptosis. Our study therefore aimed to find out the chronic effect of ketamine on neuron using prolonged incubation (48 h) of neuronal cells with ketamine in culture. Our results showed that differentiated neuronal cells were prone to the toxicity of ketamine but probably less susceptible than undifferentiated neuronal cells and fibroblasts. This suggested that the ketamine abuse would be harmful to many other organs as well as the brain. Our results also confirmed that the toxicity of ketamine is related to apoptosis via the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio pathway and caspase-3 in the differentiated neuronal cells. Therefore, long-term ketamine treated cell or animal models should be sought to study this multiorgan effects of ketamine.

  7. Glutamate transporter type 3 knockout mice have a decreased isoflurane requirement to induce loss of righting reflex.

    PubMed

    Lee, S N; Li, L; Zuo, Z

    2010-12-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) uptake extracellular glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. EAAT type 3 (EAAT3), the main neuronal EAAT, is expressed widely in the CNS. We have shown that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity and trafficking to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that EAAT3 mediates isoflurane-induced anesthesia. To test this hypothesis, the potency of isoflurane to induce immobility and hypnosis, two major components of general anesthesia, was compared in the CD-1 wild-type mice and EAAT knockout mice that had a CD-1 strain gene background. Hypnosis was assessed by loss of righting reflex in this study. The expression of EAAT1 and EAAT2, two widely expressed EAATs in the CNS, in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord was not different between the EAAT3 knockout mice and wild-type mice. The concentration required for isoflurane to cause immobility to painful stimuli, a response involving primarily reflex loops in the spinal cord, was not changed by EAAT3 knockout. However, the EAAT3 knockout mice were more sensitive to isoflurane-induced hypnotic effects, which may be mediated by hypothalamic sleep neural circuits. Interestingly, the EAAT3 knockout mice did not have an altered sensitivity to the hypnotic effects caused by ketamine, an i.v. anesthetic that is a glutamate receptor antagonist and does not affect EAAT3 activity. These results suggest that EAAT3 modulates the sensitivity of neural circuits to isoflurane. These results, along with our previous findings which suggests that isoflurane increases EAAT3 activity, indicate that EAAT3 may regulate isoflurane-induced behavioral changes, including anesthesia.

  8. Effects of ketamine and propofol on motor evoked potentials elicited by intracranial microstimulation during deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Furmaga, Havan; Park, Hyun-Joo; Cooperrider, Jessica; Baker, Kenneth B.; Johnson, Matthew; Gale, John T.; Machado, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Few preclinical or clinical studies have evaluated the effect of anesthetics on motor evoked potentials (MEPs), either alone or in the presence of conditioning stimuli such as deep brain stimulation (DBS). In this study we evaluated the effects of two commonly used anesthetic agents, propofol and ketamine (KET), on MEPs elicited by intra-cortical microstimulation of the motor cortex in a rodent model with and without DBS of the dentatothalamocortical (DTC) pathway. The effects of propofol anesthesia on MEP amplitudes during DTC DBS were found to be highly dose dependent. Standard, but not high, dose propofol potentiated the facilitatory effects of 30 Hz DTC DBS on MEPs. This facilitation was sustained and phase-dependent indicating that, compared to high dose propofol, standard dose propofol has a beta-band excitatory effect on cortical networks. In contrast, KET anesthetic demonstrated a monotonic relationship with increasing frequencies of stimulation, such that the highest frequency of stimulation resulted in the greatest MEP amplitude. KET also showed phase dependency but less pronounced than standard dose propofol. The results underscore the importance of better understanding the complex effects of anesthetics on cortical networks and exogenous stimuli. Choice of anesthetic agents and dosing may significantly confound or even skew research outcomes, including experimentation in novel DBS indications and paradigms. PMID:24904312

  9. A PK-PD model of ketamine-induced high-frequency oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Francisco J.; Ching, ShiNung; Hartnack, Katharine; Fath, Amanda B.; Purdon, Patrick L.; Wilson, Matthew A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Ketamine is a widely used drug with clinical and research applications, and also known to be used as a recreational drug. Ketamine produces conspicuous changes in the electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals observed both in humans and rodents. In rodents, the intracranial ECoG displays a high-frequency oscillation (HFO) which power is modulated nonlinearly by ketamine dose. Despite the widespread use of ketamine there is no model description of the relationship between the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics (PK-PDs) of ketamine and the observed HFO power. Approach. In the present study, we developed a PK-PD model based on estimated ketamine concentration, its known pharmacological actions, and observed ECoG effects. The main pharmacological action of ketamine is antagonism of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), which in rodents is accompanied by an HFO observed in the ECoG. At high doses, however, ketamine also acts at non-NMDAR sites, produces loss of consciousness, and the transient disappearance of the HFO. We propose a two-compartment PK model that represents the concentration of ketamine, and a PD model based in opposing effects of the NMDAR and non-NMDAR actions on the HFO power. Main results. We recorded ECoG from the cortex of rats after two doses of ketamine, and extracted the HFO power from the ECoG spectrograms. We fit the PK-PD model to the time course of the HFO power, and showed that the model reproduces the dose-dependent profile of the HFO power. The model provides good fits even in the presence of high variability in HFO power across animals. As expected, the model does not provide good fits to the HFO power after dosing the pure NMDAR antagonist MK-801. Significance. Our study provides a simple model to relate the observed electrophysiological effects of ketamine to its actions at the molecular level at different concentrations. This will improve the study of ketamine and rodent models of schizophrenia to better understand the wide and divergent

  10. Procedural moderate sedation with ketamine in pediatric critical care unit

    PubMed Central

    Hazwani, Tarek R.; Al-Alem, Hala

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of moderate sedation in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) settings according to moderate sedation protocol using ketamine and midazolam and to determine areas for the improvement in our clinical practice. Settings and Design: A retrospective study was conducted in the PICU. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed for patients who had received moderate sedation between January and the end of December 2011 and who are eligible to inclusion criteria. Results: In this study, 246 moderate sedation sessions were included. 5.3% were in infant age, while 94.7% were children (1–14 years). Their gender distributed as 59.8% males and 40.2% females. The majority of them had hematology-oncology disease nature, i.e., 80.89% (n = 199). Lumbar puncture accounted for 65.3% (n = 160) of the producers; the rests were bone marrow aspiration 32.7%, endoscopy 8.2%, and colonoscopy 2.9%. Two doses of ketamine (1–1.5 mg/kg) to achieve moderate sedation during the procedure were given to 44.1% (n = 108) of the patients. One dose of midazolam was given to 77.2% (n = 190), while 1.22% (n = 3) of sessions of moderate sedation was done without any dose of midazolam. Adverse events including apnea, laryngeal spasm, hypotension, and recovery agitation were observed during moderate sedation sessions, and it has been noticed in four sessions, i.e., 1.6%, which were mild to moderate and managed conservatively. Conclusion: Moderate sedation in the PICU using ketamine and midazolam is generally safe with minimal side effects as moderate sedation sessions were conducted by pediatric intensivist in highly monitored and equipped environment. PMID:28182021

  11. Palliative sedation in nursing anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Michael T

    2013-04-01

    Palliative sedation is a technique of providing a sedative for end-of-life care to patients with intractable pain. The literature discusses the techniques and use of palliative sedation. Numerous articles have been written regarding the issues surrounding its use, but no literature has discussed the prescription or administration of palliative sedation by a nurse anesthetist. By understanding the concept and ethics involved in its use and providing nursing care that is theory based, the author argues that the involvement of nursing anesthesia is appropriate and within the scope of practice. Few other healthcare disciplines can provide the patient care and empirical knowledge that is imperative in the care of the dying patient. This article discusses the concept and ethics of palliative sedation and presents a case of providing palliative sedation to a terminally ill patient by an experienced nurse anesthetist. Palliative sedation should be understood, embraced, and utilized as an area of expertise suited for nursing anesthesia.

  12. Ketamine coadministration attenuates morphine tolerance and leads to increased brain concentrations of both drugs in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Lilius, T O; Jokinen, V; Neuvonen, M S; Niemi, M; Kalso, E A; Rauhala, P V

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The effects of ketamine in attenuating morphine tolerance have been suggested to result from a pharmacodynamic interaction. We studied whether ketamine might increase brain morphine concentrations in acute coadministration, in morphine tolerance and morphine withdrawal. Experimental Approach Morphine minipumps (6 mg·day–1) induced tolerance during 5 days in Sprague–Dawley rats, after which s.c. ketamine (10 mg·kg–1) was administered. Tail flick, hot plate and rotarod tests were used for behavioural testing. Serum levels and whole tissue brain and liver concentrations of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, ketamine and norketamine were measured using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Key Results In morphine-naïve rats, ketamine caused no antinociception whereas in morphine-tolerant rats there was significant antinociception (57% maximum possible effect in the tail flick test 90 min after administration) lasting up to 150 min. In the brain of morphine-tolerant ketamine-treated rats, the morphine, ketamine and norketamine concentrations were 2.1-, 1.4- and 3.4-fold, respectively, compared with the rats treated with morphine or ketamine only. In the liver of morphine-tolerant ketamine-treated rats, ketamine concentration was sixfold compared with morphine-naïve rats. After a 2 day morphine withdrawal period, smaller but parallel concentration changes were observed. In acute coadministration, ketamine increased the brain morphine concentration by 20%, but no increase in ketamine concentrations or increased antinociception was observed. Conclusions and Implications The ability of ketamine to induce antinociception in rats made tolerant to morphine may also be due to increased brain concentrations of morphine, ketamine and norketamine. The relevance of these findings needs to be assessed in humans. PMID:25297798

  13. [Emergencies evolving from local anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kaufman, E; Garfunkel, A; Findler, M; Elad, S; Zusman, S P; Malamed, S F; Galili, D

    2002-01-01

    Local anesthesia is without doubt the most frequently used drug in dentistry and in medicine. In spite of records of safety set by using these drugs, there is evidence to adverse reactions ranging from 2.5%-11%. Most of the reactions originate from the autonomic system. A recent, well-planned study indicates that adverse reactions are highly correlated to the medical status of the patient: the higher the medical risk, the greater the chance to experience an adverse reaction. This study also found that adverse reactions highly correlated to the concentration of adrenalin. Another recent study found a direct relationship between adverse reactions and the level of anxiety experienced by the patient and to the dental procedure. Most of the reactions in this study occurred either immediately at injection time and within 2 hours following the injection. Since the beginning of last century, vasoconstrictors have been added to local anesthesia solutions in order to reduce toxicity and prologue activity of the LA. However, today it is commonly agreed that this addition to local anesthesia should not be administered to cardiac patients especially those suffering from refractory dysrhythmias, angina pectoris, post myocardial infarction (6 months) and uncontrolled hypertension. Other contraindications to vasoconstrictors are endocrine disorders such as hyperthyroidism, hyperfunction of the medullary adrenal (pheochromocytoma) and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. Cross reactivity of local anesthetic solutions can occur with MAO inhibitors, non specific beta adrenergic blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, phenothiazides and cocaine abusers. Noradrenaline added to local anesthetics as a vasoconstrictor has been described as a trigger to a great increase in blood pressure and therefore has been forbidden for use in many countries. This paper describes 4 cases of severe complications following the injections of local anesthesia of which three ended in fatality.

  14. Internet resources for dental anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, M.; Reed, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    The extraordinary growth of the Internet has created a revolutionary leap in the ability of health professionals to easily communicate and access information. These resources are readily available to the public as well, and an understanding of these sources is important in determining the validity of the content. A few Internet sites of interest to dentists interested in anesthesia and pain control are presented to demonstrate the depth and breadth of these resources via the Internet. PMID:10551057

  15. Impact of Anesthesia and Euthanasia on Metabolomics of Mammalian Tissues: Studies in a C57BL/6J Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Overmyer, Katherine A.; Thonusin, Chanisa; Qi, Nathan R.; Burant, Charles F.; Evans, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    A critical application of metabolomics is the evaluation of tissues, which are often the primary sites of metabolic dysregulation in disease. Laboratory rodents have been widely used for metabolomics studies involving tissues due to their facile handing, genetic manipulability and similarity to most aspects of human metabolism. However, the necessary step of administration of anesthesia in preparation for tissue sampling is not often given careful consideration, in spite of its potential for causing alterations in the metabolome. We examined, for the first time using untargeted and targeted metabolomics, the effect of several commonly used methods of anesthesia and euthanasia for collection of skeletal muscle, liver, heart, adipose and serum of C57BL/6J mice. The data revealed dramatic, tissue-specific impacts of tissue collection strategy. Among many differences observed, post-euthanasia samples showed elevated levels of glucose 6-phosphate and other glycolytic intermediates in skeletal muscle. In heart and liver, multiple nucleotide and purine degradation metabolites accumulated in tissues of euthanized compared to anesthetized animals. Adipose tissue was comparatively less affected by collection strategy, although accumulation of lactate and succinate in euthanized animals was observed in all tissues. Among methods of tissue collection performed pre-euthanasia, ketamine showed more variability compared to isoflurane and pentobarbital. Isoflurane induced elevated liver aspartate but allowed more rapid initiation of tissue collection. Based on these findings, we present a more optimal collection strategy mammalian tissues and recommend that rodent tissues intended for metabolomics studies be collected under anesthesia rather than post-euthanasia. PMID:25658945

  16. [Anesthesia in the Inca empire].

    PubMed

    Fairley, H Barrie

    2007-11-01

    The Incas had no written language and their chroniclers say little about their surgery and nothing about their methods for relieving the pain it caused. It is possible that they did have some form of anesthesia. Available plants that had central effects include maize (which they used in different ways to prepare an alcoholic beverage called chicha), Datura, espingo, tobacco, San Pedro cactus, and coca. The Incas used chicha to induce unconsciousness during minor surgical operations and it was still being used in those regions in the 19th century to perform female circumcision. Datura, espingo, tobacco, and San Pedro cactus can produce a deep trance and, in all probability, anesthesia. There is evidence that they used Datura as a total or partial anesthetic. The Incas chewed coca leaves with lime and swallowed the resulting juice, and this allowed them to work long hours without eating or drinking. Modern-day Peruvian Indians say that coca only numbs the mouth, though it was observed in the 19th century that coca leaves placed in wounds provided pain relief. It is possible that the Incas used chicha - probably in combination with another narcotic - to achieve the total or partial anesthesia needed for their surgery. A decoction of coca leaves may have been used as a topical anesthetic.

  17. Hypothermic anesthesia attenuates postoperative proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D J; Brooks, D C; Pressler, V M; Hulton, N R; Colpoys, M F; Smith, R J; Wilmore, D W

    1986-01-01

    The catabolic response that commonly occurs after major operation is characterized by net skeletal muscle proteolysis and accelerated nitrogen excretion. This response was absent in patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures associated with the combination of cardiopulmonary bypass, narcotic anesthesia, neuromuscular blockade, and hypothermia. Forearm nitrogen release was 422 +/- 492 nmol/100 ml X min on the first postoperative day, approximately 25% of preoperative values (1677 +/- 411, p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and the degree of negative nitrogen balance were comparable to levels observed in nonstressed, fasting subjects. The potential role of hypothermia, high-dose fentanyl anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade in modifying the catabolic response to laparotomy and retroperitoneal dissection was further evaluated in animal studies. Six hours after operation, amino acid nitrogen release from the hindquarter was 84% less than control values (p less than 0.05). Nitrogen excretion and urea production were also reduced compared to normothermic controls. It is concluded that the combination of hypothermia, narcotic anesthesia, and neuromuscular blockade attenuates the catabolic response to injury and thus may be useful in the care of critically ill surgical patients. PMID:3767477

  18. Pupil Size in Relation to Cortical States during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Jeung Eun; Han, Hio-Been

    2016-01-01

    In neuronal recording studies on anesthetized animals, reliable measures for the transitional moment of consciousness are frequently required. Previous findings suggest that pupil fluctuations reflect the neuronal states during quiet wakefulness, whose correlation was unknown for the anesthetized condition. Here, we investigated the pupillary changes under isoflurane anesthesia simultaneously with the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG). The pupil was tracked by using a region-based active contour model. The dose was given to the animal in a stepwise increasing mode (simulating induction of anesthesia) or in a stepwise decreasing mode (simulating emergence of anesthesia). We found that the quickly widening pupil action (mydriasis) characterizes the transitional state in anesthesia. Mydriasis occurred only in the light dose in the emergence phase, and the events were accompanied by an increase of burst activity in the EEG followed by EMG activity in 47% of the mydriasis events. Our findings suggest that recording such pupil changes may offer a noncontact monitoring tool for indexing the transitional state of the brain, particularly when a lower threshold dose is applied. PMID:27122995

  19. Role of Ketamine in Acute Postoperative Pain Management: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Brian M.; Shah, Khushbu; Parikh, Anant; Sifonios, Anthony N.; Le, Vanny; Eloy, Jean D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. Design. A literature search was performed using the phrases “ketamine” and “postoperative pain.” The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine's effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and persistent postoperative pain at long-term follow-up. Results. While many different administration protocols were evaluated, delivering ketamine both as a pre- or perioperative bolus and postoperative infusion for up to 48 hours appeared to be the most effective. These effects are dose-dependent. However, a number of studies analyzed showed no benefit in using ketamine versus placebo for controlling postoperative pain. While ketamine is a safe and well-tolerated drug, it does have adverse effects, and there are concerns for possible neurotoxicity and effects on memory. Conclusions. In a number of limited situations, ketamine has shown some efficacy in controlling postoperative pain and decreasing opioid consumption. More randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the surgical procedures and administrations (i.e., intravenous, epidural) that ketamine is best suited for. PMID:26495312

  20. Does Ketamine Have Anti-Suicidal Properties? Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Price, Rebecca B.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine, a widely used anesthetic agent, is currently being investigated as a novel therapeutic for depression and suicidality. Ketamine has garnered substantial attention from researchers, clinicians, media outlets, and patients alike, but numerous questions remain. One of the compelling features of ketamine is the rapidity of its antidepressant effects, which peak just 24 hours after infusion, setting it apart from other existing treatments. Ketamine’s rapid time course has inspired research efforts to explore its potential as a life-saving therapy for patients at imminent risk of suicide. In this article, we review current evidence supporting ketamine’s rapid effects on suicidal ideation in the context of unipolar and bipolar depression. We then discuss several future directions that are necessary before ketamine can be considered as a viable treatment option for suicidality in clinical settings. These include: testing for a specific anti-suicidal effect—separate from overall antidepressant effects—to ascertain whether ketamine might hold promise for a broader class of suicidal patients; ensuring that acute benefits of ketamine can be prolonged over a clinically meaningful timeframe; and developing a better understanding of the mechanisms by which ketamine might reduce suicide risk. Such efforts will enable the field to more accurately assess ketamine’s potential, as well as its limitations, allowing for appropriate placement within the context of comprehensive clinical care for suicide prevention. PMID:25715884

  1. Protective function of nicotinamide against ketamine-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the infant rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Najeeb; Ullah, Ikram; Lee, Hae Young; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Seok, Park Moon; Ahmed, Jawad; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2012-05-01

    During development, anesthetics activate neuroapoptosis and produce damage in the central nervous system that leads to several types of neurological disorders. A single dose of ketamine (40 mg/kg) during synaptogenesis in a 7-day-old rat brain activated the apoptotic cascade and caused extensive neuronal cell death in the forebrain. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of nicotinamide against ketamine-induced apoptotic neurodegeneration. After 4 h, neuronal cell death induced by ketamine was associated with the induction of Bax, release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, and activation of caspase-3. One single dose of 1 mg/g nicotinamide was administered to a developing rat and was found to inhibit ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by downregulating Bax, inhibiting cytochrome c release from mitochondria into cytosol, and inhibiting the expression of activated caspase-3. TUNEL and immunohistochemical analyses showed that ketamine-induced cell death occurred through apoptosis and that it was inhibited by nicotinamide. Fluoro-Jade-B staining demonstrated an increased number of dead cells in the cortex and thalamus after ketamine treatment; treatment with nicotinamide reduced the number of dead cells in these brain regions. Our findings suggest that nicotinamide attenuated ketamine-induced neuronal cell loss in the developing rat brain and is a promising therapeutic and neuroprotective agent for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  2. General and emotion-specific neural effects of ketamine during emotional memory formation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Benjamin; Steffens, Maria; Zhao, Zhiying; Kendrick, Keith M; Neumann, Claudia; Weber, Bernd; Schultz, Johannes; Mehta, Mitul A; Ettinger, Ulrich; Hurlemann, Rene

    2017-04-15

    Animal studies suggest that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dependent signalling in limbic and prefrontal regions is critically involved in both cognitive and emotional functions. In humans, ketamine-induced transient, and disorder associated chronic NMDAR hypofunction (i.e. in schizophrenia) has been associated with deficient performance in the domains of memory and higher-order emotional functioning, as well as altered neural activity in the underlying limbic-prefrontal circuits. To model the effects of NMDAR hypofunction on the integration of emotion and cognition the present pharmacological fMRI study applied the NMDAR antagonist ketamine (target plasma level=100ng/ml) to 21 healthy volunteers in a within-subject placebo-controlled crossover design during encoding of neutral, positive and negative pictures. Our results show that irrespective of emotion, ketamine suppressed parahippocampal and medial prefrontal activity. In contrast, ketamine selectively increased amygdala and orbitofrontal activity during successful encoding of negative stimuli. On the network level ketamine generally increased medial prefrontal-parahippocampal coupling while specifically decreasing amygdala-orbitofrontal interplay during encoding of negative stimuli. On the behavioural level, ketamine produced generally decreased memory performance and abolished the emotional enhancement of memory after a wash-out period of 5 days. The present findings suggest that ketamine produces general as well as valence-specific effects during emotional memory formation. The pattern partly overlaps with alterations previously observed in patients with schizophrenia.

  3. Ketamine disrupts theta modulation of gamma in a computer model of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Lazarewicz, Maciej T.; Sherif, Mohamed; Contreras, Diego; Finkel, Leif H.; Lytton, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Abnormalities in oscillations have been suggested to play a role in schizophrenia. We studied theta-modulated gamma oscillations in a computer model of hippocampal CA3 in vivo with and without simulated application of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist and psychotomimetic. Networks of 1200 multi-compartment neurons (pyramidal, basket and oriens-lacunosum moleculare, OLM, cells) generated theta and gamma oscillations from intrinsic network dynamics: basket cells primarily generated gamma and amplified theta, while OLM cells strongly contributed to theta. Extrinsic medial septal inputs paced theta and amplified both theta and gamma oscillations. Exploration of NMDA receptor reduction across all location combinations demonstrated that the experimentally-observed ketamine effect occurred only with isolated reduction of NMDA receptors on OLMs. In the ketamine simulations, lower OLM activity reduced theta power and disinhibited pyramidal cells, resulting in increased basket cell activation and gamma power. Our simulations predict: ketamine increases firing rates;oscillations can be generated by intrinsic hippocampal circuits;medial septum inputs pace and augment oscillations;pyramidal cells lead basket cells at the gamma peak but lag at trough;basket cells amplify theta rhythms;ketamine alters oscillations due to primary blockade at OLM NMDA receptors;ketamine alters phase relationships of cell firing;ketamine reduces network responsivity to the environmentketamine effect could be reversed by providing a continuous inward current to OLM cells. We suggest that this last prediction has implications for a possible novel treatment for cognitive deficits of schizophrenia by targeting OLM cells. PMID:21832203

  4. Comparative Investigation of Protective Effects of Metyrosine and Metoprolol Against Ketamine Cardiotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Ince, Ilker; Aksoy, Mehmet; Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Comez, Mehmet; Dostbil, Aysenur; Celik, Mine; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Coskun, Resit; Taghizadehghalehjoughi, Ali; Suleyman, Bahadir

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of metyrosine against ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats and compared the results with the effect of metoprolol. In this study, rats were divided into groups A, B and C. In group A, we investigated the effects of a single dose of metyrosine (150 mg/kg) and metoprolol (20 mg/kg) on single dose ketamine (60 mg/kg)-induced cardiotoxicity. In group B, we investigated the effect of metyrosine and metoprolol, which were given together with ketamine for 30 days. In group C, we investigated the effect of metyrosine and metoprolol given 15 days before ketamine and 30 days together with ketamine on ketamine cardiotoxicity. By the end of this process, we evaluated the effects of the levels of oxidant-antioxidant parameters such as MDA, MPO, 8-OHGua, tGSH, and SOD in addition to CK-MB and TP I on cardiotoxicity in rat heart tissue. The experimental results show that metyrosine prevented ketamine cardiotoxicity in groups A, B and C and metoprolol prevented it in only group C.

  5. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient.

  6. Total intravenous anesthesia will supercede inhalational anesthesia in pediatric anesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Lauder, Gillian R

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational anesthesia has dominated the practice of pediatric anesthesia. However, as the introduction of agents such as propofol, short-acting opioids, midazolam, and dexmedetomidine a monumental change has occurred. With increasing use, the overwhelming advantages of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) have emerged and driven change in practice. These advantages, outlined in this review, will justify why TIVA will supercede inhalational anesthesia in future pediatric anesthetic practice.

  7. Potentiation of low dose ketamine effects by naltrexone: potential implications for the pharmacotherapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Krystal, John H; Madonick, Steven; Perry, Edward; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Brush, Laura; Wray, Yola; Belger, Aysenil; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril

    2006-08-01

    The interplay of opiate and NMDA glutamate receptors may contribute to psychosis, cognitive function, alcoholism, and substance dependence. Ketamine and ethanol block the NMDA glutamate receptor. The purpose of this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study was to evaluate whether the interactive effects of drugs acting at opiate and NMDA glutamate receptors might partially explain the efficacy of naltrexone for the treatment of alcoholism, that is, whether naltrexone 25 mg pretreatment would modulate ketamine effects in healthy human subjects. Two groups of healthy subjects were studied. An initial group (n=31) received a perception-altering subanesthetic dose of ketamine (bolus of 0.23 mg/kg over 1 min followed by a 60-min infusion of 0.58 mg/kg or saline bolus and infusion). A second group (n=24) completed the same testing procedures, but received a subperceptual ketamine dose (bolus 0.081 mg/kg over 10 min followed by an infusion of 0.4 mg/kg/h). Ketamine produced positive symptoms, negative symptoms, emotional discomfort, and cognitive effects as measured by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) in a dose-related fashion. The lower ketamine dose produced subjective effects similar to two standard ethanol drinks, whereas the higher ketamine dose produced effects similar to five standard drinks. Although naltrexone produced no significant behavioral effects, it significantly magnified the increase in the total PANSS score produced by the lower subperceptual dose of ketamine, but not the higher perception-altering dose of ketamine. These data suggest that the interplay of opiate receptor antagonism and NMDA receptor antagonism may be relevant to the protective effects of naltrexone on alcohol consumption via potentiation of dysphoric effects associated with the NMDA receptor antagonist effects of ethanol. However, these data suggest that at levels of NMDA receptor antagonism associated with heavy drinking, this protective

  8. Synergistic interaction between ketamine and magnesium in lowering body temperature in rats.

    PubMed

    Vučković, Sonja M; Savić Vujović, Katarina R; Srebro, Dragana P; Medić, Branislava M; Vučetić, Cedomir S; Prostran, Milan Š; Prostran, Milica Š

    2014-03-29

    A large body of evidence supports the existence of an endogenous glutamate system that tonically modulates body temperature via N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Ketamine and magnesium, both NMDA receptor antagonists, are known for their anesthetic, analgesic and anti-shivering properties. This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of ketamine and magnesium sulfate on body temperature in rats, and to determine the type of interaction between them. The body temperature was measured by insertion of a thermometer probe 5cm into the colon of unrestrained male Wistar rats (200-250g). Magnesium sulfate (5 and 60mg/kg, sc) showed influence neither on baseline, nor on morphine-evoked hyperthermic response. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine (5-30mg/kg, ip) given alone, produced significant dose-dependent reduction in both baseline colonic temperature and morphine-induced hyperthermia. Analysis of the log dose-response curves for the effects of ketamine and ketamine-magnesium sulfate combination on the baseline body temperature revealed synergistic interaction, and about 5.3 fold reduction in dosage of ketamine when the drugs were applied in fixed ratio (1:1) combinations. In addition, fixed low dose of magnesium sulfate (5mg/kg, sc) enhanced the temperature lowering effect of ketamine (1.25-10mg/kg, ip) on baseline body temperature and morphine-induced hyperthermia by factors of about 2.5 and 5.3, respectively. This study is the first to demonstrate the synergistic interaction between magnesium sulfate and ketamine in a whole animal study and its statistical confirmation. It is possible that the synergy between ketamine and magnesium may have clinical relevance.

  9. Antidepressant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Caroline A.; Lucki, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Newer antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) that do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent evidence from clinical trials shows that the NMDA antagonist ketamine is a revolutionary novel antidepressant because it acts rapidly and is effective for treatment-resistant patients. A single infusion of ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant depressed patients within hours and these effects may be sustained for up to 2 weeks. Although the discovery of ketamine's effects has reshaped drug discovery for antidepressants, the psychotomimetic properties of this compound limit the use of this therapy to the most severely ill patients. In order to develop additional antidepressants like ketamine, adequate preclinical behavioral screening paradigms for fast-acting antidepressants need to be established and used to identify the underlying neural mechanisms. This review examines the preclinical literature attempting to model the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Acute administration of ketamine has produced effects in behavioral screens for antidepressants like the forced swim test, novelty suppression of feeding and in rodent models for depression. Protracted behavioral effects of ketamine have been reported to appear after a single treatment that last for days. This temporal pattern is similar to its clinical effects and may serve as a new animal paradigm for rapid antidepressant effects in humans. In addition, protracted changes in molecules mediating synaptic plasticity have been implicated in mediating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine. Current preclinical studies are examining compounds with more specific pharmacological effects at glutamate receptors and synapses in order to develop additional rapidly acting antidepressants without the hallucinogenic side effects or abuse potential of ketamine

  10. Profiles of psychiatric symptoms among Amphetamine Type Stimulant and Ketamine using inpatients in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Xu, Zaifeng; Zhang, Sheng; Desrosiers, Alethea; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Chawarski, Marek C.

    2014-01-01

    Amphetamine type stimulants (ATS) and ketamine have emerged as major drug problems in China, and chronic extensive exposure to these substances frequently co-occurs with psychiatric symptoms. This study compares the psychiatric symptoms of patients reporting ATS use only, ATS and ketamine use, or ketamine use only who were admitted to an inpatient psychiatry ward in Wuhan, China between 2010 and 2011. Data on 375 study participants collected during their ward admission and extracted from their clinical records included their socio-demographics, scores on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and urine toxicology screens. Results The ketamine-only group had significantly lower total BPRS scores and significantly lower scores on Thinking Disorder, Activity, and Hostility-Suspicion BPRS subscales than the ATS-only and ATS+ketamine groups (p<0.001 for all comparisons). The ketamine-only group also had significantly higher scores on the subscales of Anxiety-Depression and Anergia. The ATS-only group had significantly higher scores on subscales of Thinking Disorder, Activity, and Hostility-Suspicion and significantly lower scores on Anxiety-Depression and Anergia subscales than the ketamine-only and ATS+ketamine groups (p<0.001 for all comparisons). A K-means cluster method identified three distinct clusters of patients based on the similarities of their BPRS subscale profiles, and the identified clusters differed markedly on the proportions of participants reporting different primary drugs of abuse. The study findings suggest that ketamine and ATS users present with different profiles of psychiatric symptoms at admission to inpatient treatment. PMID:24613031

  11. [Tilidine as an analgesic in combination anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Seybold, R; Menninger, B; Hahn, S

    1977-05-19

    In 2446 "insufflation anesthesias" the usefulness of Tilidine as an analgesic has been established. The preferred combinations were with Methohexital, Dehydrobenzperidol, Nitrous oxide, Succinyl and Diallyl-Nortoxiferine.

  12. Field Sedation and Anesthesia of Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J

    2016-11-01

    Many surgical procedures on ruminants can be performed humanely and safely using local or regional anesthesia and physical restraint, but sedation and general anesthesia are necessary in order to perform some procedures. Although anesthesia-associated risks are greater in ruminants than monogastrics, ruminants can be anesthetized relatively safely in a field setting if the risks are understood, and adequate planning and precautions are in place. This article discusses the important features impacting sedation and anesthesia of cattle and small ruminants, and describes some commonly used drug protocols.

  13. Fully Automated Anesthesia, Analgesia and Fluid Management

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    General Anesthetic Drug Overdose; Adverse Effect of Intravenous Anesthetics, Sequela; Complication of Anesthesia; Drug Delivery System Malfunction; Hemodynamic Instability; Underdosing of Other General Anesthetics

  14. New visible endotracheal intubation method using the endoscope system for mice inhalational anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Konno, Kenjiro; Itano, Naoki; Ogawa, Teppei; Hatakeyama, Mika; Shioya, Kyoko; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2014-06-01

    Appropriate and effective anesthesia is critical, because it has a strong influence on laboratory animals, and its affect greatly impacts the experimental data. Inhalational anesthesia by endotracheal intubation is currently prevailing in general anesthesia and is prefered over injection anesthesia, especially for large laboratory animals, because it is a safe and easy control agent. However, it is not common for small laboratory animals, because of the high degree of technical skills required. We assessed the capability of use for mice of the endotracheal intubation by using the endoscope system "TESALA AE-C1" and inhalational anesthesia using a ventilator. Endotracheal intubation was successfully performed on all 10 C57BL/6 mice injected with M/M/B: 0.3/4/5 comprised of medetomidine, midazoram and butorphanol, at a dose of 0.3 mg/kg + 4.0 mg/kg + 5.0 mg/kg body weight/mouse, respectively. After the intubated mice were connected with the inhalational anesthesia circuit and the ventilator, vital signs were measured until 15 min after the connection. The data with M/M/B: 0.3/4/5 showed stable and normal values, which indicated that this new endotracheal intubation method was simple, reliable and safe, which mean that this anesthesia is favorable in regard to the animal's welfare.

  15. Study protocol of a randomised controlled trial of intranasal ketamine compared with intranasal fentanyl for analgesia in children with suspected, isolated extremity fractures in the paediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Stacy L; Studnek, Jonathan R; Bryant, Kathleen; VanderHave, Kelly; Grossman, Eric; Moore, Charity G; Young, James; Hogg, Melanie; Runyon, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fentanyl is the most widely studied intranasal (IN) analgesic in children. IN subdissociative (INSD) ketamine may offer a safe and efficacious alternative to IN fentanyl and may decrease overall opioid use during the emergency department (ED) stay. This study examines the feasibility of a larger, multicentre clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of INSD ketamine to IN fentanyl and the potential role for INSD ketamine in reducing total opioid medication usage. Methods and analysis This double-blind, randomised controlled, pilot trial will compare INSD ketamine (1 mg/kg) to IN fentanyl (1.5 μg/kg) for analgesia in 80 children aged 4–17 years with acute pain from a suspected, single extremity fracture. The primary safety outcome for this pilot trial will be the frequency of cumulative side effects and adverse events at 60 min after drug administration. The primary efficacy outcome will be exploratory and will be the mean reduction of pain scale scores at 20 min. The study is not powered to examine efficacy. Secondary outcome measures will include the total dose of opioid pain medication in morphine equivalents/kg/hour (excluding study drug) required during the ED stay, number and reason for screen failures, time to consent, and the number and type of protocol deviations. Patients may receive up to 2 doses of study drug. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, the local institutional review board and the study data safety monitoring board. This study data will be submitted for publication regardless of results and will be used to establish feasibility for a multicentre, non-inferiority trial. Trial registration number NCT02521415. PMID:27609854

  16. Sedative and Analgesic Effects of Propofol-Fentanyl Versus Propofol-Ketamine During Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami Gorji, Fakhroddin; Amri, Parviz; Shokri, Javad; Alereza, Hakimeh; Bijani, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is a painful procedure that requires analgesia and sedation. Objectives In this study, we compared the analgesic and sedative effects of propofol-ketamine versus propofol-fentanyl in patients undergoing ERCP. Methods In this clinical trial, 72 patients, aged 30 - 70 years old, who were candidates for ERCP were randomly divided into two groups. Before the start of ERCP, both groups received midazolam 0.5 - 1 mg. The intervention group (PK) received ketamine 0.5 mg/kg, and the control group (PF) received fentanyl 50 - 100 micrograms. All patients received propofol 0.5 mg/kg in a loading dose followed by 75 mcg/kg/minute in an infusion. The patients, the anesthesiologist, and the endoscopist were unaware of the medication regimen. Sedation and analgesia quality (based on a VAS), blood pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation, recovery time (based on Aldrete scores), and endoscopist and patient satisfation were recorded. Results The sedative effects were equal in the two groups (P > 0.05), but the analgesic effects were higher in the PF group than in the PK group (P < 0.05). The PK group had higher blood pressure levels in the eighth minute. Respiratory rate, heart rate, and arterial oxygen saturation showed no significant differences between the groups (P > 0.05). Endoscopist satisfaction, patient satisfaction, and recovery time showed no significant differences between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions The results showed that the sedative effect of propofol-ketamine was equal to the propofol-fentanyl combination during ERCP. To prevent respiratory and hemodynamic complications during ERCP, the propofol-ketamine combination should be used in patients with underlying disease. PMID:27853681

  17. Comparison of effect of intravenous ketamine, peritonsillar infiltration of tramadol and their combination on pediatric posttonsillectomy pain: A double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Honarmand, A.; Safavi, M.; Kashefi, P.; Hosseini, B.; Badiei, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the aim was the evaluation of effect of intravenous (IV) administration of ketamine, peritonsillar infiltration of tramadol and their combination for control of post-operative pain in comparison with single use of each drug in children undergoing tonsillectomy. One hundred and twenty children, aged 2- 15 years, selected for elective adenotonsillectomy were enrolled in the study. We divided the patients into four groups of 30 each, Group I: received IV ketamine 0.5 mg/kg, Group II: received peritonsillar infiltration of tramadol 2 mg/kg, Group III: received IV ketamine 0.5 mg/kg added to peritonsillar tramadol 2 mg/kg and Group IV: received IV and peritonsillar infiltration of 0.9% saline. We utilized the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (CHEOPS) recorded each 15 min after surgery to the first h and then each 2 , 4, 6, 8, 16, 24 h to assess pain levels postoperatively. The analysis of data showed that Group III had significantly lower CHEOPS scores than another three groups (P<0.001), while both Groups I and II had the same ranged scores, which were not statistically significant (P>0.05). During 24 h after surgery, the first time for analgesic requirement was higher in Group III in comparison with other groups (P<0.001). Combined use of IV ketamine 0.5 mg/kg with peritonsillar infiltration of tramadol 2 mg/kg provided better and more prolong analgesic effects compared with using each drug alone in patients undergoing tonsillectomy. PMID:24019827

  18. Nonconventional interventions for chronic post-traumatic stress disorder: Ketamine, repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Basant; Kluewer D'Amico, Jessica; Makani, Ramkrishna; Parikh, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    It is alarming that only 59% of those who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Many existing treatments, both pharmacological and nonpharmacological, do not directly target trauma memories that lay at the core of the PTSD pathogenesis. Notable exceptions are medications like ketamine and propranolol and trauma-focused psychotherapies like eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (developed by Shapiro) and Trauma Interventions using Mindfulness Based Extinction and Reconsolidation (TIMBER) for trauma memories (developed by Pradhan). Although the antidepressant effects of ketamine are no longer news, ketamine's effects on treatment refractory PTSD (TR-PTSD) is a recent concept. As TR-PTSD has a marked public health burden and significant limitations in terms of treatment interventions, a thorough assessment of current strategies is required. Research to bring clarity to the underlying pathophysiology and neurobiology of TR-PTSD delineating the chemical, structural, and circuitry abnormalities will take time. In the interim, in the absence of a 1-size-fits-all therapeutic approach, pragmatically parallel lines of research can be pursued using the pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments that have a strong theoretical rationale for efficacy. This article aims to review the current literature on interventions for PTSD, most notably ketamine, trans-cranial magnetic stimulation treatment, yoga and mindfulness interventions, and TIMBER. We present an outline for their future use, alone as well as in combination, with a hope of providing additional insights as well as advocating for developing more effective therapeutic intervention for this treatment-resistant and debilitating condition.

  19. Determination of ketamine and its major metabolite, norketamine, in urine and plasma samples using microextraction by packed sorbent and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ivo; Barroso, Mário; Martinho, Ana; Cruz, Angelines; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2015-11-01

    Ketamine is a club drug widely abused for its hallucinogenic effects, being also used as a "date-rape" drug in recent years. We have developed an analytical method using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) for the identification and quantification of ketamine and its major metabolite in urine and plasma. No derivatization step is needed to accomplish analysis. The compounds were extracted from 0.25mL of sample using microextraction by packed sorbent on mixed mode (M1) cartridges. Calibration curves were linear in the range of 10-250ng/mL for urine and 10-500ng/mL for plasma, with determination coefficients higher than 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) was 5ng/mL for both compounds in both specimens. Recoveries ranged from 63 to 101%, while precision and accuracy were below 14% and 15%, respectively. These low limits of detection and the quite high recoveries obtained, in very low sample amounts, allow detecting small quantities of the compounds, making this procedure suitable for those laboratories performing routine analysis in the field of forensic toxicology. Compared with existing methods, the herein described procedure is fast, since no derivatization step is required, and cost effective for the quantification of ketamine and norketamine in biological specimens by gas chromatography.

  20. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Oral Midazolam –N2O Versus Oral Ketamine – N2O in Pediatric Patients-An in–Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, Ravichandrasekhar; Vasa, Aron Arun Kumar; Sahana, Suzan; Jadadoddi, Raghavendra Kumar; Bezawada, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most children are casual and moderately agreeable in the dental treatment environment, however some of them show practices that upset the professional and make the protected conveyance of worthy treatment extremely troublesome. For such cases dental practitioner utilizes behavior management techniques. At the point when behavioral administration procedures come up short, some type of pharmacologic sedation or anesthesia may be an important and vital option. Dental sedation is a strategy in which the utilization of a medication or drugs produce(s) a condition of depression of the central sensory system empowering treatment to be completed during which verbal contact with the patient is kept up all through the time of sedation. Aim This study was designed to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of oral midazolam and oral ketamine in combination with N2O-O2 in children undergoing dental treatment. Materials and Methods This study involved a sample of 30 pediatric dental patients (age range is 3-9 years), whose selection criteria included ASA I & II health status, cooperative but apprehensive behavior and a need for multiple dental extractions. The patients were assigned to receive oral midazolam on their first visit and on the follow up visit they received oral ketamine. Nitrous oxide (30%) was used during each sedation visit. Physiological parameters like Respiratory Rate (RR), pulse rate, and oxygen saturation were evaluated for each procedure, followed by the use of modified Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test to evaluate psychomotor effects. Data were analyzed using Independent sample student t –test. Results Analysis of the data showed statistically no significant difference (p >0.05) on comparison of effectiveness of oral midazolam-N2O with oral ketamine-N2O when pulse rate, oxygen saturation and respiratory rate were taken into consideration. Psychomotor performance was found to be marginally better with oral midazolam-N2O compared to oral

  1. Postoperative cognitive changes after total knee arthroplasty under regional anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Tae; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Young Ho; Sohn, Hye-Min; Kim, Jungeun; Kim, Seung Chan; An, Seong Soo; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The type of postoperative cognitive decline after surgery under spinal anesthesia is unknown. We investigated the type of postoperative cognitive decline after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Neuropsychological testing was conducted and the changes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers after surgery were evaluated. Methods: Fifteen patients who required bilateral TKA at a 1-week interval under spinal anesthesia were included. Neuropsychological tests were performed twice, once the day before the first operation and just before the second operation (usually 1 week after the first test) to determine cognitive decline. Validated neuropsychological tests were used to examine 4 types of cognitive decline: memory, frontal-executive, language-semantic, and others. Concentrations of CSF amyloid peptide, tau protein, and S100B were measured twice during spinal anesthesia at a 1-week interval. The patients showed poor performance in frontal-executive function (forward digit span, semantic fluency, letter-phonemic fluency, and Stroop color reading) at the second compared to the first neuropsychological assessment. Results: S100B concentration decreased significantly 1 week after the operation compared to the basal value (638 ± 178 vs 509 ± 167 pg/mL) (P = 0.019). Amyloid protein β1–42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau concentrations tended to decrease but the changes were not significant. Conclusion: Our results suggest that frontal-executive function declined 1 week after TKA under spinal anesthesia. The CSF biomarker analysis indicated that TKA under regional anesthesia might not cause neuronal damage. PMID:28033253

  2. Delayed hemorrhage effect of local anesthesia with epinephrine in the loop electrosurgical excisional procedure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Jae; Park, Yunjin; Lee, In Ok; Yoon, Jung Won; Lee, Jung Yoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Tae

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate factors preventing delayed hemorrhage after the loop electrosurgical excisional procedure (LEEP). Methods Medical records of patients who underwent LEEP at one university affiliated hospital from October 2013 to January 2015 were reviewed. Patients with or without delayed hemorrhage were classified. LEEP was performed either in an operating room under general anesthesia or in a procedure room with local anesthesia in the outpatient clinic. Delayed hemorrhage was defined as excisional site bleeding occurring between 1 and 30 days after the LEEP requiring intervention such as electro-cauterization, gauze packing, or application of another hemostatic agent. Results During the study period, 369 patients underwent LEEP. Twenty-three (6.2%) patients with delayed hemorrhage returned to our hospital either to the outpatient clinic or to the emergency unit. A third of the population (103, 27.9%) underwent LEEP in the operating room under general anesthesia without injection of local anesthesia. The remaining patients (266, 72.1%) underwent LEEP with local anesthesia (lidocaine HCl 2% with epinephrine 1:100,000) in the office procedure room. Patients given local anesthesia including epinephrine had significantly lower delayed hemorrhage compared to patients with general anesthesia without injection of local anesthesia (P=0.001). Hemostats, such as fibrin glue or patch, were used for the majority of patients (346, 93.8%) during the procedure. However, using hemostats was not statistically associated with delayed hemorrhage (P=0.163). Conclusion Local anesthesia with the powerful vasoconstrictor epinephrine is effective not only to control perioperative bleeding, but also to prevent delayed hemorrhage after LEEP. PMID:28217677

  3. Neurological infections after neuraxial anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2008-03-01

    Infection is the commonest cause of serious neurologic sequelae of neuraxial anesthesia. The incidence depends on operator skill and patient population. Meningitis, a complication of dural puncture, is usually caused by viridans streptococci. The risk factors are dural puncture during labor, no mask and poor aseptic technique, vaginal infection and bacteremia. Epidural abscess is a complication of epidural catheterization, route of entry the catheter track and the organism usually the staphylococcus. Principal risk factors are prolonged catheterization, poor aseptic technique and traumatic insertion. Prevention includes wearing a mask, using a full sterile technique, avoiding prolonged catheterization and prescribing antibiotics in a high-risk situation.

  4. An update on obstetric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Beilin, Yaakov

    2010-03-01

    Many women in the United States receive analgesia for labor and delivery. The ideal labor analgesic technique would confer complete pain relief without side effects. The analgesic technique would not cause any lower extremity motor blockade nor interfere with the progress or course of labor and would be sufficiently flexible to produce anesthesia for instrumental or cesarean deliveries. Furthermore, the baby would be vigorous at birth. Modern obstetric analgesia techniques and medications achieve these goals. This article reviews current labor analgesia techniques and medications used during labor and delivery.

  5. [Carotid endarterectomy under local anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kuz'min, A L; Belov, Iu V

    2001-01-01

    Results of carotid endarterectomy (CEAE) in 193 patients with different degree of cerebrovascular insufficiency were analyzed. All the patients were men with carotid atherosclerosis (age from 39 to 68 years, mean age 53.6 +/- 0.4). A total of 253 CEAEs were performed under local anesthesia (60 patients underwent consecutive bilateral operations). In early postoperative period 3 patients died, one of them--of ischemic stroke due to thrombosis of internal carotid artery on the side of the operation. Non-fatal stroke was in 1 patient. There were no intraoperative cerebral complications. This testifies to reliability of cerebral circulation control through direct contact with patient.

  6. Differences between Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Inhalation Anesthesia in Free Flap Surgery of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Ting; Wu, Chih-Chen; Tang, Tsung-Yung; Lu, Chun-Te; Lai, Chih-Sheng; Shen, Ching-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have evaluated risk factors associated with complications after free flap surgery, but these studies did not evaluate the impact of anesthesia management. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the differences between patients who received inhalation and total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) in free flap surgery. Methods One hundred and fifty-six patients who underwent free flap surgery for head and neck cancer were retrospectively divided into the TIVA (96 patients) and the inhalation group (87 patients). Perioperative hemodynamic data and postoperative medical complications were determined by documented medical records. Results Ninety-six patients in the TIVA group were compared with 87 patients who received inhalation anesthesia. There were no differences in gender, age, classification of physical status based on American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and cormobidities between the two groups. Patients in the TIVA group required less perioperative crystalloid (4172.46 ± 1534.95 vs. 5183.91 ± 1416.40 ml, p < 0.0001) and colloid (572.46 ± 335.14 vs. 994.25 ± 434.65 ml, p < 0.0001) to maintain hemodynamic stability. Although the mean anesthesia duration was shorter in the TIVA group (11.02 ± 2.84 vs. 11.70± 1.96 hours, p = 0.017), the blood loss was similar between groups (p = 0.71). There was no difference in surgical complication rate, but patients in the TIVA group developed fewer pulmonary complications (18 vs. 47, p = 0.0008). After multivariate regression, patients in the TIVA group had a significantly reduced risk of pulmonary complication compared with the inhalation group (Odds ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.18–0.92). Conclusions Total intravenous anesthesia was associated with significantly fewer pulmonary complications in patients who received free flap reconstruction. PMID:26849439

  7. Local Anesthesia Versus Local Anesthesia and Conscious Sedation for Inguinal Hernioplasty: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Toppin, Patrick J; Reid, Marvin; Plummer, Joseph M; Roberts, Patrick O; Harding-Goldson, Hyacinth; McFarlane, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Background Conscious sedation is regularly used in ambulatory surgery to improve patient outcomes, in particular patient satisfaction. Reports suggest that the addition of conscious sedation to local anesthesia for inguinal hernioplasty is safe and effective in improving patient satisfaction. No previous randomized controlled trial has assessed the benefit of conscious sedation in this regard. Objective To determine whether the addition of conscious sedation to local anesthesia improves patient satisfaction with inguinal hernioplasty. Methods This trial is designed as a single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded trial of 148 patients. Adult patients diagnosed with a reducible, unilateral inguinal hernia eligible for hernioplasty using local anesthesia will be recruited. The intervention will be the use of intravenous midazolam for conscious sedation. Normal saline will be used as placebo in the control group. The primary outcome will be patient satisfaction, measured using the validated Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale. Secondary outcomes will include intra- and postoperative pain, operative time, volumes of sedative agent and local anesthetic used, time to discharge, early and late complications, and postoperative functional status. Results To date, 171 patients have been recruited. Surgery has been performed on 149 patients, meeting the sample size requirements. Follow-up assessments are still ongoing. Trial completion is expected in August 2017. Conclusions This randomized controlled trial is the first to assess the effectiveness of conscious sedation in improving patient satisfaction with inguinal hernioplasty using local anesthesia. If the results demonstrate improved patient satisfaction with conscious sedation, this would support routine incorporation of conscious sedation in local inguinal hernioplasty and potentially influence national and international hernia surgery guidelines. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02444260; https

  8. Drug-induced EEG pattern predicts effectiveness of ketamine in treating refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Basha, Maysaa M; Alqallaf, Abdulradha; Shah, Aashit K

    2015-04-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) can lack overt clinical manifestation and is usually treated with continuous infusion of intravenous anesthetic drugs (IVADs), where the use of continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) is imperative. Ketamine has recently been shown to be effective in the treatment of RSE. We retrospectively review a cohort of 11 patients receiving ketamine as part of their treatment regimen for RSE. We report on the presence of a characteristic EEG rhythm consisting of a generalized archiform theta to beta rhythms (7-20 Hz) appearing after ketamine administration. This pattern was seen in five patients, four of whom achieved successful resolution of RSE. Ketamine-induced EEG pattern may serve as a biomarker predictive of successful treatment outcome in RSE.

  9. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Ashraf F.; Armstrong, Josh S.; Smith, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:27462225

  10. The role of setting for ketamine abuse: clinical and preclinical evidence.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Maria Teresa; Meringolo, Maria; Spagnolo, Primavera Alessandra; Badiani, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Drug abuse is often seen as a unitary phenomenon, partly as a result of the discovery over the past three decades of shared mechanisms of action for addictive substances. Yet the pattern of drug taking is often very different from drug to drug. This is particularly evident in the case of 'club drugs', such as ketamine. Although the number of ketamine abusers is relatively small in the general population, it is quite substantial in some settings. In particular, ketamine abuse is almost exclusively limited to clubs and large music parties, which suggests a major role of context in modulating the reward effects of this drug. This review focuses on recent preclinical and clinical findings, including previously unpublished data, that provide evidence that, even under controlled conditions, ketamine reward is a function of the setting of drug taking.

  11. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine Infusions in a Neuropathic Pain Patient with Lichen Sclerosus et Atrophicus.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Ashraf F; Armstrong, Josh S; Smith, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    A patient reported to the Florida Spine Institute (Clearwater, Fla., USA) with severe lichen sclerosus of the anogenital region and legs. The patient's pain presentation was neuropathic with hypersensitivity, allodynia, swelling, and weakness. The patient had failed multiple pain management modalities including opioid therapy, anticonvulsants, and antidepressants. The patient completed a standard intravenous ketamine infusion regimen developed at the Florida Spine Institute and reported complete abolishment of her pain syndrome. For the first time, we report that ketamine infusions also dramatically improved a patient's lichen sclerosus. That ketamine is known to have immunomodulatory properties, and given the clinical observations described in this case report, suggests that ketamine should be explored as a possible new therapeutic option for managing lichen sclerosus, especially in cases that are refractory to conventional therapies.

  12. Simultaneous determination of amphetamines and ketamines in urine by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei Ru; Lua, Ahai Chang

    2006-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of amphetamines and ketamines (ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine) in urine samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was developed and validated. Urine samples were extracted with organic solvent and derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride (TFAA). The limits of detection and limits of quantification for each analyte were lower than 19 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Within-day and between-day precisions were within 0.5% and 10.6%, respectively. Biases for three levels of control samples were within -10.6% and +7.8%. The concentration of dehydronorketamine was greater than those of ketamine or norketamine in 19 of 35 ketamine-positive samples. A group of 110 human urine samples previously determined to contain at least one of the target analytes was analyzed using the new method, and excellent agreement was observed with previous results.

  13. Ketamine Metabolites for the Treatment of Depression and Pain | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute on Aging, Laboratory of Clinical Investigation, is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop ketamine metabolites for the treatment of different forms of depression and for alleviating pain.

  14. Incidence of ketamine-induced emesis in cynomologus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) used for staphylococcal enterotoxin bioassay.

    PubMed Central

    Adesiyun, A. A.; Tatini, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Ten (24%) of 41 cynomologus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) showed emetic response to 2.5-20 mg/Kg of ketamine injected i.m. Reduction of the levels of ketamine to one half or less of the emetic level resulted in faster recovery from sedation yet provided adequate time for intubation and subsequent intragastric feeding of staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) in only 6 of the 10 monkeys without emesis. The onset of the first emetic episode with ketamine was similar to that induced by staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). Cynomologus monkeys showing emetic response to ketamine could still be used for SE bioassay if an experimentally determined non-emetic dose for individual monkeys is employed for sedation. PMID:7093145

  15. Ketamine-induced affective switch in a patient with treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Banwari, Girish; Desai, Prutha; Patidar, Prahlad

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence to support the rapid, albeit short-lived antidepressant effect of subanesthetic dose of ketamine, a noncompetitive glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist in treatment-resistant unipolar and bipolar depression. Ketamine is known to cause transient mood elevation or euphoria, psychotomimetic effects, and dissociative symptoms, but its use in unipolar or bipolar depression has not been reported to induce an affective switch amounting to persistent or prolonged hypomania/mania or manic-like syndrome. We report the case of a 52-year-old male with first episode, continuous, nonpsychotic, treatment-resistant, unipolar major depression of 10 years duration, who manifested a switch from depression to mania while being treated with subanesthetic dose of ketamine, given intramuscularly. This case suggests that polarity switch should be considered as a potential side effect while using ketamine for treatment-resistant depression. PMID:26288483

  16. Thermoregulatory response thresholds during spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kurz, A; Sessler, D I; Schroeder, M; Kurz, M

    1993-10-01

    Reportedly, during spinal anesthesia, the shivering threshold is reduced approximately 1 degree C but the vasoconstriction threshold remains normal. Such divergence between the shivering and vasoconstriction thresholds is an unusual pattern of thermoregulatory impairment and suggests that the mechanisms of impairment during regional anesthesia may be especially complex. Accordingly, we sought to define the pattern of thermoregulatory impairment during spinal anesthesia by measuring response thresholds. Seven healthy women volunteered to participate on two study days. On one day, we evaluated thermoregulatory responses to hypothermia and hyperthermia during spinal anesthesia; on the other day, responses were evaluated without anesthesia. Upper body skin temperature was kept constant throughout the study. The volunteers were warmed via the lower body and cooled by central venous infusion of cold fluid. The core temperatures triggering a sweating rate of 40 g.m-2 x h-1, a finger flow of 0.1 mL/min, and a marked and sustained increase in oxygen consumption were considered the thermoregulatory thresholds for sweating, vasoconstriction, and shivering, respectively. Spinal anesthesia significantly decreased the thresholds for vasoconstriction and shivering, and the decrease in each was approximately 0.5 degree C. The range of temperatures not triggering thermoregulatory responses (those between sweating and vasoconstriction) was 0.9 +/- 0.6 degree C during spinal anesthesia. The synchronous decrease in the shivering and vasoconstriction thresholds during spinal anesthesia is consistent with thermoregulatory impairment resulting from altered afferent thermal input.

  17. Sub-Tenon’s anesthesia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Guise, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Tenon’s block has become the most common technique of orbital regional anesthesia in many centers. It provides effective anesthesia to the orbit with a lower incidence of sight-threatening complications than sharp needle techniques. This article will discuss the relevant anatomy, finer points of sub-Tenon’s block technique, and the evidence supporting its safety. PMID:22915900

  18. Partial intravenous anesthesia in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Duke, Tanya

    2013-03-01

    The partial intravenous anesthesia technique (PIVA) is used to lower the inspired concentration of an inhalational anesthetic by concurrent use of injectable drugs. This technique reduces the incidence of undesirable side-effects and provides superior quality of anesthesia and analgesia. Drugs commonly used for PIVA include opioids, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, injectable anesthetic agents, and lidocaine. Most are administered by intravenous infusion.

  19. Delayed emergence of behavioral and electrophysiological effects following juvenile ketamine exposure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, L R; Featherstone, R E; Hahn, C G; Siegel, S J

    2015-01-01

    Frequent ketamine abuse in adulthood correlates with increased risk of psychosis, as well as cognitive deficits, including disruption of higher-order executive function and memory formation. Although the primary abusers of ketamine are adolescents and young adults, few studies have evaluated its effects on juvenile cognition. Therefore, the current study analyzes the effect of adolescent ketamine exposure on cognitive development. Juvenile mice (4 weeks of age) were exposed to chronic ketamine (20 mg kg−1, i.p. daily) for 14 days. Mice were tested immediately after exposure in the juvenile period (7 weeks of age) and again as adults (12 weeks of age). Measures included electroencephalography (EEG) in response to auditory stimulation, the social choice test, and a 6-arm radial water maze task. Outcome measures include low-frequency EEG responses, event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes, indices of social behavior and indices of spatial working memory. Juvenile exposure to ketamine was associated with electrophysiological abnormalities in adulthood, particularly in induced theta power and the P80 ERP. The social choice test revealed that ketamine-exposed mice failed to exhibit the same age-related decrease in social interaction time as controls. Ketamine-exposed mice outperformed control mice as juveniles on the radial water maze task, but did not show the same age-related improvement as adult controls. These data support the hypothesis that juvenile exposure to ketamine produces long-lasting changes in brain function that are characterized by a failure to progress along normal developmental trajectories. PMID:26371763

  20. Interindividual differences in the analgesic response to ketamine in chronic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Rabben, T; Øye, I

    2001-01-01

    The analgesic effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker ketamine in 17 patients (13 females and four males, age 32-88 years) who had suffered neuropathic orofacial pain for time periods ranging from 6 months to 28 years was examined. The patients were given an i.m. test-dose of 0.4 mg/kg ketamine combined with 0.05 mg/kg midazolam. Four patients did not experience any analgesic effect of the i.m. test dose. The remaining 13 patients experienced an analgesic effect which lasted for less than 1 h (transient effect) in seven and for several hours (long-term effect) in six. One week later they were given 4 mg/kg ketamine to be taken orally in combination with a hypnotic drug for three consecutive nights. All patients who reported a long-term analgesic effect after i.m. ketamine also reported reduced pain intensity on days after taking ketamine at night. The findings of this open study are in accord with the results from a previous double-blind randomized investigation. In order to evaluate the role of age and pain duration for the analgesic effect of ketamine, we pooled the data from the two studies and performed a correlation analysis of 43 patients. We found a positive correlation between a long pain-history and lack of analgesic effect and also between a short pain-history and a long-term analgesic effect of low-dose ketamine. The apparent relationship between patient age and ketamine response was, however, not statistically significant. Further, patients with pain following a nerve lesion and patients without a known lesion of peripheral nerves were equally distributed between the three response groups. These results indicate that pain mechanisms are subject to alterations with time and that these alterations involve transition from NMDA to non-NMDA receptor mediated transmission in central pain pathways.

  1. The epidemiology and patterns of acute and chronic toxicity associated with recreational ketamine use

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Sarbjeet S.; Wood, David M.; Dargan, Paul I.

    2011-01-01

    Ketamine was originally synthesised for use as a dissociative anaesthetic, and it remains widely used legitimately for this indication. However, there is increasing evidence of non-medical recreational use of ketamine, particularly in individuals who frequent the night-time economy. The population-level and sub-population (clubbers) prevalence of recreational use of ketamine is not known but is likely to be similar, or slightly lower than, that of other recreational drugs such as cocaine, MDMA, and amphetamine. The predominant features of acute toxicity associated with the recreational use of ketamine are neuro-behavioural abnormalities such as agitation, hallucinations, anxiety, and psychosis. Secondary to these, individuals put themselves at greater risk of physical harm/trauma. Cardiovascular features (hypertension and tachycardia) occur less frequently and the risk of death from recreational use is low and is predominately due to the physical harm/trauma. Long-term recreational use of ketamine can be associated with the development of psychological dependence and tolerance. There are reports of gastro-intestinal toxicity, particularly abdominal pain and abnormal liver function tests, and of neuropsychiatric disorders, typically a schizophrenia-like syndrome, in long-term users. Finally, there are increasing reports of urological disorders, particularly haemorrhagic cystitis, associated with long-term use. The management of these problems associated with the long-term use of ketamine is largely supportive and abstinence from ongoing exposure to ketamine. In this review we will collate the available information on the epidemiology of recreational use of ketamine and describe the patterns of acute and chronic toxicity associated with its recreational use and the management of this toxicity. PMID:24149025

  2. Repeated ketamine administration redeems the time lag for citalopram's antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-F; Liu, W-X; Qiu, L-L; Guo, J; Wang, X-M; Sun, H-L; Yang, J-J; Zhou, Z-Q

    2015-06-01

    Current available antidepressants exhibit low remission rate with a long response lag time. Growing evidence has demonstrated acute sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant effects. However, a long term use of ketamine tends to elicit its adverse reactions. The present study aimed to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of intermittent and consecutive administrations of ketamine on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats, and to determine whether ketamine can redeem the time lag for treatment response of classic antidepressants. The behavioral responses were assessed by the sucrose preference test, forced swimming test, and open field test. In the first stage of experiments, all the four treatment regimens of ketamine (10mg/kg ip, once daily for 3 or 7 consecutive days, or once every 7 or 3 days, in a total 21 days) showed robust antidepressant-like effects, with no significant influence on locomotor activity and stereotype behavior in the CUMS rats. The intermittent administration regimens produced longer antidepressant-like effects than the consecutive administration regimens and the administration every 7 days presented similar antidepressant-like effects with less administration times compared with the administration every 3 days. In the second stage of experiments, the combination of ketamine (10 mg/kg ip, once every 7 days) and citalopram (20 mg/kg po, once daily) for 21 days caused more rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects than citalopram administered alone. In summary, repeated sub-anesthestic doses of ketamine can redeem the time lag for the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram, suggesting the combination of ketamine and classic antidepressants is a promising regimen for depression with quick onset time and stable and lasting effects.

  3. Low-dose Ketamine Versus Morphine for Acute Pain In the ED: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Original Contribution Low-dose ketamine vs morphine for acute pain in the ED: a randomized controlled trial☆,☆☆ Joshua P. Miller, MD a,b,⁎, Steven G...numeric rating scale (NRS) pain scores, in patients receiving low-dose ketamine (LDK) or morphine (MOR) for acute pain in the emergency department...convenience sample of patients aged 18 to 59 years with acute abdominal, flank, low back, or extremity pain were enrolled. Subjects were consented and

  4. Effects of ketamine on cognition-emotion interaction in the brain.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Milan; Henning, Anke; Walter, Martin; Boeker, Heinz; Weigand, Anne; Seifritz, Erich; Grimm, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Cognition-emotion interaction in the brain can be investigated by incorporating stimuli with emotional content into cognitive tasks. Emotional stimuli in the context of a working memory (WM) task yield increased activation in WM-related lateral prefrontal regions, whereas cognitive effort enhances deactivation in emotion-related cortical midline regions. N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDA-Rs) are critically involved in WM, and NMDA-R antagonists, such as ketamine, accordingly affect WM but also have a profound impact on emotional processing, as underscored by the rapid reduction of depressive symptoms after administration of a single dose of ketamine. The effect of ketamine on both cognitive and emotional processing therefore makes it a useful tool to further explore cognition-emotion interaction in the brain. Twenty-three healthy subjects were administered ketamine to investigate whether its effects on WM performance and brain reactivity depend on emotional content or emotional valence of stimuli. Furthermore, we aimed at investigating how ketamine affects the integration of emotion and WM processes in emotion-related cortical midline regions and WM-related lateral prefrontal regions. Results show that ketamine modulates cognition-emotion interaction in the brain by inducing lateralized and valence-specific effects in emotion-related cortical midline regions, WM-related lateral prefrontal regions and insula. In emotion-related cortical midline regions ketamine abolishes enhancement of deactivation normally observed during cognitive effort, while in the right DLPFC and the left insula the previously described pattern of increased activation due to emotional content is abrogated exclusively for negative stimuli. Our data therefore shows a specific effect of ketamine on cognition-emotion interaction in the brain and indicates that its effect on amelioration of negative biases in MDD patients might be related to less interference of cognitive processing by

  5. Ketamine administration diminishes operant responding but does not impair conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Groeber Travis, Caitlin M; Altman, Daniel E; Genovese, Raymond F

    2015-12-01

    While not well understood, the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) antagonist ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, has been reported to be efficacious in depression and related psychological disorders. Conditioned fear is a normal emotional conditioning process that is known to become dysfunctional in individuals suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and related stress disorders. We examined the effects of ketamine to determine the potential modulation of the acquisition and extinction of a conditioned fear using a conditioned suppression procedure. Rats were trained on a variable interval (VI), food maintained, operant conditioning task to establish a general measure of performance. Rats were exposed to inescapable shock (IES, unconditioned stimulus) paired (×20) with an audio/visual conditioned stimulus (CS) to establish conditioning. Conditioning was quantified by measuring response suppression following CS presentation during subsequent extinction trials where the CS alone was presented. Ketamine or vehicle was administered either after initial conditioning or after each of the subsequent extinction trials. For each regimen, a series of four injections were administered 60 min apart (100, 50, 50, 50 mg/kg, respectively) in order to sustain a ketamine effect for a minimum of 4 h. Ketamine produced a general decrease in responding on the VI, relative to baseline, as response rates were slower on the operant task when tested 24 h later and longer. Ketamine did not affect the acquisition of the conditioned fear when the regimen was administered shortly after the initial pairings of IES and CS. Ketamine did not alter extinction to the conditioned fear when the regimen was administered following each CS only presentation following initial conditioning. Our conclusion from these findings is that while ketamine alters behavior on an appetitively motivated operant task it does not, however, appear to directly modulate learning and memory processes associated

  6. Intravenous ketamine for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus: a retrospective multi-center study

    PubMed Central

    Gaspard, Nicolas; Foreman, Brandon; Judd, Lilith M.; Brenton, James N.; Nathan, Barnett R.; McCoy, Blathnaid M.; Al-Otaibi, Ali; Kilbride, Ronan; Fernández, Ivan Sánchez; Mendoza, Lucy; Samuel, Sophie; Zakaria, Asma; Kalamangalam, Giridhar P.; Legros, Benjamin; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Hahn, Cecil D.; Goodkin, Howard P.; Claassen, Jan; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; LaRoche, Suzette M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose To examine patterns of use, efficacy and safety of intravenous ketamine for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus (RSE). Methods Multicenter retrospective review of medical records and EEG reports in ten academic medical centers in North America and Europe, including 58 subjects, representing 60 episodes of RSE were identified between 1999 and 2012. Seven episodes occurred after anoxic brain injury. Key findings Permanent control of RSE was achieved in 57% (34/60) of episodes. Ketamine was felt to have contributed to permanent control (“possible” or “likely” responses) in 32% (19/60) including seven (12%) in which ketamine was the last drug added (likely responses). Four of the seven likely responses, but none of the 12 possible ones, occurred in patients with post-anoxic brain injury. No likely responses were observed when infusion rates were lower than 0.9mg/kg/h; when ketamine was introduced at least eight days after SE onset; or after failure of seven or more drugs. Ketamine was discontinued due to possible adverse events in five patients. Complications were mostly attributed to concurrent drugs, especially other anesthetics. Mortality rate was 43% (26/60), but was lower when SE was controlled within 24h of ketamine initiation (16% vs. 56%, p=0.0047). Significance Ketamine appears to be a relatively effective and safe drug for the treatment of RSE. This retrospective series provides preliminary data on effective dose and appropriate time of intervention to aid in the design of a prospective trial to further define the role of ketamine in the treatment of RSE. PMID:23758557

  7. Anesthetic induction of captive tigers (Panthera tigris) using a medetomidine-ketamine combination.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Weber, Martha; Neiffer, Donald; Mangold, Barbara; Fontenot, Deidre; Stetter, Mark

    2003-09-01

    Six adult female tigers (Panthera tigris) were anesthetized repeatedly for elective medical procedures using 3 mg medetomidine and 200 mg ketamine i.m. Inductions were rapid and smooth, although supplemental ketamine was needed for safe transport after induction in 6 of 17 procedures. Reversal of the medetomidine-induced sedation with 15 mg atipamezole i.m. 59-232 min after induction resulted in smooth, rapid recoveries.

  8. Impact of anesthesia on valvular function in normal rats during echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Droogmans, Steven; Lauwers, Rinaldo; Cosyns, Bernard; Roosens, Bram; Franken, Philippe R; Weytjens, Caroline; Bossuyt, Axel; Lahoutte, Tony; Schoors, Danny; Van Camp, Guy

    2008-10-01

    Anesthetic agents have different effects on hemodynamic and cardiac functional parameters. The influence of these changes on valvular function has not been studied in small animals. For this purpose, 48 male Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups. An echocardiogram was performed under inhaled isoflurane 2% gas (group I) or under intraperitoneal pentobarbital 50 mg/kg (group II) or ketamine/xylazine (group III) 40/8 mg/kg. Aortic regurgitation was only found in group III (80%, p < 0.0001 vs. groups I and II). Pulmonary and mitral regurgitation (PR, MR) were observed in all groups but were more frequent in group III (PR 67%, MR 100%) compared with group I (PR 13%, p = 0.003; MR 44%, p = 0.001 vs. group III) and group II (PR 19%, p = 0.011; MR 25%, p < 0.0001 vs. group III). Moreover, valvular regurgitations in group III (except tricuspid regurgitation) were more severe compared with groups I and II. The findings in group III were the result of increased blood pressure and afterload, left ventricular (LV) dilation and decreased function. Also in group III, the regurgitations diminished over time as the blood pressure decreased and LV function recovered. Isoflurane and pentobarbital had less pronounced effects on valvular function (5 and 10 min after induction, respectively) compared with ketamine/xylazine and, therefore, might be the anesthetics of choice for valvular evaluation in male Wistar rats. In conclusion, anesthesia causes hemodynamic changes that may result in functional valvular regurgitations in normal rats.

  9. [Voluntary interruption of pregnancy: anesthesia or sophrology].

    PubMed

    Ferragut, E

    1979-10-01

    General anesthesia during induced abortion has the great advantage of eliminating any physical pain; it does not do anything, however, for anxiety, guilt feeling, emotional upheaval, and postoperative depression. This study investigate sophrology, a form of anesthesia without medication, which diminishes psychic tension through comforting and sympathetic words, and corporal tension through relaxation. At the beginning of the study, which observed 7547 patients, general anesthesia was routinely used for all induced abortion patients; after 4 years of observation, general anesthesia was used on about 1.9% of patients. Judging from a questionnaire given to patients after intervention 75% of patients were completely satisfied from an emotional point of view; the same percentage judged the procedure a bit painful, but bearable; only 3.5% of patients regretted not to have opted for general anesthesia.

  10. Caudal epidural analgesia using lidocaine alone or in combination with ketamine in dromedary camels Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Azari, Omid; Molaei, Mohammad M; Ehsani, Amir H

    2014-02-27

    This study was performed to investigate the analgesic effect of lidocaine and a combination of lidocaine and ketamine following epidural administration in dromedary camels. Ten 12-18-month-old camels were randomly divided into two equal groups. In group L, the animals received 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) and in group LK the animals received a mixture of 10% ketamine (1 mg/kg) and 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) administered into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space while standing. Onset time and duration of caudal analgesia, sedation level and ataxia were recorded after drug administration. Data were analysed by U Mann-Whitney tests and significance was taken as p < 0.05. The results showed that epidural lidocaine and co-administration of lidocaine and ketamine produced complete analgesia in the tail, anus and perineum. Epidural administration of the lidocaine-ketamine mixture resulted in mild to moderate sedation, whilst the animals that received epidural lidocaine alone were alert and nervous during the study. Ataxia was observed in all test subjects and was slightly more severe in camels that received the lidocaine-ketamine mixture. It was concluded that epidural administration of lidocaine plus ketamine resulted in longer caudal analgesia in standing conscious dromedary camels compared with the effect of administering lidocaine alone.

  11. A Clickable Analogue of Ketamine Retains NMDA Receptor Activity, Psychoactivity, and Accumulates in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Emnett, Christine; Li, Hairong; Jiang, Xiaoping; Benz, Ann; Boggiano, Joseph; Conyers, Sara; Wozniak, David F.; Zorumski, Charles F.; Reichert, David E.; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is a psychotomimetic and antidepressant drug. Although antagonism of cell-surface NMDA receptors (NMDARs) may trigger ketamine’s psychoactive effects, ketamine or its major metabolite norketamine could act intracellularly to produce some behavioral effects. To explore the viability of this latter hypothesis, we examined intracellular accumulation of novel visualizable analogues of ketamine/norketamine. We introduced an alkyne “click” handle into norketamine (alkyne-norketamine, A-NK) at the key nitrogen atom. Ketamine, norketamine, and A-NK, but not A-NK-amide, showed acute and persisting psychoactive effects in mice. This psychoactivity profile paralleled activity of the compounds as NMDAR channel blockers; A-NK-amide was inactive at NMDARs, and norketamine and A-NK were active but ~4-fold less potent than ketamine. We incubated rat hippocampal cells with 10 μM A-NK or A-NK-amide then performed Cu2+ catalyzed cycloaddition of azide-Alexa Fluor 488, which covalently attaches the fluorophore to the alkyne moiety in the compounds. Fluorescent imaging revealed intracellular localization of A-NK but weak A-NK-amide labeling. Accumulation was not dependent on membrane potential, NMDAR expression, or NMDAR activity. Overall, the approach revealed a correlation among NMDAR activity, intracellular accumulation/retention, and behavioral effects. Thus, we advance first generation chemical biology tools to aid in the identification of ketamine targets. PMID:27982047

  12. Ketamine versus aminophylline for acute asthma in children: A randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhimanyu; Guglani, Vishal; Jat, Kana Ram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of consensus regarding second-line therapy in children with acute asthma who fail to the standard therapy. Ketamine had bronchodilator property and may be useful in the treatment of acute asthma. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ketamine as compared to aminophylline in children with acute asthma who respond poorly to the standard therapy. METHODS: This randomized controlled trial included patients with acute asthma having Pediatric Respiratory Assessment Measure (PRAM) score ≥5 at 2 h of standard therapy. The enrolled patients received either intravenous (IV) ketamine or IV aminophylline. Primary outcome measure was change in PRAM score at the end of intervention. Secondary outcome measures included adverse effects, change in PO2and PCO2, need for mechanical ventilation, and duration of hospital stay. RESULTS: The trial included 24 patients each in ketamine and aminophylline groups. The baseline parameters were similar between the groups. The primary outcome was similar in both the groups with a change in PRAM score of 4.00 ± 1.25 and 4.17 ± 1.68 (P = 0.699) in ketamine and aminophylline groups, respectively. The secondary outcomes were not different between the groups. CONCLUSION: Ketamine and aminophylline were equally effective for children with acute asthma who responded poorly to the standard therapy. PMID:27803755

  13. Performance on a probabilistic inference task in healthy subjects receiving ketamine compared with patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Almahdi, Basil; Sultan, Pervez; Sohanpal, Imrat; Brandner, Brigitta; Collier, Tracey; Shergill, Sukhi S; Cregg, Roman; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that some aspects of schizophrenia can be induced in healthy volunteers through acute administration of the non-competitive NMDA-receptor antagonist, ketamine. In probabilistic inference tasks, patients with schizophrenia have been shown to ‘jump to conclusions’ (JTC) when asked to make a decision. We aimed to test whether healthy participants receiving ketamine would adopt a JTC response pattern resembling that of patients. The paradigmatic task used to investigate JTC has been the ‘urn’ task, where participants are shown a sequence of beads drawn from one of two ‘urns’, each containing coloured beads in different proportions. Participants make a decision when they think they know the urn from which beads are being drawn. We compared performance on the urn task between controls receiving acute ketamine or placebo with that of patients with schizophrenia and another group of controls matched to the patient group. Patients were shown to exhibit a JTC response pattern relative to their matched controls, whereas JTC was not evident in controls receiving ketamine relative to placebo. Ketamine does not appear to promote JTC in healthy controls, suggesting that ketamine does not affect probabilistic inferences. PMID:22389244

  14. Assessment of adrenocortical and gonadal hormones in male spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) following capture, restraint and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rodas-Martínez, Alba Zulema; Canales, Domingo; Brousset, Dulce María; Swanson, William F; Romano, Marta C

    2013-01-01

    The spider monkey (SM) (Ateles geoffroyi) a New World primate species native to Mexican forests, has become endangered in the wild due to environmental perturbations. Little is known about adrenal function and its relationship to reproduction in this species. Our objectives were to assess serum glucocorticoid (GC), mineralocorticoid (MC) and testosterone concentrations in captive SM and evaluate adrenal and testicular responses to potentially stressful animal handling procedures. Seven adult males, housed in a single mixed gender group in an off-exhibit enclosure at the University Park were captured for anesthesia every 2 months over a 1-year period. Blood samples were collected from each male at three time points: (1) ∼5-10 min after ketamine injection in the outdoor enclosure; (2) ∼2 hr later following animal transport to the laboratory and immediately after tiletamine-zolazepam injection; and (3) ∼20-30 min following the second anesthetic injection. Serum samples were frozen and later analyzed for cortisol, corticosterone, aldosterone and testosterone via radioimmunoassay. Cortisol was the primary GC detected in SM serum with much higher mean concentrations than for corticosterone. Capture, restraint and anesthesia resulted in significant increases in both cortisol and corticosterone concentrations. Whereas aldosterone concentrations were unchanged by animal handling procedures, testosterone concentrations significantly declined under anesthesia over time. In summary, these results provide data for the main adrenocortical hormones in male SM and characterize their acute adrenal responses to potentially stressful handling and anesthesia procedures. Our findings also suggest an interaction between acute increases in corticosteroids and decreased concentrations of serum testosterone.

  15. Clinical perspectives of intravenous ketamine anaesthesia in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    PubMed

    Athar, M; Shakoor, A; Muhammad, G; Sarwar, M N; Chaudhry, N I

    1996-01-01

    A total of 29 peafowl (Pavo cristatus), rectified surgically for infraorbital abscesses (n = 22), lacerated wounds (n = 4), and fractures of tibia (n = 2) and radius (n = 1), were anaesthetized by the intravenous administration of ketamine hydrochloride (Inj. Calypsol, Gedeon Richter, Hungary) in a dose of 15 20 mg/kg body weight. Divided doses (10 mg + 5 mg + 5 mg) were used with an interval of 1-2 min. No premedication was undertaken in any of the birds. Anaesthesia lasted for about 15 min and the birds gained their feet completely after 30 min to 3 hours. The respiration rate was markedly depressed (8-10/min) and the respiratory pattern was deep abdominal. Only a slight increase was observed in the heart rate. Analgesia was incomplete and muscle relaxation was not satisfactory. Mild salivation was also noticed in some of the birds (n = 3). Recovery, although not smooth, was uneventful.

  16. Dexmedetomidine, Ketamine, and Midazolam for Oral Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bill W. S.; Peskin, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravenous sedation is frequently provided by anesthesiologists for phobic patients undergoing elective dental treatment in outpatient settings. Propofol is one of the most commonly used anesthetic agents that can result in apnea and respiratory depression, thereby posing potential difficulties with perioperative airway management. Dexmedetomidine has been utilized successfully in intravenous sedation for a wide variety of procedures and holds potential as an alternative to propofol in outpatient dental settings. However, as a single agent, it may not provide adequate depth of sedation and analgesia for oral rehabilitation. In this case report we demonstrate an effective alternative intravenous deep-sedation technique for an adult phobic patient undergoing oral rehabilitation utilizing 3 agents in combination: dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and midazolam. This combination of agents may be especially useful for those patients with a history of substance abuse, where administration of opioids may be undesirable or contraindicated. PMID:25849472

  17. Case report: management of differential diagnosis and treatment of severe anaphylaxis in the setting of spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Osman, Brian M; Maga, Joni M; Baquero, Sebastian M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this case report is to educate fellow anesthesiologists of a complicated differential diagnosis for sudden cardiovascular collapse after spinal anesthesia. We report a case where anaphylaxis occurred while under spinal anesthesia and resulted in difficult resuscitation. A 58-year-old woman undergoing bilateral knee replacements under spinal anesthesia experienced sudden seizure and cardiovascular collapse from acute anaphylactic shock while administering a cephalosporin. Local anesthetic toxicity, high spinal, and anaphylaxis were considered due to overlapping of symptoms. Successful resuscitation required prolonged advanced cardiac life support with substantially larger doses of epinephrine. Anaphylactic shock under spinal anesthesia is an acute and life-threatening complication, worsened by the spinal-induced sympathectomy, and aggressive resuscitation is warranted. Despite the presence of overlapping symptoms of differential diagnoses, rapid identification of the cause of cardiovascular collapse is crucial given that resuscitation treatment modalities may conflict. Timing of antibiotic administration should be adjusted for spinal anesthesia cases to allow time to detect possible anaphylaxis.

  18. Anesthesia in a patient with Stiff Person Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yagan, Ozgur; Özyilmaz, Kadir; Özmaden, Ahmet; Sayin, Özgür; Hanci, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS), typified by rigidity in muscles of the torso and extremities and painful episodic spasms, is a rare autoimmune-based neurological disease. Here we present the successful endotracheal intubation and application of TIVA without muscle relaxants on an SPS patient. A 46 years old male patient was operated with ASA-II physical status because of lumber vertebral compression fracture. After induction of anesthesia using lidocaine, propofol and remifentanil tracheal intubation was completed easily without neuromuscular blockage. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol, remifentanil and O2/air mixture. After a problem-free intraoperative period the patient was extubated and seven days later was discharged walking with aid. Though the mechanism is not clear neuromuscular blockers and volatile anesthetics may cause prolonged hypotonia in patients with SPS. We think the TIVA technique, a general anesthetic practice which does not require neuromuscular blockage, is suitable for these patients.

  19. Closed-loop control of anesthesia: a primer for anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2013-11-01

    Feedback control is ubiquitous in nature and engineering and has revolutionized safety in fields from space travel to the automobile. In anesthesia, automated feedback control holds the promise of limiting the effects on performance of individual patient variability, optimizing the workload of the anesthesiologist, increasing the time spent in a more desirable clinical state, and ultimately improving the safety and quality of anesthesia care. The benefits of control systems will not be realized without widespread support from the health care team in close collaboration with industrial partners. In this review, we provide an introduction to the established field of control systems research for the everyday anesthesiologist. We introduce important concepts such as feedback and modeling specific to control problems and provide insight into design requirements for guaranteeing the safety and performance of feedback control systems. We focus our discussion on the optimization of anesthetic drug administration.

  20. Comparison of Anesthesia-Controlled Operating Room Time between Propofol-Based Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Desflurane Anesthesia in Open Colorectal Surgery: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wei-Hung; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Lin, Chin; Wu, Chang-Chieh; Lai, Hou-Chuan; Chan, Shun-Ming; Lu, Chueng-He; Cherng, Chen-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the anesthesia-controlled time and factors that contribute to prolonged extubation in open colorectal surgery. Using our hospital database, demographic data, various time intervals (waiting for anesthesia time, anesthesia time, surgical time, emergence time, exit from operating room after extubation, total operating room time, and post-anesthesia care unit stay time), and incidence of prolonged extubation (≥ 15 mins), were compared between patients who received desflurane/fentanyl-based anesthesia and total intravenous anesthesia via target-controlled infusion with fentanyl/propofol. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between variables that contributed to prolonged extubation. In conclusion, the anesthesia-controlled time was similar in desflurane anesthesia and propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia for open colorectal surgery in our hospital. Surgical time greater than 210 minutes, as well as age, contributed to prolonged extubation. PMID:27780241

  1. Preoperative Preparation and Anesthesia for Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preoperative preparation should improve the likelihood of successful trabeculectomy surgery. The team can reconsider the appropriateness of the proposed surgery, and steps can be taken to maximize the chance of a good outcome. For example, adjustments to anti-hypertensive or anti-coagulant medications may be made, and topical ocular medications adjusted. Choice of anesthesia technique is of particular relevance to the trabeculectomy patient. Some anesthesia techniques are more likely to have serious complications, and glaucoma patients may be at higher risk of some sight-threatening complications, because the optic nerve is already damaged and vulnerable. Posterior placement of local anesthesia (retrobulbar, peribulbar, posterior sub-Tenon’s techniques) could potentially damage the optic nerve, and thereby cause “wipe-out” of vision. Anesthesia technique may influence the likelihood of vitreous bulge and surgical difficulty. Regarding long-term control of intraocular pressure, there is no good evidence to indicate that any particular anesthesia technique is better than another. There is little high-quality evidence on this topic. The author’s preferred technique for trabeculectomy is subconjunctival-intracameral anesthesia without sedation. How to cite this article: Eke T. Preoperative Preparation and Anesthesia for Trabeculectomy. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2016; 10(1):21-35. PMID:27231416

  2. Single-dose infusion ketamine and non-ketamine N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists for unipolar and bipolar depression: a meta-analysis of efficacy, safety and time trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, T.; Chawla, J. M.; Hagi, K.; Zarate, C. A.; Kane, J. M.; Bauer, M.; Correll, C. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ketamine and non-ketamine N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists (NMDAR antagonists) recently demonstrated antidepressant efficacy for the treatment of refractory depression, but effect sizes, trajectories and possible class effects are unclear. Method We searched PubMed/PsycINFO/Web of Science/clinicaltrials.gov until 25 August 2015. Parallel-group or cross-over randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing single intravenous infusion of ketamine or a non-ketamine NMDAR antagonist v. placebo/pseudo-placebo in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and/or bipolar depression (BD) were included in the analyses. Hedges’ g and risk ratios and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. The primary outcome was depressive symptom change. Secondary outcomes included response, remission, all-cause discontinuation and adverse effects. Results A total of 14 RCTs (nine ketamine studies: n = 234; five non-ketamine NMDAR antagonist studies: n = 354; MDD = 554, BD = 34), lasting 10.0 ± 8.8 days, were meta-analysed. Ketamine reduced depression significantly more than placebo/pseudo-placebo beginning at 40 min, peaking at day 1 (Hedges’ g = −1.00, 95% CI −1.28 to −0.73, p < 0.001), and loosing superiority by days 10–12. Non-ketamine NMDAR antagonists were superior to placebo only on days 5–8 (Hedges’ g = −0.37, 95% CI −0.66 to −0.09, p = 0.01). Compared with placebo/pseudo-placebo, ketamine led to significantly greater response (40 min to day 7) and remission (80 min to days 3–5). Non-ketamine NMDAR antagonists achieved greater response at day 2 and days 3–5. All-cause discontinuation was similar between ketamine (p = 0.34) or non-ketamine NMDAR antagonists (p = 0.94) and placebo. Although some adverse effects were more common with ketamine/NMDAR antagonists than placebo, these were transient and clinically insignificant. Conclusions A single infusion of ketamine, but less so of non-ketamine

  3. Possible theophylline toxicity during anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Redden, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Asthmatic patients who undergo outpatient anesthesia are typically prescribed one or more drugs for treatment. Some of these agents have narrow therapeutic ranges and are associated with potentially serious adverse reactions, toxic effects, or drug interactions. Various clinical signs of toxicity may be first uncovered during routine monitoring of an office anesthetic. The case reported here demonstrates the need for proper understanding of the asthmatic patient's medical history and an appreciation for the medications used to control the disease. A sudden cardiovascular event possibly related to drug toxicity is witnessed and treated in an asthmatic patient during intravenous sedation. A possible drug interaction with a non-asthmatic medication taken concomitantly by the patient is implicated and discussed. In addition to the case report, the broad classification of drugs employed for bronchial asthma and their effects is reviewed. PMID:10323129

  4. Possible theophylline toxicity during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Redden, R J

    1996-01-01

    Asthmatic patients who undergo outpatient anesthesia are typically prescribed one or more drugs for treatment. Some of these agents have narrow therapeutic ranges and are associated with potentially serious adverse reactions, toxic effects, or drug interactions. Various clinical signs of toxicity may be first uncovered during routine monitoring of an office anesthetic. The case reported here demonstrates the need for proper understanding of the asthmatic patient's medical history and an appreciation for the medications used to control the disease. A sudden cardiovascular event possibly related to drug toxicity is witnessed and treated in an asthmatic patient during intravenous sedation. A possible drug interaction with a non-asthmatic medication taken concomitantly by the patient is implicated and discussed. In addition to the case report, the broad classification of drugs employed for bronchial asthma and their effects is reviewed.

  5. A simple method for short-term controlled anesthesia in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Drobac, Estelle; Durand, Estelle; Laudenbach, Vincent; Mantz, Jean; Gallego, Jorge

    2004-09-15

    In this study, we describe a simple and inexpensive method for inducing short-term anesthesia and rapid recovery in newborn mice. Litters of Swiss mice pups were randomly allocated to testing on postnatal days 2, 5, and 8. Anesthesia was induced by placing the pup in a syringe and adding a volume of isoflurane-saturated gas that produced an estimated level of 32% isoflurane. Exposure to isoflurane lasted 30 s. All the pups survived the anesthesia. At all study ages, this method abolished the nociceptive response to tail clamp without inducing mortality, thus showing effective anesthesia. Recovery from anesthesia was assessed immediately after isoflurane exposure, based on two nonnoxious behavioral tests: the defensive response to a drop of water (10 tests, 1 min apart) and 10 min later the righting reflex, i.e., the time to recovery of the prone position (five tests, 10 min apart). The water drop test scores increased during the recovery phase toward the control values in all age groups. Treatment and time had no significant effect on righting reflex scores. The initial volume in the syringe, the volume of added isoflurane-saturated gas, and the duration of exposure may be adjusted according to postnatal age and specific strains or species (e.g., rats). This method is well suited to behavioral or physiological phenotype studies in developing mice, in which noxious procedures must precede functional testing, making rapid recovery from anesthesia a key requirement.

  6. Evaluation of the use of continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia for hypertensive pregnant women in labor.

    PubMed

    Moore, T R; Key, T C; Reisner, L S; Resnik, R

    1985-06-15

    The use of continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia in women with pregnancy-induced hypertension remains controversial. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 285 women with pregnancy-induced hypertension who were delivered in a 2-year period. Among 185 vaginally delivered patients who received continuous lumbar epidural or local anesthesia, there were no significant differences in the incidence of maternal hypotension, abnormal fetal heart rate tracings, low Apgar scores, or neonatal intensive care unit admissions. Of 100 patients delivered by cesarean section, the incidence of low Apgar scores, depressed umbilical cord pH values, and neonatal intensive care unit admission was increased among those who received general anesthesia (p less than 0.05). However, general anesthesia patients were more likely to have abnormal fetal heart rate tracings (27% versus 4%) requiring urgent delivery. Thus differences in outcome probably reflect poorer fetal condition prior to anesthesia induction rather than a specific anesthetic effect. These results demonstrate that continuous lumbar epidural anesthesia is safe and effective for both the fetus and the mother with pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  7. Repeat Manipulation Under Anesthesia For Persistent Stiffness After Total Knee Arthroplasty Achieves Functional Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Ferrel, Jason R; Davis, Richard L; Agha, Obiajulu A J C; Politi, Joel R

    2015-05-01

    Poor range of motion may decrease a patient's ability to participate in activities of daily living after total knee arthroplasty. Manipulation under anesthesia has been shown to improve range of motion; however, some patients have persistent stiffness even after manipulation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients who underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia for persistent stiffness after total knee arthroplasty. The review of surgical records of two joint arthroplasty surgeons identified 226 knees in 210 patients who underwent a manipulation under anesthesia for poor range of motion after total knee arthroplasty. Of these patients, 16 patients underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia. For patients undergoing two manipulations under anesthesia procedures, at latest follow up (mean 539 days), mean extension improved from 10.50° to 2.50° (p=0.001) and mean flexion improved from 87.50° to 112.69° (p=0.001) respectively. SF-12 scores were available for 12 of 16 knees with a mean score of 34.42. Two of 16 patients (12.5%) experienced a complication. Three of 16 (18.8%) patients who underwent a second manipulation required a revision arthroplasty procedure. In conclusion, a second manipulation under anesthesia can achieve functional range of motion that is sustained after total knee arthroplasty.

  8. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  9. The anesthesia of trachea and bronchus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Turktan, Mediha; Avci, Alper

    2016-01-01

    The trachea and bronchus surgery is generally performed due to stenosis, traumatic injury, foreign body and tumors. Preoperative evaluation and anesthesia management are very important issues because of higher mortality and morbidity rates. Patients may be asymptomatic, but airway difficulties, hypoxia, stridor, cough, hemoptysis are common conditions in these patient population. The collaboration between the surgeon and the anesthesiologist is very substantial and necessary. Anesthetic techniques include various applications such as one lung ventilation, fiberoptic intubation, jet ventilation, and apneic oxygenation, general anesthesia with or without neuromuscular blockade. In this review, anesthesia management of the trachea and bronchus surgery is evaluated in the light of new knowledge. PMID:28066625

  10. Cervical plexus anesthesia versus general anesthesia for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgery: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ma, Lei; Yang, Dalong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Lijun; Ding, Wenyuan

    2017-02-01

    highest degree at 8 hours postoperation; then the pain degree decreased, and the NRS was 1 at 24 hours postoperation. In group B, intraoperative pain was NRS 4, and pain degree decreased from 4 hours postoperation; the NRS was 2 at 24 hours postoperation. The incidence of severe PONV was higher in group A than that in group B. There was no significant difference in the spinal surgeon satisfaction and anesthetist satisfaction for the anesthetic techniques.